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Sample records for iron aluminide advanced

  1. Development of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKamey, C.G.; Viswanathan, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Sikka, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrating that improved engineering ductility (to 10-15% in Fe 3 Al) can be achieved in wrought Fe 3 Al-based iron aluminide alloys through control of composition and microstructure are discussed. Accompanying this improvement has been an increased understanding of the causes for ambient temperature embrittlement in this system. Because of these advances, iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. The understanding and control of cast structures are important steps in making iron-aluminide alloys viable engineering materials. This includes understanding the various components of cast structure, their evolution, their properties, their behavior during further processing, and, finally, their effect on mechanical properties. The first phase of the study of cast Fe 3 Al-based alloys characterized the various components of the cast structure in the FA-129 alloy, while the current phase of the research involves characterizing the as-cast mechanical properties of Fe 3 Al-based alloys. The investigation of the room temperature mechanical properties of as-cast Fe 3 Al, including tensile tests in air, oxygen, and water vapor environments is described. Studies have begun to refine the grain size of the cast structure. An investigation of the effect of environmental hydrogen embrittlement on the weldability of wrought alloys was also initiated during this period with the aim of understanding the role of environment in the cold-cracking of iron aluminides

  2. Iron aluminide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Iron aluminides with the B2 structure are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant. They are thermodynamically compatible with a wide range of ceramics such as TiC, WC, TiB 2 , and ZrB 2 . In addition, liquid iron aluminides wet these ceramics very well. Therefore, FeAl/ceramic composites may be produced by techniques such as liquid phase sintering of powder mixtures, or pressureless melt infiltration of ceramic powders with liquid FeAl. These techniques, the resulting microstructures, and their advantages as well as limitations are described. Iron aluminide composites can be very strong. Room temperature flexure strengths as high as 1.8 GPa have been observed for FeAl/WC. Substantial gains in strength of elevated temperatures (1,073 K) have also been demonstrated. Above 40 vol.% WC the room temperature flexure strength becomes flaw-limited. This is thought to be due to processing flaws and limited interfacial strength. The fracture toughness of FeAl/WC is unexpectedly high and follows a rule of mixtures. Interestingly, sufficiently thin (<1 microm) FeAl ligaments between adjacent WC particles fracture not by cleavage, but in a ductile manner. For these thin ligaments the dislocation pile-ups formed during deformation are not long enough to nucleate cleavage fracture, and their fracture mode is therefore ductile. For several reasons, this brittle-to-ductile size transition does not improve the fracture toughness of the composites significantly. However, since no cleavage cracks are nucleated in sufficiently thin FeAl ligaments, slow crack growth due to ambient water vapor does not occur. Therefore, as compared to monolithic iron aluminides, environmental embrittlement is dramatically reduced in iron aluminide composites

  3. ODS iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; Tortorelli, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200{degrees}C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The program has two main thrusts: (a) alloy processing, which involves mechanical alloying and thermomechanical processing to achieve the desired size and distribution of the oxide dispersoid, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. Control of the grain size and shape in the final alloy is very dependent on the homogeneity of the alloy powder, in terms of the size and distribution of the dispersed oxide particles, and on the level of strain and temperature applied in the recrystallization step. Studies of the effects of these variables are being made using mechanically-alloyed powder from two sources: a commercial powder metallurgy alloy vendor and an in-house, controlled environment high-energy mill. The effects of milling parameters on the microstructure and composition of the powder and consolidated alloy are described. Comparison of the oxidation kinetics of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys with commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys in air at 1000-1300{degrees}C indicated that the best Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys oxidized isothermally at the same rate as the ODS-FeCrAl alloys but, under thermal cycling conditions, the oxidation rate of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al was faster. The main difference was that the ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al experienced significantly more scale spallation above 1000{degrees}C. The differences in oxidation behavior were translated into expected lifetimes which indicated that, for an alloy section thickness of 2.5 mm, the scale spallation of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al leads to an expected service lifetime similar to that for the INCO alloy MA956 at 1100 to 1300{degrees}C.

  4. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D. G.; Munoz-Morris, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the materials, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered. (Author)

  5. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  6. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  7. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  8. A Review on the Properties of Iron Aluminide Intermetallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zamanzade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron aluminides have been among the most studied intermetallics since the 1930s, when their excellent oxidation resistance was first noticed. Their low cost of production, low density, high strength-to-weight ratios, good wear resistance, ease of fabrication and resistance to high temperature oxidation and sulfurization make them very attractive as a substitute for routine stainless steel in industrial applications. Furthermore, iron aluminides allow for the conservation of less accessible and expensive elements such as nickel and molybdenum. These advantages have led to the consideration of many applications, such as brake disks for windmills and trucks, filtration systems in refineries and fossil power plants, transfer rolls for hot-rolled steel strips, and ethylene crackers and air deflectors for burning high-sulfur coal. A wide application for iron aluminides in industry strictly depends on the fundamental understanding of the influence of (i alloy composition; (ii microstructure; and (iii number (type of defects on the thermo-mechanical properties. Additionally, environmental degradation of the alloys, consisting of hydrogen embrittlement, anodic or cathodic dissolution, localized corrosion and oxidation resistance, in different environments should be well known. Recently, some progress in the development of new micro- and nano-mechanical testing methods in addition to the fabrication techniques of micro- and nano-scaled samples has enabled scientists to resolve more clearly the effects of alloying elements, environmental items and crystal structure on the deformation behavior of alloys. In this paper, we will review the extensive work which has been done during the last decades to address each of the points mentioned above.

  9. Investigation of Iron Aluminide Weld Overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.B.; Levin, B.F.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-08-02

    Conventional fossil fired boilers have been retrofitted with low NO(sub)x burners in order for the power plants to comply with new clean air regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion typically has been enhanced resulting in premature tube failure. To protect the existing panels from accelerated attack, weld overlay coatings are typically being applied. By depositing an alloy that offers better corrosion resistance than the underlying tube material, the wastage rates can be reduced. While Ni-based and stainless steel compositions are presently providing protection, they are expensive and susceptible to failure via corrosion-fatigue due to microsegregation upon solidification. Another material system presently under consideration for use as a coating in the oxidation/sulfidation environments is iron-aluminum. These alloys are relatively inexpensive, exhibit little microsegregation, and show excellent corrosion resistance. However, their use is limited due to weldability issues and their lack of corrosion characterization in simulated low NO(sub)x gas compositions. Therefore a program was initiated in 1996 to evaluate the use of iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in fossil fired boilers with low NO(sub)x burners. Investigated properties included weldability, corrosion behavior, erosion resistance, and erosion-corrosion performance.

  10. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voděrová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  11. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voderova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  12. Precipitation-strengthening effects in iron-aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; McKamey, C.G.; Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to produce precipitation to improve both high-temperature strength and room-temperature ductibility in FeAl-type(B2 phase) iron-aluminides. Previous work has focused on primarily wrought products, but stable precipitates can also refine the grain size and affect the properties of as-cast and/or welded material as well. New work began in FY 1994 on the properties of these weldable, strong FeAl alloys in the as-cast condition. Because the end product of this project is components for industry testing, simpler and better (cheaper, near-net-shape) processing methods must be developed for industrial applications of FeAl alloys.

  13. The effects of zirconium and carbon on the hot cracking resistance of iron aluminides. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Iron aluminides have been of interest for about 60 years because of their good high temperature strengths (below 600{degrees}C) and excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance, as well as their relatively low cost and conservation of strategic elements. These advantageous properties have driven the development of iron aluminides as potential structural materials. However, the industrial application of iron aluminides has been inhibited because of a sharp reduction in strength at temperatures higher than 600{degrees}C and low ductility at ambient temperatures due to hydrogen embrittlement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown in recent years that room temperature properties of alloys containing 28% Al (all compositions are in atomic percent unless otherwise noted) can be improved through thermomechanical processing and alloying. Iron aluminides must have good weldability if they are to be used as structural materials. A coarse fusion zone microstructure is formed when iron aluminides are welded, increasing their susceptibility to cold cracking in water vapor. A recent study at Colorado School of Mines has shown that refining the fusion zone microstructure by weld pool oscillation effectively reduces cold cracking. Weld pool inoculation has been shown to refine fusion zone microstructures, but coarse carbide distribution caused this approach to reducing cold cracking to be ineffective.

  14. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  15. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; Sikka, Vinod K.; Hajaligol, Mohammed R.

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminide coatings on iron, nickel and superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, John T.; De, P.K.; Dubey, Vivekanand; Srinivasa, Raman

    2009-08-01

    Aluminide coatings are a class of intermetallic coatings applied on nickel and cobalt base superalloys and steels to protect them from different forms of environmental degradation at high temperatures. In this report a CVD system that can produce the aluminide coatings on iron, nickel and nickel base alloys has been described and the result of chemical vapor deposition of aluminide coatings on iron specimens, their characterization, and property evaluation have been presented. The CVD system consists of an AlCl 3 bath, a stainless steel retort as a hot-wall reacto, cold traps and vacuum system. Aluminium chloride vapor was carried in a stream of hydrogen gas at a flow rate of 150 SCCM (standard cubic centimeter per minute) into the CVD reactor maintained in the temperature range of 1173 - 1373 K and at a pressure of 1.33 kPa (10 Torr). Aluminum deposition takes place from aluminium subchlorides produced by reaction between AlCl 3 and pure aluminum kept in the CVD reactor. The aluminum diffuses into the iron samples and iron aluminide phases are formed at the surface. The coatings were shining bright and showed good adherence to the substrate. The coatings consisted of FeAl phase over a wide range of experimental conditions. The growth kinetics of the coating followed a parabolic rate law and the mean activation energy was 212 ±16 kJ/mol. Optical microscopic studies on the transverse section of the coating showed that the aluminide coating on iron consisted of two layers. The top layer had a thickness in the range of 20-50 μm, and the under layer had thickness ranging from 35 to 250 μm depending on coating temperature in two hours. The thickness of the aluminide layer increased with coating duration and temperature. Electron microprobe studies (EPMA) showed that the aluminum concentration decreased steadily as distance from the surface increased. TEM studies showed that the outer most layer had a B2 order (of the FeAl phase), which extended even into the under

  17. Advances in the Systems and Processes for the Production of Gamma Titanium Aluminide Bars and Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Robert E.

    2017-12-01

    A historical look at the melt processing of gamma titanium aluminides is presented first, followed by recent advances in melting equipment design by Retech to produce 50-mm and 100-mm-diameter ingots up to 1000 mm long. Equipment design for the economical production of gamma titanium aluminide powder is then discussed. The focus in industry has shifted away from basic research to cost-effective production of these titanium alloys for aerospace and automotive engine applications.

  18. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hall, F.; Valykeo, J. [Hoskins Mfg. Co., Hamburg, MI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  19. Effect of cerium addition on the corrosion behaviour of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mungole, M.N.; Bharagava, S.; Baligidad, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides Fe-20.0Al-2.0C, Fe-18.5Al-3.6C and Fe-19.2Al-3.3C-0.07Ce (in at.%) has been studied. The potentiodynamic polarization behaviour of the alloys was evaluated in freely aerated 0.25 mol/l H 2 SO 4 . A 0.05% C steel was used for comparison purposes. All the alloys exhibited active-passive behaviour in the acidic solution. The addition of Ce destroyed passivity as indicated by lower breakdown potentials in polarization studies. This has been related to the finer distribution of the carbides in the microstructure. Corrosion rates were evaluated by immersion testing. The iron aluminide with Ce addition exhibited a lower corrosion rate compared to the aluminides without Ce addition. This has been attributed to modifications in surface film with Ce addition. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to localized galvanic corrosion due to the presence of carbides in the microstructure

  20. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Kang, B.S. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1998-07-27

    Iron aluminides have excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperatures with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides has been undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component has been on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}Al and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}Al. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large for one of the two types of iron sites. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences for hydrogen diffusion. Indeed, the ab-initio-based estimate of the divacancy binding energy indicates a likely tendency toward such clustering for iron vacancies on the sites with large lattice relaxation. The experimental work has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior.

  1. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  2. The quantitative inspection of iron aluminide green sheet using transient thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, Michael L.; Hinders, Mark K.; Scorey, Clive; Winfree, William

    1999-01-01

    The recent development of manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of thin iron aluminide, FeAl, sheet requires advanced quantitative methods for on-line inspection. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for flaws and the development of appropriate flaw detection methods are key elements in an effective quality management system. The first step in the fabrication of thin FeAl alloy sheet is the formation of a green sheet, either by cold rolling or tape casting FeAl powder mixed with organic binding agents. The finished sheet is obtained using a series of process steps involving binder elimination, densification, sintering, and annealing. Non-uniformities within the green sheet are the major contributor to material failure in subsequent sheet processing and the production of non-conforming finished sheet. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of using active thermography to detect the flaws and heterogeneity within green powder composites (1)(2)(3). The production environment and physical characteristics of these composites provide for unique challenges in developing a rapid nondestructive inspection capability. Thermography is non-contact and minimizes the potential damage to the fragile green sheet. Limited access to the material also demands a one-sided inspection technique. In this paper, we will describe the application of thermography for 100% on-line inspection within an industrial process. This approach is cost competitive with alternative technologies, such as x-ray imaging systems, and provides the required sensitivity to the variations in material composition. The formation of green sheet flaws and their transformation into defects within intermediate and finished sheet products will be described. A green sheet conformance criterion will be presented which would significantly reduce the probability of processing poor quality green sheet which contributes to higher waste and inferior bulk alloy sheet

  3. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  4. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  5. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernieres, Jerome, E-mail: Jerome.vernieres@oist.jp; Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E. [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Bobo, Jean-François [Centre d’Elaboration de Materiaux et d’Etudes Structurales (CEMES), 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Sowwan, Mukhles, E-mail: Mukhles@oist.jp [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Nanotechnology Research Laboratory, Al-Quds University, P.O. Box 51000, East Jerusalem, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  6. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  7. A study on the formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) from elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, H.; Corneliusson, J.; Turba, K.; Iyengar, S.

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • Fe–40 at.% Al discs with coarse iron powder showed precombustion and combustion peaks. • Loose powder mixtures and discs with fine iron powder showed only combustion peaks. • Slower heating rate and fine aluminum particles promote precombustion. • The major product formed during both the reactions was Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}. • Heating the samples to 1000 °C yielded a stable FeAl phase as the final product. - Abstract: The formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) during the heating of Fe–40 at.% Al powder mixture has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of particle size of the reactants, compaction of the powder mixtures as well as the heating rate on combustion behavior has been investigated. On heating compacted discs containing relatively coarser iron powder, DSC data show two consecutive exothermic peaks corresponding to precombustion and combustion reactions. The product formed during both these reactions is Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and there is a volume expansion in the sample. The precombustion reaction could be improved by a slower heating rate as well as a better surface coverage of iron particles using relatively finer aluminum powder. The combustion reaction was observed to be weaker after a strong precombustion stage. Heating the samples to 1000 °C resulted in the formation of a single and stable FeAl phase through the diffusional reaction between Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and residual iron. DSC results for compacted discs containing relatively finer iron powder and for the non-compacted samples showed a single combustion exotherm during heating, with Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} as the product and traces of FeAl. X-ray diffraction and EDS data confirmed the formation of FeAl as the final product after heating these samples to 1000 °C.

  8. Evaluation of the Intrinsic and Extrinsic Fracture Behavior of Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.

    2001-01-11

    In this paper, we first present the status of our computational modeling study of the thermal expansion coefficient of Fe/Al over a wide range of temperature and evaluate its dependence on selected additives. This will be accomplished by applying an isobaric Monte Carlo technique. The required total energy of the sample will be computed by using a tight-binding (TB) method that allows us to significantly increase the size of the computational data base without reducing the accuracy of the calculations. The parameters of the TB Hamiltonian are fitted to reproduce the band structure obtained by our quantum mechanical full-potential LMTO calculations. The combination of the three methods mentioned above creates an effective approach to the computation of the physical properties of the transition-metal aluminides and it can be extended to alloys with more than two components. At present, we are using a simplified approach for a first-round of results; and as a test of the simplified approach, have obtained excellent agreement with experiment for aluminum. Our previous experimental results showed that, because of their smaller grain size, FA-187 and FA-189 are extrinsically more susceptible to environmental embrittlement than FA-186 under low strain loading condition. To further investigate the grain boundary size effect as related to the susceptibility of hydrogen embrittlement, we conducted comparative finite element modeling simulations of initial intergranular fracture of two iron aluminides (FA186 and FA189) due to hydrogen embrittlement. Sequentially coupled stress and mass diffusion analyses are carried out to determine crack-tip stress state and the extent of hydrogen diffusion at the crack tip region, and a proper failure criteria is then adopted to simulate the intergranular fracture. Good qualitative agreement between the modeling predictions and experimental results is observed.

  9. Effects of high temperature surface oxides on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing, heat treatment (750 {degrees}C in air, one hour) or simulated in-service-type oxidation (1000{degrees}C in air, 24 hours) on the room-temperature aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of iron aluminides. Materials evaluated included the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84, FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo, a FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385, and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy, FAPY. Tests were performed in a mild acid-chloride solution to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Cyclic-anodic-polarization tests were employed to evaluate resistances to localized aqueous corrosion. The high-temperature oxide surfaces consistently produced detrimental results relative to mechanically or chemically cleaned surfaces. Specifically, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the as-processed and 750{degrees} C surfaces, relative to the cleaned surfaces, for FA-84, FA-129, FAL-Mo, FA-385 and FAPY. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the 1000{degrees}C surfaces, relative to cleaned surfaces, for FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo.

  10. Interdiffusion behaviors of iron aluminide coatings on China low activation martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. X.; Yang, H. G.; Yuan, X. M.; Zhao, W. W.; Zhan, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The iron aluminide coating on China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was prepared by pack cementation and subsequent heat treatment. A surface Fe2Al5 layer was formed on CLAM substrate by pack cementation process with Fe2Al5 donor powder and NH4Cl activator. Diffusion heat treatment was performed in order to allow the phase transformation from Fe2Al5 to a phase with lower aluminum content. Morphology and composition of the coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). There is a need to study the interdiffusion behaviors in these Al containing systems, as a basis for controlling the formation and subsequent degradation of the coating. In this paper, a predictive model was developed to describe the phase transformation of Fe2Al5 as a function of processing parameters. The Wagner's equation was used to calculate the interdiffusion coefficients based on the analysis of the Al concentration profiles. The results showed that the interdiffusion coefficients in the FeAl and α-Fe(Al) phase strongly depends on Al content and showed a maximum at about 28 at.% Al.

  11. Interdiffusion behaviors of iron aluminide coatings on China low activation martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.X.; Yang, H.G.; Yuan, X.M.; Zhao, W.W.; Zhan, Q.

    2014-01-01

    The iron aluminide coating on China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was prepared by pack cementation and subsequent heat treatment. A surface Fe 2 Al 5 layer was formed on CLAM substrate by pack cementation process with Fe 2 Al 5 donor powder and NH 4 Cl activator. Diffusion heat treatment was performed in order to allow the phase transformation from Fe 2 Al 5 to a phase with lower aluminum content. Morphology and composition of the coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). There is a need to study the interdiffusion behaviors in these Al containing systems, as a basis for controlling the formation and subsequent degradation of the coating. In this paper, a predictive model was developed to describe the phase transformation of Fe 2 Al 5 as a function of processing parameters. The Wagner’s equation was used to calculate the interdiffusion coefficients based on the analysis of the Al concentration profiles. The results showed that the interdiffusion coefficients in the FeAl and α-Fe(Al) phase strongly depends on Al content and showed a maximum at about 28 at.% Al

  12. Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings for boiler tube protection in coal-fired low NOx boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings are currently being considered for enhanced sulfidation resistance in coal-fired low NO{sub x} boilers. The use of these materials is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility, which generally increases with an increase in aluminum concentration of the deposit. The overall objective of this program is to attain an optimum aluminum content with good weldability and improved sulfidation resistance with respect to conventional materials presently in use. Research has been initiated using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in order to achieve this end. Under different sets of GTAW parameters (wire feed speed, current), both single and multiple pass overlays were produced. Characterization of all weldments was conducted using light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Resultant deposits exhibited a wide range of aluminum contents (5--43 wt%). It was found that the GTAW overlays with aluminum contents above {approximately}10 wt% resulted in cracked coatings. Preliminary corrosion experiments of 5 to 10 wt% Al cast alloys in relatively simple H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S gas mixtures exhibited corrosion rates lower than 304 stainless steel.

  13. The influence of processing on microstructure and properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K.; Anderson, M.T. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1997-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide alloys based on Fe3Al have been formed by reaction synthesis from elemental powders followed by hot extrusion. The resulting alloys have approximately 2.5% by volume Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles dispersed throughout the material. A proper combination of extrusion temperature, extrusion ratio, and post-consolidation heat treatment results in a secondary recrystallized microstructure with grain sizes greater than 25mm. ODS material with 5% Cr addition exhibits approximately an order of magnitude increase in time to failure at 650 C compared to a similar alloy without the oxide dispersion. Addition of Nb and Mo along with Cr results in decreased minimum creep rates, however, the time to rupture is greatly reduced due to fracture at low strains initiated at large Nb particles that were not put into solution. The activation energy for creep in the 5% Cr ODS material is on the order of 210 kJ/mole and the power law creep exponent is 9--9.5. Transmission electron microscopy examination of the substructure of deformed samples indicates some formation of low angle dislocation boundaries, however, most of the dislocations are pinned at particles. The TEM observations and the value of the creep exponent are indicative of dislocation breakaway from particles as the rate controlling deformation mechanism. The TEM results indicate that particles smaller than about 100nm and larger than about 500 nm do not contribute significantly to dislocation pinning.

  14. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Materials Engineering Dept.

    1997-06-05

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium and carbon on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fe{sub 3}Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  15. Thermal and Irradiation Creep Behavior of a Titanium Aluminide in Advanced Nuclear Plant Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Per; Chen, Jiachao; Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Titanium aluminides are well-accepted elevated temperature materials. In conventional applications, their poor oxidation resistance limits the maximum operating temperature. Advanced reactors operate in nonoxidizing environments. This could enlarge the applicability of these materials to higher temperatures. The behavior of a cast gamma-alpha-2 TiAl was investigated under thermal and irradiation conditions. Irradiation creep was studied in beam using helium implantation. Dog-bone samples of dimensions 10 × 2 × 0.2 mm3 were investigated in a temperature range of 300 °C to 500 °C under irradiation, and significant creep strains were detected. At temperatures above 500 °C, thermal creep becomes the predominant mechanism. Thermal creep was investigated at temperatures up to 900 °C without irradiation with samples of the same geometry. The results are compared with other materials considered for advanced fission applications. These are a ferritic oxide-dispersion-strengthened material (PM2000) and the nickel-base superalloy IN617. A better thermal creep behavior than IN617 was found in the entire temperature range. Up to 900 °C, the expected 104 hour stress rupture properties exceeded even those of the ODS alloy. The irradiation creep performance of the titanium aluminide was comparable with the ODS steels. For IN617, no irradiation creep experiments were performed due to the expected low irradiation resistance (swelling, helium embrittlement) of nickel-base alloys.

  16. Evaluation of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion - corrosion resistant boiler tube coatings in low NO{sub x} boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuPont, J.N.; Banovic, S.W.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Low NOx burners are being installed in many fossil fired power plants in order to comply with new Clean Air Regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion is often enhanced and premature tube failures can occur. Failures due to oxidation and solid particle erosion are also a concern. A program was initiated in early 1996 to evaluate the use of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx boilers. Composite iron/aluminum wires will be used with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process to prepare overlays on boiler tubes steels with aluminum contents from 8 to 16wt%. The weldability of the composite wires will be evaluated as a function of chemical composition and welding parameters. The effect of overlay composition on corrosion (oxidation and sulfidation) and solid particle erosion will also be evaluated. The laboratory studies will be complemented by field exposures of both iron aluminide weld overlays and co-extruded tubing under actual boiler conditions.

  17. In-depth study of the mechanical properties for Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminide fabricated using the wire-arc additive manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au; Cuiuri, Dominic; Dong, Bosheng; Li, Huijun

    2016-07-04

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate iron aluminide alloy in-situ, through separate feeding of pure Fe and Al wires into a molten pool that is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This paper investigates the morphologies, chemical compositions and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated 30 at% Al iron aluminide wall components, and how these properties vary at different locations within the buildup wall. The tensile properties are also measured in different loading orientations; as epitaxial growth of large columnar grains is observed in the microstructures. Fe{sub 3}Al is the only phase detected in the middle buildup section of the wall structure, which constitutes the majority of the deposited material. The bottom section of the structure contains a dilution affected region where some acicular Fe{sub 3}AlC{sub 0.5} precipitates can be observed, induced by carbon from the steel substrate that was used for fabrication. The microhardness and chemical composition indicate relatively homogeneous material properties throughout the buildup wall. However, the tensile properties are very different in the longitudinal direction and normal directions, due to epitaxial growth of large columnar grains. In general, the results have demonstrated that the WAAM process is capable of producing full density in-situ-alloyed iron aluminide components with tensile properties that are comparable to powder metallurgy methods.

