WorldWideScience

Sample records for irradiated nuclear materials

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  2. Irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.; Findeisen, A.; Katzmann, H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is concerning with an irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors in particular for materials with a high heat generation due to irradiation. A good heat transfer between the irradiated material and the irradiation can environment has been guaranteed by a special can design. The outside of the can consists of a tube or a tube bandle which has been formed as a water guide tube. One or more tubes containing the irradiated materials have been positioned at the inner areas of the irradiated can

  3. Development status of irradiation devices and instrumentation for material and nuclear fuel irradiation tests in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Sohn, Jae Min; Choo, Kee Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), an open-tank-in-pool type reactor, is one of the multi-purpose research reactors in the world. Since the commencement of HANARO's operations in 1995, a significant number of experimental facilities have been developed and installed at HANARO, and continued efforts to develop more facilities are in progress. Owing to the stable operation of the reactor and its frequent utilization, more experimental facilities are being continuously added to satisfy various fields of study and diverse applications. The irradiation testing equipment for nuclear fuels and materials at HANARO can be classified into capsules and the Fuel Test Loop (FTL). Capsules for irradiation tests of nuclear fuels in HANARO have been developed for use under the dry conditions of the coolant and materials at HANARO and are now successfully utilized to perform irradiation tests. The FTL can be used to conduct irradiation testing of a nuclear fuel under the operating conditions of commercial nuclear power plants. During irradiation tests conducted using these capsules in HANARO, instruments such as the thermocouple, Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT), small heater, Fluence Monitor (F/M) and Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) are used to measure various characteristics of the nuclear fuel and irradiated material. This paper describes not only the status of HANARO and the status and perspective of irradiation devices and instrumentation for carrying out nuclear fuel and material tests in HANARO but also some results from instrumentation during irradiation tests

  4. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J., E-mail: jiachao.chen@psi.ch; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-15

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2–8 × 10{sup −6} dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  5. Review Paper: Review of Instrumentation for Irradiation Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Rempe, Joy L.; Villard, Jean-Francois; Solstadd, Steinar

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 years of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation testing has led to many countries developing significant improvements in instrumentation to monitor physical parameters and to control the test conditions in material test reactors (MTRs). Recently, there is increased interest to irradiate new materials and reactor fuels for advanced pressurized water reactors and Gen-IV reactor systems, such as sodium-cooled fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, supercritical water-cooled reactors, and gas-cooled fast reactors. This review paper documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world and summarizes ongoing research efforts to deploy new sensors. As described in this paper, a wide range of sensors is available to measure key parameters of interest during fuels and materials irradiations in MTRs. Ongoing development efforts focus on providing MTR users a wider range of parameter measurements with smaller, higher accuracy sensors.

  6. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2001-01-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  7. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  8. Irradiation effects on material properties of steels used in nuclear reactors: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerceker, N.; Dara, I. H.

    2001-01-01

    The structural materials of a nuclear power plant are of vital importance as they provide mechanical strength, structural support and physical containment for the primary reactor components as well as the nuclear power plant itself. These structural materials comprise mainly of metals and their alloys, ceramics and cermets. However, metals and their alloys are the most widely used materials and the irradiation effects are more pronounced on metallic materials as of their high temperature properties are more sensitive (with respect to ceramics and cermets) to any kind of external effects. The wholesale creation of effects on material properties has been studied for over four decades and it is not realistic to attempt to represent even a small part of the field in single poster paper. In the present contribution, a literature review of the irradiation effects on the material properties of different types of steel alloys will be given because steels are widely used as structural materials in reactors and therefore the irradiation effects on steels may be of paramount importance for reactor design, operation and safety concepts which will be discussed about radiation effects on material properties of steels will provide highlights to better understanding of the origins and development of radiation effects in materials

  9. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  10. Instrumentation Technologies for Improving an Irradiation Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Sung Jae; Choo, Ki Nam

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 years of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation testing has led to many countries developing significant improvements in instrumentation to monitor physical parameters and to control the test conditions in Materials Test Reactors (MTRs) or research reactors. Recent effort to deploy new fuels and materials in existing and advanced reactors has increased the demand for well-instrumented irradiation tests. Specifically, demand has increased for tests with sensors capable of providing real-time measurement of key parameters, such as temperature, geometry changes, thermal conductivity, fission gas release, cracking, coating buildup, thermal and fast flux, etc. This review paper documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world and summarizes on-going research efforts to deploy new sensors. There is increased interest to irradiate new materials and reactor fuels for advanced PWRs and the Gen-IV reactor systems, such as SFRs (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors), VHTRs (Very-High-Temperature Reactors), SCWRs (Supercritical-Water-cooled Reactors) and GFRs (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor). This review documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world, identifies challenges faced by previous testing methods and how these challenges were overcome. A wide range of sensors are available to measure key parameters of interest during fuels and materials irradiations in MTRs. Such sensors must be reliable, small size, highly accurate, and able to withstand harsh conditions. On-going development efforts are focusing on providing MTR users a wider range of parameter measurements with increased accuracy. In addition, development efforts are focusing on reducing the impact of sensor on measurements by reducing sensor size. This report includes not only status of instrumentation using research reactors in the world to irradiate nuclear fuels and materials but also future directions relating to instrumentation technologies for

  11. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  12. Materials characterization center workshop on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, F.P.; Turcotte, R.P.; Weber, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Workshop on Irradiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Forms sponsored by the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) brought together experts in radiation damage in materials and waste-management technology to review the problems associated with irradiation effects on waste-form integrity and to evaluate standard methods for generating data to be included in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook. The workshop reached the following conclusions: the concept of Standard Test for the Effects of Alpha-Decay in Nuclear Waste Solids, (MCC-6) for evaluating the effects of alpha decay is valid and useful, and as a result of the workshop, modifications to the proposed procedure will be incorpoated in a revised version of MCC-6; the MCC-6 test is not applicable to the evaluation of radiation damage in spent fuel; plutonium-238 is recommended as the dopant for transuranic and defense high-level waste forms, and when high doses are required, as in the case of commercial high-level waste forms, 244 Cm can be used; among the important property changes caused by irradiation are those that lead to greater leachability, and additionally, radiolysis of the leachant may increase leach rates; research is needed in this area; ionization-induced changes in physical properties can be as important as displacement damage in some materials, and a synergism is also likely to exist from the combined effects of ionization and displacement damage; and the effect of changing the temperature and dose rates on property changes induced by radiation damage needs to be determined

  13. Materials Characterization Center. Second workshop on irradiation effects in nuclear waste forms. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this second workshop on irradiations effects was to continue the discussions initiated at the first workshop and to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in developing test methods. The following major conclusions were reached: Ion or neutron irradiations are not substitutes for the actinide-doping technique, as described by the MCC-6 Method for Preparation and Characterization of Actinide-Doped Waste Forms, in the final evaluation of any waste form with respect to the radiation effects from actinide decay. Ion or neutron irradiations may be useful for screening tests or more fundamental studies. The use of these simulation techniques as screening tests for actinide decay requires that a correlation between ion or neutron irradiations and actinide decay be established. Such a correlation has not yet been established and experimental programs in this area are highly recommended. There is a need for more fundamental studies on dose-rate effects, temperature dependence, and the nature and importance of alpha-particle effects relative to the recoil nucleus in actinide decay. There are insufficient data presently available to evaluate the potential for damage from ionizing radiation in nuclear waste forms. No additional test methods were recommended for using ion or neutron irradiations to simulate actinide decay or for testing ionization damage in nuclear waste forms. It was recognized that additional test methods may be required and developed as more data become available. An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Task Group on the Simulation of Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Forms (E 10.08.03) was organized to act as a continuing vehicle for discussions and development of procedures, particularly with regard to ion irradiations

  14. Analysis of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Papers presented at the UKAEA Conference on Materials Analysis by Physical Techniques (1987) covered a wide range of techniques as applied to the analysis of irradiated materials. These varied from reactor component materials, materials associated with the Authority's radwaste disposal programme, fission products and products associated with the decommissioning of nuclear reactors. An invited paper giving a very comprehensive review of Laser Ablation Microprobe Mass Spectroscopy (LAMMS) was included in the programme. (author)

  15. Irradiation effects on C/C composite materials for high temperature nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, M.; Ugachi, H.; Baba, S.I.; Ishiyama, S.; Ishihara, M.; Hayashi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Excellent characteristics such as high strength and high thermal shock resistance of C/C composite materials have led us to try to apply them to the high temperature components in nuclear facilities. Such components include the armour tile of the first wall and divertor of fusion reactor and the elements of control rod for the use in HTGR. One of the most important aspects to be clarified about C/C composites for nuclear applications is the effect of neutron irradiation on their properties. At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), research on the irradiation effects on various properties of C/C composite materials has been carried out using fission reactors (JRR-3, JMTR), accelerators (TANDEM, TIARA) and the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS). Additionally, strength tests of some neutron-irradiated elements for the control rod were carried out to investigate the feasibility of C/C composites. The paper summarises the R and D activities on the irradiation effects on C/C composites. (authors)

  16. The reprocessing of irradiated MTR fuel and the nuclear material accountancy - Dounreay, UKAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, T.R.; Harrison, R. [UKAEA, Nuclear Materials Control Dep., Dounreay (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    The reprocessing of irradiated HEU MTR fuel is a sensible part of a safeguards regime. It brings together fuel otherwise scattered around the world into a concerted accountancy and protection arrangement. From a nuclear material accountants view the overall accountancy performance has been excellent. While investigations have been required for a few individual MUFs or trends, very little effort has required to be expended by the Nuclear Materials Control Department. That is a definition of a 'good plant'; it operates, measures and records input and output streams, and then the accountancy falls into place. As identified in this paper, the accountancy of the nuclear material processed in the plant is well founded and sound. The accountancy results over several decades confirm the adequacy of the safeguards arrangements at Dounreay. The processing makes good commercial sense and meets the current philosophy of recycling valuable resource materials. The risk of operating the full fuel cycle are less than those of extended storage of irradiated fuel at disparate diverse locations. The reprocessing at Dounreay accords with all of these philosophies. The assessed risk is at a very low level, well within published UK HSE 'tolerability of risk' regulatory guidelines. The impact of the operations are similarly low within the guidelines, for the operators and for the general public. (author)

  17. The reprocessing of irradiated MTR fuel and the nuclear material accountancy - Dounreay, UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, T.R.; Harrison, R.

    1997-01-01

    The reprocessing of irradiated HEU MTR fuel is a sensible part of a safeguards regime. It brings together fuel otherwise scattered around the world into a concerted accountancy and protection arrangement. From a nuclear material accountants view the overall accountancy performance has been excellent. While investigations have been required for a few individual MUFs or trends, very little effort has required to be expended by the Nuclear Materials Control Department. That is a definition of a 'good plant'; it operates, measures and records input and output streams, and then the accountancy falls into place. As identified in this paper, the accountancy of the nuclear material processed in the plant is well founded and sound. The accountancy results over several decades confirm the adequacy of the safeguards arrangements at Dounreay. The processing makes good commercial sense and meets the current philosophy of recycling valuable resource materials. The risk of operating the full fuel cycle are less than those of extended storage of irradiated fuel at disparate diverse locations. The reprocessing at Dounreay accords with all of these philosophies. The assessed risk is at a very low level, well within published UK HSE 'tolerability of risk' regulatory guidelines. The impact of the operations are similarly low within the guidelines, for the operators and for the general public. (author)

  18. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  19. Nuclear data for the production of radioisotopes in fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Schenter, R.E.; Mann, F.M.; Ikeda, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion materials irradiation facility (FMIF) is a neutron source generator that will produce a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron field for testing candidate fusion materials under reactor irradiation conditions. The construction of such a facility is one of the very important development stages toward realization of fusion energy as a practical energy source for electricity production. As a result of the high-intensity neutron field, 10 MW/m 2 or more equivalent neutron wall loading, and the relatively high-energy (10- to 20-MeV) neutrons, the FMIF, as future fusion reactors, also bears the potential capability of producing a significant quantity of radioisotopes. A study is being conducted to identify the potential capability of the FMIF to produce radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. Two types of radioisotopes are involved: one is already available; the second might not be readily available using conventional production methods. For those radioisotopes that are not readily available, the FMIF could develop significant benefits for future generations as a result of the availability of such radioisotopes for medical or industrial applications. The current production of radioisotopes could help finance the operation of the FMIF for irradiating the candidate fusion materials; thus this concept is attractive. In any case, nuclear data are needed for calculating the neutron flux and spectrum in the FMIF and the potential production rates of these isotopes. In this paper, the authors report the result of a preliminary investigation on the production of 99 Mo, the parent radioisotope for 99m Tc

  20. Irradiation environment and materials behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation environment is unique for materials used in a nuclear energy system. Material itself as well as irradiation and environmental conditions determine the material behaviour. In this review, general directions of research and development of materials in an irradiation environment together with the role of materials science are discussed first, and then recent materials problems are described for energy systems which are already existing (LWR), under development (FBR) and to be realized in the future (CTR). Topics selected are (1) irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels for LWRs, (2) high fluence performance of cladding and wrapper materials for fuel subassemblies of FBRs and (3) high fluence irradiation effects in the first wall and blanket structural materials of a fusion reactor. Several common topics in those materials issues are selected and discussed. Suggestions are made on some elements of radiation effects which might be purposely utilized in the process of preparing innovative materials. (J.P.N.) 69 refs

  1. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    This is an editorial article (preface) for the publication of symposium papers in the Journal of Nuclear materials: These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15–19, 2015.

  2. Nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1998, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) performed 38 inspections, 25 of them were performed in co-operation with IAEA inspectors. There is no fresh nuclear fuel at Bohunice A-1 NPP at present. Fresh fuel of Bohunice V-1 and V-2 NPPs is inspected in the fresh fuel storage.There are 327 fresh fuel assemblies in Mochovce NPP fresh fuel storage. In addition to that, are also 71 small users of nuclear materials in Slovakia. In most cases they use: covers made of depleted uranium for non-destructive works, detection of level in production plants, covers for therapeutical sources at medical facilities. In. 1995, NRA SR issued 4 new licences for nuclear material withdrawal. In the next part manipulation with nuclear materials, spent fuel stores and illegal trafficking in nuclear materials are reported

  3. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  4. Ion-irradiation-induced damage in nuclear materials: Case study of a-SiO2 and MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in Physics today is the development of a clean, sustainable, and efficient energy source that can satisfy the needs of the actual and future society producing the minimum impact on the environment. For this purpose, a huge international research effort is being devoted to the study of new systems of energy production; in particular, Generation IV fission reactors and nuclear fusion reactors are being developed. The materials used in these reactors will be subjected to high levels of radiation, making necessary the study of their behavior under irradiation to achieve a successful development of these new technologies. In this thesis two materials have been studied: amorphous silica (a-SiO 2 ) and magnesium oxide (MgO). Both materials are insulating oxides with applications in the nuclear energy industry. High-energy ion irradiations have been carried out at different accelerator facilities to induce the irradiation damage in these two materials; then, the mechanisms of damage have been characterized using principally Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques. One of the challenges of this thesis was to develop the Ion Beam Induced Luminescence or iono-luminescence (which is not a widely known IBA technique) and to apply it to the study of the mechanisms of irradiation damage in materials, proving the power of this technique. For this purpose, the iono-luminescence of three different types of silica (containing different amounts of OH groups) has been studied in detail and used to describe the creation and evolution of point defects under irradiation. In the case of MgO, the damage produced under 1.2 MeV Au + irradiation has been characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration and X-ray diffraction. Finally, the iono-luminescence of MgO under different irradiation conditions has also been studied.The results obtained in this thesis help to understand the irradiation-damage processes in materials

  5. Materials irradiation research in neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Materials irradiation researches are planned in Neutron Science Research Program. A materials irradiation facility has been conceived as one of facilities in the concept of Neutron Science Research Center at JAERI. The neutron irradiation field of the facility is characterized by high flux of spallation neutrons with very wide energy range up to several hundred MeV, good accessibility to the irradiation field, good controllability of irradiation conditions, etc. Extensive use of such a materials irradiation facility is expected for fundamental materials irradiation researches and R and D of nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven incineration plant for long-lifetime nuclear waste. In this paper, outline concept of the materials irradiation facility, characteristics of the irradiation field, preliminary technical evaluation of target to generate spallation neutrons, and materials researches expected for Neutron Science Research program are described. (author)

  6. Materials modified by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Application of radiation in pharmaceutical sciences and cosmetology, polymer materials, food industry, environment, health camre products and packing production is described. Nano-technology is described more detailed, because it is less known as irradiation using technology. Economic influence of the irradiation on the materials value addition is shown

  7. Material science as basis for nuclear medicine: Holmium irradiation for radioisotopes production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Ahmed Rufai; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Otuka, Naohiko

    2018-05-01

    Material Science, being an interdisciplinary field, plays important roles in nuclear science. These applications are seen in weaponry, armoured vehicles, accelerator structure and development, semiconductor detectors, nuclear medicine and many more. Present study presents the applications of some metals in nuclear medicine (radioisotope production). The charged-particle-induced nuclear reactions by using cyclotrons or accelerators have become a very vital feature of the modern nuclear medicine. Realising the importance of excitation functions for the efficient production of medical radionuclides, some very high purity holmium metals are generally prepared or purchased for bombardment in nuclear accelerators. In the present work, various methods to obtain pure holmium for radioisotope production have been discussed while also presenting details of our present studies. From the experimental work of the present studies, some very high purity holmium foils have been used in the work for a comprehensive study of residual radionuclides production cross-sections. The study was performed using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with γ-ray spectrometry. The stack was bombarded with 50.4 MeV alpha particle beam from AVF cyclotron of RI Beam Factory, Nishina Centre for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Japan. The work produced thulium radionuclides useful in nuclear medicine.

  8. JNC-JAERI united research report. A study on degradation of structural materials under irradiation environment in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiya, Taiji; Takaya, Shigeru; Nagae, Yuji; Aoto, Kazumi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yasuo; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Ohmi, Masao; Saito, Junichi; Shimizu, Michio

    2004-10-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have started a JNC-JAERI united research program cooperatively in fiscal year 2003, which has been aimed for efficient progress and synergistic effect on the research activities of both Institutes in order to lead the facing task of unification between JNC and JAERI. This study has been chosen one of the united research themes because it has been common objective for both Institutes in the research field of structural materials such as Fast Breeder Reactor and Light Water Reactors components. The purpose of the study is to clarify damage mechanism of structural materials under irradiation, and then to develop the methods for damage evaluation and detection in earlier stage of progressing process of damage along grain boundaries. In fiscal year 2003, magnetic flux density distribution (JNC) and micro-corrosion (JAERI) measurement apparatus were newly developed and equipped in Hot Facilities in two Institutes, respectively. The former apparatus, supersensitive Flux Gate sensor was installed, could detector leaked magnetic flux from material damaged by neutron irradiation. The latter one, Atomic Force Microscope was installed, could detect grain boundary corrosion loss after an electrochemical corrosion test of irradiated material. These apparatus were designed and produced in consideration of radiation resistance and remote-controlled operation to equip in hot cells. As the results of preliminary studies using Ni ion irradiated specimen, damage detection by corrosion property in grain boundary was possible but magnetic property change could not detect. We will start the study on neutron irradiation damage by employing the two apparatus as the next step. (author)

  9. The problems of the usage of powerful electrons accelerators for the irradiation of nuclear power stations' equipment and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalinska, T.V.; Khalova, N.V.; Ostapenko, I.A.; Sakhno, V.I.; Zelinsky, A.G.; Shlapatska, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities of making the qualification of the materials and equipment of nuclear power stations on modern electrons accelerators of high power are researched. The problems of using this powerful sources of radiation for modern methods of nondestructive control of functional characteristics of the equipment and materials are discussed. The purpose of researches is the determination of the possibility of such works from the point of view of radiation safety of the personnel and the environment. First of all, this problem is connected with the increase of the intensity of secondary irradiation in such processes. The character of secondary irradiation is researched, as well as the dynamics of its energetic spectrum in rooms of powerful industrial accelerator (with beam power of more than 20 kW and average energy of electrons of 1.6 MeV) in regimes of irradiation of the equipment with contents of heavy elements. The original way of solving this problem is suggested. Experimentally proved, that during the usage of the set of compensatory measures, it is also possible to make tests of NPPs' materials and equipment on industrial accelerators of high power

  10. Thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented of the Fourth International Symposium on Thermodynamics of Nuclear Materials held in Vienna, 21-25 October 1974. The technological theme of the Symposium was the application of thermodynamics to the understanding of the chemistry of irradiated nuclear fuels and to safety assessments for hypothetical accident conditions in reactors. The first four sessions were devoted to these topics and they were followed by four more sessions on the more basic thermodynamics, phase diagrams and the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of nuclear materials. Sixty-seven papers were presented

  11. Microstructure of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was on the changes produced in the microstructure of metals, ceramics, and semiconductors by irradiation with energetic particles. the symposium brought together those working in the different material systems, which revealed that there are a remarkable number of similarities in the irradiation-produced microstructures in the different classes of materials. Experimental, computational and theoretical contributions were intermixed in all of the sessions. This provided an opportunity for these groups, which should interact, to do so. Separate abstracts were prepared for 58 papers in this book

  12. Components production and assemble of the irradiation capsule of the Surveillance Program of Materials of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano, A.

    2009-01-01

    To predict the effects of the neutrons radiation and the thermal environment about the mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, a surveillance program is implemented according to the outlines settled by Astm E185-02 -Standard practice for design of surveillance programs for light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels-. This program includes the installation of three irradiation capsules of similar materials to those of the reactor vessels, these samples are test tubes for mechanical practices of impact and tension. In the National Institute of Nuclear Research and due to the infrastructure as well as of the actual human resources of the Pilot Plant of Nuclear Fuel Assembles Production it was possible to realize the materials rebuilding extracted in 2005 of Unit 2 of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde as well as the production, assemble and reassignment of the irradiation capsule made in 2006. At the present time the surveillance materials extracted in 2008 of Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde are reconstituting and the components are manufactured for the assembles of the irradiation capsule that will be reinstalled in the reactor vessel in 2010. The purpose of the present work is to describe the necessary components as well as its disposition during the assembles of the irradiation capsule for the surveillance program of the reactors vessel of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  13. Small-scale characterisation of irradiated nuclear materials: Part II nanoindentation and micro-cantilever testing of ion irradiated nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, D.E.J., E-mail: david.armstrong@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxdord OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Hardie, C.D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxdord OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE), Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gibson, J.S.K.L. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxdord OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Bushby, A.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Edmondson, P.D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxdord OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Roberts, S.G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxdord OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE), Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    This paper demonstrates the ability of advanced micro-mechanical testing methods, based on FIB machined micro-cantilevers, to measure the mechanical properties of ion implanted layers without the influence of underlying unimplanted material. The first section describes a study of iron–12 wt% chromium alloy implanted with iron ions. It is shown that by careful cantilever design and finite element modelling that changes in yield stress after implantation can be measured even with the influence of a strong size effect. The second section describes a study of tungsten implanted with both tungsten ions and tungsten and helium ions using spherical and sharp nanoindentation, and micro-cantilevers. The spherical indentation allows yield properties and work hardening behaviour of the implanted layers to be measured. However the brittle nature of the implanted tungsten is only revealed when using micro-cantilevers. This demonstrates that when applying micro-mechanical methods to ion implanted layers care is needed to understand the nature of size effects, careful modelling of experimental procedure is required and multiple experimental techniques are needed to allow the maximum amount of mechanical behaviour information to be collected.

  14. Small-scale characterisation of irradiated nuclear materials: Part II nanoindentation and micro-cantilever testing of ion irradiated nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.E.J.; Hardie, C.D.; Gibson, J.S.K.L.; Bushby, A.J.; Edmondson, P.D.; Roberts, S.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the ability of advanced micro-mechanical testing methods, based on FIB machined micro-cantilevers, to measure the mechanical properties of ion implanted layers without the influence of underlying unimplanted material. The first section describes a study of iron–12 wt% chromium alloy implanted with iron ions. It is shown that by careful cantilever design and finite element modelling that changes in yield stress after implantation can be measured even with the influence of a strong size effect. The second section describes a study of tungsten implanted with both tungsten ions and tungsten and helium ions using spherical and sharp nanoindentation, and micro-cantilevers. The spherical indentation allows yield properties and work hardening behaviour of the implanted layers to be measured. However the brittle nature of the implanted tungsten is only revealed when using micro-cantilevers. This demonstrates that when applying micro-mechanical methods to ion implanted layers care is needed to understand the nature of size effects, careful modelling of experimental procedure is required and multiple experimental techniques are needed to allow the maximum amount of mechanical behaviour information to be collected

  15. Small-scale characterisation of irradiated nuclear materials: Part II nanoindentation and micro-cantilever testing of ion irradiated nuclear materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D. E. J.; Hardie, C. D.; Gibson, J. S. K. L.; Bushby, A. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G.

    2015-07-01

    This paper demonstrates the ability of advanced micro-mechanical testing methods, based on FIB machined micro-cantilevers, to measure the mechanical properties of ion implanted layers without the influence of underlying unimplanted material. The first section describes a study of iron-12 wt% chromium alloy implanted with iron ions. It is shown that by careful cantilever design and finite element modelling that changes in yield stress after implantation can be measured even with the influence of a strong size effect. The second section describes a study of tungsten implanted with both tungsten ions and tungsten and helium ions using spherical and sharp nanoindentation, and micro-cantilevers. The spherical indentation allows yield properties and work hardening behaviour of the implanted layers to be measured. However the brittle nature of the implanted tungsten is only revealed when using micro-cantilevers. This demonstrates that when applying micro-mechanical methods to ion implanted layers care is needed to understand the nature of size effects, careful modelling of experimental procedure is required and multiple experimental techniques are needed to allow the maximum amount of mechanical behaviour information to be collected.

  16. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability

  17. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    In a memo dated 19 August 1993, Secretary O'Leary assigned the Office of Environment, Safety and Health the primary responsibility to identify, characterize, and assess the safety, health, and environmental vulnerabilities of the DOE's existing storage conditions and facilities for the storage of irradiated reactor fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. This volume is divided into three major sections. Section 1 contains the Working Group Assessment Team reports on the following facilities: Hanford Site, INEL, SRS, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Site, LANL, BNL, Sandia, General Atomics (San Diego), Babcock ampersand Wilcox (Lynchburg Technology Center), and ANL. Section 2 contains the Vulnerability Development Forms from most of these sites. Section 3 contains the documents used by the Working Group in implementing this initiative

  18. Hot cell works and related irradiation tests in fission reactor for development of new materials for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo

    1999-01-01

    Present status of research works in Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, utilizing Japan Materials Testing Reactor and related hot cells will be described.Topics are mainly related with nuclear materials studies, excluding fissile materials, which is mainly aiming for development of materials for advanced nuclear systems such as a nuclear fusion reactor. Conflict between traditional and routined procedures and new demands will be described and future perspective is discussed. (author)

  19. Bank of models of hydrogen diffusion in irradiated materials for nuclear and thermonuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikhraj, E.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Romanenko, O.G.; Klepikov, A.Kh.

    1996-01-01

    The programs for calculation of one-dimensional hydrogen distribution in diffusion media with traps are proposed. The programs have been described by the differential equations in partial derivatives, taking into account presence of convertible chemical reaction of the first order (model by Hurst-Gauss), presence of convertible chemical reaction of the second order (model by MacNabb and Forster) or presence of two different interchanging diffusion channels with traps under boundary conditions of first, second and third kinds. Programs allows to calculate and to show dynamic distribution and its flow in diffusion media and traps along the sample (both uniform and consisting of several different layers, distinguished by media structure and phase composition) in experiment on hydrogen permeability and thermodesorption. Conditions of flow continuity takes place on the borders of section layers. Code for resolving of inversive problem - extraction of diffusion parameters from an experimental curve of a gas permeation flow for specified above tree models of diffusion is developed also. The programs a written in Pascal in variants for DOS and for Windows-95. The programs could be applied for the analysis of gas release results being obtained from the structural materials samples of nuclear-power installation. 6 refs

  20. Research and materials irradiation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Guigon, B.

    2004-01-01

    Devoted to the fundamental and applied research on materials irradiation, research reactors are nuclear installations where high neutrons flux are maintained. After a general presentation of the research reactors in the world and more specifically in France, this document presents the heavy water cooled reactors and the water cooled reactors. The third part explains the technical characteristics, thermal power, neutron flux, operating and details the Osiris, the RHF (high flux reactor), the Orphee and the Jules Horowitz reactors. The last part deals with the possible utilizations. (A.L.B.)

  1. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation

  2. Physics and technology of nuclear materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ursu, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Physics and Technology of Nuclear Materials presents basic information regarding the structure, properties, processing methods, and response to irradiation of the key materials that fission and fusion nuclear reactors have to rely upon. Organized into 12 chapters, this book begins with selectively several fundamentals of nuclear physics. Subsequent chapters focus on the nuclear materials science; nuclear fuel; structural materials; moderator materials employed to """"slow down"""" fission neutrons; and neutron highly absorbent materials that serve in reactor's power control. Other chapters exp

  3. Physics and technology of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled; elements of nuclear reactor physics; structure and properties of materials (including radiation effects); fuel materials (uranium, plutonium, thorium); structural materials (including - aluminium, zirconium, stainless steels, ferritic steels, magnesium alloys, neutron irradiation induced changes in the mechanical properties of structural materials); moderator materials (including - nuclear graphite, natural (light) water, heavy water, beryllium, metal hydrides); materials for reactor reactivity control; coolant materials; shielding materials; nuclear fuel elements; nuclear material recovery from irradiated fuel and recycling; quality control of nuclear materials; materials for fusion reactors (thermonuclear fusion reaction, physical processes in fusion reactors, fuel materials, materials for blanket and cooling system, structural materials, materials for magnetic devices, specific problems of material irradiation). (U.K.)

  4. LECI Department of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The LECI is a 'hot' laboratory dedicated mostly to the characterization of irradiated materials. It has, however, limited activities on fuel, as a back up to the LECA STAR in Cadarache. The LECI belongs to the Section of Research on Irradiated Materials (Department of Nuclear Materials). The Department for Nuclear Materials (DMN) has for its missions: - to contribute, through theoretical and experimental investigations, to the development of knowledge in materials science in order to be able to predict the evolution of the material physical and mechanical properties under service conditions (irradiation, thermomechanical solicitations, influence of the environment,..); - to characterize the properties of the materials used in the nuclear industry in order to determine their performance and to be able to predict their life expectancy, in particular via modelling. These materials can be irradiated or not, and originate from surveillance programs, experimental neutron irradiations or simulated irradiations with charged particles; - to establish, maintain and make use of the databases generated by these data; - to propose new or optimized materials, satisfying future service conditions and extend the life or the competitiveness of the associated systems; - to establish constitutive laws and models for the materials in service, incidental, accidental and storage conditions, and contribute to the development of the associated design codes in order to support the safety argumentation of utilities and vendors; - to provide expertise on industrial components, in particular to investigate strain or rupture mechanisms and to offer leads for improvement. This document presents, first, the purpose of the LECI (Historical data, Strategy, I and K shielded cell lines (building 605), M shielded cell line (building 625), Authorized materials). Then, it presents the microscopy and irradiation damage studies laboratory of the Saclay centre (Building 605) Which belongs to the Nuclear

  5. Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities -Advanced nuclear material development-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Seong; Lee, Jeong Yeong; Lee, Seong Ho; Ji, Dae Yeong; Kim, Seok Hoon; An, Seong Ho; Kim, Dong Hoon; Seok, Ho Cheon; Kim, Joon Yeon; Yang, Seong Hong

    1994-07-01

    The objective of this study is to design and construct the steady state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsules to be installed in KMRR. The principle contents of this project are to design, fabricate the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule to be installed in KMRR for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1996, so preparation of design criteria for fuel test loop have been performed in 1993 as the first year of the first phase in implementing this project. Also design and pressure drop test of non-instrumented capsule have been performed in 1993

  6. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES ampersand H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary's request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford's RINM storage circumstances. ES ampersand H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks

  7. Determination of the isotopic composition of neutron irradiated nuclear fuel materials by MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerba, S.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the MCNPX code can provide acceptable results in fuel depletion calculation. There sets of cross section libraries have been process with the NJOY code on the basis of three different cross section evaluations. These libraries had been validated and the statistical evaluation of the results showed that all three sets had been processed correctly and they are applicable for the burnup calculation. To verify the burnup capabilities of the MCNPX code the third case of the IV-B phase of the OECD NEA Burnup credit benchmark has been chosen, which is a code to code validation. The main task was to compare the k and the isotope concentrations at 4 burnup steps. The comparison of the calculation results clearly showed that the results obtained by MCNPX were in the range of other codes used in nuclear research. There were some discrepancies between the calculated and the benchmark data, but it was not possible to definitely conclude whether they were caused by the accuracy of the program or not. On the one hand, the results showed that some discrepancies may have been caused by the different cross section evaluations used in the calculation. On the other hand we cannot determine, how accurate the results from the other codes were; thus the deviations that at the first glance seemed to be high might not have necessarily meant inaccuracies in the calculation. Despite the fact that the MCNPX code is still in development, we can conclude that the code is capable of obtaining relevant results. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of irradiated coating material specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Lee Moon

    2007-12-01

    Evaluation result of irradiated coating material specimens - Coating material specimens radiated Gamma Energy(Co 60) in air condition. - Evaluation conditions was above 1 X 10 4 Gy/hr, and radiated TID 2.0 X 10 6 Gy. - The radiated coating material specimens, No Checking, Cracking, Flaking, Delamination, Peeling and Blistering. - Coating system at the Kori no. 1 and APR 1400 Nuclear power plant, evaluation of irradiated coating materials is in accordance with owner's requirement(2.0 X 10 6 Gy)

  9. A guide to the effects of nuclear irradiation on materials, electronic and electrical components, oils and greases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.C.E.

    1983-03-01

    A review is given of the effects of radiation on a selection of materials. Potentially damaging radiation thresholds are listed. The information has been taken from 12 documents for which references are given. The results of a study comparing component fault rates for nuclear and non-nuclear chemical plant are presented. (U.K.)

  10. Gamma irradiation tests of concrete material recommended for storage casks of spent nuclear fuel arising from Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulama, M.; Deneanu, N.; Dulama, C.; Baboescu, E.

    2001-01-01

    Considerable effort is being devoted to the Romania's Nuclear Spent Fuel and Waste Management R and D Program to develop engineered barriers for the containment of nuclear fuel waste under conditions of deep geological disposal. Engineering practice suggests that the concrete should fulfil the requirements of long term physical stability and resistance to radiation. With an appropriate system of metal reinforcement, it should be possible to obtain the tensile and impact strength required, avoiding the risk of mechanical damage during handling and emplacement. In accordance with the concept developed by CITON-Bucharest, presently, the dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is thought by two choices: - The alternative of dry storage type MMB3; - The alternative of dry storage type TRANSTOR. By using ORIGEN and PELSHIE computer codes, we evaluated the gamma radiation dose absorbed by the concrete walls of the storage vault both in MMB3 and in TRANSTOR designing variants. The irradiation tests were performed at the Gamma Irradiation Facility of the Institute for Nuclear Research. (authors)

  11. DART, a BCA code to assess and compare primary irradiation damage in nuclear materials submitted to neutron and ion flux - 02002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneville, L.; Simeone, D.

    2016-01-01

    When a material is subjected to a flux of high-energy particles, its constituent atoms can be knocked from their equilibrium positions with a wide range of energies, depending on the exact nature of the collision. The spectrum of damage energy, derived from the exact knowledge of the recoil spectra for each nuclear reaction occurring in the solid, constitutes a vital data set required for understanding how materials evolve under irradiation. The knowledge of such damage energy is relevant to compare the impact of different facilities on the structural behavior and relevant properties of materials. The DART code was developed for two distinct reasons: the first one was a correct determination of the Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) spectrum from reliable cross section data libraries and the second was a crude estimation of the damage energy induced by different irradiations. This last term can be a quick estimation of radiation damage produced in the same material by different nuclear plants and particle accelerators. Based on the Binary Collision Approximation, this code allows computing the primary spectra produced by neutrons, ions and electrons as well as the damage energy deposited by these particles in a poly atomic material. It is then a tool to compare radiation damage induced in nuclear reactors as well as in ion beam facilities. This brief paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  12. Irradiation of nuclear materials with laser-plasma filaments produced in air and deuterium by terrawatt (TW) laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avotina, Liga; Lungu, Mihail; Dinca, Paul; Butoi, Bogdan; Cojocaru, Gabriel; Ungureanu, Razvan; Marcu, Aurelian; Luculescu, Catalin; Hapenciuc, Claudiu; Ganea, Paul C.; Petjukevics, Aleksandrs; Lungu, Cristian P.; Kizane, Gunta; Ticos, C. M.; Antohe, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Be-C-W mixed materials with variable atomic ratios were exposed to high power (TW) laser induced filamentation plasma in air in normal conditions and in deuterium at a reduced pressure of 20 Torr. Morphological and structural investigations were performed on the irradiated zones for both ambient conditions. The presence of low-pressure deuterium increased the overall ablation rate for all samples. From the elemental concentration point of view, the increase of the carbon percentage has led to an increase in the ablation rate. An increase of the tungsten percentage had the opposite effect. From structural spectroscopic investigations using XPS, Raman and FT-IR of the irradiated and non-irradiated sample surfaces, we conclude that deuterium-induced enhancement of the ablation process could be explained by preferential amorphous carbon removal, possibly by forming deuterated hydrocarbons which further evaporated, weakening the layer structure.

  13. Optimization of the irradiation conditions of some control components and materials for the nuclear power plants and the radiation stability of certain types of plastic lubricants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesek, M.; Rerichova, M.; Trebicky, V.; Chvojka, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fail-safe operation of various safeguard devices, operational and auxiliary equipments and control components, e.g. servomotors other engines and various appliances, is required for a safe operation of nuclear power plants. Non-metal materials, control components, motors and other appliances have to be tested and their properties evaluated after γ-irradiation with doses corresponding to the assumed long term radiation commitment and also to the irradiation caused by an eventual accident. The radiation stability of greases used in devices exposed to high doses of the ionizing radiation presents a rather serious and important problem. The results of some tests and the evaluation of the properties of irradiated plastic lubricants are described. (author)

  14. Irradiating strand material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, J.R.; Brown, M.J.; Loan, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Conductors covered with insulation which is to be irradiated are passed between two groups of coaxial sheaves mounted rotatably individually. Successive sections of the conductors are advanced past the window of one accelerator head, around the associated sheave or sheaves, and then past the window of another accelerator head. The accelerators face in substantially opposite directions and are staggered along the paths of the conductors to avoid any substantial overlap of the electron beams associated therewith. The windows extend vertically to encompass all the generally horizontal passes of the conductors as between the two groups of sheaves. Preferably, conductors are strung-up between the sheaves in a modified figure eight pattern. The pattern is a figure eight modified to intermittently include a pass between the sheaves which is parallel to a line joining the axes of the two groups of sheaves. This reverses the direction of travel of the conductors and optimizes the uniformity of exposure of the cross sectional area of the insulation of the conductors to irradiation. The use of a figure eight path for the conductors causes the successive sections of the conductor to turn about the longitudinal axes thereof as they are advanced around the sheaves. In this way the insulation is more uniformly irradiated. In a preferred embodiment, twisted conductor pairs may be irradiated. The twist accentuates the longitudinal turning of the conductor pair. The irradiation of twisted pairs achieves obvious manufacturing economies while avoiding the necessity of having to twist irradiation cross-linked conductors

  15. A Calculation of Nuclear Heating by Activation Product of Structure Materials for the In-core Irradiation Hole in the HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Tae Yang; Park, B. G.; Kim, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Only delayed gamma heating is considered in this paper. Contribution of the delayed gamma heating is expected to be negligible for the reactor power. For the neutron irradiation, however, the contribution of delayed gamma heating is not negligible issue, and it should be evaluated for safety analysis. Additionally, in the case of temperature-sensitive irradiation targets, the delayed gamma heating should be evaluated precisely. For the HANARO, the delayed gamma heating has been evaluated by modifying the library data of the calculation code or by assuming the heating to be conservative value based on prompt gamma heating. For the method of modifying the library data, however, it should be able to estimate isotopes which contribute to heat generation exactly. And furthermore, it should be concerned to determine modified emission yield of gamma-rays depending on the half-life. For the method of assuming conservative value, it is hard to determine whether the assumed heating value is enough conservative or not. In this study, a methodology for evaluation of nuclear heating by structure materials irradiated for a long time is established with the ORIGEN and MCNP codes. And this method is applied to determine the nuclear heating of the RI capsule in the IR2 irradiation hole in the HANARO. In this paper, the methodology for evaluation of heat generation by irradiated structure materials was established by using the ORIGEN and MCNP codes. From this result, the contribution by farther structures was expected to be negligible. Meanwhile, heat generation by delayed gamma-ray was calculated less than 0.03% of heat generation by prompt radiations. The result of this study indicates that there are some remaining issues for the real situation of the neutron irradiation at HANARO.

  16. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  17. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y H; Cho, M S [and others

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  18. Safeguards for special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.L.

    1979-12-01

    Safeguards, accountability, and nuclear materials are defined. The accuracy of measuring nuclear materials is discussed. The use of computers in nuclear materials accounting is described. Measures taken to physically protect nuclear materials are described

  19. Irradiation plant for flowable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshard, E.

    1975-01-01

    The irradiation plant can be used to treat various flowable materials including effluent or sewage sludge. The plant contains a concrete vessel in which a partition is mounted to form two coaxial irradiation chambers through which the flowable material can be circulated by means of an impeller. The partition can be formed to house tubes of radiation sources and to provide a venturi-like member about the impeller. The operation of the impeller is reversed periodically to assure movement of both heavy and light particles in the flow. (U.S.)