  18. In-depth study of the mechanical properties for Fe_3Al based iron aluminide fabricated using the wire-arc additive manufacturing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi; Cuiuri, Dominic; Dong, Bosheng; Li, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate iron aluminide alloy in-situ, through separate feeding of pure Fe and Al wires into a molten pool that is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This paper investigates the morphologies, chemical compositions and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated 30 at% Al iron aluminide wall components, and how these properties vary at different locations within the buildup wall. The tensile properties are also measured in different loading orientations; as epitaxial growth of large columnar grains is observed in the microstructures. Fe_3Al is the only phase detected in the middle buildup section of the wall structure, which constitutes the majority of the deposited material. The bottom section of the structure contains a dilution affected region where some acicular Fe_3AlC_0_._5 precipitates can be observed, induced by carbon from the steel substrate that was used for fabrication. The microhardness and chemical composition indicate relatively homogeneous material properties throughout the buildup wall. However, the tensile properties are very different in the longitudinal direction and normal directions, due to epitaxial growth of large columnar grains. In general, the results have demonstrated that the WAAM process is capable of producing full density in-situ-alloyed iron aluminide components with tensile properties that are comparable to powder metallurgy methods.

  19. Effects of Additives on the Corrosion Resistance of Iron Aluminides(Fe-38at.%AI-5at.%Cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H. C.; Kim, C. W.; Joo, S. M.; Choi, D. C.; Kim, K. H.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of additives on the corrosion resistance of iron aluminides(Fe-38at.%AI-5at.%Cr) were investigated using potentiostat. The specimens were cast by vacuum arc melting. The subsequent homogenization was carried out in Ar gas atmosphere at 1000 .deg. C for 7 days. The corroded surfaces of the tested specimens were observed using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope(SEM) after electrochemical tests were carried out in various solutions. While the Hf addition to Fe-38at.%AI-5at.%Cr resulted in equiaxial microstructure, the Zr addition resulted in dendritic microstructure. However, no change in microstructure was observed when Mo was added. The addition of Mo to Fe-38at.%AI-5at.%Cr intermetallic compound was found to increase the pitting potential, which improved the resistance against the pitting corrosion attack. The addition of Hf and Zr resulted in a higher activation current density and a lower pitting potential. These results may indicate that the dendrite structure played a major role in decreasing the pitting corrosion resistance of Fe-38at.%AI-5at%Cr intermetallic compound. The Mo addition to Fe-38at.%AI-5at.%Cr decreased the number and size of pits. In the case of Zr addition, the pits nucleated and grew remarkably at dendritic branches

  20. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  1. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  2. Development of Iron Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    a water line break subsequent to atomization. But the powder was used to determine the effects of exposure to water and of post outgasaing heat...into a water -cooled copper mold. The dimensions of the castings for alloys listed in Table 37 are about 33 mm X 33 mm x 100 mm, and weigh about 0.77...FDA 31B7 Fiuw 130. Creep Behavior of Alloy 140 at 6,VC and 293 MPa Afitr Voir.o Aging Heat Trataments Indicated. Solan Beat Treatment 1040C/lh/OQ Fe-Mn

  3. Optimization of laboratory hot rolling of brittle Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B aluminide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schindler, I.; Hadasik, E.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Kawulok, P.; Fabík, R.; Opěla, P.; Rusz, S.; Kawulok, R.; Jabłońska, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2015), s. 1693-1701 ISSN 1733-3490 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/10/0438 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : iron aluminides * EBSD * textures * modelling Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.090, year: 2014

  4. Aluminium/iron reinforced polyfurfuryl alcohol resin as advanced biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium and iron are widely used in construction sectors for the preparation of advanced composites with epoxy resins as matrices. In recent times, there are several reports on the polymerization of polyfufuryl alcohol (PFA a thermoset bioresins from furfuryl alcohol (FA. FA is obtained from waste of sugarcane bagasse. In this work, first the possibility of curing PFA from FA in the presence of aluminium or iron has been explored. Absorbance results from colorimeter/spectrophotometerindicated that the curing of FA to PFA in presence of aluminium started easily while in presence of iron the curing of FA to PFA could not start. Based on the above results, aluminium wire reinforced composites were successfully prepared with three different weight fractions (0.13, 0.09 and 0.07 of aluminium wire. The mechanical properties of these composites were determined theoretically and reported.

  5. Testing of advanced chromium - iron based steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeg Veternikova, J.; Degmova, J.; Sabelova, V.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Slugen, V.; Simko, F.; Pekarcikova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Research and Development of advanced nuclear reactors in Generation IV (GEN IV) are limited by the selection of proper construction materials. Suitable candidate materials are still under extensive investigation, because their properties must be excellent to achieve high level of reactor system safety. NF 709 (Fe-20Cr-25Ni) is new austenitic steel with improved properties in compare to AISI steels; therefore it is also one of candidate materials. Our study is focused on investigation of radiation resistance as well as thermal stability of this steel - NF 709. New austenitic steel NF 709, candidate materials for construction of Generation IV reactors, was observed in term of its stability after an exposure to very high temperature and irradiation. The change of microstructure was observed by positron annihilation techniques which demonstrated the growth of vacancy defects from di-vacancies in as-received material to three-vacancies in material after the thermal and implantation treatments; although the total change of structure was very small. Thus, NF 709 showed good resistance to tested strains and according to our preliminary results. Therefore, this material could be used for high temperature applications and interchangeable components of Generation IV reactors. (authors)

  6. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr.ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  7. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  8. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  9. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy cutting edge. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800.degree. C. for a period of time followed by rolling at 650.degree. C., cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge.

  10. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  11. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  12. Isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Singh, J.P.; Tuval, E.; Weiss, I.

    1996-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminide has received considerable attention in recent years from the automotive industry as a potential material for making rotating and reciprocating components to produce a quieter and more efficient engine. The objectives of this study were to identify processing routes for the manufacture of automobile valves from gamma titanium aluminide. The issues considered were microstructure and composition of the material, and processing parameters such as deformation rates, temperatures, and total deformation. This paper examines isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide in order to develop a processing window for this type of material

  13. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  14. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  15. Synthesis and characterisation of pack cemented aluminide coatings on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houngninou, C.; Chevalier, S.; Larpin, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The exposition of metallic materials to high temperature environments leads to their corrosion because of oxidation or sulphidation. One way to protect such materials is to produce an Al 2 O 3 layer which needs to be continuous enough to limit diffusion of oxygen or metallic elements, and withstand this corrosion. Since a few years, it has been proved that aluminide compounds are one of the most effective materials to achieve this goal. Indeed, they possess sufficient Al and many beneficial mechanical properties when exposed to high temperature conditions to make possible the formation of a protective Al 2 O 3 scale. This study is aimed at the elaboration of iron, nickel and molybdenum aluminides by modification of the surface of the base materials by a pack cementation process. The as-cemented alloys were analysed by means of SEM coupled with EDX and by XRD. Cross-section examinations showed, in each case, a progressive diffusion of aluminium through the substrates. The diffusion thickness layer was more or less important depending on the base material and on the coating conditions

  16. Environmental effects in titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental effects on titanium aluminide alloys are potentially of great importance for engineering applications of these materials, although little has been published to date on such effects. The primary emphasis in this paper is on hydrogen effects, with a brief reference to oxygen effects. Hydrogen is readily absorbed at elevated temperature into all the titanium aluminide compositions studied to date, in amounts as large as 10 at.%, and on cooling virtually all this hydrogen is precipitated as a hydride phase or phases. The presence of these precipitated hydride plates affects mechanical properties in ways similar to what is observed in other hydride forming materials, although effects per unit volume of hydride are not particularly severe in the titanium aluminides. Microstructure, and thus thermal and mechanical history, plays a major role in controlling the severity of hydrogen effects

  17. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. [comps.

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  18. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel .... of hydrogen gas into CVD reactor, where nickel samples .... presence of three phases: β-NiAl, γ -Ni3Al and γ-Ni(Al).

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Al/Fe-aluminide in-situ composite prepared by reactive stir casting route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Subhranshu; Sinha, Arijit; Das, Debdulal; Ghosh, Sumit; Basumallick, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Iron aluminide particulate reinforced aluminium composites were prepared by a simple liquid metal stir casting route. The particulate intermetallic reinforcements were formed by in-situ reaction between molten aluminium and a rotating mild steel stirrer at 800 °C. X-ray diffraction studies were carried out to identify the types of iron aluminide particulates present in the as cast composite. Compositional variations of the composite samples were estimated with the aid of energy dispersive spectroscopy. The microstructural features of the composite were studied with respect to different heat treatment schedules and deformation conditions. Microhardness and nanoindentation measurements were also carried out to assess the micromechanical behaviour e.g., hardness and elastic modulus in micrometric length scale of the composite samples. Tensile tests and fractographic analysis were performed to estimate the mechanical properties and determine the mode of failure of the samples. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the composite samples were correlated and discussed

  20. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  1. Shock response of a gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    Potential use of γ-TiAl alloys in aerospace and other structural applications require knowledge of their impact behavior for better evaluation and modeling. In the present study plate impact experiments are conducted using a single-stage gas gun to better understand the shock behavior of the recently developed class of gamma titanium aluminide alloys--the Gamma-Met PX. The Gamma-Met PX showed superior shock properties when compared to the conventional titanium aluminide alloys. The spall strength of Gamma-Met PX is 1.8±0.09 GPa, which is four to six times higher than those reported for other gamma titanium aluminide alloys. Moreover, it has a Hugoniot elastic limit of 1.88 GPa at a target thickness of 3.86 mm, which drops to 1.15 GPa at target thickness of 15.8 mm. The decay in the elastic precursor is continuous without showing an asymptote to a constant level within the range of target thicknesses studied

  2. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Soboyejo, W.; Rapp, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb 3 Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to ∼750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings

  3. Recent Advances and Research Status in Energy Conservation of Iron Ore Sintering in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Zu; Zhang, Jian-Liang; Liu, Zheng-Jian; Du, Cheng-Bo

    2017-11-01

    For the ferrous burden of blast furnaces in China, sinter generally accounts for more than 70% and the sintering process accounts for approximately 6-10% of the total energy consumption of the iron and steel enterprise. Therefore, saving energy during the sintering process is important to reduce the energy consumption in the iron and steel industry. This paper aims to illustrate recent advances and the research status of energy conservation of iron ore sintering in China. It focuses on the development and application of energy-saving technologies such as the composite agglomeration process, sintering with high-proportion flue gas recirculation sintering, recovery of sensible heat from the sinter cooling process, homogeneous deep-bed sintering technology, and comprehensive treatment technology of leakage of sintering. Moreover, some suggestions for the future development of energy-saving technologies are put forward.

  4. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  5. Microstructural characterization of silicon added titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.N.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium aluminides intermetallic compounds have received great attention during the past decade, since they have the potential, in aircraft and automotive engines, to replace the high density Ni-base superalloys However, these intermetallics possess poor oxidation properties at high temperatures. Previous studies showed that protective alumina scale formation on gamma-TiAl can be obtained by small additions (around 2 at.%) of Ag. In the present study, a number of cast Ti-Al-Si alloys were investigated in relation to transient oxide formation in air at 1300 deg. C. After various oxidation times the oxide composition, microstructure and morphology were studied by combining a number of analysis techniques. The TiAl-Si alloys appear to form Al Ti and Si oxides. However, the formation of silicon oxide at the interface of base metal and scale slows down the oxidation rate significantly. (author)

  6. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of Titanium Aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, R; Sieber, M; Lampke, T; Grund, T; Wielage, B

    2016-01-01

    Due to their outstanding specific mechanical and high-temperature properties, titanium aluminides exhibit a high potential for lightweight components exposed to high temperatures. However, their application is limited through their low wear resistance and the increasing high-temperature oxidation starting from about 750 °C. By the use of oxide ceramic coatings, these constraints can be set aside and the possible applications of titanium aluminides can be extended. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) represents a process for the generation of oxide ceramic conversion coatings with high thickness. The current work aims at the clarification of different electrolyte components’ influences on the oxide layer evolution on alloy TNM-B1 (Ti43.5Al4Nb1Mo0.1B) and the creation of compact and wear resistant coatings. Model experiments were applied using a ramp-wise increase of the anodic potential in order to show the influence of electrolyte components on the discharge initiation and the early stage of the oxide layer growth. The production of PEO layers with technically relevant thicknesses close to 100 μm was conducted in alkaline electrolytes with varying amounts of Na 2 SiO 3 ·5H 2 O and K 4 P 2 O 7 under symmetrically pulsed current conditions. Coating properties were evaluated with regard to morphology, chemical composition, hardness and wear resistance. The addition of phosphates and silicates leads to an increasing substrate passivation and the growth of compact oxide layers with higher thicknesses. Optimal electrolyte compositions for maximum coating hardness and thickness were identified by statistical analysis. Under these conditions, a homogeneous inner layer with low porosity can be achieved. The frictional wear behavior of the compact coating layer is superior to a hard anodized layer on aluminum. (paper)

  7. Microstructure and oxidation performance of a γ–γ′ Pt-aluminide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microstructure and oxidation performance of a –' Pt-aluminide bond coat on directionally solidified superalloy CM-247LC ... Keywords. Platinum aluminide bond coat; coating; cyclic oxidation; superalloy; microstructure. ... Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058, India ...

  8. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  9. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  10. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant, weldable FeAl alloys have been developed with improved high-temperature strength industrial applications. Previous processing difficulties with these alloys led to their evaluation as weld-overlay claddings on conventional structural steels to take advantage of their good properties now. Simplified and better processing methods for monolithic FeAl components are also currently being developed so that components for industrial testing can be made. Other avenues for producing FeAl coatings are currently being explored. Neutron scattering experiments residual stress distributions in the FeAl weld-overlay cladding began in FY 1993 and continued this year.

  11. The influence of composition on environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The effects of water vapor in air and hydrogen gas on the tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys has been studied at room temperature. Fe-28a%Al-5a%Cr alloys to which either Zr alone or Zr and C have been added have been tested in controlled humidity air environments as well as in 1.3 atm hydrogen or oxygen gas and in vacuum. As with other Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, oxygen produces the lowest crack growth rates as well as the highest critical stress intensities and tensile ductility in each of the alloys tested. However, while Zr lowers crack growth rates in the Paris regime, there is no apparent beneficial effect on crack growth thresholds. Hydrogen gas also produces unusual results. While crack growth rates are very high in hydrogen in the Paris regime for all alloys, hydrogen only lowers the crack growth threshold relative to air in ternary Fe-28Al-5Cr; it does not lower the threshold in the Zr-containing alloys. Fracture path tends to be transgranular in all alloys and environments. The results will be discussed in the light of possible effects of Zr on oxide formation.

  12. Compatibility of aluminide-coated Hastelloy x and Inconel 617 in a simulated gas-cooled reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, J.; Johnson, W.R.; Chen, K.

    1982-03-01

    Commercially prepared aluminide coatings on Hastelloy X and Inconel 617 substrates were exposed to controlled-impurity helium at 850 0 and 950 0 C for 3000 h. Optical and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron microprobe profiles, and SEM X-ray mapping were used to evaluate and compare exposed and unexposed control samples. Four coatings were evaluated: aluminide, aluminide with platinum, aluminide with chromium, and aluminide with rhodium. With extended time at elevated temperature, nickel diffused into the aluminide coatings to form epsilon-phase (Ni 3 Al). This diffusion was the primary cause of porosity formation at the aluminide/alloy interface

  13. Peculiarities of formation of zirconium aluminides in hydride cycle mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muradyan, G.N.

    2016-01-01

    The zirconium aluminides are promising structural materials in aerospace, mechanical engineering, chemical industry, etc. They are promising for manufacturing of heat-resistant wires, that will improve the reliability and efficiency of electrical networks. In the present work, the results of study of zirconium aluminides formation in the Hydride Cycle (HC) mode, developed in the Laboratory of high-temperature synthesis of the Institute of Chemical Physics of NAS RA, are described. The formation of zirconium aluminides in HC proceeded according to the reaction xZrH_2+(1-x)Al → alloy Zr_xAl(1-x)+H_2↑. The samples were certified using: chemical analysis to determine the content of hydrogen (pyrolysis method); differential thermal analysis (DTA, derivatograph Q-1500, T_heating = 1000°C, rate 20°C/min); X-ray analysis (XRD, diffractometer DRON-0.5). The influences of the ratio of powders ZrH_2/Al in the reaction mixture, compacting pressure, temperature and heating velocity on the characteristics of the synthesized aluminides were determined. In HC, the solid solutions of Al in Zr, single phase ZrAl_2 and ZrAl_3 aluminides and Zr_3AlH_4.49 hydride were synthesized. Formation of aluminides in HC mode took place by the solid-phase mechanism, without melting of aluminum. During processing, the heating of the initial charge up to 540°C resulted in the decomposition of zirconium hydride (ZrH_2) to HCC ZrH_1.5, that interacted with aluminum at 630°C forming FCC alumohydride of zirconium. Further increase of the temperature up to 800°C led to complete decomposition of the formed alumohydride of zirconium. The final formation of the zirconium aluminide occurred at 1000-1100°C in the end of HC process. Conclusion: in the synthesis of zirconium aluminides, the HC mode has several significant advantages over the conventional modes: lower operating temperatures (1000°C instead of 1800°C); shorter duration (1.5-2 hours instead of tens of hours); the availability of

  14. Recent advances in synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Research on synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and its surface modification for biomedical applications is of intense interest. Due to superparamagnetic property of SPION, the nanoparticles have large magnetic susceptibility, single magnetic domain and controllable magnetic behaviour. However, owing to easy agglomeration of SPION, surface modification of the magnetic particles with biocompatible materials such as silica nanoparticle has gained much attention in the last decade. In this review, we present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION. - Highlights: • We present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION • The synthetic routes of producing SPION can be classified into three: physical, chemical and biological methods. • The chemical method is the most cited method of producing SPION and it sub-classified into liquid and gas phase. • The techniques of producing silica coated SPION is grouped into seeded and non-seeded methods.

  15. Recent advances in synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode, E-mail: bashirsodipo@gmail.com [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Nano-Biotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Aziz, Azlan Abdul [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Nano-Biotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2016-10-15

    Research on synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and its surface modification for biomedical applications is of intense interest. Due to superparamagnetic property of SPION, the nanoparticles have large magnetic susceptibility, single magnetic domain and controllable magnetic behaviour. However, owing to easy agglomeration of SPION, surface modification of the magnetic particles with biocompatible materials such as silica nanoparticle has gained much attention in the last decade. In this review, we present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION. - Highlights: • We present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION • The synthetic routes of producing SPION can be classified into three: physical, chemical and biological methods. • The chemical method is the most cited method of producing SPION and it sub-classified into liquid and gas phase. • The techniques of producing silica coated SPION is grouped into seeded and non-seeded methods.

  16. Methods of preparation and modification of advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles, their properties and application in water treatment technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Jan; Kašlík, Josef; Medřík, Ivo; Petala, Eleni; Zbořil, Radek; Slunský, Jan; Černík, Miroslav; Stavělová, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles are commonly used in modern water treatment technologies. Compared to conventionally-used macroscopic iron or iron microparticles, the using of nanoparticles has the advantages given mainly by their generally large specific surface area (it drives their high reactivity and/or sorption capacity), small dimensions (it allows their migration e.g. in ground water), and particular physical and chemical properties. Following the applications of zero-valent iron particles in various pilot tests, there arose several critical suggestions for improvements of used nanomaterials and for development of new generation of reactive nanomaterials. In the presentation, the methods of zero-valent iron nanoparticles synthesis will be summarized with a special attention paid to the thermally-induced solid-state reaction allowing preparation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in an industrial scale. Moreover, the method of thermal reduction of iron-oxide precursors enables to finely tune the critical parameters (mainly particle size and morphology, specific surface area, surface chemistry of nanoparticles etc.) of resulting zero-valet iron nanoparticles. The most important trends of advanced nanoparticles development will be discussed: (i) surface modification of nanomaterilas, (ii) development of nanocomposites and (iii) development of materials for combined reductive-sorption technologies. Laboratory testing of zero-valent iron nanoparticles reactivity and migration will be presented and compared with the field observations: the advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles were used for groundwater treatment at the locality contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons (VC, DCE, TCE and PCE) and reacted nanoparticles were extracted from the sediments for their fate assessment. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic "Competence Centres" (project No. TE01020218) and the EU FP7 (project NANOREM).

  17. Iron-Based Nanomaterials/Graphene Composites for Advanced Electrochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Movlaee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanostructures (IONs in combination with graphene or its derivatives—e.g., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide—hold great promise toward engineering of efficient nanocomposites for enhancing the performance of advanced devices in many applicative fields. Due to the peculiar electrical and electrocatalytic properties displayed by composite structures in nanoscale dimensions, increasing efforts have been directed in recent years toward tailoring the properties of IONs-graphene based nanocomposites for developing more efficient electrochemical sensors. In the present feature paper, we first reviewed the various routes for synthesizing IONs-graphene nanostructures, highlighting advantages, disadvantages and the key synthesis parameters for each method. Then, a comprehensive discussion is presented in the case of application of IONs-graphene based composites in electrochemical sensors for the determination of various kinds of (biochemical substances.

  18. Iron-Based Nanomaterials/Graphene Composites for Advanced Electrochemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movlaee, Kaveh; Ganjali, Mohmmad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanostructures (IONs) in combination with graphene or its derivatives—e.g., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide—hold great promise toward engineering of efficient nanocomposites for enhancing the performance of advanced devices in many applicative fields. Due to the peculiar electrical and electrocatalytic properties displayed by composite structures in nanoscale dimensions, increasing efforts have been directed in recent years toward tailoring the properties of IONs-graphene based nanocomposites for developing more efficient electrochemical sensors. In the present feature paper, we first reviewed the various routes for synthesizing IONs-graphene nanostructures, highlighting advantages, disadvantages and the key synthesis parameters for each method. Then, a comprehensive discussion is presented in the case of application of IONs-graphene based composites in electrochemical sensors for the determination of various kinds of (bio)chemical substances. PMID:29168771

  19. A general strategy toward graphitized carbon coating on iron oxides as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunyan; Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Guangwu

    2017-08-25

    Integration of carbon materials with benign iron oxides is blazing a trail in constructing high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this paper, a unique general, simple, and controllable strategy is developed toward in situ uniform coating of iron oxide nanostructures with graphitized carbon (GrC) layers. The basic synthetic procedure only involves a simple dip-coating process for the loading of Ni-containing seeds and a subsequent Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the growth of GrC layers. More importantly, the CVD treatment is conducted at a quite low temperature (450 °C) and with extremely facile liquid carbon sources consisting of ethylene glycol (EG) and ethanol (EA). The GrC content of the resulting hybrids can be controllably regulated by altering the amount of carbon sources. The electrochemical results reveal remarkable performance enhancements of iron oxide@GrC hybrids compared with pristine iron oxides in terms of high specific capacity, excellent rate and cycling performance. This can be attributed to the network-like GrC coating, which can improve not only the electronic conductivity but also the structural integrity of iron oxides. Moreover, the lithium storage performance of samples with different GrC contents is measured, manifesting that optimized electrochemical property can be achieved with appropriate carbon content. Additionally, the superiority of GrC coating is demonstrated by the advanced performance of iron oxide@GrC compared with its corresponding counterpart, i.e., iron oxides with amorphous carbon (AmC) coating. All these results indicate the as-proposed protocol of GrC coating may pave the way for iron oxides to be promising anodes for LIBs.

  20. Creep deformation mechanisms in a γ titanium aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, Zakaria [Institute of Structural Materials, College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA18EN (United Kingdom); Ding, Rengen [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TT (United Kingdom); Martin, Nigel; Dixon, Mark [Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby DE248BJ (United Kingdom); Bache, Martin [Institute of Structural Materials, College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA18EN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Titanium aluminides (TiAl) are considered as potential alternatives to replace nickel-based alloys of greater density for selected components within future gas turbine aero-engines. This is attributed to the high specific strength as well as the good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. The gamma (γ) titanium aluminide system Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb has previously demonstrated promising performance in terms of its physical and mechanical properties. The main aim of the current study, which is a continuation of a previously published paper, aims at evaluating the performance of this titanium aluminide system under high temperature creep conditions. Of particular interest, the paper is strongly demonstrating the precise capability of the Wilshire Equations technique in predicting the long-term creep behaviour of this alloy. Moreover, it presents a physically meaningful understanding of the various creep mechanisms expected under various testing conditions. To achieve this, two creep specimens, tested under distinctly different stress levels at 700 °C have been extensively examined. Detailed microstructural investigations and supporting transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have explored the differences in creep mechanisms active under the two stress regimes, with the deformation mechanisms correlated to Wilshire creep life prediction curves.

  1. 2-Chlorophenol Removal of Aqueous Solution Using Advanced Oxidation Processes Resulting from Iron/ Persulfate and Ultra Violet/ Persulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokufeh Astereki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advanced oxidation processes are used to remove toxic aromatic compounds with low biodegradability, such as 2-chlorophenol. This study investigated the use of sulfate (SO4- and persulfate (S2O82- radicals, as one of the advanced oxidation methods, to remove 2- chlorophenol from aquatic solutions. Methods: This experimental and pilot-scale study was carried out using two chemical batch reactors; one of the reactors equipped with UV lamps and the other was on the hot plate. In iron/ persulfate (Fe/S2O82- and ultra violet/ persulfate (UV/S2O82- processes different parameters were investigated. Results: Iron, UV, the initial pH of the solution, persulfate concentration have considerable effects on the elimination of 2-chlorophenol in both processes. In both processes, the maximum elimination occurred in acidic conditions. The elimination efficiency was increased by increasing the concentration of 2-chlorophenol and UV intensity, and also by decreasing the concentration of persulfate and iron. Accordingly, in iron/ persulfate and ultra violet/ persulfate processes 2-chlorophenol was eliminated with 99.96% and 99.58% efficiencies, respectively. Conclusion: Sulfate radicals produced from activated persulfate ions with hot-Fe ion and UV radiation have significant impact on the removal of 2-chlorophenol. Therefore, the processes of Fe/S2O82- and UV/S2O82- can be regarded as good choices for industrial wastewater treatment plants operators in the future.

  2. The Effect of Nb Addition on the Microstructure and the High-Temperature Strength of Fe3Al Aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, Petr; Švec, Martin; Král, Robert; Veselý, Jozef; Lukáč, Pavel; Vlasák, Tomáš

    2018-02-01

    The microstructural and high-temperature mechanical properties of Fe-26Al-xNb (x = 3 and 5 at. pct) are compared. The alloys were investigated "as cast" and after hot rolling at 1473 K (1200 °C). Scanning electron microscopes equipped with EDS and EBSD were used for the microstructure and phase identification. The addition of 3 at. pct of Nb into the Fe3Al matrix leads to the formation of C14 λ—Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Nb (LP) particles spread in the Fe3Al matrix, while an eutectic with thin lamellae of LP C14 λ—Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Nb and matrix is also formed in the iron aluminide with 5 at. pct of Nb. The presence of incoherent precipitates is connected with the enhancement of the high-temperature strength and creep resistance.

  3. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-03-10

    Alloys are disclosed for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1{+-}0.8%)Al--(1.0{+-}0.8%)Mo--(0.7 + 0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques. 4 figs.

  4. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  5. Titanium Aluminide Scramjet Inlet Flap Subelement Benchmark Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David L.; Draper, Susan L.

    2005-01-01

    A subelement-level ultimate strength test was completed successfully at the NASA Glenn Research Center (http://www.nasa.gov/glenn/) on a large gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) inlet flap demonstration piece. The test subjected the part to prototypical stress conditions by using unique fixtures that allowed both loading and support points to be located remote to the part itself (see the photograph). The resulting configuration produced shear, moment, and the consequent stress topology proportional to the design point. The test was conducted at room temperature, a harsh condition for the material because of reduced available ductility. Still, the peak experimental load-carrying capability exceeded original predictions.

  6. Microstructures and superplasticity in near-gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bampton, C.C.; Martin, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructure control by thermomechanical processing in near-gamma titanium aluminide alloys has recently progressed to a point where the authors are able to reliably produce a wide range of microstructures in a single alloy. The authors are now studying the basic superplastic deformation microstructures. Correlations are made between microstructural details and flow stress, strain hardening, strain-rate hardening, necking, cavitation and failure. Special emphasis is given to the cavitation behavior since this phenomenon may constitute a major limitation to the useful application of superplastic forming for gamma TiAl structures

  7. Eco-Friendly Magnetic Iron Oxide Pillared Montmorillonite for Advanced Catalytic Degradation of Dichlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-friendly pillared montmorillonites, in which the pillars consist of iron oxide are expected to have interesting and unusual magnetic properties that are applicable for environmental decontamination. Completely “green” and effective composite was synthesized using mild reactio...

  8. Formation of electrically insulating coatings on aluminided vanadium-base alloys in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were produced on vanadium and vanadium-base alloys by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium that contained 3-5 at.% dissolved aluminum in sealed capsules at temperatures between 775 and 880 degrees C. Reaction of the aluminide layer with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium provides a means of developing an in-situ electrical insulator coating on the surface of the alloys. The electrical resistivity of A1N coatings on aluminided V and V-20 wt.% Ti was determined in-situ

  9. Alloying of aluminum and its influence on the properties of aluminide coatings: oxidation behavior and the chemical stability in Pb-17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbrenner, H.; Peric, Z.; Borgstedt, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical insulation of the structural material is necessary to reduce the MHD pressure drop in a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. This coating has to be compatible with liquid Pb-17Li up to 450 C. Specimens with different types of coatings were exposed to static Pb-17Li for 1200 h at 450 C in order to study their compatibility. Iron and a ferritic steel were coated with an aluminide layer by means of an aluminizing process. Iron metal plate was hot dip aluminized at Thyssen, Germany. The preheated sheet was coated for this purpose by exposing for a few seconds to a melt of Al with 10 wt% Si. The ferritic steel, MANET, was immersed into a melt of the same composition. In this case, cold specimens were dipped into the melt at 700 C for up to 10 min. The formation of the required oxide scale on top of the aluminide layer was performed by using two different methods: high temperature oxidation in air and anodic oxidation at room temperature. All the exposed specimens were examined before and after the corrosion experiments. The analytical method used is EDX measurements on the cut of the specimens and metallographical examinations. (orig.)

  10. Structural formation of aluminide phases on titanium alloy during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaeva, A.A.; Romankov, S.E.; Sagdoldina, Zh.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aluminum layer on the surface of titanium alloy has been formed by thermal deposition. The structural formation of aluminide phases on the surface has been studied. The sequence of structural transformations at the Ti/Al interface is limited by the reaction temperature and time. The sequence of aluminide phase formation is occurred in compliance with Ti-Al equilibrium phase diagram. At the initial stages at the Ti/Al interface the Al3Ti alloy starts forming as a result of interdiffusion, and gradually the whole aluminum films is spent on the formation of this layer. The Al3Ti layer decomposes with the increase of temperature (>600C). At 800C the two-phase (Ti3Al+TiAl) layer is formed on the titanium surface. The TiAl compound is unstable and later on with the increase of the exposure time at 800C gradually transforms into the Ti3Al. The chain of these successive transformations leads to the formation of the continuous homogeneous layer consisting of the Ti3Al compound on the surface. At temperatures exceeding the allotropic transformation temperature (>900C) the Ti3Al compound starts decomposing. All structural changes taking place at the Ti/Al interface are accompanied by considerable changes in micro hardness. The structure of initial substrate influences on kinetics of phase transformation and microstructure development. (author)

  11. Effect of cerium addition on microstructures of carbon-alloyed iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    All the alloys exhibited a typical two-phase microstructure consisting of Fe3AlC carbides in an iron aluminide matrix. In the alloy without Ce addition, large bulky carbides were equally distributed throughout the matrix with many smaller precipitates interspersed in between. In the alloy with Ce addition, the carbide grain sizes ...

  12. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  13. Gamma titanium aluminide production using the Induction Skull Melting (ISM) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, S.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1985, more than 2,000 titanium aluminide heats have been produced using the Induction Skull Melting (ISM) process. The history of ISM/Gamma production will be discussed in this paper. Gamma titanium aluminide processing with Induction Skull Melting offers many advantages over other types of reactive alloy melting methods. These advantages will be discussed as well as drawbacks. Also, potential markets and applications for ISM/Gamma will be presented

  14. Phase stability and electronic structure of transition-metal aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will describe the interplay between die electronic structure and structural energetics in simple, complex, and quasicrystalline Al-transition metal (T) intermetallics. The first example is the Ll 2 -DO 22 competition in Al 3 T compounds. Ab-initio electronic total-energy calculations reveal surprisingly large structural-energy differences, and show that the phase stability of both stoichiometric and ternary-substituted compounds correlates closely with a quasigap in the electronic density of states (DOS). Secondly, ab-initio calculations for the structural stability of the icosahedrally based Al 12 W structure reveal similar quasigap effects, and provide a simple physical explanation for the stability of the complex aluminide structures. Finally, parametrized tight-binding model calculations for the Al-Mn quasicrystal reveal a large spread in the local Mn DOS behavior, and support a two-site model for the quasicrystal's magnetic behavior

  15. The iron swords from the necropolis of Son Pellisser; preliminary advance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Fernández Mártinez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper submits the iron swords from the necropolis of Son Pellisser (Calvià-Majorca. Although the materials that we find are numerous and still under research offer a preliminary study about three imported swords, found in burial objects, also their possible origin and way of introduction on the island. These weapons could be the first archaeological evidence that the Balearic mercenaries participated in the Wars of Sicily, between Carthaginians and Greeks, from the fifth century BC.

  16. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    Dual phase titanium aluminides composed vastly of gamma phase (TiAl) with moderate amount of alpha2 phase (Ti3Al) have been considered for several high temperature aerospace and automobile applications. High specific strength coupled with good high temperature performance in the areas of creep and oxidation resistance makes titanium aluminides "materials of choice" for next generation propulsion systems. Titanium alumnides are primarily being considered as potential replacements for Ni-based superalloys in gas turbine engine components with aim of developing more efficient and leaner engines exhibiting high thrust-to-weight ratio. Thermo-mechanical treatments have shown to enhance the mechanical performance of titanium aluminides. Additionally, small additions of interstitial elements have shown further and significant improvement in the mechanical performance of titanium alumnide alloys. However, titanium aluminides lack considerably in room temperature ductility and as a result manufacturing processes of these aluminides have greatly suffered. Traditional ingot metallurgy and investment casting based methods to produce titanium aluminide parts in addition to being expensive, have also been unsuccessful in producing titanium aluminides with the desired mechanical properties. Hence, the manufacturing costs associated with these methods have completely outweighed the benefits offered by titanium aluminides. Over the last two decades, several powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques have been studied to produce titanium aluminide parts. These techniques have been successful in producing titanium aluminide parts with a homogeneous and refined microstructure. These powder metallurgy techniques also hold the potential of significant cost reduction depending on the wide market acceptance of titanium aluminides. In the present study, a powder metallurgy based rapid consolidation technique has been used to produce near-net shape parts of titanium aluminides. Micron

  17. A comparative study on laser processing of commercially available titanium aluminide (TI-48AL-2CR-2NB) and in-situ alloying of titanium aluminide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hoosain, Shaik E

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminides (TiAl) are acknowledged as promising high temperature structural materials due to their high melting point, high strength to density, high elastic modulus and high creep strength. Due to their low ductility, it is difficult...

  18. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin

    2016-11-15

    A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H2O2 concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD5/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD5/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72g/L, H2O2 concentration 12.32mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Recent advances and future prospects of iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabani, N V Srikanth; Singh, Sanjay

    2018-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are considered as chemically inert materials and, therefore, being extensively applied in the areas of imaging, targeting, drug delivery and biosensors. Their unique properties such as low toxicity, biocompatibility, potent magnetic and catalytic behavior and superior role in multifunctional modalities have epitomized them as an appropriate candidate for biomedical applications. Recent developments in the area of materials science have enabled the facile synthesis of Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) offering easy tuning of surface properties and surface functionalization with desired biomolecules. Such developments have enabled IONPs to be easily accommodated in nanocomposite platform or devices. Additionally, the tag of biocompatible material has realized their potential in myriad applications of nanomedicines including imaging modalities, sensing, and therapeutics. Further, IONPs enzyme mimetic activity pronounced their role as nanozymes in detecting biomolecules like glucose, and cholesterol etc. Hence, based on their versatile applications in biomedicine, the present review article focusses on the current trends, developments and future prospects of IONPs in MRI, hyperthermia, photothermal therapy, biomolecules detection, chemotherapy, antimicrobial activity and also their role as the multifunctional agent in diagnosis and nanomedicines.

  20. An advanced lithium-ion battery based on a graphene anode and a lithium iron phosphate cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoun, Jusef; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Agostini, Marco; Angelucci, Marco; Betti, Maria Grazia; Cingolani, Roberto; Gemmi, Mauro; Mariani, Carlo; Panero, Stefania; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Scrosati, Bruno

    2014-08-13

    We report an advanced lithium-ion battery based on a graphene ink anode and a lithium iron phosphate cathode. By carefully balancing the cell composition and suppressing the initial irreversible capacity of the anode in the round of few cycles, we demonstrate an optimal battery performance in terms of specific capacity, that is, 165 mAhg(-1), of an estimated energy density of about 190 Wh kg(-1) and a stable operation for over 80 charge-discharge cycles. The components of the battery are low cost and potentially scalable. To the best of our knowledge, complete, graphene-based, lithium ion batteries having performances comparable with those offered by the present technology are rarely reported; hence, we believe that the results disclosed in this work may open up new opportunities for exploiting graphene in the lithium-ion battery science and development.

  1. Structure and Properties of the Aluminide Coatings on the Inconel 625 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiak, Stanisław; Bochnowski, Wojciech; Dziedzic, Andrzej; Filip, Ryszard; Szeregij, Eugeniusz

    2016-01-01

    The research samples used in this study were based on the Inconel 625 alloy; the examined samples were coated with aluminide films deposited in a low-activity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The samples' microstructure was investigated with optical and electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. Hardness measurements were performed using Vickers and Berkovich test methods. The adhesion of the aluminide coating was determined by fractography. It was shown that the fracture mechanism was different for the respective zones of the aluminide coating and the substrate material. The outer zone of the aluminide coating is characterized by an intercrystalline fracture, with a small contribution of transcrystalline fracture within individual grains (large crystallites in the bottom of the zone, composed of smaller crystallites, also show an intercrystalline fracture). The substrate material exhibited a ductile intercrystalline fracture. Based on this investigation, an increase of the microhardness of the material occurring at loads below 0.2 N was observed. When determining microhardness of aluminide coating it is necessary to take into account the optimal choice of the indentation tip.

  2. Control of the flame front advance in a sintering bed of iron ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cores, A.; Mochon, J.; Ruiz-Bustinza, I.; Parra, R.

    2010-01-01

    A sintering pan of 40 cm cubed is loaded with a mixture of iron ores, limestone and coke weighing 110 kg in a sintering pilot plant. In this sintering pan, a series of thermocouples have been introduced at different depths. Tests have been carried out to study the width of the combustion zone and the maximum temperature of the flame front across the sintering bed. For the analysis of the results, a data acquisition system was used. This consisted of two modules connected in serie, for performing the analogue-digital conversion. The analogue entry point is the exit point of the thermocouples and the digital exit point was the temperature average. A computer was used for conserving and storing the data and for carrying out interpolations, simulating the state and evolution of the flame front across the bed. (Author) 21 refs.

  3. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liqun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe-C microelectrolysis-Fenton process is proposed to pretreat landfill leachate. • Operating variables are optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). • 3D-EEMs and MW distribution explain the mechanism of enhanced biodegradability. • Fixed-bed column experiments are performed at different flow rates. - Abstract: A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H_2O_2 concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD_5/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD_5/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72 g/L, H_2O_2 concentration 12.32 mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate.

  4. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liqun, E-mail: 691127317@qq.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Qi, E-mail: yangqi@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Dongbo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmli121x@hotmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Fe-C microelectrolysis-Fenton process is proposed to pretreat landfill leachate. • Operating variables are optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). • 3D-EEMs and MW distribution explain the mechanism of enhanced biodegradability. • Fixed-bed column experiments are performed at different flow rates. - Abstract: A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD{sub 5}/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72 g/L, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration 12.32 mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote ...

  6. Halo Formation During Solidification of Refractory Metal Aluminide Ternary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N.; Feitosa, L. M.; West, G. D.; Dong, H. B.

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of eutectic morphologies following primary solidification has been studied in the refractory metal aluminide (Ta-Al-Fe, Nb-Al-Co, and Nb-Al-Fe) ternary systems. The undercooling accompanying solid growth, as related to the extended solute solubility in the primary and secondary phases can be used to account for the evolution of phase morphologies during ternary eutectic solidification. For small undercooling, the conditions of interfacial equilibrium remain valid, while in the case of significant undercooling when nucleation constraints occur, there is a departure from equilibrium leading to unexpected phases. In Ta-Al-Fe, an extended solubility of Fe in σ was observed, which was consistent with the formation of a halo of μ phase on primary σ. In Nb-Al-Co, a halo of C14 is formed on primary CoAl, but very limited vice versa. However, in the absence of a solidus projection it was not possible to definitively determine the extended solute solubility in the primary phase. In Nb-Al-Fe when nucleation constraints arise, the inability to initiate coupled growth of NbAl3 + C14 leads to the occurrence of a two-phase halo of C14 + Nb2Al, indicating a large undercooling and departure from equilibrium.

  7. Benchmark Testing of the Largest Titanium Aluminide Sheet Subelement Conducted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Krause, David L.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate wrought titanium aluminide (gamma TiAl) as a viable candidate material for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) exhaust nozzle, an international team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field successfully fabricated and tested the largest gamma TiAl sheet structure ever manufactured. The gamma TiAl sheet structure, a 56-percent subscale divergent flap subelement, was fabricated for benchmark testing in three-point bending. Overall, the subelement was 84-cm (33-in.) long by 13-cm (5-in.) wide by 8-cm (3-in.) deep. Incorporated into the subelement were features that might be used in the fabrication of a full-scale divergent flap. These features include the use of: (1) gamma TiAl shear clips to join together sections of corrugations, (2) multiple gamma TiAl face sheets, (3) double hot-formed gamma TiAl corrugations, and (4) brazed joints. The structural integrity of the gamma TiAl sheet subelement was evaluated by conducting a room-temperature three-point static bend test.

  8. A respiratory model for uranium aluminide based on occupational data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R W; Eckerman, K F; Jr, J D Boice

    2005-01-01

    As part of an epidemiological study, doses from intake of radionuclides were estimated for workers employed during a 52-year period at the Rocketdyne/Atomics International facility in California. The facility was involved in a variety of research programmes, including nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel decladding, and reactor operation and disassembly. Most of the documented intakes involved inhalation of enriched uranium (U), fission products, or plutonium (Pu). Highest doses were estimated for a group of workers exposed to airborne uranium aluminide (UAl x ) during the fabrication of reactor fuel plates. Much of the exposure to UAl x occurred early in the fuel fabrication programme, before it was recognised that intake and lung retention were being underestimated from urinary data due to an unexpected delayed dissolution of the inhaled material. In workers who had been removed from exposure, the rate of urinary excretion of U increased for a few months, peaked, and then declined at a rate consistent with moderately soluble material. This pattern differs markedly from the monotonically decreasing absorption rates represented by the default absorption types in the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This paper summarises the findings on the behaviour of UAl x in these workers and describes material-specific parameter values of the HRTM based on this information

  9. On the texture of spray formed gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staron, P.; Bartels, A.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Gerling, R.; Schimansky, F.P.; Clemens, H.

    2006-01-01

    Spray forming is an attractive processing route for titanium aluminides that combines advantages both of ingot and powder metallurgy. Spray formed deposits were produced using the electrode induction melting gas atomization technique. The texture of a spray formed Ti-48.9 at.% Al deposit in the as-sprayed state and after isothermal forging as well as after isothermal forging and a subsequent stress relief heat treatment was analysed by means of neutron diffraction. The spray formed deposit was found to have a very weak -fibre texture with a maximum pole density of 1.12 multiples of random distribution. After isothermal forging of cylinders to 77% reduction at an initial strain rate of 2 x 10 -3 s -1 at 1150 deg. C, a band of orientations from to with a maximum close to was found. A Zener-Hollomon parameter of 12.6 is estimated, which indicates that during isothermal forging dynamic recrystallization is governed by nucleation of new grains. A subsequent stress relief treatment at 1030 deg. C for 2 h caused additional grain growth, after which the maximum pole density is increased from 3.3 to 3.8 times random

  10. The oxidation of aluminide diffusion coatings containing platinum used for the protection of IN738 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, M.D.; Haworth, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminide coatings, as used for the protection against oxidation of most nickel-base superalloy components in modern jet engines, have been formed by a diffusion process on IN738 to give a coating that is essentially NiAl containing Al-rich precipitates. Aluminide coatings containing platinum have also been produced by initially depositing a thin layer (several microns thick) of Pt on the superalloy prior to the aluminisation process. Depending upon the details of the processing (such as the thickness of the Pt or the Al flux during the diffusion process) the structure of the coating on being formed was essentially either PtAl/sub 2/, PtAl or NiAl, or a mixture of these phases, but after some hours heat treatment at a high temperature (equivalent to service) was converted to either NiAl (containing Pt), or PtAl (containing Ni) or a mixture of PtAl and NiAl. The oxidation rate of these coatings at different temperatures between 800 and 1000 deg. C was studied using an automatic recording micro-balance and compared with the oxidation rate of a simple aluminide coating and of uncoated IN738. Further longer-term oxidation tests, including cyclic tests, were also undertaken. The Pt containing coatings gave approximately the same performance, and some were slightly better than the simple aluminide coatings, (and much better than the uncoated IN738). Both sections through the oxidised surface of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ scale formed on the coatings were examined using optical microscopy and the SEM. The coating/scale interface on the platinum aluminide was seen to be slightly convoluted. It was more adherent and showed less tendency to spall than that formed on the simple aluminide coating. (author)

  11. Increased levels of advanced glycation end products positively correlate with iron overload and oxidative stress markers in patients with β-thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlohi, Maryam Sadat; Yaghooti, Hamid; Shirali, Saeed; Aminasnafi, Ali; Olapour, Samaneh

    2018-04-01

    The impaired biosynthesis of the β-globin chain in β-thalassemia leads to the accumulation of unpaired alpha globin chains, failure in hemoglobin formation, and iron overload due to frequent blood transfusion. Iron excess causes oxidative stress and massive tissue injuries. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are harmful agents, and their production accelerates in oxidative conditions. This study was conducted on 45 patients with major β-thalassemia who received frequent blood transfusions and chelation therapy and were compared to 40 healthy subjects. Metabolic parameters including glycemic and iron indices, hepatic and renal functions tests, oxidative stress markers, and AGEs (carboxymethyl-lysine and pentosidine) levels were measured. All parameters were significantly increased in β-thalassemia compared to the control except for glutathione levels. Blood glucose, iron, serum ferritin, non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI), MDA, soluble form of low-density lipoprotein receptor, glutathione peroxidase, total reactive oxygen species (ROS), and AGE levels were significantly higher in the β-thalassemia patients. Iron and ferritin showed a significant positive correlation with pentosidine (P overload in β-thalassemia major patients and highlight the enhanced formation of AGEs, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of β-thalassemia major.

  12. Aluminide Coating on Stainless Steel for Nuclear Reactor Application: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishamuddin Husain; Zaifol Samsu; Yusof Abdullah; Muhamad Daud

    2015-01-01

    Stainless steels have been used as structural materials in the nuclear reactor since its first generation. Stainless steels type 304 and 316 are commonly used in structural components. Since the first generation materials, improvements were made on Stainless steels. This includes addition of stabilizing elements and by modification of metallurgical structure. This study investigates the formation of aluminide coating on Stainless steels by diffusion to help improve corrosion resistance. Stainless steels type 304 and 316 substrates were immersed in molten aluminium at 750 degree Celsius for 5 minutes. Interaction between molten aluminium and solid to form the outer aluminide coating by hot dipped aluminizing is studied. (Author)

  13. Ion-plasma diffusion aluminide coatings for gas turbine blades (structure and properties)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muboyadzhyan, S.A.; Budinovskij, S.A.; Terekhova, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    A consideration is given to the ion-plasma method of heart resisting alloy diffusion coating with alloyed aluminides offering some advantages over routine techniques. Specific features of ion-plasma diffusion coatings production at the surface of heart resisting alloys using one- and multistage techniques are studied. The process of formation of coatings (Al-Si-Y, Al-Si-Ni-B, Al-Si-Cr-Y) along with coating effects on long-term heat resistance of nickel base alloys (ZhS6U, VZhL12U, ZhS26VNK) is investigated. The advantages of the new method of diffusion aluminide coatings are reported [ru

  14. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories: Formation of Iron(III) Thiocyannate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R.

    1997-10-01

    A series of 15 stopped-flow kinetic experiments relating to the formation of iron(III)- thiocyanate at 25.0 °C and I = 1.0 M (NaClO4) is described. A methodology is given whereby solution preparation and data collection are able to be carried out within the time scale of a single laboratory period (3-4 h). Kinetic data are obtained using constant [SCN-], and at three H+ concentrations (0.10, 0.20, 0.30 M) for varying concentrations of Fe3+ (ca. 0.0025 - 0.020 M). Rate data (450 nm) are consistent with rate laws for the forward and reverse reactions: kf = (k1 + k2Ka1/[H+])[Fe3+] and kr = k-1 + k-2Ka2/[H+] respectively, with k1,k-1 corresponding to the rate constants for formation and decay of FeSCN2+, k2, k-2 to the rate constants for formation and decay of the FeSCN(OH)+ ion and Ka1,Ka2 to the acid dissociation constants (coordinated OH2 ionization) of Fe3+ and FeSCN2+. Using literature values for the latter two quantities ( Ka1 = 2.04 x 10-3 M, Ka2 = 6.5 x 10-5 M) allows values for the four rate constants to be obtained. A typical data set is analyzed to give k1 = 109(10) M-1s-1, k-1 = 0.79(0.10) s-1, k2= 8020(800) M-1s-1, k-2 = 2630(230) s-1. Absorbance change data for reaction (DeltaA) follow the expression: DeltaA = Alim.Kf.[Fe3+]/(1 + Kf.[Fe3+]), with Alim corresponding to the absorbance of fully formed FeSCN2+ (i.e. free SCN- absent) and Kf to the formation constant of this complex (value in the example 112(5) M-1, c.f. 138(29) M-1 from the kinetic data).