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Comprehensive nuclear materials

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Todd; Stoller, Roger; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive Nuclear Materials encapsulates a panorama of fundamental information on the vast variety of materials employed in the broad field of nuclear technology. The work addresses, in five volumes, 3,400 pages and over 120 chapter-length articles, the full panorama of historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds' leading scientists and engineers. It synthesizes the most pertinent research to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

  2. General purpose nuclear irradiation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Fadzlin Hasbullah; Nuurul Iffah Che Omar; Nahrul Khair Alang Md Rashid; Jaafar Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear technology has found a great need for use in medicine, industry, and research. Smoke detectors in our homes, medical treatments and new varieties of plants by irradiating its seeds are just a few examples of the benefits of nuclear technology. Portable neutron source such as Californium-252, available at Industrial Technology Division (BTI/ PAT), Malaysian Nuclear Agency, has a 2.645 year half-life. However, 252 Cf is known to emit gamma radiation from the source. Thus, this chamber aims to provide a proper gamma shielding for samples to distinguish the use of mixed neutron with gamma-rays or pure neutron radiation. The chamber is compatible to be used with other portable neutron sources such as 241 Am-Be as well as the reactor TRIGA PUSPATI for higher neutron dose. This chamber was designed through a collaborative effort of Kulliyyah Engineering, IIUM with the Industrial Technology Division (BTI) team, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. (Author)

  3. Metallographic examination in irradiated materials examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Lee, Key Soon; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Yoo, Byoung Ok

    1998-01-01

    It is very important to have equipment of metallographic examination in hot-cell to observe the micro-structure of nuclear fuels and materials irradiated at nuclear power and/or research reactor. Those equipment should be operated by master-slave manipulators, so they are designed, manufactured and modified to make exercise easy and no trouble. The metallographic examination equipment and techniques as well as its operation procedure are described, so an operator can practice the metallography in hot-cell. (author). 5 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs.

  4. Recent irradiation tests for future nuclear system at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Yang, Seong Woo; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The capsule at HANARO is a device that evaluates the irradiation effects of nuclear materials and fuels, which can reproduce the environment of nuclear power plants and accelerate to reach to the end of life condition. As the integrity assessment and the extension of lifetime of nuclear power plants are recently considered as important issues in Korea, the requirements for irradiation test are gradually being increased. The capacity and capability irradiation tests at HANARO are becoming important because Korea strives to develop SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) and VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) among the future nuclear system and to export the research reactors and to develop the fusion reactor technology.

  5. A neutron irradiator to perform nuclear activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Zahn, G.S.; Figueredo, A. M. G.; Madi, T. F.; Yoriyaz, H.; Lima, R. B.; Shtejer, K.; Dalaqua Jr, L.

    2001-01-01

    The development of appropriate nuclear instrumentation to perform neutron activation analyze (NAA), using thermal and fast neutrons, can be useful to investigate materials outside the reactor premises. Considering this fact, a small size neutron irradiator prototype was developed at IPEN facilities (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - Brazil). Basically, this prototype consists of a cylinder of 1200 mm long and 985 mm diameter (filled with paraffin) with two Am-Be sources (600GBq each) arranged in the longitudinal direction of its geometric center. The material to be irradiated is positioned at a radial direction of the cylinder between the two Am-Be sources. The main advantage of this irradiator is a very stable neutron flux eliminating the use of standard material (measure of the induced activity in the sample by comparative method). This way the process became agile, practical and economic, but quantities at mg levels of samples are necessary to achieve good sensitivity, when the material has a low microscopy neutron cross section. As fast and thermal neutron can be used, the flux distribution, for both, were calculated and the prototype performance is discussed

  6. Thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: The science of chemical thermodynamics has substantially contributed to the understanding of the many problems encountered in nuclear and reactor technology. These problems include reaction of materials with their surroundings and chemical and physical changes of fuels. Modern reactor technology, by its very nature, has offered new fields of investigations for the scientists and engineers concerned with the design of nuclear fuel elements. Moreover, thermodynamics has been vital in predicting the behaviour of new materials for fission as well as fusion reactors. In this regard, the Symposium was organized to provide a mechanism for review and discussion of recent thermodynamic investigations of nuclear materials. The Symposium was held in the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre, at the invitation of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany. The International Atomic Energy Agency has given much attention to the thermodynamics of nuclear materials, as is evidenced by its sponsorship of four international symposia in 1962, 1965, 1967, and 1974. The first three meetings were primarily concerned with the fundamental thermodynamics of nuclear materials; as with the 1974 meeting, this last Symposium was primarily aimed at the thermodynamic behaviour of nuclear materials in actual practice, i.e., applied thermodynamics. Many advances have been made since the 1974 meeting, both in fundamental and applied thermodynamics of nuclear materials, and this meeting provided opportunities for an exchange of new information on this topic. The Symposium dealt in part with the thermodynamic analysis of nuclear materials under conditions of high temperatures and a severe radiation environment. Several sessions were devoted to the thermodynamic studies of nuclear fuels and fission and fusion reactor materials under adverse conditions. These papers and ensuing discussions provided a better understanding of the chemical behaviour of fuels and materials under these

  7. Nuclear materials management procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veevers, K.; Silver, J.M.; Quealy, K.J.; Steege, E. van der.

    1987-10-01

    This manual describes the procedures for the management of nuclear materials and associated materials at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. The procedures are designed to comply with Australia's nuclear non-proliferation obligations to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), bilateral agreements with other countries and ANSTO's responsibilities under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act, 1987. The manual replaces those issued by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission in 1959, 1960 and 1969

  8. The nuclear materials contraband

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.; Woessner, P.

    1996-01-01

    Several seizures of nuclear materials carried by contraband have been achieved. Some countries or criminal organizations could manufacture atomic bombs and use them. This alarming situation is described into details. Only 40% of drugs are seized by the American police and probably less in western Europe. The nuclear materials market is smaller than the drugs'one but the customs has also less experience to intercept the uranium dispatch for instance more especially as the peddlers are well organized. A severe control of the international transports would certainly allow to seize a large part of nuclear contraband materials but some dangerous isotopes as uranium 235 or plutonium 239 are little radioactive and which prevents their detection by the Geiger-Mueller counters. In France, some regulations allow to control the materials used to manufacture the nuclear weapons, and diminish thus the risk of a nuclear materials contraband. (O.L.). 4 refs., 2 figs

  9. Materials aging: first predictive modeling of iron under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    Researchers from the CEA-Bruyeres-le-Chatel have been able to quantitatively foresee for the very first time the evolution of irradiation defects inside a structural material. Their results, obtained with iron, will contribute to better understand the aging of the materials of today's nuclear power plants and of future nuclear systems. Short paper. (J.S.)

  10. Auditing nuclear materials statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1973-01-01

    A standard that may be used as a guide for persons making independent examinations of nuclear materials statements or reports regarding inventory quantities on hand, receipts, production, shipment, losses, etc. is presented. The objective of the examination of nuclear materials statements by the independent auditor is the expression of an opinion on the fairness with which the statements present the nuclear materials position of a nuclear materials facility and the movement of such inventory materials for the period under review. The opinion is based upon an examination made in accordance with auditing criteria, including an evaluation of internal control, a test of recorded transactions, and a review of measured discards and materials unaccounted for (MUF). The standard draws heavily upon financial auditing standards and procedures published by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants

  11. AGC 2 Irradiated Material Properties Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technologies Graphite Research and Development Program is conducting an extensive graphite irradiation experiment to provide data for licensing of a high temperature reactor (HTR) design. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor designs. , Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphite grades have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for new HTR reactor designs. To support the design and licensing of HTR core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade, with a specific emphasis on data accounting for the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the HTR candidate graphite grades. Further details on the research and development activities and associated rationale required to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the HTR are documented in the graphite technology research and development plan.

  12. Materials Modification Under Ion Irradiation: JANNUS Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serruys, Y.; Trocellier, P.; Ruault, M.-O.; Henry, S.; Kaietasov, O.; Trouslard, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nano-Science and Nuclear Simulation) is a project designed to study the modification of materials using multiple ion beams and in-situ TEM observation. It will be a unique facility in Europe for the study of irradiation effects, the simulation of material damage due to irradiation and in particular of combined effects. The project is also intended to bring together experimental and modelling teams for a mutual fertilisation of their activities. It will also contribute to the teaching of particle-matter interactions and their applications. JANNUS will be composed of three accelerators with a common experimental chamber and of two accelerators coupled to a 200 kV TEM

  13. The Change of the Seebeck Coefficient Due to Neutron Irradiation and Thermal Fatigue of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel and its Application to the Monitoring of Material Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niffenegger, M.; Reichlin, K.; Kalkhof, D.

    2002-05-01

    The monitoring of material degradation, that might be caused by neutron irradiation and thermal fatigue, is an important topic in lifetime extension of nuclear power plants. We therefore investigated the application of the Seebeck effect for determining material degradation of common reactor pressure vessel steel. The Seebeck coefficient (SC) of several irradiated Charpy specimens made from Japanese JRQ-steel were measured. The specimens suffered a fluence from 0 up to 4.5 x 10 19 neutrons per cm 2 with energies higher than 1 MeV. The measured changes of the SC within this range were about 500 nV, increasing continuously in the range under investigation. Some indications of saturation appeared at fluencies larger than 4.55 x 10 19 neutrons per cm 2 . We obtained a linear dependency between the SC and the temperature shift ΔT 41 of the Charpy-Energy- Temperature curve which is widely used to characterize material embrittlement. Similar measurements were performed on specimens made from the widely used austenitic steel X6CrNiTi18-10 (according to DIN 1.4541) that were fatigued by applying a cyclic strain amplitude of 0.28%. For this kind of fatigue the observed change of SC was somewhat smaller than for the irradiated specimens. Further investigations were made to quantify the size of the gage volume in which the thermoelectric power is generated. It appeared that the information gathered from a Thermo Electric Power (TEP) measurement is very local. To overcome this problem we propose a novel TEP-method using a Thermoelectric Scanning Microscope (TSM). We finally conclude that the change of the SC has a potential for monitoring of material degradation due to neutron irradiation and thermal fatigue, but it has to be taken into account that several influencing parameters could contribute to the TEP in either an additional or extinguishing manner. A disadvantage of the method is the requirement of a clean surface without any oxide layer. A part of this disadvantage can

  14. The analysis of irradiated nuclear fuel and cladding materials, determination of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen/metal ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I.G.

    1976-02-01

    Equipment has been developed for the determination of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen/metal ratio on irradiated fuels, of carbon in stainless steel cladding materials and in graphite rich deposits, and of hydrogen in zircaloy. Carbon is determined by combustion to carbon dioxide which is collected and measured manometrically, hydrogen by vacuum extraction followed by diffusion through a palladium thimble, and oxygen/metal ratio by CO/CO 2 equilibration. A single set of equipment was devised in order to minimise the time and work involved in changing to a different set of equipment in a separate box, for each type of analysis. For each kind of analysis, alterations to the apparatus are involved but these can be carried out with the basic set in position in a shielded cell, although to do so it is necessary to obtain access via the gloves on the fibre-glass inner glove box. This requires a removal of samples emitting radiation, by transfer to an adjoining cell. A single vacuum system is employed. This is connected through a plug in the lead wall of the shielded cell, and couplings in the glove box wall to the appropriate furnaces. Carbon may be determined, in stainless steel containing 400 to 800 ppm C, with a coefficient of variation of +- 2%. On deposits containing carbon, the coefficient of variation is better than +- 1% for 2 to 30 mg of carbon. Hydrogen, at levels between 30 and 200 ppm in titanium can be determined with a coefficient of variation of better than +- 5%. Titanium has been used in lieu of zircaloy since standardised zircaloy specimens are not available. The precision for oxygen/metal ratio is estimated to be +- 0.001 Atoms oxygen. Sample weights of 200 mg are adequate for most analyses. (author)

  15. Neutron irradiation effects on plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Rödig, M.; Snead, L. L.; Wu, C. H.

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the effects of neutron irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties and bulk tritium retention of armour materials (beryllium, tungsten and carbon). For each material, the main properties affected by neutron irradiation are described and the specific tests of neutron irradiated armour materials under thermal shock and disruption conditions are summarized. Based on current knowledge, the expected thermal and structural performance of neutron irradiated armour materials in the ITER plasma facing components are analysed.

  16. Neutron irradiation effects on plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Roedig, M.; Snead, L.L.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of neutron irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties and bulk tritium retention of armour materials (beryllium, tungsten and carbon). For each material, the main properties affected by neutron irradiation are described and the specific tests of neutron irradiated armour materials under thermal shock and disruption conditions are summarized. Based on current knowledge, the expected thermal and structural performance of neutron irradiated armour materials in the ITER plasma facing components are analysed

  17. Nuclear material operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion

  18. Nuclear material operations manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1979-06-01

    This manual is intended to provide a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion

  19. Nuclear material operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, R.P.; Gassman, L.D.

    1978-04-01

    This manual is intended to provide a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations--management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of ''play-scripts'' in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion

  20. Plan and reports of coupled irradiation (JRR-3 and JOYO of research reactors) and hot facilities work (WASTEF, JMTR-HL, MMF and FMF). R and D project on irradiation damage management technology for structural materials of long-life nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Masaya; Yoshitake, Tsunemitsu; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Iwamatsu, Shigemi; Ichikawa, Shoichi; Yamagata, Ichiro; Soga, Tomonori; Yonekawa, Minoru; Kitamura, Ryoichi; Miyake, Osamu; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuyoshi; Kikuchi, Taiji; Usami, Koji; Endo, Shinya; Ichise, Kenichi; Numata, Masami; Onozawa, Atsushi; Aizawa, Masao; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Nakata, Masahito; Abe, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kazuhiro; Takaya, Shigeru; Nagae, Yuji; Wakai, Eiichi; Aoto, Kazumi

    2010-03-01

    'R and D Project on Irradiation Damage Management Technology for Structural Materials of Long-life Nuclear Plant' was carried out from FY2006 in a fund of a trust enterprise of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The coupled irradiations or single irradiation by JOYO fast reactor and JRR-3 thermal reactor were performed for about two years. The irradiation specimens are very important materials to establish of 'Evaluation of Irradiation Damage Indicator' in this research. For the acquisition of the examination specimens irradiated by the JOYO and JRR-3, we summarized about the overall plan, the work process and the results for the study to utilize these reactors and some facilities of hot laboratory (WASTEF, JMTR-HL, MMF and FMF) of the Oarai Research and Development Center and the Nuclear Science Research Institute in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  1. Smuggling special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gheorghe

    1999-01-01

    Ever since the collapse of the former Soviet Union reports have circulated with increasing frequency concerning attempts to smuggle materials from that country's civil and military nuclear programs. Such an increase obviously raises a number of concerns (outlined in the author's introduction), chief among which is the possibility that these materials might eventually fall into the hands of proliferant states or terrorist groups. The following issues are presented: significance of materials being smuggled; sources and smuggling routes; potential customers; international efforts to reduce nuclear smuggling; long-term disposition of fissile materials. (author)

  2. Automated nuclear materials accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacak, P.; Moravec, J.

    1982-01-01

    An automated state system of accounting for nuclear materials data was established in Czechoslovakia in 1979. A file was compiled of 12 programs in the PL/1 language. The file is divided into four groups according to logical associations, namely programs for data input and checking, programs for handling the basic data file, programs for report outputs in the form of worksheets and magnetic tape records, and programs for book inventory listing, document inventory handling and materials balance listing. A similar automated system of nuclear fuel inventory for a light water reactor was introduced for internal purposes in the Institute of Nuclear Research (UJV). (H.S.)

  3. Dry storage of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmie, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    In transferring radioactive material between the preparation and clean chambers of a dry storage complex, irradiated nuclear fuel is posted from the preparation chamber to a sealable canister supported in a closable bucket in the clean chamber, or a contaminated sealed canister is posted from a closed bucket in the clean chamber into the preparation chamber by using a facility comprising two coaxial tubes constituting a closable orifice between the two chambers, the tubes providing sealing means for the bucket, and masking means for the bucket and canister closures together with means for withdrawing the closures into the preparation chamber. (author)

  4. Professional Nuclear Materials Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forcella, A.A.; O'Leary, W.J.

    1966-01-01

    This paper describes the scope of nuclear materials management for a typical power reactor in the United States of America. Since this power reactor is financed by private capital, one of the principal obligations of the reactor operator is to ensure that the investment is protected and will furnish an adequate financial return. Because of the high intrinsic value of nuclear materials, appropriate security and accountability must be continually exercised to minimize losses beyond security and accountability for the nuclear materials. Intelligent forethought and planning must be employed to ensure that additional capital is not lost as avoidable additional costs or loss of revenue in a number of areas. The nuclear materials manager must therefore provide in advance against the following contingencies and maintain constant control or liaison against deviations from planning during (a) pre-reactor acquisition of fuel and fuel elements, (b) in-reactor utilization of the fuel elements, and (c) post-reactor recovery of fuel values. During pre-reactor planning and operations, it is important that the fuel element be designed for economy in manufacture, handling, shipping, and replaceability. The time schedule for manufacturing operations must minimize losses of revenue from unproductive dead storage of high cost materials. For in-reactor operations, the maximum achievable burn-up of the fissionable material must be obtained by means of appropriate fuel rearrangement schemes. Concurrently the unproductive down-time of the reactor for fuel rearrangement, inspections, and the like must be minimized. In the post-reactor period, when the fuel has reached a predetermined depletion of fissionable material, the nuclear materials manager must provide for the most economical reprocessing and recovery of fissionable values and by-products. Nuclear materials management is consequently an essential factor in achieving competitive fuel cycle and unit energy costs with power reactors

  5. Detecting Illicit Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2005-01-01

    The threat that weapons of mass destruction might enter the United States has led to a number of efforts for the detection and interdiction of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and biological weapons at our borders. There have been multiple deployments of instrumentation to detect radiation signatures to interdict radiological material, including weapons and weapons material worldwide

  6. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kaoumi, Djamel; Bai, Xian-Ming

    2017-12-01

    The 8th symposium on Microstructural Progresses in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) was held at San Diego Convention Center and Marriott Marquis & Marina, San Diego, California, USA, February 26-March 2, 2017, as part of the TMS 2017 146th Annual Meeting and Exhibition. Since 2003, when the first MPIM symposium was held in the same place, the symposium has been held in odd years and has grown to one of the biggest symposia in the TMS Annual Meeting which invites more than sixty symposia. In the 8th MPIM symposium, a total of 106 oral and poster presentations, including 16 invited talks, were delivered for 4 days.

  7. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  8. SEM analysis for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaosong; Yao Liang

    2008-06-01

    A radiation-proof Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) system is introduced. It has been widely used in various areas. For analyzing radioactive samples, normal SEM system needs lots of alterations. Based on KYKY-2800B SEM, the sample room, belt line, operating table and aerator were updated. New radiation-proof SEM system has used to analytic surface contaminated samples and RPV materials samples. An elementary means of SEM analysis for radioactive samples was studied, and this examination supported some available references for further irradiated fuel researches. (authors)

  9. Transport of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In response to public interest in the transport by rail through London of containers of irradiated fuel elements on their way from nuclear power stations to Windscale, the Central Electricity Generating Board and British Rail held three information meetings in London in January 1980. One meeting was for representatives of London Borough Councils and Members of Parliament with a known interest in the subject, and the others were for press, radio and television journalists. This booklet contains the main points made by the principal speakers from the CEGB and BR. (The points covered include: brief description of the fuel cycle; effect of the fission process in producing plutonium and fission products in the fuel element; fuel transport; the fuel flasks; protection against accidents; experience of transporting fuel). (U.K.)

  10. Safeguards on nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisar, V.; Keselica, M.; Bezak, S.

    2001-01-01

    The article describes the implementation of IAEA safeguards for nuclear materials in the Czech and Slovak Republics, the establishment and development of the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC) at the levels of the state regulatory body and of the operator, particularly at the Dukovany nuclear power plant. A brief overview of the historical development is given. Attention is concentrated on the basic concepts and legal regulation accepted by the Czech and Slovak Republics in accordance with the new approach to create a complete legislative package in the area of nuclear energy uses. The basic intention is to demonstrate the functions of the entire system, including safeguards information processing and technical support of the system. Perspectives of the Integrated Safeguards System are highlighted. The possible ways for approximation of the two national systems to the Safeguards System within the EU (EURATOM) are outlined, and the necessary regulatory and operators' roles in this process are described. (author)

  11. High energy electron irradiation of flowable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offermann, B.P.

    1975-01-01

    In order to efficiently irradiate a flowable material with high energy electrons, a hollow body is disposed in a container for the material and the material is caused to flow in the form of a thin layer across a surface of the body from or to the interior of the container while the material flowing across the body surface is irradiated. (U.S.)

  12. Nuclear material accounting handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The handbook documents existing best practices and methods used to account for nuclear material and to prepare the required nuclear material accounting reports for submission to the IAEA. It provides a description of the processes and steps necessary for the establishment, implementation and maintenance of nuclear material accounting and control at the material balance area, facility and State levels, and defines the relevant terms. This handbook serves the needs of State personnel at various levels, including State authorities, facility operators and participants in training programmes. It can assist in developing and maintaining accounting systems which will support a State's ability to account for its nuclear material such that the IAEA can verify State declarations, and at the same time support the State's ability to ensure its nuclear security. In addition, the handbook is useful for IAEA staff, who is closely involved with nuclear material accounting. The handbook includes the steps and procedures a State needs to set up and maintain to provide assurance that it can account for its nuclear material and submit the prescribed nuclear material accounting reports defined in Section 1 and described in Sections 3 and 4 in terms of the relevant agreement(s), thereby enabling the IAEA to discharge its verification function as defined in Section 1 and described in Sections 3 and 4. The contents of the handbook are based on the model safeguards agreement and, where applicable, there will also be reference to the model additional protocol. As a State using The handbook consists of five sections. In Section 1, definitions or descriptions of terms used are provided in relation to where the IAEA applies safeguards or, for that matter, accounting for and control of nuclear material in a State. The IAEA's approach in applying safeguards in a State is also defined and briefly described, with special emphasis on verification. In Section 2, the obligations of the State

  13. A disposal centre for irradiated nuclear fuel: conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report describes a conceptual design of a disposal centre for irradiated nuclear fuel. The surface facilities consist of plants for the preparation of steel cylinders containing irradiated nuclear fuel immobilized in lead, shaft headframe buildings, and all necessary support facilities. The undergound disposal vault is located on one level at a depth of 1000 metres. The cylinders containing the irradiated fuel are emplaced on a one-metre thick layer of backfill material and then completely covered with backfill. All surface and subsurface facilities are described, operations and schedules are summarized, and cost estimates and manpower requirements are given. (auth)

  14. Nuclear materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakov, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Various methods of nuclear materials transportation at different stages of the fuel cycle (U 3 O 8 , UF 6 production enrichment, fuel element manufacturing, storage) are considered. The advantages and drawbacks of railway, automobile, maritime and air transport are analyzed. Some types of containers are characterized

  15. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this project was to establish basic capsule irradiation technology using the multi-purpose research reactor [HANARO] to eventually support national R and D projects of advanced fuel and materials related to domestic nuclear power plants and next generation reactors. There are several national nuclear projects in KAERI, which require several irradiation tests to investigate in-pile behavior of nuclear reactor fuel and materials for the R and D of several types of fuels such as advanced PWR and DUPIC fuels and for the R and D of structural materials such as RPV(reactor pressure vessel) steel, Inconel, zirconium alloy, and stainless steel. At the moment, internal and external researchers in institutes, industries and universities are interested in investigating the irradiation characteristics of materials using the irradiation facilities of HANARO. For these kinds of material irradiation tests, it is important to develop various capsules using our own techniques. The development of capsules requires several leading-edge technologies and our own experiences related to design and fabrication. In the second phase from April 1,2000 to March 31, 2003, the utilization technologies were developed using various sensors for the measurements of temperature, pressure and displacement, and instrumented capsule technologies for the required fuel irradiation tests were developed. In addition, the improvement of the existing capsule technologies and the development of an in-situ measurable creep capsule for specific purposes were done to meet the various requirements of users

  16. Nuclear materials transport worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellpflug, J.

    1987-01-01

    This Greenpeace report shows: nuclear materials transport is an extremely hazardous business. There is no safe protection against accidents, kidnapping, or sabotage. Any moment of a day, at any place, a nuclear transport accident may bring the world to disaster, releasing plutonium or radioactive fission products to the environment. Such an event is not less probable than the MCA at Chernobyl. The author of the book in hand follows the secret track of radioactive materials around the world, from uranium mines to the nuclear power plants, from reprocessing facilities to the waste repositories. He explores the routes of transport and the risks involved, he gives the names of transport firms and discloses incidents and carelessness, tells about damaged waste drums and plutonium that 'disappeared'. He also tells about worldwide, organised resistance to such nuclear transports, explaining the Greenpeace missions on the open sea, or the 'day X' operation at the Gorleben site, informing the reader about protests and actions for a world freed from the threat of nuclear energy. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Experimental study associated to irradiation of FBR structural material, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The study presents one of the bases to evaluate the results of the post-irradiation tests to conduct the thermal control tests related to the second JMTR irradiation (70M-61P) of the demestic austenitic stainless steels for the structural material of the FBR performed by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The thermal control specimens were given the temperature history which simulated that of the irradiation temperature in vacuum by the electrical furnance, and then the tensile, fatigue and Charpy impact tests were performed. The changes of the material properties caused by the thermal history were investigated. (auth.)

  18. Construction and characterization of a new high current ion source for research of impact of hydrogen irradiation on wall materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arredondo Parra, Rodrigo; Neu, Rudolf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Oberkofler, Martin; Schmid, Klaus; Weghorn, Arno [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The HSQ (HochStromQuelle) is a high current DuoPIGatron type ion source used for research in surface properties of wall materials for nuclear fusion reactors. The existing HSQ-I will be replaced by the conceptually identical HSQ-II, currently under construction. Varying the acceleration potential and optimizing gas inflow and beam focusing grid voltage, ion currents before the deflecting magnet between 10 and 875 μA were reached for acceleration voltages of 0.7 to 8 kV. The ion beam footprint will be characterized, and ion optics will be installed before and after the deflecting magnet, capable of bending 10 keV Ar. A monoenergetic beam of a single species (e.g. D{sub 3}{sup +}) will finally be used for irradiation of samples in the separate implantation chamber at a base pressure of 10{sup -8} mbar. The energy of the impinging particles ranges from 200 eV/D to several keV/D. Fluxes of 10{sup 15} D/cm{sup 2}/s to the target are expected. The temperature of the sample is varied via electron impact heating and the sample weight can be assessed in situ by means of a magnetic suspension balance.

  19. International nuclear material safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Azmi Syed Ali

    1985-01-01

    History can be a very dull subject if it relates to events which have long since lost their relevance. The factors which led to the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), however, are as important and relevant today as they were when the Agency was first created. Without understanding these factors it is impossible to realise how important the Agency is in the present world or to understand some of the controversies surrounding its future. Central to these controversies is the question of how best to promote the international transfer of nuclear technology without contributing further to the problem of proliferating nuclear explosives or explosive capabilities. One effective means is to subject nuclear materials (see accompanying article in box), which forms the basic link between the manufacture of nuclear explosives and nuclear power generation, to international safeguards. This was realized very early in the development of nuclear power and was given greater emphasis following the deployment of the first two atomic bombs towards the end of World War II. (author)

  20. Irradiated film material and method of the irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The irradiation of polymer film material is a strengthening procedure. To obtain a substantial uniformity in the radiation dosage profile, the film is irradiated in a trough having lateral deflection blocks adjacent to the film edges. These deflect the electrons towards the surface of the trough bottom for further deflection towards the film edge. (C.F.)

  1. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  2. Thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The first session of the symposium discussed in general the thermodynamic properties of actinides, including thorium, uranium and Plutonium which provide reactor fuel. The second session was devoted to applications of thermodynamic theory to the study of nuclear materials, while the experimental techniques for the determination of thermodynamic data were examined at the next session. The thermodynamic properties of alloys were considered at a separate session, and another session was concerned with solids other than alloys. Vaporization processes, which are of special interest in the development of high-temperature reactors, were discussed at a separate session. The discussions on the methods of developing the data and ascertaining their accuracy were especially useful in highlighting the importance of determining whether any given data are reliable before they can be put to practical application. Many alloys and refractory materials (i. e. materials which evaporate only at very high temperatures) are of great importance in nuclear technology, and some of these substances are extremely complex in their chemical composition. For example, until recently the phase composition of the oxides of thorium, uranium and plutonium had been only very imperfectly understood, and the same was true of the carbides of these elements. Recent developments in experimental techniques have made it possible to investigate the phase composition of these complex materials as well as the chemical species of these materials in the gaseous phase. Recent developments in measuring techniques, such as fluorine bomb calorimetry and Knudsen effusion technique, have greatly increased the accuracy of thermodynamic data

  3. Gamma-Ray Irradiation Effects on the Characteristics of New Material P Type 6H-SiC Ni-Schottky Diodes (Application For Nuclear Fuel Facilities)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U-Sudjadi; T-Ohshima, N. Iwamoto; S-Hishiki; N-Iwamoto, K. Kawano

    2007-01-01

    Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on electrical characteristics of new material p type 6H-SiC Ni-Schottky diodes were investigated. Ni Schottky diodes fabricated on p type 6H-SiC epi-layer were irradiated with gamma-rays at RT. The electrical characteristics of the diodes were evaluated before and after irradiation. The value of the on-resistance does not change up to 1 MGy, and the value increases with increasing absorbed dose above 1 MGy. For n factor, no significant increase is observed below 500 kGy, however, the value increases above 500 kGy. Schottky Barrier Height (SBH) decreases with increasing absorbed dose. Leakage current tends to increase due to irradiation. (author)

  4. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 3, Site team reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES & H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary`s request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford`s RINM storage circumstances. ES & H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks.

  5. The sea transport of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes the development of a transport system dedicated to the sea transport of irradiated nuclear fuel. It reviews the background to why shipments were required and the establishment of a specialist shipping company, Pacific Nuclear Transport Limited. A description of the ships, flasks and other equipment utilized is provided, together with details of key procedures implemented to ensure safety and customer satisfaction

  6. Supply of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    Any large-scale atomic energy programme is inherently dependent on the availability of materials that can be used as fuel in reactors, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, at its inception, was intended to act as a bank for the flow of materials between Member States. According to its Statute, one of its primary functions is to provide materials 'to meet the needs of research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes, including the production of electric power, with due consideration for the needs of the under-developed areas of the world'. If the Agency is to fulfil its Statutory function, it would be essential for it to have not only some ready sources of supply, but also an established framework of general terms and conditions on which it could secure the supplies. The latter would eliminate the need for going through elaborate procedural formalities whenever the Agency receives a new request for materials. Such a framework has now been established with the signing of broad agreements with three countries which had offered to supply various quantities of special fissionable materials to the Agency. These agreements, signed in Vienna on 11 May 1959, with the USSR, the UK and the USA, lay down the basic terms and conditions on which these three countries will make nuclear materials available when needed by the Agency. The USSR has agreed to make available to the Agency 50 kg of uranium-235, the UK 20 kg and the USA 5 000 kg. The material will be supplied in the form of enriched uranium in any concentration up to 20 per cent; the amounts mentioned relate to the 235-isotope content of the materials. The UK and the USA have agreed that the parties to a particular supply agreement may decide on higher enrichment of uranium to be used for research reactors, material testing reactors or for other research purposes. The USA has also agreed to make available to the Agency such additional supplies as would match in amount

  7. New JMTR irradiation test plan on fuels and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Sasajima, Hideo; Ogiyanagi, Jin; Nakamura, Jinichi; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In order to maintain and enhance safety of light water reactors (LWRs) in long-term and up-graded operations, proper understanding of irradiation behavior of fuels and materials is essentially important. Japanese government and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have decided to refurbish the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and to install new tests rigs, in order to play an active role for solving irradiation related issues on plant aging and high-duty uses of the current LWRs and on development of next-generation reactors. New tests on fuel integrity under simulated abnormal transients and high-duty irradiation conditions are planned in the JMTR. Power ramp tests of newdesign fuel rods will also be performed in the first stage of the program, which is expected to start in year 2011 after refurbishment of the JMTR. Combination of the JMTR tests with simulated reactivity initiated accident tests in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and loss of coolant accident tests in hot laboratories would serve as the integrated fuel safety research on the high performance fuels at extended burnups, covering from the normal to the accident conditions, including abnormal transients. For the materials irradiation, fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steels are being studied in addition to basic irradiation behavior of nuclear materials such as hafnium. The irradiation studies would contribute not only to solve the current problems but also to identify possible seeds of troubles and to make proactive responses. (author)

  8. Irradiation probe and laboratory for irradiated material evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutny, S.; Kupca, L.; Beno, P.; Stubna, M.; Mrva, V.; Chmelo, P.

    1975-09-01

    The survey and assessment are given of the tasks carried out in the years 1971 to 1975 within the development of methods for structural materials irradiation and of a probe for the irradiation thereof in the A-1 reactor. The programme and implementation of laboratory tests of the irradiation probe are described. In the actual reactor irradiation, the pulse tube length between the pressure governor and the irradiation probe is approximately 20 m, the diameter is 2.2 mm. Temperature reaches 800 degC while the pressure control system operates at 20 degC. The laboratory tests (carried out at 20 degC) showed that the response time of the pressure control system to a stepwise pressure change in the irradiation probe from 0 to 22 at. is 0.5 s. Pressure changes were also studied in the irradiation probe and in the entire system resulting from temperature changes in the irradiation probe. Temperature distribution in the body of the irradiation probe heating furnace was determined. (B.S.)

  9. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  10. What destiny could be given to the nuclear irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundim, S.G.

    1985-01-01

    The uranium used in nuclear plants in the production of electric energy is not totally consumed. Part of the fuel that is left over is composed of radioactive material, that represents great danger to earth life. The destines that could be given to the irradiated fuel - reprocessing, provisional or definite storage - depend on the policy adopted by each country that enters the nuclear era, being involved in this increasing problem. (Author) [pt

  11. Transportation of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brobst, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty years of almost accident-free transport of nuclear materials is pointed to as evidence of a fundamentally correct approach to the problems involved. The increased volume and new technical problems in the future will require extension of these good practices in both regulations and packaging. The general principles of safety in the transport of radioactive materials are discussed first, followed by the transport of spent fuel and of radioactive waste. The security and physical protection of nuclear shipments is then treated. In discussing future problems, the question of public understanding and acceptance is taken first, thereafter transport safeguards and the technical bases for the safety regulations. There is also said to be a need for a new technology for spent fuel casks, while a re-examination of the IAEA transport standards for radiation doses is recommended. The IAEA regulations regarding quality assurance are said to be incomplete, and more information is required on correlations between engineering analysis, scale model testing and full scale crash testing. Transport stresses on contents need to be considered while administrative controls have been neglected. (JIW)

  12. Design and construction of an irradiation apparatus with controlled atmosphere and temperature for radiation damage evaluation of nuclear materials in the IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucki, Georgi; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Castanheira, Myrthes; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac; Teodoro, Celso Antonio; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Damy, Margaret de Almeida

    2005-01-01

    A material irradiation apparatus CIMAT (Capsula de Irradiacao de Materiais) with controlled temperature and atmosphere is described. The device was specifically designed to perform experiments inside the core of the IEA-R1 swimming pool reactor and allows fast neutron (E=1 MeV) irradiations of multiple miniature metallic samples at temperature between 100 deg C and 500 deg C, in Argon or Helium atmosphere to inhibit corrosion. The aim of CIMAT is to make a comparative assessment of Radiation Embrittlement (RE) on the AS 508 cl.3 steel, of different origins (ELETROMETAL-Brazil and VITCOVICE-Chekia) used in Pressure Vessels (PV) of PWR, for fluence of 10 exp 19 nvt at 300 C, by means of mechanical post irradiation evaluation. Previous characterization of non-irradiated samples of these materials is presented. In situ electrical and magnetic measurements, at high temperatures, are foreseen to be made with this apparatus. Extensive temperature stability and leak-tightness tests performed in the reactor swimming pool have proven the CIMAT to be intrinsically safe and operational. (author)

  13. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  14. Needs of in-situ materials testing under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Hishinuma, A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    Under neutron irradiation, the component atoms of materials are displaced as primary knock-on atoms, and the energy of the primary knock-on atoms is consumed by electron excitation and nuclear collision. Elementary irradiation defects accumulate to form damage structure including voids and bubbles. In situ test under neutron irradiation is necessary for investigating into the effect of irradiation on creep behavior, the electric properties of ceramics, transport phenomena and so on. The in situ test is also important to investigate into the phenomena related to the chemical reaction with environment during irradiation. Accelerator type high energy neutron sources are preferable to fission reactors. In this paper, the needs and the research items of in situ test under neutron irradiation using a D-Li stripping type high energy neutron source on metallic and ceramic materials are described. Creep behavior is one of the most important mechanical properties, and depends strongly on irradiation environment, also it is closely related to microstructure. Irradiation affects the electric conductibity of ceramics and also their creep behavior. In this way, in situ test is necessary. (K.I.)

  15. Discrimination of source reactor type by multivariate statistical analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopic concentrations in unknown irradiated nuclear fuel material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robel, Martin; Kristo, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The problem of identifying the provenance of unknown nuclear material in the environment by multivariate statistical analysis of its uranium and/or plutonium isotopic composition is considered. Such material can be introduced into the environment as a result of nuclear accidents, inadvertent processing losses, illegal dumping of waste, or deliberate trafficking in nuclear materials. Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition were analyzed using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA) of the concentrations of nine U and Pu isotopes in fuel as a function of burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of (234)U and (236)U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was incorporated. The U and Pu were also analyzed separately, with results that suggest that, even after reprocessing or environmental fractionation, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the source reactor type and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination.

  16. New trends in nuclear fuel experimental irradiation. Modern control and acquisition of the irradiation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, M.; Ciocanescu, M.; Ana, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    With the irradiation devices used in the irradiation tests, the following experiments have been performed in TRIGA-SCN reactor: a) In capsule-type irradiation devices: - fission gases composition determination; - dimensional measurements; - fission gases pressure measurement; - power pre-ramp and ramp; - power cycling; - structural materials testing. b) In loop-type irradiation device: - power ramp; - multiple power ramps; - overpower. Aiming to develop irradiation tests for advanced nuclear fuel elements, it is mandatory to increase the maximum neutron flux in the core with about 20%. This will lead to reactor power increase up to 21 MW. This objective can be reached through: - increasing the number of fuel clusters in the reactor core; - using the 6x6 fuel cluster to replace the present 5x5 clusters; - relocation of the control rods. In this context, the new control system and the data acquisition system operates online and allows real-time data evaluation. (author)

  17. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials

  18. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.; Wang, Lumin; Hess, Nancy J.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials

  19. Study of nuclear material accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruderman, H.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of deliberate diversion of nuclear materials on materials accounting, the validity of the MUF concept to establish assurance concerning the possible diversion of special nuclear materials, and an economic analysis to permit cost comparison of varying the inventory frequency are being studied. An inventory cost model, the statistical hypothesis testing approach, the game theoretic approach, and analysis of generic plants are considered

  20. Low cycle fatigue of irradiated LMFBR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    A review of low cycle fatigue data on irradiated LMFBR materials was conducted and extensive graphical representations of available data are presented. Representative postirradiation tensile properties of annealed 304 and 316 SS are selected and employed in several predictive methods to estimate irradiated material fatigue curves. Experimental fatigue data confirm the use of predictive methods for establishing conservative design curves over the range of service conditions relevant to such CRBRP components as core former, fixed radial shielding, core barrel, lower inlet module and upper internals structures. New experimental data on fatigue curves and creep-fatigue interaction in irradiated 20 percent cold worked (CW) 316 SS and Alloy 718 would support the design of removable radial shielding and upper internals in CRBRP. New experimental information on notched fatigue behavior and cyclic stress-strain curves of all these materials in the irradiated condition could provide significant design data

  1. Global nuclear material control model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of a disposition program for special nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool that treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. Such a tool must represent the fundamental data, information, and capabilities of the fuel cycle including an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, and a framework supportive of national or international perspective. They have developed a prototype global nuclear material management and control systems analysis capability, the Global Nuclear Material Control (GNMC) model. The GNMC model establishes the framework for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material

  2. Mechanical properties of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.; Robach, J.; Wirth, B.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of metals is considered with particular attention being paid to the development of defect-free channels following uniaxial tensile loading. The in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique is coupled with dislocation dynamic computer simulations to reveal the fundamental processes governing the elimination of defects by glissile dislocations. The observations of preliminary experiments are reported.(author)

  3. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  4. In-service irradiated and aged material evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this task is to provide a direct assessment of actual material properties in irradiated components of nuclear reactors, including the effects of irradiation and aging. Four activities are currently in progress: (1) establishing a machining capability for contaminated or activated materials by completing procurement and installation of a computer-based milling machine in a hot cell; (2) machining and testing specimens from cladding materials removed from the Gundremmingen reactor to establish their fracture properties; (3) preparing an interpretive report on the effects of neutron irradiation on cladding; and (4) continuing the evaluation of long-term aging of austenitic structural stainless steel weld metal by metallurgically examining and testing specimens aged at 288 and 343 degrees C and reporting the results, as well as by continuing the aging of the stainless steel cladding toward a total time of 50,000 h

  5. Determination of material irradiation parameters. Required accuracies and available methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerles, J.M.; Mas, P.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports some main methods to determine the nuclear parameters of material irradiation in testing reactor (nuclear power, burn-up, fluxes, fluences, ...). The different methods (theoretical or experimental) are reviewed: neutronics measurements and calculations, gamma scanning, thermal balance, ... The required accuracies are reviewed: they are of 3-5% on flux, fluences, nuclear power, burn-up, conversion factor, ... These required accuracies are compared with the real accuracies available which are at the present time of order of 5-20% on these parameters

  6. New materials in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi

    1988-01-01

    In the autumn of 1987, the critical condition was attained in the JET in Europe and Japanese JT-60, thus the first subject in the physical verification of nuclear fusion reactors was resolved, and the challenge to the next attainment of self ignition condition started. As the development process of nuclear fusion reactors, there are the steps of engineering, economical and social verifications after this physical verification, and in respective steps, there are the critical problems related to materials, therefore the development of new materials must be advanced. The condition of using nuclear fusion reactors is characterized by high fluence, high thermal flux and strong magnetic field, and under such extreme condition, the microscopic structures of materials change, and they behave much differently from usual case. The subjects of material development for nuclear fusion reactors, the material data base being built up, the materials for facing plasma and high thermal flux, first walls, blanket structures, electric insulators and others are described. The serious effect of irradiation and the rate of defect inducement must be taken in consideration in the structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. (Kako, I.)