  15. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni 5 Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results

  16. Effects of thermomechanical processing on titanium aluminide strip cast by the melt overflow process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, T.A. (Ribbon Technology Corporation, PO Box 30758, Columbus, OH 43230 (United States)); Hackman, L.E. (Ribbon Technology Corporation, PO Box 30758, Columbus, OH 43230 (United States)); Batawi, E. (Sulzer-Innotec, Division 1511, PO Box 65, Winterthur 8404 (Switzerland)); Peters, J.A. (Sulzer-Innotec, Division 1511, PO Box 65, Winterthur 8404 (Switzerland))

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to investigate the feasibility of producing titanium aluminide foils from direct cast strip using ribbon technology''s plasma melt overflow process. Niobium-modified Ti[sub 3]Al alloys were melted in a cold copper crucible using a transferred plasma arc and then direct cast into strip on a rotating chill roll.Samples cut from the as-cast Ti[sub 3]Al-Nb ([alpha][sub 2]) titanium aluminide strip were encapsulated into a pack. The packs were heated to the rolling temperature and then hot rolled at low strain rates. Foils 70 [mu]m (0.003 in) thick, having a uniform [alpha][sub 2]-B2 microstructure with oxygen contents as low as 900 wt.ppm were obtained after pack rolling. The strips and foils were characterized in terms of microstructure and chemical composition in the as-received, heat-treated and pack-rolled conditions.The results indicated that it was technically feasible to produce foils from direct cast titanium aluminide strip using pack-rolling technology. The advantage of this technology lies in its cost-effectiveness, since the relatively low cost direct-cast titanium aluminide strip was thermomechanically processed into foil with the desired microstructure without any intermediate processing steps. ((orig.))

  17. High Temperature Oxidation of Spark Plasma Sintered and Thermally Sprayed FeAl-Based Iron Aluminides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haušild, P.; Karlík, M.; Skiba, T.; Sajdl, P.; Dubský, Jiří; Palm, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2012), s. 465-468 ISSN 0587-4246. [International Symposium on Physics of Materials (ISPMA)/12./. Prague, 04.09.2011-08.09.2011] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : thermal spraying * plasma sintering Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.531, year: 2012

  18. Mechanical behavior of iron aluminides: A comparison of nanoindentation, compression and bending of micropillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanzade, Mohammad, E-mail: m.zamanzade@matsci.uni-sb.de [Saarland University, Institute of Material Science and Methods, Saarbrücken (Germany); Velayarce, Jorge Rafael [Saarland University, Institute of Material Science and Methods, Saarbrücken (Germany); Abad, Oscar Torrents [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials and Saarland University, Saarbrücken (Germany); Motz, Christian [Saarland University, Institute of Material Science and Methods, Saarbrücken (Germany); Barnoush, Afrooz [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-01-15

    Various local testing methods, namely, nanoindentation, compression and bending tests of micropillars were used to better understand the influence of ternary Cr atoms on the extrinsic and intrinsic mechanical properties of Fe{sub 3}Al intermetallics with the D0{sub 3} super lattice. Using such local techniques enables us to quantify the influence of Cr on the enhancement of the Young´s modulus. Furthermore, the effect of Cr on the yield stress, strain hardening and appearance of slip traces was studied based on the stress–strain curves and secondary electron micrographs of the bended and compressed pillars.

  19. Microstructures of iron aluminides processed by additive layer manufacturing and spark plasma sintering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalcová, A.; Palm, M.; Senceková, L.; Rolink, G.; Weisheit, A.; Kubatík, Tomáš František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), s. 610-614 ISSN 1213-2489 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Intermetallics * Laser additive manufacturing * Powder metal lurgy Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  20. The influence of processing on microstructure and properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-08-01

    An Fe-28%Al alloy containing 5% Cr has been synthesized by reaction of elemental powders, followed by consolidation using hot extrusion. The resulting material is fully dense, homogeneous, and has a grain size of less than 5{mu}m. Reaction synthesis results in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion that is uniformly dispersed during hot extrusion. Under some circumstances the hot extruded material undergoes secondary recrystallization, resulting in grain sizes greater than 25 millimeters. The fine grained material exhibits improved yield strength compared to the coarse grained material up to test temperatures of 800{degrees}C. Creep testing has shown that the coarse grained material has significantly improved time to rupture compared to fine grained material. The oxide dispersion strengthened material has significantly improved creep resistance compared to conventional powder metallurgy material. With proper heat treatment, the coarse grained material exhibits time to rupture of 425 hours at 650{degrees}C and a stress of 75 MPa, compared to 40 hours for conventional material of similar composition.

  1. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A boron-microalloyed FeAl alloy (Fe-36Al-0.2Mo-0.05Zr-0.13C, at.%, with 100-400 appm B) with improved weldability and mechanical properties was developed in FY 1994. A new scale-up and industry technology development phase for this work began in FY 1995, pursuing two parallel paths. One path was developing monolithic FeAl component and application technology, and the other was developing coating/cladding technology for alloy steels, stainless steels and other Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. In FY 1995, it was found that cast FeAl alloys had good strength at 700-750{degrees}C, and some (2.5%) ductility in air at room-temperature. Hot-extruded FeAl with refined grain size was found to have ductility and to also have good impact-toughness at room-temperature. Further, it was discovered that powder-metallurgy (P/M) FeAl, consolidated by direct hot-extrusion at 950-1000{degrees}C to have an ultra fine-grained microstructure, had the highest ductility, strength and impact-toughness ever seen in such intermetallic alloys.

  2. Fatigue-crack propagation in gamma-based titanium aluminide alloys at large and small crack sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzic, J.J.; Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-01-01

    Most evaluations of the fracture and fatigue-crack propagation properties of γ+α 2 titanium aluminide alloys to date have been performed using standard large-crack samples, e.g., compact-tension specimens containing crack sizes which are on the order of tens of millimeters, i.e., large compared to microstructural dimensions. However, these alloys have been targeted for applications, such as blades in gas-turbine engines, where relevant crack sizes are much smaller ( 5 mm) and (c ≅ 25--300 microm) cracks in a γ-TiAl based alloy, of composition Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr-0.2B (at.%), specifically for duplex (average grain size approximately17 microm) and refined lamellar (average colony size ≅150 microm) microstructures. It is found that, whereas the lamellar microstructure displays far superior fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth resistance in the presence of large cracks, in small-crack testing the duplex microstructure exhibits a better combination of properties. The reasons for such contrasting behavior are examined in terms of the intrinsic and extrinsic (i.e., crack bridging) contributions to cyclic crack advance

  3. Effect of Nb on phase transformations and microstructure in high Nb titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, Glenn E.; Kesler, Michael S.; Manuel, Michele V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamically-guided design of heat treatment schedules. • Linking chemistry and heat treatment to phase morphology. • Strong dependence of phase transformation behavior on Nb concentration. - Abstract: Titanium aluminides are of interest due to their high specific strength and performance up to 750 °C. Research into high-Nb γ-TiAl based titanium aluminides has shown promising improvements in performance by introduction of the σ-Nb 2 Al phase. However, one current challenge is improving mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures in order to enable their further implementation. These properties are closely tied with microstructural refinement, and thus phase evolution and microstructural development is the focus of this work. Phase transformation temperatures and stability ranges were determined experimentally through DSC analysis of arc melted alloys, then compared with predictions based upon computational models, and investigated through heat treatment of experimental alloys to develop an ultrafine γ + σ microstructure

  4. Effect of Nb on phase transformations and microstructure in high Nb titanium aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, Glenn E.; Kesler, Michael S.; Manuel, Michele V., E-mail: mmanuel@mse.ufl.edu

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Thermodynamically-guided design of heat treatment schedules. • Linking chemistry and heat treatment to phase morphology. • Strong dependence of phase transformation behavior on Nb concentration. - Abstract: Titanium aluminides are of interest due to their high specific strength and performance up to 750 °C. Research into high-Nb γ-TiAl based titanium aluminides has shown promising improvements in performance by introduction of the σ-Nb{sub 2}Al phase. However, one current challenge is improving mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures in order to enable their further implementation. These properties are closely tied with microstructural refinement, and thus phase evolution and microstructural development is the focus of this work. Phase transformation temperatures and stability ranges were determined experimentally through DSC analysis of arc melted alloys, then compared with predictions based upon computational models, and investigated through heat treatment of experimental alloys to develop an ultrafine γ + σ microstructure.

  5. Aluminide protective coatings on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kubicki; A. Kochmańska

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research on aluminide protective coatings manufactured on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel. The main purpose of these coatings is protection against the high temperature corrosion, especially at high carburizing potential atmosphere. Coatings were obtained on cast steel type G–XNiCrSi36–18 with the following methods: pack cementation, paste method, cast method and slurry cementation. The phase composition, thickness and morphology of coatings were...

  6. Rhodium and Hafnium Influence on the Microstructure, Phase Composition, and Oxidation Resistance of Aluminide Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Małgorzata Wierzbińska; Jan Sieniawski

    2017-01-01

    A 0.5 μm thick layer of rhodium was deposited on the CMSX 4 superalloy by the electroplating method. The rhodium-coated superalloy was hafnized and aluminized or only aluminized using the Chemical vapour deposition method. A comparison was made of the microstructure, phase composition, and oxidation resistance of three aluminide coatings: nonmodified (a), rhodium-modified (b), and rhodium- and hafnium-modified (c). All three coatings consisted of two layers: the additive layer and the interdi...

  7. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  8. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.P.; Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L.; Qian, M.

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways

  9. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.P., E-mail: thpfys@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L. [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@rmit.edu.au [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); RMIT University, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2015-06-11

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways.

  10. Simulation of uranium aluminide dissolution in a continuous aluminum dissolver system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.R.; Farman, R.F.; Christian, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which recovers highly-enriched uranium (uranium that contains at least 20 atom percent 235 U) from spent nuclear reactor fuel by dissolution of the fuel elements and extraction of the uranium from the aqueous dissolver product. Because the uranium is highly-enriched, consideration must be given to whether a critical mass can form at any stage of the process. In particular, suspended 235 U-containing particles are of special concern, due to their high density (6.8 g/cm 3 ) and due to the fact that they can settle into geometrically unfavorable configurations when not adequately mixed. A portion of the spent fuel is aluminum-alloy-clad uranium aluminide (UAl 3 ) particles, which dissolve more slowly than the cladding. As the aluminum alloy cladding dissolves in mercury-catalyzed nitric acid, UAl 3 is released. Under standard operating conditions, the UAl 3 dissolves rapidly enough to preclude the possibility of forming a critical mass anywhere in the system. However, postulated worst-case abnormal operating conditions retard uranium aluminide dissolution, and thus require evaluation. To establish safety limits for operating parameters, a computerized simulation model of uranium aluminide dissolution in the aluminum fuel dissolver system was developed

  11. Effect of microstructures on the hydrogen attack to gamma titanium aluminide at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamzah, E. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Technologi Malaysia 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)]. E-mail: esah@fkm.utm.my; Suardi, K. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Technologi Malaysia 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ourdjini, A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Technologi Malaysia 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2005-04-25

    Intermetallic alloys based on gamma titanium aluminide are now regarded as promising candidates for high temperature applications such as for aerospace, marine and automotive engine components, due to their high specific strength and modulus. Their oxidation resistance is good, especially at intermediate and high temperature; oxidation resistance can be obtained up to 800 deg. C. One critical area of application is in combustion engines in aerospace vehicles such as hypersonic airplanes and high-speed civil transport airplanes. This entails the use of hydrogen as a fuel component and it has been widely reported by researchers that these materials exhibit corrosion in the form of environment embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen. A fair amount of research has been carried out to investigate the influence of hydrogen in {gamma}-titanium aluminide. Some researchers reported that {alpha}{sub 2} and lamellar phases had major influence in the susceptible of hydrogen to alloys, while hydrogen is too low to penetrate the {gamma}-phases. This research focused on the effect of different microstructures of {gamma}-titanium aluminide to the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) and the corrosion product after hydrogen attack. Modification of {gamma}-titanium aluminide can be achieved by heat treatment of as-cast binary samples Ti-45% Al and Ti-48% Al. All samples were then subjected to corrosion attack under cathodically charged with galvanostatic mode for 6 h. The potential variation with time was monitored from these data the values of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) to {gamma}-titanium aluminide was obtained. D was calculated based on Fick's second Law. These results were compared with that obtained from micro-Vickers hardness profiling, which was measured at cross-section area per depth from the top corroded surface. The hardness values were calculated using the error function equation. An image analyzer; X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron

  12. Effect of microstructures on the hydrogen attack to gamma titanium aluminide at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamzah, E.; Suardi, K.; Ourdjini, A.

    2005-01-01

    Intermetallic alloys based on gamma titanium aluminide are now regarded as promising candidates for high temperature applications such as for aerospace, marine and automotive engine components, due to their high specific strength and modulus. Their oxidation resistance is good, especially at intermediate and high temperature; oxidation resistance can be obtained up to 800 deg. C. One critical area of application is in combustion engines in aerospace vehicles such as hypersonic airplanes and high-speed civil transport airplanes. This entails the use of hydrogen as a fuel component and it has been widely reported by researchers that these materials exhibit corrosion in the form of environment embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen. A fair amount of research has been carried out to investigate the influence of hydrogen in γ-titanium aluminide. Some researchers reported that α 2 and lamellar phases had major influence in the susceptible of hydrogen to alloys, while hydrogen is too low to penetrate the γ-phases. This research focused on the effect of different microstructures of γ-titanium aluminide to the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) and the corrosion product after hydrogen attack. Modification of γ-titanium aluminide can be achieved by heat treatment of as-cast binary samples Ti-45% Al and Ti-48% Al. All samples were then subjected to corrosion attack under cathodically charged with galvanostatic mode for 6 h. The potential variation with time was monitored from these data the values of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) to γ-titanium aluminide was obtained. D was calculated based on Fick's second Law. These results were compared with that obtained from micro-Vickers hardness profiling, which was measured at cross-section area per depth from the top corroded surface. The hardness values were calculated using the error function equation. An image analyzer; X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscope (SEM) and secondary ion mass

  13. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ashfaq; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M; Mohammed, Muneer Khan; Renganayagalu, Ravi Kottan; Moiduddin, Khaja

    2017-02-21

    Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM), an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  14. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM, an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  15. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways ... from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , we are committed ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues ... and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technology commercialization through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron- ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the ... Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron-deficiency anemia, in part by ...

  2. Effect of grit blasting on the thermal cycling behavior of diffusion aluminide/YSZ TBCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxuciac@163.com; Huang, Guanghong; He, Limin; Mu, Rende; Wang, Kai; Dai, Jianwei

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • TBCs including of CVD NiAl bond coat and EB-PVD YSZ ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. • Ridges are removed, and no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode are suppressed. • Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. -- Abstract: Thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited NiAl bond coat and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, cyclic oxidation behaviors of these coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges form on the surface of aluminide bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating by EB-PVD, which are shown to be the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. When these ridges are removed, there is no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode is suppressed. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface with additional cycling. From the result of thermal cycling, an averaged four folds lifetime improvement can be achieved with samples after grit blasting of bond coat surface as compared with those samples existence in ridges on the bond coats’ surface.

  3. Saturated bonds and anomalous electronic transport in transition-metal aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.

    2006-05-22

    This thesis deals with the special electronic properties of the transition-metal aluminides. Following quasicrystals and their approximants it is shown that even materials with small elementary cells exhibit the same surprising effects. So among the transition-metal aluminides also semi-metallic and semiconducting compounds exist, although if they consist of classic-metallic components like Fe, Al, or Cr. These properties are furthermore coupled with a deep pseusogap respectively gap in the density of states and strongly covalent bonds. Bonds are described in this thesis by two eseential properties. First by the bond charge and second by the energetic effect of the bond. It results that in the caes of semiconducting transition-metal aluminides both a saturation of certain bonds and a bond-antibond alteration in the Fermi level is present. By the analysis of the near-order in form of the so-calles coordination polyeders it has been succeeded to establish a simple rule for semiconductors, the five-fold coordination for Al. This rule states that aluminium atoms with their three valence electrons are not able to build more than five saturated bonds to their nearest transition-metal neighbours. In excellent agreement with the bond angles predicted theoretically under assumption of equal-type bonds it results that all binary transition-element aluminide semiconductors exhibit for the Al atoms the same near order. Typical values for specific resistances of the studied materials at room temperature lie in the range of some 100 {mu}{omega}cm, which is farly larger than some 10 {mu}{omega}cm as in the case of the unalloyed metals. SUrprising is furthermore a high transport anisotropy with a ratio of the specific resistances up to 3.0. An essential result of this thesis can be seen in the coupling of the properties of the electronic transport and the bond properties. The small conducitivities could be explained by small values in the density of states and a bond

  4. The dependence of tensile ductility on investment casting parameters in gamma titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raban, R.; Rishel, L.L.; Pollock, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Plates of three gamma titanium aluminide alloys have been investment cast with a wide variety of casting conditions designed to influence cooling rates. These alloys include Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nv, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb+0.5at%B and Ti-45Al-2Cr-2Nb+0.9at%B. Cooling rates have been estimated with the use of thermal data from casting experiments, along with the UES ProCAST simulation package. Variations in cooling rate significantly influenced the microstructure and tensile properties of all three alloys

  5. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams-13000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  6. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  7. Micro-Intertexture Carbon-Free Iron Sulfides as Advanced High Tap Density Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Hwang, Jang-Yeon; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2017-11-15

    Numerous materials have been considered as promising electrode materials for rechargeable batteries; however, developing efficient materials to achieving good cycling performance and high volumetric energy capacity simultaneously remains a great challenge. Considering the appealing properties of iron sulfides, which include low cost, high theoretical capacity, and favorable electrochemical conversion mechanism, in this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of carbon-free microscale Fe 1-x S as high-efficiency anode materials for rechargeable batteries by designing hierarchical intertexture architecture. The as-prepared intertexture Fe 1-x S microspheres constructed from nanoscale units take advantage of both the long cycle life of nanoscale units and the high tap density (1.13 g cm -3 ) of the micro-intertexture Fe 1-x S. As a result, high capacities of 1089.2 mA h g -1 (1230.8 mA h cm -3 ) and 624.7 mA h g -1 (705.9 mA h cm -3 ) were obtained after 100 cycles at 1 A g -1 in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries, respectively, demonstrating one of the best performances for iron sulfide-based electrodes. Even after deep cycling at 20 A g -1 , satisfactory capacities could be retained. Related results promote the practical application of metal sulfides as high-capacity electrodes with high rate capability for next-generation rechargeable batteries.

  8. High-velocity-oxidation performance of metal-chromium-aluminum (MCrAl), cermet, and modified aluminide coatings on IN-100 and type VIA alloys at 1093 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Cermet, MCrAl, and modified aluminide types of coatings applied to IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA alloy specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C. Several coating compositions of each type were evaluated for oxidation resistance. The modified aluminide coating, Pt-Al, applied to alloy 6A proved to be the best, providing oxidation protection to approximately 750 hours based on weight change measurements. The second best, a CoCrAlY coating applied to 6A, provided protection to 450 hours. The third best was a cermet + aluminide coating on 6A with a protection time to 385 hours.

  9. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or

  10. Formation of alumina-aluminide coatings on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, alumina-aluminide coatings were formed on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel substrate. First, coatings of aluminum were deposited electrochemically on T91 steel in a room temperature AlCl3-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid, then the obtained coating was subjected to a two stage heat treatment procedure consisting of prolonged heat treatment of the sample in vacuum at 300 ○C followed by oxidative heat treatment in air at 650 ○C for 16 hours. X-ray diffraction measurement of the oxidatively heat treated samples indicated formation of Fe-Al and Cr-Al intermetallics and presence of amorphous alumina. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurement confirmed 50 wt- % O in the oxidized coating. Microscratch adhesion test conducted on alumina-aluminide coating formed on T91 steel substrate showed no major adhesive detachment up to 20 N loads. However, adhesive failure was observed at a few discrete points on the coating along the scratch track.

  11. Microstructural Study on Oxidation Resistance of Nonmodified and Platinum Modified Aluminide Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Sieniawski, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Platinum electroplating layers (3 and 7 μm thick) were deposited on the surface of the Inconel 713 LC, CMSX 4, and Inconel 625 Ni-base superalloys. Diffusion treatment at 1050°C for 2 h under argon atmosphere was performed after electroplating. Diffusion treated samples were aluminized according to the low activity CVD process at 1050°C for 8 h. The nonmodified aluminide coatings consist of NiAl phase. Platinum modification let to obtain the (Ni,Pt)Al phase in coatings. The coated samples were subjected to cyclic oxidation testing at 1100°C. It was discovered that increase of the platinum electroplating thickness from 3 to 7 μm provides the improvement of oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings. Increase of the platinum thickness causes decreases in weight change and decreases in parabolic constant during oxidation. The platinum provides the pure Al2O3 oxide formation, slow growth oxide layer, and delay the oxide spalling during heating-cooling thermal cycles.

  12. Management of the acceptance process of RTR aluminide type spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auziere, P.; Thomasson, J.

    2002-01-01

    A wide range of Research Test Reactor aluminide type spent fuel is already received for treatment conditioning at the La Hague reprocessing complex. Such a diversity calls for an utmost attention to be paid to all safety-related systems and technical aspects, to all regulatory and administrative constraints. Despite of such multiple data inputs and rigid constraints, a close cooperation between the Research Reactor operator and COGEMA enables to reach adequate and cost effective solutions also relevant to spent fuel having had an uneven history. The acceptance process is primarily based on the client descriptive data and status declaration issued by the Research Reactor (RR) operator under QA. This acceptance process is a key step, to be keenly scheduled as it is directly interactive with the RR evacuation plans and the La Hague industrial plant program. It is also governed by the reviews conducted by the French Safety Authority and generally translated into operational authorisations. Concerned by maintaining high safety standards, reliable and proven operational levels of its nuclear services performed in the La Hague facilities COGEMA includes, all through this acceptance process, the operating, regulatory and administrative requirements. This paper sets forth an overview of the approach implemented in the COGEMA organisation for the management of the acceptance process of RTR aluminide type spent fuel. (author)

  13. Oxidation-sulfidation behavior of Ni aluminide in oxygen-sulfur mixed-gas atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation-sulfidation studies were conducted with sheet samples of nickel aluminide, containing 23.5 at. % Al, 0.5 at. % Hf, and 0.2 at. % B, in an annealed condition and after preoxidation treatments. Continuous weight-change measurements were made by a thermogravimetric technique in exposure atmospheres of air, a low-pO/sub 2/ gas mixture, and low-pO/sub 2/ gas mixtures with several levels of sulfur. The air-exposed specimens developed predominantly nickel oxide; the specimen exposed to a low-pO/sub 2/ environment developed an aluminum oxide scale. As the sulfur content of the gas mixture increased, the alumina scale exhibited spallation and the alloy tended to form nickel sulfide as the reaction phase. The results indicated that the sulfidation reaction of nickel aluminide specimens (both bare and preoxidized) was determined by the rate of transport of nickel from the substrate through the scale to the gas/alumina scale interface, the mechanical integrity of the oxide scale, and the H/sub 2/S concentration in the exposure environment

  14. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  15. Effect of Hf Additions to Pt Aluminide Bond Coats on EB-PVD TBC Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James; Nagaraj, Ben; Williams, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    Small Hf additions were incorporated into a Pt aluminide coating during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on single crystal RENE N5 substrates. Standard yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats were subsequently deposited onto the coated substrates by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The coated substrates underwent accelerated thermal cycle testing in a furnace at a temperature in excess of 1121 C (2050 F) (45 minute hot exposure, 15 minute cool to approximately 121 C (250 F)) until the thermal barrier coating (TBC) failed by spallation. Incorporating Hf in the bond coat increased the TBC life by slightly more than three times that of a baseline coating without added Hf. Scanning electron microscopy of the spalled surfaces indicated that the presence of the Hf increased the adherence of the thermally grown alumina to the Pt aluminide bond coat. The presence of oxide pegs growing into the coating from the thermally grown alumina may also partially account for the improved TBC life by creating a near-surface layer with a graded coefficient of thermal expansion.

  16. Chemical Reduction Synthesis of Iron Aluminum Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Méndez, N. N.; la Torre, G. Carbajal-De; Ballesteros-Almanza, L.; Villagómez-Galindo, M.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Espinosa-Medina, M. A.

    In this study, a chemical reduction synthesis method of iron aluminum (FeAl) nano-dimensional intermetallic powders is described. The process has two stages: a salt reduction and solvent evaporation by a heat treatment at 1100°C. The precursors of the synthesis are ferric chloride, aluminum foil chips, a mix of Toluene/THF in a 75/25 volume relationship, and concentrated hydrochloric acid as initiator of the reaction. The reaction time was 20 days, the product obtained was dried at 60 °C for 2 h and calcined at 400, 800, and 1100 °C for 4 h each. To characterize and confirm the obtained synthesis products, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques were used. The results of morphology and chemical characterization of nano-dimensional powders obtained showed a formation of agglomerated particles of a size range of approximately 150 nm to 1.0 μm. Composition of powders was identified as corundum (Al2O3), iron aluminide (FeAl3), and iron-aluminum oxides (Fe0. 53Al0. 47)2O3 phases. The oxide phases formation were associated with the reaction of atmospheric concentration-free oxygen during synthesis and sintering steps, reducing the concentration of the iron aluminum phase.

  17. The Effects of Oxidation-Induced Failures on Thermal Barrier Coatings with Platinum Aluminide and NiCoCrAlY Bond Coats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yanar, N

    2001-01-01

    ...) deposited via electron beam vapor deposition (EBPVD). This TBC was deposited on both platinum aluminide and NiCoCrA1Y bond coats which in turn were deposited on superalloy substrates of Rare N5...

  18. Synthesis of Complex-Alloyed Nickel Aluminides from Oxide Compounds by Aluminothermic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gostishchev

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the investigation of complex-alloyed nickel aluminides obtained from oxide compounds by aluminothermic reduction. The aim of the work was to study and develop the physicochemical basis for obtaining complex-alloyed nickel aluminides and their application for enhancing the properties of coatings made by electrospark deposition (ESD on steel castings, as well as their use as grain refiners for tin bronze. The peculiarities of microstructure formation of master alloys based on the Al–TM (transition metal system were studied using optical, electronic scanning microscopy and X-ray spectral microanalysis. There were regularities found in the formation of structural components of aluminum alloys (Ni–Al, Ni-Al-Cr, Ni-Al-Mo, Ni-Al-W, Ni-Al-Ti, Ni-Cr-Mo-W, Ni-Al-Cr-Mo-W-Ti, Ni-Al-Cr-V, Ni-Al-Cr-V-Mo and changes in their microhardness, depending on the composition of the charge, which consisted of oxide compounds, and on the amount of reducing agent (aluminum powder. It is shown that all the alloys obtained are formed on the basis of the β phase (solid solution of alloying elements in nickel aluminide and quasi-eutectic, consisting of the β′ phase and intermetallics of the alloying elements. The most effective alloys, in terms of increasing microhardness, were Al-Ni-Cr-Mo-W (7007 MPa and Al-Ni-Cr-V-Mo (7914 MPa. The perspective is shown for applying the synthesized intermetallic master alloys as anode materials for producing coatings by electrospark deposition on steel of C1030 grade. The obtained coatings increase the heat resistance of steel samples by 7.5 times, while the coating from NiAl-Cr-Mo-W alloy remains practically nonoxidized under the selected test conditions. The use of NiAl intermetallics as a modifying additive (0.15 wt. % in tin bronze allows increasing the microhardness of the α-solid solution by 1.9 times and the microhardness of the eutectic (α + β phase by 2.7 times.

  19. Blocked-micropores, surface functionalized, bio-compatible and silica-coated iron oxide nanocomposites as advanced MRI contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbandi, Masih; Laurent, Sophie; Busch, Martin; Li Zian; Yuan Ying; Krüger, Michael; Farle, Michael; Winterer, Markus; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N.; Wende, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. In this article, a systematic study of the design and development of surface-modification schemes for silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) via a one-pot, in situ method at room temperature is presented. Silica-coated IONP were prepared in a water-in-oil microemulsion, and subsequently the surface was modified via addition of organosilane reagents to the microemulsion system. The structure and the morphology of the as synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and measurement of N 2 adsorption–desorption. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of the IONP structures. Nitrogen adsorption indicates microporous and blocked-microporous structures for the silica-coated and amine functionalized silica-coated IONP, respectively which could prove less cytotoxicity of the functionalized final product. Besides, the colloidal stability of the final product and the presence of the modified functional groups on top of surface layer have been proven by zeta-potential measurements. Owing to the benefit from the inner IONP core and the hydrophilic silica shell, the as-synthesized nanocomposites were exploited as an MRI contrast enhancement agent. Relaxometric results prove that the surface functionalized IONP have also signal enhancement properties. These surface functionalized nanocomposites are not only potential candidates for highly efficient contrast agents for MRI, but could also be used as ultrasensitive biological-magnetic labels, because they are in nanoscale size, having magnetic properties, blocked-microporous and are well dispersible in biological environment.

  20. Aluminide protective coatings on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kubicki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on aluminide protective coatings manufactured on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel. The main purpose of these coatings is protection against the high temperature corrosion, especially at high carburizing potential atmosphere. Coatings were obtained on cast steel type G–XNiCrSi36–18 with the following methods: pack cementation, paste method, cast method and slurry cementation. The phase composition, thickness and morphology of coatings were determined. Coatings capacity of carbon diffusion inhibition and thermal shocks resistance of coatings were determined with different methods. It was found, that all of the coatings reduce carbon diffusion in different degree and all coatings liable to degradation in consequence cracking and oxidation. Coating life time is mainly dependent on morphology, phase composition and service condition (thermal shocks first of all.

  1. Development of aluminide coatings on vanadium-base alloys in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, D.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were produced on vanadium and vanadium-base alloys by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium that contained 3/5 at.% dissolved aluminum in sealed V and V-20 wt.% Ti capsules at temperatures between 775 and 880 degrees C. After each test, the capsules were opened and the samples were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and analyzed by electron-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Hardness of the coating layers and bulk alloys was determined by microidentation techniques. The nature of the coatings, i.e., surface coverage, thickness, and composition, varied with exposure time and temperature, solute concentration in lithium, and alloy composition. Solute elements that yielded adherent coatings on various substrates can provide a means of developing in-situ electrical insulator coatings by reaction of the reactive layers with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium

  2. Release of fission products from irradiated aluminide fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu; Kanda, Keiji; Mishima, Kaichiro; Tamai, Tadaharu; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Snelgrove, James L.; Stahl, David; Matos, James E.; Travelli, Armando; Case, F. Neil; Posey, John C.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiated uranium aluminide fuel plates of 40% U-235 enrichment were heated for the determination of fission products released under flowing helium gas at temperatures up to and higher than the melting point of fuel cladding material. The release of fission products from the fuel plate at temperature below 500 deg. C was found negligible. The first rapid release of fission products was observed with the occurrence of blistering at 561±1 deg. C on the plates. The next release at 585. C might be caused by melting of the cladding material of 6061-Al alloy. The last release of fission product gases was occurred at the eutectic temperature of 640 deg. C of U-Al x . The released material was mostly xenon, but small amounts of iodine and cesium were observed. (author)

  3. Release of fission products from irradiated aluminide fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, T.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, K.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiated uranium aluminide fuel plates of 40% U-235 enrichment were heated for the determination of fission products released under flowing helium gas at temperatures up to and higher than the melting point of fuel-cladding material. The release of fission products from the fuel plate at temperature below 500 0 C was found negligible. The firist rapid release of fission products was observed with the occurrence of blistering at 561 +- 1 0 C on the plates. The next release at 585 0 C might be caused by melting of the cladding material of 6061-Al alloy. The last release of fission product gases was occurred at the eutectic temperature of 640 0 C of U-Al/sub x/. The released material was mostly xenon, but small amounts of iodine and cesium were observed

  4. Oxidation behavior of Hf-modified platinum aluminide coatings during thermal cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Ye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Platinum aluminide coatings with different Hf contents were fabricated by using HfCl4. The oxidation kinetics and the rumpling behavior of oxide scale were investigated. After thermal cycling, the coating with 0.46 wt% Hf showed least weight gain. With the increase of Hf content, rumpling extent of the scale decreased. Meanwhile, HfO2 preferentially formed in the scale resulting in the increase of scale thickness. The oxidation of excessive Hf even caused the spallation of the scale. The results in the present study indicate that although Hf plays an important role in decreasing rumpling extent of TGO, the oxidation of Hf decreases the adhesion of the scale. Keywords: Pt-Al coating, Hf, Oxidation, Rumpling

  5. Simulation and experimental approach to CVD-FBR aluminide coatings on ferritic steels under steam oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, J.; Alcala, G.; Bolivar, F.J.; Sanchez, L.; Hierro, M.P.; Perez, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ferritic steels used to produce structural components for steam turbines are susceptible to strong corrosion and creep damage due to the extreme working conditions pushed to increase the process efficiency and to reduce pollutants release. The response of aluminide coatings on the P-92 ferritic steel, deposited by CVD-FBR, during oxidation in a simulated steam environment was studied. The analyses were performed at 650 deg. C in order to simulate the working conditions of a steam turbine, and 800 deg. C in order to produce a critical accelerated oxidation test. The Thermo-Calc software was used to predict the different solid phases that could be generated during the oxidation process, in both, coated and uncoated samples. In order to validate the thermodynamic results, the oxides scales produced during steam tests were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and EDS. The preliminary results obtained are discussed in the present work

  6. Characterization of titanium aluminide alloy components fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.; Gaytan, S.M.; Ceylan, A.; Martinez, E.; Martinez, J.L.; Hernandez, D.H.; Machado, B.I.; Ramirez, D.A.; Medina, F.; Collins, S.; Wicker, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Intermetallic, γ-TiAl, equiaxed, small-grain (∼2 μm) structures with lamellar γ/α 2 -Ti 3 Al colonies with average spacing of 0.6 μm have been fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) of precursor, atomized powder. The residual microindentation (Vickers) hardness (HV) averaged 4.1 GPa, corresponding to a nominal yield strength of ∼1.4 GPa (∼HV/3), and a specific yield strength of 0.37 GPa cm 3 g -1 (for a density of 3.76 g cm -3 ), in contrast to 0.27 GPa cm 3 g -1 for EBM-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V components. These results demonstrate the potential to fabricate near net shape and complex titanium aluminide products directly using EBM technology in important aerospace and automotive applications.

  7. Microstructural effects on the creep and crack propagation behaviors of γ-Ti aluminide alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinc, V.; Onofrio, G.; Nazmy, M.; Staubli, M.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides class of materials possess several unique physical and mechanical properties. These characteristics can be attractive for specific industrial applications. By applying different heat treatment schedules one can change the microstructural features of this class of materials. In the present investigation, two heat treatment schedules were used to produce two different microstructures, duplex (D) and nearly lamellar (NL) in the cast and HIP'ed Ti-47Al-2W-0.5Si alloy. The tensile strength and creep behavior, in the 700--850 C temperature range, of this alloy have been determined and correlated to the corresponding microstructures. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation behavior in this alloy has been studied at different temperatures. The results on the creep behavior showed that the alloy with nearly lamellar microstructure has a strongly improved creep strength as compared with that of the duplex microstructure

  8. Interface-related deformation phenomena in intermetallic γ-titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of titanium aluminides towards higher ductility concentrates on Ti-rich alloys which are composed of the intermetallic phases γ(TiAl) and α 2 (Ti 3 Al). The two phases form a lamellar microstructure with various types of interfaces. The deformation behaviour of these materials was investigated by compression tests, which were performed for different orientations of the interfacial boundaries with respect to the sample axis. With regard to the mechanical properties the structure of the interfaces and the micromechanisms of deformation were studied by conventional and high resolution electron microscopy. Accordingly, the interfacial boundaries impede the propagation of slip across the lamellae, leading to an athermal contribution to the flow stress. (orig.)

  9. Interface-related deformation phenomena in intermetallic γ-titanium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of titanium aluminides towards higher ductility concentrates on Ti-rich alloys which are composed of the intermetallic phases γ(TiAl) and α2(Ti3Al). The two phases form a lamellar microstructure with various types of interfaces. The deformation behaviour of these materials was investigated by compression tests, which were performed for different orientations of the interfacial boundaries with respect to the sample axis. With regard to the mechanical properties the structure of the interfaces and the micromechanisms of deformation were studied by conventional and high resolution electron microscopy. Accordingly, the interfacial boundaries impede the propagation of slip across the lamellae, leading to an athermal contribution to the flow stress.

  10. Preparation of Ti-aluminide reinforced in situ aluminium matrix composites by reactive hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.; Ghosh, S.; Basumallick, A.; Basu, B.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminium based metal matrix composites reinforced with in situ Ti-aluminide and alumina particles were prepared by reactive hot pressing a powder mix of aluminium and nanosized TiO 2 powders. The reinforcements were formed in situ by exothermal reaction between the TiO 2 nano crystalline powder and aluminium. The thermal characteristics of the in situ reaction were studied with the aid of Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to study the microstructural architecture of the composites as a function of hot pressing temperature and volume percent reinforcement. Microhardness measurements on the as prepared in situ aluminium matrix composites exhibit significant increase in hardness with increase in hot pressing temperature and volume fraction of reinforcement

  11. Effects of stress concentrations on the fatigue life of a gamma based titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trail, S.J.; Bowen, P.

    1995-01-01

    S-N curves for a gamma based titanium aluminide alloy of composition Ti-47.2Al-2.1Mn-1.9Nb(at.%)+2TiB 2 (wt.%) have been used to define fatigue life. Effects of residual stress, stressed volume, loading ratio, loading mode, elevated temperature and surface roughness have been considered. Residual tensile stresses and micro-cracking are introduced by Electro Discharge Machining and the fatigue life is reduced slightly compared with polished samples. Notched fatigue tests show a significant notch strengthening effect which increases with increasing stress concentration factor. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested at room temperature reveal fully brittle failure mechanisms and no evidence of stable crack growth is observed. The fatigue life appears, therefore, to be determined predominantly by the number of cycles to crack initiation. At the elevated temperature of 830 C, evidence for some stable fatigue crack growth has been found. Probable sites for crack initiation are addressed

  12. The effect of aluminium on the creep behavior of titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, T.K.; Mishra, R.S.; Gogia, A.K.; Banerjee, D.

    1995-01-01

    Small increases in the Al content of Ti 3 Al-Nb alloys are known to improve creep resistance at the expense of the room temperature ductility. Though considerable work has been done on the creep behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, a systematic investigation involving the role of Al on the creep of aluminides is lacking. In the present study the authors have therefore carried out a complete investigation on stress and temperature effects on two alloys with differing Al contents, Ti-24Al-15Nb and Ti-26Al-15Nb (nominal composition in at%) in order to understand the effect of Al in terms of power law creep behavior. The following conclusions are made: (1) A strong Al effect on the creep resistance of O phase alloys in the Ti-Al-Nb systems has been confirmed, through a study of stress and temperature effects on the creep behavior of the Ti-24Al-15Nb and the Ti-26Al-15Nb compositions. (2) It has been shown, however, that the small differences in Al do not affect either the activation energies for creep (∼370 kJ/mole) or the creep mechanism (climb controlled creep with a stress exponent of 4). The activation energies and stress exponents are similar to that observed in single phase O alloys. (3) It is suggested that Al influences creep strength through an intrinsic effect on the pre-exponential term AD o in the power law creep equation. It is possible that this effect is related to a higher ordering energy of the O phase with increasing Al content

  13. The obtainment of highly concentrated uranium pellets for plate type (MTR) fuel by dispersion of uranium aluminides in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morando, R.A.; Raffaeli, H.A.; Balzaretti, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the intermetallic UAl 3 for manufacturing plate type MTR fuel with 20% U 235 enriched uranium and a density of about 20 kg/m 3 is analyzed. The technique used is the dispersion of UAl 3 particles in aluminium powder. The obtainment of the UAl 3 intermetallic was performed by fusion in an induction furnace in an atmosphere of argon at a pressure of 0.7 BAR (400 mm) using an alumina melting pot. To make the aluminide powder and attain the wished granulometry a cutting and a rotating crusher were used. Aluminide powders of different granulometries and different pressures of compactation were analyzed. In each case the densities were measured. The compacts were colaminated with the 'Picture Frame' technique at temperatures of 490 and 0 deg C with excellent results from the manufacturing view point. (M.E.L.) [es

  14. Hydrogen permeation rate reduction by post-oxidation of aluminide coatings on DIN 1.4914 martensitic steel (MANET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perujo, A.; Sample, T.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous work, it has been shown that lower aluminium content aluminide, having the same permeation rate reduction as the higher aluminium content, exhibited a lower hardness and greater ductility and therefore greater crack resistance than the higher aluminium content. In this work we combine this characteristic with a post-oxidation to obtain a further deuterium permeation reduction. The post-oxidation was performed in air at 1023 K for 15 h and at 1223 K for 10 h and 1 h. The maximum deuterium permeation rate reduction obtained is very moderate (maximum of a factor 500 for 1 h at 1223 K) as compared to that of the non-oxidised aluminide specimen (two orders of magnitude) and is constant in the temperature range studied (573-800 K). This method has the technological appeal of using air rather than the controlled environment used by other authors. (orig.)

  15. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Low-Temperature Fiffusion Aluminide Coating for Ultrasupercritical Coal-Fried Boiler Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-12-31

    An ultrasupercritical (USC) boiler with higher steam temperature and pressure is expected to increase the efficiency of the coal-fired power plant and also decrease emissions of air pollutants. Ferritic/martensitic alloys have been developed with good creep strength for the key components in coal-fired USC plants. However, they typically suffer excessive steam-side oxidation, which contributes to one of main degradation mechanisms along with the fire-side corrosion in coal-fired boilers. As the steam temperature further increases in USC boilers, oxidation of the tube internals becomes an increasing concern, and protective coatings such as aluminide-based diffusion coatings need to be considered. However, conventional aluminizing processes via pack cementation or chemical vapor deposition are typically carried out at elevated temperatures (1000-1150 C). Thermochemical treatment of ferritic/martensitic alloys at such high temperatures could severely degrade their mechanical properties, particularly the alloy's creep resistance. The research focus of this project was to develop an aluminide coating with good oxidation resistance at temperatures {le} 700 C so that the coating processing would not detrimentally alter the creep performance of the ferritic/martensitic alloys. Nevertheless, when the aluminizing temperature is lowered, brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases, such as Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3}, tend to form in the coating, which may reduce the resistance to fatigue cracking. Al-containing binary masteralloys were selected based on thermodynamic calculations to reduce the Al activity in the pack cementation process and thus to prevent the formation of brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases. Thermodynamic computations were carried out using commercial software HSC 5.0 for a series of packs containing various Cr-Al binary masteralloys. The calculation results indicate that the equilibrium partial pressures of Al halides at 700 C were a function of Al

  17. Design and properties of advanced {gamma}(TiAl) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, F; Clemens, H; Oehring, M [Institute for Materials Research, GKSS Research Centre, Max-Planck-Strasse, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Intermetallic titanium aluminides are one of the few classes of emerging materials that have the potential to be used in demanding high-temperature structural applications whenever specific strength and stiffness are of major concern. However, in order to effectively replace the heavier nickel-base superalloys currently use, titanium aluminides must combine a wide range of mechanical property capabilities. Advanced alloy designs are tailored for strength, toughness, creep resistance, and environmental stability. Some of these concerns are addressed in the present paper through global commentary on the physical metallurgy and technology of gamma TiAl-base alloys. Particular emphasis is paid on recent developments of TiAl alloys with enhanced high-temperature capability. (author)

  18. Design and properties of advanced γ(TiAl) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, F.; Clemens, H.; Oehring, M.

    2001-01-01

    Intermetallic titanium aluminides are one of the few classes of emerging materials that have the potential to be used in demanding high-temperature structural applications whenever specific strength and stiffness are of major concern. However, in order to effectively replace the heavier nickel-base superalloys currently use, titanium aluminides must combine a wide range of mechanical property capabilities. Advanced alloy designs are tailored for strength, toughness, creep resistance, and environmental stability. Some of these concerns are addressed in the present paper through global commentary on the physical metallurgy and technology of gamma TiAl-base alloys. Particular emphasis is paid on recent developments of TiAl alloys with enhanced high-temperature capability. (author)

  19. Mitochondrial Iron Transport and Homeostasis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshika eJain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for plants and although the mechanisms controlling iron uptake from the soil are relatively well understood, comparatively little is known about subcellular trafficking of iron in plant cells. Mitochondria represent a significant iron sink within cells, as iron is required for the proper functioning of respiratory chain protein complexes. Mitochondria are a site of Fe-S cluster synthesis, and possibly heme synthesis as well. Here we review recent insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling mitochondrial iron transport and homeostasis. We focus on the recent identification of a mitochondrial iron uptake transporter in rice and a possible role for metalloreductases in iron uptake by mitochondria. In addition, we highlight recent advances in mitochondrial iron homeostasis with an emphasis on the roles of frataxin and ferritin in iron trafficking and storage within mitochondria.

  20. Intestinal absorbtion from therapeutic iron doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, E.

    1977-01-01

    On a total of 105 persons with normal iron stores, iron depletion, and iron deficiency the intestinal absorption from therapeutic iron doses (100 mg Fe and 50 mg Fe as ferrous glycocoll sulphate) of a special galenic form was measured. The measurements were performed by means of a whole-body counter and preparations labelled with radio iron ( 59 Fe). Mean values of absorption rates from 100 mg Fe in healthy males were 5.0% and in healthy females 5.6% whereas in latent iron deficiency and in iron deficiency anemia mean values of 10% and 13% were obtained, respectively. The maximum absorption rate of 20 to 25% is reached already in the late stage of latent iron deficiency. Advancing severeness of iron deficiency is not followed by an increase of iron absorption. Investigations an 21 persons showed no significant difference between absorption rates of the galenic preparations used when administered orally before or after breakfast, respectively. (orig.) [de

  1. Preparation of aluminide coatings on the inner surface of tubes by heat treatment of Al coatings electrodeposited from an ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Dongpeng; Chen, Yimin; Ling, Guoping; Liu, Kezhao; Chen, Chang’an; Zhang, Guikai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Al coating is prepared on the inner surface of one-meter tube. • Al coating shows good adherence to the substrate. • The thickness of Al coating is uniform along the tube. • Aluminide coating is obtained by heat treating Al coating. • Structure of aluminide coating is regulated by different thickness of Al coating. - Abstract: Aluminide coatings were prepared on the inner surface of 316L stainless steel tubes with size of Ø 12 mm × 1000 mm by heat-treating Al coatings electrodeposited from AlCl 3 -1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (AlCl 3 –EMIC) ionic liquid at room temperature. Studies on the electrolytic etching pretreatment of stainless tubes before Al coating electrodeposition were carried out. The Al coating showed good adherence to the substrate after electrolytic etching at 10 mA/cm 2 for 10 min. The thickness of Al coatings was uniform along the tube. The structure of prepared aluminide coatings can be regulated by different thickness of Al coating. The outer layer of aluminide coatings was FeAl, Fe 2 Al 5 and FeAl 3 for the samples of 1-μm, 5-μm and 10-μm thick Al coatings, respectively.

  2. Ironing Out the Wrinkles in Host Defense: Interactions between Iron Homeostasis and Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijian; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for both microbial pathogens and their mammalian hosts. Changes in iron availability and distribution have significant effects on pathogen virulence and on the immune response to infection. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of iron metabolism have shed new light on how alterations in iron homeostasis both contribute to and influence innate immunity. In this article, we review what is currently known about the role of iron in the response to infection. PMID:20375603

  3. Online available capacity prediction and state of charge estimation based on advanced data-driven algorithms for lithium iron phosphate battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhongwei; Yang, Lin; Cai, Yishan; Deng, Hao; Sun, Liu

    2016-01-01

    The key technology of a battery management system is to online estimate the battery states accurately and robustly. For lithium iron phosphate battery, the relationship between state of charge and open circuit voltage has a plateau region which limits the estimation accuracy of voltage-based algorithms. The open circuit voltage hysteresis requires advanced online identification algorithms to cope with the strong nonlinear battery model. The available capacity, as a crucial parameter, contributes to the state of charge and state of health estimation of battery, but it is difficult to predict due to comprehensive influence by temperature, aging and current rates. Aim at above problems, the ampere-hour counting with current correction and the dual adaptive extended Kalman filter algorithms are combined to estimate model parameters and state of charge. This combination presents the advantages of less computation burden and more robustness. Considering the influence of temperature and degradation, the data-driven algorithm namely least squares support vector machine is implemented to predict the available capacity. The state estimation and capacity prediction methods are coupled to improve the estimation accuracy at different temperatures among the lifetime of battery. The experiment results verify the proposed methods have excellent state and available capacity estimation accuracy. - Highlights: • A dual adaptive extended Kalman filter is used to estimate parameters and states. • A correction term is introduced to consider the effect of current rates. • The least square support vector machine is used to predict the available capacity. • The experiment results verify the proposed state and capacity prediction methods.

  4. Studies on the formation of aluminides in heated Nb–Al powder mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, H.; Iyengar, S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Combustion initiates with NbAl{sub 3} formation above the melting point of aluminum. • Nb + 3Al samples yield almost 100% NbAl{sub 3} after combustion. • Nb-rich samples yield multi-phase products after heating to 1000 °C. • Reacted Nb-rich samples yield stable phases on reheating. • For NbAl{sub 3}, calculations show ΔH{sub formation} = −153 ± 15, E{sub activation} = 255 ± 26 kJ mol{sup −1}. - Abstract: The formation of aluminides during the heating of Nb–Al powder mixtures with different initial compositions (25, 33.3 and 75 at.% Al) has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of parameters like particle size, compaction and heating rate on the onset temperature of reaction has been determined. The results show that an increase in heating rate leads to an increase in onset temperature for compacted as well as loose powder samples in the particle size range considered. For Al-rich mixtures, compaction increases the onset temperature irrespective of particle size. For all samples, finer aluminum particles and slower heating rates resulted in a decrease in onset temperature while higher aluminum contents in the mixture led to a higher reaction temperature. In Nb-rich samples, compaction led to a decrease in the onset temperatures. NbAl{sub 3} was the first compound to form in all the mixtures, irrespective of the initial composition. After heating to 1000 °C, EDS and XRD analyses confirmed the formation of only NbAl{sub 3} in Al-rich samples and a mixture of NbAl{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}Al along with unreacted niobium particles in Nb-rich samples. A subsequent heat treatment was necessary to obtain a single aluminide corresponding to the initial composition. These observations can be explained on the basis of niobium dissolution in molten aluminum and subsequent precipitation of NbAl{sub 3} in Al-rich samples and solid state diffusion through Nb{sub 3}Al and Nb{sub 2}Al phases in Nb-rich samples. For Nb

  5. Microstructure evaluation and mechanical behavior of high-niobium containing titanium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Glenn Estep, Jr.