  7. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    Each Site Team, consisting of M ampersand O contractor and Operations Office personnel, performed data collection and identified ES ampersand H concerns relative to RINM storage by preparing responses to the detailed question set for each storage facility at the site. These responses formed the basis for the Site Team reports. These reports are contained in this volume and are from the following facilities: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site, Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Demonstration Project Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, General Atomics, San Diego, Babcock ampersand Wilcox, Lynchburg Technical Center, Argonne National Laboratory - East, Naval Reactors Facilities, Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, Ohio, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory. This volume also contains information received from the sites that were not visited. These sites include the Naval Reactor Facility at the INEL, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, The Catholic University of America, Rocky Flats Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, Energy Technology Engineering Center, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Information received through the Chicago Operations Office for University Reactors, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory is also included. Materials contained in this volume consist of information, data and site documents. They are unedited

  8. Radiation damage in nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.

    2000-01-01

    Final disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear waste is usually envisioned in some sort of ceramic material. The physical and chemical properties of host materials for nuclear waste can be altered by internal radiation and consequently their structural integrity can be jeopardized. Assessment of long-term performance of these ceramic materials is therefore vital for a safe and successful disposal. This paper presents an overview of studies on several possible candidate materials for immobilization of fission products and actinides, such as spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ), perovskite (CaTiO 3 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 ). The basic microscopic picture of radiation damage in ceramics consists of atomic displacements and ionization. In many cases these processes result in amorphization (metaminctization) of irradiated material. The evolution of microscopic structure during irradiation leads to various macroscopic radiation effects. The connection between microscopic and macroscopic picture is in most cases at least qualitatively known and studies of radiation induced microscopic changes are therefore an essential step in the design of a reliable nuclear waste host material. The relevance of these technologically important results on our general understanding of radiation damage processes and on current research efforts in Slovenia is also addressed. (author)

  9. Structural material irradiations in FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA); instrumentation and control system; MOTA neutronic data; pressurized tube specimens; stress-rupture measurements for reactor materials; miniature specimen design; the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell at the FFTF; support services; and general information concerning the FFTF

  10. Nuclear materials inventory plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, R.W.; Nichols, D.H.

    1982-03-01

    In any processing, manufacturing, or active storage facility it is impractical to assume that any physical security system can prevent the diversion of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). It is, therefore, the responsibility of any DOE Contractor, Licensee, or other holder of SNM to provide assurance that loss or diversion of a significant quantity of SNM is detectable. This ability to detect must be accomplishable within a reasonable time interval and can be accomplished only by taking physical inventories. The information gained and decisions resulting from these inventories can be no better than the SNM accounting system and the quality of measurements performed for each receipt, removal and inventory. Inventories interrupt processing or production operations, increase personnel exposures, and can add significantly to the cost of any operation. Therefore, realistic goals for the inventory must be defined and the relationship of the inherent parameters used in its validation be determined. Purpose of this document is to provide a statement of goals and a plan of action to achieve them

  11. Nondestructive assay methods for irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Crane, T.W.; Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Lee, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report is a review of the status of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods used to determine burnup and fissile content of irradiated nuclear fuels. The gamma-spectroscopy method measures gamma activities of certain fission products that are proportional to the burnup. Problems associated with this method are migration of the fission products and gamma-ray attenuation through the relatively dense fuel material. The attenuation correction is complicated by generally unknown activity distributions within the assemblies. The neutron methods, which usually involve active interrogation and prompt or delayed signal counting, are designed to assay the fissile content of the spent-fuel elements. Systems to assay highly enriched spent-fuel assemblies have been tested extensively. Feasibility studies have been reported of systems to assay light-water reactor spent-fuel assemblies. The slowing-down spectrometer and neutron resonance absorption methods can distinguish between the uranium and plutonium fissile contents, but they are limited to the assay of individual rods. We have summarized the status of NDA techniques for spent-fuel assay and present some subjects in need of further investigation. Accuracy of the burnup calculations for power reactors is also reviewed

  12. Illicit diversion of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bett, F.L.

    1975-08-01

    This paper discusses the means of preventing illegal use of nuclear material by terrorists or other sub-national groups and by governments. With respect to sub-national groups, it concludes that the preventive measures of national safeguards systems, when taken together with the practical difficulties of using nuclear material, would make the diversion and illegal use of nuclear material unattractive in comparison with other avenues open to these groups to attain their ends. It notes that there are only certain areas in the nuclear fuel cycle, e.g. production of some types of nuclear fuel embodying highly enriched uranium and shipment of strategically significant nuclear material, which contain material potentially useful to these groups. It also discusses the difficult practical problems, e.g. coping with radiation, which would face the groups in making use of the materials for terrorist purposes. Concerning illegal use by Governments, the paper describes the role of international safeguards, as applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the real deterrent effect of these safeguards which is achieved through the requirements to maintain comprehensive operating records of the use of nuclear material and by regular inspections to verify these records. The paper makes the point that Australia would not consider supplying nuclear material unless it were subject to international safeguards. (author)

  13. Nuclear material control in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velilla, A.

    1988-01-01

    A general view about the safeguards activities in Spain is presented. The national system of accounting for and control of nuclear materials is described. The safeguards agreements signed by Spain are presented and the facilities and nuclear materials under these agreements are listed. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Nuclear material control in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzo, M.A.S.; Iskin, M.C.L.; Palhares, L.C.; Almeida, S.G. de.

    1988-01-01

    A general view about the safeguards activities in Brazil is presented. The national system of accounting for and control of nuclear materials is described. The safeguards agreements signed by Brazil are presented, the facilities and nuclear material under these agreements are listed, and the dificulties on the pratical implementation are discussed. (E.G.) [pt

  15. CONTRIBUTION OF HANARO IRRADIATION TECHNOLOGIES TO NATIONAL NUCLEAR R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEE NAM CHOO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available HANARO is a multipurpose research reactor located at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI. Since the commencement of its operation in 1995, various neutron irradiation facilities, such as rabbit irradiation facilities, fuel test loop (FTL facilities, capsule irradiation facilities, and neutron transmutation doping (NTD facilities, have been developed and actively utilized for various nuclear material irradiation tests requested by users from research institutes, universities, and industries. Most irradiation tests have been related to national R&D relevant to present nuclear power reactors such as the ageing management and safety evaluation of the components. Based on the accumulated experience as well as the sophisticated requirements of users, HANARO has recently supported national R&D projects relevant to new nuclear systems including the System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART, research reactors, and future nuclear systems. This paper documents the current state and utilization of irradiation facilities in HANARO, and summarizes ongoing research efforts to deploy advanced irradiation technology.

  16. Comparison of material irradiation conditions for fusion, spallation, stripping and fission neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Selection and development of materials capable of sustaining irradiation conditions expected for a future fusion power reactor remain a big challenge for material scientists. Design of other nuclear facilities either in support of the fusion materials testing program or for other scientific purposes presents a similar problem of irradiation resistant material development. The present study is devoted to an evaluation of the irradiation conditions for IFMIF, ESS, XADS, DEMO and typical fission reactors to provide a basis for comparison of the data obtained for different material investigation programs. The results obtained confirm that no facility, except IFMIF, could fit all user requirements imposed for a facility for simulation of the fusion irradiation conditions

  17. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to −80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use. - Highlights: ► A study is performed to quantify low temperature irradiation effects on polymer materials and BIs. ► Low temperature irradiation alters the balance of cross-linking and chain scissoning in polymers. ► Low temperatures provide radioprotection for BIs. ► Benefits of low temperatures are application specific and must be considered when dose setting.

  18. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear-waste-package structural-barrier materials. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250 0 C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a 60 Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10 6 rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300 0 C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90 0 C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking

  19. Nuclear materials management storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The Office of Weapons and Materials Planning (DP-27) requested the Planning Support Group (PSG) at the Savannah River Site to help coordinate a Departmental complex-wide nuclear materials storage study. This study will support the development of management strategies and plans until Defense Programs' Complex 21 is operational by DOE organizations that have direct interest/concerns about or responsibilities for nuclear material storage. They include the Materials Planning Division (DP-273) of DP-27, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Facilities (DP-60), the Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (DP-40), and other program areas, including Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). To facilitate data collection, a questionnaire was developed and issued to nuclear materials custodian sites soliciting information on nuclear materials characteristics, storage plans, issues, etc. Sites were asked to functionally group materials identified in DOE Order 5660.1A (Management of Nuclear Materials) based on common physical and chemical characteristics and common material management strategies and to relate these groupings to Nuclear Materials Management Safeguards and Security (NMMSS) records. A database was constructed using 843 storage records from 70 responding sites. The database and an initial report summarizing storage issues were issued to participating Field Offices and DP-27 for comment. This report presents the background for the Storage Study and an initial, unclassified summary of storage issues and concerns identified by the sites

  20. The construction of irradiated material examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Lee, Key Soon; Herr, Young Hoi

    1990-03-01

    A detail design of the examination process, the hot cell facility and the annexed facility of the irradiated material examination facility (IMEF) which will be utilized to examine and evaluate physical and mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated materials, has been performed. Also a start-up work of the underground structure construction has been launched out. The project management and tasks required for the license application were duly carried out. The resultant detail design data will be used for the next step. (author)

  1. Polymeric materials obtained by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, M.; Moraru, R.; Martin, D.; Radoiu, M.; Marghitu, S.; Oproiu, C.

    1995-01-01

    Research activities in the field of electron beam irradiation of monomer aqueous solution to produce polymeric materials used for waste waters treatment, agriculture and medicine are presented. The technologies and special features of these polymeric materials are also described. The influence of the chemical composition of the solution to ba irradiated, absorbed dose level and absorbed dose rate level are discussed. Two kinds of polyelectrolytes, PA and PV types and three kinds of hydrogels, pAAm, pAAmNa and pNaAc types, the production of which was first developed with IETI-10000 Co-60 source and then adapted to the linacs built in Accelerator Laboratory, are described. (author)

  2. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10 21 to 10 22 n/cm 2

  3. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  4. Post irradiation examinations on HTTR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Haruyuki; Ohmi, Masao; Eto, Motokuni; Watanabe, Katsutoshi

    1995-01-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) is being constructed at Oarai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In order to develop necessary materials for the HTTR, after irradiations in the JMTR, PIEs are being carried out on these materials in the JMTRHL (JMTR Hot Laboratory). Impact test, tensile test, fatigue test, creep test, metallography and so on were performed for irradiated 2 1/4Cr 1Mo steel as the pressure vessel material and Alloy 800H as the cladding material of the control rod. A fatigue testing machine and four creep testing machines newly designed were fabricated and installed in the steel cells in order to evaluate the integrity of the HTTR materials. The development process and PIE results obtained with these machines are given in this paper

  5. Nuclear measurements and reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the JRC programs on nuclear data, nuclear metrology, nuclear reference materials and non-nuclear reference materials. Budget restrictions and personnel difficulties were encountered during 1987. Fission properties of 235 U as a function of neutron energy and of the resonances can be successfully described on the basis of a three exit channel fission model. Double differential neutron emission cross-sections were accomplished on 7 Li and were started for the tritium production cross-section of 9 Be. Reference materials of uranium minerals and ores were prepared. Special nuclear targets were prepared. A batch of 250 g of Pu0 2 was characterized in view of certification as reference material for the elemental assay of plutonium

  6. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  7. Radiation damage studies of nuclear structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.

    2012-01-01

    Maximum utilization of fuel in nuclear reactors is one of the important aspects for operating them economically. The main hindrance to achieve this higher burnups of nuclear fuel for the nuclear reactors is the possibility of the failure of the metallic core components during their operation. Thus, the study of the cause of the possibility of failure of these metallic structural materials of nuclear reactors during full power operation due to radiation damage, suffered inside the reactor core, is an important field of studies bearing the basic to industrial scientific views.The variation of the microstructure of the metallic core components of the nuclear reactors due to radiation damage causes enormous variation in the structure and mechanical properties. A firm understanding of this variation of the mechanical properties with the variation of microstructure will serve as a guide for creating new, more radiation-tolerant materials. In our centre we have irradiated structural materials of Indian nuclear reactors by charged particles from accelerator to generate radiation damage and studied the some aspects of the variation of microstructure by X-ray diffraction studies. Results achieved in this regards, will be presented. (author)

  8. Materials for the nuclear - Modelling and simulation of structure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Cappelaere, Chantal; Andrieux, Catherine; Athenes, Manuel; Baldinozzi, Guido; Bechade, Jean-Luc; Bonin, Bernard; Boutard, Jean-Louis; Brechet, Yves; Bruneval, Fabien; Carassou, Sebastien; Castelier, Etienne; Chartier, Alain; Clouet, Emmanuel; Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin; Crocombette, Jean-Paul; Dupuy, Laurent; Forget, Pierre; Fu, Chu Chun; Garnier, Jerome; Gelebart, Lionel; Henry, Jean; Jourdan, Thomas; Luneville, Laurence; Marini, Bernard; Meslin, Estelle; Nastar, Maylise; Onimus, Fabien; Poussard, Christophe; Proville, Laurent; Ribis, Joel; Robertson, Christian; Rodney, David; Roma, Guido; Sauzay, Maxime; Simeone, David; Soisson, Frederic; Tanguy, Benoit; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Trocellier, Patrick; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Ventelon, Usa; Vincent, Ludovic; Willaime, Francois; Yvon, Pascal; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This collective publication proposes presentations of scientific approaches implemented to model and simulate the behaviour of materials submitted to irradiation, of associated experimental methods, and of some recent important results. After an introduction presenting the various materials used in different types of nuclear reactors (PWR, etc.), the effects of irradiation at the macroscopic or at the atomic scale, and the multi-scale (time and space) approach to the modelling of these materials, a chapter proposes an overview of modelling tools: multi-scale approach, electronic calculations for condensed matter, inter-atomic potentials, molecular dynamics simulation, thermodynamic and medium force potentials, phase diagrams, simulation of primary damages in reactor materials, kinetic models, dislocation dynamics, production of microstructures for simulation, crystalline visco-plasticity, homogenization methods in continuum mechanics, local approach and probabilistic approach in material fracture. The next part presents tools for experimental validation: tools for microscopic characterization or for mechanical characterization, experimental reactors and tests in atomic pile, tools for irradiation by charged particles. The next chapters presents different examples of thermodynamic and kinetic modelling in the case of various alloys (zirconium alloys, iron-chromium alloys, silicon carbide, austenitic alloys), of plasticity and failure modelling

  9. Shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    The shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility is based upon one-, two- and three-dimensional transport calculations with experimental measurements utilized to refine the nuclear data including the neutron cross sections from 20 to 50 MeV and the gamma ray and neutron source terms. The high energy neutrons and deuterons produce activation products from the numerous reactions that are kinematically allowed. The analyses for both beam-on and beam-off (from the activation products) conditions have required extensive nuclear data libraries and the utilization of Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates, point kernel and auxiliary computer codes

  10. Passive nondestructive assay of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, D.; Ensslin, N.; Smith, H. Jr.; Kreiner, S.

    1991-03-01

    The term nondestructive assay (NDA) is applied to a series of measurement techniques for nuclear fuel materials. The techniques measure radiation induced or emitted spontaneously from the nuclear material; the measurements are nondestructive in that they do not alter the physical or chemical state of the nuclear material. NDA techniques are characterized as passive or active depending on whether they measure radiation from the spontaneous decay of the nuclear material or radiation induced by an external source. This book emphasizes passive NDA techniques, although certain active techniques like gamma-ray absorption densitometry and x-ray fluorescence are discussed here because of their intimate relation to passive assay techniques. The principal NDA techniques are classified as gamma-ray assay, neutron assay, and calorimetry. Gamma-ray assay techniques are treated in Chapters 1--10. Neutron assay techniques are the subject of Chapters 11--17. Chapters 11--13 cover the origin of neutrons, neutron interactions, and neutron detectors. Chapters 14--17 cover the theory and applications of total and coincidence neutron counting. Chapter 18 deals with the assay of irradiated nuclear fuel, which uses both gamma-ray and neutron assay techniques. Chapter 19 covers perimeter monitoring, which uses gamma-ray and neutron detectors of high sensitivity to check that no unauthorized nuclear material crosses a facility boundary. The subject of Chapter 20 is attribute and semiquantitative measurements. The goal of these measurements is a rapid verification of the contents of nuclear material containers to assist physical inventory verifications. Waste and holdup measurements are also treated in this chapter. Chapters 21 and 22 cover calorimetry theory and application, and Chapter 23 is a brief application guide to illustrate which techniques can be used to solve certain measurement problems

  11. Irradiation facilities for materials research: IFMIF and small scale installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlado, J. M.; Victoria, M.

    2007-01-01

    The research of advance materials in nuclear fields such as new fission reactors (Generation-IV), Accelerator Driven Systems for Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes and Nuclear Fusion, is becoming very much common in the types of low activation and radiation resistant Materials. Ferritic-Martensitic Steels (based in 9-12 Cr) with or without Oxide Dispersion Techniques (Ytria Nanoparticles), Composites materials are becoming the new generation to answer requirements of high temperature, high radiation resistance of structural materials. Special dedication is appearing in general research programmes to this area of Materials. The understanding of their final performance needs a wider knowledge of the mechanisms of radiation damage in these materials from the atomistic scale to the macroscopic responses. New extensive campaigns are being funded to irradiate from simple elements to model alloys and finally the complex materials themselves. That sequence and its state of art will be presented One clear technique for that understanding is the Multi scale Modelling which includes simulation techniques from quantum mechanics, molecular dynamics, defects diffusion, mesoscopic modelling and finally the macroscopic constitutive relations for macroscopic analysis. However, in each one of these steps is necessary a systematic and well established program of experiments that combines the irradiation and the very detailed analysis with techniques such as Transmission Electron Microscope, Positron Annihilation, SIMS, Atom Probe, Nanoindebntation. A key aspect that wants to be presented in this work is the state of art and discussion of Irradiation Facilities for Materials studies. Those facilities goes from ion implantation sources, small accelerator, Experimental Reactors such High Flux Reactor, sophisticated Triple Beams Sources as JANNUS in France to generate at the same time displacements-hydrogen-helium, and projected very large neutron installation such as IFMIF. The role to

  12. Materials. The Argentine nuclear policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasser, H.

    1982-01-01

    Part A of the volume contains a literature search on proliferation and the Third World and on the nuclear technology of Argentina. The materials in part B are divided in: 1. Nonproliferation discussion and the Third World. 2. Development and state of nuclear technology in Argentina. 3. Argentina's international contacts in the field of nuclear energy 1. Federal Republic of Germany, 2. Soviet Union, 3. Brazil. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  14. Stochastic simulation of destruction processes in self-irradiated materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Patsahan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-irradiation damages resulting from fission processes are common phenomena observed in nuclear fuel containing (NFC materials. Numerous α-decays lead to local structure transformations in NFC materials. The damages appearing due to the impacts of heavy nuclear recoils in the subsurface layer can cause detachments of material particles. Such a behaviour is similar to sputtering processes observed during a bombardment of the material surface by a flux of energetic particles. However, in the NFC material, the impacts are initiated from the bulk. In this work we propose a two-dimensional mesoscopic model to perform a stochastic simulation of the destruction processes occurring in a subsurface region of NFC material. We describe the erosion of the material surface, the evolution of its roughness and predict the detachment of the material particles. Size distributions of the emitted particles are obtained in this study. The simulation results of the model are in a qualitative agreement with the size histogram of particles produced from the material containing lava-like fuel formed during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster.

  15. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  16. Microbial biofilm growth on irradiated, spent nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, D.F.; Frank, S.M.; Roberto, F.F.; Pinhero, P.J.; Johnson, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 x 10 3 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments

  17. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, David Andrew

    2016-01-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • Evaluation and modeling of light water reactor accident tolerant fuel concepts • Status and results of recent TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiations, post-irradiation examinations, high-temperature safety testing to demonstrate the accident performance of this fuel system, and advanced microscopy to improve the understanding of fission product transport in this fuel system. • Improvements in and applications of meso and engineering scale modeling of light water reactor fuel behavior under a range of operating conditions and postulated accidents (e.g., power ramping, loss of coolant accident, and reactivity initiated accidents) using the MARMOT and BISON codes. • Novel measurements of the properties of nuclear (actinide) materials under extreme conditions, (e.g. high pressure, low/high temperatures, high magnetic field) to improve the scientific understanding of these materials. • Modeling reactor pressure vessel behavior using the GRIZZLY code. • New methods using sound to sense temperature inside a reactor core. • Improved experimental capabilities to study the response of fusion reactor materials to a tritium plasma. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at Idaho National Laboratory, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  18. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • Evaluation and modeling of light water reactor accident tolerant fuel concepts • Status and results of recent TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiations, post-irradiation examinations, high-temperature safety testing to demonstrate the accident performance of this fuel system, and advanced microscopy to improve the understanding of fission product transport in this fuel system. • Improvements in and applications of meso and engineering scale modeling of light water reactor fuel behavior under a range of operating conditions and postulated accidents (e.g., power ramping, loss of coolant accident, and reactivity initiated accidents) using the MARMOT and BISON codes. • Novel measurements of the properties of nuclear (actinide) materials under extreme conditions, (e.g. high pressure, low/high temperatures, high magnetic field) to improve the scientific understanding of these materials. • Modeling reactor pressure vessel behavior using the GRIZZLY code. • New methods using sound to sense temperature inside a reactor core. • Improved experimental capabilities to study the response of fusion reactor materials to a tritium plasma. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at Idaho National Laboratory, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  19. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  20. Uncontrolled transport of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassermann, U.

    1985-01-01

    An account is given of international transport of plutonium, uranium oxides, uranium hexafluoride, enriched uranium and irradiated fuel for reprocessing. Referring to the sinking of the 'Mont Louis', it is stated that the International Maritime Organization has been asked by the National Union of Seamen and 'Greenpeace' to bar shipment of radioactive material until stricter international safety regulations are introduced. (U.K.)

  1. Gamma irradiation technology for composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Guillermo R; Gonzalez, Maria E.

    2003-01-01

    A composite of sugar cane bagasse and low-density polyethylene was prepared. Gamma -radiation of Cobalt-60 (Co 60 ) and reactive additives were used, to make compatible the lignocellulosic fibers with the polymeric matrix. Gamma-radiation was applied in different stages with different purposes: a) Irradiation of cellulosic fibers treated or not with reactive additive, in presence of air, to produce macro radicals increasing their reactivity during extrusion with polyethylene. A homogeneous and fusible material resulted that can be used as raw material in thermoforming processes with cost in between that of its constitutive elements; b) Irradiation of final products, to produce the cross-linking of polymeric chains. The fibers remain trapped in the cross-linked matrix. A homogeneous and infusible material with high mechanical properties was obtained. (author)

  2. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  3. Material input of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rissanen, S.; Tarjanne, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Material Input (MI) of nuclear fuel, expressed in terms of the total amount of natural material needed for manufacturing a product, is examined. The suitability of the MI method for assessing the environmental impacts of fuels is also discussed. Material input is expressed as a Material Input Coefficient (MIC), equalling to the total mass of natural material divided by the mass of the completed product. The material input coefficient is, however, only an intermediate result, which should not be used as such for the comparison of different fuels, because the energy contents of nuclear fuel is about 100 000-fold compared to the energy contents of fossil fuels. As a final result, the material input is expressed in proportion to the amount of generated electricity, which is called MIPS (Material Input Per Service unit). Material input is a simplified and commensurable indicator for the use of natural material, but because it does not take into account the harmfulness of materials or the way how the residual material is processed, it does not alone express the amount of environmental impacts. The examination of the mere amount does not differentiate between for example coal, natural gas or waste rock containing usually just sand. Natural gas is, however, substantially more harmful for the ecosystem than sand. Therefore, other methods should also be used to consider the environmental load of a product. The material input coefficient of nuclear fuel is calculated using data from different types of mines. The calculations are made among other things by using the data of an open pit mine (Key Lake, Canada), an underground mine (McArthur River, Canada) and a by-product mine (Olympic Dam, Australia). Furthermore, the coefficient is calculated for nuclear fuel corresponding to the nuclear fuel supply of Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) company in 2001. Because there is some uncertainty in the initial data, the inaccuracy of the final results can be even 20-50 per cent. The value

  4. Reliability of structural materials in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1996-01-01

    The reliability of nuclear installations is a fundamental point for the exploitation of nuclear energy. It requires an extensive knowledge of the behaviour of materials in the operating conditions and during the expected service life of the installations. In nuclear power plants multiple risks of failure can exist and are expressed by corrosion and deformation phenomena or by modification in the mechanical characteristics of materials. The knowledge of the evolution with time of a given material requires to take into account the data relative to the material itself, to its environment and to the physical conditions of this environment. The study of materials aging needs a more precise knowledge of the kinetics of phenomena at any scale and of their interactions, and a micro- or macro-modeling of their behaviour during long periods of time. This paper gives an overview of the aging phenomena that occur in the structural materials involved in PWR and fast neutron reactors: thermal aging, generalized corrosion, corrosion under constraint, intergranular corrosion, crack growth under loading, wear, irradiation etc.. (J.S.)

  5. Nuclear fuel cladding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahigashi, Shigeo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To largely improve the durability and the safety of fuel cladding material. Constitution: Diffusion preventive layers, e.g., aluminum or the like are covered on both sides of a zirconium alloy base layer of thin material, and corrosion resistant layers, e.g., copper or the like are covered thereon. This thin plate material is intimately wound in a circularly tubular shape in a plurality of layers to form a fuel cladding tube. With such construction, corrosion of the tube due to fuel and impurity can be prevented by the corrosion resistant layers, and the diffusion of the corrosion resistant material to the zirconium alloy can be prevented by the diffusion preventive layers. Since a plurality of layers are cladded, even if the corrosion resistant layers are damaged or cracked due to stress corrosion, only one layer is damaged or cracked, but the other layers are not affected. (Sekiya, K.)

  6. Self-organization in irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimenko, N.N.; Dzhamanbalin, K.K.; Medetov, N.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: By the present time a great deal of experimental material concerning self-organization in irradiated materials is stored. It means that in different materials (single crystal and amorphous semiconductor, metals, polymers) during one process of irradiation with accelerated particles or energetic quanta the structure previously disordered can be reordered to the previous or different order. These processes are considered separately from the processes of radiation-stimulated ordering when the renewal of the structure occurs as the result of extra irradiation, sometimes accompanied with another influence (heating, lighting, application of mechanical tensions). The processes of reordering are divided into two basic classes: the reconstruction of crystalline structure (1) and the formation of space-ordered system (2). The processes of ordering are considered with the use of synergetic approach and are analyzed conformably to the concrete conditions of new order appearance process realization in order to reveal the self-organization factor's role. The concrete experimental results of investigating of the radiation ordering processes are analyzed for different materials: semiconductor, metals, inorganic dielectrics, polymers. The ordering processes are examined from the point of their possible use in the technology of creating nano-dimensional structures general and quantum-dimensional ones in particular

  7. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop fundamental understanding and predictive models of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels, as well as an understanding of the effects of these radiation-induced solid-state changes on dissolution kinetics (i.e., radionuclide release). The research performed during the duration of this project has addressed many of the scientific issues identified in the reports of two DOE panels [1,2], particularly those related to radiation effects on the structure of glasses and ceramics. The research approach taken by this project integrated experimental studies and computer simulations to develop comprehensive fundamental understanding and capabilities for predictive modeling of radiation effects and dissolution kinetics in both glasses and ceramics designed for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste (HLW), plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, other actinides, and other highly radioactive waste streams. Such fundamental understanding is necessary in the development of predictive models because all experimental irradiation studies on nuclear waste materials are ''accelerated tests'' that add a great deal of uncertainty to predicted behavior because the damage rates are orders of magnitude higher than the actual damage rates expected in nuclear waste materials. Degradation and dissolution processes will change with damage rate and temperature. Only a fundamental understanding of the kinetics of all the physical and chemical processes induced or affected by radiation will lead to truly predictive models of long-term behavior and performance for nuclear waste materials. Predictive models of performance of nuclear waste materials must be scientifically based and address both radiation effects on structure (i.e., solid-state effects) and the effects of these solid-state structural changes on dissolution kinetics. The ultimate goal of this

  8. Transport of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During november and december 2001, 2 events concerning nuclear transport were reported and classified on the first grade (grade 1) of the INES scale. The first event concerns a hole in a transport cask of contaminated tools. The hole seems to have been made by the fork of a handling equipment. The second event concerns the loss of a parcel containing a technetium generator, this generator represented an activity of about 141 G Becquerel of 99 Mo the day it left the premises of CIS-bio in Saclay. (A.C.)

  9. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  10. Introduction to nuclear material safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroi, Hideo

    1986-01-01

    This article is aimed at outlining the nuclear material safeguards. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was established in 1957 and safeguards inspection was started in 1962. It is stressed that any damage resulting from nuclear proliferation would be triggered by a human intentional act. Various measures have been taken by international societies and nations, of which the safeguards are the only means which relay mainly on technical procedures. There are two modes of diversing nuclear materials to military purposes. One would be done by national intension while the other by indivisulas or expert groups, i.e., sub-national intention. IAEA is responsible for the prevention of diversification by nations, for which the international safeguards are being used. Measures against the latter mode of diversification are called nuclear protection, for which each nation is responsible. The aim of the safeguards under the Nonproliferation Treaty is to detect the diversification of a significant amount of nuclear materials from non-military purposes to production of nuclear explosion devices such as atomic weapons or to unidentified uses. Major technical methods used for the safeguards include various destructive and non-destructive tests as well as containment and monitoring techniques. System techniques are to be employed for automatic containment and monitoring procedures. Appropriate nuclear protection system techniques should also be developed. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  12. Physical protection of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Full text: An Advisory Group met to consider the up-dating and extension of the Recommendations for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, produced in 1972. Twenty-seven experts from 11 countries and EURATOM were present. Growing concern has been expressed in many countries that nuclear material may one day be used for acts of sabotage or terrorism. Serious attention is therefore being given to the need for States to develop national systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials during use, storage and transport throughout the nuclear fuel cycle which should minimize risks of sabotage or theft. The revised Recommendations formulated by the Advisory Group include new definitions of the objectives of national systems of physical protection and proposals for minimizing possibilities of unauthorized removal and sabotage to nuclear facilities. The Recommendations also describe administrative or organizational steps to be taken for this purpose and the essential technical requirements of physical protection for various types and locations of nuclear material, e.g., the setting up of protected areas, the use of physical barriers and alarms, the need for security survey, and the need of advance arrangements between the States concerned in case of international transportation, among others. (author)

  13. Innovative nuclear fuels and applications. Part 1: limits of today's fuels and concepts for innovative fuels. Part 2: materials properties, irradiation performance and gaps in our knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    2000-01-01

    Part I of this contribution on innovative nuclear fuels gives a summary of current developments and problems of today's fuels, i.e. enriched UO 2 and UO 2 with a few % of PUO 2 (MOX fuel) or Gd 2 O 3 (as burnable neutron poison). The problems and property changes caused by high burnups (e.g. degradation of the thermal conductivity, polygonization or formation of the rim-structure) are discussed. Subsequently, the concepts for new fuels to burn excess Pu and to achieve an effective transmutation of the minor actinides Np, Am and Cm are treated. The criteria for the choice of suitable fuels and different fuel types (high Pu-content fuels, nitrides, U-free fuels, inert matrix supported fuels, cercers, cermets, etc.) are discussed. Part II of this contribution on innovative nuclear fuels deals with the properties of relevance of the different materials suggested to be used in innovative fuels which range from pure actinide fuel such as PuN and AmO 2 to spinel MgAl 2 O 4 and zircon ZrSiO 4 for inert matrix-based fuels, etc. The available knowledge on materials research aspects is summarized with emphasis on the physics of radiation damage. It is shown that significant gaps in the present knowledge exist, e.g. for the minor actinide compounds, and suggestions are made to fill these gaps in order to achieve a sufficient data base to design and operate suitable innovative fuels in a near future. (author)

  14. Nuclear prehistory influence on irradiated metallic iron phase composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    With application of different Moessbauer spectroscopy applications the phase composition of metallic iron after irradiation by both neutrons and charged particles were studied. Irradiation conditions, method of targets examination and phase composition of samples after irradiation were presented in tabular form. It is shown, that phase composition of irradiated metal is defined by nuclear prehistory. So, in a number of cases abnormals (stabilization of high- and low-temperature structural phases of iron at room temperature after irradiation end) were revealed

  15. Atomistic Simulations of Small-scale Materials Tests of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chan Sun; Jin, Hyung Ha; Kwon, Jun Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of materials properties under neutron irradiation is one of the key issues affecting the lifetime of nuclear reactors. Evaluating the property changes of materials due to irradiations and understanding the role of microstructural changes on mechanical properties are required for ensuring reliable and safe operation of a nuclear reactor. However, high dose of neuron irradiation capabilities are rather limited and it is difficult to discriminate various factors affecting the property changes of materials. Ion beam irradiation can be used to investigate radiation damage to materials in a controlled way, but has the main limitation of small penetration depth in the length scale of micro meters. Over the past decade, the interest in the investigations of size-dependent mechanical properties has promoted the development of various small-scale materials tests, e.g. nanoindentation and micro/nano-pillar compression tests. Small-scale materials tests can address the issue of the limitation of small penetration depth of ion irradiation. In this paper, we present small-scale materials tests (experiments and simulation) which are applied to study the size and irradiation effects on mechanical properties. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation and nanopillar compression tests. These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials

  16. Segmented fuel irradiation program: investigation on advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, H.; Goto, K.; Sabate, R.; Abeta, S.; Baba, T.; Matias, E. de; Alonso, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Segmented Fuel Irradiation Program, started in 1991, is a collaboration between the Japanese organisations Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) representing other Japanese utilities, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI); and the Spanish Organisations Empresa Nacional de Electricidad, S.A. (ENDESA) representing A.N. Vandellos 2, and Empresa Nacional Uranio, S.A. (ENUSA); with the collaboration of Westinghouse. The objective of the Program is to make substantial contribution to the development of advanced cladding and fuel materials for better performance at high burn-up and under operational power transients. For this Program, segmented fuel rods were selected as the most appropriate vehicle to accomplish the aforementioned objective. Thus, a large number of fuel and cladding combinations are provided while minimising the total amount of new material, at the same time, facilitating an eventual irradiation extension in a test reactor. The Program consists of three major phases: phase I: design, licensing, fabrication and characterisation of the assemblies carrying the segmented rods (1991 - 1994); phase II: base irradiation of the assemblies at Vandellos 2 NPP, and on-site examination at the end of four cycles (1994-1999). Phase III: ramp testing at the Studsvik facilities and hot cell PIE (1996-2001). The main fuel design features whose effects on fuel behaviour are being analysed are: alloy composition (MDA and ZIRLO vs. Zircaloy-4); tubing texture; pellet grain size. The Program is progressing satisfactorily as planned. The base irradiation is completed in the first quarter of 1999, and so far, tests and inspections already carried out are providing useful information on the behaviour of the new materials. Also, the Program is delivering a well characterized fuel material, irradiated in a commercial reactor, which can be further used in other fuel behaviour experiments. The paper presents the main

  17. Nuclear material shipment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Radioactive Material Transport Assessment Study is expected to provide a flexible set of capabilities and useful information to the public, industry and government users by using a system design to assure obtaining high quality data from selected industry sources at acceptable cost. It is expected that the shipping record approach coupled with an efficient sampling strategy will accomplish this. The study is also designed to yield analytical capabilities and statistical output to serve public, industry and government users. The information provided by the study will make a valuable contribution to environmental and accident risk assessment, policy development and operational planning and management activities

  18. A Path Forward to Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Spectroscopic Calorimetry of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The goal is to relieve the shortage of thermodynamic and kinetic information concerning the stability of nuclear fuel alloys. Past studies of the ternary nuclear fuel UPuZr have demonstrated constituent redistribution when irradiated or with thermal treatment. Thermodynamic data is key to predicting the possibilities of effects such as constituent redistribution within the fuel rods and interaction with cladding materials

  19. The century of nuclear materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Lou; Was, Gary S.; Zinkle, Steve; Petti, David; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2018-03-01

    In the spring of 1959 the well-read metallurgist would have noticed the first issue of an infant Journal, one dedicated to a unique and fast growing field of materials issues associated with nuclear energy systems. The periodical, Journal of Nuclear Materials (JNM), is now the leading publication in the field from which it takes its name, thriving beyond the rosiest expectations of its founders. The discipline is well into the second half-century. During that time much has been achieved in nuclear materials; the Journal provides the authoritative record of virtually all those accomplishments. These pages introduce the 500th volume, a significant measure in the world of publishing. The Editors reflect on the progress in the field and the role of this journal.

  20. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  1. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Dennis R [Oakland, CA; Pohl, Bertram A [Berkeley, CA; Dougan, Arden D [San Ramon, CA; Bernstein, Adam [Palo Alto, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA; Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  2. Nuclear data information system for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji; Utsumi, Misako

    1996-01-01

    The conceptual system for nuclear material design is considered and some trials on WWW server with functions of the easily accessible simulation of nuclear reactions are introduced. Moreover, as an example of the simulation on the system using nuclear data, transmutation calculation was made for candidate first wall materials such as 9Cr-2W steel, V-5Cr-5Ti and SiC in SUS316/Li 2 O/H 2 O(SUS), 9Cr-2W/Li 2 O/H 2 O(RAF), V alloy/Li/Be(V), and SiC/Li 2 ZrO 3 /He(SiC) blanket/shield systems based on ITER design model. Neutron spectrum varies with different blanket/shield compositions. The flux of low energy neutrons decreases in order of V< SiC< RAF< SUS blanket/shield systems. Fair amounts of W depletion in 9Cr-2W steel and the increase of Cr content in V-5Cr-5Ti were predicted in SUS or RAF systems. Concentration change in W and Cr is estimated to be suppressed if Li coolant is used in place of water. Helium and hydrogen production are not strongly affected by the different blanket/shield compositions. (author)

  3. Materials science for nuclear detection

    OpenAIRE

    Peurrung, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The increasing importance of nuclear detection technology has led to a variety of research efforts that seek to accelerate the discovery and development of useful new radiation detection materials. These efforts aim to improve our understanding of how these materials perform, develop formalized discovery tools, and enable rapid and effective performance characterization. We provide an overview of these efforts along with an introduction to the history, physics, and taxonomy of radiation detec...

  4. Tests on irradiated magnet-insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmunk, R.E.; Miller, L.G.; Becker, H.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion-reactor coils, located in areas where they will be only partially shielded, must be fabricated from materials which are as resistant to radiation as possible. They will probably incorporate resistive conductors with either water or cryogenic cooling. Inorganic insulators have been recommended for these situations, but the possibility exists that some organic insulators may be usuable as well. Results were previously reported for irradiation and testing of three glass reinforced epoxies: G-7, G-10, and G-11. Thin disks of these materials, nominally 0.5 mm thick by 11.1 mm diameter, were tested in compressive fatigue, a configuration and loading which represents reasonably well the magnet environment. In that work G-10 was shown to withstand repeated loading to moderately high stress levels without failure, and the material survived better at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature

  5. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  6. Nuclear Material (Offences) Act 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The main purpose of this Act is to enable the United Kingdom to ratify the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material which opened for signature at Vienne and New York on 3 March 1980. The Act extends throughout the United Kingdom. (NEA) [fr

  7. International control of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, Hannu

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear materials are subject to both national and international safeguards control. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) takes care of the international safeguards control. The control activities, which are discussed in this article, are carried out according to the agreements between various countries and the IAEA

  8. Responsible stewardship of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannum, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to tap the massive energy potential of nuclear fission was first developed as a weapon to end a terrible world war. Nuclear fission is also a virtually inexhaustible energy resource, and is the only energy supply in certain areas in Russia, Kazakhstan and elsewhere. The potential link between civilian and military applications has been and continues to be a source of concern. With the end of the Cold War, this issue has taken a dramatic turn. The U.S. and Russia have agreed to reduce their nuclear weapons stockpiles by as much as two-thirds. This will make some 100 tonnes of separated plutonium and 500 tonnes of highly enriched uranium available, in a form that is obviously directly usable for weapons. The total world inventory of plutonium is now around 1000 tonnes and is increasing at 60-70 tonnes per year. There is even more highly enriched uranium. Fortunately the correct answer to what to do with excess weapons material is also the most attractive. It should be used and reused as fuel for fast reactors. Material in use (particularly nuclear material) is very easy to monitor and control, and is quite unattractive for diversion. Active management of fissile materials not only makes a major contribution to economic stability and well-being, but also simplifies accountability, inspection and other safeguards processes; provides a revenue stream to pay for the necessary safeguards; and, most importantly, limits the prospective world inventory of plutonium to only that which is used and useful

  9. Nuclear and hazardous material perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, Gary M.; Kunze, Jay F.; Rogers, Vern C.