    Ti-Al-Nb-based alloys with gamma(TiAl)+sigma(Nb2Al) microstructure have shown promise for potential high temperature applications due to their high specific strength. Recent research has been aimed towards increasing strength and operating temperatures through microstructural refinement and control. Alloys with 10 - 30% sigma-phase have been investigated, exploring relationships between chemistry, microstructure development, and flow behavior. Alloys with composition Ti-45Al-xNb-5Cr-1Mo (where x = 15, 20, 25 at%) have been produced, characterized, and tested at high temperature under compression. Processing, microstructure and mechanical property relationships are thoroughly investigated to reveal a significant connection between phase stability, morphology and their resultant effects on mechanical properties. Phase transformation temperatures and stability ranges were predicted using the ThermoCalc software program and a titanium aluminide database, investigated through thermal analysis, and alloys were heat treated to develop an ultrafine gamma+sigma microstructure. It has been demonstrated that microstructural development in these alloys is sensitive to composition and processing parameters, and heating and cooling rates are vital to the modification of gamma+sigma microstructure in these alloys. Towards the goal of designing a high-Nb titanium aluminide with ultrafine, disconnected gamma+sigma morphology, it has been established that microstructural control can be accomplished in alloys containing 15-25at% Nb through targeted chemistry and processing controls. The strength and flow softening characteristics show strain rate sensitivity that is also affected by temperature. From the standpoint of microstructure development and mechanical behavior at elevated temperature, the most favorable results are obtained with the 20 at% Nb alloy, which produces a combination of high strength and fine disconnected gamma+sigma microstructure. Microstructural analysis reveals

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and save lives. We are committed to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through ...

  7. First-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal aluminides. III. Extension to ternary phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widom, Mike; Al-Lehyani, Ibrahim; Moriarty, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Modeling structural and mechanical properties of intermetallic compounds and alloys requires detailed knowledge of their interatomic interactions. The first two papers of this series [Phys. Rev. B 56, 7905 (1997); 58, 8967 (1998)] derived first-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal (TM) aluminides using generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT). Those papers focused on binary alloys of aluminum with first-row transition metals and assessed the ability of GPT potentials to reproduce and elucidate the alloy phase diagrams of Al-Co and Al-Ni. This paper addresses the phase diagrams of the binary alloy Al-Cu and the ternary systems Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni, using GPT pair potentials calculated in the limit of vanishing transition-metal concentration. Despite this highly simplifying approximation, we find rough agreement with the known low-temperature phase diagrams, up to 50% total TM concentration provided the Co fraction is below 25%. Full composition-dependent potentials and many-body interactions would be required to correct deficiencies at higher Co concentration. Outside this troublesome region, the experimentally determined stable and metastable phases all lie on or near the convex hull of a scatter plot of energy versus composition. We verify, qualitatively, reported solubility ranges extending binary alloys into the ternary diagram in both Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni. Finally, we reproduce previously conjectured transition-metal positions in the decagonal quasicrystal phase. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  8. Effect of aluminium concentration and boron dopant on environmental embrittlement in FeAl aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.T.; George, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the room-temperature tensile properties of FeAl aluminides determined as functions of aluminum concentration (35 to 43 at. % Al), test environment, and surface (oil) coating. The two lower aluminum alloys containing 35 and 36.5% Al are prone to severe environmental embrittlement, while the two higher aluminum alloys with 40 and 43% Al are much less sensitive to change in test environment and surface coating. The reason for the different behavior is that the grain boundaries are intrinsically weak in the higher aluminum alloys, and these weak boundaries dominate the low ductility and brittle fracture behavior of the 40 and 43% Al alloys. When boron is added to the 40% Al alloy as a grain-boundary strengthener, the environmental effect becomes prominent. In this case, the tensile ductility of the boron-doped alloy, just like that of the lower aluminum alloys, can be dramatically improved by control of test environment (e.g. dry oxygen vs air). Strong segregation of boron to the grain boundaries, with a segregation factor of 43, was revealed by Auger analyses

  9. Hot workability of γ + α2 titanium aluminide: Development of processing map and constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Narayana Murty, S.V.S.; Pant, Bhanu; Agarwala, Vijaya; Sinha, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deformation studies of five TiAl alloys carried out through processing map. ► DRX domain and superplastic domain identified in power efficiency map. ► Safe working zone for alloys found at 1223–1423 K at strain rates (10 −2 –10 −3 s −1 ). ► Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy, Zener Hollomon parameter (Z) are obtained. ► Constitutive equations derived and verified. DRX grain size correlated with Z. - Abstract: Gamma titanium alumindes are intermetallics, which have very narrow working range. Hot isothermal working is the most suitable process for hot working of alloy. Accordingly, hot isothermal compression test is carried out on reaction synthesized and homogenized titanium aluminide alloys at different temperatures and strain rates using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys of Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (atom%) have been used in the study. Stress–strain data obtained from the test has been used to construct processing map, which indicates the safe and unsafe working zone. Strain rate sensitivity and Zener–Hollomon parameter has been calculated. Further, constitutive equations have been generated and verified. It is found that alloy has good workability in the temperature range of 1223–1423 K at strain rates of 0.01–0.001 s −1 . In this range of parameters, the alloys nearly follow the constitutive equations.

  10. Microcracking and macroscopic failure in intermetallic titanium aluminides; Mikrorissbildung und makroskopisches Versagen in intermetallischen Titanaluminiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesand-Valk, B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2000-07-01

    This paper deals with the correlations between microstructural disorder, that means statistical distribution of phases and local material properties, and macroscopic failure of disordered multiphase materials. On a microscopic level the microstructural disorder leads to randomly distributed local damage before failure (in brittle materials to microcracks) and eventually to localisation of damage. On a macroscopic level the value and scatter of fracture strength and its dependence on specimen size are essentially determined by the microstructural disorder. The failure behaviour is treated by using the discrete chain-of-bundles-model, which treats the details of the microstructure not explicitly but as locally distributed fluctuations of characteristical material parameters. The model has been verified by comparing with experimental results for four intermetallic titanium aluminides and its validity has been demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit behandelt die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der Stochastizitaet des Gefueges, das heisst, einer statistischen Verteilung von Phasen und lokalen Materialeigenschaften und dem makroskopischen Versagen von ungeordneten mehrphasigen Werkstoffen. Auf mikroskopischer Ebene fuehrt die Stochastizitaet des Gefueges vor dem Versagen zu lokalen Schaedigungen (in sproeden Werkstoffen zu Mikrorissen) und schliesslich (abhaengig vom Grad der Unordnung) zur Lokalisierung des Bruchgeschehens. Makroskopisch werden die Groesse und Streuung von Bruchfestigkeitswerten und ihre Probengroessenabhaengigkeit durch die mikrostrukturelle Unordnung wesentlich bestimmt. Dieses Versagensverhalten wird in dem diskreten Chain-of-Bundles-Modell beschrieben, das die Details der Mikrostruktur nicht explizit sondern als lokale statistische Schwankungen von charakteristischen Werkstoffparametern erfasst. Am Beispiel von vier ausgewaehlten Titan-Aluminiden wird das Modell validiert und verifiziert. (orig.)

  11. Deformation behaviour of {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} Ti aluminide processed through reaction synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Kumar, Vinod [SAIL-RDCIS, Ranchi (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India)

    2013-01-01

    {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} titanium aluminide alloys made through reaction synthesis have been used for deformation study. Hot isothermal compression test is carried out to study the deformation characteristics of the alloys using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys based on Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (at%) are tested at different temperatures and at different strain rates. True stress-true strain plots are analyzed along with analysis of tested specimens. Tested specimens are observed under optical and electron microscopes. Presence of various deformation morphologies and phases were confirmed. Microhardness evaluation and transmission electron microscopic examination are used to confirm the presence of different phases. It is found that dynamic recrystallization is mainly playing role in deformation of these alloys. Presence of dynamically recrystallized (DRX) grains and lamellar microstructures is confirmed at the intergranular area and inside the grains, respectively. A nucleation model is suggested for DRX and lamellar grain nucleation during deformation. Attempt has been made to quantify the presence of various phases through optical microscopy. Hot workability map is also suggested on the basis of microstructural and visual observation of compression tested specimens.

  12. First-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal aluminides. III. Extension to ternary phase diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Mike; Al-Lehyani, Ibrahim; Moriarty, John A.

    2000-08-01

    Modeling structural and mechanical properties of intermetallic compounds and alloys requires detailed knowledge of their interatomic interactions. The first two papers of this series [Phys. Rev. B 56, 7905 (1997); 58, 8967 (1998)] derived first-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal (TM) aluminides using generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT). Those papers focused on binary alloys of aluminum with first-row transition metals and assessed the ability of GPT potentials to reproduce and elucidate the alloy phase diagrams of Al-Co and Al-Ni. This paper addresses the phase diagrams of the binary alloy Al-Cu and the ternary systems Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni, using GPT pair potentials calculated in the limit of vanishing transition-metal concentration. Despite this highly simplifying approximation, we find rough agreement with the known low-temperature phase diagrams, up to 50% total TM concentration provided the Co fraction is below 25%. Full composition-dependent potentials and many-body interactions would be required to correct deficiencies at higher Co concentration. Outside this troublesome region, the experimentally determined stable and metastable phases all lie on or near the convex hull of a scatter plot of energy versus composition. We verify, qualitatively, reported solubility ranges extending binary alloys into the ternary diagram in both Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni. Finally, we reproduce previously conjectured transition-metal positions in the decagonal quasicrystal phase.

  13. Plastic flow and microstructure of cast nickel aluminides at 1273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneibel, J. H.; Porter, W. D.; Horton, J. A.

    1987-12-01

    Chill-cast nickel aluminides based on Ni3Al were compression-tested in vacuum at 1273 K at strain rates ranging from 10-5 s-1 to 10-1 s-1. As the strain rate increases, the propensity for intergranular cracking increases. The ductile-to-brittle transition strain rate (DBTS) of as-cast Ni-22.5Al-0.5Hf-0.1B (at. pct) is approximately 10-1 s-1. Homogenization lowers this value by three orders of magnitude, to 10-4 s-1 (a homogenized specimen disintegrated completely at a rate of 10-3 s-1). The fine-grained structure of the as-cast alloy plays an important role in its relatively high DBTS. A hafnium-free alloy, Ni-24A1-0.1B, on the other hand, shows only a weak dependence of the DBTS on prior homogenization, and possible reasons for this finding are discussed.

  14. A simple stir casting technique for the preparation of in situ Fe-aluminides reinforced Al-matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K. Pradhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a simple stir casting technique for the development of Fe-aluminides particulate reinforced Al-matrix composites. It has been demonstrated that stirring of super-heated Al-melt by a mild steel plate followed by conventional casting and hot rolled results in uniform dispersion of in situ Al13Fe4 particles in the Al matrix; the amount of reinforcement is found to increase with increasing melt temperature. With reference to base alloy, the developed composite exhibits higher hardness and improved tensile strength without much loss of ductility; since, composite like base alloy undergoes ductile mode of fracture.

  15. A Stochastic Reliability Model for Application in a Multidisciplinary Optimization of a Low Pressure Turbine Blade Made of Titanium Aluminide

    OpenAIRE

    Dresbach,Christian; Becker,Thomas; Reh,Stefan; Wischek,Janine; Zur,Sascha; Buske,Clemens; Schmidt,Thomas; Tiefers,Ruediger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are a lot of research activities dealing with gamma titanium aluminide (γ-TiAl) alloys as new materials for low pressure turbine (LPT) blades. Even though the scatter in mechanical properties of such intermetallic alloys is more distinctive as in conventional metallic alloys, stochastic investigations on γ -TiAl alloys are very rare. For this reason, we analyzed the scatter in static and dynamic mechanical properties of the cast alloy Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb. It wa...

  16. Qualification of high density aluminide fuels for the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, Andre; Gubel, Pol; Ponsard, Bernard; Pin, Thomas; Falgoux, Jean Louis

    2005-01-01

    The BR2 operation still relies on the use of 90..93% enriched HEU aluminide fuel. The availability of a limited batch of 73% enriched HEU from reprocessed BR2 uranium in Dounreay justified 10 years ago the qualification and use of this material. After some preliminary test irradiations, various batches of fuel elements were fabricated by the UKAEA-Dounreay and successfully irradiated. Due to their lower 235 U content (0.050 g 235 U/cm 2 ), these elements were always irradiated together with standard 90...93% HEU fuel elements. A mixed-core strategy was developed at this occasion for an optimal utilization, and was reported during the 4th RRFM conference (March 19-21, 2000, Colmar, France). The availability of a new batch of fresh 73% HEU material was the occasion, a few years ago, to initiate the development, fabrication and qualification of a new high density fuel element. An order was placed with CERCA to assess the optimal fabrication methods and tooling required to meet as far as possible the existing BR2 standard specifications and 235 U content (0.060 g 235 U/cm 2 ). This development phase has been already reported during the 7th RRFM conference (March 9-12, 2003, Aix-en-Provence, France). Afterwards, six lead test fuel elements were ordered for qualification by irradiation. The neutronic properties of the fuel elements were adjusted and optimized. After a short summary of the main results of the development program, this paper describes the nuclear characteristics of the high density fuel elements and comments on the nuclear follow-up of the lead test fuel elements during their irradiation for five cycles in the BR2 reactor and the return of experience for CERCA. (author)

  17. HCP to FCT + precipitate transformations in lamellar gamma-titanium aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadge, Mallikarjun Baburao

    Fully lamellar gamma-TiAl [alpha2(HCP) + gamma(FCT)] based alloys are potential structural materials for aerospace engine applications. Lamellar structure stabilization and additional strengthening mechanisms are major issues in the ongoing development of titanium aluminides due to the microstructural instability resulting from decomposition of the strengthening alpha 2 phase. This work addresses characterization of multi-component TiAl systems to identify the mechanism of lamellar structure refinement and assess the effects of light element additions (C and Si) on creep deformation behavior. Transmission electron microscopy studies directly confirmed for the first time that, fine lamellar structure is formed by the nucleation and growth of a large number of basal stacking faults on the 1/6 dislocations cross slipping repeatedly into and out of basal planes. This lamellar structure can be tailored by modifying jog heights through chemistry and thermal processing. alpha 2 → gamma transformation during heating (investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction) is a two step process involving the formation of a novel disordered FCC gamma' TiAl [with a(gamma') = c(gamma)] as an intermediate phase followed by ordering. Addition of carbon and silicon induced Ti2AlC H-type carbide precipitation inside the alpha2 lath and Ti 5(Al,Si)3 zeta-type silicide precipitation at the alpha 2/gamma interface. The H-carbides preserve alpha2/gamma type interfaces, while zeta-silicide precipitates restrict ledge growth and interfacial sliding enabling strong resistance to creep deformation.

  18. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  19. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  20. Comparison of orthorhombic and alpha-two titanium aluminides as matrices for continuous SiC-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Graves, J.A.; Rhodes, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The attributes of an orthorhombic Ti aluminide alloy, Ti-21Al-22Nb (at. pct), and an alpha-two Ti aluminide alloy, Ti-24Al-11Nb (at. pct), for use as a matrix with continuous SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforcement have been compared. Foil-fiber-foil processing was used to produce both unreinforced (''neat'') and unidirectional ''SCS-6'' reinforced panels. Microstructure of the Ti-24Al-11Nb matrix consisted of ordered Ti 3 Al (α 2 ) + disordered beta (β), while the Ti-21Al-22Nb matrix contained three phases: α 2 , ordered beta (β 0 ), and ordered orthorhombic (O). Fiber/matrix interface reaction zone growth kinetics at 982 C were examined for each composite system. Although both systems exhibited similar interface reaction products (i.e., mixed Ti carbides, silicides, and Ti-Al carbides), growth kinetics in the α 2 + β matrix composite were much more rapid than in the O + β 0 + α 2 matrix composite. Additionally, interfacial reaction in the α 2 + β composite resulted in a relatively large brittle matrix zone, depleted of beta phase, which was not present in the O + β 0 + α 2 matrix composite. Mechanical property measurements included room and elevated temperature tensile, thermal stability, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue (TMF), and creep. The three-phase orthorhombic-based alloy outperformed the α 2 + β alloy in all of these mechanical behavioral areas, on both an absolute and a specific (i.e., density corrected) basis

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  2. Towards advanced structural analysis of iron oxide clusters on the surface of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubnov, Alexey [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Catalysis Research and Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Roppertz, Andreas [Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Chair of Reaction Engineering, Technical University of Freiberg, Fuchsmuehlenweg 9, D-09599 Freiberg (Germany); Kundrat, Matthew D. [Center for Functional Nanostructures and Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mangold, Stefan [Institut für Beschleunigerphysik und Technologie (IBPT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Reznik, Boris [Institute of Applied Geosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jacob, Christoph R. [Center for Functional Nanostructures and Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Kureti, Sven [Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Chair of Reaction Engineering, Technical University of Freiberg, Fuchsmuehlenweg 9, D-09599 Freiberg (Germany); Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk, E-mail: grunwaldt@kit.edu [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Catalysis Research and Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of isolated and oligomeric FeOx (x = 4, 5) on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by XANES and EXAFS. • Iron is trivalent and is mainly located at octahedral lattice sites of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Low Fe loading (0.1%) guarantees high dispersion of catalytically active iron sites. • Surface Fe-cluster on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and DFT-optimised Fe-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as input models for EXAFS. • Interactions of iron with support are well-accounted for using realistic models. - Abstract: Iron oxide centres are structurally investigated in 0.1% Fe/γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is known as highly active catalyst, for instance in the oxidation of CO. The sample was characterised by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in terms of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analyses evidenced high dispersion of the iron oxide entities without significant presence of bulk-like aggregates associated with the low Fe content of the catalyst. A library of structural models of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported surface Fe was created as input for EXAFS fitting. Additionally, several model structures of Fe substituting Al ions in bulk γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were created with optimised geometry based on density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. From EXAFS refinement of the best 8 out of 24 models, it was found that the trivalent Fe ions are coordinated by 4–5 oxygen atoms and are located on octahedral lattice sites of the exposed surfaces of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These iron oxide species exist mainly as a mixture of monomeric and binuclear species and due to the low concentration represent suitable model systems as alternative to single crystal systems for structure-function relationships.

  3. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  4. Barium aluminides BaxAl5(x=3,3.5,4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehle, Michael; Scherer, Harald; Wendorff, Marco; Roehr, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Three aluminides of the series Ba x Al 5 (x=3,3.5,4) were synthesized from stoichiometric ratios of the elements in Ta crucibles. The crystal structure of the new compound Ba 7 Al 10 was determined using single crystal X-ray data (space group R3-barm, a=604.23(9), c=4879.0(12)pm, Z=3, R1=0.0325). The compound exhibits Al Kagome (3.6.3.6.) nets in which half of the triangles form the basis of trigonal bipyramids Al 5 . The apical Al are thus three-bonded assuming a charge of -2 ( 27 Al-NMR chemical shift δ=660pm), whereas the Al atoms of the basal triangle (i.e. of the Kagome net) are four-bonded and thus of formal charge -1(δ=490ppm). The total charge of the anion is thus exactly compensated by the Ba cations, i.e. the compound can be interpreted as an electron precise Zintl phase, exhibiting a distinct pseudo-band gap at the Fermi level of the calculated tDOS. According to the total formula, the structure displays a combination the stacking sequences of Ba 3 Al 5 and Ba 4 Al 5 , the structures of which have been redetermined with current methods (both hexagonal with space group P6 3 /mmc; Ba 3 Al 5 : a=606.55(7), c=1461.8(2)pm, Z=2, R1=0.0239; Ba 4 Al 5 : a=609.21(7), c=1775.8(3)pm, Z=2, R1=0.0300). These three compounds with slightly different electron counts but similar polyanions allow to compare the bond lengths, the electronic structures and the overall bonding situation in dependence of positive or negative deviation of the electron count in relation to the novel formally electron precise Zintl compound Ba 7 Al 10 . - Al 5 layers of Kagome nets in the new binary electron precise Zintl compound Ba 3.5 Al 5 , also found in Ba 3 Al 5 and Ba 4 Al 5 .

  5. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Lin, H.-T.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    2006-11-30

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was {approx} 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity was {approx} 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the groove depth. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch test of the TiAls, which facilitated both the detachment of developing chips and pile-up of material on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction in the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the TiAls tested. The material removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall material response can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen candidate materials for the applications that are scratch-dominated versus impact-dominated. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation during material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size shows a higher resistance to indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and conclusions in this study can serve as a base line for the further

  6. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL

    2006-11-01

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was ~ 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity used was ~ 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the depth of groove. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch of the tested TiAls, which facilitated both the detachments of developing chips and the pile-ups of materials on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction on the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the tested TiAls. The materiel removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall response of materials can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The obtained depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen the candidate materials for the specific purpose depending on whether the application is scratch-dominant or impact-dominant. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation in the material loss or material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size show a higher resistance against the indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and

  7. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  8. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  9. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO and DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-01-01

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  10. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  11. The adherence of aluminide coatings on MANET II stainless steel and their effect on its mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample, T.; Fenici, P.; Kolbe, H.; Orecchia, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the production and testing of two different aluminide coatings on the surface of MANET II stainless steel. The coatings were produced by heat treatment of a pure aluminium layer (∼ 100 μm) which had been deposited by vacuum plasma spray. Series 1 coatings were produced by a single heat treatment (1023 K/2h) while series 2 coatings were produced by two consecutive heat treatments (1348 K/30 min, 1023 K/2h). Series 1 coatings were ∼ 120 μm thick, richer in aluminium and harder than series 2 coatings which formed two layers of ∼ 120 μm each. Due to their softer character, series 2 coatings exhibited a greater resistance to cracking under cyclic testing than series 1 coatings. Tensile tests of coated specimens indicated that the coating procedures did not degrade the mechanical properties of the bulk MANET II. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. A study on the growth kinetics of CeO2-modified aluminide coating and its computer fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jiuba; Yang Liusong; Zhu Limin; Zhang Jinmin; Li QuanAn

    2009-01-01

    A CeO 2 -modified aluminide coating was obtained by composite electro-deposition Ni and CeO 2 particles on 20 steel with different holding time using pack cementation. The growth kinetics curve was given with computer fitting by measuring the thickness of the layer. Scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry were used to analyze the microstructure and components of the layer. The results showed that the content of CeO 2 was up to 5.21 wt.% in the rich area of NiAl coatings, which restrain the interdiffusion between the coating and the base during the oxidation process at high temperature. Meanwhile, the growth curve obtained could offer an important basis to forecasting and controlling the depth of the coating

  13. High quality aluminide and thermal barrier coatings deposition for new and service exposed parts by CVD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza, F.; Tuohy, C.; Whelan, L.; Kennedy, A.D. [SIFCO Turbine Components, Carrigtwohill, Cork (Ireland)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the performance of CVD aluminide coatings is compared to that of coatings deposited by the classical pack cementation technique using standard SIFCO procedures. The CVD coatings always seem to behave better upon exposure to isothermal and cyclic oxidation conditions. This is explained by a longer term stability of CVD coatings, with higher Al amounts in the diffusion zone and less refractory element precipitation in the additive layer. The qualities of Pt/Al coatings by out-of-pack and CVD are also compared as a previous step for further thermal barrier coating deposition. As an example, YSZ thermal barrier coatings are deposited by MO-CVD on Pt/Al CVD bond coats rendering adherent and thick coatings around the surface of turbine blades. This process under development does not require complex manipulation of the component to be coated. (orig.)

  14. Experimental Study on Influence of Process Variables on Crater Dimensions in Micro- EDM of γ-Titanium Aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Paul, G.; Sarkar, S.; Nagahanumaiah

    2011-01-01

    In the present work the effect of different dielectric mediums in micro-EDM of γ-Titanium Aluminide alloy have been investigated. Experiments were conducted both in the absence (dry conditions) and in presence of dielectric (EDM oil).Circular craters were produced both in the presence and absence of dielectric fluid using varying micro-EDM process variables i.e. open circuit voltage, discharge capacitance, pulse frequency and pulse-on-time. Over cut was measured from optical microscope images using Image Analyzer software. Influences of process variables and optimal conditions for minimum over cut on crater dimensions were investigated. ANOVA test which shows that capacitance of RC circuit contributes significantly in crater formation followed by pulse frequency. Optical photographs exhibit that over cut are less in air medium compared to oil medium.