    2007-01-01

    The reemerging nuclear enterprise in the 21. century empowering the power industry and nuclear technology is still viewed with fear and concern by many of the public and many political leaders. Nuclear phobia is also exhibited by many nuclear professionals. The fears and concerns of these groups are complex and varied, but focus primarily on (1) management and disposal of radioactive waste [especially spent nuclear fuel and low level radioactive waste], (2) radiation exposures at any level, and (3) the threat nuclear terrorism. The root cause of all these concerns is the exaggerated risk perceived to human health from radiation exposure. These risks from radiation exposure are compounded by the universal threat of nuclear weapons and the disastrous consequences if these weapons or materials become available to terrorists or rogue nations. This paper addresses the bases and rationality for these fears and considers methods and options for mitigating these fears. Scientific evidence and actual data are provided. Radiation risks are compared to similar risks from common chemicals and familiar human activities that are routinely accepted. (authors)

  10. Studies on gamma irradiated rubber materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, I. B.; Stelescu, M. D.; Cutrubinis, M.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the increase in use and production of polymer materials, there is a constant pressure of finding a solution to more environmental friendly composites. Beside the constant effort of recycling used materials, it seems more appropriate to manufacture and use biodegradable and renewable row materials. Natural polymers like starch, cellulose, lignin etc are ideal for preparing biodegradable composites. Some of the dynamic markets that use polymer materials are the food and pharmaceutical industries. Because of their desinfastation and sometimes sterility requirements, different treatment processes are applied, one of it being radiation treatment. The scope of this paper is to analyze the mechanical behaviour of rubber based materials irradiated with gamma rays at four medium doses, 30.1 kGy, 60.6 kGy, 91 kGy and 121.8 kGy. The objectives are the following: to identify the optimum radiation dose in order to obtain a good mechanical behaviour and to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material when adding different quantities of natural filler (20 phr, 60 phr and 100 phr).

  11. Proceedings of the second international conference on advances in nuclear materials: abstract booklet and souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear materials form special class of materials which either act as fuel for the nuclear reactors or form the structure of the reactors and the allied systems. The topics covered in this conference are: materials challenges for thermal and fast reactors, technological advances in nuclear fuels and components, materials for future reactors, fuel cycles and materials challenges, materials degradation and life management, advanced materials development, modelling and simulation, advanced materials- II, advanced materials for future reactors, development of advanced fuel and structural materials, zirconium alloy developments, irradiation effects and PIE, advanced nuclear fuels, corrosion and materials characterization. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. A new materials irradiation facility at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yanagita, S.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Tsujimoto, H.; Kozuka, T.; Kamae, K.; Mishima, K.; Shiroya, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new materials irradiation facility with improved control capabilities has been installed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Several deficiencies of conventional fission neutron material irradiation systems have been corrected. The specimen temperature is controlled both by an electric heater and by the helium pressure in the irradiation tube without exposure to neutrons at temperatures different from the design test conditions. The neutron spectrum is varied by the irradiation position. Irradiation dose is changed by pulling the irradiation capsule up and down during irradiation. Several characteristics of the irradiation field were measured. The typical irradiation intensity is 9.4x10 12 n/cm 2 s (>0.1 MeV) and the irradiation temperature of specimens is controllable from 363 to 773 K with a precision of ±2 K

  13. Nuclear material statistical accountancy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentest, F.; Casilli, T.; Franklin, M.

    1979-01-01

    The statistical accountancy system developed at JRC Ispra is refered as 'NUMSAS', ie Nuclear Material Statistical Accountancy System. The principal feature of NUMSAS is that in addition to an ordinary material balance calcultation, NUMSAS can calculate an estimate of the standard deviation of the measurement error accumulated in the material balance calculation. The purpose of the report is to describe in detail, the statistical model on wich the standard deviation calculation is based; the computational formula which is used by NUMSAS in calculating the standard deviation and the information about nuclear material measurements and the plant measurement system which are required as data for NUMSAS. The material balance records require processing and interpretation before the material balance calculation is begun. The material balance calculation is the last of four phases of data processing undertaken by NUMSAS. Each of these phases is implemented by a different computer program. The activities which are carried out in each phase can be summarised as follows; the pre-processing phase; the selection and up-date phase; the transformation phase, and the computation phase

  14. Calculation simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for dispersion nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wei; Zhao Yunmei; Gong Xin; Ding Shurong; Huo Yongzhong

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion nuclear fuel was regarded as a kind of special particle composites. Assuming that the fuel particles are periodically distributed in the dispersion nuclear fuel meat, the finite element model to calculate its equivalent irradiation swelling was developed with the method of computational micro-mechanics. Considering irradiation swelling in the fuel particles and the irradiation hardening effect in the metal matrix, the stress update algorithms were established respectively for the fuel particles and metal matrix. The corresponding user subroutines were programmed, and the finite element simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for the fuel meat was performed in Abaqus. The effects of the particle size and volume fraction on the equivalent irradiation swelling were investigated, and the fitting formula of equivalent irradiation swelling was obtained. The results indicate that the main factors to influence equivalent irradiation swelling of the fuel meat are the irradiation swelling and volume fraction of fuel particles. (authors)

  15. Nuclear materials facility safety initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.; Nelson, P.; Roundhill, M.; Jardine, L.J.; Lazarev, L.; Moshkov, M.; Khromov, V.V.; Kruchkov, E.; Bolyatko, V.; Kazanskij, Yu.; Vorobeva, I.; Lash, T.R.; Newton, D.; Harris, B.

    2000-01-01

    Safety in any facility in the nuclear fuel cycle is a fundamental goal. However, it is recognized that, for example, should an accident occur in either the U.S. or Russia, the results could seriously delay joint activities to store and disposition weapons fissile materials in both countries. To address this, plans are underway jointly to develop a nuclear materials facility safety initiative. The focus of the initiative would be to share expertise which would lead in improvements in safety and safe practices in the nuclear fuel cycle.The program has two components. The first is a lab-to-lab initiative. The second involves university-to-university collaboration.The lab-to-lab and university-to-university programs will contribute to increased safety in facilities dealing with nuclear materials and related processes. These programs will support important bilateral initiatives, develop the next generation of scientists and engineers which will deal with these challenges, and foster the development of a safety culture

  16. Selection of materials in nuclear fuel: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Reja, C.; Fuentes, L.; Garcia de la Infanta, J. M.; Munoz Sicilia, A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main aspects of the nuclear fuel is the selection of materials for the components. The operating conditions of the fuel elements impose a major challenge to materials: high temperature, corrosive aqueous environment, high mechanical properties, long periods of time under these extreme conditions and what is the differentiating factor; the effect of irradiation. The materials are selected to fulfill these severe requirements and also to be able to control and to predict its behavior in the working conditions. Their development, in terms of composition and processing, is based on the continuous follow-up of the operation behavior. Many of these materials are specific of the nuclear industry, such as the uranium dioxide and the zirconium alloys. This article presents the selection and development of the nuclear fuel materials as a function of the services requirements. It also includes a view of the new nuclear fuels materials that are being raised after Fukushima accident. (Author)

  17. Consolidation equipment for irradiated nuclear fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Ose, T.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed and put into use a new type of mechanical consolidation equipment for irradiated nuclear fuel channels. This includes round-slice cutting of the top 100mm of the fuel channel with a guillotine cutter, and press cutting of the two corners of the remaining length of the fuel channel. Four guillotine blades work in combination with receiving blades arranged inside the fuel channel to cut the top 100mm, including the clips and spacers, of the fuel channel into a round slice. A press assembled in the consolidation equipment then presses the slice to achieve volume reduction. The press cutting operation uses two press cutting blades arranged inside the fuel channel and the receiving blades outside the fuel channel. The remaining length of fuel channel is cut off into L-shaped pieces by press cutting. This consolidation equipment is highly efficient because the round-slice cutting, pressing, and press cutting are all achieved by one unit

  18. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  19. Applying RFID technology in nuclear materials management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Chen, K.; Liu, Y.; Norair, J.P.; Bellamy, S.; Shuler, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) of US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM), Office of Safety Management and Operations (EM-60), has developed a radio frequency identification (RFID) system for the management of nuclear materials. Argonne National Laboratory, a PCP supporting laboratory, and Savi Technology, a Lockheed Martin Company, are collaborating in the development of the RFID system, a process that involves hardware modification (form factor, seal sensor and batteries), software development and irradiation experiments. Savannah River National Laboratory and Argonne will soon field test the active RFID system on Model 9975 drums, which are used for storage and transportation of fissile and radioactive materials. Potential benefits of the RFID system are enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real time access of status and history data, and overall cost effectiveness

  20. Current investigations of packaging materials used for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiszer, W.

    1996-01-01

    The article reviews current investigations of packaging materials applied for food irradiation. The increasing role of various synthetic materials is described. Author reviews radiation-induced damages in these materials. The article includes the list of materials accepted for food packaging and subsequent irradiation with different doses

  1. Simulation of the welding of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hua Tay

    1989-07-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted using the ''tritium trick'' technique to levels of 0.18, 2.5, 27, 105 and 256 atomic part per million (appm) for type 316 stainless steel, and 0.3 and 1 appm for Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr-1MoVW). Both full penetration as well as partial penetration welds were then produced on control and helium-containing materials using the autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under full constraint conditions. For full penetration welds, both materials were successfully welded when they contained less than 0.3 appm helium. However, welds of both materials, when containing greater than 1 appm helium, were found to develop cracks during cooling of the weld. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the HAZ cracking was caused by the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. This cracking occurred as a result of the combination of high temperatures and high shrinkage tensile stresses. The cracking in the fusion zone was found to result from the precipitation of helium along dendrite interfaces. A model based on the kinetics of diffusive cavity growth is presented to explain the observed results. The model proposes a helium bubble growth mechanism which leads to final intergranular rupture in the heat-affected zone. Results of the present study demonstrate that the use of conventional fusion welding techniques to repair materials degraded by exposure to irradiation environments may be difficult if the irradiation results in the generation of helium equal to or greater than 1 appm

  2. Workshop on materials irradiation effects and applications 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qiu; Sato, Koichi; Yoshiie, Toshimasa

    2013-01-01

    For the study of the material irradiation effects, irradiation fields with improved control capabilities, advanced post irradiation experiments and well developed data analyses are required. This workshop aims to discuss new results and to plan the future irradiation research in the KUR. General meeting was held from December 14, 2012 to December 15, 2012 with 44 participants and 28 papers were presented. Especially recent experimental results using irradiation facilities in the KUR such as Materials Controlled Irradiation Facility, Low Temperature Loop and LINAC, and results of computer simulation, and fruitful discussions were performed. This volume contains the summary and selected transparencies presented in the meeting. (author)

  3. Special nuclear material simulation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, John H.; DeMint, Amy; Gooch, Jack; Hawk, Todd; Pickett, Chris A.; Blessinger, Chris; York, Robbie L.

    2014-08-12

    An apparatus for simulating special nuclear material is provided. The apparatus typically contains a small quantity of special nuclear material (SNM) in a configuration that simulates a much larger quantity of SNM. Generally the apparatus includes a spherical shell that is formed from an alloy containing a small quantity of highly enriched uranium. Also typically provided is a core of depleted uranium. A spacer, typically aluminum, may be used to separate the depleted uranium from the shell of uranium alloy. A cladding, typically made of titanium, is provided to seal the source. Methods are provided to simulate SNM for testing radiation monitoring portals. Typically the methods use at least one primary SNM spectral line and exclude at least one secondary SNM spectral line.

  4. Evaluation method for change of concentration of nuclear fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyono, Takeshi; Ando, Ryohei.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of evaluating the change of concentration of compositions of nuclear fuel element materials loaded to a reactor along with neutron irradiation based on analytic calculation not relying on integration with time. Namely, the method of evaluating the change of concentration of nuclear fuel materials comprises evaluating the changing concentration of nuclear fuel materials based on nuclear fission, capturing of neutrons and radioactive decaying along with neutron irradiation. In this case, an optional nuclide on a nuclear conversion chain is determined as a standard nuclide. When the main fuel material is Pu-239, it is determined as the standard nuclide. The ratio of the concentration of the standard nuclide to that of the nuclide as an object of the evaluation can be expressed by the ratio of the cross sectional area of neutron nuclear reaction of the standard nuclide to the cross sectional area of the neutron nuclear reaction of the nuclide as the object of the evaluation. Accordingly, the concentration of the nuclide as the object of the evaluation can be expressed by an analysis formula shown by an analysis function for the ratio of the concentration of the standard nuclide to the cross section of the neutron nuclear reaction. As a result, by giving an optional concentration of the standard nuclide to the analysis formula, the concentration of each of other nuclides can be determined analytically. (I.S.)

  5. 10 CFR 74.51 - Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for strategic special nuclear material. 74.51 Section 74.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Formula Quantities of Strategic Special Nuclear...

  6. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    The second panel on the Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials was organized for two purposes: first, to advise the Seibersdorf Laboratory of the Agency on its future programme, and second, to review the results of the Second International Comparison of routine analysis of trace impurities in uranium and also the action taken as a result of the recommendations of the first panel in 1962. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Nuclear reactors: physics and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G

    2005-07-01

    In the form of a tutorial addressed to non-specialists, the article provides an introduction to nuclear reactor technology and more specifically to Light Water Reactors (LWR); it also shows where materials and chemistry problems are encountered in reactor technology. The basics of reactor physics are reviewed, as well as the various strategies in reactor design and the corresponding choices of materials (fuel, coolant, structural materials, etc.). A brief description of the various types of commercial power reactors follows. The design of LWRs is discussed in greater detail; the properties of light water as coolant and moderator are put in perspective. The physicochemical and metallurgical properties of the materials impose thermal limits that determine the performance and the maximum power a reactor can deliver. (author)

  8. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

  9. Control of nuclear material specified equipment and specified material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The goal and application field of NE 2.02 regulatory guide of CNEN (Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear), are described. This regulatory guide is about nuclear material management, specified equipment and specified material. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Better materials for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy /materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear systems comprising fuels, structural materials, moderators and coolants are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring - induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques, in-reactor degradation mechanisms, and in-service inspection. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. New challenges are thrown to material scientists for the development of materials suitable for high temperature reactors, which have a potential for providing primary heat for thermo chemical dissociation of water. Development of several ceramic materials, carbon based materials, dissimilar

  11. Control of Nuclear Materials and Special Equipment (Nuclear Safety Regulations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizmek, A.; Prah, M.; Medakovic, S.; Ilijas, B.

    2008-01-01

    Based on Nuclear Safety Act (OG 173/03) the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) in 2008 adopted beside Ordinance on performing nuclear activities (OG 74/06) and Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety (OG 74/06) the new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (OG 15/08). Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment lays down the list of nuclear materials and special equipment as well as of nuclear activities covered by the system of control of production of special equipment and non-nuclear material, the procedure for notifying the intention to and filing the application for a license to carry out nuclear activities, and the format and contents of the forms for doing so. This Ordinance also lays down the manner in which nuclear material records have to be kept, the procedure for notifying the State administration organization (regulatory body) responsible for nuclear safety by the nuclear material user, and the keeping of registers of nuclear activities, nuclear material and special equipment by the State administration organization (regulatory body) responsible for nuclear safety, as well as the form and content of official nuclear safety inspector identification card and badge.(author)

  12. Calcium phosphate nuclear materials: apatitic ceramics for separated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpena, J.; Lacout, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Is it feasible to elaborate conditioning materials for separated high activity nuclear wastes, as actinides or fission products? Specific materials have been elaborated so that the waste is incorporated within the crystalline structure of the most stable calcium phosphate, i.e. apatite. This mineral is able to sustain high irradiation doses assuming a well chosen chemical composition. Mainly two different ways of synthesis have been developed to produce hard apatite ceramics that can be used to condition nuclear wastes. Here we present a data synthesis regarding the elaboration of these apatite nuclear materials that includes experiments on crystallo-chemistry, chemical analysis, leaching and irradiation tests performed for the past fifteen years. (authors)

  13. Nuclear reactor structural material forming less radioactive corrosion product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide nuclear reactor structural materials forming less radioactive corrosion products. Constitution: Ni-based alloys such as inconel alloy 718, 600 or inconel alloy 750 and 690 having excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical property even in coolants at high temperature and high pressure have generally been used as nuclear reactor structural materials. However, even such materials yield corrosion products being attacked by coolants circulating in the nuclear reactor, which produce by neutron irradiation radioactive corrosion products, that are deposited in primary circuit pipeways to constitute exposure sources. The present invention dissolves dissolves this problems by providing less activating nuclear reactor structural materials. That is, taking notice on the fact that Ni-58 contained generally by 68 % in Ni changes into Co-58 under irradiation of neutron thereby causing activation, the surface of nuclear reactor structural materials is applied with Ni plating by using Ni with a reduced content of Ni-58 isotopes. Accordingly, increase in the radiation level of the nuclear reactor structural materials can be inhibited. (K.M.)

  14. Modelling irradiation effects in fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Dudarev, S.; Boutard, J.L.; Diegele, E.; Laesser, R.; Almazouzi, A.; Caturla, M.J.; Fu, C.C.; Kaellne, J.; Malerba, L.; Nordlund, K.; Perlado, M.; Rieth, M.; Samaras, M.; Schaeublin, R.; Singh, B.N.; Willaime, F.

    2007-01-01

    We review the current status of the European fusion materials modelling programme. We describe recent findings and outline potential areas for future development. Large-scale density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the structure of the point defects in α-Fe, and highlight the crucial part played by magnetism. The calculations give accurate migration energies of point defects and the strength of their interaction with He atoms. Kinetic models based on DFT results reproduce the stages of radiation damage recovery in iron, and stages of He-desorption from pre-implanted iron. Experiments aimed at validating the models will be carried out in the future using a multi-beam ion irradiation facility chosen for its versatility and rapid feedback

  15. Modelling irradiation effects in fusion materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Dudarev, S. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB, UK and Department of Physics, Imperial College, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Boutard, J.L. [EFDA-CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: jean-louis.boutard@tech.efda.org; Diegele, E.; Laesser, R. [EFDA-CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Almazouzi, A. [Structural Materials Expert Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Caturla, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, 03690 San Vicente de Raspeig (Spain); Fu, C.C. [Service de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Kaellne, J. [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Malerba, L. [Structural Materials Expert Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-Tekes, Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 43, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Perlado, M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rieth, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Samaras, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schaeublin, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Singh, B.N. [Department of Materials Research, Risoe National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Willaime, F. [Service de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15

    We review the current status of the European fusion materials modelling programme. We describe recent findings and outline potential areas for future development. Large-scale density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the structure of the point defects in {alpha}-Fe, and highlight the crucial part played by magnetism. The calculations give accurate migration energies of point defects and the strength of their interaction with He atoms. Kinetic models based on DFT results reproduce the stages of radiation damage recovery in iron, and stages of He-desorption from pre-implanted iron. Experiments aimed at validating the models will be carried out in the future using a multi-beam ion irradiation facility chosen for its versatility and rapid feedback.

  16. Irradiation of Parts of the X-Gen Nuclear Fuel Assembly made by KNF in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, K. N.; Cho, M. S.; Shin, Y. T.; Kim, B. G.; Lee, S. H.; Eom, K. B.

    2008-01-01

    An instrumented capsule has been developed at HANARO (High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) for the neutron irradiation tests of materials. The capsule system has been actively utilized for the various material irradiation tests requested by users from research institutes, universities, and the industries. As a preliminary test, some specimens made of the parts of a nuclear fuel assembly were inserted in the 05M-07U instrumented capsule and successfully irradiated at HANARO. Based on the results and experience, a new irradiation capsule of 07M-13N was designed, fabricated, and irradiated at HANARO for the evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the parts of the X-Gen nuclear fuel assembly made by KNF (Korea Nuclear Fuel). Specimens such as bucking and spring test specimens of spacer grid, microstructure and tensile test specimens of welded parts, tensile, irradiation growth and spring test specimens made of HANA tube, Zirlo, Zircaloy-4 and Inconel-718 were placed in the capsule. The capsule was loaded into the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output and the specimens were irradiated at 295 - 460 .deg. C up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.2x10 21 (n/cm 2 ) (E>1.0MeV)

  17. Overall viscoplastic behavior of non-irradiated porous nuclear ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monerie, Yann; Gatt, Jean-Marie

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the overall behavior of nonlinear viscous and porous nuclear ceramics. Bi-viscous isotropic porous materials are considered: the matrix is subjected to two power-law viscosities with different exponents related to two stationary temperature-activated creeping mechanisms (scattering-creep and dislocation-creep), and this matrix contains a low porosity volume fraction. The overall behavior of these types of composite materials is obtained with the help of quadratic strain-rate potentials combined with experimental-based coupling function depending on stress and temperature. For each creeping mechanism, the hollow sphere model of [Michel, J.-C., Suquet, P., 1992. The constitutive law of nonlinear viscous and porous materials. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 40, 783-812] is used. Mechanical parameters of the resulting model are identified and validated in the particular case of non-irradiated uranium dioxide nuclear ceramics. This model predicts, under pure thermo-mechanical loading, a variation of the material volume and a variation of the porosity volume fraction (the so-called densification or swelling). (authors)

  18. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed an enormous development in chemical analysis. The rapid progress of nuclear energy, of solid-state physics and of other fields of modern industry has extended the concept of purity to limits previously unthought of, and to reach the new dimensions of these extreme demands, entirely new techniques have been invented and applied and old ones have been refined. Recognizing these facts, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Panel on Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials to discuss the general problems facing the analytical chemist engaged in nuclear energy development, particularly in newly developing centre and countries, to analyse the represent situation and to advise as to the directions in which research and development appear to be most necessary. The Panel also discussed the analytical programme of the Agency's laboratory at Seibersdorf, where the Agency has already started a programme of international comparison of analytical methods which may lead to the establishment of international standards for many materials of interest. Refs and tabs

  19. Nuclear materials for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.; Schumacher, G.

    1992-01-01

    This volume brings together 47 papers from scientists involved in the fabrication of new nuclear fuels, in basic research of nuclear materials, their application and technology as well as in computer codes and modelling of fuel behaviour. The main emphasis is on progress in the development of non -oxide fuels besides reporting advances in the more conventional oxide fuels. The two currently performed large reactor safety programmes CORA and PHEBUS-FP are described in invited lectures. The contributions review basic property measurements, as well as the present state of fuel performance modelling. The performance of today's nuclear fuel, hence UO 2 , at high burnup is also reviewed with particular emphasis on the recently observed phenomenon of grain subdivision in the cold part of the oxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called 'rim' effect. Similar phenomena can be simulated by ion implantation in order to better elucidate the underlying mechanism and reviews on high resolution electron microscopy provide further information. The papers will provide a useful treatise of views, ideas and new results for all those scientists and engineers involved in the specific questions of current nuclear waste management

  20. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  1. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettger, H.; Hardt, P. von der; Tas, A.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to January 1981

  2. An analysis of irradiation creep in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Hacker, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear graphite under load shows remarkably high creep ductility with neutron irradiation, well in excess of any strain experienced in un-irradiated graphite (and additional to any dimensional changes that would occur without stress). As this behaviour compensates, to some extent, some other irradiation effects such as thermal shutdown stresses, it is an important property. This paper briefly reviews the approach to irradiation creep in the UK, described by the UK Creep Law. It then offers an alternative analysis of irradiation creep applicable to most situations, including HTR systems, using AGR moderator graphite as an example, to high values of neutron fluence, applied stress and radiolytic weight loss. (authors)

  3. Nuclear Materials Stewardship Within the DOE Environmental Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyeu, J. D.; Kiess, T. E.; Gates, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has made significant progress in planning disposition of its excess nuclear materials and has recently completed several noteworthy studies. Since establishment in 1997, the EM Nuclear Material Stewardship Program has developed disposition plans for excess nuclear materials to support facility deactivation. All nuclear materials have been removed from the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (Mound), and disposition planning is nearing completion for the Fernald Environmental Management Project and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Only a few issues remain for materials at the Hanford and Idaho sites. Recent trade studies include the Savannah River Site Canyons Nuclear Materials Identification Study, a Cesium/Strontium Management Alternatives Trade Study, a Liquid Technical Standards Trade Study, an Irradiated Beryllium Reflectors with Tritium study, a Special Performance Assessment Required Trade Study, a Neutron Source Trade Study, and development of discard criteria for uranium. A Small Sites Workshop was also held. Potential and planned future activities include updating the Plutonium-239 storage study, developing additional packaging standards, developing a Nuclear Material Disposition Handbook, determining how to recover or dispose of Pu-244 and U-233, and working with additional sites to define disposition plans for their nuclear materials

  4. Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radle, James E.; Archer, Daniel E.; Carter, Robert J.; Mullens, James Allen; Mihalczo, John T.; Britton, Charles L. Jr.; Lind, Randall F.; Wright, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System (FNMIS), funded by the NA-241 Office of Dismantlement and Transparency, provides information to determine the material attributes and identity of heavily shielded nuclear objects. This information will provide future treaty participants with verifiable information required by the treaty regime. The neutron interrogation technology uses a combination of information from induced fission neutron radiation and transmitted neutron imaging information to provide high confidence that the shielded item is consistent with the host's declaration. The combination of material identification information and the shape and configuration of the item are very difficult to spoof. When used at various points in the warhead dismantlement sequence, the information complimented by tags and seals can be used to track subassembly and piece part information as the disassembly occurs. The neutron transmission imaging has been developed during the last seven years and the signature analysis over the last several decades. The FNMIS is the culmination of the effort to put the technology in a usable configuration for potential treaty verification purposes.

  5. Protection and control of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalouneix, J.; Winter, D.

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the French regulation on nuclear materials possession, the first liability is the one of operators who have to know at any time the quantity, quality and localization of any nuclear material in their possession. This requires an organization of the follow up and of the inventory of these materials together with an efficient protection against theft or sabotage. The French organization foresees a control of the implementation of this regulation at nuclear facilities and during the transport of nuclear materials by the minister of industry with the sustain of the institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN). This article presents this organization: 1 - protection against malevolence; 2 - national protection and control of nuclear materials: goals, administrative organization, legal and regulatory content (authorization, control, sanctions), nuclear materials protection inside facilities (physical protection, follow up and inventory, security studies), protection of nuclear material transports (physical protection, follow up), control of nuclear materials (inspection at facilities, control of nuclear material measurements, inspection of nuclear materials during transport); 3 - international commitments of France: non-proliferation treaty, EURATOM regulation, international convention on the physical protection of nuclear materials, enforcement in France. (J.S.)

  6. Complete Report on the Development of Welding Parameters for Irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The advanced welding facility at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which was conceived to enable research and development of weld repair techniques for nuclear power plant life extension, is now operational. The development of the facility and its advanced welding capabilities, along with the model materials for initial welding trials, were funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, with additional support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Welding of irradiated materials was initiated on November 17, 2017, which marked a significant step in the development of the facility and the beginning of extensive welding research and development campaigns on irradiated materials that will eventually produce validated techniques and guidelines for weld repair activities carried out to extend the operational lifetimes of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years. This report summarizes the final steps that were required to complete weld process development, initial irradiated materials welding activities, near-term plans for irradiated materials welding, and plans for post-weld analyses that will be carried out to assess the ability of the advanced welding processes to make repairs on irradiated materials.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation on glass ceramics as pressure-less joining materials for SiC based components for nuclear applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferraris, M.; Casalegno, V.; Rizzo, S.; Salvo, M.; Van Staveren, T.O.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 429, 1-3 (2012), s. 166-172 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : glass-ceramic * joining * SiC composites * fusion materials Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311512002668

  8. Perspective on transporting nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wymer, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the material flow to be expected up to the year 2000 to and from the various steps in the nuclear cycle. These include the reactors, reprocessing plants, enrichment plants, U mills, U conversion plants, and fuel fabrication plants. A somewhat more-detailed discussion is given of the safety engineering that goes into the design of containers and packages and the selection of the mode of transportation. The relationship of shipping to siting and transportation accidents is considered briefly

  9. Effects of irradiation temperature on polarisation and relaxation characteristics of polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, Marcel; Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Reeve, Scott; Runkel, Stefan [Physikalisches Institut, Bonn Univ. (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To achieve significant enhancement of polarisation of solid target materials one must use the principles of dynamic nuclear polarisation and utilise the coupling of the nuclear and electron spins. The unpaired electrons needed can be created as paramagnetic structural defects by irradiation of the material. Polyethylene and polypropylene materials were irradiated at various temperatures and subsequently polarised with microwaves of approximately 70 GHz at temperatures around 1 K. Additionally the samples were investigated with respect to the nature of the created paramagnetic defects using a X-band EPR spectrometer. It was found that the irradiation temperature has a significant effect on the polarisation values achieved and also on the relaxation times of the materials in the 2.5 T magnetic field. The EPR line shape is clearly dominated by the well known alkyl radical structure.

  10. Surveillance of irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najzer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Surveillance of irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels is briefly discussed. The experimental techniques and computer programs available for this work at the J. Stefan Institute are described. (author)

  11. Statistical methods for nuclear material management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen W.M.; Bennett, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-12-01

    This book is intended as a reference manual of statistical methodology for nuclear material management practitioners. It describes statistical methods currently or potentially important in nuclear material management, explains the choice of methods for specific applications, and provides examples of practical applications to nuclear material management problems. Together with the accompanying training manual, which contains fully worked out problems keyed to each chapter, this book can also be used as a textbook for courses in statistical methods for nuclear material management. It should provide increased understanding and guidance to help improve the application of statistical methods to nuclear material management problems.

  12. Statistical methods for nuclear material management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, W.M.; Bennett, C.A.

    1988-12-01

    This book is intended as a reference manual of statistical methodology for nuclear material management practitioners. It describes statistical methods currently or potentially important in nuclear material management, explains the choice of methods for specific applications, and provides examples of practical applications to nuclear material management problems. Together with the accompanying training manual, which contains fully worked out problems keyed to each chapter, this book can also be used as a textbook for courses in statistical methods for nuclear material management. It should provide increased understanding and guidance to help improve the application of statistical methods to nuclear material management problems

  13. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  14. Radiation research of materials using irradiation capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamrad, B.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are briefly characterized of radiation experiments on the WWR-S research reactor. The irradiation capsule installed in the reactor including the electronic instrumentation is described. Irradiated samples temperature is stabilized by an auxiliary heat source placed in the irradiation space. The electronic control equipment of the system is automated. In irradiation experiments, experimental and operating conditions are recorded by a digital measuring centre with electric typewriter and paper tape data recording and by an analog compensating recorder. The irradiation experiment control system controls irradiated sample temperature, the supply current size and the heating element temperature of the auxiliary stabilizing source, inert and technological pressures of the capsule atmosphere and the thermostat temperature of the thermocouple junctions. (O.K.)

  15. Standard Guide for Packaging Materials for Foods to Be Irradiated

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides a format to assist producers and users of food packaging materials in selecting materials that have the desirable characteristics for their intended use and comply with applicable standards or government authorizations. It outlines parameters that should be considered when selecting food-contact packaging materials intended for use during irradiation of prepackaged foods and it examines the criteria for fitness for their use. 1.2 This guide identifies known regulations and regulatory frameworks worldwide pertaining to packaging materials for holding foods during irradiation; but it does not address all regulatory issues associated with the selection and use of packaging materials for foods to be irradiated. It is the responsibility of the user of this guide to determine the pertinent regulatory issues in each country where foods are to be irradiated and where irradiated foods are distributed. 1.3 This guide does not address all of the food safety issues associated with the synergisti...

  16. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  17. Material irradiation techniques used in corrosion and wear analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenreiro, Claudio

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear physics methods, applied to material analysis are discussed and some application examples are given. Experiments have been performed to study corrosion du to the presence of humidity and sulfur compounds. The use of resonant reactors allows the determination of depth profiles of H and S from structures located in particularly contaminated areas. The method provides a non destructive and quick way of estimating the effect of such elements in different types of structures, such as the ones used in high voltage transmission lines. Also the wear out rates in mechanical engine components having a difficult direct access, have been evaluated by proton activation analysis. The evaluation of the advantages of this method is being done. The effect of irradiation damage on superconducting high temperature ceramics was analyzed by the interaction of energetic alpha particles with high T c YBaCuO samples

  18. Materials of 15. autumn school on irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The ionizing radiation use for food preservation has been shown on the background of other methods. Several aspects connected with food irradiation have been discussed. Among them the legal aspects and recommendations have been performed. The healthy aspects from the view point of the radiolysis of main components of irradiated food have been presented. The broad review of physical, chemical and biological methods for identification of irradiated food products has been done. The accelerator pilot plant for food irradiation working at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw, has been presented as well

  19. Nuclear power plant cable materials :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Gillen, Kenneth T; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2013-05-01

    A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostly inert aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on

  20. Materials irradiation subpanel report to BESAC neutron sources and research panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Goland, A.N.; Lott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The future success of the nuclear power option in the US (fission and fusion) depends critically on the continued existence of a healthy national materials-irradiation program. Consideration of the requirements for acceptable materials-irradiation systems in a new neutron source has led the subcommittee to identify an advanced steady-state reactor (ANS) as a better choice than a spallation neutron source. However, the subcommittee also hastens to point out that the ANS cannot stand alone as the nation's sole high-flux mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation source in the next century. It must be incorporated in a broader program that includes other currently existing neutron irradiation facilities. Upgrading and continuing support for these facilities must be planned. In particular, serious consideration should be given to converting the HFIR into a dedicated materials test reactor, and long-term support for several university reactors should be established

  1. Nuclear material measurement system in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, S.G. de.

    1988-01-01

    The description of the activities developed at the Safeguards Laboratory of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission is done. The methods and techniques used for measuring and evaluating nuclear materials and facilities are presented. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Nuclear material management: challenges and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieu, J.; Besnainou, J.; Leboucher, I.; Chiguer, M.; Capus, G.; Greneche, D.; Durret, L.F.; Carbonnier, J.L.; Delpech, M.; Loaec, Ch.; Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Granger, S.; Devid, S.; Bidaud, A.; Jalouneix, J.; Toubon, H.; Pochon, E.; Bariteau, J.P.; Bernard, P.; Krellmann, J.; Sicard, B.

    2008-01-01

    The articles in this dossier were derived from the papers of the yearly S.F.E.N. convention, which took place in Paris, 12-13 March 2008. They deal with the new challenges and prospects in the field of nuclear material management, throughout the nuclear whole fuel cycle, namely: the institutional frame of nuclear materials management, the recycling, the uranium market, the enrichment market, the different scenarios for the management of civil nuclear materials, the technical possibilities of spent fuels utilization, the option of thorium, the convention on the physical protection of nuclear materials and installations, the characterisation of nuclear materials by nondestructive nuclear measurements, the proliferation from civil installations, the use of plutonium ( from military origin) and the international agreements. (N.C.)

  3. Neutrophil and lymphocyte dose curves in whole-body relatively homogeneous human γ-irradiation (on the basis of the materials of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konchalovskij, M.V.; Baranov, A.E.; Solov'ev, V.Yu.

    1991-01-01

    The experience in a study of regularties of the bone marrow syndrome in persons exposed to rather homogeneous γ-beam irradiation during the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station (127 cases) were summed up. Hematological data were processed by computer, and emperic dose curves of neutrophils and lymphocytes were obtained within the range of 0.5-12 Gy by regressive analysis. New data were obtained on the nature of a course of a granulocyte recovery phase at a dose level over 5 Gy. Some features of the time course of lymphocytes in persons exposed to radiation during the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station, were considered

  4. Techniques and methods in nuclear materials traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The nonproliferation community is currently addressing concerns that the access to special nuclear materials may increase the illicit trafficking in weapons-usable materials from civil and/or weapons material stores and/or fuel cycles systems. Illicit nuclear traffic usually involves reduced quantities of nuclear materials perhaps as samplings of a potential protracted diversionary flow from sources to users. To counter illicit nuclear transactions requires the development of techniques and methods in nuclear material traceability as an important phase of a broad forensic analysis capability. This report discusses how isotopic signatures and correlation methods were applied to determine the origins of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium samples reported as illicit trafficking in nuclear materials

  5. Fundamental Technology Development for Radiation Damage in Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Kwon, J. H.; Kim, E. S. and others

    2005-04-01

    This project was performed to achieve technologies for the evaluation of radiation effects at materials irradiated at HANARO and nuclear power plants, to establish measurement equipment and software for the analysis of radiation defects and to set up facilities for the measurements of radiation damage with non-destructive methods. Major targets were 1) establishment of hot laboratories and remote handling facilities/ technologies for the radioactive material tests, 2) irradiation test for the simulation of nuclear power plant environment and measurement/calculation of physical radiation damage, 3) evaluation and analysis of nano-scale radiation damage, 4) evaluation of radiation embrittlement with ultrasonic resonance spectrum measurement and electromagnetic measurement and 5) basic research of radiation embrittlement and radiation damage mechanism. Through the performance of 3 years, preliminary basics were established for the application research to evaluation of irradiated materials of present nuclear power plants and GEN-IV systems. Particularly the results of SANS, PAS and TEM analyses were the first output in Korea. And computer simulations of radiation damage were tried for the first time in Korea. The technologies will be developed for the design of GEN-IV material

  6. Irradiation test on connector part for nuclear instrumentation of nuclear powered ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takahiro; Mizushima, Toshihiko; Tsunoda, Tsunemi; Nakazawa, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear instrumetnation facility of the nuclear powered ship 'Mutsu' is composed of neutron detectors, signal cables and the circuits for measurement, and ocntinuously monitors neutron flux. Since this facility treats very faint signals, for the signal cables, coaxial cables and triple coaxial cables are used. The coaxial cables for the nuclear instrumentation are equipped with connectors at both ends, and those are called prefabricated cable. The prefabricated cables are connected to neutron detectors, and installed in the detection holes of the primary shielding tank in the containment vessel. Therefore, at the time of reactor operation, they are exposed to high radiation, and the deterioration of the characteristics of the prefabricated cables is feared. For the purpose of confirming that the part of deteriorating the insulation of the prefabricated cables is connectors, and clarifying the cause of the deterioration of insulation in connector part, the irradiation test of this time was carried out. The environment in which the prefabricated cables are laid, the specifications of the cables and connectors, the materials, gamma ray irradiation and the test results are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  8. On the material durability under irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselevskij, V.N.; Kosov, B.D.

    1977-01-01

    The initial principle adopted for the construction of a phenomenological model of the failure of irradiated steel, as proposed in the paper of V.A. Tsykanov and coworkers, is analized and some critical remarks made

  9. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  10. Van de Graaff Irradiation of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Through irradiations using our 3 MeV Van de Graaf accelerator, Argonne is testing the radiation stability of components of equipment that are being used to dispense molybdenum solutions for use as feeds to 99mTc generators and in the 99mTc generators themselves. Components have been irradiated by both a direct electron beam and photons generated from a tungsten convertor.

  11. Studies of the effect of irradiation in a nuclear reactor, of targets containing Mo used for the preparation of 99Mo gel, material that constitutes the 99Mo - 99mTc generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, Renata Correa

    2004-01-01

    The most used radioisotope in Nuclear Medicine is 99m Tc, obtained in the 99 Mo - 99m Tc generator form. 99 Mo can be produced by several nuclear reactions in Cyclotron and Reactor. The production in Cyclotron is not technically and commercially feasible. The production in Nuclear Reactor can be made in two ways: 235 U fission and 99 Mo (n,γ) 99 Mo reaction. A project aiming the production of 99 Mo by activation of Mo is under way at IPEN, producing a gel type MoZr generator. There are two ways of preparing the gel and the generators: by irradiating MoO 3 and preparing the gel or by the preparation of the gel and further irradiation. This work consists in the study of the irradiation effects in several targets containing Mo for the production of 99 Mo by the 98 Mo (n,γ) 99 Mo reaction and further preparation of the gel for use as a gel type 99 Mo - 99m Tc generator. Three rinds of gel were studied: zirconium, titanium and cerium molybdate, and their morphology, infrared structure and elution yield of 99m Tc were analysed. The best results were achieved with the generators prepared with MoZr post formed gel, with amorphous structure and better elution yields. The pre formed gel induced crystallinity and worst performance of the generators. (author)

  12. Some elaborating methods of gamma scanning results on irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternini, E.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma scanning, as a post-irradiation examination, is a technique which provides a large number of informations on irradiated nuclear fuels. Power profile, fission products distribution, average and local burn-up of single elements structural and nuclear behaviour of fuel materials are examples of the obtained informations. In the present work experimental methods and theoretical calculations used at the CNEN hot cell laboratory for the mentioned purposes are described. Errors arising from the application of the gamma scanning technique are also discussed

  13. Nuclear material control systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    Paragraph 70.51(c) of 10 CFR Part 70 requires each licensee who is authorized to possess at any one time special nuclear material in a quantity exceeding one effective kilogram to establish, maintain, and follow written material control and accounting procedures that are sufficient to enable the licensee to account for the special nuclear material in his possession under license. While other paragraphs and sections of Part 70 provide specific requirements for nuclear material control systems for fuel cycle plants, such detailed requirements are not included for nuclear power reactors. This guide identifies elements acceptable to the NRC staff for a nuclear material control system for nuclear power reactors. (U.S.)

  14. Opening of new field in material science and technology by materials irradiation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurishita, Hiroaki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1998-03-01

    It is believed that high energy particle irradiation causes severe degradation of materials, and great efforts have been made to reveal the underlying mechanism of such degradation. However, recent progress of the developments of irradiation rigs performed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and materials fabrication techniques has enabled to change our understanding of radiation effects on materials from the above pessimistic one to the very challenging one, i.e., irradiation has the beneficial effect of producing new phenomena and/or innovative materials that will not be available without irradiation. An example to be noted is that irradiation with neutrons in JMTR greatly improved the ductility of less ductile metals. This ductility improvement due to irradiation is directly opposite to irradiation embrittlement and is called radiation induced ductilization (RIDU). In this presentation the significance of RIDU and its mechanism will be stated. (author)

  15. Tracer techniques in estimating nuclear materials holdup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1987-01-01

    Residual inventory of nuclear materials remaining in processing facilities (holdup) is recognized as an insidious problem for safety of plant operations and safeguarding of special nuclear materials (SNM). This paper reports on an experimental study where a well-known method of radioanalytical chemistry, namely tracer technique, was successfully used to improve nondestructive measurements of holdup of nuclear materials in a variety of plant equipment. Such controlled measurements can improve the sensitivity of measurements of residual inventories of nuclear materials in process equipment by several orders of magnitude and the good quality data obtained lend themselves to developing mathematical models of holdup of SNM during stable plant operations

  16. Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab

  17. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  18. Corrosion degradation of materials in nuclear reactors and its control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Vivekanand

    2016-01-01

    As in every industry, nuclear industry also faces the challenge of corrosion degradation due to the exposure of the materials to the working environment. The aggressiveness of the environment is enhanced by the presence of radiation and high temperature and high-pressure environment. Radiation has influence on both the materials (changes in microstructure and microchemistry) and the aqueous environment (radiolysis producing oxidizing conditions). A survey of all the light water reactors in the world showed that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) account for more than two third of all the corrosion degradation cases. This paper visits these two forms of corrosion in nuclear power plants and illustrates cases from Indian nuclear power plants. Remedial measures against these two forms of corrosion that are possible to be employed and the actual measures employed in Indian nuclear power plants are discussed. Key features of SCC in different types of nuclear power plants are discussed. Main reasons for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are presented and discussed. The signature patterns of single and dual phase FAC captured from components replaced from Indian nuclear power plants are presented. The development of a correlation between the scallop size and rate of single phase FAC - based on the database developed in Indian nuclear power plants is presented. Based on these two forms of degradation in nuclear reactors, design of materials that would resist these forms of degradation is presented. (author)

  19. Disk-bend ductility tests for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Braski, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    We modified the HEDL disk-bend test machine and are using it to qualitatively screen alloys that are susceptible to embrittlement caused by irradiation. Tests designed to understand the disk-bend test in relation to a uniaxial test are discussed. Selected results of tests of neutron-irradiated material are also presented

  20. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  1. Evaluation and development of advanced nuclear materials: IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inozemtsev, V.; Basak, U.; Killeen, J.; Dyck, G.; Zeman, A.; )

    2011-01-01

    Economical, environmental and non-proliferation issues associated with sustainable development of nuclear power bring about a need for optimization of fuel cycles and implementation of advanced nuclear systems. While a number of physical and design concepts are available for innovative reactors, the absence of reliable materials able to sustain new challenging irradiation conditions represents the real bottle-neck for practical implementation of these promising ideas. Materials performance and integrity are key issues for the safety and competitiveness of future nuclear installations being developed for sustainable nuclear energy production incorporating fuel recycling and waste transmutation systems. These systems will feature high thermal operational efficiency, improved utilization of resources (both fissile and fertile materials) and reduced production of nuclear waste. They will require development, qualification and deployment of new and advanced fuel and structural materials with improved mechanical and chemical properties combined with high radiation and corrosion resistance. The extensive, diverse, and expensive efforts toward the development of these materials can be more effectively organized within international collaborative programmes with wide participation of research, design and engineering communities. IAEA carries out a number of international projects supporting interested Member States with the use of available IAEA program implementation tools (Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings, Expert Reviews, etc). The presentation summarizes the activities targeting material developments for advanced nuclear systems, with particular emphasis on fast reactors, which are the focal topics of IAEA Coordinated Research Projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modelling of Radiation Effects' (on-going), 'Benchmarking of Structural Materials Pre-Selected for Advanced Nuclear Reactors', 'Examination of advanced fast reactor fuel and core

  2. Uncertainty estimation in nuclear material weighing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaure, Bernard [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses, (France)

    2011-12-15

    The assessment of nuclear material quantities located in nuclear plants requires knowledge of additions and subtractions of amounts of different types of materials. Most generally, the quantity of nuclear material held is deduced from 3 parameters: a mass (or a volume of product); a concentration of nuclear material in the product considered; and an isotopic composition. Global uncertainties associated with nuclear material quantities depend upon the confidence level of results obtained in the measurement of every different parameter. Uncertainties are generally estimated by considering five influencing parameters (ISHIKAWA's rule): the material itself; the measurement system; the applied method; the environmental conditions; and the operator. A good practice guide, to be used to deal with weighing errors and problems encountered, is presented in the paper.

  3. Development of nuclear material accountancy control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirosawa, Naonori; Kashima, Sadamitsu; Akiba, Mitsunori

    1992-01-01

    PNC is developing a wide area of nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, much nuclear material with a various form exists at each facility in the Works, and the controls of the inventory changes and the physical inventories of nuclear material are important. Nuclear material accountancy is a basic measure in safeguards system based on Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). In the light of such importance of material accountancy, the data base of nuclear material control and the material accountancy report system for all facilities has been developed by using the computer. By this system, accountancy report to STA is being presented certainly and timely. Property management and rapid corresponding to various inquiries can be carried out by the data base system which has free item searching procedure. (author)

  4. Production behavior of irradiation defects in solid breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Hirotake; Moritani, Kimikazu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The irradiation effects in solid breeder materials are important for the performance assessment of fusion reactor blanket systems. For a clearer understanding of such effects, we have studied the production behavior of irradiation defects in some lithium ceramics by an in-situ luminescence measurement technique under ion beam irradiation. The luminescence spectra were measured at different temperatures, and the temperature-transient behaviors of luminescence intensity were also measured. The production mechanisms of irradiation defects were discussed on the basis of the observations. (author)

  5. The physics of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, M.

    1980-01-01

    The knowledge of the neutron irradiation effect is essential in dealing with all subjects related to the fuel. Neutron irradiation provokes fission reactions within the fuel and produces new nuclides. The formation chains are described and the importance of each isotope in the fuel cycle is explained with regards to its own characteristics. To solve the system of equations giving the evolution of different nuclides concentrations, the corresponding effective cross-sections and flux received are given by standard codes used for reactor calculations. A good test for calculation methods is the experimental study of irradiated fuel. Many techniques have been developed for this purpose. The last chapter compares fuel evolution in different reactors, in connection with some specific characteristics. (author)

  6. Base isolation for nuclear power and nuclear material facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidinger, J.M.; Kircher, C.A.; Vaidya, N.; Constantinou, M.; Kelly, J.M.; Seidensticker, R.; Tajirian, F.F.; Ovadia, D.

    1989-01-01

    This report serves to document the status of the practice for the use of base isolation systems in the design and construction of nuclear power and nuclear material facilities. The report first describes past and current (1989) applications of base isolation in nuclear facilities. The report then provides a brief discussion of non-nuclear applications. Finally, the report summarizes the status of known base-isolation codes and standards

  7. UV-irradiation effects on polyester nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Kalsi, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of UV irradiation (λ=254 nm) on polyester nuclear track detector have been investigated employing bulk-etch technique, UV-visible spectrophotometry and infra-red spectrometry (FTIR). The activation energy values for bulk-etching were found to decrease with the UV-irradiation time indicating the scission of the polymer. Not much shift in the absorption edge due to UV irradiation was seen in the UV-visible spectra. FTIR studies also indicate the scission of the chemical bonds, thereby further validating the bulk-etch rate results.

  8. Dry storage of irradiated nuclear fuels and vitrified wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deacon, D.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of the work of GEC Energy Systems Ltd. over the years in the dry storage of irradiated fuel. The dry-storage module (designated as Cell 4) for irradiated magnox fuel recently constructed at Wylfa nuclear power station is described. Development work on the long-term dry storage of irradiated oxide fuels is reported. Four different methods of storage are compared. These are the pond, vault, cask and caisson stores. It is concluded that there are important advantages with the passive air-cooled ESL dry stove. (U.K.)

  9. Hydrogen release from irradiated elastomers measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagielski, J., E-mail: jacek.jagielski@itme.edu.pl [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Ostaszewska, U. [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials & Dyes, Division of Elastomers & Rubber Technology, Harcerska 30, 05-820 Piastow (Poland); Bielinski, D.M. [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Polymer & Dye Technology, Stefanowskiego 12/16, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Grambole, D. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, PO Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Kozinski, R. [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); Kosinska, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    Ion irradiation appears as an interesting method of modification of elastomers, especially friction and wear properties. Main structural effect caused by heavy ions is a massive loss of hydrogen from the surface layer leading to its smoothening and shrinking. The paper presents the results of hydrogen release from various elastomers upon irradiation with H{sup +}, He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} studied by using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that the hydrogen release is controlled by inelastic collisions between ions and target electrons. The last part of the study was focused on preliminary analysis of mechanical properties of irradiated rubbers.

  10. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A. (University Texas Medical Branch); Neerathilingam, Muniasamy (University Texas Medical Branch); Ansari, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Volk, David (University Texas Medical Branch); Sarkar, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  11. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  12. Concepts of IAEA nuclear materials accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakberg, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes nuclear material accounting from the standpoint of IAEA Safeguards and how this accounting is applied by the Agency. The basic concepts of nuclear material accounting are defined and the way these apply to States with INFCIRC/153-type safeguards agreements is presented. (author)

  13. Atomic scale modelling of materials of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.

    2011-10-01

    This document written to obtain the French accreditation to supervise research presents the research I conducted at CEA Cadarache since 1999 on the atomic scale modelling of non-metallic materials involved in the nuclear fuel cycle: host materials for radionuclides from nuclear waste (apatites), fuel (in particular uranium dioxide) and ceramic cladding materials (silicon carbide). These are complex materials at the frontier of modelling capabilities since they contain heavy elements (rare earths or actinides), exhibit complex structures or chemical compositions and/or are subjected to irradiation effects: creation of point defects and fission products, amorphization. The objective of my studies is to bring further insight into the physics and chemistry of the elementary processes involved using atomic scale modelling and its coupling with higher scale models and experimental studies. This work is organised in two parts: on the one hand the development, adaptation and implementation of atomic scale modelling methods and validation of the approximations used; on the other hand the application of these methods to the investigation of nuclear materials under irradiation. This document contains a synthesis of the studies performed, orientations for future research, a detailed resume and a list of publications and communications. (author)

  14. Isotopically enriched structural materials in nuclear devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, L.W.G., E-mail: Lee.Morgan@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Shimwell, J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Gilbert, M.R. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    decommissioning are considered. It is shown that the addition of molybdenum and nickel in small concentrations (<2% mass) could have the potential to increase availability to such an extent that the capital investment associated with isotope enrichment is negated and profits from electricity sale increased. Another important issue for materials exposed to neutron irradiation is the production of gases, in particular helium, as a result of nuclear interactions. Helium accumulation in materials can cause embrittlement and so mitigating the rate of production is an important consideration when selecting materials. The second part of this paper considers whether helium production can be reduced in CuCrZr by isotopic tailoring. CuCrZr is a candidate bonding material for tungsten at first wall locations, however it suffers from degradation due to helium production. Inventory calculations show that isotopically enriching the copper, in CuCrZr, can reduce helium production by approximately 50%. However, cost–benefit analysis suggests that the cost of enriching copper is not cost-effective due to the high price of electromagnetic enrichment that is required for copper.

  15. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  16. TEM investigation of plant-irradiated NPP bolt material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Ehrnsten, U.; Keinaenen, H.; Karlsen, W.; Karlsen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) was used to examine irradiation-induced damage in material removed from two different bolts from two different nuclear power plants. One section came from a French PWR, was made of CW AISI 316, and included a section of the bolt that had accumulated a dose of approximately 15 dpa during 19 operation cycles at 350 - 390 C. degrees. Another section came from a VVER bolt that was removed from the plant due to indications found in non-destructive examinations (NDE). The VVER bolt was made of solution annealed titanium stabilized 0X18H10T (corresponding to Type AISI 321) and had accumulated a fluence of 2.9 dpa. During the removal of that bolt, it was found that the bolt washer had been inappropriately spot welded to the shielding plate during assembly. Destructive investigations showed that the bolt had two large intergranular cracks, and the TEM samples were prepared from the material adjacent to those cracks. The PWR bolt had not failed, although cracks in the bolts with a similar history had been found previously. The fluence for the cold-worked AISI 316 PWR bolt was estimated to be about 15 dpa. Both the examined bolts showed a clear radiation induced segregation of alloying elements at the grain boundaries (GB-RIS), the presence of dislocation loops, the formation of precipitates, and linear deformation microstructures. Additionally, voids were found from the PWR bolt and the VVER bolt had a high density of dislocations. (authors)

  17. Automated processing of nuclear materials accounting data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straka, J.; Pacak, P.; Moravec, J.

    1980-01-01

    An automated system was developed of nuclear materials accounting in Czechoslovakia. The system allows automating data processing including data storage. It comprises keeping records of inventories and material balance. In designing the system, the aim of the IAEA was taken into consideration, ie., building a unified information system interconnected with state-run systems of accounting and checking nuclear materials in the signatory countries of the non-proliferation treaty. The nuclear materials accounting programs were written in PL-1 and were tested at an EC 1040 computer at UJV Rez where also the routine data processing takes place. (B.S.)

  18. Nuclear irradiation parameters of beryllium under fusion, fission and IFMIF irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Chen, Y.; Leichtle, D.; Simakov, S.; Moeslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.

    2004-01-01

    A computational analysis is presented of the nuclear irradiation parameters for Beryllium under irradiation in typical neutron environments of fission and fusion reactors, and of the presently designed intense fusion neutron source IFMIF. The analysis shows that dpa and Tritium production rates at fusion relevant levels can be achieved with existing high flux fission reactors while the achievable Helium production is too low. The resulting He-Tritium and He/dpa ratios do not meet typical fusion irradiation conditions. Irradiation simulations in the medium flux test modules of the IFMIF neutron source facility were shown to be more suitable to match fusion typical irradiation conditions. To achieve sufficiently high production rates it is suggested to remove the creep-fatigue testing machine together with the W spectra shifter plate and move the tritium release module upstream towards the high flux test module. (author)

  19. Determination of burn-up of irradiated nuclear fuels using mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagadish Kumar, S.; Telmore, V.M.; Shah, R.V.; Sasi Bhushan, K.; Paul, Sumana; Kumar, Pranaw; Rao, Radhika M.; Jaison, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    Burn-up defined as the atom percent fission, is a vital parameter used for assessing the performance of nuclear fuel during its irradiation in the reactor. Accurate data on the actinide isotopes are also essential for the reliable accountability of nuclear materials and for nuclear safeguards. Both destructive and non-destructive methods are employed in the post-irradiation analysis for the burn-up measurements. Though non-destructive methods are preferred from the point view of remote handling of irradiated fuels with high radioactivity, they do not provide the high accuracy as achieved by the chemical analysis methods. Thus destructive radiochemical and chemical analyses are still the established reference methods for accurate and reliable burn-up determination of irradiated nuclear fuels. In the destructive method, burn-up of irradiated nuclear fuel is determined by correlating the amount of a fission product formed during irradiation with that of heavy elements. Thus the destructive experimental determination of burn-up involves the dissolution of irradiated fuel samples followed by the separation and determination of heavy elements and fission product(s) to be used as burn-up monitor(s). Another approach for the experimental determination of burn-up is based on the changes in the abundances of the heavy element isotopes. A widely accepted method for burn-up determination is based on stable "1"4"8Nd and "1"3"9La as burn-up monitors. Several properties such as non-volatility, nearly same yields for thermal fissions of "2"3"5U and "2"3"9Pu etc justifies the selection of "1"4"8Nd as a burn-up monitor

  20. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  1. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [es

  2. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  3. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)

  4. Focusing mirrors for enhanced neutron radiography with thermal neutrons and application for irradiated nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Abir, Muhammad; Wu, Huarui; Khaykovich, Boris; Moncton, David E.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a powerful method of probing the structure of materials based on attenuation of neutrons. This method is most suitable for materials containing heavy metals, which are not transparent to X-rays, for example irradiated nuclear fuel and other nuclear materials. Neutron radiography is one of the first non-distractive post-irradiated examination methods, which is applied to gain an overview of the integrity of irradiated nuclear fuel and other nuclear materials. However, very powerful gamma radiation emitted by the samples is damaging to the electronics of digital imaging detectors and has so far precluded the use of modern detectors. Here we describe a design of a neutron microscope based on focusing mirrors suitable for thermal neutrons. As in optical microscopes, the sample is separated from the detector, decreasing the effect of gamma radiation. In addition, the application of mirrors would result in a thirty-fold gain in flux and a resolution of better than 40 μm for a field-of-view of about 2.5 cm. Such a thermal neutron microscope can be useful for other applications of neutron radiography, where thermal neutrons are advantageous.

  5. Application of nuclear irradiation to traditional chinese medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jianping; Li Xuehu; Lu Xihong; Tao Lei; Wang Shuyang

    2010-01-01

    The application of nuclear irradiation in the field of traditional Chinese medicine has received much attention. In this paper we reviewed the application of nuclear radiation on the cultivation, breeding and disinfection of traditional Chinese medicine, and pointed out that the combination of radiation-induced mutagenesis and biological technology would promise broad prospects for increasing the cellular mutation rate and speeding up the genetic improvement of traditional Chinese medicine. (authors)

  6. Nuclear battery materials and application of nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Shaochang; Lu Zhenming; Fu Xiaoming; Liang Tongxiang

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear battery has lots of advantages such as small volume, longevity, environal stability and so on, therefore, it was widely used in aerospace, deep-sea, polar region, heart pacemaker, micro-electromotor and other fields etc. The application of nuclear battery and the development of its materials promote each other. In this paper the development and the latest research progress of nuclear battery materials has been introduced from the view of radioisotope, electric energy conversion and encapsulation. And the current and potential applications of the nuclear battery are also summarized. (authors)

  7. Microstructural examination of irradiated zircaloy-2 pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Sah, D.N.; Banerjee, S.

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation induced microstructural changes in Zr alloys strongly influence the creep, growth and mechanical properties of pressure tube material. Since dimensional changes and mechanical property degradation can limit the life of pressure tube, it is essential to study and develop an understanding of the microstructure produced by neutron irradiation, by examining samples taken from the irradiated components. In the present work, an effort has been made to examine, microstructure of the Zircaloy-2 pressure tube material irradiated in the Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The present work is a first step towards a comprehensive program of characterization of microstructure of reactor materials after irradiation to different fluence levels in power reactors. In this study, samples from a Zircaloy-2 pressure tube, which had been in operation in the high flux region of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit 1, for a period for 6.77 effective full power years (EFPYs), have been prepared and examined. The samples selected from the tube are expected to have a cumulative radiation damage of about 3 dpa. Samples prepared from the off cuts of RAPS-1 pressure tubes were also studied for examining the unirradiated microstructure of the material. The samples were examined in a 200kV JEOL 2000 FX microscope. This paper presents the distinct features observed in irradiated sample and a comprehensive comparison of the microstructures of the unirradiated and irradiated material. The effect of annealing on the annihilation of the defects generated during irradiation has been also studied. The bright field micrographs revealed that microstructure of the irradiated samples was different in many respects from the microstructure of the unirradiated samples. The presence of defect structure in the form of loops etc could be seen in the irradiated sample. These loops were mostly c-type loops lying in the basal plane. The dissolution and redistribution of the precipitates were

  8. Aims and methods of nuclear materials management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leven, D.; Schier, H.

    1979-05-01

    Whilst international safeguarding of fissile materials against abuse has been the subject of extensive debate, little public attention has so far been devoted to the internal security of these materials. All countries using nuclear energy for peaceful purposes have laid down appropriate regulations. In the Federal Republic of Germany safeguards are required, for instance, by the Atomic Energy Act, and are therefore a prerequisite for licensing. The aims and methods of national nuclear materials management are contrasted with viewpoints on international safeguards

  9. Irradiation behavior of graphite shielding materials for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Kaito, Takeji; Onose, Shoji; Shibahara, Itaru

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597degC. Postirradiation examination was carried out on dimensional change, elastic modulus, and the thermal conductivity. The result of measurement of dimensional change indicated that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased to two to three times of unirradiated values. A large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependency on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, but the change in specific heat was negligibly small. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (author)

  10. The physical protection of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    A Technical Committee on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material met in April-May 1989 to advise on the need to update the recommendations contained in document INFCIRC/225/Rev.1 and on any changes considered to be necessary. The Technical Committee indicated a number of such changes, reflecting mainly: the international consensus established in respect of the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material; the experience gained since 1977; and a wish to give equal treatment to protection against the theft of nuclear material and protection against the sabotage of nuclear facilities. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. 1 tab

  11. Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management Preliminary Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E; Dreicer, M.

    2006-01-01

    The world is at a turning point, moving away from the Cold War nuclear legacy towards a future global nuclear enterprise; and this presents a transformational challenge for nuclear materials management. Achieving safety and security during this transition is complicated by the diversified spectrum of threat 'players' that has greatly impacted nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and homeland security requirements. Rogue states and non-state actors no longer need self-contained national nuclear expertise, materials, and equipment due to availability from various sources in the nuclear market, thereby reducing the time, effort and cost for acquiring a nuclear weapon (i.e., manifestations of latency). The terrorist threat has changed the nature of military and national security requirements to protect these materials. An Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management (IGNMM) approach would address the existing legacy nuclear materials and the evolution towards a nuclear energy future, while strengthening a regime to prevent nuclear weapon proliferation. In this paper, some preliminary concepts and studies of IGNMM will be presented. A systematic analysis of nuclear materials, activities, and controls can lead to a tractable, integrated global nuclear materials management architecture that can help remediate the past and manage the future. A systems approach is best suited to achieve multi-dimensional and interdependent solutions, including comprehensive, end-to-end capabilities; coordinated diverse elements for enhanced functionality with economy; and translation of goals/objectives or standards into locally optimized solutions. A risk-informed basis is excellent for evaluating system alternatives and performances, and it is especially appropriate for the security arena. Risk management strategies--such as defense-in-depth, diversity, and control quality--help to weave together various technologies and practices into a strong and robust security fabric. Effective

  12. Croatian National System of Nuclear Materials Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscan, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the process of economic and technological development of Croatia by using or introducing nuclear power or in the case of international co-operation in the field of peaceful nuclear activities, including international exchange of nuclear material, Croatia should establish and implement National System of Nuclear Materials Control. Croatian National System of accounting for and control of all nuclear material will be subjected to safeguards under requirements of Agreement and Additional Protocol between the Republic of Croatia and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The decision by NPT parties at the 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference to endorse the Fullscope IAEA Safeguards Standard (FSS) as a necessary precondition of nuclear supply means that states are obliged to ensure that the recipient country has a FSS agreement in place before any nuclear transfer can take place (Ref. 1). The FSS standard of nuclear supply is a central element of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) Guidelines which the NSG adopted in 1992 and should be applied to members and non-members of the NSG. The FSS standard of nuclear supply in general allows for NPT parties or countries which have undertaken the same obligations through other treaty arrangements, to receive favourable treatment in nuclear supply arrangements. However, the Iraqi experience demonstrate that trade in nuclear and dual-use items, if not properly monitored, can contribute to a nuclear weapons program in countries acting contrary to their non-proliferation obligation. Multilateral nuclear export control mechanisms, including the FSS supply standard, provide the basis for co-ordination and standardisation of export control measures. (author)

  13. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T.

    1998-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  14. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  15. Development of materials for the fusion nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, W. J.; Jung, C. H.; Jun, B. H.; Maeng, W. Y.; Kwon, J. H.; Kim, H. P.; Hong, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    A state of the art on the nuclear material development has been reviewed based on the each component of the Tokamak typed fusion reactor. The current status of the development of structural materials such as FM steels, ODS steels, vanadium alloys and SiCf/SiC composites are introduced. The application of Li-based ceramics as a ceramic breeder and W-based alloys and C/C composites as plasma facing components for the divertor were also investigated, respectively. Some evaluation methods and results of the computational material simulation for irradiation damages and the compatibility between materials and coolant are described. Additionally, the material related research activities of ITER and ITER TBM and the collaboration activities on fusion materials between Japan and USA are briefly summarized

  16. DBMS Development of Irradiated Materials and Spare parts on master-slave manipulator in IMEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Y. S.; Kim, D. S.; Jung, Y. H.; Kim, H. M.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Hong, K. P.; Ahn, S. B.; Ryu, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The data of irradiated specimens(include nuclear fuel) which are transported from research reactor and commercial power reactor and the spare parts of the master-slave manipulator for the IMEF facility, which is operated since 1996, were controlled and managed through the Hangul and Excel software. But it is recommended to use a special program, which is developed for DBMS, for the beneficial control and systematic management of all irradiated specimens, especially assuming the increase of specimen's kind and amount by increasing customers in the near future. This report summarized the whole logical and physical processes and results about following items : - Management System of Irradiated Materials including nuclear fuel - Management System of spare parts for the master-slave manipulator.

  17. How to improve the irradiation conditions for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Daum, E

    2000-01-01

    The accelerator-based intense D-Li neutron source International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) provides very suitable irradiation conditions for fusion materials development with the attractive option of accelerated irradiations. Investigations show that a neutron moderator made of tungsten and placed in the IFMIF test cell can further improve the irradiation conditions. The moderator softens the IFMIF neutron spectrum by enhancing the fraction of low energy neutrons. For displacement damage, the ratio of point defects to cascades is more DEMO relevant and for tritium production in Li-based breeding ceramic materials it leads to a preferred production via the sup 6 Li(n,t) sup 4 He channel as it occurs in a DEMO breeding blanket.

  18. Research status on radiation damage in nuclear materials and recommendations for IAEA activities. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, Alfredo; Caro, Magdalena

    2002-03-01

    This report addresses the synergy between the continuous progress of parallel computing and the spectacular advances in the theoretical framework that describes materials. Together, they contributed to significantly advance our comprehension of materials properties like mechanical behavior. It also highlights its impact on nuclear technology, as it provides physical insight into the complex processes responsible for the degradation of structural materials under neutron irradiation

  19. Supplier responsibility for nuclear material quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, P.S.; Dohna, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear materials must be delivered by either the manufacturer or the distributor with objective, documented evidence that the material was manufactured, inspected, and tested by proven techniques performed by qualified personnel working to documented procedures. Measurement devices used for acceptance must be of proven accuracy. The material and all records must be identified for positive traceability as part of the quality history of the nuclear components, system, or structure in which the material was used. In conclusion, the nuclear material supplier must join the fabricator, the installer, and the user in effective implementation of the total systems approach to the application of quality assurance principles to all phases of procurement, fabrication, installation, and use of the safety-related components, systems, and structures in a nuclear power plant

  20. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  1. Evaluation by nuclear relaxation of hydrogen tucuman irradiated fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Keila dos Santos Cople; Lima, Antonio Luis dos Santos; Araujo, Leandro Moreira; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The tucuman (Astrocarium vulgare Mart.) develops a yellow-orange fibrous pulp and a yellow-green peel as it gets mature. In Brazil it is considered a good source of carotenoids, which is the main precursor of vitamin A. Considering that the irradiation process is an alternative to avoid post-harvesting losses, without changing the nutritional value of food, this study had the objective of evaluating of different gamma irradiation doses (0.0; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0 kGy) in Tucuman samples, divided into control (non irradiated) and irradiated, by the low-field Magnetic Nuclear Resonance (NMR) analysis. The technique is used in quantitative determinations of nondestructively and non-invasive instrumentation employing low, with minimal sample, quickly, preserving its constitution and nature. (author)

  2. Determination of the origin of unknown irradiated nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, G

    2006-01-01

    An isotopic fingerprinting method is presented to determine the origin of unknown nuclear material with forensic importance. Spent nuclear fuel of known origin has been considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to demonstrate the method and verify its prediction capabilities. The method compares, using factor analysis, the measured U, Pu isotopic compositions of the 'unknown' material with U, Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. Then, the 'unknown' fuel has the same origin as the commercial fuel with which it exhibits the highest similarity in U, Pu compositions.

  3. Determination of the origin of unknown irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaou, G.

    2006-01-01

    An isotopic fingerprinting method is presented to determine the origin of unknown nuclear material with forensic importance. Spent nuclear fuel of known origin has been considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to demonstrate the method and verify its prediction capabilities. The method compares, using factor analysis, the measured U, Pu isotopic compositions of the 'unknown' material with U, Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. Then, the 'unknown' fuel has the same origin as the commercial fuel with which it exhibits the highest similarity in U, Pu compositions

  4. Stored energy in fusion magnet materials irradiated at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, R.L.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R.

    1989-08-01

    During the power cycle of a fusion reactor, the radiation reaching the superconducting magnet system will produce an accumulation of immobile defects in the magnet materials. During a subsequent warm-up cycle of the magnet system, the defects will become mobile and interact to produce new defect configurations as well as some mutual defect annihilations which generate heat-the release of stored energy. This report presents a brief qualitative discussion of the mechanisms for the production and release of stored energy in irradiated materials, a theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials, theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials during warm-up, and a discussion of the possible impact of stored energy release on fusion magnet operation 20 refs

  5. Residual stress improvement mechanism on metal material by underwater laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji; Yoda, Masaki; Mukai, Naruhiko; Obata, Minoru; Kanno, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    Residual stress improvement technology for component surface by underwater pulsed laser irradiation has been developed as a method of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of core components in nuclear reactors. In order to optimize the laser irradiation conditions based on a complete understanding of the mechanism, the propagation of a shock wave induced by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the irradiated material were analyzed through time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program. The calculated results are compared with the measured results obtained by experiments in which laser pulses with an energy of 200 mJ are focused to a diameter of 0.8 mm on a water-immersed test piece of 20% cold-worked Type 304 austenitic stainless steel to simulate neutron irradiation hardening. A residual compressive stress, which is nearly equivalent to the yield stress of the processed material, remains on the material surface after passage of the shock wave with enough amplitude to induce a permanent strain. Multiple irradiation of laser pulses extends the stress-improved depth to about 1 mm, which would be the limit corresponding to the three-dimensional dispersion effect of the shock wave. (author)

  6. Characterization of semiconductor and frontier materials by nuclear microprobe technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jieqing; Li Xiaolin; Yang Changyi; Lu Rongrong; Wang Jiqing; Guo Panlin

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe technology is used to characterize the properties of semiconductor and other frontier materials at the stages of their synthesis, modification, integration and application. On the basis of the beam current being used, the analytical nuclear microprobe techniques being used in this project can be divided into two categories: high beam current (PIXE, RBS, PEB) or low beam current (IBIC, STIM) techniques. The material properties measured are the thickness and composition of a composite surface on a SiC ceramic, the sputtering-induced surface segregation and depth profile change in a Ag-Cu binary alloy, the irradiation effects on the CCE of CVD diamond, the CCE profile at a polycrystalline CVD diamond film and a GaAs diode at different voltage biases and finally, the characterization of individual sample on an integrated material chip. (author)

  7. Technical limitations of nuclear fuel materials and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, L.; Planman, T.; Vitikainen, E.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives a summary of the tasks carried out within the project 'Technical limitations of nuclear fuel materials and structures' which belongs to the Finnish national research programme called 'Systems behaviour and operational aspects of safety'. The duration of the project was three years from 1990 to 1992. Most western LWR utilities, including the two Finnish ones have an incentive to implement extended burnup fuel cycles in their nuclear power plants. The aim of this project has been authorities to support them in the assessment and licensing of new fuel designs and materials. The research work of the project was focused on collecting and qualifying fuel performance data and on performing laboratory tests on fresh and irradiated cladding and structural materials. Moreover, knowledge of the high burnup phenomena was obtained through participation in international research projects such as OECD Halden Project and several Studsvik projects. Experimental work within the framework of the VVER fuel cooperative effort was also continued. (orig.)

  8. Transport and reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1981-01-01

    This contribution deals with transport and packaging of oxide fuel from and to the Cogema reprocessing plant at La Hague (France). After a general discussion of nuclear fuel and the fuel cycle, the main aspects of transport and reprocessing of oxide fuel are analysed. (Auth.)

  9. Nuclear materials stewardship: Our enduring mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have handled a remarkably wide variety of nuclear materials over the past 50 yr. Two fundamental changes have occurred that shape the current landscape regarding nuclear materials. If one recognizes the implications and opportunities, one sees that the stewardship of nuclear materials will be a fundamental and important job of the DOE for the foreseeable future. The first change--the breakup of the Soviet Union and the resulting end to the nuclear arms race--altered US objectives. Previously, the focus was on materials production, weapon design, nuclear testing, and stockpile enhancements. Now the attention is on dismantlement of weapons, excess special nuclear material inventories, accompanying increased concern over the protection afforded to such materials; new arms control measures; and importantly, maintenance of the safety and reliability of the remaining arsenal without testing. The second change was the raised consciousness and sense of responsibility for dealing with the environmental legacies of past nuclear arms programs. Recognition of the need to clean up radioactive contamination, manage the wastes, conduct current operations responsibly, and restore the environment have led to the establishment of what is now the largest program in the DOE. Two additional features add to the challenge and drive the need for recognition of nuclear materials stewardship as a fundamental, enduring, and compelling mission of the DOE. The first is the extraordinary time frames. No matter what the future of nuclear weapons and no matter what the future of nuclear power, the DOE will be responsible for most of the country's nuclear materials and wastes for generations. Even if the Yucca Mountain program is successful and on schedule, it will last more than 100 yr. Second, the use, management, and disposition of nuclear materials and wastes affect a variety of nationally important and diverse objectives, from national

  10. Control of nuclear materials and materials in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbor G, A.; Fernandes M, S.

    1988-01-01

    A general view about the safeguards activities in Argentina is presented. The national system of accounting for and control of nuclear materials is described. The safeguards agreement signed by Argentina are presented. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Global nuclear material flow/control model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.S.; Fasel, P.K.; Riese, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of an international regime for nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool which treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. The prototype model developed visually represents the fundamental data, information, and capabilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in a framework supportive of national or an international perspective. This includes an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, facility specific geographic identification, and the capability to estimate resource requirements for the management and control of nuclear material. The model establishes the foundation for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material and supports the development of other pertinent algorithmic capabilities necessary to undertake further global nuclear material related studies

  12. Early works on the nuclear microprobe for microelectronics irradiation tests at the CEICI (Sevilla, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, F.R.; Morilla, Y.; Mogollon, J.M.; Garcia-Lopez, J.; Labrador, J.A.; Aguirre, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Particle radiation effects are a fundamental problem in the use of numerous electronic devices for space applications, which is aggravated with the technology shrinking towards smaller and smaller scales. The suitability of low-energy accelerators for irradiation testing is being considered nowadays. Moreover, the possibility to use a nuclear microprobe, with a lateral resolution of a few microns, allows us to evaluate the behavior under ion irradiation of specific elements in an electronic device. The CEICI is the new CEnter for Integrated Circuits Irradiation tests, created into the facilities at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Sevilla-Spain. We have verified that our 3 MV Tandem accelerator, typically used for ion beam characterization of materials, is also a valuable tool to perform irradiation experiments in the low LET (Linear Energy Transfer) region.

  13. Assessment of repair welding technologies of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Damages of reactor internals of stainless steels caused by SCC and fatigue were identified in aged BWR plants. Repair-welding is one of the practical countermeasure candidates to restore the soundness of components and structures. The project of 'Assessment of Repair welding Technologies of Irradiated Materials' is being carried out to develop the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals. In fiscal 2011, we investigated the weldability of stainless steel 316L irradiated by welding (TIG) tungsten inert gas. Furthermore, the tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the welds were investigated. Cross-sectional observation of heat affected zone (HAZ) of the bead on plate TIG weldments (heat input 4 kJ/cm) of irradiated SUS316L stainless steel containing 0.026 ~ 0.12appm helium showed degradation of grain boundaries due to helium accumulation. Degree of the degradation depended on the amount of helium. No deterioration of grain boundaries was observed by bead on plate welding with one pass one layer when helium content was 0.039appm. The tensile strengths of welds in non-irradiated and irradiated material were similar. However, the elongation of a weldment by irradiated SUS316L containing 0.124appm Helium was lower than non-irradiated. It was estimated to cause the effects of helium bubbles. The SCC susceptibility of the HAZ was no significant difference compared with other locations. (author)

  14. A shielded measurement system for irradiated nuclear fuel measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosby, W.R.; Aumeier, S.E.; Klann, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is driving a transition toward dry storage of irradiated nuclear fuel (INF), toward characterization of INF for final disposition, and toward resumption of measurement-based material control and accountability (MC and A) efforts for INF. For these reasons, the ability to efficiently acquire radiological measurements of INF in a dry environment is important. The DOE has recently developed a guidance document proposing MC and A requirements for INF. The intent of this document is to encourage the direct measurement of INF on inventory within DOE. The guidance document reinforces and clarifies existing material safeguards requirements as they pertain to INF. Validation of nuclear material contents of non-self-protecting INF must be accomplished by direct measurement, application of validated burnup codes using qualified initial fissile content, burnup data, and age or by other valid means. The fuel units must remain intact with readable identification numbers. INF may be subject to periodic inventories with visual item accountability checks. Quantitative measurements may provide greater assurance of the integrity of INF inventories at a lower cost and with less personnel exposure than visual item accountability checks. Currently, several different approaches are used to measure the radiological attributes of INF. Although these systems are useful for a wide variety of applications, there is currently no relatively inexpensive measurement system that is readily deployable for INF measurements for materials located in dry storage. The authors present the conceptual design of a shielded measurement system (SMS) that could be used for this purpose. The SMS consists of a shielded enclosure designed to house a collection of measurement systems to allow measurements on spent fuel outside of a hot cell. The phase 1 SMS will contain 3 He detectors and ionization chambers to allow for gross neutron and gamma-ray measurements. The phase 2 SMS

  15. Materials for Nuclear Plants From Safe Design to Residual Life Assessments

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The clamor for non-carbon dioxide emitting energy production has directly  impacted on the development of nuclear energy. As new nuclear plants are built, plans and designs are continually being developed to manage the range of challenging requirement and problems that nuclear plants face especially when managing the greatly increased operating temperatures, irradiation doses and extended design life spans. Materials for Nuclear Plants: From Safe Design to Residual Life Assessments  provides a comprehensive treatment of the structural materials for nuclear power plants with emphasis on advanced design concepts.   Materials for Nuclear Plants: From Safe Design to Residual Life Assessments approaches structural materials with a systemic approach. Important components and materials currently in use as well as those which can be considered in future designs are detailed, whilst the damage mechanisms responsible for plant ageing are discussed and explained. Methodologies for materials characterization, material...

  16. Regulation on control of nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kaname

    1976-01-01

    Some comment is made on the present laws and the future course of consolidating the regulation of nuclear fuel materials. The first part gives the definitions of the nuclear fuel materials in the laws. The second part deals with the classification and regulation in material handling. Refinement undertaking, fabrication undertaking, reprocessing undertaking, the permission of the government to use the materials, the permission of the government to use the materials under international control, the restriction of transfer and receipt, the reporting, and the safeguard measures are commented. The third part deals with the strengthening of regulation. The nuclear fuel safety deliberation special committee will be established at some opportunity of revising the ordinance. The nuclear material safeguard special committee has been established in the Atomic Energy Commission. The last part deals with the future course of legal consolidation. The safety control will be strengthened. The early investigation of waste handling is necessary, because low level solid wastes are accumulating at each establishment. The law for transporting nuclear materials must be consolidated as early as possible to correspond to foreign transportation laws. Physical protection is awaiting the conclusions of the nuclear fuel safeguard special committee. The control and information systems for the safeguard measures must be consolidated in the laws. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Computational modeling of the behavior of nuclear materials (2). Molecular simulations for nuclear materials. Current situation and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Taira; Itakura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Molecular simulations for nuclear materials aim to reproduce atomistic-scale phenomena induced by irradiation and infer the change in material properties. In the present work, recent progress in this field is presented. In particular, the following three topics are explained: (1) Quantification of lattice defects formation process induced by fast neutron collision. (2) Identification of dislocation-channeling mechanism induced by interactions between defect clusters and dislocations. (3) Modeling of the three dimensional movement of defect clusters using molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  18. Structural materials for innovative nuclear systems (SMINS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Structural materials research is a field of growing relevance in the nuclear sector, especially for the different innovative reactor systems being developed within the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), for critical and subcritical transmutation systems, and of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) the Workshop on Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems (SMINS) was organised in collaboration with the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in Germany. The objectives of the workshop were to exchange information on structural materials research issues and to discuss ongoing programmes, both experimental and in the field of advanced modelling. These proceedings include the papers and the poster session materials presented at the workshop, representing the international state of the art in this domain. (author)

  19. Automated accounting systems for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkkila, B.

    1994-01-01

    History of the development of nuclear materials accounting systems in USA and their purposes are considered. Many present accounting systems are based on mainframe computers with multiple terminal access. Problems of future improvement accounting systems are discussed

  20. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international cooperation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  1. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international cooperation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [es

  2. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international cooperation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [fr

  3. Transport packages for nuclear material and waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The regulations and responsibilities concerning the transport packages of nuclear materials and waste are given in the guide. The approval procedure, control of manufacturing, commissioning of the packaging and the control of use are specified. (13 refs.)

  4. List of Nuclear Materials Licensing Actions Received

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — A catalog of all Materials Licensing Actions received for review. The catalog lists the name of the entity submitting the license application, their city and state,...

  5. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international cooperation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  6. 10 CFR 74.41 - Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for special nuclear material of moderate strategic significance. 74.41 Section 74.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear Material...