  15. Iron(III) phthalocyanine supported on a spongin scaffold as an advanced photocatalyst in a highly efficient removal process of halophenols and bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Małgorzata; Żółtowska-Aksamitowska, Sonia; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Ehrlich, Hermann; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2018-04-05

    This study investigated for the first time the degradation of phenol, chlorophenol, fluorophenol and bisphenol A (BPA) by the novel iron phthalocyanine/spongin hybrid material under various process conditions: hydrogen peroxide and UV irradiation. The heterogeneous catalyst, iron phthalocyanine/spongin (SFe), was produced by an adsorption process. The product obtained was investigated by a variety of spectroscopic techniques - X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13 C NMR) - as well as elemental and thermal analysis. The study confirmed the stable immobilization of the dye on the biopolymer. The results demonstrate that the degradation of phenols and BPA followed pseudo-second-order kinetics under different experimental conditions. The synergy of SFe, H 2 O 2 and UV was found to produce a significant increase in the removal efficiency and resulted in complete removal of contaminants in a short time of 1 h. The reaction products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and possible degradation pathways were proposed, featuring a series of steps including cleavage of CC bonds and oxidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ferumoxtran-10 advanced magnetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, W.P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Ferumoxtran-10 (Combidex) is an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide molecular resonance imaging contrast agent under development by Advanced Magnetics Ltd and Guerbet for the principal indication of lymph node imaging.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  19. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  7. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  10. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  11. Infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies on sodium borosilicate glass interacted with thermally oxidized aluminides formed on alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusufali, C.; Dutta, R.S.; Dey, G.K.; Kshirsagar, R.J.; Jagannath; Mishra, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Thermally oxidized aluminides formed on Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates were subjected to interaction with sodium borosilicate melt (used as matrices for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste) at 1248 K for 192 hours. After the interaction, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis of glass samples indicated the incorporation of Al in the glass network. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of glass specimens revealed modified glass structure. (author)

  12. Covalent bonding and band-gap formation in ternary transition-metal di-aluminides: Al4MnCo and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajci, M.; Hafner, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we extend our previous study of the electronic structure of and bonding mechanism in transition-metal (TM) di-aluminides to ternary systems. We have studied the character of the bonding in Al 4 MnCo and related TM di-aluminides in the C11 b (MoSi 2 ) and C54 (TiSi 2 ) crystal structures. A peculiar feature of the electronic structure of these TM di-aluminides is the existence of a semiconducting gap at the Fermi level. In our previous work we predicted a gap in Al 2 TM compounds where the TM atoms have eight valence electrons. Here we demonstrate that the semiconducting gap does not disappear if the TM sites are occupied by two different TMs, provided that the electron-per-atom ratio is conserved. Such a replacement substantially increases the class of possibly semiconducting TM di-aluminides. Substitution for 3d TMs of 4d or 5d TMs enhances the width of the gap. From the analysis of the charge density distribution and the crystal orbital overlap population, we conclude that the bonding between atoms has dominantly covalent character. This is confirmed not only by the enhanced charge density halfway between atoms, but also by the clear bonding-antibonding splitting of the electronic states. If the gaps between split states that correspond to all bonding configurations in the crystal have a common overlap at the Fermi level, the intermetallic compound becomes a semiconductor. However, the results of the total-energy calculations suggest that the existence of a band gap does not necessarily imply a stable structure. Strong covalent bonds can exist also in Al-TM structures where no band gap is observed. (author)

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  14. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Microstructure and hot corrosion behaviors of two Co modified aluminide coatings on a Ni-based superalloy at 700 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Q.X.; Jiang, S.M.; Yu, H.J.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructures of two Co modified NiAl coatings have been studied. • The addition of Co improves the corrosion resistance in sulfate salts at 700 °C. • For the sulfide and its eutectic of Co are more stable than those of Ni. • In chloride salts coating with medium Co content has best corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Two Co modified aluminide coatings with different Co contents were prepared by pack cementation process and above-the-pack process. The hot corrosion tests of the two coatings were performed in mixed salts of 75 wt.% Na 2 SO 4 + 25 wt.% K 2 SO 4 and 75 wt.% Na 2 SO 4 + 25 wt.% NaCl at 700 °C, with a simple aluminide coating as the reference coating. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to characterize the coatings and the corrosion scales. Results indicate that the addition of Co improves the hot corrosion resistance of the simple aluminide coating in the mixed sulfate salts, for the sulfide as well as its eutectic of cobalt are more stable, and possess higher melting points than those of nickel. While in the mixed salt containing chloride, the coating with medium Co content possesses the best corrosion resistance, primarily because the nitrides formed in the deposition process deteriorate the corrosion resistance of the coating with highest Co content

  16. Relationship of interaction of titanium aluminides with alloying elements as a basis for design of high-temperature alloys and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povarova, K.B.; Bannykh, O.A.; Antonova, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    One analyzed the available ternary phase diagrams of Ti-Al-AE where AE - alloying metal or metalloid. Nature of interaction of titanium aluminides, in particular, α 2 -Ti 3 Al, γ-TiAl and TiAl 3 with alloying elements (AE) in the uninvestigated systems was hypothesized with regard to the available binary and ternary phase diagrams and data on electron structure of AE. One determined that structure of Ti-Al-AE ternary phase diagrams, namely, position of domains of γ-TiAl and α 2 -Ti 3 Al base solid solutions, nature of substitution for AE positions in Ti or Al sublattices and position of (α 2 +γ)/γ domain boundary were governed by likeness or difference of electron structure of AE and of the substituted metal (Ti or Al) in titanium aluminide lattice and by value of dimension factor (difference of atomic radii of Al and Ti or Al). One analyzed promises offered by application of solid solution alloying and microalloying of aluminides by I-VIII group metals of the Periodic System [ru

  17. Modern iron replacement therapy: clinical and pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, Domenico; Ugolini, Sara; Busti, Fabiana; Marchi, Giacomo; Castagna, Annalisa

    2018-01-01

    Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, is extremely frequent worldwide, representing a major public health problem. Iron replacement therapy dates back to the seventeenth century, and has progressed relatively slowly until recently. Both oral and intravenous traditional iron formulations are known to be far from ideal, mainly because of tolerability and safety issues, respectively. At the beginning of this century, the discovery of hepcidin/ferroportin axis has represented a turning point in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of iron metabolism disorders, ushering a new era. In the meantime, advances in the pharmaceutical technologies are producing newer iron formulations aimed at minimizing the problems inherent with traditional approaches. The pharmacokinetic of oral and parenteral iron is substantially different, and diversities have become even clearer in light of the hepcidin master role in regulating systemic iron homeostasis. Here we review how iron therapy is changing because of such important advances in both pathophysiology and pharmacology.

  18. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  19. Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Aerospace Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashbaugh, Noel

    1997-01-01

    .... For a gamma titanium aluminide alloy, the coarse and refined lamellar materials with colony sizes equal to 700 and 280 micrometers, respectively, have substantially greater crack growth resistance...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  3. Aluminide slurry coatings for protection of ferritic steel in molten nitrate corrosion for concentrated solar power technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigié, Pauline; Bizien, Nicolas; Baráibar, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Sergio; Pastor, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Agüero, Alina

    2017-06-01

    Molten nitrates can be employed as heat storage fluids in solar concentration power plants. However molten nitrates are corrosive and if operating temperatures are raised to increase efficiencies, the corrosion rates will also increase. High temperature corrosion resistant coatings based on Al have demonstrated excellent results in other sectors such as gas turbines. Aluminide slurry coated and uncoated P92 steel specimens were exposed to the so called Solar Salt (industrial grade), a binary eutectic mixture of 60 % NaNO3 - 40 % KNO3, in air for 2000 hours at 550°C and 580°C in order to analyze their behavior as candidates to be used in future solar concentration power plants employing molten nitrates as heat transfer fluids. Coated ferritic steels constitute a lower cost technology than Ni based alloy. Two different coating morphologies resulting from two heat treatment performed at 700 and 1050°C after slurry application were tested. The coated systems exhibited excellent corrosion resistance at both temperatures, whereas uncoated P92 showed significant mass loss from the beginning of the test. The coatings showed very slow reaction with the molten Solar Salt. In contrast, uncoated P92 developed a stratified, unprotected Fe, Cr oxide with low adherence which shows oscillating Cr content as a function of coating depth. NaFeO2 was also found at the oxide surface as well as within the Fe, Cr oxide.

  4. A Stochastic Reliability Model for Application in a Multidisciplinary Optimization of a Low Pressure Turbine Blade Made of Titanium Aluminide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dresbach

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, there are a lot of research activities dealing with gamma titanium aluminide (γ-TiAl alloys as new materials for low pressure turbine (LPT blades. Even though the scatter in mechanical properties of such intermetallic alloys is more distinctive as in conventional metallic alloys, stochastic investigations on γ -TiAl alloys are very rare. For this reason, we analyzed the scatter in static and dynamic mechanical properties of the cast alloy Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb. It was found that this alloy shows a size effect in strength which is less pronounced than the size effect of brittle materials. A weakest-link approach is enhanced for describing a scalable size effect under multiaxial stress states and implemented in a post processing tool for reliability analysis of real components. The presented approach is a first applicable reliability model for semi-brittle materials. The developed reliability tool was integrated into a multidisciplinary optimization of the geometry of a LPT blade. Some processes of the optimization were distributed in a wide area network, so that specialized tools for each discipline could be employed. The optimization results show that it is possible to increase the aerodynamic efficiency and the structural mechanics reliability at the same time, while ensuring the blade can be manufactured in an investment casting process.

  5. The free growth criterion for grain initiation in TiB 2 inoculated γ-titanium aluminide based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosslar, D.; Günther, R.

    2014-02-01

    γ-titanium aluminide (γ-TiAl) based alloys enable for the design of light-weight and high-temperature resistant engine components. This work centers on a numerical study of the condition for grain initiation during solidification of TiB2 inoculated γ-TiAl based alloys. Grain initiation is treated according to the so-called free growth criterion. This means that the free growth barrier for grain initiation is determined by the maximum interfacial mean curvature between a nucleus and the melt. The strategy presented in this paper relies on iteratively increasing the volume of a nucleus, which partially wets a hexagonal TiB2 crystal, minimizing the interfacial energy and calculating the corresponding interfacial curvature. The hereby obtained maximum curvature yields a scaling relation between the size of TiB2 crystals and the free growth barrier. Comparison to a prototypical TiB2 crystal in an as cast γ-TiAl based alloy allowed then to predict the free growth barrier prevailing under experimental conditions. The validity of the free growth criterion is discussed by an interfacial energy criterion.

  6. Fatigue damage evolution and property degradation of a SCS-6/Ti-22Al-23Nb orthorhombic titanium aluminide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.C.; Jeng, S.M.; Yang, J.M.; Russ, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue damage evolution and property degradation of a SCS-6/Ti-22Al-23Nb orthorhombic titanium aluminide composite under low cycle fatigue loading at room temperature was investigated. The fatigue test was conducted under a load-controlled mode with a load ratio (R) of 0.1, a frequency of 10 Hz, and a maximum applied stress ranging from 600 to 945 MPa. The stiffness reduction as well as the evolution of microstructural damage which includes matrix crack length, matrix crack density and interfacial debonding length as a function of fatigue cycles, and applied stresses were measured. An analytical model and a computer simulation were also developed to predict the residual stiffness and the post-fatigued tensile strength as a function of microstructural damage. Finally, a steady-state crack growth model proposed by Marshall et al. was used to predict the interfacial frictional stress and the critical crack length. Correlation between the theoretical predictions and experimental results were also discussed

  7. Open volume defects and magnetic phase transition in Fe{sub 60}Al{sub 40} transition metal aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, M. O., E-mail: m.liedke@hzdr.de; Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Wagner, A. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Bali, R.; Cornelius, S.; Potzger, K. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Trinh, T. T. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technical University Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 10, 01609 Dresden (Germany); Salamon, S.; Walecki, D.; Smekhova, A.; Wende, H. [Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstraße 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic phase transition in the Fe{sub 60}Al{sub 40} transition metal aluminide from the ferromagnetic disordered A2-phase to the paramagnetic ordered B2-phase as a function of annealing up to 1000 °C has been investigated by means of magneto-optical and spectroscopy techniques, i.e., Kerr effect, positron annihilation, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The positron annihilation spectroscopy has been performed in-situ sequentially after each annealing step at the Apparatus for In-situ Defect Analysis that is a unique tool combining positron annihilation spectroscopy with temperature treatment, material evaporation, ion irradiation, and sheet resistance measurement techniques. The overall goal was to investigate the importance of the open volume defects onto the magnetic phase transition. No evidence of variation in the vacancy concentration in matching the magnetic phase transition temperature range (400–600 °C) has been found, whereas higher temperatures showed an increase in the vacancy concentration.

  8. Processing and application properties of silicon-doped titanium aluminides; Formgebungs- und Anwendungseigenschaften silizidhaltiger TiAl-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanta, G. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2001-07-01

    Submicrocrystalline intermetallic/ceramic composites based on the system Ti-Al-Si are prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent powder consolidation. Finely dispersed silicides prevent coarsening of the {gamma}-TiAl matrix during hot-forming. Therefore, the deformation temperatures can be reduced by about 200 C compared to conventional titanium aluminides. After a subsequent coarsening heat treatment, creep properties comparable to those of conventional TiAl based alloys (1.10{sup -9} s{sup -1} at 700 C) are achieved. This study demonstrates that microstructure design allows for favorable processing properties without compromises regarding the desired application properties. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung des technischen Anwendungspotenzials submikrokristalliner Werkstoffe werden silizidhaltige {gamma}-TiAl-Basislegierungen durch Hochenergiemahlen und heissisostatisches Pressen hergestellt. Bei der industriellen Formgebung ermoeglicht die durch Silizide stabilisierte feine Mikrostruktur eine deutliche Temperaturabsenkung von 200 C im Vergleich zu den fuer Titanaluminide ueblichen Prozesstemperaturen. Nach einer anschliessend durchgefuehrten Gefuegeumwandlung werden Kriechgeschwindigkeiten gemessen, die mit 1.10{sup -9} s{sup -1} bei 700 C im Bereich der Werte schmelzmetallurgisch hergestellter TiAl-Legierungen liegen. Eine gezielte Mikrostrukturgestaltung ermoeglicht somit eine deutliche Verbesserung der Umformeigenschaften unter Beibehaltung der guenstigen Eigenschaften fuer Hochtemperaturanwendungen. (orig.)

  9. A Model for Creep and Creep Damage in the γ-Titanium Aluminide Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, William; Abdallah, Zakaria; Whittaker, Mark

    2014-03-14

    Gamma titanium aluminides (γ-TiAl) display significantly improved high temperature mechanical properties over conventional titanium alloys. Due to their low densities, these alloys are increasingly becoming strong candidates to replace nickel-base superalloys in future gas turbine aeroengine components. To determine the safe operating life of such components, a good understanding of their creep properties is essential. Of particular importance to gas turbine component design is the ability to accurately predict the rate of accumulation of creep strain to ensure that excessive deformation does not occur during the component's service life and to quantify the effects of creep on fatigue life. The theta (θ) projection technique is an illustrative example of a creep curve method which has, in this paper, been utilised to accurately represent the creep behaviour of the γ-TiAl alloy Ti -45Al-2Mn-2Nb. Furthermore, a continuum damage approach based on the θ-projection method has also been used to represent tertiary creep damage and accurately predict creep rupture.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ... and lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... delivery or giving birth to a baby with low birth weight In people with chronic conditions, iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  19. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... amount of iron, and medical conditions that make it hard for your body to absorb iron from ... hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy ... sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  7. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark ... choose nonmeat sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  13. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  14. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  15. Microstructure and hot corrosion behaviors of two Co modified aluminide coatings on a Ni-based superalloy at 700 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Q.X., E-mail: qxfan@imr.ac.cn; Jiang, S.M., E-mail: smjiang@imr.ac.cn; Yu, H.J.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Microstructures of two Co modified NiAl coatings have been studied. • The addition of Co improves the corrosion resistance in sulfate salts at 700 °C. • For the sulfide and its eutectic of Co are more stable than those of Ni. • In chloride salts coating with medium Co content has best corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Two Co modified aluminide coatings with different Co contents were prepared by pack cementation process and above-the-pack process. The hot corrosion tests of the two coatings were performed in mixed salts of 75 wt.% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 25 wt.% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 75 wt.% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 25 wt.% NaCl at 700 °C, with a simple aluminide coating as the reference coating. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to characterize the coatings and the corrosion scales. Results indicate that the addition of Co improves the hot corrosion resistance of the simple aluminide coating in the mixed sulfate salts, for the sulfide as well as its eutectic of cobalt are more stable, and possess higher melting points than those of nickel. While in the mixed salt containing chloride, the coating with medium Co content possesses the best corrosion resistance, primarily because the nitrides formed in the deposition process deteriorate the corrosion resistance of the coating with highest Co content.

  16. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  17. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  20. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ... iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  4. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  5. Three-dimensional nanometer scale analyses of precipitate structures and local compositions in titanium aluminide engineering alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, Stephan S. A.

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys are among the fastest developing class of materials for use in high temperature structural applications. Their low density and high strength make them excellent candidates for both engine and airframe applications. Creep properties of TiAl alloys, however, have been a limiting factor in applying the material to a larger commercial market. In this research, nanometer scale compositional and structural analyses of several TiAl alloys, ranging from model Ti-Al-C ternary alloys to putative commercial alloys with 10 components are investigated utilizing three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and transmission electron microscopies. Nanometer sized borides, silicides, and carbide precipitates are involved in strengthening TiAl alloys, however, chemical partitioning measurements reveal oxygen concentrations up to 14 at. % within the precipitate phases, resulting in the realization of oxycarbide formation contributing to the precipitation strengthening of TiAl alloys. The local compositions of lamellar microstructures and a variety of precipitates in the TiAl system, including boride, silicide, binary carbides, and intermetallic carbides are investigated. Chemical partitioning of the microalloying elements between the alpha2/gamma lamellar phases, and the precipitate/gamma-matrix phases are determined. Both W and Hf have been shown to exhibit a near interfacial excess of 0.26 and 0.35 atoms nm-2 respectively within ca. 7 nm of lamellar interfaces in a complex TiAl alloy. In the case of needle-shaped perovskite Ti3AlC carbide precipitates, periodic domain boundaries are observed 5.3+/-0.8 nm apart along their growth axis parallel to the TiAl[001] crystallographic direction with concomitant composition variations after 24 hrs. at 800°C.

  6. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  7. Devising Strain Hardening Models Using Kocks–Mecking Plots—A Comparison of Model Development for Titanium Aluminides and Case Hardening Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Bambach

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the development of strain hardening models taking into account the peculiarities of titanium aluminides. In comparison to steels, whose behavior has been studied extensively in the past, titanium aluminides possess a much larger initial work hardening rate, a sharp peak stress and pronounced softening. The work hardening behavior of a TNB-V4 (Ti–44.5Al–6.25Nb–0.8Mo–0.1B alloy is studied using isothermal hot compression tests conducted on a Gleeble 3500 simulator, and compared to the typical case hardening steel 25MoCrS4. The behavior is analyzed with the help of the Kocks-Mecking plots. In contrast to steel the TNB-V4 alloy shows a non-linear course of θ (i.e., no stage-III hardening initially and exhibits neither a plateau (stage IV hardening nor an inflection point at all deformation conditions. The present paper describes the development and application of a methodology for the design of strain hardening models for the TNB-V4 alloy and the 25CrMoS4 steel by taking the course of the Kocks-Mecking plots into account. Both models use different approaches for the hardening and softening mechanisms and accurately predict the flow stress over a wide range of deformation conditions. The methodology may hence assist in further developments of more sophisticated physically-based strain hardening models for TiAl-alloys.

  8. Ironing out the Details: Exploring the Role of Iron and Heme in Blood-Sucking Arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Shavonn R.; Eggleston, Heather; Adelman, Zach N.

    2018-01-01

    Heme and iron are essential molecules for many physiological processes and yet have the ability to cause oxidative damage such as lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, and ultimately cell death if not controlled. Blood-sucking arthropods have evolved diverse methods to protect themselves against iron/heme-related damage, as the act of bloodfeeding itself is high risk, high reward process. Protective mechanisms in medically important arthropods include the midgut peritrophic matrix in mosquitoes, heme aggregation into the crystalline structure hemozoin in kissing bugs and hemosomes in ticks. Once heme and iron pass these protective mechanisms they are presumed to enter the midgut epithelial cells via membrane-bound transporters, though relatively few iron or heme transporters have been identified in bloodsucking arthropods. Upon iron entry into midgut epithelial cells, ferritin serves as the universal storage protein and transport for dietary iron in many organisms including arthropods. In addition to its role as a nutrient, heme is also an important signaling molecule in the midgut epithelial cells for many physiological processes including vitellogenesis. This review article will summarize recent advancements in heme/iron uptake, detoxification and exportation in bloodfeeding arthropods. While initial strides have been made at ironing out the role of dietary iron and heme in arthropods, much still remains to be discovered as these molecules may serve as novel targets for the control of many arthropod pests. PMID:29387018

  9. Numerical study of crucial parameters in tilt casting for titanium aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of the tilt casting process for TiAl alloys was investigated to achieve a tranquil mould filling and TiAl castings free of defects. Titanium alloys are very reactive in molten state, so they are widely melted in cold crucible, e.g. the Induction Skull Melting (ISM furnace. Then the crucible holding the molten metal together with the mould is rotated to transfer the metal into the mould — ISM+ tilt casting. This paper emphasizes the effect of crucial parameters on mould filling and solidification of the castings during tilt casting. All crucial parameters, such as rotation rate, rotation profile, venting, initial mould temperature, casting orientation, feeder design, change of radius in 'T' junction and mould insulation have been discussed using numerical modeling data. Simulations were performed using a 3D CFD code PHYSICA implemented with front tracking, heat transfer algorithms and a turbulence model (which accounts for an advancing solid front.

  10. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend changes to help you meet the recommended daily amount of iron. If you ... stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron levels, your doctor may ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... less Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... lose blood, you lose iron. Certain conditions or medicines can cause blood loss and lead to iron- ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments ... improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. ... red blood cells on hand, their bodies can store iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  7. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  8. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. Certain ... domestic small businesses that have strong potential for technology commercialization through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron ...

  15. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  3. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  4. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding or other abnormalities, such as growths or cancer of the lining of the colon. For this test, a ... that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  7. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  16. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency isn't corrected, it can lead to iron-deficiency anemia (a decrease in the number of red blood ... Parents Kids Teens Anemia Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegetarianism Menstrual Problems Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ... cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  19. Atomic-scale simulation study of some bulk and interfacial properties of iron aluminium ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, Remy

    1997-01-01

    A semi-empirical potential was designed for B 2 and DO 3 iron aluminides and used to study point defects and grain boundaries in these compounds. At low temperature, departure from B 2 stoichiometry is accommodated with antisite defects; when T increases, iron vacancies appear and defects have a trend to form clusters, the structure of which is very sensitive to this departure. Our calculations, relying on T = 0 K formation energies, predict the nature of major defects, but lead to underestimated quantitative results, which may point out the essential role of atomic vibrations. In the stoichiometric B 2 compound, the diffusion of both species is induced by four-jump cycles involving iron vacancies. Although the agreement between our calculated activation energies and other experiments is good, the calculated diffusion coefficients are below the experimental ones. Here again, this discrepancy may be put down to the overlooking of phonon contributions. The second application concerns the atomic structures of the [001] (310) symmetric tilt grain boundary in the B 2 and DO 3 compounds. At low temperature, in the stoichiometric B 2 compound, we obtain an iron-rich single stable structure (pseudo-symmetric), whose structure is strongly influenced by the bulk composition (with intergranular segregation of the major element). In the stoichiometric DO 3 compound, many energetically equivalent structures exist, all being systematically aluminium-rich. The study of the B 2 grain boundary structure at high temperature shows a phase transition favouring a symmetric structure. Its high excess energy at low temperature emphasizes the influence of atomic vibrations in the interfacial properties of B 2 Fe-Al compounds. (author) [fr

  20. Titanium alloys. Advances in alloys, processes, products and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkinsop, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The last few years have been a period of consolidation of existing alloys and processes. While the aerospace industry remains the principal driving force for alloy development, the paper illustrates examples of new markets being established in 'older' alloys, by a combination of product/process development and a re-examination of engineering design parameters. Considerable attention is still being directed towards the titanium aluminide systems, but other more conventional alloy developments are underway aimed at specific engineering and process requirements, both in the aerospace and non-aerospace sectors. Both the advanced high temperature and conventional alloy developments are considered, before the paper goes on to assess the potential of new processes and products, like spray-forming, metal matrix composites and shaped-plate rolling. (orig.)

  1. Iron addiction: a novel therapeutic target in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basuli, D.

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal malignancy that has not seen a major therapeutic advance in over 30 years. We demonstrate that ovarian cancer exhibits a targetable alteration in iron metabolism. Ferroportin (FPN), the iron efflux pump, is decreased, and transferrin receptor (TFR1), the iron importer, is increased in tumor tissue from patients with high grade but not low grade serous ovarian cancer. A similar profile of decreased FPN and increased TFR1 is observed in a genetic model of ovarian cancer tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The net result of these changes is an accumulation of excess intracellular iron and an augmented dependence on iron for proliferation. A forced reduction in intracellular iron reduces the proliferation of ovarian cancer TICs in vitro, and inhibits both tumor growth and intraperitoneal dissemination of tumor cells in vivo. Some mechanistic studies demonstrate that iron increases metastatic spread by facilitating invasion through expression of matrix metalloproteases and synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Here, we show that the iron dependence of ovarian cancer TICs renders them exquisitely sensitive in vivo to agents that induce iron-dependent cell death (ferroptosis) as well as iron chelators, and thus creates a metabolic vulnerability that can be exploited therapeutically.

  2. Genomic insights into microbial iron oxidation and iron uptake strategies in extremely acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S

    2012-07-01

    This minireview presents recent advances in our understanding of iron oxidation and homeostasis in acidophilic Bacteria and Archaea. These processes influence the flux of metals and nutrients in pristine and man-made acidic environments such as acid mine drainage and industrial bioleaching operations. Acidophiles are also being studied to understand life in extreme conditions and their role in the generation of biomarkers used in the search for evidence of existing or past extra-terrestrial life. Iron oxidation in acidophiles is best understood in the model organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, recent functional genomic analysis of acidophiles is leading to a deeper appreciation of the diversity of acidophilic iron-oxidizing pathways. Although it is too early to paint a detailed picture of the role played by lateral gene transfer in the evolution of iron oxidation, emerging evidence tends to support the view that iron oxidation arose independently more than once in evolution. Acidic environments are generally rich in soluble iron and extreme acidophiles (e.g. the Leptospirillum genus) have considerably fewer iron uptake systems compared with neutrophiles. However, some acidophiles have been shown to grow as high as pH 6 and, in the case of the Acidithiobacillus genus, to have multiple iron uptake systems. This could be an adaption allowing them to respond to different iron concentrations via the use of a multiplicity of different siderophores. Both Leptospirillum spp. and Acidithiobacillus spp. are predicted to synthesize the acid stable citrate siderophore for Fe(III) uptake. In addition, both groups have predicted receptors for siderophores produced by other microorganisms, suggesting that competition for iron occurs influencing the ecophysiology of acidic environments. Little is known about the genetic regulation of iron oxidation and iron uptake in acidophiles, especially how the use of iron as an energy source is balanced with its need to take up

  3. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  5. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–. Langalata iron ore ...... sure to sea water. Uranium in these samples varies ..... Ce oxidation and removal (Elderfield and Greaves. 1982; De Baar et ...

  6. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, T

    2018-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy with a hypochromic microcytic anaemia, refractory to oral iron treatment. After exclusion of dietary and gastrointestinal causes of iron deficiency, a genetic cause for iron deficiency was confirmed by finding two mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, consistent with a diagnosis of iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA).

  7. Iron deficiency in chronic systolic heart failure(indic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic systolic heart failure (HF is characterized by the left ventricular dysfunction, exercise intolerance and is associated with neurohormonal activation that affects several organs such as kidney and skeletal muscle. Anemia is common in HF and may worsen symptoms. Iron deficiency (ID is also common in HF patients with or without anemia. Iron is the key cofactor in oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle and the Krebs cycle. There is a paucity of data regarding iron metabolism in chronic systolic HF in India. Methods: IroN Deficiency In CHF study (INDIC is an observational study that investigated forty chronic heart failure patients for the presence of ID. Serum ferritin (micrograms per liter, serum iron (micrograms per liter, total iron binding capacity (micrograms per liter, transferring (milligrams per deciliter, and transferrin saturation were measured to assess iron status. Results: There were 67.5% (27/40 patients who had ID with a mean serum ferritin level of 76.4 μg/L. Of the 27 iron deficient patients, 22 (55% had an absolute ID, and 5 had a functional ID. Eight out of 27 of the iron deficient patients were anemic (20% of the total cohort, 30% of the iron deficient patients. Anemia was seen in 6 other patients, which was possibly anemia of chronic disease. There was a trend for more advanced New York Heart Association (NYHA class (NYHA III and NYHA IV patients with ID (37.4% vs. 30.77%, P = 0.697. Conclusion: In our study, ID was very common, affecting more than half of the patients with systolic HF. Absolute ID was the most common cause of ID and patients with ID had a tendency to have advanced NYHA class. Our study also demonstrated that ID can occur in the absence of anemia (iron depletion.

  8. Update on the use of deferasirox in the management of iron overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Ali Taher,1 Maria Domenica Cappellini21American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Universitá di Milano, Policlinico Foundation IRCCS, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Regular blood transfusions as supportive care for patients with chronic anemia inevitably lead to iron overload as humans cannot actively remove excess iron. The cumulative effects of iron overload cause significant morbidity and mortality if not effectively treated with chelation therapy. Based on a comprehensive clinical development program, the once-daily, oral iron chelator deferasirox (Exjade® is approved for the treatment of transfusional iron overload in adult and pediatric patients with various transfusion-dependent anemias, including β-thalassemia and the myelodysplastic syndromes. Deferasirox dose should be titrated for each individual patient based on transfusional iron intake, current iron burden and whether the goal is to decrease or maintain body iron levels. Doses of >30 mg/kg/day have been shown to be effective with a safety profile consistent with that observed at doses <30 mg/kg/day. Recent data have highlighted the ability of deferasirox to decrease cardiac iron levels and to prevent the accumulation of iron in the heart. The long-term efficacy and safety of deferasirox for up to 5 years of treatment have now been established. The availability of this effective and generally well tolerated oral therapy represents a significant advance in the management of transfusional iron overload. Keywords: deferasirox, Exjade, oral, iron chelation, iron overload, cardiac iron 

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia in pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, C; Honegger, C; Hösli, I; Surbek, D

    2017-12-01

    Iron deficiency occurs frequently in pregnancy and can be diagnosed by serum ferritin-level measurement (threshold value iron-deficiency anemia is recommended in every pregnant women, and should be done by serum ferritin-level screening in the first trimester and regular hemoglobin checks at least once per trimester. In the case of iron deficiency with or without anaemia in pregnancy, oral iron therapy should be given as first-line treatment. In the case of severe iron-deficiency anemia, intolerance of oral iron, lack of response to oral iron, or in the case of a clinical need for rapid and efficient treatment of anaemia (e.g., advanced pregnancy), intravenous iron therapy should be administered. In the postpartum period, oral iron therapy should be administered for mild iron-deficiency anemia (haemorrhagic anemia), and intravenous iron therapy for moderately severe-to-severe anemia (Hb iron therapy in pregnancy or postpartum, iron-containing drugs which have been studied in well-controlled clinical trials in pregnancy and postpartum such as ferric carboxymaltose must be preferred for safety reasons. While anaphylactic reactions are extremely are with non-dextrane products, close surveillance during administration is recommended for all intravenous iron products.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your ... very young red blood cells. Peripheral smear to see if your red blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is the most common treatment ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect ... in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored Cardiovascular Health Study ...

  20. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those ... environments Children who have lead in ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  9. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  15. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... age, sex, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ...

  19. Iron Homeostasis in Peripheral Nervous System, Still a Black Box?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveggia, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Iron is the most abundant transition metal in biology and an essential cofactor for many cellular enzymes. Iron homeostasis impairment is also a component of peripheral neuropathies. Recent Advances: During the past years, much effort has been paid to understand the molecular mechanism involved in maintaining systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. This has been stimulated by the evidence that iron dyshomeostasis is an initial cause of several disorders, including genetic and sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Critical Issues: However, very little has been done to investigate the physiological role of iron in peripheral nervous system (PNS), despite the development of suitable cellular and animal models. Future Directions: To stimulate research on iron metabolism and peripheral neuropathy, we provide a summary of the knowledge on iron homeostasis in the PNS, on its transport across the blood–nerve barrier, its involvement in myelination, and we identify unresolved questions. Furthermore, we comment on the role of iron in iron-related disorder with peripheral component, in demyelinating and metabolic peripheral neuropathies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 634–648. PMID:24409826

  20. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  1. Advances in Gammalloy Materials-Processes-Application Technology: Successes, Dilemmas, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Won; Kim, Sang-Lan

    2018-04-01

    For the last several years, gamma titanium aluminide ( γ-TiAl)-based alloys, called "gammalloys," in specific alloy-microstructure forms began to be implemented in civil aero-engines as cast or wrought low-pressure turbine (LPT) blades and in select ground vehicle engines as cast turbocharger rotors and wrought exhaust valves. Their operation temperatures are approximately up to 750°C for LPT blades and around 1000°C for turbocharger rotors. This article critically assesses current engineering gammalloys and their limitations and introduces eight strengthening pathways that can be adopted immediately for the development of advanced, higher temperature gammalloys. Intelligent integration of the pathways into the emerging application-specific research and development processes is emphasized as the key to the advancement of the gammalloy technology to the next higher engineering performance levels.

  2. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Resistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report No. Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-01-01

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  3. Role of glutaredoxin 3 in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential mineral nutrient that is tightly regulated through mechanisms involving iron regulatory genes, intracellular storage, and iron recycling. Dysregulation of these mechanisms often results in either excess tissue iron accumulation (overload) or iron deficiency (anemia). Many bioche...

  4. Liver Iron Contents in Rats after Administration of Certain Iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of certain iron compounds on liver iron deposition was ... extra iron probably depends on the type of food prepared, .... main groups. Each main group consisted of 4 subgroups. (8 rats per subgroup) which received the same basic diet but differing amounts of iron of a specific type. Each animal was ...

  5. The iron pnictide superconductors an introduction and overview

    CERN Document Server

    Citro, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    This book covers different aspects of the physics of iron-based superconductors ranging from the theoretical, the numerical and computational, to the experimental ones. It starts from the basic theory modeling many-body physics in Fe-superconductors and other multi-orbital materials and drreaches up to the magnetic and Cooper pair fluctuations and nematic order. Finally, it offers a comprehensive overview of the most recent advancements in the experimental investigations of iron based superconductors. .

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health [NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact ... Email Alerts Receive automatic alerts about NHLBI related news and highlights from ...

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    Full Text Available ... may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during ... concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common symptom. This can make it hard to ...

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness ... If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Your ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... age, sex, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. ... need 8 mg. Pregnant women need 27 mg. Breastfeeding girls under age 18 need 10 mg while ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam Your doctor may ask about your medical history ... has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... person’s body to make too much of a hormone called hepcidin. Hepcidin blocks the intestine from taking ... is inflammation, your liver makes more of a hormone called hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron- ... donate blood frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

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    Full Text Available ... common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People ... make it hard to find the energy to do normal activities. Headache Irregular heartbeat. This is a ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron supplements ... warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell your doctor if you have any new ...

  14. Banded Iron Formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R; Konhauser, Kurt O; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Sedimentary deposits of alternating iron-rich (20–40% Fe) and iron-poor, siliceous (40–50% SiO2) mineral layers that primarily precipitated throughout much of the late Archean (2.7–2.5 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.5– 1.8 Ga), but then remerged in the Neoproterozoic (0.8 Ga).......Sedimentary deposits of alternating iron-rich (20–40% Fe) and iron-poor, siliceous (40–50% SiO2) mineral layers that primarily precipitated throughout much of the late Archean (2.7–2.5 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.5– 1.8 Ga), but then remerged in the Neoproterozoic (0.8 Ga)....

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

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    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ...

  1. Ocean iron fertilization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    In 2009 and 2010, an Indo-German scientific expedition dusted the ocean with iron to stimulate the biological pump that captures atmosphereic carbon dioxide. Two onboard scientists tell the story of this controversial project. Besides raising...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... doctor may recommend that you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and ...

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    Full Text Available ... duodenum, the first part of the small intestine just beyond the stomach. Even if you have enough ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials to improve health, and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to ... common symptom. This can make it hard to find the energy to do normal activities. Headache Irregular ...

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

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    Full Text Available ... Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and Working at the NHLBI Contact and ... to improve health, and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms. More severe iron-deficiency anemia may cause fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. ... in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common symptom. ...

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder that affects the blood’s ability to clot. This makes it ... could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you experience heavy periods. During pregnancy, after delivery, or when breastfeeding you may be consuming less ... store iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help ... has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues to translate current research into improved health for people with iron- ...

  2. Structural and functional intermetallics - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varin, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This overview presents the current status of the research and development of both structural and functional intermetallics. On the one hand, the discussion is focused on commercialization and existing industrial applications of intermetallics. Within this frame the applications of titanium aluminides (TiAl) for turbocharger rotors and exhaust valves in automotive industry are being discussed. Advances in the applications of TiAl alloys for the next generation of turbine blades in aerospace/aircraft segment are also presented. The entire spectrum of nickel and iron aluminide alloys developed commercially by the Oak Ridge national Laboratory (USA) and the examples of their application in various segments of industry are thoroughly discussed. Some inroads made in the application of directionally solidified (DS) multiphase niobium silicides (Nb 3 Si+Nb 5 Si 3 ) in situ intermetallic composites with the goal of pushing the service temperature envelope of turbine blades to ∼ 1200-1300 o C are also discussed. On the other hand, various topics in basic or curiosity driven research of titanium aluminides and trialuminides, iron aluminides and high temperature structural silicides are discussed. Some very recent findings on the improvements in fracture toughness and strength of titanium trialuminides and magnetic behaviour of unconventionally cold - worked iron aluminides are highlighted. The topic of functional intermetallics is limited to the systems must suitable for hydrogen storage applications. A perspective on the directions of future research and development of intermetallics is also provided. (author)

  3. Iron and Prochlorococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    including: acid -cleaned filters, filters rinsed with un-amended trace-metal clean seawater, and filters rinsed with the oxalate solution followed by...greatly influenced by the sources of iron to the marine environment, which include riverine input, hydrothermal upwelling, and atmospheric...deposition (Jickells et al, 2005). While the amount of iron introduced to the oceans from riverine and hydrothermal sources is high, precipitation occurs

  4. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  5. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...... anemia....

  6. Control of the flame front advance in a sintering bed of iron ores; Control del avance del frente de llama en el lecho de sinterizacion de minerales de hierro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cores, A.; Mochon, J.; Ruiz-Bustinza, I.; Parra, R.

    2010-07-01

    A sintering pan of 40 cm cubed is loaded with a mixture of iron ores, limestone and coke weighing 110 kg in a sintering pilot plant. In this sintering pan, a series of thermocouples have been introduced at different depths. Tests have been carried out to study the width of the combustion zone and the maximum temperature of the flame front across the sintering bed. For the analysis of the results, a data acquisition system was used. This consisted of two modules connected in serie, for performing the analogue-digital conversion. The analogue entry point is the exit point of the thermocouples and the digital exit point was the temperature average. A computer was used for conserving and storing the data and for carrying out interpolations, simulating the state and evolution of the flame front across the bed. (Author) 21 refs.

  7. Screening for iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy: a structured review and gap analysis against UK national screening criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukuni, Ruramayi; Knight, Marian; Murphy, Michael F; Roberts, David; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-10-20

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a common problem in pregnancy despite national recommendations and guidelines for treatment. The aim of this study was to appraise the evidence against the UK National Screening Committee (UKNSC) criteria as to whether a national screening programme could reduce the prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia and/or iron deficiency in pregnancy and improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Search strategies were developed for the Cochrane library, Medline and Embase to identify evidence relevant to UK National Screening Committee (UKNSC) appraisal criteria which cover the natural history of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia, the tests for screening, clinical management and evidence of cost effectiveness. Many studies evaluated haematological outcomes of anaemia, but few analysed clinical consequences. Haemoglobin and ferritin appeared the most suitable screening tests, although future options may follow recent advances in understanding iron homeostasis. The clinical consequences of iron deficiency without anaemia are unknown. Oral and intravenous iron are effective in improving haemoglobin and iron parameters. There have been no trials or economic evaluations of a national screening programme for iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy. Iron deficiency in pregnancy remains an important problem although effective tests and treatment exist. A national screening programme could be of value for early detection and intervention. However, high quality studies are required to confirm whether this would reduce maternal and infant morbidity and be cost effective.

  8. The influence of extracellular superoxide on iron redox chemistry and bioavailability to aquatic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eRose

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide, the one-electron reduced form of dioxygen, is produced in the extracellular milieu of aquatic microbes through a range of abiotic chemical processes and also by microbes themselves. Due to its ability to promote both oxidative and reductive reactions, superoxide may have a profound impact on the redox state of iron, potentially influencing iron solubility, complex speciation and bioavailability. The interplay between iron, superoxide and oxygen may also produce a cascade of other highly reactive transients in oxygenated natural waters. For microbes, the overall effect of reactions between superoxide and iron may be deleterious or beneficial, depending on the organism and its chemical environment. Here I critically discuss recent advances in understanding: (i sources of extracellular superoxide in natural waters, with a particular emphasis on microbial generation; (ii the chemistry of reactions between superoxide and iron; and (iii the influence of these processes on iron bioavailability and microbial iron nutrition.

  9. An iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopic study of titania-supported iron- and iron-iridium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Jobson, S.

    1992-01-01

    57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy shows that titania-supported iron is reduced by treatment in hydrogen at significantly lower temperatures than corresponding silica- and alumina-supported catalysts. The metallic iron formed under hydrogen at 600deg C is partially converted to carbide by treatment in carbon monoxide and hydrogen. In contrast to its alumina- and silica-supported counterparts, the remainder of the titania-supported iron is unchanged by this gaseous mixture. The 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra of EXAFS show that iron and iridium in the titania-supported iron-iridium catalysts are reduced in hydrogen at even lower temperatures and, after treatment at 600deg C, are predominantly present as the iron-iridium alloy. The treatment of these reduced catalysts in carbon monoxide and hydrogen is shown by Moessbauer spectroscopy and EXAFS to induce the segregation of iron from the iron-iridium alloy and its conversion to iron oxide. (orig.)

  10. Misregulation of iron homeostasis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gajowiak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for all mammalian cells, but it is toxic in excess. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms ensuring iron homeostasis at both cellular and systemic levels has dramatically increased over the past 15 years. However, despite major advances in this field, homeostatic regulation of iron in the central nervous system (CNS requires elucidation. It is unclear how iron moves in the CNS and how its transfer to the CNS across the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, which separate the CNS from the systemic circulation, is regulated. Increasing evidence indicates the role of iron dysregulation in neuronal cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective cortical czynand spinal motor neuron dysfunction that results from a complex interplay among various pathogenic factors including oxidative stress. The latter is known to strongly affect cellular iron balance, creating a vicious circle to exacerbate oxidative injury. The role of iron in the pathogenesis of ALS is confirmed by therapeutic effects of iron chelation in ALS mouse models. These models are of great importance for deciphering molecular mechanisms of iron accumulation in neurons. Most of them consist of transgenic rodents overexpressing the mutated human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene. Mutations in the SOD1 gene constituteone of the most common genetic causes of the inherited form of ALS. However, it should beconsidered that overexpression of the SOD1 gene usually leads to increased SOD1 enzymaticactivity, a condition which does not occur in human pathology and which may itself changethe expression of iron metabolism genes.

  11. Environmental transformations and ecological effects of iron-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Cheng; Sun, Yuqing; Tsang, Daniel C W; Lin, Daohui

    2018-01-01

    The increasing application of iron-based nanoparticles (NPs), especially high concentrations of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI), has raised concerns regarding their environmental behavior and potential ecological effects. In the environment, iron-based NPs undergo physical, chemical, and/or biological transformations as influenced by environmental factors such as pH, ions, dissolved oxygen, natural organic matter (NOM), and biotas. This review presents recent research advances on environmental transformations of iron-based NPs, and articulates their relationships with the observed toxicities. The type and extent of physical, chemical, and biological transformations, including aggregation, oxidation, and bio-reduction, depend on the properties of NPs and the receiving environment. Toxicities of iron-based NPs to bacteria, algae, fish, and plants are increasingly observed, which are evaluated with a particular focus on the underlying mechanisms. The toxicity of iron-based NPs is a function of their properties, tolerance of test organisms, and environmental conditions. Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species is considered as the primary toxic mechanism of iron-based NPs. Factors influencing the toxicity of iron-based NPs are addressed and environmental transformations play a significant role, for example, surface oxidation or coating by NOM generally lowers the toxicity of nZVI. Research gaps and future directions are suggested with an aim to boost concerted research efforts on environmental transformations and toxicity of iron-based NPs, e.g., toxicity studies of transformed NPs in field, expansion of toxicity endpoints, and roles of laden contaminants and surface coating. This review will enhance our understanding of potential risks of iron-based NPs and proper uses of environmentally benign NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dietary iron intake, iron status, and gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cuilin; Rawal, Shristi

    2017-12-01

    Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to iron deficiency and related adverse pregnancy outcomes and, as such, are routinely recommended for iron supplementation. Emerging evidence from both animal and population-based studies, however, has raised potential concerns because significant associations have been observed between greater iron stores and disturbances in glucose metabolism, including increased risk of type 2 diabetes among nonpregnant individuals. Yet, the evidence is uncertain regarding the role of iron in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy complication which has short-term and long-term adverse health ramifications for both women and their children. In this review, we critically and systematically evaluate available data examining the risk of GDM associated with dietary iron, iron supplementation, and iron status as measured by blood concentrations of several indicators. We also discuss major methodologic concerns regarding the available epidemiologic studies on iron and GDM. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  14. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  15. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  16. Absorption of medicamental iron and iron from food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reizenstein, P.; Carlmark, B.; Ehn, L.; Forsberg, K.; Hoeglund, S.; Terpstra, T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are reviewed for the measurement of iron absorption. The chemical balance method has been almost entirely supplanted by radioisotope methods, which include notably whole-body counting and measurement of incorporation of radioiron into red cells. A survey is also given of the various conditions that influence iron absorption, including chemical form of iron, amount of iron, accompanying diet. Absorption tests must be conducted under relevant conditions. (author)

  17. Monitoring of Non-Linear Ground Movement in an Open Pit Iron Mine Based on an Integration of Advanced DInSAR Techniques Using TerraSAR-X Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Claudio Mura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an investigation to determine ground deformation based on an integration of DInSAR Time-Series (DTS and Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI techniques aiming at detecting high rates of linear and non-linear ground movement. The combined techniques were applied in an open pit iron mine located in Carajás Mineral Province (Brazilian Amazon region, using a set of 33 TerraSAR-X-1 images acquired from March 2012 to April 2013 when, due to a different deformation behavior during the dry and wet seasons in the Amazon region, a non-linear deformation was detected. The DTS analysis was performed on a stack of multi-look unwrapped interferograms using an extension of the SVD (Singular Value Decomposition, where a set of additional weighted constraints on the acceleration of the displacement was incorporated to control the smoothness of the time-series solutions, whose objective was to correct the atmospheric phase artifacts. The height errors and the deformation history provided by the DTS technique were used as previous information to perform the PSI analysis. This procedure improved the capability of the PSI technique to detect non-linear movement as well as to increase the numbers of point density of the final results. The results of the combined techniques are presented and compared with total station/prisms and ground-based radar (GBR measurements.

  18. The effect of location on the microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium aluminides produced by additive layer manufacturing using in-situ alloying and gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yan; Cuiuri, Dominic; Hoye, Nicholas; Li, Huijun; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au

    2015-04-17

    An innovative and low cost additive layer manufacturing (ALM) process is used to produce γ-TiAl based alloy wall components. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) provides the heat source for this new approach, combined with in-situ alloying through separate feeding of commercially pure Ti and Al wires into the weld pool. This paper investigates the morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the additively manufactured TiAl material, and how these are affected by the location within the manufactured component. The typical additively layer manufactured morphology exhibits epitaxial growth of columnar grains and several layer bands. The fabricated γ-TiAl based alloy consists of comparatively large α{sub 2} grains in the near-substrate region, fully lamellar colonies with various sizes and interdendritic γ structure in the intermediate layer bands, followed by fine dendrites and interdendritic γ phases in the top region. Microhardness measurements and tensile testing results indicated relatively homogeneous mechanical characteristics throughout the deposited material. The exception to this homogeneity occurs in the near-substrate region immediately adjacent to the pure Ti substrate used in these experiments, where the alloying process is not as well controlled as in the higher regions. The tensile properties are also different for the vertical (build) direction and horizontal (travel) direction because of the differing microstructure in each direction. The microstructure variation and strengthening mechanisms resulting from the new manufacturing approach are analysed in detail. The results demonstrate the potential to produce full density titanium aluminide components directly using the new additive layer manufacturing method.

  19. The effect of location on the microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium aluminides produced by additive layer manufacturing using in-situ alloying and gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yan; Cuiuri, Dominic; Hoye, Nicholas; Li, Huijun; Pan, Zengxi

    2015-01-01

    An innovative and low cost additive layer manufacturing (ALM) process is used to produce γ-TiAl based alloy wall components. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) provides the heat source for this new approach, combined with in-situ alloying through separate feeding of commercially pure Ti and Al wires into the weld pool. This paper investigates the morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the additively manufactured TiAl material, and how these are affected by the location within the manufactured component. The typical additively layer manufactured morphology exhibits epitaxial growth of columnar grains and several layer bands. The fabricated γ-TiAl based alloy consists of comparatively large α 2 grains in the near-substrate region, fully lamellar colonies with various sizes and interdendritic γ structure in the intermediate layer bands, followed by fine dendrites and interdendritic γ phases in the top region. Microhardness measurements and tensile testing results indicated relatively homogeneous mechanical characteristics throughout the deposited material. The exception to this homogeneity occurs in the near-substrate region immediately adjacent to the pure Ti substrate used in these experiments, where the alloying process is not as well controlled as in the higher regions. The tensile properties are also different for the vertical (build) direction and horizontal (travel) direction because of the differing microstructure in each direction. The microstructure variation and strengthening mechanisms resulting from the new manufacturing approach are analysed in detail. The results demonstrate the potential to produce full density titanium aluminide components directly using the new additive layer manufacturing method

  20. Changes in serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iron is a vital constituent of cells but in excess may be harmful and is associated with a raised risk for some malignant diseases including breast cancer. We aimed to study changes in iron profile in Sudanese females newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: A case- control study in which serum iron, Total ...