  7. Pyroelectrochemical process for reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.; Sartorelli, A.

    1982-01-01

    A pyroelectrochemical process for reprocessing irradiated fast reactor mixed oxide or carbide fuels is described. The fuel is dissolved in a bath of molten alkali metal sulfates. The Pu(SO 4 ) 2 formed in the bath is thermally decomposed, leaving crystalline PuO 2 on the bottom of the reaction vessel. Electrodes are then introduced into the bath, and UO 2 is deposited on the cathode. Alternatively, both UO 2 and PuO 2 may be electrodeposited. The molten salts, after decontamination by precipitating the fission products dissolved in the bath by introducing basic agents such as oxides, carbonates, or hydroxides, may be recycled. Since it is not possible to remove cesium from the molten salt bath, periodic disposal and partial renewal with fresh salts is necessary. The melted salts that contain the fission products are conditioned for disposal by embedding them in a metallic matrix

  8. Study of nuclear environment and material strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    There is a concern about the environmental hazard caused by radioactive materials coming with the expansion of nuclear power and even by renewable energies, which are used as countermeasures against global warming to construct a sustainable society. A concept to internalize the pollution caused by radioactive materials, which are directly or indirectly related to nuclear power, to economical activities by adopting externality is proposed. Energy and industrial productions are strongly related to the supply of material. Therefore material flow is also part of this internalization concept. The concept is named 'NEMS (Nuclear Environment and Material Strategy)'. Fission products and transuranic isotopes from nuclear power such as plutonium are considered in this concept. Thorium, which comes from the material flow of rare-earth production to support the elaboration of renewable energies including electric vehicles on the consumer side, is considered as an externality of the non-nuclear power field. Fission products contain some rare-earth materials. Thus, these rare-earth materials, which are extracted by the advanced ORIENT (Optimization by Recycling Instructive Elements) cycle, are internalized as rare-earth supplier in economy. However, the supply quantity is limited. Therefore rare-earth production itself is still needed. The externality of rare-earth production is thorium and is internalized by using it as nuclear fuel. In this case, the demand of thorium is still small within these few decades compared to the production of thorium as byproduct of the rare-earth production. A thorium energy bank (The Bank) is advanced to regulate the storage of the excess amount of thorium inside of an international framework in order to prevent environmental hazard resulting from the illegal disposal of thorium. In this paper, the material flows of thorium and rare-earth are outlined. Their material balance are demonstrated based on the prediction of rare-earth mining and an

  9. Reactor Structure Materials: Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannen, L.; Verwerft, M.

    2000-01-01

    Progress and achievements in 1999 in SCK-CEN's programme on applied and fundamental nuclear fuel research in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is on thermochemical fuel research, the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel as well as on integral experiments

  10. Overview of nuclear materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grella, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of transportation as it relates to one specific type of material, low specific activity (LSA) material. It is the predominant type of material that fits into the low-level waste category. An attempt is made to discuss how LSA is regulated, setting forth the requirements. First the general scheme of regulations are reviewed. In addition future changes in the regulations which will affect transportation of LSA materials and, which quite likely, will have an impact on R and D needs in this area are presented

  11. Estimation methods for special nuclear materials holdup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.; Picard, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The potential value of statistical models for the estimation of residual inventories of special nuclear materials was examined using holdup data from processing facilities and through controlled experiments. Although the measurement of hidden inventories of special nuclear materials in large facilities is a challenging task, reliable estimates of these inventories can be developed through a combination of good measurements and the use of statistical models. 7 references, 5 figures

  12. Fundamentals of materials accounting for nuclear safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillay, K.K.S. (comp.)

    1989-04-01

    Materials accounting is essential to providing the necessary assurance for verifying the effectiveness of a safeguards system. The use of measurements, analyses, records, and reports to maintain knowledge of the quantities of nuclear material present in a defined area of a facility and the use of physical inventories and materials balances to verify the presence of special nuclear materials are collectively known as materials accounting for nuclear safeguards. This manual, prepared as part of the resource materials for the Safeguards Technology Training Program of the US Department of Energy, addresses fundamental aspects of materials accounting, enriching and complementing them with the first-hand experiences of authors from varied disciplines. The topics range from highly technical subjects to site-specific system designs and policy discussions. This collection of papers is prepared by more than 25 professionals from the nuclear safeguards field. Representing research institutions, industries, and regulatory agencies, the authors create a unique resource for the annual course titled ''Materials Accounting for Nuclear Safeguards,'' which is offered at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. Resources of nuclear fuels and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, K [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Kamiyama, Teiji; Hayashi, S; Hida, Noboru; Okano, T

    1974-11-01

    In this explanatory article, data on the world resources of nuclear fuels and materials, their production, and the present state of utilization are presented by specialists in varied fields. Main materials taken up are uranium, thorium, beryllium, zirconium, niobium, rare earth elements, graphite, and materials for nuclear fusion (heavy hydrogen and tritium). World reserves and annual production of these materials listed in a number of tables are cited from statistics of the period 1970-1973 or given by estimation. These data may be used as valuable numerical data for various projects and problems of atomic power industries.

  14. Nuclear material control in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.; Waddoups, I.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy has defined a safeguards system to be an integrated system of physical protection, material accounting and material control subsystems designed to deter, prevent, detect, and respond to unauthorized possession, use, or sabotage of SNM. In practice, safeguards involve the development and application of techniques and procedures dealing with the establishment and continued maintenance of a system of activities. The system must also include administrative controls and surveillance to assure that the procedures and techniques of the system are effective and are being carried out. The control of nuclear material is critical to the safeguarding of nuclear materials within the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy includes as part of material control four functional performance areas. They include access controls, material surveillance, material containment and detection/assessment. This paper will address not only these areas but also the relationship between material control and other safeguards and security functions

  15. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity. Present status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tatsuo; Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    For developing the materials for nuclear fusion reactors, it is indispensable to study on the neutron irradiation behavior under fusion reactor conditions, but there is not any high energy neutron irradiation facility that can simulate fusion reactor conditions at present. Therefore, the investigation of the IFMIF was begun jointly by Japan, USA, Europe and Russia following the initiative of IEA. The conceptual design activities were completed in 1997. As to the background and the course, the present status of the research on heavy irradiation and the testing means for fusion materials, the requirement and the technical basis of high energy neutron irradiation, and the international joint design activities are reported. The materials for fusion reactors are exposed to the neutron irradiation with the energy spectra up to 14 MeV. The requirements from the users that the IFMIF should satisfy, the demand of the tests for the materials of prototype and demonstration fusion reactors and the evaluation of the neutron field characteristics of the IFMIF are discussed. As to the conceptual design of the IFMIF, the whole constitution, the operational mode, accelerator system and target system are described. (K.I.)

  16. Meso-scale magnetic signatures for nuclear reactor steel irradiation embrittlement monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, J. D., E-mail: pradeep.ramuhalli@pnnl.gov; Ramuhalli, P., E-mail: pradeep.ramuhalli@pnnl.gov; Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Jiang, W.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Johnson, B. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); McCloy, J. S., E-mail: john.mccloy@wsu.edu; Xu, K., E-mail: john.mccloy@wsu.edu [Washington State University, PO Box 642920, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the “state of health” of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of nondestructive evaluation technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results of integrating advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models. In the future, this will help to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in structural materials. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. Ongoing research is focused on extending the measurements and models on thin films to gain insights into the structural state of irradiated materials and the resulting impact on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  17. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Robbins, J.M.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  18. Spectroscopic studies of irradiated glasses: Application in nuclear dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, Khaled

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims to study the effects of ionizing radiation on silicate glasses in order to develop a new dosimetry system simple, precise, stable and inexpensive. Indeed, changes in mechanical properties, optical and paramagnetic glasses when subjected to ionizing radiation. The prediction of long-term behavior, physical aging under irradiation, the glass is paramount. many studies have brought many ways to avoid obscuring glass windows used in nuclear reactors or hot cells and optical devices. Recently, much work has concentrated on the application of the color induced by irradiation for developing a recyclable glass in the glass industry is of great interest economically and environmentally.

  19. Advances in nuclear fuel cycle materials and concepts. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the new trends in the materials used in various steps of the nuclear fuel cycle. This will cover fuels for various types of reactors (PWRs, HTRs, ... etc.) cladding materials, control rod materials, reactor structural materials, as well as materials used in the back end of the fuel cycle. Problems associated with corrosion of fuel cladding materials as well as those in control rod materials (B 4 C swelling...etc.), and approaches for combating these influences are reviewed. For the case of reactor pressure vessel materials issues related to the influences of alloy composition, design approaches including the use of more forged parts and minimizing, as for as possible, longitudinal welds especially in the central region, are discussed. Furthermore the application of techniques for recovery of pre-irradiation mechanical properties of PVS components is also covered. New candidate materials for the construction of high level waste containers including modified types of stainless steel (high Ni and high MO), nickel-base alloys and titanium alloys are also detailed. Finally, nuclear fuel cycle concepts involving plutonium and actinides recycling shall be reviewed. 28 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Advances in nuclear fuel cycle materials and concepts. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, A A [Materials Division, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the new trends in the materials used in various steps of the nuclear fuel cycle. This will cover fuels for various types of reactors (PWRs, HTRs, ... etc.) cladding materials, control rod materials, reactor structural materials, as well as materials used in the back end of the fuel cycle. Problems associated with corrosion of fuel cladding materials as well as those in control rod materials (B{sub 4} C swelling...etc.), and approaches for combating these influences are reviewed. For the case of reactor pressure vessel materials issues related to the influences of alloy composition, design approaches including the use of more forged parts and minimizing, as for as possible, longitudinal welds especially in the central region, are discussed. Furthermore the application of techniques for recovery of pre-irradiation mechanical properties of PVS components is also covered. New candidate materials for the construction of high level waste containers including modified types of stainless steel (high Ni and high MO), nickel-base alloys and titanium alloys are also detailed. Finally, nuclear fuel cycle concepts involving plutonium and actinides recycling shall be reviewed. 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Accountability of Radioactive Materials in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Fadilla Ismail; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah; Khairuddin Mohamad Kontol; Azimawati Ahmad; Suzilawati Muhd Sarowi; Mohd Fazlie Abdul Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive materials possessed in Malaysian Nuclear Agency have many beneficial applications for research and development, calibration, tracer and irradiation. There are two types of radioactive materials which consist of sealed sourced and unsealed sourced shall be accounted for and secured at all the times by following the security aspect. The Health Physics Group in the Department of Radiation Safety and Health Division is responsible to manage the issues related to any accountability for all radioactive material purchased or received under the radioactive material protocol. The accountability of radioactive materials in Malaysian Nuclear Agency is very important to ensure the security and control the radioactive materials to not to be lost or fall into the hands of people who do not have permission to possess or use it. The accountability of radioactive materials considered as a mandatory to maintaining accountability by complying the requirements of the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304) and regulations made thereunder and the conditions of license LPTA / A / 724. In this report describes the important element of accountability of radioactive materials in order to enhances security standard by allowing tracking of the locations of sources and to reduce the risk of radioactive materials falling into the wrong hands. (author)

  2. Considerations for sampling nuclear materials for SNM accounting measurements. Special nuclear material accountability report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Upson, U.L.

    1978-05-01

    This report presents principles and guidelines for sampling nuclear materials to measure chemical and isotopic content of the material. Development of sampling plans and procedures that maintain the random and systematic errors of sampling within acceptable limits for SNM(Special Nuclear Materials) accounting purposes are emphasized

  3. Use of the SPIRAL 2 facility for material irradiations with 14 MeV energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosnier, A.; Ridikas, D.; Ledoux, X.; Pellemoine, F.; Anne, R.; Huguet, Y.; Lipa, M.; Magaud, P.; Marbach, G.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Villari, A.C.C.

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of an irradiation facility for fusion applications will be to generate a material irradiation database for the design, construction, licensing and safe operation of a fusion demonstration power station (e.g., DEMO). This will be achieved through testing and qualifying material performance under neutron irradiation that simulates service up to the full lifetime anticipated in the power plant. Preliminary investigations of 14 MeV neutron effects on different kinds of fusion material could be assessed by the SPIRAL 2 Project at GANIL (Caen, France), aiming at rare isotope beams production for nuclear physics research with first beams expected by 2009. In SPIRAL 2, a deuteron beam of 5 mA and 40 MeV interacts with a rotating carbon disk producing high-energy neutrons (in the range between 1 and 40 MeV) via C (d, xn) reactions. Then, the facility could be used for 3-4 months y -1 for material irradiation purposes. This would correspond to damage rates in the order of 1-2 dpa y -1 (in Fe) in a volume of ∼10 cm 3 . Therefore, the use of miniaturized specimens will be essential in order to effectively utilize the available irradiation volume in SPIRAL 2. Sample package irradiation temperature would be in the range of 250-1000 deg. C. The irradiation level of 1-2 dpa y -1 with 14 MeV neutrons (average energy) may be interesting for micro-structural and metallurgical investigations (e.g., mini-traction, small punch tests, etc.) and possibly for the understanding of specimen size/geometric effects of critical material properties. Due to the small test cell volume, sample in situ experiments are not foreseen. However, sample packages would be, if required, available each month after transfer in a special hot cell on-site

  4. Accelerated irradiation test of gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279 degrees C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed

  5. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  6. The international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, T.E.; Cozzani, F.; Crandall, D.H.; Wiffen, F.W.; Katsuta, H.; Kondo, T.; Teplyakov, V.; Zavialsky, L.

    1994-01-01

    It is widely agreed that the development of materials for fusion systems requires a high flux, 14 MeV neutron source. The European Union, Japan, Russia and the US have initiated the conceptual design of such a facility. This activity, under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Fusion Materials Agreement, will develop the design for an accelerator-based D-Li system. The first organizational meeting was held in June 1994. This paper describes the system to be studied and the approach to be followed to complete the conceptual design by early 1997

  7. Overview moderator material for nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairing Manutu Pongtuluran; Hendra Prihatnadi

    2009-01-01

    In order for a reactor design is considered acceptable absolute technical requirement is fulfilled because the most important part of a reactor design. Safety considerations emphasis on the handling of radioactive substances emitted during the operation of a reactor and radioactive waste handling. Moderator material is a layer that interacts directly with neutrons split the nuclear fuel that will lead to changes in physical properties, nuclear properties, mechanical properties and chemical properties. Reviews moderator of this time is of the types of moderator is often used to meet the requirements as nuclear material. (author)

  8. Material degradation - a nuclear utility's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spekkens, P.

    2007-01-01

    Degradation of nuclear plant materials has been responsible for major costs and unit outage time. As such, nuclear utilities are important end users of the information produced by R and D on material degradation. This plenary describes the significance of material degradation for the nuclear utilities, and how utilities use information about material degradation in their short, medium and long term planning activities. Utilities invest in R and D programs to assist them in their business objective of operating safely, reliably and cost competitively. Material degradation impacts all three of these business drivers. Utilities make decisions on life cycle planning, unit refurbishment and 'new build' projects on the basis of their understanding of the behaviour of a variety of materials in a broad range of environments. The R and D being carried out today will determine the future business success of the nuclear utilities. The R and D program needs to be broadly based to include a range of materials, environments and time-frames, particularly any new materials proposed for use in new units. The R and D community needs to help the utility managers make choices that will result in an optimized materials R and D program

  9. Investigations on neutron irradiated 3D carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Alur, V. D.; Patra, A. K.; Acharya, R.; Srivastava, D.

    2018-04-01

    As against conventional graphite materials carbon-carbon (C/C) composite materials are now being contemplated as the promising candidate materials for the high temperature and fusion reactor owing to their high thermal conductivity and high thermal resistance, better mechanical/thermal properties and irradiation stability. The current need is for focused research on novel carbon materials for future new generation nuclear reactors. The advantage of carbon-carbon composite is that the microstructure and the properties can be tailor made. The present study encompasses the irradiation of 3D carbon composite prepared by reinforcement using PAN carbon fibers for nuclear application. The carbon fiber reinforced composite was subjected to neutron irradiation in the research reactor DHRUVA. The irradiated samples were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The DSC scans were taken in argon atmosphere under a linear heating program. The scanning was carried out at temperature range from 30 °C to 700 °C at different heating rates in argon atmosphere along with reference as unirradiated carbon composite. The Wigner energy spectrum of irradiated composite showed two peaks corresponding to 200 °C and 600 °C. The stored energy data for the samples were in the range 110-170 J/g for temperature ranging from 30 °C to 700 °C. The Wigner energy spectrum of irradiated carbon composite did not indicate spontaneous temperature rise during thermal annealing. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments have been carried out to investigate neutron irradiation induced changes in porosity of the composite samples. SANS data were recorded in the scattering wave vector range of 0.17 nm-1 to 3.5 nm-1. Comparison of SANS profiles of irradiated and unirradiated samples indicates significant change in pore morphology. Pore size distributions of the samples follow power law size distribution with

  10. Modelling irradiation effects in fusion materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Victoria, M.; Dudarev, S.; Boutard, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    We review the current status of the European fusion materials modelling programme. We describe recent findings and outline potential areas for future development. Large-scale density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the structure of the point defects in α-Fe, and highlight the crucial...

  11. International safeguards: Accounting for nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbone, L.G.

    1988-09-28

    Nuclear safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are one element of the non-proliferation regime'', the collection of measures whose aim is to forestall the spread of nuclear weapons to countries that do not already possess them. Safeguards verifications provide evidence that nuclear materials in peaceful use for nuclear-power production are properly accounted for. Though carried out in cooperation with nuclear facility operators, the verifications can provide assurance because they are designed with the capability to detect diversion, should it occur. Traditional safeguards verification measures conducted by inspectors of the IAEA include book auditing; counting and identifying containers of nuclear material; measuring nuclear material; photographic and video surveillance; and sealing. Novel approaches to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in safeguards verifications are under investigation as the number and complexity of nuclear facilities grow. These include the zone approach, which entails carrying out verifications for groups of facilities collectively, and randomization approach, which entails carrying out entire inspection visits some fraction of the time on a random basis. Both approaches show promise in particular situations, but, like traditional measures, must be tested to ensure their practical utility. These approaches are covered on this report. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. International safeguards: Accounting for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are one element of the ''non-proliferation regime'', the collection of measures whose aim is to forestall the spread of nuclear weapons to countries that do not already possess them. Safeguards verifications provide evidence that nuclear materials in peaceful use for nuclear-power production are properly accounted for. Though carried out in cooperation with nuclear facility operators, the verifications can provide assurance because they are designed with the capability to detect diversion, should it occur. Traditional safeguards verification measures conducted by inspectors of the IAEA include book auditing; counting and identifying containers of nuclear material; measuring nuclear material; photographic and video surveillance; and sealing. Novel approaches to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in safeguards verifications are under investigation as the number and complexity of nuclear facilities grow. These include the zone approach, which entails carrying out verifications for groups of facilities collectively, and randomization approach, which entails carrying out entire inspection visits some fraction of the time on a random basis. Both approaches show promise in particular situations, but, like traditional measures, must be tested to ensure their practical utility. These approaches are covered on this report. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    2004-01-01

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited

  14. Evaluation of Terminated Nuclear Material Licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, K.M.; Zeighami, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of a six-year project that reviewed material licenses that had been terminated during the period from inception of licensing until approximately late-1994. The material licenses covered in the review project were Part 30, byproduct material licenses; Part 40, source material licenses; and Part 70, special nuclear material licenses. This report describes the methodology developed for the project, summarizes the findings of the license file inventory process, and describes the findings of the reviews or evaluations of the license files. The evaluation identified nuclear material use sites that need review of the licensing material or more direct follow-up of some type. The review process also identified licenses authorized to possess sealed sources for which there was incomplete or missing documentation of the fate of the sources

  15. Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchi, L.

    1991-01-01

    The book contains contributed papers from various authors on the following subjects: Safeguards systems and implementation, Measurement techniques: general, Measurement techniques: destructive analysis, Measurement techniques: non-destructive assay, Containment and surveillance, Spent fuel strategies, Material accounting and data evaluation

  16. Radiation effects in nuclear materials: Role of nuclear and electronic energy losses and their synergy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomé, Lionel [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud; Debelle, Aurelien [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Garrido, Frederico [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Mylonas, Stamatis [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Décamps, B. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Bachelet, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Sattonnay, G. [LEMHE/ICMMO, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. Orsay, France; Moll, Sandra [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette; Pellegrino, S. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Miro, S. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Trocellier, P. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Serruys, Y. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Velisa, G. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Grygiel, C. [CNRS, France; Monnet, I. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-Université de Caen, France; Toulemonde, Marcel [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)-ENSICAE; Simon, P. [CEMHTI, CNRS, France; Jagielski, Jacek [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Jozwik-Biala, Iwona [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Nowicki, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk, Poland; Behar, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre,; Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Backman, Marie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic oxides and carbides are promising matrices for the immobilization and/or transmutation of nuclear wastes, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors and structural components for fusion reactors. For these applications there is a need of fundamental data concerning the behavior of nuclear ceramics upon irradiation. This article is focused on the presentation of a few remarkable examples regarding ion-beam modifications of nuclear ceramics with an emphasis on the mechanisms leading to damage creation and phase transformations. Results obtained by combining advanced techniques (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channeling, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy) concern irradiations in a broad energy range (from keV to GeV) with the aim of exploring both nuclear collision (Sn) and electronic excitation (Se) regimes. Finally, the daunting challenge of the demonstration of the existence of synergistic effects between Sn and Se is tackled by discussing the healing due to intense electronic energy deposition (SHIBIEC) and by reporting results recently obtained in dual-beam irradiation (DBI) experiments.

  17. Nuclear physics methods in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethge, K.; Baumann, H.; Jex, H.; Rauch, F.

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings of the seventh divisional conference of the Nuclear Physics Division held at Darmstadt, Germany, from 23rd through 26th of September, 1980. The scope of this conference was defined as follows: i) to inform solid state physicists and materials scientists about the application of nuclear physics methods; ii) to show to nuclear physicists open questions and problems in solid state physics and materials science to which their methods can be applied. According to the intentions of the conference, the various nuclear physics methods utilized in solid state physics and materials science and especially new developments were reviewed by invited speakers. Detailed aspects of the methods and typical examples extending over a wide range of applications were presented as contributions in poster sessions. The Proceedings contain all the invited papers and about 90% of the contributed papers. (orig./RW)

  18. Developing Ultra-small Scale Mechanical Testing Methods and Microstructural Investigation Procedures for Irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosemann, Peter; Kaoumi, Djamel

    2018-04-02

    Nuclear materials are an essential aspect of nuclear engineering. While great effort is spent on designing more advanced reactors or enhancing a reactor’s safety, materials have been the bottleneck of most new developments. The designs of new reactor concepts are driven by neutronic and thermodynamic aspects, leading to unusual coolants (liquid metal, liquid salt, gases), higher temperatures, and higher radiation doses than conventional light water reactors have. However, any (nuclear) engineering design must consider the materials used in the anticipated application in order to ever be realized. Designs which may look easy, simple and efficient considering thermodynamics or neutronic aspects can show their true difficulty in the materials area, which then prevents them from being deployed. In turn, the materials available are influencing the neutronic and thermodynamic designs and therefore must be considered from the beginning, requiring close collaborations between different aspects of nuclear engineering. If a particular design requires new materials, the licensing of the reactor must be considered, but licensing can be a costly and time consuming process that results in long lead times to realize true materials innovation. Extensive materials evaluation and irradiation campaigns need to be conducted in order to introduce a new material in a nuclear system. For licensing purposes, standard materials testing is key. However, basic scientific studies on new materials or even already used materials have the potential to accelerate the process of materials development or foster predictability of materials that are already in service and therefore are essential in order not to face difficulties later in the development or service stage. Therefore a combination of engineering scale materials evaluation as well as basic scientific understanding of the materials property changes under service condition is key to address potential issues in the process. Ion

  19. Available post-irradiation examination techniques at Romanian institute for nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvan, Marcel; Sorescu, Antonius; Mincu, Marin; Uta, Octavian; Dobrin, Relu

    2005-01-01

    The Romanian Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) has a set of nuclear facilities consisting of TRIGA 14 MW(th) materials testing reactor and LEPI (Romanian acronym for post-irradiation examination laboratory) which enable to investigate the behaviour of the nuclear fuel and materials under various irradiation conditions. The available techniques of post-irradiation examination (PIE) and purposes of PIE for CANDU reactor fuel are as follows. 1) Visual inspection and photography by periscope: To examine the surface condition such as deposits, corrosion etc. 2) Eddy current testing: To verify the cladding integrity. 3) Profilometry and length measurement performed both before and after irradiation: To measure the parameters which highlight the dimensional changes i.e. diameter, length, diametral and axial sheath deformation, circumferential sheath ridging height, bow and ovality. 4) Gamma scanning and Tomography: To determine the burnup, axial and radial fission products activity distribution and to check for flux peaking and loading homogeneity. 5) Puncture test: To measure the pressure, volume and composition of fission gas and the inner free volume. 6) Optical microscopy: To highlight the structural changes and hydriding, to examine the condition of the fuel-sheath interface and to measure the oxide thickness and Vickers microhardness. 7) Mass spectrometry: To measure the burnup. 8) Tensile testing: To check the mechanical properties. So far, non-destructive and destructive post-irradiation examinations have been performed on a significant number of CANDU fuel rods (about 100) manufactured by INR and irradiated to different power histories in the INR 14 MW(th) TRIGA reactor. These examinations have been performed as part of the Romanian research programme for the manufacturing, development and safety of the CANDU fuel. The paper describes the PIE techniques and some results. (Author)

  20. The feasibility of welding irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. T.; Chin, B. A.

    1991-03-01

    Helium was implanted into solution-annealed (SA) 316 stainless steel, 20% cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel and titanium-modified Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) through tritium decay to levels ranging from 0.18 to 256 appm. Full penetration welds were then made on helium-doped materials using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) under fully constrained conditions. Intergranular heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was observed in all of the materials containing greater than 1 appm He. Electron microscopy showed that the HAZ cracking originated from the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. Bubble growth kinetics in the HAZ is explained by stress-enhanced diffusive cavity growth. Results suggest that the propensity for HAZ cracking can be reduced by the pre-existing cold-worked structure and by finely-distributed MC precipitates that refine the distribution of helium bubbles and minimize the flow of vacancies in grain boundaries.

  1. The feasibility of welding of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.T.; Chin, B.A.; Auburn Univ., AL

    1989-01-01

    Helium was implanted into solution-annealed (SA) 316 stainless steel, 20% cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel and titanium-modified Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) through tritium decay to levels ranging from 0.18 to 256 appm. Full penetration welds were then made on helium-doped materials using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) under fully constrained conditions. Intergranular heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was observed in all of the materials containing greater than 1 appm He. Electron microscopy showed that the HAZ cracking originated from the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. Bubble growth kinetics in the HAZ is explained by stress-enhanced diffusive cavity growth. Results suggest that the propensity for HAZ cracking can be reduced by the preexisting cold-worked structure and by finely-distributed MC precipitates that refine the distribution of helium bubbles and minimize the flow of vacancies in grain boundaries. 16 refs., 3 figs

  2. Irradiation devices for fusion reactor materials results obtained from irradiated lithium aluminate at the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.; Rasneur, B.; Botter, F.

    1986-06-01

    Studies about controlled fusion reactor of the Tokamak type require the examination of the radiation effects on the behaviour of various potential materials. Thus, in the first part of this paper, are presented the devices adapted to these materials studies and used in the OSIRIS reactor. In a second part, is described an experiment of irradiation ceramics used as candidates for breeding material and are given the first results

  3. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  4. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States.

  5. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States

  6. Nuclear materials transport in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korycanek, J.

    1990-01-01

    About 1.5 million tons of uranium ore, 8000 tons of uranium concentrate, 1000 tons of UF 6 , 340 spent fuel containers, and 30 000 m 3 of nuclear wastes are transported annually by trucks, trains and ships in France. Annual costs of this transportation amount to 500-600 million FRF, and about 200 employees are engaged in this activity. Transportation of spent fuel to the La Hague and Marcoule fuel reprocessing plants, and the transport of plutonium are dealt with in detail. (Z.M.). 5 figs., 1 ref

  7. Verification and nuclear material security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Director General will open the symposium by presenting a series of challenges facing the international safeguards community: the need to ensure a robust system, with strong verification tools and a sound research and development programme; the importance of securing the necessary support for the system, in terms of resources; the effort to achieve universal participation in the non-proliferation regime; and the necessity of re-energizing disarmament efforts. Special focus will be given to the challenge underscored by recent events, of strengthening international efforts to combat nuclear terrorism. (author)

  8. Long-term radiation effects on commercial cable-insulating materials irradiated at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, P.; Stolarz, A.

    1983-01-01

    Long-term irradiation damage tests have been carried out on a variety of flexible cable-insulating materials offered to CERN by different European cable manufacturers. Tensile test specimens were exposed for a maximum of three years in high-level radiation areas of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and for comparison at high dose rates in a nuclear reactor. The degradation of mechanical properties after irradiation in air depends not only on the total absorbed dose, but also on the dose rate for most of these polymer compounds. These dose-rate effects vary between material types and for different compounds. The results presented here illustrate the difference in radiation damage between short-term and long-term irradiation conditions in a typical service application for the various materials tested. They also allow safety factors to be estimated for the extrapolation of the limiting exposure in service from accelerated material tests in the range of dose rates covered. A discussion of the available models of the dose-rate effects results in a conservative estimate for extrapolation to low dose rates from measured values at intermediate dose rates of the order of 0.1 Gy/s. Based on short-term irradiation tests only, the safety factors to be applied depend on the end-point criterion used, and may vary between 1 and 10 for the range of dose rates and materials considered here. (orig.)

  9. Polymers for nuclear materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, G.; Benicewicz, B.; Duke, J.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The use of open-celled microcellular foams as solid sorbents for metal ions and other solutes could provide a revolutionary development in separation science. Macroreticular and gel-bead materials are the current state-of-the-art for solid sorbents to separate metal ions and other solutes from solution. The new polymer materials examined in this effort offer a number of advantages over the older materials that can have a large impact on industrial separations. The advantages include larger usable surface area in contact with the solution, faster sorption kinetics, ability to tailor the uniform cell size to a specific application, and elimination of channeling and packing instability

  10. Measurement control program for nuclear material accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Merrill, J.A.; Brown, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    A measurement control program for nuclear material accounting monitors and controls the quality of the measurments of special nuclear material that are involved in material balances. The quality is monitored by collecting data from which the current precision and accuracy of measurements can be evaluated. The quality is controlled by evaluations, reviews, and other administrative measures for control of selection or design of facilities, equipment and measurement methods and the training and qualification of personnel who perform SNM measurements. This report describes the most important elements of a program by which management can monitor and control measurement quality

  11. Advance of investigation of irradiation embrittlement mechanism of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. History and future of irradiation embrittlement researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is the most important component of LWR plants required to be safe. This paper describes contents of the title consisting of four chapters. The first chapter states the general theory of irradiation effects, irradiation embrittlement and decreasing of toughness, and some kinds of pressure vessel steels. The second chapter explains history of irradiation embrittlement investigations and the advance of research methods for experiments and calculation. The third chapter contains information of inner structure of irradiated materials and development of prediction equations, recent information of embrittlement mechanism and mechanism guided prediction method, USA model and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) model. The fourth chapter states recent problems from viewpoints of experimental and analytical approaches. Comparison of standards of LWR pressure vessel steels between Japan and USA, relation between the density of number of cluster and the copper content, effect of flux on clustering of copper atoms, and CRIEPI's way of approaching the prediction method are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  12. Irradiated nuclear fuel transport from Japan to Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, M.T.; Shimoyama, S.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been transported from Japan to Europe since 1969, although U.K. experience goes back almost two decades. Both magnox and oxide fuel have been transported, and the technical requirements associated with each type of fuel are outlined. The specialized ships used by British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) for this transport are described, as well as the ships being developed for future use in the Japan trade. The ship requirements are related to the regulatory position both in the United Kingdom and internationally, and the Japanese regulatory requirements are described. Finally, specific operational experience of a Japanese reactor operator is described

  13. Repair-welding technology of irradiated materials - WIM project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new project on the development of repair-welding technology for core internals and reactor (pressure) vessel, consigned by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), has been started from October 1997. The objective of the project is classified into three points as follows: (1) to develop repair-welding techniques for neutron irradiated materials, (2) to prove the availability of the techniques for core internals and reactor (pressure) vessel, and (3) to recommend the updated repair-welding for the Technical Rules and Standards. Total planning, neutron irradiation, preparation of welding equipment are now in progress. The materials are austenitic stainless steels and a low alloy steel. Neutron irradiation is performed using test reactors. In order to suppress the helium aggregation along grain boundaries, low heat input welding techniques, such as laser, low heat input TIG and friction weldings, will be applied. (author)

  14. The regulations concerning refining business of nuclear source material and nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This rule is established under the provisions concerning refining business in the law concerning the regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and nuclear reactors and the ordinance for the execution of this law, and to enforce them. Basic terms are defined, such as: exposure radiation dose, cumulative dose, control area, surrounding monitoring area and worker. The application for the designation for refining business under the law shall be classified into the facilities for crushing and leaching-filtration, thikening, and refining, the storage facilities for nuclear raw materials and nuclear fuel materials, and the disposal facilities for radioactive wastes, etc. To the application, shall be attached business plans, the explanations concerning the technical abilities of applicants and the prevention of hazards by nuclear raw materials and nuclear fuel materials regarding refining facilities, etc. Records shall be made on the accept, delivery and stock of each kind of nuclear raw materials and nuclear fuel materials, radiation control, the maintenance of and accidents in refining facilities, and kept for specified periods, respectively. Security regulations shall be enacted for each works or enterprise on the functions and organizations of persons engaged in the control of refining facilities, the operation of the apparatuses which must be controlled for the prevention of accidents, and the establishment of control area and surrounding monitoring area, etc. The report on the usage of internationally regulated goods and the measures taken at the time of danger are defined particularly. (Okada, K.)

  15. Nuclear material accounting software for Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, M.; Ewing, T.; Lindley, R.; McWilliams, C.; Roche, C.; Sakunov, I.; Walters, G.

    1999-01-01

    Among the needs identified during initial surveys of nuclear facilities in Ukraine was improved accounting software for reporting material inventories to the regulatory body. AIMAS (Automated Inventory/Material Accounting System) is a PC-based application written in Microsoft Access that was jointly designed by an US/Ukraine development team. The design is highly flexible and configurable, and supports a wide range of computing infrastructure needs and facility requirements including situations where networks are not available or reliable. AIMAS has both English and Russian-language options for displays and reports, and it operates under Windows 3.1, 95, or NT 4.0trademark. AIMAS functions include basic physical inventory tracking, transaction histories, reporting, and system administration functions (system configuration, security, data backup and recovery). Security measures include multilevel password access control, all transactions logged with the user identification, and system administration control. Interfaces to external modules provide nuclear fuel burn-up adjustment and barcode scanning capabilities for physical inventory taking. AIMAS has been installed at Kiev Institute of Nuclear Research (KINR), South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant (SUNPP), Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT), Sevastopol Institute of Nuclear Energy and Industry (SINEI), and the Ministry of Environmental Protection and Nuclear Safety/Nuclear Regulatory Administration (MEPNS/NRA). Facility specialists are being trained to use the application to track material movement and report to the national regulatory authority

  16. Safeguarding nuclear weapon: Usable materials in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, T.

    1998-01-01

    Both the United States and Russia are retaining as strategic reserves more plutonium and HEU for potential reuse as weapons, than is legitimately needed. Both have engaged in discussions and have programs in various stages of development to dispose of excess plutonium and HEU. These fissile material disposition programs will take decades to complete. In the interim there will be, as there is now, hundreds of tons of separated weapon-usable fissile material stored in tens of thousands of transportable canisters, each containing from a few to several tons of kgs of weapon-usable fissile material. This material must be secured against theft and unauthorized use. To have high confidence that the material is secure, one must establish criteria against which the adequacy of the protective systems can be judged. For example, one finds such criteria in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) regulations for the protection of special nuclear materials

  17. The permission of transport of irradiated nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klomberg, T.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    In July and October 2000 the Dutch government granted permits for the transportation of irradiated nuclear fuel elements. The environmental organization Greenpeace objected against the permit, but that was rejected by the Dutch Council of State. A brief overview is given of the judgements and the state-of-the-art with respect to the transportation of the elements from Dutch reactors and storage facilities in Petten, Dodewaard and Borssele to Cogema in La Hague, France and BNFL in Sellafield, England

  18. Mass spectrometry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the 235 U/ 238 U ratio in product-quality material have improved from uncertainties of 0.1 percent (rel) to 0.2 percent since the Manhattan Project. The hardware and procedural changes responsible for these measurement improvements are traced and discussed

  19. Chimera of new nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    The current and future needs in materials for light water reactors and liquid metal fast breeder reactors are reviewed. Information and discussions are included on boiling water reactors, pressurized water reactors, liquid metal fast breeder reactors, corrosion of piping systems and steam generators, ferritic steels, stainless steels, Inconel 600, pressure vessels, and radiation damage. (U.S.)

  20. Software development for managing nuclear material database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondin, Julio Benedito Marin

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, the nuclear material control is one of the most important activities. The Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), when inspecting routinely, regards the data provided as a major safety factor. Having a control system of nuclear material that allows the amount and location of the various items to be inspected, at any time, is a key factor today. The objective of this work was to enhance the existing system using a more friendly platform of development, through the VisualBasic programming language (Microsoft Corporation), to facilitate the operation team of the reactor IEA-R1 Reactor tasks, providing data that enable a better and prompter control of the IEA-R1 nuclear material. These data have allowed the development of papers presented at national and international conferences and the development of master's dissertations and doctorate theses. The software object of this study was designed to meet the requirements of the CNEN and the IAEA safeguard rules, but its functions may be expanded in accordance with future needs. The program developed can be used in other reactors to be built in the country, since it is very practical and allows an effective control of the nuclear material in the facilities. (author)

  1. Gamma spectrometric discrimination of special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdall, M.; Mattila, A.; Ramebaeck, H.; Aage, H.K.; Palsson, S.E.

    2012-12-01

    This report presents details pertaining to an exercise conducted as part of the NKS-B programme using synthetic gamma ray spectra to simulate the type of data that may be encountered in the interception of material potentially containing special nuclear materials. A range of scenarios were developed involving sources that may or may not contain special nuclear materials. Gamma spectral data was provided to participants as well as ancillary data and participants were asked, under time constraint, to determine whether or not the data was indicative of circumstances involving special nuclear materials. The situations varied such that different approaches were required in order to obtain the correct result in each context. In the majority of cases participants were able to correctly ascertain whether or not the situations involved special nuclear material. Although fulfilling the primary goal of the exercise, some participants were not in a position to correctly identify with certainty the material involved, Situations in which the smuggled material was being masked by another source proved to be the most challenging for participants. (Author)

  2. Modernizing computerized nuclear material accounting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkkila, B.H.; Claborn, J.

    1995-01-01

    DOE Orders and draft orders for nuclear material control and accountability address a complete material control and accountability (MC and A) program for all DOE contractors processing, using, or storing nuclear materials. A critical element of an MC and A program is the accounting system used to track and record all inventories of nuclear material and movements of materials in those inventories. Most DOE facilities use computerized accounting systems to facilitate the task of accounting for all their inventory of nuclear materials. Many facilities still use a mixture of a manual paper system with a computerized system. Also, facilities may use multiple systems to support information needed for MC and A. For real-time accounting it is desirable to implement a single integrated data base management system for a variety of users. In addition to accountability needs, waste management, material management, and production operations must be supported. Information in these systems can also support criticality safety and other safety issues. Modern networked microcomputers provide extensive processing and reporting capabilities that single mainframe computer systems struggle with. This paper describes an approach being developed at Los Alamos to address these problems

  3. Gamma spectrometric discrimination of special nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowdall, M. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Mattila, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Ramebaeck, H. [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Stockholm (Sweden); Aage, H.K. [Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark); Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2012-12-15

    This report presents details pertaining to an exercise conducted as part of the NKS-B programme using synthetic gamma ray spectra to simulate the type of data that may be encountered in the interception of material potentially containing special nuclear materials. A range of scenarios were developed involving sources that may or may not contain special nuclear materials. Gamma spectral data was provided to participants as well as ancillary data and participants were asked, under time constraint, to determine whether or not the data was indicative of circumstances involving special nuclear materials. The situations varied such that different approaches were required in order to obtain the correct result in each context. In the majority of cases participants were able to correctly ascertain whether or not the situations involved special nuclear material. Although fulfilling the primary goal of the exercise, some participants were not in a position to correctly identify with certainty the material involved, Situations in which the smuggled material was being masked by another source proved to be the most challenging for participants. (Author)

  4. Sampling by electro-erosion on irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, M.; Pizzanelli, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    Sampling on irradiated materials, in particular for mechanical property study of steels in the FAST NEUTRON program needed the set in a hot cell of a machining device by electroerosion. This device allows sampling of tenacity, traction, resilience test pieces [fr

  5. Novel designs of continuous process for dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rance, P.J.W.; Tinsley, T.P.; Polyakov, A.S.; Raginsky, L.S.; Morkovnikov, V.E.; Morozov, N.V.; Eliseev, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    A novel design of continuous dissolver for the dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuels is described. The development of the dissolver has resulted from a successful collaboration over the last four years between British Nuclear Fuels plc (UK) and the A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (Russia). An overview of the development work carried out on three different models is presented, and results from each of these are discussed. The dissolver provides many advantages over current designs of dissolvers. (author)

  6. New materials options for nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Garner, F.A.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gelles, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Development of new materials for nuclear reactor systems is continuing to produce options for improved reactor designs. Materials with reduced environment-induced crack growth is a key materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry while the development of low activation ferritic, austenitic and vanadium alloys has been an active area for materials development for fusion reactor structural applications. Development of advanced materials such as metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites for reactor systems have received a limited amount of attention. (author)

  7. Design verification test of instrumented capsule (02F-11K) for nuclear fuel irradiation in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Sohn, J. M.; Oh, J. M. [and others

    2004-01-01

    An instrumented capsule is being developed to be able to measure fuel characteristics, such as fuel temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, fuel elongation, and neutron flux, etc., during the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in HANARO. The instrumented capsule for measuring and monitoring fuel centerline temperature and neutron flux was designed and manufactured. The instrumented capsule includes three test fuel rods installed thermocouple to measure fuel centerline temperature and three SPNDs (Self-Powered Neutron Detector) to monitor the neutron flux. Its stability was verified by out-of-pile performance test, and its safety evaluation was also shown that the safety requirements were satisfied. And then, to verify the design of the instrumented capsule in the test hole, it was successfully irradiated in the test hole of HANARO from March 14, 2003 to June 1, 2003 (53.8 full power days at 24 MWth). During irradiation, the centerline temperature of PWR UO{sub 2} fuel pellets fabricated by KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Company and the neutron flux were continuously measured and monitored. The test fuel rods were irradiated at less than 350 W/cm to 5.13 GWD/MTU with fuel centerline peak temperature below 1,375 .deg. C. The structural stability of the capsule was satisfied by the naked eye in service pool of HANARO. The capsule and test fuel rods were dismantled and test fuel rods were examined at the hot cell of IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility)

  8. Multiscale modeling of radiation effects in nuclear reactor structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Junhyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Most problems in irradiated materials originate from the atomic collision of high-energy particles and lattice atoms. This collision leads to displacement cascades through the energy transfer reaction and causes various types of defects such as vacancies, interstitials, and clusters. The behavior of the point defects created in the displacement cascades is important because these defects play a major role in a microstructural evolution and further affect the changes in material properties. Rapid advances have been made in the computational capabilities for a realistic simulation of complex physical phenomena, such as irradiation and aging effects. At the same time, progress has been made in understanding the effect of radiation in metals, especially iron-based alloys. In this work, we present some of our ongoing work in this area, which illustrates a multiscale modeling for evaluating a microstructural evolution and mechanical property changes during irradiation. Multiscale modeling approaches are briefly presented here in the following order: nuclear interaction, atomic-level interaction, atomistic modeling, microstructural evolution modeling and mechanical property modeling. This is one of many possible methods for classifying techniques. The effort in developing physical multiscale models applied to radiation damage has been focused on a single crystal or single-grain materials.

  9. Potential use of nuclear irradiation technology for the microbial industry in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, P.; Isyanti, I.

    2002-01-01

    The potential application of irradiation is numerous. The process seems technically feasible for sterilization of medical devices, pharmaceutical products, foods, cosmetics, packaging materials, scientific laboratory materials like petri dishes, growth media, complying with phytosanitary requirements for fruit and vegetables etc. An awareness of biofertilizer or microbial product has established itself to be a significant part of food production and consumption internationally as well as in Malaysia. People are discovering organic agriculture can serve their need for safe quality food, environment conservation and social accountability. One of the major technical constraints of viable microbial or biofertilizer product production is contaminated free carrier materials. In order to develop the good microbial product, we are practicing the gamma irradiation on our carrier materials and successfully established the product. The different carrier materials were packed and used 25 kGy Cobalt-60 source (JS 8900, SINAGAMA, MINT) for sterilization and simultaneously the materials were sterilized in steam. The cultured Trichoderma virile and T harzianum were mixed with sterilized carrier and observed the colony formin. unit (CFU) on regular intervals. The results showed the efficient colony forming unit on both sterilization method of materials. However, the nuclear irradiation is more cost effective and time saving than steam method. (Author)

  10. Device for separating, purifying and recovering nuclear fuel material, impurities and materials from impurity-containing nuclear fuel materials or nuclear fuel containing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ryuichi; Kamei, Yoshinobu; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate, purify and recover nuclear fuel materials, impurities and materials with no formation of liquid wastes. Constitution: Oxidizing atmosphere gases are introduced from both ends of a heating furnace. Vessels containing impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing material are continuously disposed movably from one end to the other of the heating furnace. Then, impurity oxides or material oxides selectively evaporated from the impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing materials are entrained in the oxidizing atmosphere gas and the gases are led out externally from a discharge port opened at the intermediate portion of the heating furnace, filters are disposed to the exit to solidify and capture the nuclear fuel substances and traps are disposed behind the filters to solidify and capture the oxides by spontaneous air cooling or water cooling. (Sekiya, K.)

  11. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  12. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A.N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite exhibits

  13. The regulations concerning refining business of nuclear source material and nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The regulations are provided for under the law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors and provisions concerning refining business in the enforcement order for the law. The basic concepts and terms are defined, such as: exposure dose, accumulative dose; controlled area; inspected surrounding area and employee. Refining facilities listed in the application for designation shall be classified into clushing and leaching, thickning, refining facilities, storage facilities of nuclear source materials and nuclear fuel materials, disposal facilities of contaminated substances and building for refining, etc. Business program attached to the application shall include expected time of beginning of refining, estimated production amount of nuclear source materials or nuclear fuel materials for the first three years and funds necessary for construction, etc. Records shall be made and kept for particular periods on delivery and storage of nuclear source materials and nuclear fuel materials, control of radiation, maintenance and accidents of refining facilities. Safety securing, application of internationally regulated substances and measures in dangerous situations are stipulated respectively. Exposure dose of employees and other specified matters shall be reported by the refiner yearly to the Director General of Science and Technology Agency and the Minister of International Trade and Industry. (Okada, K.)

  14. Materials analysis with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability to produce focused beams of a few MeV light ions from Van de Graaff accelerators has resulted in the development of nuclear microprobes. Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reactions, and particle-induced x-ray emission are used to provide spatially resolved information from the near surface region of materials. Rutherford backscattering provides nondestructive depth and mass resolution. Nuclear reactions are sensitive to light elements (Z < 15). Particle-induced x-ray analysis is similar to electron microprobe analysis, but 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive. The focused beams are usually produced with specially designed multiplets of magnetic quadrupoles. The LASL microprobe uses a superconducting solenoid as a final lens. The data are acquired by a computer interfaced to the experiment with CAMAC. The characteristics of the information acquired with a nuclear microprobe are discussed; the means of producing the beams of nuclear particles are described; and the limitations and applications of such systems are given

  15. Growth kinetics of dislocation loops in irradiated ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Kinoshita, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic materials are expected to be applied in the future fusion reactor as radio frequency (RF) windows, toroidal insulating breaks and diagnostic probes. The radiation resistance of ceramic materials, degradation of the electrical properties and radiation induced conductivity of these materials under neutron irradiation are determined by the kinetics of the accumulation of point defects in the matrix and point defect cluster formation (dislocation loops, voids, etc.). Under irradiation, due to the ionization process, excitation of electronic subsystem and covalent type of interaction between atoms the point defects in ceramic materials are characterized by the charge state (e.g. an F + center, an oxygen vacancy with a single trapped electron) and the effective charge. For the investigation of radiation resistance of ceramic materials for future fusion applications it is very important to understand the physical mechanisms of formation and growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation taking into account in this system the effective charge of point defects. In the present paper the physical mechanisms of dislocation loop growth in ceramic material are investigated. For this aim a theoretical model is suggested for the description of the kinetics of point defect accumulation in the matrix taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of an electric field on diffusion migration process of charged point defects. A self-consistent system of kinetic equations describing the generation of electrical fields near dislocation loops and diffusion migration of charged point defects in elastic and electrical fields is formulated. The solution of the kinetic equations allows to find the growth rate of dislocation loops in ceramic materials under irradiation taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of electric and elastic stress fields near dislocation loop on the diffusion processes

  16. Subcritical calculation of the nuclear material warehouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia M, T.; Mazon R, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the subcritical calculation of the nuclear material warehouse of the Reactor TRIGA Mark III labyrinth in the Mexico Nuclear Center is presented. During the adaptation of the nuclear warehouse (vault I), the fuel was temporarily changed to the warehouse (vault II) and it was also carried out the subcritical calculation for this temporary arrangement. The code used for the calculation of the effective multiplication factor, it was the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended code known as MCNPX, developed by the National Laboratory of Los Alamos, for the particles transport. (Author)

  17. A short note on physical properties to irradiated nuclear fuel by means of X-ray diffraction and neutron scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Yusof, E-mail: yusofabd@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Husain, Hishamuddin; Hak, Cik Rohaida Che; Alias, Nor Hayati; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Kasim, Norasiah Ab; Zali, Nurazila Mat [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Kajang 43000, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga National, Jalan Ikram-Uniten, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    For nuclear reactor applications, understanding the evolution of the fuel materials microstructure during irradiation are of great importance. This paper reviews the physical properties of irradiated nuclear fuel analysis which are considered to be of most importance in determining the performance behavior of fuel. X-rays diffraction was recognize as important tool to investigate the phase identification while neutron scattering analyses the interaction between uranium and other materials and also investigation of the defect structure.

  18. Nuclear fuels for material test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Durazzo, M.; Freitas, C.T. de

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results related do the development of nuclear fuels for reactors cooled and moderated by water have been presented cylindrical and plate type fuels have been described in which the core consists of U compouns dispersed in an Al matrix and is clad with aluminium. Fabrication details involving rollmilling, swaging or hot pressing have been described. Corrosion and irradiation test results are also discussed. The performance of the different types of fuels indicates that it is possible to locally fabricate fuel plates with U 3 O 8 +Al cores (20% enriched U) for use in operating Brazilian research reactors. (Author) [pt

  19. Irradiation Test in HANARO of the Parts of an X-Gen Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H. (and others)

    2008-08-15

    An instrumented capsule of 07M-13N was designed, fabricated and irradiated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the parts of an X-Gen nuclear fuel assembly for PWR requested by KNF. Some specimens requested by Westinghouse Co. and Hanyang university were also inserted. 389 KNF specimens such as bucking and spring test specimens of 1x1 cell spacer grid, tensile, microstructure and tensile of welded parts, irradiation growth, spring test specimens made of HANA tube, Zirlo, Zircaloy-4, Inconel-718 were placed in the capsule. The capsule was composed of 5 stages having many kinds of specimens and an independent electric heater at each stage. During the irradiation test, the temperature of the specimens and the thermal/fast neutron fluences were measured by 14 thermocouples and 7 sets of Ni-Ti-Fe (2 sets contain additional Nb-Ag) neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. The capsule was irradiated for 59.19days (4 cycles) in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 300 {approx} 420 .deg. C(for KNF specimens) up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.27x10{sup 21}(n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1MeV). After an irradiation test, the main body of the capsule was cut off at the bottom of the protection tube with a cutting system and it was transported to the IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility). The irradiated specimens were tested to evaluate the irradiation performance of the parts of an X-Gen fuel assembly in the IMEF hot cell.

  20. Materials aspects of nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide an overview of the nuclear waste repository performance requirements and the roles which we expect materials to play in meeting these requirements. The objective of the U.S. Dept. of Energy's (DOE) program is to provide for the safe, permanent isolation of high-level radioactive wastes from the public. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (the Act) provides the mandate to accomplish this objective by establishing a program timetable, a schedule of procedures to be followed, and program funding (1 mil/kwhr for all nuclear generated electricity). The centerpiece of this plan is the design and operation of a mined geologic repository system for the permanent isolation of radioactive wastes. A nuclear waste repository contains several thousand acres of tunnels and drifts into which the nuclear waste will be emplaced, and several hundred acres for the facilities on the surface in which the waste is received, handled, and prepared for movement underground. With the exception of the nuclear material-related facilities, a repository is similar to a standard mining operation. The difference comes in what a repository is supposed to do - to contain an isolate nuclear waste from man and the environment

  1. Swedish studies on irradiation effect in structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M; Myers, H P

    1962-12-15

    A brief description of work in hand at AB Atomenergi concerning the effects of neutron irradiation on structural materials is given. Some recent data is listed for the following pressure vessel steels 2103/R3 as used in the Aagesta reactor, SIS 142103, NO345, Fortiweld and weld metal OK 54 P. Zircaloy-2 has been studied regarding the combined effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen content on tensile properties. The difficulties associated with determination of neutron dose and the correlation of damage with dose and neutron energy spectrum are discussed.

  2. Effects of gamma irradiation on raw materials and perfumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, M.; Pelpel, A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to enlight the strange problem of apparent perfume stability observed in manufactured talc powders sterilized by gamma rays, investigations were made on samples of odorant substances (raw materials, essential oils, or elaborated mixtures). As a rule, no immediate adulteration of olfactive caracteristics resulted at once from gamma irradiation. In several cases, a stabilizing effect appeared immediately and remained effective after long storage in various conditions (of temperature, or light, or oxygen exposure). This unexpected effect seems to be in accordance with previous experiments on gamma or electron irradiations of mixtures of organic molecules, reported in litterature: a mutual inhibition was observed to take place [fr

  3. Swedish studies on irradiation effect in structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.; Myers, H.P.

    1962-12-01

    A brief description of work in hand at AB Atomenergi concerning the effects of neutron irradiation on structural materials is given. Some recent data is listed for the following pressure vessel steels 2103/R3 as used in the Aagesta reactor, SIS 142103, NO345, Fortiweld and weld metal OK 54 P. Zircaloy-2 has been studied regarding the combined effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen content on tensile properties. The difficulties associated with determination of neutron dose and the correlation of damage with dose and neutron energy spectrum are discussed

  4. Nuclear science in the 20th century. Nuclear technology applications in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Junchen; Xu Furong; Zheng Chunkai

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear technology to material science has led to a new cross subject, nuclear material science (also named nuclear solid physics) which covers material analysis, material modification and new material synthesis. This paper reviews the development of nuclear technical applications in material science and the basic physics involved

  5. Method for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel using cerenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.T.; Dowdy, E.J.; Nicholson, N.

    1983-01-01

    A method is provided for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in a water-filled storage pond wherein the intensity of the cerenkov radiation emitted from the water in the vicinity of the nuclear fuel is measured. This intensity is then compared with the expected intensity for nuclear fuel having a corresponding degree of irradiation exposure and time period after removal from a reactor core. Where the nuclear fuel inventory is located in an assembly having fuel pins or rods with intervening voids, the cerenkov light intensity measurement is taken at selected bright spots corresponding to the water-filled interstices of the assembly in the water storage, the waterfilled interstices acting as cerenkov light channels so as to reduce cross-talk. On-line digital analysis of an analog video signal is possible, or video tapes may be used for later measurement using a video editor and an electrometer. Direct measurement of the cerenkov radiation intensity also is possible using spot photometers pointed at the assembly

  6. Analysis of nuclear material flow for experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process at DFDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.; Baik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.

    1999-08-01

    This report describes facilities necessary for manufacturing experiment for DUPIC fuel, manufacturing process and equipment. Nuclear material flows among facilities, in PIEF and IMEF, for irradiation test, for post examination of DUPIC fuel, for quality control, for chemical analysis and for treatment of radioactive waste have been analyzed in details. This may be helpful for DUPIC project participants and facility engineers working in related facilities to understand overall flow for nuclear material and radioactive waste. (Author). 14 refs., 15 tabs., 41 figs

  7. Analysis of nuclear material flow for experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process at DFDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.; Baik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P

    1999-08-01

    This report describes facilities necessary for manufacturing experiment for DUPIC fuel, manufacturing process and equipment. Nuclear material flows among facilities, in PIEF and IMEF, for irradiation test, for post examination of DUPIC fuel, for quality control, for chemical analysis and for treatment of radioactive waste have been analyzed in details. This may be helpful for DUPIC project participants and facility engineers working in related facilities to understand overall flow for nuclear material and radioactive waste. (Author). 14 refs., 15 tabs., 41 figs.

  8. Technologies for detection of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1996-01-01

    Detection of smuggled nuclear materials at transit points requires monitoring unknown samples in large closed packages. This review contends that high-confidence nuclear-material detection requires induced fission as the primary mechanism, with passive radiation screening in a complementary role. With the right equipment, even small quantities of nuclear materials are detectable with a high probability at transit points. The equipment could also be linked synergistically with detectors of other contrabond. For screening postal mail and packages, passive monitors are probably more cost-effective. When a suspicious item is detected, a single active probe could then be used. Until active systems become mass produced, this two-stage screening/interrogation role for active/passive equipment is more economic for cargo at border crossings. For widespread monitoring of nuclear smuggling, it will probably be necessary to develop a system for simultaneously detecting most categories of contraband, including explosives and illicit drugs. With control of nuclear materials at known storage sites being the first line of defense, detection capabilities at international borders could establish a viable second line of defense against smuggling

  9. Effects of the temperature and the irradiation on the behaviour of chlorine 37 in nuclear graphite: consequences on the mobility of chlorine 36 in irradiated graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the studies of the management of irradiated graphite wastes issued from the dismantling of the UNGG French reactors. This work focuses on the behavior of 36 Cl. This radionuclide is mainly issued through the neutron activation of 35 Cl by the reaction 35 Cl(n, γ) 36 Cl, pristine chlorine being an impurity of nuclear graphite, present at the level of some at.ppm. 36 Cl is a long lived radionuclide (about 300,000 years) and is highly soluble in water and mobile in concrete and clay. The solubilization of 36 Cl is controlled by the water accessibility into irradiated graphite pores as well as by factors related to 36 Cl itself such as its chemical speciation and its location within the irradiated graphite. Both speciation and chlorine location should strongly influence its behaviour and need to be taken into account for the choice of liable management options. However, data on radioactive chlorine features are difficult to assess in irradiated graphite and are mainly related to detection sensitivity problems. In this context, we simulated and evaluated the impact of the temperature, the irradiation and the radiolytic oxidation on the chlorine 36 behaviour. In order to simulate the presence of 36 Cl, we implanted 37 Cl into virgin nuclear graphite. Ion implantation has been widely used to study the lattice location, the diffusion and the release of fission and activation products in nuclear materials. Our results on the comparative effects of the temperature and the irradiation show that chlorine occurs in irradiated graphite on temperature and electronic and nuclear irradiation improve this effect. (author)

  10. LAMI - a planned Brazilian facility to investigate the mechanical and physical properties of structural materials under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Lobo, Raquel M.

    2011-01-01

    The LAMI (Laboratorio de Materiais Irradiados) is a hot laboratory designed to the characterization of irradiated structural material and will constitute one of the main installations of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB). The strong points of LAMI are: to contribute, through theoretical and experimental investigations, to the development of knowledge in materials science in order to be able to predict the evolution of the physical and mechanical material properties under service conditions (irradiation, thermomechanical solicitation, influence of the environment, etc); to characterize the properties of the materials used in the nuclear industry in order to determine their performance and to be able to predict their life expectancy; to establish, maintain and make use of the database generated by these data and to provide expertise on industrial components, in particular to investigate strain or rupture mechanisms. The test materials can be irradiated or not, and originate from surveillance programs, experimental neutron irradiations or simulated irradiation with charged particles. The main line of LAMI will have 10 shielded hot cells. The building also will have an area dedicated to micro and nano structural materials analysis. The mechanical characterization to be carried out within LAMI includes mechanical tests on irradiated materials, comprehension of behavior and damage processes and the incorporation of the test data results in a data bank for capitalization of test results. Planned materials to be tested are going to be metallic alloys used in industrial and experimental reactor: pressure vessel steels, internal stainless steels, austeno-ferritic steels, zirconium alloys and aluminum alloys. (author)

  11. Effect of low dose electron beam irradiation on the alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Panczer, G. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Charpentier, T. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    This investigation concerns borosilicate glass leaching mechanisms and the evolution of alteration layer under electron beam irradiation. A simple glass doped with rare earth elements was selected in order to access mechanistic and structural information and better evaluate the effects of irradiation. It was fully leached in initially pure water at 90 °C and at high glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V = 20 000 m{sup −1}) in static conditions. Under these conditions, the system quickly reaches the residual alteration rate regime. A small particle size fraction (2–5 μm) was sampled in order to obtain a fairly homogeneous altered material enabling the use of bulk characterization methods. External irradiations with 10 MeV electrons up to a dose of 10 MGy were performed either before or after leaching, to investigate respectively the effect of initial glass irradiation on its alteration behavior and the irradiation stability of the alteration layer. Glass dissolution rate was analyzed by regular leachate samplings and the alteration layer structure was characterized by Raman, luminescence (continuous or time-resolved), and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that the small initial glass evolutions under irradiation did not induce any modification of the leaching kinetic nor of the structure of the alteration layer. The alteration process seemed to “smooth over” the created defects. Otherwise, the alteration layer and initial glass appeared to have different behaviors under irradiation. No Eu{sup 3+} reduction was detected in the alteration layer after irradiation and the defect creation efficiency was much lower than for initial glass. This can possibly be explained by the protective role of pore water contained in the altered material (∼20%). Moreover, a slight depolymerization of the silicon network of the altered glass under irradiation with electrons was evidenced, whereas in the initial glass it typically

  12. Performance analysis of nuclear materials accounting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, D.D.; Shipley, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques for analyzing the level of performance of nuclear materials accounting systems in terms of the four performance measures, total amount of loss, loss-detection time, loss-detection probability, and false-alarm probability, are presented. These techniques are especially useful for analyzing the expected performance of near-real-time (dynamic) accounting systems. A conservative estimate of system performance is provided by the CUSUM (cumulative summation of materials balances) test. Graphical displays, called performance surfaces, are developed as convenient tools for representing systems performance, and examples from a recent safeguards study of a nuclear fuels reprocessing plant are given. 6 refs

  13. Education and training in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcon, S.; Marco, M.

    2014-01-01

    CIEMAT participates in the European project Matisse (Materials Innovations for a Safe and Sustainable nuclear in Europe) belonging to FP7, whose main objective is to promote the link between the respective national research programs through networking and integration of activities for innovation in materials for advanced nuclear systems, sharing among partners best practices and implementation of training tools and efficient communication. The draft four years, from 2013 to 2017, includes aspects such as the interaction between infrastructure, R and D programs and postgraduate education and training. (Author)

  14. Application of electron irradiation to food containers and packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Problems caused by microbial contamination and hazardous chemicals have attracted much attention in the food industry. The number of systems such as hygienic management systems and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems adopted in the manufacturing process is increasing. As manufacturing process control has become stricter, stricter control is also required for microbial control for containers and packaging materials (from disinfection to sterilization). Since safe and reliable methods for sterilizing food containers and packaging materials that leave no residue are required, electron beam sterilization used for medical equipment has attracted attention from the food industry. This paper describes an electron irradiation facility, methods for applying electron beams to food containers and packaging materials, and products irradiated with electron beams. (author)

  15. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  16. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The age old method of physically taking an inventory of materials by listing each item's identification number has lived beyond its usefulness. In this age of computerization, which offers the local grocery store a quick, sure, and easy means to inventory, it is time for nuclear materials facilities to automate accountability activities. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At that time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable; however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented

  17. TEM examination of irradiated zircaloy-2 pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Sharma, B.P.; Sah, D.N.; Banerjee, Suparna; Sahoo, K.C.

    2005-09-01

    In the present work, microstructure of the zircaloy-2 pressure tube material irradiated in the Indian Pressurized Heavy Water RAPP-1. Reactor (PHWR) has been examined for the first time using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The samples were obtained from a zircaloy-2 pressure tube, which had been in operation in the high flux region of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit -1, for a period for 6.77 effective full power years (EFPYs) and expected to have a cumulative radiation damage of about 3 dpa. In this study irradiated microstructure has been characterized and compared it with the microstructure of the unirradiated pressure tube samples. The effect of irradiation on the hydriding behaviour is also studied. (author)

  18. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  19. Gamma exposure rate estimation in irradiation facilities of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    There are experimental situations in the nuclear field, in which dose estimations due to energy-dependent radiation fields are required. Nuclear research reactors provide such fields under normal operation or due to radioactive disintegration of fission products and structural materials activation. In such situations, it is necessary to know the exposure rate of gamma radiation the different materials under experimentation are subject to. Detectors of delayed reading are usually used for this purpose. Direct evaluation methods using portable monitors are not always possible, because in some facilities the entrance with such devices is often impracticable and also unsafe. Besides, these devices only provide information of the place where the measurement was performed, but not of temporal and spatial fluctuations the radiation fields could have. In this work a direct evaluation method was developed for the 'in-situ' gamma exposure rate for the irradiation facilities of the RA-1 reactor. This method is also applicable in any similar installation, and may be complemented by delayed evaluations without problem. On the other hand, it is well known that the residual effect of radiation modifies some properties of the organic materials used in reactors, such as density, colour, viscosity, oxidation level, among others. In such cases, a correct dosimetric evaluation enables in service estimation of material duration with preserved properties. This evaluation is for instance useful when applied to lubricating oils for the primary circuit pumps in nuclear power plants, thus minimizing waste generation. In this work the necessary elements required to estimate in-situ time and space integrated dose are also established for a gamma irradiated sample in an irradiation channel of a nuclear facility with zero neutron flux. (author)

  20. New challenges in nuclear material detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, W.; Sale, K.; Dougan, A.; Luke, J.; Suski, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Even before the attacks of September 11, 2001 the International Safeguards community recognized the magnitude of the threat posed by illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and the need for enhanced physical protection. For the first time, separate sessions on illicit trafficking and physical protection of nuclear materials were included in the IAEA Safeguards Symposium. In the aftermath of September 11, it is clear that the magnitude of the problem and the urgency with which it must be addressed will be a significant driver for advanced nuclear materials detection technologies for years to come. Trafficking in nuclear material and other radioactive sources is a global concern. According to the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database Program, there have been confirmed cases in more than 40 countries and the number of cases per year have nearly doubled since 1996. The challenge of combating nuclear terrorism also brings with it many opportunities for the development of new tools and new approaches. In addition to the traditional gamma-ray imaging, spectrometry and neutron interrogation, there is a need for smaller, smarter, more energy-efficient sensors and sensor systems for detecting and tracking threats. These systems go by many names - correlated sensor networks, wide-area tracking systems, sensor or network fabrics - but the concept behind them is the same. Take a number of wireless sensors and tie them together with a communications network, develop a scheme for fusing the data and make the system easy to deploy. This paper will present a brief survey of nuclear materials detection capability, and discuss some advances in research and development that are particularly suited for illicit trafficking, detection of shielded highly enriched uranium, and border security. (author)

  1. Irradiation of aluminium alloy materials with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Osamu; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi

    1982-01-01

    It is a theme with a room for discussion to employ the stainless steel composed of longer half-life materials for the vacuum system of accelerators, from the viewpoint of radiation exposure. Therefore, it is desirable to use aluminium of shorter half-life in place of stainless steel. As a result of investigation on the above theme in the 1.2 GeV electron linac project in Tohoku University, it has been concluded that aluminium alloy vacuum chambers can reduce exposure dose by about one or two figures as compared with stainless steel ones. Of course, aluminium alloy contains trace amounts of Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu and others. Therefore, four kinds of aluminium alloy considered to be usable have been examined for induced radioactivity by electron beam irradiation. Stainless steel SUS 304 has been also irradiated for comparison. Radiation energy has been 30 MeV and 200 MeV. When stainless steel and aluminium alloy were compared, aluminium alloy was very effective for reducing surface dose in low energy irradiation. In 200 MeV irradiation, the dose ratio of aluminium alloy to stainless steel became 1/30 to 1/100 after one week, though the dose difference between these two materials became smaller in 100 days or more after irradiation. If practical inspection and repair are implemented during the period from a few days to one week after shutdown, the aluminium alloy is preferable for exposure dose reduction even in high energy irradiation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Project accent: graphite irradiated creep in a materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooking, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atkins manages a pioneering programme of irradiation experiments for EDF Energy. One of these projects is Project ACCENT, designed to obtain evidence of a beneficial physical property of the graphite, which may extend the life of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The project team combines the in-house experience of EDF Energy with two supplier organisations (providing the material test reactors and testing facilities) and supporting consultancies (Atkins and an independent technical expert). This paper describes: - Brief summary of the Project; - Discussion of the challenges faced by the Project; and - Conclusion elaborating on the aims of the Project. These challenging experiments use bespoke technology and both un-irradiated (virgin) and irradiated AGR graphite. The results will help to better understand graphite irradiation-induced creep (or stress modified dimensional change) properties and therefore more accurately determine lifetime and safe operating envelopes of the AGRs. The first round of irradiation has been completed, with a second round about to commence. This is a key step to realising the full lifetime ambition for AGRs, demonstrating the relaxation of stresses within the graphite bricks. (authors)

  3. National and international nuclear material monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddoups, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    The status of nuclear materials in both the U.S. and Former Soviet Union is changing based upon the execution of agreements relative to weapons materials production and weapon dismantlement. The result of these activities is that a considerably different emphasis is being placed on how nuclear materials are viewed and utilized. Even though much effort is being expended on the final disposition of these materials, the interim need for storage and security of the material is increasing. Both safety and security requirements exist to govern activities when these materials are placed in storage. These requirements are intended to provide confidence that the material is not being misused and that the storage operations are conducted safely. Both of these goals can be significantly enhanced if technological monitoring of the material is performed. This paper will briefly discuss the traditional manual methods of U.S. and international material monitoring and then present approaches and technology that are available to achieve the same goals under the evolving environment

  4. Research on new materials development and elucidation of degradation phenomena in nuclear environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    Advanced materials technologies are required to develop the pressure boundary materials used in nuclear corrosive environments under irradiation. The outline of the materials research for overcoming the requirements is described. The applicability and fusibility of new materials technology and major characteristics are shown with respect to several examples. A new-type coating method of diamond-like carbide films by using RF magnetron sputtering, mechanistic analysis on tritium release behavior from molten lithium-tin alloy in-reactor, neutron irradiation assisted change in pinning properties of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x single crystals are discussed as typical outputs concerning the research. (author)

  5. Countermeasure technologies against materials deterioration of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    This report was tentative safety standard on countermeasure technologies against materials deterioration of nuclear power plant components issued in 2004 on the base of the testing data obtained until March 2004, which was to be applied for technical evaluation for lifetime management of aged plants and preventive maintenance or repair of neutron irradiated components such as core shrouds and jet pumps. In order to prevent stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) of austenitic stainless steel welds of reactor components, thermal surface modification using laser beams was used on neutron irradiated materials with laser cladding or surface melting process methods by limiting heat input according to amount of accumulated helium so as to prevent crack initiation caused by helium bubble growth and coalescence. Laser cladding method of laser welding using molten sleeve set inside pipe surface to prevent SCCs of nickel-chromium-iron alloy welds, alloy 690 cladding method using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding to prevent SCCs of nickel-chromium-iron alloy welds for dissimilar joints of pipes, and laser surface solid solution heat treatment method of laser irradiation on surfaces to prevent SCCs of austenitic stainless steel welds were also included as repair technologies. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Interatomic potentials for materials of nuclear interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Julian R.; Monti, Ana M.; Pasianot, Roberto C.; Simonelli, G.

    2007-01-01

    Procedures to develop embedded atom method (EAM) interatomic potentials are described, with foreseeable applications in nuclear materials. Their reliability is shown by evaluating relevant properties. The studied materials are Nb, Zr and U. The first two were then used to develop an inter species potential for the Zr-Nb binary system. In this sense, the Fe-Cu system was also studied starting from Fe and Cu potentials extracted from the literature. (author) [es

  7. XAFS study on silica glasses irradiated in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoko; Yoshida, Hisao; Hara, Takanobu; Ii, Tatsuya; Okada, Tomohisa; Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    X-ray absorption technique (XANES and EXAFS) was applied to study the local structures of silica glasses before and after the irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Although our separate photoluminescence (PL) measurements clearly showed the different aspects about oxygen vacancies in these samples, i.e., at least the B 2β type oxygen-deficient center exists as an intrinsic defect in the fused silica glass while another type B 2α center is formed in the synthesized silica glass, such differences did not directly reflect on the X-ray absorption spectra (XANES and EXAFS). However, the curve-fitting analysis of EXAFS showed that the number of oxygen atoms coordinated to Si relatively increased after the irradiation. This result may indicate the occurrence of the structural relaxation in the irradiated samples, that is, a slightly distorted SiO 4 tetrahedra in silica glasses relaxed to the regular SiO 4 tetrahedra due to the break of some connections between SiO 4 units in the silica glasses. Thus, the X-ray absorption technique gave the important information of the in-reactor irradiated silica glasses which complements the results obtained from PL measurements

  8. Legal aspects of transport of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, Mans.

    The Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention are briefly discussed and other conventions in the field of civil liability for nuclear damage are mentioned: the Vienna Convention, the Nuclear Ships Convention and the 1971 Convention relating to civil liability in the field of maritime carriage of nuclear material. Legislation on civil liability in the Nordic countries, which is based on the Paris Convention and the Supplementary Convention is discussed, notably the principle of channelling of liability and exceptions from that principle due to rules of liability in older transport conventions and certain problems due to the limited geographical scope of the Paris Convention and the Supplementary Convention. Insurance problems arising in connection with transport of nuclear materials are surveyed and an outline is given of the administrative provisions concerning transport (based on the IAEA transport regulations) which govern transport of radioactive materials by different means: road, rail, sea and air. Finally, the 1968 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is discussed. (NEA) [fr

  9. Thermal analysis of the APT materials irradiation samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, S.A.; Willcutt, G.J.; James, M.R.; Teague, J.; Diebe, D.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-01-01

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) project proposes to use a 1.7 GeV, 100 mA proton beam to produce neutrons from an Inconel 718 clad tungsten target. The neutrons are multiplied and moderated in a lead/water blanket before being captured in He 3 to form tritium. In this process, the materials in the target and blanket region are exposed to a wide range of different fluxes comprised of protons and neutrons with energies into the GeV range. To investigate the effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of candidate APT materials (Inconel 718, 316L stainless steel, Al 6061-T6, Mod 9Cr-1Mo, 304L stainless steel and Al5052-0), the APT Engineering Design and Development group fielded an extensive materials irradiation using the LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) accelerator, which operates at an energy of 800 MeV and a current of 1 mA. The test set-up was designed to place mechanical test specimens in locations in and near the proton beam where the environment of proton and neutron fluxes and temperatures are prototypic to those expected in the APT target/blanket (50--170 C). After irradiating for about 3,600 hours, the maximum achieved proton fluence was 4--5 x 10 21 p/cm 2 for the materials in the center of the beam. To obtain relevant data on the change in the mechanical properties with fluence, it is essential to know the temperature at which the materials were irradiated. This paper explains the method of determining the specimen temperature and reports some specific examples

  10. Materials technologies for advanced nuclear energy concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.; Harms, B.

    1983-01-01

    High-performance, advanced nuclear power plant concepts have emerged with major emphasis on lower capital costs, inherent safety, and increased reliability. The materials problems posed by these concepts are discussed and how the scientists and technologists at ORNL plan to solve them is described

  11. Examination of Experimental Data for Irradiation - Creep in Nuclear Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasheran, Amir Sassan

    The objective of this dissertation was to establish credibility and confidence levels of the observed behavior of nuclear graphite in neutron irradiation environment. Available experimental data associated with the OC-series irradiation -induced creep experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were examined. Pre- and postirradiation measurement data were studied considering "linear" and "nonlinear" creep models. The nonlinear creep model considers the creep coefficient to vary with neutron fluence due to the densification of graphite with neutron irradiation. Within the range of neutron fluence involved (up to 0.53 times 10^{26} neutrons/m ^2, E > 50 KeV), both models were capable of explaining about 96% and 80% of the variation of the irradiation-induced creep strain with neutron fluence at temperatures of 600^circC and 900^circC, respectively. Temperature and reactor power data were analyzed to determine the best estimates for the actual irradiation temperatures. It was determined according to thermocouple readouts that the best estimate values for the irradiation temperatures were well within +/-10 ^circC of the design temperatures of 600^circC and 900 ^circC. The dependence of the secondary creep coefficients (for both linear and nonlinear models) on irradiation temperature was determined assuming that the variation of creep coefficient with temperature, in the temperature range studied, is reasonably linear. It was concluded that the variability in estimate of the creep coefficients is definitely not the results of temperature fluctuations in the experiment. The coefficients for the constitutive equation describing the overall growth of grade H-451 graphite were also studied. It was revealed that the modulus of elasticity and the shear modulus are not affected by creep and that the electrical resistivity is slightly (less than 5%) changed by creep. However, the coefficient of thermal expansion does change with creep. The consistency of

  12. Method for the chemical reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels, in particular nuclear fuels containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the chemical processing of irradiated uranium-containing nuclear fuels which are hydrolyzed with aqueous nitric acid, a suggestion is made to use as quaternary ammonium nitrate trialkyl-methyl ammonium nitrates as extracting agent, in which the sum of C atoms is greater than 16. In the illustrated examples, tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, trilaurylmethylammonium nitrate and tridecylmethylammonium nitrate are named. (HPH/LH) [de

  13. Report on the Workshop on Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Wayne E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Allen, Todd [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Arsenlis, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bench, Graham [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bulatov, Vasily [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fluss, Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klein, Richard [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McMahon, Donn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Middleton, Carolin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morley, Maureen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Turchi, Patrice [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-05-11

    This document reports on the Office of Nuclear Energy’s (NE’s) Workshop on Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development held May 11, 2010, in Washington, DC. The purpose of the workshop was twofold: (1) to provide feedback on an initiative to use uncertainty quantification (UQ) to integrate theory, simulation, and modeling with accelerated experimentation to predict the behavior of materials and fuels in an irradiation environment and thereby accelerate the lengthy materials design and qualification process; and (2) to provide feedback on and refinement to five topical areas to develop predictive models for fuels and cladding and new radiation-tolerant materials. The goal of the workshop was to gather technical feedback with respect to the Office of Nuclear Energy’s research and development while also identifying and highlighting crosscutting capability and applicability of the initiative to other federal offices, including the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), and Naval Reactors. The goals of the initiative are twofold: (1) develop time- and length-scale transcending models that predict material properties using UQ to effectively integrate theory, simulation, and modeling with accelerated experiments; and (2) design and develop new radiation-tolerant materials using the knowledge gained and methodologies created to shorten the development and qualification time and reduce cost. The initiative is crosscutting and has synergy with industry and other federal offices including Naval Reactors, NRC, FES, BES, and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). It is distinguished by its use of uncertainty quantification to effectively integrate theory, simulation, and modeling with high-dose experimental capabilities. The initiative aims to bring the methodology that is being

  14. Nuclear material safeguards surveillance and accountancy by isotope correlation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.; Goleb, J.A.; Kroc, T.K.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT) to the Light Water Reactor (LWR) and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel cycles for nuclear material accountancy and safeguards surveillance. The isotopic measurement of the inventory input to the reprocessing phase of the fuel cycle is the primary direct determination that an anomaly may exist in the fuel management of nuclear material. The nuclear materials accountancy gap which exists between the fabrication plant output and the input to the reprocessing plant can be minimized by using ICT at the dissolver stage of the reprocessing plant. The ICT allows a level of verification of the fabricator's fuel content specifications, the irradiation history, the fuel and blanket assemblies management and scheduling within the reactor, and the subsequent spent fuel assembly flows to the reprocessing plant. The investigation indicates that there exist relationships between isotopic concentration which have predictable, functional behavior over a range of burnup. Several cross-correlations serve to establish the initial core assembly-averaged composition. The selection of the more effective functionals will depend not only on the level of reliability of ICT for verification, but also on the capability, accuracy and difficulty of developing measurement methods. The propagation of measurement errors on the correlation functions and respective sensitivities to isotopic compositional changes have been examined and found to be consistent with current measurement methods

  15. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  16. ORNL capability to conduct post irradiation examination of full-length commercial nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Hot cells at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are nearing completion of a multi-year upgrade program to implement 21. century capabilities to meet the examination demands for higher burnup fuels and the future demands that will come from fuel recycling programs. Fuel reliability and zero tolerance for fuel failure is more than an industry goal. Fuel reliability is becoming a requirement that supports the renaissance of nuclear power generation. Thus, fuel development and management of new forms of waste that will come from programs such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will require extensive use of the flexible, high-quality, technically advanced hot cells at ORNL. ORNL has the capability to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel rods and the management structure to ensure a timely, cost-effective result. ORNL can: 1) Handle the transportation issues, 2) Perform macroscopic fuel rod examinations, 3) Perform microscopic fuel and clad examinations, and 4) Manage legacy material and waste disposal issues from PIE activities. All four of these items will be managed in a way that allows the customer day-to-day access to the results and data. Hot cell examination equipment that is necessary to determine the characteristics and performance of irradiated materials must operate in a hostile environment and is subject to long-term degradation that may result in reliability and quality assurance (QA) issues. ORNL has modernized its hot cell nuclear fuel examination equipment, installing state-of-the-art automated examination equipment and data gathering capabilities. ORNL is planning a major commitment to nuclear fuel examination and development, and future improvements will continue to be made over the next few years. (author)

  17. Contamination confinement system of irradiated materials handling laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobao, A. dos S.T.; Araujo, J.A. de; Camilo, R.L.

    1988-06-01

    A study to prevent radioctivity release in lab scale is presented. As a basis for the design all the limits established by the IAEA for ventilation systems were observed. An evaluation of the different parameters involved in the design have been made, resulting in the especification of the working areas, ducts and filtering systems in order to get the best conditions for the safe handling of irradiated materials. (author) [pt

  18. Construction of irradiated material examination facility-basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Kim, Eun Ka; Hong, Gye Won; Herr, Young Hoi; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, Myeong Han; Baik, Sang Youl; Choo, Yong Sun; Baik, Seung Je

    1989-02-01

    The basic design of the hot cell facility which has the main purpose of doing mechanical and physical property tests of irradiated materials, the examination process, and the annexed facility has been made. Also basic and detall designs for the underground excavation work have been performed. The project management and tasks required for the license application have been carried out in due course. The facility is expected to be completed by the end of 1992, if the budgetary support is sufficient. (Author)

  19. Containment system of contamination in irradiated materials handling laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobao, A.S.T.; Araujo, J.A. de; Camilo, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    A study to prevent radiactivity release in lab scale is presented. As a basis for the design all the limits established by the IAEA for ventilation systems were observed. An evaluation of the different parameters involved in the design have been made, resulting in the specification of the working areas, ducts and filtering systems in order to get the best conditions for the safe handling of irradiated materials. (author) [pt

  20. Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams

  1. Nuclear material inventory estimation in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.E.; Beyerlein, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach in the application of modern system identification and estimation techniques is proposed to help nuclear reprocessing facilities meet the nuclear accountability requirement proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The proposed identification and estimation method considers the material inventory in a portion of the chemical separations area of a reprocessing facility. The method addresses the nonlinear aspects of the problem, the time delay through the separation facility, and the lack of measurement access. The method utilizes only input-output measured data and knowledge of the uncertainties associated with the process and measured data. 14 refs

  2. Questions raised on transport of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubinska, A.

    1984-01-01

    Public opinion is demanding safer rules for the shipment of radioactive materials since the recent collision and sinking of a French freighter carrying uranium hexafluoride. At issue is the secrecy of the cargo, the delay in releasing information to the public and salvage crews, and the use of unmarked trucks. The nuclear industry points out that no recent incidents have led to the loss of human life, but there is concern among European Community members that a number of countries have yet to ratify international conventions and agreements on hazardous materials transport, that none of these agreements are mandatory, and that none address the transfrontier movement of waste materials

  3. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong

    2011-06-01

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  4. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yijie; Wang Qiming; Cui Yi; Huo Yongzhong [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ding Shurong, E-mail: dsr1971@163.com [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  5. New technologies for monitoring nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes new technologies for monitoring the continued presence of nuclear materials that are being evaluated in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to reduce the effort, cost, and employee exposures associated with conducting nuclear material inventories. These technologies also show promise for the international safeguarding of process systems and nuclear materials in storage, including spent fuels. The identified systems are based on innovative technologies that were not developed for safeguards applications. These advanced technologies include passive and active sensor systems based on optical materials, inexpensive solid-state radiation detectors, dimensional surface characterization, and digital color imagery. The passive sensor systems use specialized scintillator materials coupled to optical-fiber technologies that not only are capable of measuring radioactive emissions but also are capable of measuring or monitoring pressure, weight, temperature, and source location. Small, durable solid-state gamma-ray detection devices, whose components are estimated to cost less than $25 per unit, can be implemented in a variety of configurations and can be adapted to enhance existing monitoring systems. Variations in detector design have produced significantly different system capabilities. Dimensional surface characterization and digital color imaging are applications of developed technologies that are capable of motion detection, item surveillance, and unique identification of items

  6. The changing role of nuclear materials accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear materials accounting and accounting systems at what have been DOE Production sites are evolving into management decision support tools. As the sites are moving into the mode of making decisions on how to disposition complex and varied nuclear material holdings, the need for complete and many times different information has never been greater. The artificial boundaries that have historically been established between what belongs in the classic material control and accountability (MC and A) records versus what goes into the financial, radiological control, waste, or decommissioning and decontamination records are being challenged. In addition, the tools historically used to put material into different categories such as scrap codes, composition codes, etc. have been found to be inadequate for the information needs of today. In order to be cost effective and even, more importantly to effectively manage -our inventories, the new information systems the authors design have to have the flexibility to serve many needs. In addition, those tasked with the responsibility of managing the inventories must also expand beyond the same artificial boundaries. This paper addresses some of the things occurring at the Savannah River Site to support the changing role of nuclear materials accounting

  7. Induced-Fission Imaging of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausladen, Paul; Blackston, Matthew A.; Mullens, James Allen; McConchie, Seth M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Bingham, Philip R.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents initial results from development of the induced-fission imaging technique, which can be used for the purpose of measuring or verifying the distribution of fissionable material in an unopened container. The technique is based on stimulating fissions in nuclear material with 14 MeV neutrons from an associated-particle deuterium-tritium (D-T) generator and counting the subsequent induced fast fission neutrons with an array of fast organic scintillation detectors. For each source neutron incident on the container, the neutron creation time and initial trajectory are known from detection of the associated alpha particle of the d + t → α + n reaction. Many induced fissions will lie along (or near) the interrogating neutron path, allowing an image of the spatial distribution of prompt induced fissions, and thereby fissionable material, to be constructed. A variety of induced-fission imaging measurements have been performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a portable, low-dose D-T generator, including single-view radiographic measurements and three-dimensional tomographic measurements. Results from these measurements will be presented along with the neutron transmission images that have been performed simultaneously. This new capability may have applications to a number of areas in which there may be a need to confirm the presence or configuration of nuclear materials, such as nuclear material control and accountability, quality assurance, treaty confirmation, or homeland security applications.

  8. Characterization of damaging in apatitic materials irradiated with heavy ions and thermally annealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisserand, R.

    2004-12-01

    Some minerals belonging to the family of apatite are seen to be potential candidates for use as conditioning matrices or transmutation targets for high level nuclear waste management. Indeed, studies of natural nuclear reactors (Oklo) highlighted the strong ability of these minerals to anneal irradiation damage. In order to determine the global behaviour of these materials, we performed a fundamental study on the evolution of irradiation damage induced by various heavy ions in two apatites: a natural phospho-calcic fluor-apatite from Durango and a synthetic sintered mono-silicated fluor-apatite, called britholite. The damage in these materials was measured by using channelling R.B.S. and X-ray diffraction respectively and by determining an amorphization effective radius Re. The results revealed a similar behaviour for both apatites according to the electronic energy deposit at the entrance of the material. In addition, the effect of an isothermal annealing at 300 C was quantified on a mono-silicated britholite previously irradiated with Kr ions. We highlighted in this case the return of the lattice parameters to their initial values, followed by a partial and slow rebuilding of the crystalline lattice versus the annealing time. Finally, we followed the changes in the morphology of etch pits in the Durango fluor-apatite after acid dissolution as a function of the energy deposit by the ions. We showed that the influence of crystallography leads quickly to opening angles close to 30 degrees. The calculation of etching velocities within the irradiated material highlighted that there is a range of deposit energy where the velocity ratio increases strongly before becoming constant. (author)

  9. Irradiation effects on the ductility of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudamous, F.

    1986-10-01

    Austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steels have been proposed as first wall structural materials for the next generation of fusion devices. In order to study the effect of high temperature irradiation on their tensile properties, specimens of the steel AISI 316 L (CEC reference), of the martensitic steel W. Nr 1.4914 and of the duplex ferritic-martensitic steel EM12 have been irradiated in the BR2 reactor in Mol. The austenitic steel was irradiated at 470 0 C to about 1.1 10 22 n/cm 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) while the ferritic-martensitic steels were irradiated at 590 0 C to about 7.7 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). The tensile tests of the 316 L steel have been performed between 250 and 750 0 C. Below around 550 0 C, the yield stress after irradiation increased from about 160 to 270 MPa and the total elongation decreased from 42 to about 26%. At 750 0 C, the yield stress increase was small but the total elongation decreased from 60 to only 10%. At this temperature, the rupture of the irradiated specimen was intergranular while all the other specimens presented a transgranular rupture. At 650 0 C the variations were intermediate. The change of the ultimate tensile strength was small at all test temperatures. The EM12 and W. Nr 1.4914 steels tested only at 550 0 C, showed a decrease of the yield and tensile strength as well as an increase of the total elongation. The same tests performed on specimens which have been heat treated in parallel showed that the observed changes were due, in a large part, if not completely, to the maintenance of steels at high temperature

  10. Iodine nutrition and risk of thyroid irradiation from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delange, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to discuss the following aspects of physiopathology of iodine nutrition related to thyroid irradiation by nuclear accidents: (1) The cycle of iodine in nature, the dietary sources of iodine and the recommended dietary allowances for iodine. (2) The anomalies of thyroid metabolism induced by iodine deficiency. The caricatural situation as seen in endemic goitre will be used as mode. (3) The specific paediatric aspects of adaptation to iodine deficiency. (4) The present status of iodine nutrition in Europe. (author)

  11. Application of the nuclear microprobe to the study of organic and inorganic composition of teeth irradiated by a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, F.; Engelmann, Ch.; Couble, Ml.; Magloire, H.; Bonnin, P.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe uses both direct observation of nuclear reactions induced by deuterons and X ray emission induced by protons or deuterons. Thanks to these techniques, concentration profiles of the main elements (C, N, P, Ca...) contained in different parts of healthy teeth (enamel, dentine and cementum) are drawn in control zones and laser irradiated zones. The results obtained show that important perturbations appear during the irradiation by the laser beam; we observe successively, depleted zones in carbon and nitrogen which contain calcium and phosphorus and hypomineralized zones which contain organic material. 10 refs [fr

  12. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  13. Preparation of silica-based hybrid materials by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, S.R.; Margaca, F.M.A.; Miranda Salvado, I.M.; Ferreira, L.M.; Falcao, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray irradiation is well known to promote the crosslinking of polymer chains. The method is now used by the authors to prepare hybrid materials from a mixture of polymer and metallic alkoxides of silicium and zirconium that are usually obtained via the sol-gel process. Macroscopically homogeneous and transparent hybrid materials have been obtained by γ-irradiation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and zirconium propoxide (PrZr). The influence of several parameters has been studied. The dose rate was found to have no significant impact in the prepared material. The polymer molecular weight was also observed not to play any special role. It was found that all irradiated samples consist of a polymer gel matrix. In the case where both alkoxides are present there are inorganic oxide regions linked to the PDMS network. However when one of the alkoxides is absent there is no formation of inorganic oxide regions linked to the polymer matrix, there being only a few individual derived molecules of the other alkoxide linked to the polymer

  14. Development of Environment and Irradiation Effects of High Temperature Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. W.; Kim, S. H.

    2009-11-01

    Proposed materials, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (32 mm thickness) and 9Cr-1Mo-1W (100 mm thickness), for the reactor vessel were procured, and welded by the qualified welding technologies. Welding soundness was conformed by NDT, and mechanical testings were done along to weld depth. Two new irradiation capsules for use in the OR test hole of HANARO were designed and fabricated. specimens was irradiated in the OR5 test hole of HANARO with a 30MW thermal power at 390±10 .deg. C up to a fast neutron fluence of 4.4x10 19 (n/cm 2 ) (E>1.0 MeV). The dpa was evaluated to be 0.034∼0.07. Base metals and weldments of both Mod.9Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo-1W steels were tested tensile and impact properties in order to evaluate the irradiation hardening effects due to neutron irradiation. DBTT of base metal and weldment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were -16 .deg. C and 1 .deg. C, respectively. After neutron irradiation, DBTT of weldment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel increased to 25 . deg. C. Alloy 617 and several nickel-base superalloys were studied to evaluate high temperature degradation mechanisms. Helium loop was developed to evaluate the oxidation behaviors of materials in the VHTR environments. In addition, creep behaviors in air and He environments were compared, and oxidation layers formed outer surfaces were measured as a function of applied stress and these results were investigated to the creep life

  15. Advanced physical protection systems for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1975-10-01

    Because of the increasing incidence of terrorism, there is growing concern that nuclear materials and facilities need improved physical protection against theft, diversion, or sabotage. Physical protection systems for facilities or transportation which have balanced effectiveness include information systems, access denial systems, adequate and timely response, recovery capability, and use denial methods for despoiling special nuclear materials (SNM). The role of these elements in reducing societal risk is described; however, it is noted that, similar to nuclear war, the absolute risks of nuclear theft and sabotage are basically unquantifiable. Sandia Laboratories has a major Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) role in developing advanced physical protection systems for improving the security of both SNM and facilities. These activities are surveyed. A computer simulation model is being developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative physical protection systems under various levels of threat. Improved physical protection equipment such as perimeter and interior alarms, secure portals, and fixed and remotely-activated barriers is being developed and tested. In addition, complete prototype protection systems are being developed for representative nuclear facilities. An example is shown for a plutonium storage vault. The ERDA safe-secure transportation system for highway shipments of all significant quantities of government-owned SNM is described. Adversary simulation as a tool for testing and evaluating physical protection systems is discussed. A list of measures is given for assessing overall physical protection system performance. (auth)

  16. Advanced physical protection systems for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the increasing incidence of terrorism, there is growing concern that nuclear materials and facilities need improved physical protection against theft, diversion, or sabotage. Physical protection systems for facilities or transportation which have balanced effectiveness include information systems, access denial systems, adequate and timely response, recovery capability, and use denial methods for despoiling special nuclear materials (SNM). The role of these elements in reducing societal risk is described; however, it is noted that, similar to nuclear war, the absolute risks of nuclear theft and sabotage are basically unquantifiable. Sandia Laboratories has a major US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) role in developing advanced physical protection systems for improving the security of both SNM and facilities. These activities are surveyed in this paper. A computer simulation model is being developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative physical protection systems under various levels of threat. Improved physical protection equipment such as perimeter and interior alarms, secure portals, and fixed and remotely activated barriers is being developed and tested. In addition, complete prototype protection systems are being developed for representative nuclear facilities. An example is shown for a plutonium storage vault. The ERDA safe-secure transportation system for highway shipments of all significant quantities of government-owned SNM is described. Adversary simulation as a tool for testing and evaluating physical protection systems is discussed. Finally, a list of measures is given for assessing overall physical protection system performance. (author)

  17. Materials for innovative lead alloy cooled nuclear systems: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Georg; Weisenburger, Alfons; Fetzer, Renate; Heinzel, Annette; Jianu, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues for all future innovative nuclear systems including Gen IV reactors are materials. The selection of the structural materials determines the design which has to consider the properties and the availability of the materials. Beside general requirements for material properties that are common for all fast reactor types specific issues arise from coolant compatibility. The high solubility of steel alloying elements in liquid Pb-alloys at reactor relevant temperatures is clearly detrimental. Therefore, all steels that are considered as structural materials have to be protected by dissolution barriers. The most common barriers for steels under consideration are oxide scales that form in situ during operation. However, increasing the temperature above 500 deg. C will result either in dissolution attack or in enhanced oxidation. For higher temperatures additional barriers like alumina forming surface alloys are discussed and investigated. Mechanical loads like creep stress and fretting will act on the steels. These mechanical loads will interact with the coolant and can increase the negative effects. For a LFR (Lead Fast Reactor) Demonstrator and MYHRRA (ADS) austenitic steels (316L) are selected for most in core components. The 15-15Ti is the choice for the fuel cladding of MYHRRA and a Pb cooled demonstrator. For an industrial LFR (Lead Fast Reactor) the ferritic martensitic steel T91 was selected as fuel clad material due to its improved irradiation resistance. T91 is in both designs the material to be used for the heat exchanger. Surface alloying with alumina forming alloys is considered to assure material functionality at higher temperatures and is therefore selected for fuel cladding of the ELFR and the heat exchanger tubes. This presentation will give an overview on the selected materials for innovative Pb alloy cooled nuclear systems considering, beside pure compatibility, the influence of mechanical interaction like creep and

  18. Nuclear Materials: Reconsidering Wastes and Assets - 13193

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalske, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable ('assets') to worthless ('wastes'). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or - in the case of high level waste - awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Site's (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as 'waste' include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the national interest. (authors)

  19. Nuclear Materials: Reconsidering Wastes and Assets - 13193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalske, T.A. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable ('assets') to worthless ('wastes'). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or - in the case of high level waste - awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Site's (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as 'waste' include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the

  20. Effects of irradiation on four solid breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The tritium breeding material with the highest lithium atom density, Li 2 O has been observed to incur significant swelling (>4%) under fast reactor irradiation. Such swelling, if unrestrained leads to either unacceptable, induced-strains in adjacent structural material or undesirable design compromises. Fortunately, however, Li 2 O deforms at low temperatures so that swelling strains may be internally accommodated. Laboratory dilational creep experiments were conducted on unirraciated Li 2 O between 500 and 700 0 C in order to provide data for structural analysis of in-reactor experiments and blanket design studies. A densification model agreed with most of the available data. 15 refs

  1. Robot development for nuclear material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.; Armantrout, G.A.; Allen, D.C.; Sievers, R.H. Sr.

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Energy is seeking to modernize its special nuclear material (SNM) production facilities and concurrently reduce radiation exposures and process and incidental radioactive waste generated. As part of this program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) lead team is developing and adapting generic and specific applications of commercial robotic technologies to SNM pyrochemical processing and other operations. A working gantry robot within a sealed processing glove box and a telerobot control test bed are manifestations of this effort. This paper describes the development challenges and progress in adapting processing, robotic, and nuclear safety technologies to the application. 3 figs

  2. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  3. Simulation of tensile stress-strain properties of irradiated type 316 SS by heavily cold-worked material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Yasushi; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    1995-07-01

    Type 316 stainless steel is one of the most promising candidate materials to be used for the structural parts of plasma facing components in the nuclear fusion reactor. The neutron irradiation make the material brittle and reduces its uniform elongation to almost zero at heavy doses. In order to apply such a material of reduced ductility to structural components, the structural integrity should be examined and assured by the fracture mechanics. The procedure requires a formulated stress-strain relationship. However, the available irradiated tensile test data are very limited at present, so that the cold-worked material was used as a simulated material in this study. Property changes of 316 SS, that is, a reduction of uniform elongation and an enhancement of yield stress are seemingly very similar for both the irradiated 316 SS and the cold-worked one. The specimens made of annealed 316 SS, 20% (or 15%) cold worked one and 40% cold worked one were prepared. After the formulation of stress strain behavior, the equation for the cold-worked 316 SS was fitted to the data on irradiated material under the assumption that the yield stress is the same for both materials. In addition, the upper limit for the plastic strain was introduced using the data on the irradiated material. (author)

  4. Optical and electrical phenomena in dielectric materials under irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, P A; Demenkov, P V; Chernov, V M; Krutskikh, A O

    2002-01-01

    Optical and acoustic properties of the materials based on Al sub 2 O sub 3 , SiO sub 2 and BN under 8 MeV proton irradiation (<10 sup 4 Gy/s) have been measured. Electric charge partitioning has been shown to result in charging the microscopic regions in the bulk of the dielectrics under irradiation, which is due to different mobility of free electrons and holes (sapphire), concentration inhomogeneity in the system of charge carrier traps (alumina), or thermodynamic instability of the homogeneous distribution of the filled traps (silica glasses). Prevalent charge carrier recombination in the grain boundaries causes re-crystallization of pyrolytic boron nitride under irradiation, which shows up as simultaneous decrease of the intensity of radiation-induced luminescence (RIL) of the centres in the grain boundaries and the BN. The local charging results in optical inhomogeneity of the silica glasses which is sustained by the optical loss spectra of the irradiated glasses, features of kinetics of bleaching, RI...

  5. Mechanical Tests Plan after Neutron Irradiation for SMART SG Tube Materials in a Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Bok; Baik, Seung Jai; Kim, Do Sik; Yoo, Byung Ok; Jung, Yang Hong; Song, Woong Sub; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Jin Seok; Lee, Yong Sun; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2010-01-01

    An advanced integral PWR, SMART (System- Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is being developed in KAERI. It has compact size and a relatively small power rating compared to a conventional reactor. The main components such as the steam generators, main circulation pumps are located in the reactor vessel. Therefore they are damaged from neutron irradiations generated from nuclear fuel fissions during operation. The SMART SG tubes which are 17 mm in a diameter and 2.5 mm in a thickness will be made of Alloy 690. To ensure the operation safety the post irradiation examinations is necessary to evaluate the deterioration levels of various original properties. Specially the amount of mechanical properties change should be reflected and revised to design data. For that tensile, fracture, hardness test are planned and under preparations. In this paper the detailed plans are reviewed. Three kinds of materials having different heat treatment procedures are prepared to fabricate specimens. The capsules installed the specimens are going to be irradiated in HANARO. Finally the tests for them will be performed in IMEF, Irradiated Materials Examination Facility at KAERI

  6. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d`Etudes des Combustibles; Averseng, J.L.; Serpantie, J.P. [Novatome Industries, 92 - Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    1994-12-31

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs.

  7. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs

  8. Retrieval system of nuclear data for transmutation of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Utsumi, Misako; Noda, Tetsuji [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A database storing the data on nuclear reaction was built to calculate for simulating transmutation behaviours of materials /1/-/3/. In order to retrieve and maintain the database, the user interface for the data retrieval was developed where special knowledge on handling of the database or the machine structure is not required for end-user. It is indicated that using the database, the possibility of He formation and radioactivity in a material can be easily retrieved though the evaluation is qualitatively. (author)

  9. Estimation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated coolant channels at a nuclear plant for its decomissing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquin, Ruben; Zanni, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    The widespread replacement of reactor internals generates a substantial volume of active material.It is essential to work with these components at least in a partial way before the next planned stop.Due to the fact that the reactor internals pool and the storage pools for irradiated nuclear fuel have limited capacities, it has been proposed to compact an experimental shift of 50 irradiated coolant channels, that are currently placed in storage pools.Basically the processed waste will be put in baskets at the bottom of the storage pools.The alternative choice proposes to divide an irradiation coolant channel tube into different parts: stainless steel section, zircaloy-4 section and stainless steel section with hardened zones with cobalt alloys named Estelite-6.Having planned the constructive and operative solutions, the mechanical characterization of the different parts of the channel tube remains to be done.In the present paper, the necessary compacted strength of the irradiation coolant channel tube will be estimated for the stainless steel section and for the zircaloy-4 section, starting from experiment with unirradiated material and considering effects of radiation damage and hydrides on the ductility.These results will be used to design the necessary compacted tools for the semi-industrial installation

  10. Gamma irradiation induced effects of butyl rubber based damping material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Wang, Pu-Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Feng-Shun; Ao, Yin-Yong

    2018-04-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the butyl rubber based damping material (BRP) at various doses in nitrogen were investigated in this study. The results show that irradiation leads to radiolysis of BRP, with extractives increasing from 14.9 ± 0.8% of control to 37.2 ± 1.2% of sample irradiated at 350 kGy, while the swelling ratio increasing from 294 ± 3% to 766 ± 4%. The further investigation of the extractives with FTIR shows that the newly generated extractives are organic compounds containing C-H and C˭C bonds, with molecular weight ranging from 26,500 to 46,300. SEM characterization shows smoother surface with holes disappearing with increasing absorbed doses, consistent with "softer" material because of radiolysis. Dynamic mechanical study of BRP show that tan δ first slightly then obviously increases with increasing absorbed dose, while storage modulus slightly decreases. The tensile testing shows that the tensile strength decreases while the elongation at break increases with increasing dose. The positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy show no obvious relations between free volume parameters and the damping properties, indicating the complicated influencing factors of damping properties.

  11. Small Punch Test Techniques for Irradiated Materials in Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Sik; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Choo, Y. S.

    2006-06-01

    Detailed procedures of the small punch test including the apparatus, the definition of small punch-related parameters, and the interpretation of results were presented. The testing machine should have a capability of the compressive loading and unloading at a given deflection level. The small punch specimen holder consists of an upper and lower die and clamping screws. The clamped specimen is deformed by using ball or spherical head punch. Two type of specimens with a circular and a square shape were used. The irradiated small punch specimen is made from the undamaged portion of the broken CVN bars or prepared by the irradiation of the specimen fabricated from the fresh materials. The heating and cooling devices should have the capability of the temperature control within ±2 .deg. C for the target value during the test. Based on the load-deflection data obtained from the small punch test. the empirical correlation between the small punch related parameters and a tensile properties such as 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, fracture toughness, ductile-brittle transition temperature and creep properties determined from the standard test method is established and used to evaluate the mechanical properties of an irradiated materials. In addition, from the quantitative fractographic assessment of small punch test specimens, the relationship between the small punch energy and the quantity of ductile crack growth is obtained. Analytical formulations demonstrated good agreement with experimental load-deflection curves

  12. Nuclear Materials Characterization in the Materials and Fuels Complex Analytical Hot Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriquez, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As energy prices skyrocket and interest in alternative, clean energy sources builds, interest in nuclear energy has increased. This increased interest in nuclear energy has been termed the 'Nuclear Renaissance'. The performance of nuclear fuels, fuels and reactor materials and waste products are becoming a more important issue as the potential for designing new nuclear reactors is more immediate. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Analytical Laboratory Hot Cells (ALHC) are rising to the challenge of characterizing new reactor materials, byproducts and performance. The ALHC is a facility located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the INL Site. It was built in 1958 as part of the former Argonne National Laboratory West Complex to support the operation of the second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). It is part of a larger analytical laboratory structure that includes wet chemistry, instrumentation and radiochemistry laboratories. The purpose of the ALHC is to perform analytical chemistry work on highly radioactive materials. The primary work in the ALHC has traditionally been dissolution of nuclear materials so that less radioactive subsamples (aliquots) could be transferred to other sections of the laboratory for analysis. Over the last 50 years though, the capabilities within the ALHC have also become independent of other laboratory sections in a number of ways. While dissolution, digestion and subdividing samples are still a vitally important role, the ALHC has stand alone capabilities in the area of immersion density, gamma scanning and combustion gas analysis. Recent use of the ALHC for immersion density shows that extremely fine and delicate operations can be performed with the master-slave manipulators by qualified operators. Twenty milligram samples were tested for immersion density to determine the expansion of uranium dioxide after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The data collected confirmed modeling analysis with very tight

  13. The physical protection of nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Technical Committee met 21-25 June 1993 to consider changes to INFCIRC/225/Rev.2. The revised document, INFCIRC/225/Rev.3, reflects the Technical Committee recommendations for changes to the text as well as other modifications determined necessary to advance the consistency of the Categorization Table in INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 with the categorization table contained in The Convention of the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and to reflect additional improvements presented by the experts. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States.

  14. The physical protection of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Technical Committee met 21-25 June 1993 to consider changes to INFCIRC/225/Rev.2. The revised document, INFCIRC/225/Rev.3, reflects the Technical Committee recommendations for changes to the text as well as other modifications determined necessary to advance the consistency of the Categorization Table in INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 with the categorization table contained in The Convention of the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and to reflect additional improvements presented by the experts. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States

  15. Ion-Neutron Irradiated BOR60 Sample Preparation and Characterization: Nuclear Science User Facility 2017 Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Quinlan B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This document outlines the results obtained by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with the University of Michigan-led Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research project, “Feasibility of combined ion-neutron irradiation for accessing high dose levels.” In this reporting period, neutron irradiated were prepared and shipped to the University of Michigan for subsequent ion irradiation. The specimens were returned to ORNL’s Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis facility, prepared via focused ion beam for examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM), and then examined using S/TEM to measure the as-irradiated microstructure. This report briefly summarizes the S/TEM results obtained at ORNL’s Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis facility.

  16. A new nuclear materials laboratory at Queen's University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.A.; Daymond, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    The Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (RMTL) at Queen's University and the results of commissioning tests are described. RMTL uses energetic protons (up to 8MeV) to simulate fast neutron damage in materials for reactor components. The laboratory is also capable of He implantation (up to 12 MeV) to simulate the effects of transmutation He in reactor components. The $17.5M laboratory comprises a new building, a 4MV tandem accelerator, two electron microscopes, mechanical testing and specimen preparation equipment, and a radiation detection laboratory. RMTL focusses on studying dynamic effects of irradiation (irradiation creep, irradiation growth, irradiation induced swelling, fatigue under irradiation) in-situ. (author)

  17. Irradiation-accelerated corrosion of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, David; Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie

    2012-09-01

    The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, but also applies to most all other GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion presents a unique and extremely challenging environment for materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is essentially absent. Irradiation can affect corrosion or oxidation in at least three different ways. Radiation interaction with water results in the decomposition of water into radicals and oxidizing species that will increase the electrochemical corrosion potential and lead to greater corrosion rates. Irradiation of the solid surface can produce excited states that can alter corrosion, such as in the case of photo-induced corrosion. Lastly, displacement damage in the solid will result in a high flux of defects to the solid-solution interface that can alter and perhaps, accelerate interface reactions. While there exists reasonable understanding of how corrosion is affected by irradiation of the aqueous environment, there is little understanding of how irradiation affects corrosion through its impact on the solid, whether metal or oxide. The reason is largely due to the difficulty of conducting experiments that can measure this effect separately. We have undertaken a project specifically to separate the several effects of irradiation on the mechanisms of corrosion. We seek to answer the question: How does radiation damage to the solution-oxide couple affect the oxidation process differently from radiation damage to either component alone? The approach taken in this work is to closely compare corrosion accelerated by (1) proton irradiation, (2) electron irradiation, and (3) chemical corrosion potential effects alone, under typical PWR operating conditions at 300 deg. C. Both 316 stainless steel and zirconium are to be studied. The proton

  18. Staged deployment of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) employs an accelerator based D-Li intense neutron source as defined in the 1995-96 Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) study. In 1999, IEA mandated a review of the CDA IFMIF design for cost reduction without change to its original mission. This objective was accomplished by eliminating the previously assumed possibility of potential upgrade of IFMIF beyond the user requirements. The total estimated cost was reduced from $797.2 M to $487.8 M. An option of deployment in 3 stages was also examined to reduce the initial investment and annual expenditures during construction. In this scenario, full performance is achieved gradually with each interim stage as follows. 1st Stage: 20% operation for material selection for ITER breeding blanket, 2nd Stage: 50% operation to demonstrate materials performance of a reference alloy for DEMO, 3rd Stage: full performance operation ( 2MW/m 2 at 500cm 3 ) to obtain engineering data for potential DEMO materials under irradiation up to 100-200 dpa. In summary, the new, reduced cost IFMIF design and staged deployment still satisfies the original mission. The estimated cost of the 1st Stage facility is only $303.6 M making it financially much more attractive. Currently, IFMIF Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) is underway to reduce the key technology risk factors. (author)

  19. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility

  20. Assessment of repair welding technologies of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Damages on reactor internals of stainless steels caused by stress corrosion cracking and fatigue were identified in aged BWR plants. Repair-welding is one of the practical countermeasure candidates to restore the soundness of components and structures. The project of 'Assessment of Repair welding Technologies of Irradiated Materials' has been carried out to develop the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals. In FY 2011, we investigated the fatigue strength of stainless steel SUS316L irradiated by YAG laser welding. Furthermore, revision of the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals was discussed. Diagram of tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld cracking caused by entrapped Helium was modified. Helium concentration for evaluation-free of TIG weld cracking caused by entrapped Helium was revised to 0.007appm from 0.01appm. (author)

  1. Irradiation tests on bitumen and bitumen coated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabardel-Brian, R.; Rodier, J.; Lefillatre, G.

    1969-01-01

    The use of bitumen as a material for coating high-activity products calls for prior study of the resistance of bitumen to irradiation. After giving briefly the methods of preparation of bitumen- coated products, this report lists the equipment which has been used for carrying out the β and γ irradiations of these products, and gives the analytical results obtained as a function of the dose rates chosen and of the total integrated dose. Finally, some conclusions have been drawn concerning the best types of bitumen. It should be stressed that some bitumens apparently underwent no degradation whatsoever nor any volume increase, for a total integrated dose of 1.8 x 10 10 rads. (authors) [fr

  2. Process for the irradiation of a film-like material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Kazuo; Inoue, Takashi.

    1969-01-01

    Herein provided is a process for curing a polymerizable coating applied to a strip-like material by irradiating the film with high energy radiation. A plurality of rollers are arranged on both sides of the radiation path in a rectangular configuration such that only the underside of the film contacts the rollers as it is unwound in spiral fashion from a feed bobbin and rewound by a take-up bobbin located within the rectangle. The rollers are further positioned to feed the film in a direction perpendicular to the radiation beam path and to assure that successive levels of the strip superimposed while being inwardly wound are mutually parallel, uniformly spaced and adjusted to precisely intercept the radiation beam. Such an arrangement prevents a polymerizable liquid coating applied to the surface of the strip from contacting the rollers and allows effective repetitive irradiation of the strip as it passes through successive levels of the spiral before being rewound. (Owens, K. J.)

  3. Dielectric changes in neutron-irradiated rf window materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, H.M.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics used for windows in ECRH heating systems for magnetically-confined fusion reactors must retain adequate properties during and after intense neutron irradiation. Of particular concern is a decrease in transmissivity, a parameter inversely related to the product of dielectric constant K and loss tangent tanδ. Samples of polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 and BeO were irradiated to 1 x 10 26 n/m 2 at 660K in the EBR-II fission reactor, and the above properties subsequently measured at 95 GHz. It was found that ktanδ for both materials doubled, implying a doubling of thermal stresses and a consequent reduction of time-to-failure from an assumed one year to 20 min for beryllia and 2 s for alumina. In the case of BeO, a large increase in reflectance of the incident millimeter-wave power results from dielectrically uncompensated swelling. This phenomenon could significantly degrade source performance

  4. Contributions to radiochemical and nuclear materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    1982-01-01

    Series of talks given during a seminar of the European Institute for Transuranium Elements in april 1981 in honor of R. LINDNER on the occasion of his 60th birth day. The topics include general aspects of research practice and science prognosis, retrospective essays about the discovery of nuclear fission by O. HAHN as well as surveys of actual research activities concerning a radiochemistry and the use of radioactivity in material science

  5. Nuclear physics methods in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The brochure contains the abstracts of the papers presented at the 7th EPS meeting 1980 in Darmstadt. The main subjects were: a) Neutron scattering and Moessbauer effect in materials research, b) ion implantation in micrometallurgy, c) applications of nuclear reactions and radioisotopes in research on solids, d) recent developments in activation analysis and e) pions, positrons, and heavy ions applied in solid state physics. (RW) [de

  6. Nuclear data needs for material analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Gabor L.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear data for material analysis using neutron-based methods are examined. Besides a critical review of the available data, emphasis is given to emerging application areas and new experimental techniques. Neutron scattering and reaction data, as well as decay data for delayed and prompt gamma activation analysis are all discussed in detail. Conclusions are formed concerning the need of new measurement, calculation, evaluation and dissemination activities. (author)

  7. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1991-05-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1988 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1988 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized. 16 tabs

  8. Institutional issues affecting transportation of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, R.T.; Luna, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    The institutional issues affecting transportation of nuclear materials in the United States represent significant barriers to meeting future needs in the transport of radioactive waste materials to their ultimate repository. While technological problems which must be overcome to perform such movements seem to be within the state-of-the-art, the timely resolution of these institutional issues seems less assured. However, the definition of these issues, as attempted in this paper, together with systematic analysis of cause and possible solutions are the essential elements of the Transportation Technology Center's Institutional Issues Program

  9. Materials qualification for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braconi, F.

    1987-01-01

    The supply of materials to be used in the fabrication of components submitted to pressure destined to Atucha II nuclear power plant must fulfill the quality assurance requirements in accordance with the international standards. With the aim of promoting the national participation in CNA II, ENACE had the need to adapt these requirements to the national industry conditions and to the availability of official entities' qualification and inspection. As a uniform and normalized assessment for the qualification of materials did not exist in the country, ENACE had to develop a materials suppliers qualification system. This paper presents a suppliers qualification procedure, its application limits and the alternative procedures for the acceptance of individual stock and for the stock materials purchase. (Author)

  10. Testing capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, S.A.; James, M.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources expose materials to high energy (>100 MeV) proton and neutron spectra. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of radiation damage in a lower energy neutron flux from fission or fusion reactors on the mechanical properties of materials, very little work has been performed on the effects that exposure to a spallation neutron spectrum has on the mechanical properties of materials. These effects can be significantly different than those observed in a fission or fusion reactor spectrum because exposure to high energy protons and neutrons produces more He and H along with the atomic displacement damage. Los Alamos National Laboratory has unique facilities to study the effects of spallation radiation damage on the mechanical properties of materials. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has a pulsed linear accelerator which operates at 800 MeV and 1 mA. The Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF) located at the end of this accelerator is designed to allow the irradiation of components in a proton beam while water cooling these components and measuring their temperature. After irradiation, specimens can be investigated at hot cells located at the Chemical Metallurgy Research Building. Wing 9 of this facility contains 16 hot cells set up in two groups of eight, each having a corridor in the center to allow easy transfer of radioactive shipments into and out of the hot cells. These corridors have been used to prepare specimens for shipment to collaborating laboratories such as PNNL, ORNL, BNL, and the Paul Scherrer Institute to perform specialized testing at their hot cells. The LANL hot cells contain capabilities for opening radioactive components and testing their mechanical properties as well as preparing specimens from irradiated components

  11. The law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Concerning refining, fabrication and reprocessing operations of such materials as well as the installation and operation of reactors, necessary regulations are carried out. Namely, in case of establishing the business of refining, fabricating and reprocessing nuclear materials as well as installing nuclear reactors, applications for the permission of the Prime Minister and the Minister of International Trade and Industry should be filed. Change of such operations should be permitted after filing applications. These permissions are retractable. As regards the reactors installed aboard foreign ships, it must be reported to enter Japanese waters and the permission by the Prime Minister must be obtained. In case of nuclear fuel fabricators, a chief technician of nuclear fuel materials (qualified) must be appointed per each fabricator. In case of installing nuclear reactors, the design and methods of construction should be permitted by the Prime Minister. The standard for such permission is specified, and a chief engineer for operating reactors (qualified) must be appointed. Successors inherit the positions of ones who have operated nuclear material refining, fabrication and reprocessing businesses or operated nuclear reactors. (Rikitake, Y.)

  12. The law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The law intends under the principles of the atomic energy act to regulate the refining, processing and reprocessing businesses of nuclear raw and fuel metarials and the installation and operation of reactors for the peaceful and systematic utilization of such materials and reactors and for securing public safety by preventing disasters, as well as to control internationally regulated things for effecting the international agreements on the research, development and utilization of atomic energy. Basic terms are defined, such as atomic energy; nuclear fuel material; nuclear raw material; nuclear reactor; refining; processing; reprocessing; internationally regulated thing. Any person who is going to engage in refining businesses other than the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation shall get the special designation by the Prime Minister and the Minister of International Trade Industry. Any person who is going to engage in processing businesses shall get the particular admission of the Prime Minister. Any person who is going to establish reactors shall get the particular admission of the Prime Minister, The Minister of International Trade and Industry or the Minister of Transportation according to the kinds of specified reactors, respectively. Any person who is going to engage in reprocessing businesses other than the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute shall get the special designation by the Prime Minister. The employment of nuclear fuel materials and internationally regulated things is defined in detail. (Okada, K.)

  13. The regulations concerning refining business of nuclear source material and nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Regulations specified here cover application for designation of undertakings of refining (spallation and eaching filtration facilities, thickening facilities, refining facilities, nuclear material substances or nuclear fuel substances storage facilities, waste disposal facilities, etc.), application for permission for alteration (business management plan, procurement plan, fund raising plan, etc.), application for approval of merger (procedure, conditions, reason and date of merger, etc.), submission of report on alteration (location, structure, arrangements processes and construction plan for refining facilities, etc.), revocation of designation, rules for records, rules for safety (personnel, organization, safety training for employees, handling of important apparatus and tools, monitoring and removal of comtaminants, management of radioactivity measuring devices, inspection and testing, acceptance, transport and storage of nuclear material and fuel, etc.), measures for emergency, submission of report on abolition of an undertaking, submission of report on disorganization, measures required in the wake of revocation of designation, submission of information report (exposure to radioactive rays, stolen or missing nuclear material or nuclear fuel, unusual leak of nuclear fuel or material contaminated with nuclear fuel), etc. (Nogami, K.)

  14. Radiation damage and materials performance in irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.

    2009-01-01

    Collisions of energetic projectile particles with host atoms produce atomic displacements in the target materials. Subsequently, some of these displacements are transformed into lattice defects and survive in the form of single defects and of defect clusters. Depending on the ambient temperature, these defects and their clusters diffuse, interact, annihilate, segregate and accumulate in various forms and are responsible for the evolution of the irradiation-induced microstructure. Naturally, both physical and mechanical properties and thereby the performance and lifetime of target materials are likely to be determined by the nature and the magnitude of the accumulated defects and their spatial dispositions. The defect accumulation, microstructural evolution and the resulting materials response gets very complicated particularly under the reactor operational conditions. The complication arises from the fact that the materials used in the structural components will experience concurrently generation of defects produced by the flux of neutrons and generation of dislocations due to plastic deformation. In other words, the defect accumulation will have to be considered under the conditions of two interactive reaction kinetics operating simultaneously. Both materials and experimental variables are likely to affect the damage accumulation and thereby the materials performance. Experimental and theoretical results pertaining to effects of major materials and experimental variables on materials performance will be briefly examined. (au)

  15. Integrating the stabilization of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, H.F. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In response to Recommendation 94-1 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the Department of Energy committed to stabilizing specific nuclear materials within 3 and 8 years. These efforts are underway. The Department has already repackaged the plutonium at Rocky Flats and metal turnings at Savannah River that had been in contact with plastic. As this effort proceeds, we begin to look at activities beyond stabilization and prepare for the final disposition of these materials. To describe the plutonium materials being stabilize, Figure 1 illustrates the quantities of plutonium in various forms that will be stabilized. Plutonium as metal comprises 8.5 metric tons. Plutonium oxide contains 5.5 metric tons of plutonium. Plutonium residues and solutions, together, contain 7 metric tons of plutonium. Figure 2 shows the quantity of plutonium-bearing material in these four categories. In this depiction, 200 metric tons of plutonium residues and 400 metric tons of solutions containing plutonium constitute most of the material in the stabilization program. So, it is not surprising that much of the work in stabilization is directed toward the residues and solutions, even though they contain less of the plutonium.

  16. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At this time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable, however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented

  17. Fugitive binder for nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallivan, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for fabricating a body of a nuclear fuel material has the steps of admixing the nuclear fuel material in powder form wih a binder of a compound or its hydration products containing ammonium cations and anions selected from the group consisting of carbonate anions, bicarbonate anions, carbamate anions and mixtures of such anions, forming the resulting mixture into a green body such as by die pressing, heating the green body to decompose substantially all of the binder into gases, further heating the body to produce a sintered body, and cooling the sintered body in a controlled atmosphere. Preferred binders used in the practice of this invention include ammonium bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate carbamate, ammonium sesquicarbonate, ammonium carbamate and mixtures thereof. This invention includes a composition of matter in the form of a compacted structure suitable for sintering comprising a mixture of a nuclear fuel material and a binder of a compound or its hydration products containing ammonium cations and anions selected from the group consisting of carbonate anions, bicarbonate anions, carbamate anions and mixtures of such anions. 9 claims, 4 figures

  18. Study of candu fuel elements irradiated in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, S.; Uta, O.; Mincu, M.; Anghel, D.; Prisecaru, I.

    2015-01-01

    The object of this work is the behaviour of CANDU fuel elements after service in nuclear power plant. The results are analysed and compared with previous result obtained on unirradiated samples and with the results obtained on samples irradiated in the TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti. Zircaloy-4 is the material used for CANDU fuel sheath. The importance of studying its behaviour results from the fact that the mechanical properties of the CANDU fuel sheath suffer modifications during normal and abnormal operation. In the nuclear reactor, the fuel elements endure dimensional and structural changes as well as cladding oxidation, hydriding and corrosion. These changes can lead to defects and even to the loss of integrity of the cladding. This paper presents the results of examinations performed in the Post Irradiation Examination Laboratory (PIEL) of INR Pitesti on samples from fuel elements after they were removed out of the nuclear power plant: - dimensional and macrostructural characterization; - microstructural characterization by metallographic analyses; - determination of mechanical properties; - fracture surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A full set of non-destructive and destructive examinations concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the cladding was performed. The obtained results are typical for CANDU 6-type fuel. The obtained data could be used to evaluate the security, reliability and nuclear fuel performance, and for the improvement of the CANDU fuel. (authors)

  19. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  20. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules