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Sample records for ionising radiation induced

  1. Diseases induced by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    An interim report is presented by the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council in accordance with Section 141 of the Social Security Act 1975 on the question whether the terms of prescription for occupational diseases induced by ionising radiation should be amended to cover a wider range of conditions. A lack of persuasive statistical data has prevented reliable estimates of health risks of radiation workers in the UK to be made. However the report gives details of the progress made so far and the difficulties encountered. (U.K.)

  2. Ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The law covering ionising radiation in Luxembourg is summarised under the headings: introduction (the outline law of 25 March 1963, and the Grand-Ducal Decree of 8 February 1967); the control of establishments (the authorisation procedure; emergency measures, suspension and withdrawal of the authorisation; alterations to the establishment); the importation, distribution and transit of radioactive substances; the transport of radioactive substances; the protection and safety of the population as a whole; sanctions; international conventions. (U.K.)

  3. Ionising radiation. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A brief tutorial on the health effects of ionising radiation is presented. The distinction between somatic and genetic health effects is explained. The two types of somatic health effects, i.e., acute and chronic effects, are discussed, as well as the concepts of ''deterministic'' and ''stochastic'' (also called ''probabilistic'') health effects. The possibility of cancer caused by DNA damage is discussed. The document ends with the definition of some key radiation terms

  4. Generator for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovsky, V.F.; Panasjuk, V.S.; Stepanov, B.M.; Ovcharov, A.M.; Akimov, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    The generator for ionising radiation wherein a transmitter for ionising radiation contains a resonance transformer wherein the field coil is composed of a low voltage outside portion and a transformer coil, electrically connected with an electrically conducting housing of the resonance transformer, and an acclerating tube wherein the high voltage electrode is coupled with the high voltage end of the transformer coil of the resonance transformer and fixed to one of the ends of the tubular insulator of the accelerator tube, wherein the low voltage electrode is electrically connected with the housing of the resonance transformer and a source of charged particles is introduced into the evacuated inner space of the acceleration tube and electrically connected with one of the electrodes thereof, is described. (G.C.)

  5. Adaptive response to ionising radiation induced by cadmium in zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, V W Y; Ng, C Y P; Kong, M K Y; Yu, K N; Cheng, S H

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive response is a biological response where the exposure of cells or animals to a low priming exposure induces mechanisms that protect the cells or animals against the detrimental effects of a subsequent larger challenging exposure. In realistic environmental situations, living organisms can be exposed to a mixture of stressors, and the resultant effects due to such exposures are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work we demonstrated, via quantification of apoptosis in the embryos, that embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (cadmium in micromolar concentrations) could undergo an adaptive response against a subsequent challenging exposure provided by another environmental stressor (alpha particles). We concluded that zebrafish embryos treated with 1 to 10 μM Cd at 5 h postfertilisation (hpf) for both 1 and 5 h could undergo an adaptive response against subsequent ∼4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation at 10 hpf, which could be interpreted as an antagonistic multiple stressor effect between Cd and ionising radiation. The zebrafish has become a popular vertebrate model for studying the in vivo response to ionising radiation. As such, our results suggested that multiple stressor effects should be carefully considered for human radiation risk assessment since the risk may be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal. (paper)

  6. Genetic effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.

    1981-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of ionising radiation on germ cells with resulting genetic abnormalities in subsequent generations, are considered. Having examined a simple model to explain the interaction of ionising radiation with genetic material and discussed its limitations, the methods whereby mutations are transmitted are discussed. Methods of estimating genetic risks and the results of such studies are examined. (U.K.)

  7. Working safely with ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A small leaflet provides information on working safely with ionizing radiation. Topics covered include the types of radiation, radiological units, external radiation, contamination and internal radiation, methods of protection form radiation, radiation monitors, protective clothing for contamination, personal dosemeters, radiation dose limits for classified workers and finally the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985. (UK)

  8. Use of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    The Committee has inquired into and reported on the use of ionising radiation for commercial sterilisation, disinfestation, food preservation and other purposes with particular reference to human health and safety; environmental impacts, and adequacy of assessment and regulatory procedures. While food irradiation is apparently commercially successful overseas the application to Australia seems extremely limited - it would be used primarily for disinfestation of insect pests and perhaps to reduce levels of harmful bacteria in a limited range of foods. For other applications there are effective and more economic alternatives. The report reviews other studies of food irradiation and the policies and practices governing its use in other countries. The safety of irradiated food, the radiological safety issues and the regulations which would be required in Australia are dealt with in detail. The Committee recommends, inter alia, that the Australian Government should not approve the irradiation of food in Australia until such time as a routine commercial method of detection has been developed and that the import of caesium 137 for use as an irradiation source in commercial irradiation facilities be prohibited

  9. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Acien, Maribel; Paya, Pilar; Giulotto, Elena; Egozcue, Josep; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia, Montserrat

    2006-01-01

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs

  10. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Acien, Maribel [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Paya, Pilar [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Giulotto, Elena [Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia Adriano Buzzati Traverso, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Egozcue, Josep [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Montserrat [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain) and Departament de Biologia Cellular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2006-03-20

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs.

  11. Advisory group on ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Advisory Group on Ionising Radiation has a busy and challenging work programme. Its reports will be published in the Documents of the NRPB series. These may advise further research or could form the basis of formal NRPB advice. Covering the full spectrum of radiation issues at work, in public health and clinical medicine, and the environment, it should enhance the radiation advice available to NRPB. (author)

  12. Dose limits for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, D.

    1989-01-01

    Dose limits for exposure to ionising radiation are assessed to see if they give sufficient protection both for the occupationally exposed and for the general public. It is concluded that current limits give a level of safety that satisfies the necessary criteria in the light of present knowledge and further reductions would be unlikely to improve standards of safety. (author)

  13. Molecular alterations in thyroid tumors induced after exposure to ionising radiation in infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bounacer, A.; Wicker, R.; Sarasin, A.; Suarez, H.G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Schlumberger, M.; Caillou, B. [Institut de Recherches sur le Cancer, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1997-03-01

    We investigated the presence of molecular lesions in the ras, gsp and ret genes, in epithelial thyroid tumors developed in patients who had received ionising radiation therapy in infancy for benign or malignant conditions. Our data showed: a similar frequency of ras and gsp activating mutations in radiation-associated and `spontaneous` tumors. However, while the mutations are only transversions in the radiation-associated tumors, they are transversions as well as transitions in the `spontaneous` ones and a mutation in codon 691 giving rise to a polymorphism in the ret gene, and frequently associated to a C-cell hyperplasia in radiation-associated tumors. The frequency of this mutation was significantly higher (60%) in these tumors, than in normal controls (21%) or `spontaneous` epithelial thyroid tumors (23%). (author)

  14. Molecular alterations in thyroid tumors induced after exposure to ionising radiation in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounacer, A.; Wicker, R.; Sarasin, A.; Suarez, H.G.; Schlumberger, M.; Caillou, B.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the presence of molecular lesions in the ras, gsp and ret genes, in epithelial thyroid tumors developed in patients who had received ionising radiation therapy in infancy for benign or malignant conditions. Our data showed: a similar frequency of ras and gsp activating mutations in radiation-associated and 'spontaneous' tumors. However, while the mutations are only transversions in the radiation-associated tumors, they are transversions as well as transitions in the 'spontaneous' ones and a mutation in codon 691 giving rise to a polymorphism in the ret gene, and frequently associated to a C-cell hyperplasia in radiation-associated tumors. The frequency of this mutation was significantly higher (60%) in these tumors, than in normal controls (21%) or 'spontaneous' epithelial thyroid tumors (23%). (author)

  15. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  16. Food preservation by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The process of food preservation by ionising radiation is an alternative, or a complement, to the traditional methods of heating, refrigerating, freezing or using chemical additives. The study and development of this technique has started on the beginning of the fifties but it is based on the radiation killing effect on micro-organisms discovered by the end of last century. Foodstuffs are treated in appropriate plants: isotopic facilities (gamma radiation) and accelerated electron beams produced by machines called accelerators. The FAO and WHO in close cooperation with the IAEA have played an important role on the development of the process and on the increment of the industrial application of food irradiation. Over the world there are about 37 countries trading foods treated by ionising radiation. However, governments have been slow to clear the utilization of this process. The main reason of this attitude is in general due to the fact that the advantages of the technique are not clearly understood. Therefore, the dissemination of the information could on one hand clarify who has to take decisions and on the other hand support the choice of those foods by the consumers. This is the unique way to dynamize the application of this process

  17. Antioxidant Protection in Blood against Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bognar, G.; Meszaros, G.; Koteles, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The quantities of the antioxidants in the human blood are important indicators of health status. The routine determinations of activities/capacities of antioxidant compounds would be of great importance in assessing individual sensitivities against oxidative effects. We have investigated the sensitivities of those antioxidant elements against various doses of ionising radiation tested by the RANDOX assays. Our results show dose-dependent decreases of antioxidant activities caused by the different doses. The total antioxidant status value linearly decreased up to 1 Gy, but further increase of dose (2 Gy) did not influence the respective values although the test system still indicated their presence. It means that the human blood retains 60-70% of its total antioxidant capacity. Radiation induced alterations of the antioxidant enzymes: glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase have been also investigated. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase decreased linearly upon the effects of various doses of ionising radiation till 1 Gy. Between 1 and 2 Gy only further mild decreases could be detected. In this case the human blood retained 40-60% of these two antioxidant enzymes. These observations suggest either the limited response of antioxidant system against ionising radiation, or the existence of protection system of various reactabilities. (author)

  18. Infrequent alterations of the P53 gene in rat skin cancers induced by ionising-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Y.; Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.; Hosselet, S.; New York Univ., NY

    1996-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis almost certainly involves multiple genetic alterations. Identification of such genetic alterations would provide information to help understand better the molecular mechanism or radiation carcinogenesis. The energy released by ionizing radiation has the potential to produce DNA strand breaks, major gene deletions or rearrangements, and other base damages. Alterations of the p53 gene, a common tumour suppressor gene altered in human cancers, were examined in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. Genomic DNA from a total of 33rat skin cancers induced by ionizing radiation was examined by Southern blot hybridization for abnormal restriction fragment patterns in the p53 gene. A abnormal p53 restriction pattern was found in one of 16 cancers induced by electron radiation and in one of nine cancers induced by neon ions. The genomic DNA from representative cancers, including the two with an abnormal restriction pattern was further examined by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene. The results showed that one restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-positive cancer induced by electron radiation had a partial gene deletion which was defined approximately between exons 2-8, while none of the other cancers showed sequence changes. Our results indicate that the alterations in the critical binding region of the p53 gene are infrequent in rat skin cancers induced by either electron or neon ion radiation. (Author)

  19. The study of some thiazinic and indaminic dye syntheses induced by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestic, S.

    1961-03-01

    With a view to finding some radiochemical reactions applicable on an industrial scale for evaluating the radioactive waste from nuclear reactors, a systematic study was made of the radiochemical synthesis of thiazinic dyes such as methylene blue and Lauths' violet, on which the first tests were carried out in 1954. The first part of the study concerned the identification and the dosage, during radiolysis, of dyes by means of their absorption spectra after separation from the reaction medium by adsorption chromatography or ion-exchange; other radiolysis products such as ammonium chloride and hydrogen peroxide were also identified. During a later stage by systematically varying the physico-chemical parameters it was possible to determine the most favourable conditions for radio-synthesis; the maximum radiochemical yields obtained had the following values: G (Lauths' violet) 1,65; G (Methylene blue) = 1,75. Furthermore, the study of the influence of variously substituted aminated products on the radiochemical yield showed the possibility of synthesising Bindsehedlers green and Wursters blue by radiochemical methods. Finally the discovery of a fundamental intermediate product, Wursters red, together with the kinetic study of the chemical synthesis of methylene blue made it possible to determine the main stages of the reaction mechanism and to decide which of these stages could be attributed to ionising radiations in the case of the radiochemical synthesis. (author) [fr

  20. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlong, Hayley; Mothersill, Carmel; Lyng, Fiona M.; Howe, Orla

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  1. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlong, Hayley, E-mail: hayley.furlong@dit.ie [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Nuclear Research Building, 1280 Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Lyng, Fiona M. [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Howe, Orla [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  2. Ionising radiation - physical and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holter, Oe.; Ingebretsen, F.; Parr, H.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of ionising radiation is briefly presented. The effects of ionising radiation on biological cells, cell repair and radiosensitivity are briefly treated, where after the effects on man and mammals are discussed and related to radiation doses. Dose limits are briefly discussed. The genetic effects are discussed separately. Radioecology is also briefly treated and a table of radionuclides deriving from reactors, and their radiation is given. (JIW)

  3. Health Service use of ionising radiations: Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This booklet gives outline guidance on the use of ionising radiations in the Health Service in the United Kingdom. Extensive reference is made to documents where more detailed information may be found. The guidance covers general advice on the medical use of ionising radiations, statutory requirements, and guidance on selected Health Service issues such as patient identification procedures, information management systems, deviations from prescribed radiation dose, imaging and radiotherapy. (57 references) (U.K.)

  4. Genetic effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.A.H.

    1991-12-01

    Ionizing radiation effects on the gem cells, which can result in genetic abnormalities, are described. The basic mechanisms of radiation interactions with chromosomes, or specifically DNA, which can result in radiation induced mutation are discussed. Methods of estimating genetic risks, and some values for quantitative risk estimates are given. (U.K.). 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. McColl (Neil); A. Auvinen (Anssi); A. Kesminiene (Ausrele); C. Espina (Carolina); F. Erdmann (Friederike); E. de Vries (Esther); R. Greinert (Rüdiger); J. Harrison (John); J. Schüz (Joachim)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIonising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other

  6. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteventi, F.; Sermenghi, I.

    1999-01-01

    The report describes all the facilities available at the the service of the ENEA Calibration Service for Ionising Radiations at Bologna (Italy). It gives a detailed description of all equipments qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters [it

  7. Impact assessment of ionising radiation in wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This R and D project was commissioned by the Environment Agency and English Nature in January 2001 to provide up-to-date information on ionising radiation impact to wildlife, upon which a robust assessment approach may be developed. The methodology will provide an interim approach, whilst awaiting the outcome of the European Commission funded project 'Framework for Assessment of Environmental Impact' (FASSET) due to end in October 2003. The aims of the report were: to summarise the latest research on the behaviour, transfer and impact of ionising radiation effects on wildlife; to outline and review relevant European Directives which have impacted on the requirements to assess the impact to wildlife from ionising radiation in the UK; to consider the role of regulatory bodies in assessing the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife with respect to England and Wales; to make recommendations on the relative biological effectiveness of different types of radiation with respect to wildlife; and to recommend an approach with which to assess the 'scale of risk' to wildlife from the effects of ionising radiation, with spreadsheets to support the methodology. The report describes the behaviour and transfer of radionuclides in a number of different ecosystem types. Particular emphasis is placed on those ecosystems most likely to be impacted by the authorised discharges of radioactivity within the UK. As there is no international consensus on the approach to be taken to assess the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife, some countries have adopted their own legislation. The report evaluates these regulatory frameworks and describe the current UK position

  8. Impact assessment of ionising radiation on wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copplestone, D.; Bielby, S.; Jones, S.

    2001-01-01

    This R and D project was commissioned by the Environment Agency and English Nature in January 2001 to provide up-to-date information on the impacts of ionising radiation on wildlife, upon which a robust assessment approach may be developed. This approach will also feed into the European Commission funded project 'Framework for Assessment of Environmental Impact' (FASSET), due to complete in October 2003. This report describes the behaviour and transport of radionuclides in the environment, considers the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife, and makes recommendations on an approach for the impact assessment of ionising radiation on wildlife for England and Wales. The assessment approach focuses on three ecosystems representative of those considered potentially most at risk from the impact of authorised radioactive discharges, namely a coastal grassland (terrestrial ecosystem); estuarine and freshwater ecosystems. The likely scale of the impact on wildlife is also assessed in light of a preliminary analysis based on this assessment approach. The aims of the report are: to summarise the latest research on the behaviour, transfer and impact of ionising radiation effects on wildlife; an outline and review of the relevant European and national legislation which has impacts on the requirements for assessments of the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife in the UK; to consider the role of regulatory bodies in assessing the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife with respect to England and Wales; to make recommendations on the relative biological effectiveness of different types of radiation with respect to wildlife; and to recommend an approach to assess the impacts to wildlife from ionising radiation from authorised discharges in England and Wales, with spreadsheets to support the methodology. The report demonstrates the behaviour and transfer of radionuclides in a number of different ecosystem types. Particular emphasis is placed on exposure pathways in those

  9. Medical response to effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, W.A.; Gittus, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on 'Medical Response to Effects of Ionising Radiation' in 1989 in the form of nineteen papers published as a book. Topics discussed include radiation accidents at nuclear facilities, the medical management of radiation casualties, the responsibilities, plans and resources for coping with a nuclear accident and finally the long term effects of radiation, including leukaemia epidemiology studies. All papers were selected and indexed separately. (UK)

  10. The study of some thiazinic and indaminic dye syntheses induced by ionising radiation; Etude de quelques syntheses de colorants thianziniques et indaminiques amorcees par les rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestic, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-03-15

    With a view to finding some radiochemical reactions applicable on an industrial scale for evaluating the radioactive waste from nuclear reactors, a systematic study was made of the radiochemical synthesis of thiazinic dyes such as methylene blue and Lauths' violet, on which the first tests were carried out in 1954. The first part of the study concerned the identification and the dosage, during radiolysis, of dyes by means of their absorption spectra after separation from the reaction medium by adsorption chromatography or ion-exchange; other radiolysis products such as ammonium chloride and hydrogen peroxide were also identified. During a later stage by systematically varying the physico-chemical parameters it was possible to determine the most favourable conditions for radio-synthesis; the maximum radiochemical yields obtained had the following values: G (Lauths' violet) 1,65; G (Methylene blue) = 1,75. Furthermore, the study of the influence of variously substituted aminated products on the radiochemical yield showed the possibility of synthesising Bindsehedlers green and Wursters blue by radiochemical methods. Finally the discovery of a fundamental intermediate product, Wursters red, together with the kinetic study of the chemical synthesis of methylene blue made it possible to determine the main stages of the reaction mechanism and to decide which of these stages could be attributed to ionising radiations in the case of the radiochemical synthesis. (author) [French] Dans le but de trouver des reactions radiochimiques susceptibles d'une application industrielle pour valoriser les dechets radioactifs provenant des reacteurs nucleaires, il a ete entrepris une etude systematique de la synthese radiochimique des colorants thiazimiques tels que le Bleu de Methylene et le Violet de Lauth dont les premiers essais ont ete effectues par Loiseleur en 1954. La premiere partie de l'etude a porte sur l'identification et le dosage des colorants formes au cours de la radiolyse

  11. Immunosuppression by non-ionising and ionising radiation - are there similarities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, V.

    2003-01-01

    Solar UV radiation, the ubiqitous environmental non-ionising radiation, initiates its immunomodulating effects almost entirely in the skin. In direct contrast, ionising radiation penetrates much more efficiently, and has a multitude of internal targets throughout the body. As a consequence, the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immunosuppression have been more readily characterised, whereas surprisingly little is known about immunosuppression resulting from ionising radiation. Photoimmunological studies in mice during the past 20-30 years have established the action spectrum for UV-induced immunosuppression, implicating the UVB waveband, 290-320 nm. Controversy rages over the immunosuppressive potential of the UVA waveband, 320-400 nm, but we demonstrate that environmentally relevant doses of UVA not only are immunologically innocuous, but provide protection against UVB-immunosuppression. Increasingly larger UVA exposures increasingly immunosuppress mice. The UVA immunoprotective effect is strongly dependent on the induction of a cutaneous redox-regulated enzyme, haem oxygenase (heat shock protein 32) that is known to protect cells from oxidative stress, and it is consistent that a number of exogenous antioxidants (vitamin E, vitamin C, green tea polyphenols, isoflavones) can protect effectively from photoimmuno-suppression. Thus the UV-immunosuppressed state is promoted by oxidative damage and depletion of endogenous antioxidant molecules. It is also associated with cutaneous cytokine derangements, such that Th-2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-10) are increased at the expense of Th-1 cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-12), and with histamine and inflammatory prostaglandin activity. In contrast, immunoprotective UVA irradiation protects the cutaneous cytokine array, inhibits IL-10 upregulation and increases IFN-gamma and IL-12 expression. On the other hand, while ionising radiation is known to cause immunosuppression, large doses target the bone marrow and haemopoiesis lethally and

  12. A Discussion about Ionising and Non-Ionising Radiation and the Critical Issue of Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation is one of the most important issues affecting peoples' lives today. The misunderstanding of students and the general population of the effects of electromagnetic radiation is a problem which must be eliminated. Thus, a discussion about ionising and non-ionising radiation focusing on the crucial issue of radiation emitted…

  13. Bystander effects and biota: implications of radiation-induced bystander effects for protection of the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, C.E.; Seymour, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    Bystander effects are now known to be induced by both high and low LET in a variety of cells in culture. They have been proven to occur in vivo in mice following 0.5Gy total body irradiation and in blood from humans being treated for cancer by radiotherapy. Effects have also been detected in fish, crustacea and molluscs. The important questions now are not whether bystander effects occur but why and what implications they have, if any, for radiation protection. Different species and different genetic backgrounds within a species produce different types of bystander effect, different organs also produce different effects. This paper will review the data in this field and will discuss likely implications for protection of man and non-human biota. In particular it will look at the potential long-term outcomes for different organisational levels, from cell to ecosystem, of bystander mechanisms. In view of new concerns about the effects of low level radiation on non-human biota, emphasis will be placed on considering how bystander effects might operate at chronic low doses versus acute accidental low doses. Problems of radiation interaction with chemicals, whether chemicals can also induce 'bystander effects' , and how regulators might handle these situations which occur all the time in real environments, will be presented for discussion. Finally the paper will discuss likely implications of these mechanisms for evolutionary biology

  14. Biological effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the proceedings of a conference organised jointly by Friends of the Earth (U.K.) and Greenpeace (International). The aim of the conference was to discuss the effects of low level radiation, particularly on man, within the terms of dose/risk relationships. The topics discussed included: sources of radiation, radiation discharges from nuclear establishments, predictive modelling of radiation hazards, radiation effects at Hiroshima, low dose effects and ICRP dose limits, variation in sensitivity to radiation, and the link between childhood cancer and nuclear power. (U.K.)

  15. Studies of ionising radiation induced bystander effects in 3D artificial tissue system and applications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, Oleg V.; Kuopio Univ.

    2008-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. The bystander effect cannot be comprehensively explained on the basis of a single cell reaction. It is well known that an organism is composed of different cell types that interact as functional units in a way to maintain normal tissue function. Therefore the radiation response is not simply the sum of cellular responses as assumed in classical radiobiology, predominantly from studies using cell cultures. Experimental models, which maintain tissue-like intercellular cell signalling and 3D structure, are essential for proper understanding of the bystander effect. Our work relates to experimentation with novel 3D artificial human tissue systems available from MatTek Corporation (Boston, USA). Air-liquid interface culture technique is used to grow artificial tissues, which allow to model conditions present in vivo. The Gray Cancer Institute (Northwood, UK) charged particle microbeam was used to irradiate tissue samples in a known pattern with a known number of 3 He 2+ particles or protons. After irradiation, the tissues models were incubated for 3 days, fixed in 10 % NBF, paraffin embedded and then sliced into 5 μm histological sections located at varying distances from the plane of the irradiated cells. We studied in situ apoptosis and markers of differentiation. Significantly elevated bystander induced apoptosis was observed with 3'-OH DNA end-labelling based technique in 3D artificial tissue systems. Our results also suggested an importance of proliferation and differentiation status for bystander

  16. Health effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Human and animal studies have shown an increased incidence of cancer and malformation due to radioactive materials and external radiation. The biological effects of radiation on tissues are the occurrence of morphological and functional changes in the body. The critical parts of the body are those tissues or organs which when irradiated, are likely to influence the health of the individual or its offspring. The probability of these changes depends on the radiation dose. There are two main types of damage due to radiation dose. Radiation Sickness with well-defined symptoms like cancer and inherited disorders which can appear after several years. A second type of damage, namely Acute Radiation Sickness results after exposure of the whole or parts of the body to high doses of radiation greater than 1 Gy. There are safety standards for the amount of dose equivalent that is taken as acceptable. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has given norms in which natural and medical causes were not included. These are given as recommended values (1966) and proposed values (2000), both in mSv/yr: population at large: 1.7 and 0.4; members of the public: 5 and 2; and radiologic workers: 50 and 20, respectively. Taking into account the increased number of reactor accidents, the question is how safe is our safety standards? Even when one is able to connect a quantitative risk with a radiation dose, there are three fundamental principles which we should obey in dealing with risks from radiation. These are: (1) Avoid any risk. (2) The risk should be related to the possible benefit. (3) Any dose below the politically agreed limits is acceptable

  17. Ionising radiation: a guide to the Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Donald.

    1986-01-01

    The author explains the basic requirements on health and safety personnel in relation to the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985. The outline paper is presented under the following headings: Dose assessment, Interpretation and general regulations 1-5, Dose limitation regulations 6 and 7, Regulation of work - regulations 8-12, Dosimetry and medical surveillance - regulations 13-17, summary of records to be kept, entry to controlled areas, Control of radioactive substances -regulations 18-23, Monitoring of radiation regulation 24, Assessments and notifications - regulations 25-31, Safety of articles and equipment - regulations 32-34, Other guidance. (U.K.)

  18. Additives in UV and ionising radiation grafting and curing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.; Ng, L.T.; Viengkhou, V.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Curing of polymers induced by both UV and ionising radiation are now established technologies. Currently both systems are predominantly based on acrylate chemistry. UV processes use photoinitiators to achieve fast polymerisation. In the proposed paper the significance of the occurrence of concurrent grafting with cure will be examined. particularly with respect to the recycling of finished product. Basic studies on grafting initiated by UV and ionising radiation will be discussed. Polar methyl methacrylate (MMA) and non-polar styrene will be used as representative monomers with cellulose and propylene typifying the backbone polymers. The additives chosen for examination in this study are predominantly components used in radiation curing formulations since grafting and curing are known to be mechanically related. The additives used were mineral acid, photoinitiators, vinyl ethers, oligomers, polyfunctional monomers including multifunctional acrylates (MFAs) and methacrylates (MFMAs). For the first time the use of charge transfer complexes in the Mulliken sense as additives in radiation grafting will be discussed. The CT complexes themselves, being monomers, have also been grafted to the above polymers. Recent developments with excimer laser sources for initiating these processes will be discussed, especially the use of non-acrylate chemistry. Excimer laser sources are shown to complement conventional UV and ionising radiation and are photoinitiator free. Mechanisms for the above grafting and curing processes will be outlined

  19. Ionising radiation and trans-generational instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrhovac, I.; Niksic, G.

    2007-01-01

    Indirect monitoring of the impact posed by ionising radiation to the genome instability of the descendants, consequent to the irradiation of one of their parents, boils down to the investigation of changes occurring exclusively in the mini-satellite loci of the cells constituting the gametal developmental line. The resultant mini-satellite mutations are expressed in their percentages, and equal to the ratio of the number of mutated alleles in that particular generation over the total number of alleles present. The impact of ionising radiation to the irradiated parent's offspring was first noticed on haematopoietic mouse stem-cells. Even though an irradiated cell of a female parent lacks any mutations whatsoever, daughter cells present with the increased mutation rates. The observed phenomenon of the so called trans-generational instability has been defined as the occurrence of mutations in the genome of individuals originating from the irradiated ancestors. Due to the aforementioned, one can conclude that these mutations need not be present in the irradiated parental cells, and do not necessarily vanish in the next few generations, but may result in the increase in mutation rates observed in the latter. The results of the investigations performed on the animal model, as well as of those carried out in human population, point to the occurrence of significant changes to be found on mini-satellite loci of the descending generation, while the mechanism underlying those changes hasn't been completely clarified yet, and, therefore, calls for the further investigation. (author)

  20. The work of the ILO in the field of protection of workers against ionising and non-ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppee, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    A chronological account since 1934 of the activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the protection of workers against risks due to ionising and non-ionising radiations is given. Several ILO publication on safety standards and codes of practice for protection against mainly ionising radiation in various occupational situations are indicated. A more intensive study by the ILO on the protection of workers against non-ionising radiation was proposed for 1980-81. (UK)

  1. Disposal regulations and techniques applicable to devices using ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    L'office de Protection contre les rayonnement ionisants, being a government body under the supervision of Ministry of Health and Labour, among other different missions controls the compliance of radiation protection laws with the aim to guarantee the safe operation of equipment using ionising radiation sources. These regulations concerning competence of personnel, especially in the field of medicine or application of ionising radiation on humans, are restricted only to medical doctors (or dentists in their domain) by technical constraints dealing with design of equipment and its exploitation. At the same time regulations define conditions of permanent control in order to verify compliance of radiation protection laws

  2. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  3. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  4. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of small doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, R.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainty remains about the quantitative effects of doses of ionising radiation less than 0.2 Sv. Estimates of hereditary effects, based on the atomic bomb survivors, suggest that the mutation doubling dose is about 2 Sv for acute low LET radiation, but the confidence limits are wide. The idea that paternal gonadal irradiation might explain the Seascale cluster of childhood leukaemia has been disproved. Fetal irradiation may lead to a reduction in IQ and an increase in seizures in childhood proportional to dose. Estimates that doses to a whole population cause a risk of cancer proportional to dose, with 0.1 Sv given acutely causing a risk of 1%, will need to be modified as more information is obtained, but the idea that there is a threshold for risk above this level is not supported by observations on the irradiated fetus or the effect of fallout. The idea, based on ecological observations, that small doses protect against the development of cancer is refuted by the effect of radon in houses. New observations on the atomic bomb survivors have raised afresh the possibility that small doses may also have other somatic effects. (author)

  6. Introducing Biological Microdosimetry for Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Schoellnberger, H.

    2000-01-01

    Microdosimetry is important for radiation protection, for understanding mechanisms of radiation action, and for radiation risk assessment. This article introduces a generic, Monte Carlo based approach to biological microdosimetry for ionising radiation. Our Monte Carlo analyses are carried out with a widely used Crystal Ball software. The approach to biological microdosimetry presented relates to quantal biological effects data (e.g. cell survival, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation) for which there is an initial linear segment to the dose-response curve. The macroscopic dose data considered were selected such that is could be presumed that the vast majority of cells at risk have radiation dose delivered to their critical target. For cell killing, neoplastic transformation, and mutagenesis, the critical biological target for radiation is presumed to be DNA. Our approach to biological microdosimetry does not require detailed information about the mass, volume, and shape of the critical biological target. Further, one does not have to know what formal distribution function applies to the microdose distribution. However, formal distributions are required for the biological data used to derive the non-parametric microdose distributions. Here, we use the binomial distribution to characterise the variability in the number of cells affected by a fixed macroscopic dose. Assuming this variability to arise from variability in the microscopic dose to the critical biological target, a non-parametric microdose distribution is generated by the standard Monte Carlo method. The non-parametric distribution is then fitted using a set of formal distributions (beta, exponential, extreme value, gamma, logistic, log-normal, normal, Pareto, triangular, uniform, and Weibull). The best fit is then evaluated based on statistical criteria (chi-square test). To demonstrate the application of biological microdosimetry, the standard Monte Carlo method is used with radiobiological data for

  7. Introducing Biological Microdosimetry for Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Schoellnberger, H

    2000-07-01

    Microdosimetry is important for radiation protection, for understanding mechanisms of radiation action, and for radiation risk assessment. This article introduces a generic, Monte Carlo based approach to biological microdosimetry for ionising radiation. Our Monte Carlo analyses are carried out with a widely used Crystal Ball software. The approach to biological microdosimetry presented relates to quantal biological effects data (e.g. cell survival, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation) for which there is an initial linear segment to the dose-response curve. The macroscopic dose data considered were selected such that is could be presumed that the vast majority of cells at risk have radiation dose delivered to their critical target. For cell killing, neoplastic transformation, and mutagenesis, the critical biological target for radiation is presumed to be DNA. Our approach to biological microdosimetry does not require detailed information about the mass, volume, and shape of the critical biological target. Further, one does not have to know what formal distribution function applies to the microdose distribution. However, formal distributions are required for the biological data used to derive the non-parametric microdose distributions. Here, we use the binomial distribution to characterise the variability in the number of cells affected by a fixed macroscopic dose. Assuming this variability to arise from variability in the microscopic dose to the critical biological target, a non-parametric microdose distribution is generated by the standard Monte Carlo method. The non-parametric distribution is then fitted using a set of formal distributions (beta, exponential, extreme value, gamma, logistic, log-normal, normal, Pareto, triangular, uniform, and Weibull). The best fit is then evaluated based on statistical criteria (chi-square test). To demonstrate the application of biological microdosimetry, the standard Monte Carlo method is used with radiobiological data for

  8. Health Services management. Health Service use of ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This circular consolidates and updates advice on the statutory and management responsibilities of Health Authorities in relation to the use of ionising radiations (including radioactive substances) on premises controlled by them and/or by persons employed by them (author)

  9. Working Group on Ionising Radiations. Report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The programme of work for 1987/88 by the Working Group on Ionising Radiation, Health and Safety Commision in February 1988, included the main topics of continuing interest and concern in relation to ionising radiations in general and the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR 85) (Ref 1) in particular. These were: emergency dose limitation, occupational dose limitation, practical experience of the principle of keeping doses as low as reasonably practicable, experience of the regulatory requirements in respect of internal dosimetry and the need for a standing advisory committee on ionising radiations. Calibration of radiotherapy equipment was also considered as a matter of principle following a specific incident involving cancer patients. This report of progress during the first year summarises the Group's opinions on each topic and gives recommendations. (author)

  10. Tumour induction by small doses of ionised radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putten, L.M. van

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionised radiation on tumour induction in animals is discussed. It is hypothesised that high doses of radiation can strongly advance tumour induction from the combination of a stimulated cell growth, as a reaction to massive cell killing, and damage to DNA in the cell nuclei. This effect has a limit below which the radiation dose causes a non-significant amount of dead cells. However in animals where through other reasons, a chronic growth stimulation already exists, only one effect, the damage of DNA, is necessary to induce tumours. A linear dose effect without a threshold level applies in these cases. Applying this hypothesis to man indicates that calculating low dose effects by linear extrapolation of high dose effects is nothing more than a reasonable approximation. (C.F.)

  11. Functional characterisation of an Arabidopsis gene strongly induced by ionising radiation: the gene coding the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (AthPARP-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet-Chabeaud, G.

    2000-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana, the model-system in plant genetics, has been used to study the responses to DNA damage, experimentally introduced by γ-irradiation. We have characterised a radiation-induced gene coding a 111 kDa protein, AthPARP-1, homologous to the human poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (hPARP-1). As hPARP-1 is composed by three functional domain with characteristic motifs, AthPARP-1 binds to DNA bearing single-strand breaks and shows DNA damage-dependent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. The preferential expression of AthPARP-1 in mitotically active tissues is in agreement with a potential role in the maintenance of genome integrity during DNA replication, as proposed for its human counterpart. Transcriptional gene activation by ionising radiation of AthPARP-1 and AthPARP-2 genes is to date plant specific activation. Our expression analyses after exposure to various stress indicate that 1) AthPARP-1 and AthPARP-2 play an important role in the response to DNA lesions, particularly they are activated by genotoxic agents implicating the BER DNA repair pathway 2) AthPARP-2 gene seems to play an additional role in the signal transduction induced by oxidative stress 3) the observed expression profile of AthPARP-1 is in favour of the regulation of AthPARP-1 gene expression at the level of transcription and translation. This mode of regulation of AthPARP-1 protein biosynthesis, clearly distinct from that observed in animals, needs the implication of a so far unidentified transcription factor that is activated by the presence of DNA lesions. The major outcome of this work resides in the isolation and characterisation of such new transcription factor, which will provide new insight on the regulation of plant gene expression by genotoxic stress. (author) [fr

  12. Biomarkers specific to densely-ionising (high LET) radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.; Okladnikova, N.; Hande, P.; Burak, L.; Geard, C.R.; Azizova, T.

    2001-01-01

    There have been several suggestions of biomarkers that are specific to high LET radiation. Such a biomarker could significantly increase the power of epidemiological studies of individuals exposed to densely-ionising radiations such as alpha particles (e.g. radon, plutonium workers, individuals exposed to depleted uranium) or neutrons (e.g. radiation workers, airline personnel). We discuss here a potentially powerful high LET biomarker (the H value) which is the ratio of induced inter-chromosomal aberrations to intra-arm aberrations. Both theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that this ratio should differ by a factor of about three between high LET radiation and any other likely clastogen, and will yield more discrimination than the previously suggested F value (ratio of inter-chromosomal aberrations to intra-chromosomal inter-arm aberrations). Evidence of the long-term stability of such chromosomal biomarkers has also been generated. Because these stable intra-arm and inter-chromosomal aberrations are (1) frequent and (2) measurable at long times after exposure, this H value appears to be a practical biomarker of high LET exposure, and several in vitro studies have confirmed the approach for unstable aberrations. The approach is currently being tested in a population of Russian radiation workers exposed several decades ago to high- or low LET radiation. (author)

  13. Radicals of DNA and DNA nucleotides generated by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybytniak, G.

    2004-01-01

    A first stage of cell processes leading to DNA damage of initiated by radical reactions. In a model system such transformations were generated by ionising radiation which involves production of electron loss and electron gain centers of the substrate and radical formation. Using cryogenic ESR spectroscopy it was found that the DNA nucleotides, which convert to radical anions upon electron capture undergo the separation of unpaired spin and charge due to protonation. Circular and linear dichroism studies enabled to conclude that iron ions(III) induce strong changes in the DNA helical structure indicating their coordination with nitrogen bases. The repair of DNA radicals produced via radiolytic oxidation, i.e. the guanine radical cation and the allyl type radical of thymine, is possible at elevated temperatures due to the involvement of sulphydryl groups. The influence of the thiol charge is then limited

  14. Medical effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggle, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ionising radiation is genotoxic and causes biological effects via a chain of events involving DNA strand breaks and 'multiply damaged sites' as critical lesions that lead to cell death. The acute health effects of radiation after doses of a few gray, are due to such cell death and consequent disturbance of cell population kinetics. Because of cellular repair and repopulation there is generally a threshold dose of about 1-2 Gy below which such severe effects are not inducible. However, more subtle, sub-lethal mutational DNA damage in somatic cells of the body and the germ cells of the ovary and testis cause the two major low dose health risks -cancer induction and genetic (heritable) effects. This paper discusses some of the epidemiological and experimental evidence regarding radiation genetic effects, carcinogenesis and CNS teratogenesis. It concludes that current risk estimates imply that about 3% of all cancers; 1% of genetic disorders and between 0% and 0.3% of severe mental subnormality in the UK is attributable to the ubiquitous background radiation. The health risks associated with the medical uses of radiation are smaller, whilst the nuclear industry causes perhaps 1% of the health detriment attributable to background doses. (author)

  15. The case against protecting the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the (rarely heard) argument in favour of retention of the present system of radiation protection of the environment. There has been a recent trend in the radioecological and radiation protection community towards greater regulation of the effects of ionising radiations on biota. In particular, the often quoted International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) hypothesis that: If humans are protected from the effects of ionising radiation, then flora and fauna are also adequately protected has been criticised as being too anthropocentric and not adequate for protection of the environment. In this paper I will challenge this view, arguing firstly that this statement is almost always quoted out of its proper context, and secondly that the ICRP hypothesis does adequately protect the environment from the effects of ionising radiations. In view of the relatively insignificant effect of regulated releases of ionising radiation on the environment, the economic cost of further regulation will not result in a significant environmental benefit. Whilst empirical research to test the ICRP hypothesis should continue, until there is clear evidence against it, this simple and cost-effective approach should be retained. This would benefit the environment by directing scarce resources to more urgent environmental problems. (author)

  16. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects and genomic instability. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm would cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (orig.)

  17. Emissions and doses from sources of ionising radiation in the Netherlands: radiation policy monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleveld, H.; Pruppers, M.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997 the Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment requested RIVM to develop an information system for policy monitoring. One of the motives was that the European Union requires that the competent authorities of each member state ensure that dose estimates due to practices involving exposure to ionising radiation are made as realistic as possible for the population as a whole and for reference groups in all places where such groups may occur. Emissions of radionuclides and radiation to the environment can be classified as follows: (1) emissions to the atmosphere, (2) emissions to the aquatic system and (3) emission of external radiation from radioactive materials and equipment that produces ionising radiation. Released radioactivity is dispersed via exposure pathways, such as the atmosphere, deposition on the ground and farmland products, drinking water, fish products, etc. This leads to radiation doses due to inhalation, ingestion and exposure to external radiation. To assess the possible radiation doses different kinds of models are applied, varying from simple multiplications with dispersion coefficients, transfer coefficients and dose conversion coefficients to complex dispersion models. In this paper an overview is given of the human-induced radiation doses in the Netherlands. Also, trends in and the effect of policy on the radiation dose of members of the public are investigated. This paper is based on an RIVM report published recently. A geographical distribution of radiation risks due to routine releases for a typical year in the Netherlands was published earlier

  18. Medical effects and risks of exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mettler, Fred A

    2012-01-01

    Effects and risk from exposure to ionising radiation depend upon the absorbed dose, dose rate, quality of radiation, specifics of the tissue irradiated and other factors such as the age of the individual. Effects may be apparent almost immediately or may take decades to be manifest. Cancer is the most important stochastic effect at absorbed doses of less than 1 Gy. The risk of cancer induction varies widely across different tissues; however, the risk of fatal radiation-induced cancer for a general population following chronic exposure is about 5% Sv −1 . Quantification of cancer risk at doses of less than 0.1 Gy remains problematic. Hereditary risks from irradiation that might result in effects to offspring of humans appear to be much lower and any such potential risks can only be estimated from animal models. At high doses (over 1 Gy) cell killing and modification causes deterministic effects such as skin burns, and bone marrow depression, in which case immunosuppression becomes a critical issue. Acute whole body penetrating gamma irradiation at doses in excess of 2 Gy results in varying degrees of acute radiation sickness and doses over 10 Gy are usually lethal as a result of combined organ injury. (note)

  19. NDT using ionising radiation in the Indian space programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    1997-01-01

    Ionising radiations continue to play a vital role in the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of various components used in space vehicles and satellites. The different Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods which are useful to the Indian space programme are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs

  20. Ionising radiation safety training in the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.J.; O'Donovan, E.J.B.; Wood, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    Training personnel in ionising radiation safety within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) requires addressing some unique features of an organisation employing both military and civilian personnel. Activities may include those of a civil nature (such as industrial and medical radiography), specific military requirements (for training and emergency response) and scientific research and development. Some personnel may be assigned to full-time duties associated with radiation. However, most are designated as radiation protection officers as a secondary duty. A further complication is that most military personnel are subjected to postings at regular intervals. The ADO's Directorate of Defence Occupational Health and Safety has established an Ionising Radiation Safety Subcommittee to monitor not only the adequacy of the internal Ionising Radiation Safety Manual but also the training requirements. A Training Course, responding to these requirements, has been developed to emphasize, basic radiation theory and protection, operation of radiation monitors available in the ADO, an understanding of the Ionising Radiation Safety Manual, day-to-day radiation safety in units and establishments, and appropriate responses to radiation accidents and emergencies. In addition, students are briefed on a limited number of peripheral topics and participate in some site visits. Currently, two Courses are held annually, each with about twenty students. Most of the material is presented by ADO personnel with external contractor support. The three Courses held to date have proved successful, both for the students and the ADO generally. To seek national accreditation of the course through the Australian National Training Authority, as a first step, competency standards have been proposed. (authors)

  1. Ionising radiation effects on food packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragni, P.; Segre, A. L.; Capitani, D.; Danesi, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    The main aim of any food irradiation treatment is to guarantee the best safe quality of the products, reducing the spreading risk ( c ross-contamination ) for several food-associated diseases. Actually, over 40 countries provide clearances for the treatment of about 45 different types of foodstuffs. EU has to homogenise the situation within the associated States. With the European directive 1999/2/EC Italy, as other EU countries, already has brought into force their regulations to comply. The current Italian regulation on irradiation treatment of foodstuffs is referred since 1996 as follows: a) potatoes, onions and garlic; b) spices, herbs and condiments microbial. The new (April 2001) Italian law allows the possibility to ask for special permission of treatment for other foodstuff which is possible to treat in other E.U. countries. Large majority of foods are submitted to irradiation treatment after they have been packaged. In Dutch cases the study of radiation effects on the package becomes crucial, also because polymeric materials may be affected by ionizing radiation. We performed our studies on several materials employed in food packaging, with a particular care to the role of anti-oxidant additives present in food packaging materials. The attention is pointed on the possible chemical-physical effects induced by radiation on foodstuff packaging. After irradiation in plastic materials two main effects may occur: degradation and cross-linking. The result depending on the comparative rates of the two actions. This kind of information was successfully obtained using NMR methods on a large number of polymers effectively used for the food packaging procedures

  2. Extra holiday because of ionising radiation not necessary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The 'regulations for special measures to protect employees working with X-rays and radium radiation' of 21st November 1947, which included a statutory six-week holiday period annually, has now been superceded by 'regulations on special protective measures for work with ionising radiation', issued by the Directorate for Work Inspection on 31st March 1978, effective from 1st May 1978. In addition to removing the requirement for six weeks annual holiday for radiation personnel, routine medical surveillance is only required every third year instead of annually. A number of other changes are mentioned. The basis for these changes is that continuous personnel dosimetry and better knowledge of the effects of ionising radiation allows any necessary measures to be taken on the basis of these. (JIW)

  3. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde; Smith, Jim T.; Ford, Alex T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  4. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  5. Medical use of ionising radiation - challenges for the third millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, W.

    2003-01-01

    From the very beginning after its discovery ionising radiation has been in beneficial use for health care. But even the drawbacks showed up very early: only a few months after Roentgens discovery reports were published on patients who got severe skin damage after fluoroscopy with x-rays. This finding of the adverse effects was soon turned into something positive: ionising radiation could be used for treatment of cancer. In 1928 radiologists took the initiative to the foundation of what later became the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. Medical use of ionising radiation is giving by far the largest contribution to the radiation burden of the global population from artificial sources, on average 0,3 mSv per year and inhabitant, excluding doses from radiation treatment. In the Nordic countries this dose is approximately 0,7 mSv. This isn't a problem by itself. The total benefit is exceeding the total radiation risk with large margins. But the margins could even be larger. Methods for examinations and treatments have often a potential for improvements, meaning that the medical effect can be obtained with a lower dose to the patient. In certain circumstances the examination does not contribute to the further treatment of the patient or to her/his well-being and is then regarded as not justified. The huge challenge we are facing depends among other things on the extreme fast technical development which enables exposures of a magnitude that we haven't seen before and applications we only could dream about. There is a risk that the motto 'do what is possible to do' is followed instead of 'do what the individual patient needs'. This presentation addresses the possibilities, but also the dangers that medical use of ionising radiation in medical care is facing in the new millennium, or at least in its first years. (orig.)

  6. Complex systems of biological interest stability under ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maclot, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    This PhD work presents the study of stability of molecular systems of biological interest in the gas phase after interaction with ionising radiations. The use of ionising radiation can probe the physical chemistry of complex systems at the molecular scale and thus consider their intrinsic properties. Beyond the fundamental aspect, this work is part of the overall understanding of radiation effects on living organisms and in particular the use of ionizing radiation in radiotherapy. Specifically, this study focused on the use of low-energy multiply charged ions (tens of keV) provided by the GANIL (Caen), which includes most of the experiments presented. In addition, experiments using VUV photons were also conducted at synchrotron ELETTRA (Trieste, Italy). The bio-molecular systems studied are amino acids and nucleic acid constituents. Using an experimental crossed beams device allows interaction between biomolecules and ionising radiation leads mainly to the ionization and fragmentation of the system. The study of its relaxation dynamics is by time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled to a coincidences measurements method. It is shown that an approach combining experiment and theory allows a detailed study of the fragmentation dynamics of complex systems. The results indicate that fragmentation is generally governed by the Coulomb repulsion but the intramolecular rearrangements involve specific relaxation mechanisms. (author) [fr

  7. Use of ionising radiation for food processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninjoor, V.

    1989-01-01

    Food irradiation is a recently developed technique used to sterilize and preserve food. Food products are exposed to ionising radiations such as X-rays, gamma rays or high energy electrons which destroy food borne pathogens and parasites and inhibit sprouting. Shelf life of food is extended. The following aspects of radiation processing of food are discussed in the monograph: radiation sources, choice of dose for specific results, safety and nutritional quality of radiation processed food, international status of acceptance of food irradiation, and cost. (M.G.B.). 6 tabs

  8. IRID: specifications for the Ionising Radiations Incident Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.O.; Croft, J.R.; Williams, M.K.; McHugh, J.O.

    1996-01-01

    Technologies that make use of ionising radiations are widespread. They provide many benefits but, as with other technologies, the use of ionising radiations carries with it the potential for incidents and accidents. Their severity can vary from the trivial to the fatal and may involve substantial economic penalties. In order to minimise the number of incidents and their consequences it is important that there is a mechanism to learn the lessons from those that do occur. To help pursue this objective the National Radiological Protection Board, the Health and Safety Executive and the Environment Agency have established a national Ionising Radiations Incident Database (IRID) to cover radiation incidents in industry, medicine, research and teaching. This publication details the specifications for IRID and its methods of operation. All information in the database will be unattributable and names of persons or organisations will not be included. It is a personal computer based system with 24 fields to categorise an incident, including a text field that will provide a description of the incident giving the causes, consequences, follow-up actions and lessons to be learned. These descriptions will be used in subsequent publications to provide feedback to the users. (UK)

  9. Ionising radiation safety training in the Australian defence organisation (ADO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.J.; O'Donovan, E.J.B.; Wood, W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Training personnel in ionising radiation safety within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) requires addressing some unique features of an organisation employing both military and civilian personnel. Activities may include those of a civil nature (such as industrial and medical radiography), specific military requirements (for training and emergency response) and scientific research and development. Some personnel may be assigned to full-time duties associated with radiation, while others may be designated as radiation protection officers in remote units with few duties to perform in this role. A further complication is that most military personnel are subjected to postings at regular intervals. The ADO's Directorate of Defence Occupational Health and Safety has established an Ionising Radiation Safety Subcommittee to monitor not only the adequacy of the internal Ionising Radiation Safety Manual but also the training requirements. A training course, responding to these requirements, has been developed to emphasise: basic radiation theory and protection; operation of radiation monitors available in the ADO; an understanding of the Safety Manual; day-to-day radiation safety in units and establishments; and appropriate responses to radiation accidents and emergencies. In addition, students are briefed on a limited number of peripheral topics and participate in some site visits. Currently, two Courses are held annually, each with about twenty students. Most of the material is presented by ADO personnel with external contractor support. The three Courses held to date have proved sufficiently successful, both for the students and the ADO generally, to seek national accreditation through the Australian National Training Authority and, as a first step, competency standards have been identified

  10. Tumor induction by small doses ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putten, L.M. van

    1981-01-01

    Tumour induction by low radiation doses is in general a non-linear process. However, two exceptions are well known: myeloid leukemia in Rf mice and mamma tumours in Sprague-Dawley rats. The hypothesis that radiation is highly oncogenic in combination with cell growth stimuli, as reaction to massive cell death after damage of nuclear DNA, is applied to man and the consequences are discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Ionising radiation and the developing human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the effects of radiation exposure of the developing human brain. Much of the evidence has come from the prenatally exposed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The effects on development age, mental retardation, head size, neuromuscular performance, intelligence tests, school performance and the occurrence of convulsions are discussed. Other topics covered include the biological nature of the damage to the brain, risk estimates in human and problems in radiation protection. (UK)

  12. The quality factor in ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao

    1990-12-01

    The existing quality factors for ionizing radiation and the Q values recommended by ICRU report 40 are briefly introduced, and the relevant aspects are also discussed. It is recommended that the new Q values presented by ICRU should not be adopted in protection radiation practices, but the ultimate decision from ICRP should be noted. It is pointed out that the relevant academic discussion should be developed at present, in order to study the position and policy which should be taken. (author)

  13. Radiation hazards and biological effects of ionising radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Najila Mohd Janib

    2004-01-01

    The contents of this chapter are follows - Mechanism of damage: direct action of radiation, indirect action of radiation. Classification of effects: somatic effect, induction of cancer, factors, affecting somatic effects, genetic effect, inherited abnormalities, induced effects, early effects, late effects, deterministic effect, stochastic effect. Effect of specific group: development abnormality, childhood Cancer, fertile women, risk and uncertainty, comparison of risk

  14. Interaction of ionising radiations with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In a first part, this academic course addresses the interaction of non-charged particles with matter. The author more particularly addresses the interaction of a photon plasma with matter (attenuation of electromagnetic radiations, law of exponential attenuation, attenuation half value layer), the elementary phenomena of the interaction of a photon with matter (photoelectric effect, Compton effect, Thomson-Rayleigh scattering, materialisation, photo-nuclear reaction, prevalence domains, application in medical imagery), and the interaction of fast and slow neutrons with matter (elastic and inelastic scattering, radiative and non-radiative capture). The second part addresses the interaction of charged particles with matter. The author more particularly addresses the interaction with electrons present in the medium (ionization, excitation, stop efficiency, linear energy transfer, ionization linear density), the interaction with the nucleus (Bremsstrahlung), and the case of light particles (electrons) and of heavy particles (protons, alpha, fission products)

  15. Human exposure to low level ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paix, David

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the low-level radiation sources and their effects on human populations, from a global perspective. 'Low-level' means exposures in the range of the natural background to which everybody is exposed. The quoted values are whole-world averages, but individual variations are mentioned in a few cases. (author). 22 refs

  16. Control of ionising radiation - a UK viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The primary aim of radiological protection is to provide an appropriate standard of protection for mankind, both as individuals and collectively, without unduly limiting the beneficial practices giving rise to radiation exposure. Guidance on the fundamental principles for radiation protection is provided on a global scale by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Member states of the European Union, such as the UK, are bound by the Euratom Treaty that requires the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) to develop uniform standards for radiological protection. These standards are based on recommendations from ICRP and are laid down in Euratom Directives relating to the safety of workers and the public, and of patients undergoing medical exposures. Member states are required to introduce national legislation to comply with Directives. In addition to ICRP and CEC, other international bodies are involved in developing practical standards and guidelines for radiological protection. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides guidelines relating to the transport of radioactive material, and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides information on the biological effects of radiation. In the UK, the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) was established in 1970 as a statutory advisory body. It has no regulatory functions. NRPB advises Government on the acceptability and applicability of international recommendations. Principles are then applied in the UK by Acts of Parliament and subsidiary instruments such as regulations, licences, authorizations and approvals. Various government departments are involved in policing the control of radiation according to their particular role, for example the Department of the Environment in relation to pollution, and the Department of Employment for the health and safety of workers. (author)

  17. Recent trends in utilising ionising radiations for nondestructive evaluation of materials (Preprint No. SP-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Venkatraman, B.

    1988-02-01

    The various NDT techniques based on the use of ionising radiations can be broadly classified into radiography, radiation gaging techniques and analytical techniques. This paper highlights the state of art of these techniques along with their applications. While an effort has been made to cover the major techniques based on ionising radiations, many techniques utilising ionising radiations as xeroradiography, laminography, ionography etc, have not been dealt with due to their restricted applications. (author). 23 refs., 4 figs

  18. Population exposure to ionising radiation in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, K.K.; Krishnan, D.; Subba Ramu, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Estimates of exposure from various radiation sources to Indian population are given. The per caput dose from all the identifiable sources, both natural and man-made is estimated to be 2490 μSv per year to the present population of India. 97.9% of this dose is contributed by natural sources which include cosmic and terrestrial radiations, 1.93% by medical sources used for diagnostic and treatment purpose, 0.3% by exposures due to activities related nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear tests and nuclear accidents, and 0.07% by miscellaneous sources such as industrial applications, consumer products, research activities, air travel etc. The monograph is written for the use of the common man. (M.G.B.). 25 refs., 7 tabs., 7 figs

  19. The Radman Guide to the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.

    1986-01-01

    The guidance given in the handbook is of general nature for the assistance of senior managers and administrators (rather than scientific or technical staff), involved in or responsible for work with ionising radiations. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: 1) Digest of the Regulations. 2) Application of Regulations (division of responsibility between employer, employee, supervisors, medical personnel etc., role of the Health and Safety Executive.) 3) Designation of work areas and persons 4) Radiation Protection Supervisors and Local Rules 5) Hazard assessments and contingency plans 6) Notifications and Record Keeping 7) Routines in source control. (UK)

  20. ALARA - the contribution of the proposed new ionising radiations regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, T.O.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed regulatory requirements and appropriate guidance contained in the approved code of practice on ionising radiations which are designed to support and help reach the objective of keeping radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable. This is discussed against the background of factory legislation, and the way in which the form of the proposed legislation handles this topic is illustrated. The measures required by the proposed legislation are reviewed, both as direct measures designed to create a climate of dose reduction, and as general measures designed to achieve the same end by means of a wide range of requirements. (author)

  1. Ionising Radiation and Cabin Crew Concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balouet, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The trend in flying at higher altitudes and latitudes results in increased exposure to cosmic radiation. The biological incidence of highest energy particles and heavy ions is not well documented. Crew members flying transpolar routes are already exposed to levels of about 6 mSv.y -1 , and are expected to exceed this level in a number of cases. Epidemiological studies are important in risk assessment. Organisation of monitoring campaigns, aircrew information, solar flares and related high levels of exposures, pregnancy related issues, medical control, recognition of occupational exposure during illness, including cancer cases, and social protection, are also major concerns. (author)

  2. Genetic effects of ionising radiation in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of genetic risk estimation in man. Topics covered include the methods used, the germ cell stages and radiation conditions relevant for genetic risk estimation, doubling dose estimates, the classification and prevalence of naturally-occurring genetic disorders, the source of data used in the direct method of risk estimation, the genetic risk estimates from the mid-1970s to the present, the estimates of genetic risk used in ICRP 26 in 1977 and ICRP's current assessment of genetic risks. (UK)

  3. Medical response to effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper will first of all deal with a scenario in which a radiation hazard arises within the DPH's Health District and, building on this, will go on to consider a modified role for the Community Physician where a hazard arises outside his District but poses some threat to it. The submissions made on the role of the Community Physician as Director of Public Health of a District Health Authority are based on experience of exercises conducted over recent years in relation to a possible incident at Sellafield in West Cumbria. (author)

  4. Ante-natal ionising radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This editorial comments on the latest reports of the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancer (now based on Birmingham). With 14759 pairs, the latest survey is over 10-fold larger than the 1958 report and the calculation of fatal childhood cancer rate at one case in 990 ante-natal radiographic examinations is rather larger than the early estimates, in spite of the fetal radiation dose having been halved and the cure rate for childhood leukemia being much improved. Comments are made on the comparisons with bomb survivors, and on the much increased fatal cancer incidence after first trimester radiography. (UK)

  5. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-05-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  6. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-01-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD) cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  7. Fitness of equipment used for medical exposures to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The advice in this guidance note is aimed at employers in control of equipment used for medical exposures to ionising radiation and ancillary equipment. This includes NHS trusts, health authorities or boards, private hospitals, clinics, surgeries, medical X-ray facilities in industry, dentists and chiropractors. The guidance should also be useful to radiation protection advisers appointed by such employers. The guidance provides advice on the requirements of regulation 33 of the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR85). In particular, it covers: (a) the selection, installation, maintenance, calibration and replacement of equipment to ensure that it is capable of restricting, so far as reasonably practicable, the medical exposure of any person to the extent that this is compatible with the intended diagnostic or therapeutic purpose; (b) recommended procedures for the definitive calibration of radiotherapy treatment; and (c) the need to investigate incidents involving a malfunction or defect in any 'radiation equipment' which result in medical exposures much greater than intended and to notify the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). 'Medical exposure' is defined in IRR85 as exposure of a person to ionising radiation for the purpose of his or her medical or dental examination or treatment which is conducted under the direction of a suitably qualified person and includes any such examination or treatment conducted for the purposes of research. For convenience, people undergoing medical exposure will be referred to as 'patients' in this guidance. Nothing in this publication is intended to indicate whether or not patients should be informed of any incident resulting from malfunction or defect in equipment used for medical exposure and the possible consequences of that exposure. As stated above, this guidance concerns medical exposures much greater than intended and although exposures much lower than intended can also have serious consequences, the incident would not

  8. Biological monitors for low levels of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohankumar, M.N.; Jeevanram, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of high doses of ionising radiation are well understood and the methods of measurement of these doses well established. However the effects due to extremely low doses remain by and large uncertain. This is because of the fact that at such low doses no gross symptoms are seen. In fact, at these levels the occurrence of double strand breaks leading to the formation of chromosomal aberrations like dicentrics is rare and chances of mutation due to base damage are negligible. Hence neither chromosomal aberration studies nor mutational assays are useful for detecting doses of the order of a few milligray. Results of exhaustive work done by various laboratories indicate that below 20 mGy the chromosomal aberration technique based on scoring of dicentrics cannot distinguish between a linear or a threshold model. However indirect methods like unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) appear to be promising for the detection of radiation exposures due to low levels of radiation. This report reviews the available literature on the biological effects of low levels of ionising radiation and highlights the merits and demerits of the various methods employed in the measurement of UDS and SCE. The phenomenon of radio-adaptive response (RAR) and its relation to DNA repair is also discussed. (author)

  9. Biological monitors for low levels of ionising radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohankumar, M N; Jeevanram, R K [Safety Research and Health Physics Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1996-12-31

    The biological effects of high doses of ionising radiation are well understood and the methods of measurement of these doses well established. However the effects due to extremely low doses remain by and large uncertain. This is because of the fact that at such low doses no gross symptoms are seen. In fact, at these levels the occurrence of double strand breaks leading to the formation of chromosomal aberrations like dicentrics is rare and chances of mutation due to base damage are negligible. Hence neither chromosomal aberration studies nor mutational assays are useful for detecting doses of the order of a few milligray. Results of exhaustive work done by various laboratories indicate that below 20 mGy the chromosomal aberration technique based on scoring of dicentrics cannot distinguish between a linear or a threshold model. However indirect methods like unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) appear to be promising for the detection of radiation exposures due to low levels of radiation. This report reviews the available literature on the biological effects of low levels of ionising radiation and highlights the merits and demerits of the various methods employed in the measurement of UDS and SCE. The phenomenon of radio-adaptive response (RAR) and its relation to DNA repair is also discussed. (author). 98 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Investigation of damage mechanism by ionising radiation on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1996-01-01

    Occupational radiation hazard is a very controversial subject. Effects from high radiation doses are well known from past experiences. However, hazard from low doses is still a subject that is hotly debated upon until now. The occupational dosimetry used now is based on a macroscopic scale. Lately, microdosimetry is fast gaining recognition as a more superior way of measuring hazard. More importantly, scientists are researching the basic damage mechanism that leads to biological effects by ionising radiation. In this report, a simulation study of the basic damage mechanism is discussed . This simulation is based upon Monte Carlo calculations and using polyuridylic acid (Poly-U) as the DNA model This simulation tries to relate the physics and chemistry of interactions of ionising radiation with biomolecules. The computer codes used in this simulation, OREC and RADLYS were created by Hamm et al. (1983) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The biological endpoints in this simulation are the strand break and base release of the DNA, which is the precursor of all biological effects. These results are compared with model studies that had been done experimentally to check the validity of this simulation. The G-values of strand break and base release from this simulation were -2.35 and 2.75 and compared well with results from irradiation experiments by von Sonntag (I 98 7) from Max Plank's Institute, Germany

  11. Documentation of Occupational Accidents and Diseases caused by Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G.

    2004-01-01

    . One of the major goals of the institutions for statutory accident insurance is the prevention of occupational diseases. To perform a successful prevention work it is necessary not only to count the number of accidents or diseases in the various working fields but to look for details of the conditions of work and the human response to those conditions. The institutions for statutory accident insurance have engaged the institution for statutory accident insurance in the precision engineering and electrical industry to carry out documentation, in form of a data bank, for all cases of occupational diseases which could be caused by ionising radiation. Those are not only the cases which are accepted as occupational disease but also the cases where a suspicion of an occupational disease is announced but finally rejected. At the moment about 1700 cases are included in the data bank. For preserving the anonymity information to name and residence are deleted. Various data to one single case are linked by a case-specific key-number. Information to occupation and field of working, to details of a possible exposure to ionising radiation like kind of radiation, time and duration of radiation, exposure of the whole body or of parts of the body and whole body or organ doses are collected. Additional information refers to medical aspects like diagnosis and date of diagnosis. (Author)

  12. The principal phenolic and alcoholic components of wine protect human lymphocytes against hydrogen peroxide- and ionising radiation-induced DNA damage in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, M.; Greenrod, W.

    2003-01-01

    the DNA damaging effects of two important oxidants ie hydrogen peroxide and ionising radiation, in this physiologically relevant in vitro system

  13. Doubling potential of fibroblasts from different species after ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macieira-Coelho, A.; Diatloff, C.; Malaise, E.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that whereas chicken fibroblasts invariably die after a certain number of doublings in vitro, and this fact is never altered by chemical or physical agents, mouse fibroblasts invariably acquire spontaneously an infinite growth potential. In the human species fibroblasts never acquire spontaneously the capacity to divide for ever, although they can become permanent cell lines after treatment with certain viruses. This behaviour of fibroblasts in vitro has been attributed to different nutritional requirements. Experiments are described with human and mouse fibroblasts in which it was found that the response to ionising radiation matches the relative tendencies of the fibroblasts to yield permanent cell lines. Irradiation was commenced during the phase of active proliferation. Human fibroblast cultures irradiated with 100 R stopped dividing earlier than the controls, whereas cultures irradiated with 200, 300 and 500 R had the same lifespan as the control cultures. Cultures irradiated with 400 R showed the longest survival. With mouse fibroblasts the growth curves of the irradiated cells were of the same type as in the controls, but recovery occurred earlier. The results indicated that ionising radiation accelerates a natural phenomenon; in cells with a limited growth potential (chicken) it shortens the lifespan, whereas in cells that can acquire an unlimited growth potential (mouse) it accelerates acquisition of this potential; human fibroblasts showed an intermediate response, since ionising radiation neither established the cultures as with mouse cells nor reduced the number of cells produced as with chicken fibroblasts. Possible explanations for the different behaviour of the species are offered. (U.K.)

  14. Injuries to embryo and foetus from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devik, F.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of experimental and clinical evidence for tetatological effects of ionising radiation, against the background of general teratology. International and national recommendations and regulations for the protection of the conceptus are quoted. As to interruption of a pregnancy following an unintended exposure, it is pointed out that much of the present evidence points to a dose in the order of 0.1Gy (10 rads) as a dose which may be considered as a practical threshold for the induction of congenital defects. (Auth.)

  15. Evaluation of chromosomal aberrations in radiologists and medical radiographers chronically exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuba, V.; Rozgaj, R.; Jazbec, A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are fairly reliable indicators of damage induced by ionising radiation. This study included 180 radiologists and medical radiographers (technicians) and 90 controls who were not occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. All exposed subjects were routinely monitored with film badge, and none was exposed to a radiation dose exceeding the limit for occupational exposure recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Two hundred metaphases for each person were scored. The frequencies of acentric fragments, dicentrics, ring chromosomes and chromosomal exchanges were determined and compared to those obtained in the control group. Chromosome aberrations were analysed using Poisson regression for profession, age, sex, smoking and years of exposure. Age, smoking, diagnostic exposure to X-rays and occupation were found to correlate with the occurrence of acentric fragments. The influence of exposure duration on the frequency of acentric fragments was greater in medical radiographers than in radiologists. Smoking and sex were found to correlate with the occurrence of dicentric chromosomes, which were more common in men than in women. As chromosome aberrations exceeded the expected level with respect to the absorbed dose, our findings confirm the importance of chromosome analysis as a part of regular medical check-up of subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation.(author)

  16. Review of retrospective dosimetry techniques for external ionising radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsbury, E. A.; Bakhanova, E.; Barquinero, J. F.; Brai, M.; Chumak, V.; Correcher, V.; Darroudi, F.; Fattibene, P.; Gruel, G.; Guclu, I.; Horn, S.; Jaworska, A.; Kulka, U.; Lindholm, C.; Lloyd, D.; Longo, A.; Marrale, M.; Monteiro Gil, O.; Oestreicher, U.; Pajic, J.; Rakic, B.; Romm, H.; Trompier, F.; Veronese, I.; Voisin, P.; Vral, A.; Whitehouse, C. A.; Wieser, A.; Woda, C.; Wojcik, A.; Rothkamm, K.

    2011-01-01

    The current focus on networking and mutual assistance in the management of radiation accidents or incidents has demonstrated the importance of a joined-up approach in physical and biological dosimetry. To this end, the European Radiation Dosimetry Working Group 10 on 'Retrospective Dosimetry' has been set up by individuals from a wide range of disciplines across Europe. Here, established and emerging dosimetry methods are reviewed, which can be used immediately and retrospectively following external ionising radiation exposure. Endpoints and assays include dicentrics, translocations, premature chromosome condensation, micronuclei, somatic mutations, gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence, neutron activation, haematology, protein biomarkers and analytical dose reconstruction. Individual characteristics of these techniques, their limitations and potential for further development are reviewed, and their usefulness in specific exposure scenarios is discussed. Whilst no single technique fulfils the criteria of an ideal dosemeter, an integrated approach using multiple techniques tailored to the exposure scenario can cover most requirements. (authors)

  17. Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation and Countermeasures (Les effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants et leurs contre-mesures)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    radiation physicists. As an example, a special issue of Health Physics [3] presents a body of experimental work characterizing the outdoor...Terrorist Attack involving Ionising Radiation. Campus Vesta, Belgium September 25-29, 2016. [3] Health Physics (Special Issue) 2016:110;399- 547...of Radiobiology & Radiation Protection 128 Szaserów Street 04-141 Warsaw POLAND Email: mjaniak@wihe.waw.pl Mr. Tjerk KUIPERS Health Physics

  18. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance fo participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors

  19. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to practical environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of who or what has moral standing; second the appropriate level of protection; and third compatibility with other environmental stressors. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds for efforts to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors. (author)

  20. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance for participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. The use of detectors based on ionisation recombination in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Intitial recombination of ionisation in a gas depends on the ionisation density and hence on the linear energy transfer along the tracks of charged particles. This effect can be used as a basis for instruments that respond to different types of ionising radiation approximately in the way required by the quality factor-linear energy transfer relation recommended by the ICRP for use in radiation protection. Empirical instruments based on ionisation recombination that have been used for radiation protection measurements are reviewed, and relations are derived from recombination theory that show that the response of such detectors can be readily predicted. The usefulness of recombination instruments in radiation protection is discussed and their advantages and limitations assessed. It is shown that their main application will be as reference instruments against which other detectors can be calibrated. As an extension to using recombination detectors as reference instruments, the feasibility of specifying radiation quality in terms of ionisation recombination is investigated. (author)

  2. International Conference on Low Doses of Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Is there a threshold? and is a little radiation good for you? were two questions raised at the International Conference on Low Doses of Ionising Radiation : Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, jointly organised by the IAEA and WHO, and convened in Seville, Spain, over 17-21 November 1997. The answer to both these questions appears to be 'Maybe', but the answer has no present implications for radiation protection practice and regulation. The conference which had over 500 participants from 65 countries, was organised around ten fora which explored basic molecular mechanisms of radiation effects, through to radiation protection principles and implementation in practices and interventions. Each forum was introduced by an overview presentation by an invited keynote speaker. Brief presentations of a few of the proffered papers followed, and then open discussion. There was opportunity for all proffered papers to be presented as posters. The fora, which occupied 3 full days, were preceded by reports on biological effects of radiation from international orgnaisations, and on related international conferences held in the recent past. The fora were followed by round table presentations of regulatory control and scientiFic research, and a summary session drawing together conclusions on the topic areas of the conference. (author)

  3. The use of ionising radiation screening devices in airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2010-01-01

    Although the NEA generally focuses on radiological protection at nuclear power plants and related facilities, it also addresses other areas of radiological protection of interest to member countries. A particular subject of recent importance concerns the use of ionising radiation screening devices as part of airport security efforts. Modern body scanners can produce human images that can be used to detect weapons that may be hidden beneath a person's clothing. Heightened concerns over terrorist threats to airline flights have prompted many countries to consider the use, or expanded use of body scanners. The use of such devices raises a wide series of questions, some of which concern the radiological protection of those who might be scanned. As such, the Inter-Agency Committee on Radiation Safety (IACRS), an expert body in which the NEA works together with several other international organisations addressing radiological protection issues, recently developed a joint information paper laying out the key radiological protection and other issues that should be or have been considered when making decisions as to whether ionising radiation body scanners should be deployed in airports. This article provides an overview of the information paper. In assessing the possible use of X-ray body scanners, there are two significant radiological protection issues that may be of relevance with regard to the government decision whether their use is justified. First, although the individual exposures are very low, the exposure experienced by the scanned population as a whole will depend on whether all passengers are systematically scanned, or alternatively whether passengers are selected for scanning randomly or on the basis of specific criteria. The manner in which passengers would be selected would need to be known in order to appropriately assess the full radiological protection impact of scanner use. Second, the use of X-ray body scanners on sensitive groups, such as pregnant

  4. Characterization and pharmacological modulation of intestinal inflammation induced by ionizing radiation; Caracterisation et modulation pharmacologique de l'inflammation intestinale induite par les rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gremy, O

    2006-12-15

    The use of radiation therapy to treat abdominal and pelvic malignancies inevitably involves exposure of healthy intestinal tissues which are very radiosensitive. As a result, most patients experience symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea. Such symptoms are associated with acute damage to intestine mucosa including radio-induced inflammatory processes. With a rat model of colorectal fractionated radiation, we have shown a gradual development of a colonic inflammation during radiation planning, without evident tissue injury. This radio-induced inflammation is characterized not only by the sur expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, a NF-kB activation, but also by a repression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and the nuclear receptors PPARa and RXRa, both involved in inflammation control. This early inflammation is associated with a discreet neutrophil recruitment and a macrophage accumulation. Macrophages are still abnormally numerous in tissue 27 weeks after the last day of irradiation. Inflammatory process is the most often related to a specific immune profile, either a type Th1 leading to a cellular immune response, or a type Th2 for humoral immunity. According to our studies, a unique abdominal radiation in the rat induces an ileum inflammation and an immune imbalance resulting in a Th2-type profile. Inhibiting this profile is important as its persistence promotes chronic inflammation, predisposition to bacterial infections and fibrosis which is the main delayed side-effect of radiotherapy. The treatment of rats with an immuno-modulator compound, the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (C.A.P.E.), have the potential to both reduce ileal mucosal inflammation and inhibit the radio-induced Th2 status. In order to search new therapeutic molecular target, we has been interested in the PPARg nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of colon mucosal integrity. In our abdominal irradiation model, we have demonstrated that the prophylactic

  5. Characterization and pharmacological modulation of intestinal inflammation induced by ionizing radiation; Caracterisation et modulation pharmacologique de l'inflammation intestinale induite par les rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gremy, O

    2006-12-15

    The use of radiation therapy to treat abdominal and pelvic malignancies inevitably involves exposure of healthy intestinal tissues which are very radiosensitive. As a result, most patients experience symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea. Such symptoms are associated with acute damage to intestine mucosa including radio-induced inflammatory processes. With a rat model of colorectal fractionated radiation, we have shown a gradual development of a colonic inflammation during radiation planning, without evident tissue injury. This radio-induced inflammation is characterized not only by the sur expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, a NF-kB activation, but also by a repression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and the nuclear receptors PPARa and RXRa, both involved in inflammation control. This early inflammation is associated with a discreet neutrophil recruitment and a macrophage accumulation. Macrophages are still abnormally numerous in tissue 27 weeks after the last day of irradiation. Inflammatory process is the most often related to a specific immune profile, either a type Th1 leading to a cellular immune response, or a type Th2 for humoral immunity. According to our studies, a unique abdominal radiation in the rat induces an ileum inflammation and an immune imbalance resulting in a Th2-type profile. Inhibiting this profile is important as its persistence promotes chronic inflammation, predisposition to bacterial infections and fibrosis which is the main delayed side-effect of radiotherapy. The treatment of rats with an immuno-modulator compound, the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (C.A.P.E.), have the potential to both reduce ileal mucosal inflammation and inhibit the radio-induced Th2 status. In order to search new therapeutic molecular target, we has been interested in the PPARg nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of colon mucosal integrity. In our abdominal irradiation model, we have demonstrated that the prophylactic

  6. Martian sub-surface ionising radiation: biosignatures and geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Ward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars, unshielded by thick atmosphere or global magnetic field, is exposed to high levels of cosmic radiation. This ionising radiation field is deleterious to the survival of dormant cells or spores and the persistence of molecular biomarkers in the subsurface, and so its characterisation is of prime astrobiological interest. Here, we present modelling results of the absorbed radiation dose as a function of depth through the Martian subsurface, suitable for calculation of biomarker persistence. A second major implementation of this dose accumulation rate data is in application of the optically stimulated luminescence technique for dating Martian sediments.

    We present calculations of the dose-depth profile in the Martian subsurface for various scenarios: variations of surface composition (dry regolith, ice, layered permafrost, solar minimum and maximum conditions, locations of different elevation (Olympus Mons, Hellas basin, datum altitude, and increasing atmospheric thickness over geological history. We also model the changing composition of the subsurface radiation field with depth compared between Martian locations with different shielding material, determine the relative dose contributions from primaries of different energies, and discuss particle deflection by the crustal magnetic fields.

  7. The application of ionising radiation in industrial wastewater treatment technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kos, L. [Inst. of Knitting Technology and Techniques, Lodz (Poland); Perkowski, J. [Inst. of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Technical Univ. of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Ledakowicz, S. [Dept. of Bioprocess Engineering, Technical Univ. of Lodz, Lodz (Poland)

    2003-07-01

    An attempt was made to apply radiation techniques in the treatment of industrial wastewater from a dairy, brewery and sugar factory. For degradation of pollutants present in the wastewater, the following methods were used: irradiation, irradiation combined with aeration, ozonation, and combined irradiation and ozonation. For all three types of wastewater, the best method among these listed above appeared to be the method of irradiation combined with ozonation. Most degradable was the wastewater produced in sugar factories, and the least biodegradable appeared to be dairy wastewater. Depending on the dose of ozone and radiation, a maximum 60% reduction of COD was obtained. No effect of the wastewater aeration on its degradation by radiation was found. Changes in the content of mineral compounds were observed in none of the cases. The process of biological treatment of wastewater was carried out in a low-loaded, wetted bed. Pretreatment of the wastewater had no significant effect on the improvement of the biological step operation. Some effect was observed only in the case of the wastewater coming from a sugar factory. For medium concentrated wastewater from food industry, it is not economically justified to apply the pretreatment with the use of ionising radiation. (orig.)

  8. Transcription-based model for the induction of chromosomal exchange events by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for chromosomal aberration formation, following exposure of mammalian cells to ionising radiation, has long been debated. Although chromosomal aberrations are probably initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), little is understood about the mechanisms that generate and modulate DNA rearrangement. Based on results from our laboratory and data from the literature, a novel model of chromosomal aberration formation has been suggested (Radford 2002). The basic postulates of this model are that: (1) DSB, primarily those involving multiple individual damage sites (i.e. complex DSB), are the critical initiating lesion; (2) only those DSB occurring in transcription units that are associated with transcription 'factories' (complexes containing multiple transcription units) induce chromosomal exchange events; (3) such DSB are brought into contact with a DNA topoisomerase I molecule through RNA polymerase II catalysed transcription and give rise to trapped DNA-topo I cleavage complexes; and (4) trapped complexes interact with another topo I molecule on a temporarily inactive transcription unit at the same transcription factory leading to DNA cleavage and subsequent strand exchange between the cleavage complexes. We have developed a method using inverse PCR that allows the detection and sequencing of putative ionising radiation-induced DNA rearrangements involving different regions of the human genome (Forrester and Radford 1998). The sequences detected by inverse PCR can provide a test of the prediction of the transcription-based model that ionising radiation-induced DNA rearrangements occur between sequences in active transcription units. Accordingly, reverse transcriptase PCR was used to determine if sequences involved in rearrangements were transcribed in the test cells. Consistent with the transcription-based model, nearly all of the sequences examined gave a positive result to reverse transcriptase PCR (Forrester and Radford unpublished)

  9. The biological effects of exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Scenarios for exposure to ionising radiation range from natural background radiation (chronic) to the explosions of atomic bombs (acute), with some medical, industrial and research exposures lying between these extremes. Biological responses to radiation that predominate at high doses incurred at high dose rates are different from those that predominate at low doses and low dose rates. Single doses from bomb explosions ranged up to many thousand mGy. Acute doses greater than about 1000 mGy cause acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Below this threshold, radiation has a variety of potential latent health effects: Change to the incidence of cancer is the most usual subject of attention but change to longevity may be the best overall measure because decreased incidences of non-cancer mortality have been observed to coincide with increased incidence of cancer mortality. Acute doses greater than 500 mGy cause increased risks of cancer and decreased life expectancy. For doses less than 100 mGy, beneficial overall health effects ('radiation hormesis') have been observed. At the other end of the spectrum, chronic exposure to natural radiation has occurred throughout evolution and is necessary for the normal life and health of current species. Dose rates greater than the present global average of about 2 mGy per year have either no discernible health effect or beneficial health effects up to several hundred mGy per year. It is clearly not credible that a single health effects model -- such as the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of risk estimation -- could fit all latent health effects. A more realistic model is suggested.

  10. Education and training issues in individual monitoring of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2011-01-01

    The present article deals with the education and training (E and T) issues of individual monitoring (IM) of ionising radiation, based on the requirements provided by the Basic Safety Standards EURATOM Directive and the European Commission Technical Recommendations for IM of external radiation. The structure and the objectives of E and T programmes addressed to the staff of dosimetry services, in order to allow the recognition and ensure the continuity of expertise are discussed. The necessity for the establishment of a national strategy for building competence in IM through information, education, training and retraining programmes, addressed to the individually monitored personnel is underlined. The train the trainers' concept is recognised as being an important tool for optimising resources and transferring the skills necessary for building competence. The conditions under which an efficient train the trainers' approach can be established are discussed. Examples of curricula concerning the key persons involved in the provision of E and T in occupational radiation protection are also given. (authors)

  11. International conference on individual monitoring of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, Filip

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry is dedicated to the Proceedings of the International Conference on Individual Monitoring of Ionising Radiation (IM2015), which is the fifth of a series of conferences dealing with individual monitoring. This conference series is initiated by EURADOS, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group, and is organised every 5 years. In 2015, the conference was jointly organised by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), AV Controlatom, and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. It brought together scientists from regulatory authorities, individual monitoring services (IMS), research bodies, European networks and companies, for the purpose of facilitating the dissemination of knowledge, exchanging experiences and promoting new ideas in the field of individual monitoring. After the conference, 124 papers were submitted for publication in these peer-reviewed proceedings. From these, 103 were finally accepted for publication. The help of the numerous referees and the guest editors is very much appreciated. These proceedings provide a full image of the IM2015 conference. The high-level publications will be useful to improve the state of individual monitoring all over the world and aim to inspire many scientists to continue their work on a better monitoring of radiologically exposed workers

  12. A review of multiple stressor studies that include ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Real, Almudena; Bradshaw, Clare; Stark, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    Studies were reviewed that investigated the combined effects of ionising radiation and other stressors on non-human biota. The aim was to determine the state of research in this area of science, and determine if a review of the literature might permit a gross generalization as to whether the combined effects of multi-stressors and radiation are fundamentally additive, synergistic or antagonistic. A multiple stressor database was established for different organism groups. Information was collected on species, stressors applied and effects evaluated. Studies were mostly laboratory based and investigated two-component mixtures. Interactions declared positive occurred in 58% of the studies, while 26% found negative interactions. Interactions were dependent on dose/concentration, on organism's life stage and exposure time and differed among endpoints. Except for one study, none of the studies predicted combined effects following Concentration Addition or Independent Action, and hence, no justified conclusions can be made about synergism or antagonism. - This review on multiple stressor studies involving radiation, highlights that most experimental designs used did not allow to deduce the nature of the interactive effects.

  13. Proceedings. Protection of the natural environment. International symposium on ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.; Johansson, Gunnar; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Luening, M.

    1996-01-01

    The symposium was organised jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute and the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada. The programme was organised around six major topics: Biological effects of ionising radiation; Ecological effects of ionising radiation; Behaviour and transport of radionuclides in the natural environment; Criteria for environmental protection; Assessment methodology; and Social and economic aspects. All 86 contributions (excluding the opening addresses) have been separately indexed

  14. Making ionising radiation a real experience for high school science students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.; Lang, P.; De La Matter, D.; Hinman, P.; White, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian public has little understanding of ionising radiation due in part to its treatment in popular media. In principle, students learn about ionising radiation in their school science classes. Developments in science curricula are providing more education opportunities for this subject. The Canadian Nuclear Society's program for introducing real, personal experience with ionising radiation in the classroom is starting to make a difference. The demand is expected to exceed the resources of the CNS and the program is being developed to facilitate external support. This paper summarizes the need, the history of this program development, and the path forward. (author)

  15. Occupational Exposure to Ionising Radiation in Greece (1994-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Drikos, G.; Dimitriou, P.

    2000-01-01

    This study was scheduled in order to analyse the individual annual dose information on classified workers in Greece, monitored and assessed by the central dosimetry service at the Greek Atomic Energy Commission for the years 1994-98. This service provides film badges to about 7500 workers all over the country on a monthly basis. Dose summaries were recorded and processed by the Dose Registry Information System, the database of which has been totally renewed since 1994. The statistical analysis provided refers to and deals with the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distribution of the dose over the different specialities and the number of workers that have exceeded any of the established dose levels. Results concerning the annual dose summaries demonstrate a decrease in the collective and the mean individual dose to workers in the year 1995 and a slight but steady year-by-year increase thereafter during the period under consideration. This increasing tendency is discussed along with the increase in the ionising radiation applications, especially those in the medical sector, the change of the positioning of the film badge and the quality control measures provided by Greek law for radiation laboratories. (author)

  16. Using ionising radiation against terrorism and contrabandism - dosimetric problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankerhold, U.; Hupe, O.; Buchholz, G.

    2006-01-01

    As will be explained in more detail in a talk at this conference, the personnel X-ray scanners can be divided into two groups, one using the transmitted X rays for image creation, the other one using the Compton back scatters X-rays. In the case of a backscatter scanner, a narrow, pencil -like X-ray beam is produced by a rotating chopper-wheel. The person/object is scanned in a raster scan pattern. The backscattered X-rays of all points are measured and recorded. The transmission X-ray scanner can use both fan-like and pencil like X-ray beams. The transmission detectors are installed behind the object and detect the absorption of the scanned person. Due to the very low dose values of the X-ray scanner systems in combination with a high dose rate in the direct beam for a short irradiation time, special dosemeters have to be used. In the literature and in manufacturers' specifications, the dose values given for some systems are in the range from 0.05 μSv to 5 μSv per scan with a typical irradiation time of a few milliseconds. Due to this pulse-like character of the radiation fields, the dose rate is several sieverts per hour. For the measurements of the investigated scanner, dosemeters were therefore needed having the capability to measure low doses at high dose rates and to measure in pulsed radiation fields. For the optimization of the measurements, the use of measuring devices with a direct indication is necessary. Ionisation chambers are the most suitable measuring instruments to fulfill these requirements. The difficulty for the measurements with an ionisation chamber is that the leakage charge integrated over time can reach values at the level of the expected radiation-produced charge. Additionally unpredictable variations of the leakage charge can be in the same order of magnitude as the expected signal. This challenge led to the development of a special electronics which allow the execution of time-resolved measurements. With this time resolution, it is

  17. The Ionising Radiations Advisory Committee Open Meeting 10 October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    Full text: The Ionising Radiations Advisory Committee (IRAC) held its first open meeting on 10 October 2001 in response to a request from the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) that all its advisory committees should follow the Commission's example and hold such meetings. Some of the other advisory committees have already held open meetings and others are planning to do so shortly. The aim of the meeting was to enable members of the public to meet IRAC members and to find out more about the Committee - how it worked and the type of issues it dealt with. The first two sessions were devoted to short presentations describing IRAC's work and influences, now and in the future, on radiation protection generally. The third session was a discussion forum. The agenda for the meeting and the presentations are posted on the web at: www.hse.gov.uk/foi/iracopen.htm. Each session of presentations was followed by questions of clarification and the third session of the meeting comprised an open forum. Many of the questions raised were not directly relevant to IRAC but, nevertheless, members provided brief responses and referred questions on to others as appropriate. One question had been notified in advance, asking whether members of IRAC agreed that it is now (regrettably) reasonably foreseeable that a loss of containment of radioactive material may occur at a nuclear facility as a result of impact by an aeroplane or by other hostile acts, and that this should be made clear in published guidance on REPPIR. This question was not within IRAC's remit. The Chairman of the Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee offered to take the question to the Committee's next meeting. Issues discussed included: Concerns that exposure to ionising radiation at low levels is more dangerous than is currently reflected in risk estimates. The European Parliament has adopted a resolution calling on the main international bodies, including the International Commission on Radiological

  18. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  19. Medical exposure to ionising radiation and the risk of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blettner, Maria; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Samkange-Zeeb, Florence

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in the aetiology of brain tumours has yet to be clarified. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between medically or occupationally related exposure to ionising radiation and brain tumours. METHODS: We...... used self-reported medical and occupational data collected during the German part of a multinational case-control study on mobile phone use and the risk of brain tumours (Interphone study) for the analyses. RESULTS: For any exposure to medical ionising radiation we found odds ratios (ORs) of 0.63 (95...... regions. CONCLUSION: We did not find any significant increased risk of brain tumours for exposure to medical ionising radiation....

  20. Metabolic changes in broiler chickens exposed to low dose of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Kafka, I.; Kalenicova, Z.; Petrovova, E.; Toropila, M.

    2008-01-01

    In our experiment broiler chickens, 28-day old, were exposed to single whole- body dose 3 Gy of ionising radiation in time gap 3., 7., 14. and 21 day. We applied zinc to organism of chicks after irradiation. We observed changes of concentrations of cholesterol and glucose in blood serum. From obtained results it is evident that despite relative high resistance of poultry to irradiation, it reacts strongly to ionising radiation even at laboratory levels. (authors)

  1. Application of ionising radiation to the pharmaceutical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmar, E.

    1975-01-01

    Pharmacons, commonly called 'Drugs', are subject to a many-sided procedure of development before they are released on the market and reach the patient. Again and again they are submitted to controls for safety reasons and at least seven (sometimes nine or ten) years pass before the active substance has made its way from chemistry through many trials with animals in experimental pathology and through the laboratories of the biochemistry department. Ionising radiation is used in each field of drug research as an additional method for obtaining information. In chemistry the structure of molecules can be detected by X-ray diffraction, and the active component elucidated. In the teratology section of experimental pathology the foetus just before delivery and newborn animals are X-rayed. This is in order to find out skeletal malformations that might have occurred during feeding of the substance in question during gestation. In biochemistry the pharmacon is labelled with a suitable radioactive isotope. Its way through the body can then be followed by measuring absorption rate, distribution, binding and elimination. It is also important to explore the influence of the drug on the organism and the reverse - how the pharmacon is influenced by the organism. This means examining the metabolites of the drug and the mechanism of action by means of serial auto-radiography and clearance or excretion studies. Gamma rays are employed for sterilisation of ointment tubes and vials just before filling. Sterilisation of the pharmacon is discussed. (author)

  2. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitfils, A.

    2007-09-01

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  3. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: IUR's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, P.; Brown, J. E.; Iospje, M.

    2004-01-01

    Sufficient information currently exists to introduce an overall framework for the protection of the environment from ionising radiation, drawing upon the large amount of radiobiological and radioecological information that has been gathered over the preceding decades. Nevertheless, there is a requirement to address numerous knowledge gaps and to improve upon existing databases. After the first presentation of a framework for the protection of the environment in 1999/2000 by the IUR, there has been activity to collate information and develop methodologies. This has allowed numerous recommendations to be made concerning future system development.. Although the transfer of radionuclides is quite well known within some food-chains, there are very few data on the behaviour of radionuclides in non-temperate zones and on uptake to species that do not form part of the human food chain. There is a need to develop both transfer models (flux, dynamic, ecosystem, etc.) and genotoxicological bio monitoring techniques that are capable of allowing impact assessments at a variety of species, population and ecosystem levels and that could also deal with other environmental stressors. Knowledge of the doses and effects of background radiation is lacking, as are dose-effect relationships, including information on RBE for a variety of species, doses and dose rates. The importance of various components of an environmental impact assessment can be explored, through the application of sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. An example of this type of analysis, for a marine system, demonstrated the importance of several radioecological parameters in the derivation of dose rates. However, although such examples provide insight, caution should be practiced in their interpretation. It is therefore suggested that further analyses are conducted in order to provide more robust priority lists for resource allocation. The recommendations made in this paper emphasize the need for further focussed

  4. FREQUENCY OF CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS AND MICRONUCLEI IN HORSE LYMPHOCYTES FOLLOWING IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO LOW DOSE IONISING RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Rukavina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ionising radiation is known to cause chromosomal instability, which is observed as increased frequency of chromosomal aberration and micronuclei. These are listed as reliable criteria in biological dosimetry. Numerous experiments conducted on both animal and plant models demonstrated that increase in radiation dosage is followed by increased mutation frequency, and that mutations occur even at the lowest exposure. We used horse blood in vitro irradiated by low doses of ionizing radiation. Cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes and micronucleus test were used as biomarkers of genetic damage. The observed aberrations were recorded and classified in accordance with the International System of Cytogenetic Nomenclature. Micronuclei were identified on the basis of criteria proposed by Fenech et al. (8. Analysis of chromosomal aberration showed increased frequency of aberrations in blood cultures exposed to 0,1 Gy and 0,2 Gy compared to the controls. Microscopic analysis of chromosomal damage in in vitro micronucleus test revealed that the applied radiation dose induced micronuclei while no binucleated cells with micronuclei were found in lymphocytes that were not irradiated. In this paper we analysed the influence of low dose ionising radiation on frequency of chromosomal aberration and micronuclei in horse lymphocytes following in vitro exposure to X-rays (0,1 Gy and 0,2 Gy. Key words: chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei, ionising radiation, horse lymphocytes

  5. Chapter 8. Ionisation radiation and human organism. Radioactivity of human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with ionisation radiation and human organism as well as with radioactivity of human tissues. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Radiation stress of human organism; (2) Radioactivity of human tissues and the factors influencing radioactive contamination; (3) Possibilities of decreasing of radiation stress

  6. Use of ionising radiation in the teaching of physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide lays down the safety requirements for the use of radiation in school education, as well as the principles regulating the use of radiation sources without the safety licence referred to in section 16 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/1991). The guide covers the use of radiation sources emitting ionising radiation in elementary schools and high schools, as well as the use of radiation in the teaching of physics and chemistry in vocational training institutions and corresponding educational institutions

  7. Effects of ionising radiation on isolated and cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, J.; Artignan, X.; Berger, M.; Douki, T.; Gromova, M.; Polverelli, M.; Ravanat, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    In the present survey, emphasis has been placed on mechanistic aspects of the radiation-induced decomposition of the base moities of DNA and model compounds. An almost complete description of the radical reactions mediated by both OH radicals (indirect effects) and one-electron oxidation (direct effects) is now possible for guanine compounds in aerated aqueous solution. In addition, the results of a comparison of a targeted assay (high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical method) and a non specific method ('comet assay') for monitoring radiation-induced DNA damage within human cells are reported. (authors)

  8. Simulation and measurements of the response of an air ionisation chamber exposed to a mixed high-energy radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincke, H.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Perrin, D.; Theis, C.

    2005-01-01

    CERN's radiation protection group operates a network of simple and robust ionisation chambers that are installed inside CERN's accelerator tunnels. These ionisation chambers are used for the remote reading of ambient dose rate equivalents inside the machines during beam-off periods. This Radiation Protection Monitor for dose rates due to Induced Radioactivity ('PMI', trade name: PTW, Type 34031) is a non-confined air ionisation plastic chamber which is operated under atmospheric pressure. Besides its current field of operation it is planned to extend the use of this detector in the Large Hadron Collider to measure radiation under beam operation conditions to obtain an indication of the machine performance. Until now, studies of the PMI detector have been limited to the response to photons. In order to evaluate its response to other radiation components, this chamber type was tested at CERF, the high-energy reference field facility at CERN. Six PMI detectors were installed around a copper target being irradiated by a mixed hadron beam with a momentum of 120 GeV c -1 . Each of the chosen detector positions was defined by a different radiation field, varying in type and energy of the incident particles. For all positions, detailed measurements and FLUKA simulations of the detector response were performed. This paper presents the promising comparison between the measurements and simulations and analyses the influence of the different particle types on the resulting detector response. (authors)

  9. Significance of grafting in radiation curing reactions. Comparison of ionising radiation and UV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilic, E.; Ng, L.; Viengkhou, V.; Garnett, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Radiation curing is now an accepted commercial technology where both ionising radiation (electron beam) and ultra violet light (UV) sources are used. Grafting is essentially the copolymerisation of a monomer/oligomer to a backbone polymer whereas curing is the rapid polymerisation of a monomer/oligomer mixture onto the surface of the substrate. There is no time scale theoretically associated with grafting processes which can occur in minutes or hours whereas curing reactions are usually very rapid, occurring within a fraction of a second. An important difference between grafting and curing is the nature of the bonding occurring in each process. In grafting covalent carbon-carbon bonds are formed, whereas in curing, bonding usually involves weaker Van der Waals or London dispersion forces. The bonding properties of the systems are important in determining their use commercially. Thus the possibility that concurrent grafting during curing could occur in a system is important since if present, grafting would not only minimise delamination of the coated product but could also, in some circumstances, render difficulties recycling of the finished product especially if it were cellulosic. Hence the conditions for observing the occurrence of concurrent grafting during radiation curing are important. In the present paper, this problem has been studied by examining the effect that the components used in radiation curing exert on a typical reaction. Instead of electron beam sources, the spent fuel element facility at Lucas Heights is used to simulate such ionising radiation sources. The model system utilised is the grafting of a typical methacrylate to cellulose. This is the generic chemistry used in curing systems. The effect of typical additives from curing systems including polyfunctional monomer and oligomers in the grafting reactions have been studied. The ionising radiation results have been compared with analogous data from UV experiments. The significance

  10. EPR spectroscopy for the detection of foods treated with ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowicz, W.; Burlinska, G.; Michalik, J.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.; Ostrowski, K.

    1996-01-01

    The advantage of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR or ESR) as a tool for the control of irradiated food lies in its sensitivity and accuracy. Ionising radiation produces, in irradiated materials, paramagnetic species of different kinds, i.e. radicals, radical-ions and paramagnetic centres, which can be measured by EPR but most of them are not stable enough to be used for the detection of irradiation. It is because radiation-induced paramagnetic species are thermodynamically less stable than surrounding molecules and take part in fast radiolytic reactions leading to the formation of final diamagnetic products that they are not detectable by the EPR method. Most of organic radicals produced by radiation in the liquid phase ae unstable but if the unpaired electron is incorporated into the complex polymeric system as in peptides and polysaccharides and is structurally isolated from the water, its stability is markedly increased. Since 1954 it is known that ionising radiation produces paramagnetic entities in biological materials, cells and tissues and some are stable enough to be observed by EPR spectroscopy at room temperature. The present paper describes and discusses that part of results obtained by this group during the period of ADMIT activity (1989-94) which are original and may be useful to those who will be working in the near future on the development of uniform control systems for the detection of irradiated food. The intention was to focus attention on these facts and data which influence the certainty of the detection in both positive and negative manner. (author)

  11. Genotoxicity in earthworm after combined treatment of ionising radiation and mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; An, Kwang-Guk

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of mercury and radiation on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The levels of DNA damage and the repair kinetics in the coelomocytes of E. fetida treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) and ionising radiation (gamma rays) were analysed by means of the comet assay. For detection of DNA damage and repair, E. fetida was exposed to HgCl 2 (0-160 mg kg -1 ) and irradiated with gamma rays (0-50 Gy) in vivo. The increase in DNA damage depended on the concentration of mercury or dose of radiation. The results showed that the more the oxidative stress induced by mercury and radiation the longer the repair time that was required. When a combination of HgCl 2 and gamma rays was applied, the cell damage was much higher than those treated with HgCl 2 or radiation alone, which indicated that the genotoxic effects were increased after the combined treatment of mercury and radiation. (authors)

  12. The ionising radiation (medical exposure) regulations - IR (ME) R, Malta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, R.; Brejza, P.; Cremona, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The regulations in Malta at present are in draft stage. These regulations partially implement European Council Directive 97/43/Euratom. This Directive lays down the basic measurements for the health and protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure. The regulations impose duties on persons administering radiations, to protect people from unnecessary exposure whether as part of their own medical diagnosis, treatment or as part of occupational health worker for health screening, medico-legal procedures, voluntary participation in research etc. These regulations also apply to individuals who help other individuals undergoing medical exposure. Main provisions 1. Regulation 2 contains the definitions of 28 terms used in these regulations. 2. Regulation 3.1 and 3.2 sets out the medical exposures to which the regulations apply. 3. Regulation 4 requires approval of medical exposures due to medical research, from radiation protection board of Malta. 4. Regulation 5 prohibits new procedures involving medical exposure unless it has been justified in advance. 5. Regulation 6 provides conditions justifying medical exposures. It prohibits any medical exposure from being carried out which has not been justified and authorized and sets out matters to be taken into account for justification. 6. Regulation 7 requires that practitioner justifies the exposure, shall pay special attention towards (a) exposure from medical research procedures where there is no direct health benefit to the individual undergoing exposure, (b) exposures for medico-legal purposes; (c) exposures to pregnant or possible pregnant women and (d) exposures to breast-feeding women. 7. Regulation 8.1 to 8.3 prohibit any medical exposure from being carried out which has not been justified and sets out matters to be taken for justification 8. Regulation 8.4 prohibits an exposure if it cannot be justified. 9. Regulation 9 requires the employer to provide a

  13. Molecular mechanisms of plant response to ionising radiation. Exploration of the glucosinolate role in the anti-oxidative response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gicquel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial organisms are exposed to low doses of ionising radiation from natural or anthropogenic sources. The major effects of the radiations are due to DNA deterioration and water radiolysis which generates an oxidative stress by free radical production. Plants constitute good models to study the effects of ionising radiations and the search of antioxidant molecules because of their important secondary metabolism. Thus this thesis, funded by the Brittany region, characterized the physiological and molecular response of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to low (10 Gy) and moderate (40 Gy) doses of ionising radiation, and was therefore interested in glucosinolates, characteristic compounds of the Brassicaceae family. The global proteomic and transcriptomic studies carried out on this model revealed (1) a common response for both doses dealing with the activation of DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle regulation and protection of cellular structures; (2) an adjustment of the energetic metabolism and an activation of secondary compounds biosynthesis (i.e. glucosinolates and flavonoids) after the 10 Gy dose; (3) an induction of enzymatic control of ROS, the regulation of cellular components recycling and of programmed cell death after the 40 Gy dose. The potential anti-oxidative role of glucosinolates was then explored. The in vitro anti-oxidative power of some glucosinolates and their derivative products were demonstrated. Their modulating effects against irradiation-induced damages were then tested in vivo by simple experimental approaches. The importance of the glucosinolate level to give a positive or negative effect was demonstrated. (author)

  14. Ionisation and dissociation of water induced by swift multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, S.

    2006-02-01

    Ionization and dissociation of water molecules and water clusters induced by 11.7 MeV/A Ni 25+ ions were carried out by imaging techniques. Branching ratios, ionisation cross sections and Kinetic Energy Released distributions have been measured together with fragmentation dynamics studies. Multiple ionization represents approximately 30% of the ionizing events. Double ionization produces in significant way atomic oxygen, considered as a possible precursor of the large production of HO 2 radical in liquid water radiolysis by ions of high Linear Energy Transfer. We evidence a strong selectivity of bond breakage in the case of ion-induced HOD fragmentation. Once the molecule doubly ionized, the breakage of the O-H bond is found 6.5 times more probable than that of the O-D bond. A semi-classical calculation simulating the fragmentation dynamics on the potential energy surface of the ground-state of di-cation H 2 O 2+ makes possible to as well reproduce the preferential nature of the breakage of the O-H bond as the position and the shift of the kinetic energy distributions. First results concerning interaction with water clusters are also reported. Measurements in coincidence are carried out giving access to correlation, with the distributions in energy and angle of the emitted fragments. Mass spectrum points fast intra-cluster proton transfer, leading to the emission of protonated clusters. (author)

  15. S.I. No 125 of 2000 Radiological Protection Act 1991 (ionising radiation) Order 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This statutory instrument provides for the implementation of Council Directive 96/29/Euratom of 13 May 1996 laying down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionising radiation. It also incorporates the provisions of Council Directive 90/641/Euratom of 4 December 1990 on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas. It replaces the provisions of the European Communities (Ionising Radiation) Regulations, 1991 (S.I. No. 43 of 1991), the Radiological Protection Act, 1991 (General Control of Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Devices and Irradiating Apparatus) Order, 1993 (S.I. No. 151 of 1993) and the European Communities (Protection of Outside Workers from Ionising Radiation) Regulations, 1994 (S.I. No. 144 of 1994). The main changes introduced in this Order are: the inclusion of work activities involving exposure to natural sources of radiation, stricter application of existing radiation protection principles through the introduction of lower dose limits, the use of dose constraints in keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable (i.e. optimisation process) and extended application of justification principles, the introduction of radiation protection principles for intervention in cases of radiological emergencies or lasting exposures. (author)

  16. Basic radiation chemistry for the ionising energy treatment of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Before we can understand the chemistry involved in the irradiation of complex substances such as food we need to have some appreciation of the reactions involved and the products formed when ionising energy interacts with the simple substances such as water and dilute solutions. Reactions involving hydrated electrons, hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals are examined and methods for minimising radiolytic effects in foods are discussed

  17. Student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, G. Z.; Wong, D. D.; Nguyen, L. K.; Mendelson, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This study aims to evaluate medical student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures and to suggest how education could be improved. Fourth to sixth year medical students enrolled at a Western Australian university and interns from three teaching hospitals in Perth were recruited. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of 26 questions on their background, knowledge of ionising radiation doses and learning preferences for future teaching on this subject. A total of 331 completed questionnaires were received (95.9%). Of the 17 questions assessing knowledge of ionising radiation, a mean score of 6.0 was obtained by respondents (95% CI 5.8-6.2). Up to 54.8% of respondents underestimated the radiation dose from commonly requested radiological procedures. Respondents (11.3 and 25.5%) incorrectly believed that ultrasound and MRI emit ionising radiation, respectively. Of the four subgroups of respondents, the intern doctor subgroup performed significantly better (mean score 6.9, P< 0.0001, 95% CI 6.5-7.3) than each of the three medical student subgroups. When asked for the preferred method of teaching for future radiation awareness, a combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops was preferred. This study has clearly shown that awareness of ionising radiation from diagnostic imaging is lacking among senior medical students and interns. The results highlight the need for improved education to minimise unnecessary exposure of patients and the community to radiation. Further studies are required to determine the most effective form of education.

  18. Non-Targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation induced bystander effects (RlBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RlBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summ rises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RlBE. The main emphasis of this al1icle is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy.

  19. Ionising radiations - an ecological problem of indoor architectural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djukanovic, M.

    1995-01-01

    Architectural buildings are assessed not only for their esthetic characteristics but human settlements are considered now, as ecosystems and homes and flats as habitats (bio tops). Because of that healthy environment and influences of nonpolluting factors are of a great importance. The use of appropriate building materials harmless to health, contrary to the use of those that emit radon with its ionising effects and consequent health hazards, is of a great importance, too. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of investigation of building materials before their use, as well as the importance of quality control of soil where the construction is planned. (author)

  20. Non-stochastic effects of ionising radiations on gonads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, P.J.N.D.

    1986-01-01

    Fractionated gonad doses of 0.35 Gy cause marked temporary reduction in sperm count; fractionated ovarian doses up to 1.5 Gy have no apparent effect in women aged 20 to 30. Single testicular doses of 0.5 to 3 Gy cause aspermia; return to pre-irradiation sperm counts occurs about 30 months after single doses of 2 and 3 Gy. The ovary also has a recovery capacity, particularly in women under 40. Type B spermatogonia are the most radiosensitive germ cells for cell killing. Later stages are more radioresistant, forming a transient population in the total male reproductive life. Following radiation-induced sterilisation, fertility is restored if enough spermatogonia survive to repopulate the seminiferous tubules. Radiation effects on female fertility are explained on the basis of reduction in a fixed oocyte pool. Doses needed to induce artificial menopause are higher in younger women because their ovaries contain larger oocyte numbers. Particular fractionation regimes decrease the threshold dose for permanent male sterility. It has been inferred that human testes could tolerate 1 mGy per day indefinitely without fertility impairment. In female experimental mammals, fractionation reduces fertility damage. Fractionation may also have a protective effect on the human ovary, depending on age and total dose. (U.K.)

  1. International responsability of state by the deleterius effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, N.M. de.

    1988-01-01

    International Responsability of State, considering the deleterius effects of ionising radiation on the human being, property, territory and environment which are under other jurisdiction, is focused. Conventional rules, costumary rules, the evolution of ''opinion juris'' as well as the decisions of tribunals related to the subject are analysed. (author) [pt

  2. Gene expression analysis after low dose ionising radiation exposure of the developing organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrafi Benotmane, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measuring gene expression using microarrays is relevant to many areas of biology and medicine, such as follow up of developmental stages and diseases onset, and treatment study. Since there can be tens of thousands of distinct probes on an array, each micro array experiment can accomplish the equivalent number of genetic tests in parallel. Arrays have therefore dramatically accelerated many types of investigations. For example, microarrays can be used to identify stress response genes by comparing gene expression in challenged versus normal cells. In the Molecular and Cellular Biology lab (MCB), the micro array experiments are performed within the Genomic Platform, fully equipped to analyse either the behaviour of bacteria during long space flight, the effect of low dose ionising radiation on the developing organism in mice, or the human individual radiation sensitivity. For the low dose effect, two main stages of development are of interest; 1) the gastrula stage at which ionizing radiation can induce several malformations. 2) the organogenesis. During brain development, epidemiological studies of the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima/Nagasaki showed increased risk of mental retardation in children of women exposed between weeks 8-15 of pregnancy or at a lower extend between weeks 15 to 25

  3. Destruction of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation and the implications for life detection on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Page, Kristian; Jorge-Villar, Susana E; Wright, Gary; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J; Ward, John M; Edwards, Howell G M

    2012-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a very effective approach for the detection of microorganisms colonising hostile environments on Earth. The ExoMars rover, due for launch in 2018, will carry a Raman laser spectrometer to analyse samples of the martian subsurface collected by the probe's 2-m drill in a search for similar biosignatures. The martian surface is unprotected from the flux of cosmic rays, an ionising radiation field that will degrade organic molecules and so diminish and distort the detectable Raman signature of potential martian microbial life. This study employs Raman spectroscopy to analyse samples of two model organisms, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the extremely radiation resistant polyextremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, that have been exposed to increasing doses of ionising radiation. The three most prominent peaks in the Raman spectra are from cellular carotenoids: deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans and β-carotene in Synechocystis. The degradative effect of ionising radiation is clearly seen, with significant diminishment of carotenoid spectral peak heights after 15 kGy and complete erasure of Raman biosignatures by 150 kGy of ionising radiation. The Raman signal of carotenoid in D. radiodurans diminishes more rapidly than that of Synechocystis, believed to be due to deinoxanthin acting as a superior scavenger of radiolytically produced reactive oxygen species, and so being destroyed more quickly than the less efficient antioxidant β-carotene. This study highlights the necessity for further experimental work on the manner and rate of degradation of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation, as this is of prime importance for the successful detection of microbial life in the martian near subsurface.

  4. Ionising radiation risk disclosure: When should radiographers assume a duty to inform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, C W E; Douglas, C; Warren-Forward, H

    2018-05-01

    Autonomy is a fundamental patient right for ethical practice, and informed consent is the mechanism by which health care professionals ensure this right has been respected. The ethical notion of informed consent has evolved alongside legal developments. Under Australian law, a provider who fails to disclose risk may be found to be in breach of a duty of disclosure, potentially facing legal consequences if the patient experiences harm that is attributable to an undisclosed risk. These consequences may include the common law tort of negligence. Ionising radiation, in the form of a medical imaging examination, has the potential to cause harm. However, stochastic effects cannot be attributable to a specific ionising radiation event. What then is the role of the Australian medical imaging service provider in disclosing ionising radiation risk? The ethical and legal principles of informed consent, and the duty of information provision to the patient are investigated. These general principles are then applied to the specific and unusual case of ionising radiation, and what responsibilities apply to the medical imaging provider. Finally, the legal, professional and ethical duties of the radiographer to disclose information to their patients are investigated. Australian law is unclear as to whether a radiographer has a common law responsibility to disclose radiation risk. There is ambiguity as to whether stochastic ionising radiation risk could be considered a legal disclosure responsibility. While it is unlikely that not disclosing risk will have medicolegal consequences, doing so represents sound ethical practice. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Properties of an electret ionisation chamber for individual dosimetry in photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Pretzsch, G.

    1985-01-01

    The main properties of individual photon dosemeters are their energy and angular dependence and their measuring range and measurement accuracy. The determination of radiation exposure from the dosemeter readout is based on the choice of appropriate conversion factors, taking into account the influence of body backscatter on the dosemeter readout. The measurement range and accuracy of an electret ionisation chamber primarily depend on the electret stability and charge state measurement as well as on the chamber geometry. Dosimetric properties are described for an electret ionisation chamber designed for personnel monitoring. (author)

  6. Biological effects induced by K photo-ionisation in and near constituent atoms of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touati, A.; Herve du Penhoot, M.A.; Fayard, B.; Champion, C.; Abel, F.; Gobert, F.; Lamoureux, M.; Politis, M.F.; Martins, L.; Ricoul, M.; Sabatier, L.; Sage, E.; Chetioui, A.

    2002-01-01

    In order to assess the lethal efficiency and other biological effects of inner shell ionisations of constituent atoms of DNA ('K' events), experiments were developed at the LURE synchrotron facility using ultrasoft X rays as a probe of K events. The lethal efficiency of ultrasoft X rays above the carbon K threshold was especially investigated using V79 cells and compared with their efficiency to induce double strand breaks in dry plasmid-DNA. A correlation between the K event efficiencies for these processes is shown. Beams of 340 eV were found to be twice as efficient at killing cells than were beams at 250 eV. In addition, a rough two-fold increase of the relative biological effectiveness for dicentric+ring induction has also been observed between 250 and 340 eV radiations. (author)

  7. Code of practice for safety in laboratory - non ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli Jaya; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Khoo Boo Huat; Khatijah Hashim

    1995-01-01

    The code identifies the non-ionizing radiation encountered in laboratories and the associated hazards. The code is intended as a laboratory standard reference document for general information on safety requirements relating to the usage of non-ionizing radiations in laboratories. The nonionizing radiations cover in this code, namely, are ultraviolet radiation, visible light, radio-frequency radiation, lasers, sound waves and ultrasonic radiation. (author)

  8. Nucleation in an ultra low ionisation environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    in aerosol nucleation. By exposing a controlled volume of air to varying levels of ionising radiation, and with the minimum ionisation level vastly reduced compared to normal surface laboratory conditions, we have provided both a validation of earlier studies of ion-induced nucleation and extended...

  9. The use of caffeine to assess high dose exposures to ionising radiation by dicentric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol, M.; Puig, R.; Caballin, M. R.; Barrios, L.; Barquinero, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Dicentric analysis is considered as a 'gold standard' method for biological dosimetry. However, due to the radiation-induced mitotic delay or inability to reach mitosis of heavily damaged cells, the analysis of dicentrics is restricted to doses up to 4-5 Gy. For higher doses, the analysis by premature chromosome condensation technique has been proposed. Here, it is presented a preliminary study is presented in which an alternative method to analyse dicentrics after high dose exposures to ionising radiation (IR) is evaluated. The method is based on the effect of caffeine in preventing the G2/M checkpoint allowing damaged cells to reach mitosis. The results obtained indicate that the co-treatment with Colcemide and caffeine increases significantly increases the mitotic index, and hence allows a more feasible analysis of dicentrics. Moreover in the dose range analysed, from 0 to 15 Gy, the dicentric cell distribution followed the Poisson distribution, and a simulated partial-body exposure has been clearly detected. Overall, the results presented here suggest that caffeine has a great potential to be used for dose-assessment after high dose exposure to IR. (authors)

  10. Dosimetry Methods for Human Exposure to Non-Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poljak, D.; Sarolic, A.; Doric, V.; Peratta, C.; Peratta, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with human exposure to electromagnetic fields from extremely low frequencies (ELF) to GSM frequencies. The problem requires (1) the assessment of external field generated by electromagnetic interference (EMI) source at a given frequency (incident field dosimetry) and then (2) the assessment of corresponding fields induced inside the human body (internal field dosimetry). Several methods used in theoretical and experimental dosimetry are discussed within this work. Theoretical dosimetry models at low frequencies are based on quasistatic approaches, while analyses at higher frequencies use the full-wave models. Experimental techniques involve near and far field measurement. Human exposure to power lines, transformer substations, power line communication (PLC) systems, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) antennas and GSM base station antenna systems is analyzed. The results o are compared to the exposure limits proposed by relevant safety guidelines. Theoretical incident dosimetry used in this paper is based on the set of Pocklington integro-differential equations for the calculation of the current distribution and subsequently radiated field from power lines. Experimental incident dosimetry techniques involve measurement techniques of fields radiated by RFID antennas and GSM base station antennas. First example set of numerical results is related to the internal dosimetry of realistic well-grounded body model exposed to vertical component of the electric field E = 10 kV/m generated by high voltage power line. The results obtained via the HNA model exceed the ICNIRP basic restrictions for public exposure (2 mA/m 2 ) in knee (8.6 mA/m 2 ) and neck (9.8 mA/m 2 ) and for occupational exposure (10 mA/m 2 ) in ankle (32 mA/m 2 ). In the case of a conceptual model of a realistic human body inside a transformer substation room touching a control panel at the potential φ0 = 400 V and with two scenarios for dry-air between worker's hand and panel, the values

  11. Quantification of complex DNA damage by ionising radiation. An experimental and theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulford, J.

    2000-05-01

    Ionising radiation potentially produces a broad spectrum of damage in DNA including single and double strand breaks (ssb and dsb) and base damages. It has been hypothesised that sites of complex damage within cellular DNA have particular biological significance due to an associated decreased efficiency in repair. The aim of this study is to gain further understanding of the formation of complex DNA damage. Irradiations of plasmid DNA illustrate that an increase in ionising density of the radiation results in a decrease in ssb yields/Gy but an increase in dsb per ssb, indicative of an increase in the number of complex damage sites per simple isolated damage site. As the mechanism for damage formation shifts from purely indirect at low scavenging capacities to a significant proportion of direct at higher scavenging capacities the proportion of complex damage increases. Comparisons with the yields of ssb and dsb simulated by Monte-Carlo calculations for Al K USX and α-particles also indicate this correspondence. The ionisation density of low energy, secondary electrons produced by photons was assessed experimentally from the dependence of the yield of OH radicals escaping intra-track recombination on photon energy. As energy decreases the OH radical yield initially decreases reflecting an increased ionisation density. However, with further decrease in photon energy the yield of OH radicals increases in line with theoretical calculations. Base damage yields were determined for low and high ionising density radiation over a range of scavenging capacities. As scavenging capacity increases the base damage: ssb ratios increases implying a contribution from electrons to base damage. It is proposed that base damage contributes to DNA damage complexity. Complex damage analysis reveals that at cell mimetic scavenging capacities, 23% and 72% of ssb have an additional spatially close damage site following γ-ray and α-particle irradiation respectively. (author)

  12. Long term effects of low doses of ionising radiation: facts and fallacies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    Health effects of low doses of ionising radiation have been a public concern. The public perception of these low effects is that it causes cancer and genetic effects. Enormous amount of work regarding this cancer has been done all over the world, on occupational workers exposed to low doses of ionising radiation. These studies do not show any adverse effect on them. Epidemiological studies done on members of public staying near nuclear facilities also have shown that there is no health risk involved in staying near these facilities. Genetic effects have also shown negative results. These two aspects of health effects of low dose of radiation are discussed in detail. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  13. Evaluation of cytogenetic damage in nuclear medicine personnel occupationally exposed to low-level ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Kopjar, N.; Poropat, M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite intensive research over the last few decades, there still remains considerable uncertainty as to the genetic impact of ionising radiation on human populations, particularly at low levels. The aim of this study was to provide data on genetic hazards associated with occupational exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in nuclear medicine departments. The assessment of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of medical staff was performed using the chromosome aberration (CA) test. Exposed subjects showed significantly higher frequencies of CA than controls. There were significant inter-individual differences in DNA damage within the exposed population, indicating differences in genome sensitivity. Age and gender were not confounding factors, while smoking enhanced the levels of DNA damage only in control subjects. The present study suggests that chronic exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in nuclear medicine departments causes genotoxic damage. Therefore, to avoid potential genotoxic effects, the exposed medical personnel should minimise radiation exposure wherever possible. Our results also point to the significance of biological indicators providing information about the actual risk to the radiation exposed individuals.(author)

  14. European Communities (Foodstuffs treated with ionising radiation) Regulations, 2000. Statutory Instrument S.I. No. 297 of 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These Regulations give effect to Directive 1999/2/EC (the framework Directive) of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 February 1999 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States concerning foods and food ingredients treated with ionising radiation and Directive 1999/3/EC (the implementing Directive) of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 February 1999 on the establishment of a Community list of foods and food ingredients treated with ionising radiation. The effect of these Regulations is to lay down the general provisions for the treatment of foodstuffs with ionising radiation. Provisions concerning the approval and control of irradiation facilities and rules on labelling are also included. A positive list of foodstuffs authorised for treatment with ionising radiation and their maximum radiation doses are defined in the implementing Directive. These Regulations should be read together with the two Directives (author)

  15. Risk of ionising radiation to trainee orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ishrat A; Kamalasekaran, Senthil; Fazal, M Ali

    2012-02-01

    We undertook this study to determine the amount of scattered radiation received by the primary surgeon, assistant and patient during dynamic hip screw fixation for proximal femoral fractures. Data was collected from fifty patients. Five registrars were included as operating surgeon and four senior house officers as assistant surgeon. Radiation was monitored by thermo luminescent dosimeters placed on the surgeon and assistant. The approximate distance of surgeon and assistant from the operative site was measured. A dosimeter on the unaffected hip of patients measured the radiation to the patient. The results show that the surgeon's dominant hand receives the highest dose of radiation and radiation exposure is dependent on the experience of the operator. Our study concludes that exposure to radiation during this procedure is well below the toxic levels; however greater awareness is needed for harmful effects of exposure to long term low dose radiation.

  16. Radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.; CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low range i.e, population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. (author)

  17. Exposure of the French paediatric population to ionising radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, Cecile; Aubert, Bernard; Mezzarobba, Myriam; Bernier, Marie-Odile

    2014-01-01

    Medical examination is the main source of artificial radiation exposure. Because children present an increased sensitivity to ionising radiation, radiology practices at a national level in paediatrics should be monitored. This study describes the ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic medical examinations of the French paediatric population in 2010. Data on frequency of examinations were provided by the French National Health Insurance through a representative sample including 107,627 children ages 0-15 years. Effective doses for each type of procedure were obtained from the published French literature. Median and mean effective doses were calculated for the studied population. About a third of the children were exposed to at least one examination using ionising radiation in 2010. Conventional radiology, dental exams, CT scans and nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent respectively 55.3%, 42.3%, 2.1% and 0.3% of the procedures. Children 10-15 years old and babies from birth to 1 year are the most exposed populations, with respectively 1,098 and 734 examinations per 1,000 children per year. Before 1 year of age, chest and pelvis radiographs are the most common imaging tests, 54% and 32%, respectively. Only 1% of the studied population is exposed to CT scan, with 62% of these children exposed to a head-and-neck procedure. The annual median and mean effective doses were respectively 0.03 mSv and 0.7 mSv for the exposed children. This study gives updated reference data on French paediatric exposure to medical ionising radiation that can be used for public health or epidemiological purposes. Paediatric diagnostic use appears much lower than that of the whole French population as estimated in a previous study. (orig.)

  18. Exposure of the French paediatric population to ionising radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, Cecile; Aubert, Bernard [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Medical Expertise Unit, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Mezzarobba, Myriam [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/PRP-HOM/SRBE/LEPID, Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Medical examination is the main source of artificial radiation exposure. Because children present an increased sensitivity to ionising radiation, radiology practices at a national level in paediatrics should be monitored. This study describes the ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic medical examinations of the French paediatric population in 2010. Data on frequency of examinations were provided by the French National Health Insurance through a representative sample including 107,627 children ages 0-15 years. Effective doses for each type of procedure were obtained from the published French literature. Median and mean effective doses were calculated for the studied population. About a third of the children were exposed to at least one examination using ionising radiation in 2010. Conventional radiology, dental exams, CT scans and nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent respectively 55.3%, 42.3%, 2.1% and 0.3% of the procedures. Children 10-15 years old and babies from birth to 1 year are the most exposed populations, with respectively 1,098 and 734 examinations per 1,000 children per year. Before 1 year of age, chest and pelvis radiographs are the most common imaging tests, 54% and 32%, respectively. Only 1% of the studied population is exposed to CT scan, with 62% of these children exposed to a head-and-neck procedure. The annual median and mean effective doses were respectively 0.03 mSv and 0.7 mSv for the exposed children. This study gives updated reference data on French paediatric exposure to medical ionising radiation that can be used for public health or epidemiological purposes. Paediatric diagnostic use appears much lower than that of the whole French population as estimated in a previous study. (orig.)

  19. Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation: RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift from acclimation to survival strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Nauts, Robin; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plant species. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treatments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stress in plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morphological and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7days in a dose-rate dependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosynthetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined the gene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expression data reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by triggering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes related to antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting that only high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the photosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study, supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towards survival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Problems associated with the effects of low doses of ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This book is the English version of the report number 34 of the Academie des Sciences, published in October 1995, and entitled 'Problemes lies aux effets des faibles doses des radiations ionisantes'. This report had been endorsed by CODER (Comite des Etudes et Rapports) on February 7, 1995. In dealing with problems associated with ionising radiation, a wide range of important aspects must be taken into account and many different international bodies are concerned with them. It was therefore though useful to make the report available in English. Several additions have been made to the original edition: it has been complemented with three appendices on the cellular, molecular and genetic effects of exposure to low doses of ionising radiations ; it was though useful to give, in addition to the references of the chapters and appendices, a summary of the main relevant work published by French research teams over the past few years; an addendum quotes some of the important contributions made over the past year; a symposium devoted to the effects of low doses of ionising radiations, and to repair enzyme systems will be organized by the Academy at the end of 1997. This will provide the opportunity to re-explore the situation in the light of the data accumulated at that time. This field is evolving rapidly and a periodic evaluation of the new data is mandatory. (authors)

  1. Health protection of persons occupationally exposed to ionising radiation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavalic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the health condition of workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The results for 1406 workers exposed to ionising radiations, who were regularly examined in 2004, were analysed using Statistica 5.0. The analysis included workers' case histories, frequency of illnesses and causes of temporary or permanent work disability. Of 1406 workers, 16 (1.13%) were found permanently disabled; in 11 the cause of disability was lens opacity, in 2 persistent trombocitophenia, and in 2 malignant tumour. Twenty-four workers were temporarily disabled, of whom 5 due to pregnancy. Thrombocytopenia was found in 12 men and only one woman. Anaemia was found in 4 women; dicentric chromosomes were the cause of temporary disability in one person, and tuberculosis in one person. Medical examinations of Croatian workers confirm low occupational exposure to ionising radiation. With this type of radiation, the established lens impairments could not be characterised as occupational. The two malignant tumours however were recognised as occupational diseases.(author)

  2. Search for ionisation density effects in the radiation absorption stage in LiF:Mg,Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nail, I.; Horowitz, Y. S.; Oster, L.; Brandan, M. E.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Avila, O.; Tovar, V. M.; Olko, P.; Ipe, N.

    2006-01-01

    Optical absorption (OA) dose-response of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) is studied as a function of electron energy (ionisation density) and irradiation dose. Contrary to the situation in thermoluminescence dose-response where the supra-linearity is strongly energy-dependent, no dependence of the OA dose filling constants on energy is observed. This result is interpreted as indicating a lack of competitive process in the radiation absorption stage. The lack of an energy dependence of the dose filling constant also suggests that the charge carrier migration distances are sufficiently large to smear out the differences in the non-uniform distribution of ionisation events created by the impinging gamma/ electron radiation of various energies. (authors)

  3. Voxel anthropomorphic phantoms: review of models used for ionising radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemosquet, A.; Carlan, L. de; Clairand, I.

    2003-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have been used since the 1970's for dosimetric calculations. Realistic geometries are required for this operation, resulting in the development of ever more accurate phantoms. Voxel phantoms, consisting of a set of small-volume elements, appeared towards the end of the 1980's, and significantly improved on the original mathematical models. Voxel phantoms are models of the human body, obtained using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images (MRI). These phantoms are an extremely accurate representation of the human anatomy. This article provides a review of the literature available on the development of these phantoms and their applications in ionising radiation dosimetry. The bibliographical study has shown that there is a wide range of phantoms, covering various characteristics of the general population in terms of sex, age or morphology, and that they are used in applications relating to all aspects of ionising radiation. (author)

  4. The risk of low doses of ionising radiation and the linear no threshold relationship debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Masse, R.; Vathaire, F. de; Averbeck, D.; Aurengo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP and the B.E.I.R. VII reports recommend a linear no threshold (L.N.T.) relationship for the estimation of cancer excess risk induced by ionising radiations (IR), but the 2005 report of Medicine and Science French Academies concludes that it leads to overestimate of risk for low and very low doses. The bases of L.N.T. are challenged by recent biological and animal experimental studies which show that the defence against IR involves the cell microenvironment and the immunologic system. The defence mechanisms against low doses are different and comparatively more effective than for high doses. Cell death is predominant against low doses. DNA repairing is activated against high doses, in order to preserve tissue functions. These mechanisms provide for multicellular organisms an effective and low cost defence system. The differences between low and high doses defence mechanisms are obvious for alpha emitters which show several greys threshold effects. These differences result in an impairment of epidemiological studies which, for statistical power purpose, amalgamate high and low doses exposure data, since it would imply that cancer IR induction and defence mechanisms are similar in both cases. Low IR dose risk estimates should rely on specific epidemiological studies restricted to low dose exposures and taking precisely into account potential confounding factors. The preliminary synthesis of cohort studies for which low dose data (< 100 mSv) were available show no significant risk excess, neither for solid cancer nor for leukemias. (authors)

  5. Decontamination of hospital wastes by the combined action of ionising radiation and heat - the thermorad process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icre, P.; Rocquigny, H. de

    1995-01-01

    The Thermorad process is used for decontaminating hospital wastes at the hospital as they are collected from the different departments. The process utilises the combined microbiological effects of ionising radiation (5 kGy) and dry heat (60 o C). The treatment unit, which is compact and of small size, contains a cobalt 60 source of under 100,000 curies and has an annual treatment capacity of 5000 m 3 . (author)

  6. The design of a calorimetric standard of ionising radiation absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntley, R.B.

    1981-05-01

    The design of a calorimetric working standard of ionising radiation absorbed dose is discussed. A brief history of the appropriate quantities and units of measurement is given. Detailed design considerations follow a summary of the relevant literature. The methods to be used to relate results to national standards of measurement are indicated, including the need for various correction factors. A status report is given on the construction and testing program

  7. An isotope view on ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Bork, Nicolai Christian; Hattori, S.

    2012-01-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a miss...... yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion....

  8. An isotopic analysis of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Bork, Nicolai Christian; Hattori, S.

    2012-01-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a miss...... of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion....

  9. The philosophy and assumptions underlying exposure limits for ionising radiation, inorganic lead, asbestos and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akber, R.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: A review of the literature relating to exposure to, and exposure limits for, ionising radiation, inorganic lead, asbestos and noise was undertaken. The four hazards were chosen because they were insidious and ubiquitous, were potential hazards in both occupational and environmental settings and had early and late effects depending on dose and dose rate. For all four hazards, the effect of the hazard was enhanced by other exposures such as smoking or organic solvents. In the cases of inorganic lead and noise, there were documented health effects which affected a significant percentage of the exposed populations at or below the [effective] exposure limits. This was not the case for ionising radiation and asbestos. None of the exposure limits considered exposure to multiple mutagens/carcinogens in the calculation of risk. Ionising radiation was the only one of the hazards to have a model of all likely exposures, occupational, environmental and medical, as the basis for the exposure limits. The other three considered occupational exposure in isolation from environmental exposure. Inorganic lead and noise had economic considerations underlying the exposure limits and the exposure limits for asbestos were based on the current limit of detection. All four hazards had many variables associated with exposure, including idiosyncratic factors, that made modelling the risk very complex. The scientific idea of a time weighted average based on an eight hour day, and forty hour week on which the exposure limits for lead, asbestos and noise were based was underpinned by neither empirical evidence or scientific hypothesis. The methodology of the ACGIH in the setting of limits later brought into law, may have been unduly influenced by the industries most closely affected by those limits. Measuring exposure over part of an eight hour day and extrapolating to model exposure over the longer term is not the most effective way to model exposure. The statistical techniques used

  10. Epidemiological methods of assessing risks from low level occupational exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissland, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The resolution of radiation-attributable malignancies from the background of malignancies which are responsible for about 20% of all deaths in the Western world, presents a formidable challenge to epidemiological methods. Some of the major difficulties facing those with the task of estimating the risks associated with exposure to low level ionising radiation are discussed, particularly in the context of radiological protection. Some of the studies currently in progress are summarised and suggestions are made for other work which may help to contribute to a better understanding of the quantitative aspects of radiation risk assessment. (author)

  11. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations. Part 1: Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteventi, F.; Sermenghi, I.

    1999-01-01

    The ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) calibration service for ionizing radiations has been active for 40 years in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory web. It has been the first center, in 1985, to be acknowledges by the Italian calibration service (SIT) for the two quantities for photons: exposure and air kerma. Since the Institute for the Radiation Protection of ENEA has moved to the new site in Montecuccolino (Bologna, Italy) in 1995, the whole laboratory has been renovated and all irradiation rooms together with radiation source and equipment have been reorganized according to the Χ, γ, β and neutron fields metrology requirements. The aim of this report, as the first part of a report describing all facilities available at the service, is to give a detailed description of all equipment s qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters [it

  12. The causes and consequences of human exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Few phenomena cause as much concern in developed countries as human exposure to artificial sources of radiation, and yet there are more potent threats to health: natural radiation is more pervasive and exposures more substantial; common practices such as smoking and drinking are more detrimental. Developing countries may be more anxious to establish radiological procedures than radiological protection. This paper gives the ranges of exposure to which people are subjected from natural and artificial sources which should help to put all doses in perspective. The relationship between dose and risk is established and used to show that exposures to radiation leak to low levels of risk. Finally, the new recommendations of ICRP for the control of radiation risk are presented. (Author)

  13. Teaching about radioactivity and ionising radiation: an alternative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, R.; Klaassen, K.; Eijkelhof, H.

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews children's ideas about radiation and radioactivity and identifies several common areas of misunderstanding. A new approach to teaching the topic at school level, which seeks specifically to address these known difficulties, is then proposed and outlined. (author)

  14. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehm, W.; Woda, C.; Fantuzzi, E.; Harrison, R.; Schuhmacher, H.; Neumaier, S.; Vanhavere, F.; Alves, J.; Bottollier Depois, J.F.; Fattibene, P.; Knezevic, Z.; Miljanic, S.; Lopez, M. A.; Mayer, S.; Olko, P.; Stadtmann, H.; Tanner, R.

    2016-01-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS web site (www.eurados.org). (authors)

  15. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation. Proceedings of the RISC-RAD specialised training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.

    2008-12-01

    The training course 'Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation' took place at the STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland 14-16 February 2005. Proceeding of this course is collected in this volume. The idea of the course was to convene a number of scientists leading in the area of non-targeted effects of ionising radiation with the aim to outline their visions for the role of these effects and outline the future directions of radiation research on the basis of their expertise. The course was supported by the RISC-RAD IP FI6R-CT-2003-508842, Euratom specific programme for research and training on nuclear energy, 6th FP of the EC. The main objectives of the training course were: (1) to clarify the mechanisms of non-targeted effects, in particular, bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response; (2) to look if and how non-targeted effects modulate the cancer risk in the low dose region, and whether they relate to protective or harmful functions; (3) to clarify if ionising radiation can cause non-cancer diseases or beneficial effects at low and intermediate doses; (4) address the issue of individual susceptibility and other factors modifying non-targeted responses; (5) attempt to assess the relevance of non-targeted effects for radiation protection and to set the scientific basis for a modern, more realistic, radiation safety system; (6) and finally to contribute to the conceptualisation of a new paradigm in radiation biology that would cover both the classical direct (DNA-targeted) and non-targeted (indirect) effects

  16. How do air ions reflect variations in ionising radiation in the lower atmosphere in a boreal forest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ion production in the atmosphere is attributed to ionising radiation. In the lower atmosphere, ionising radiation consists mainly of the decay emissions of radon and its progeny, gamma radiation of the terrestrial origin as well as photons and elementary particles of cosmic radiation. These types of radiation produce ion pairs via the ionisation of nitrogen and oxygen as well as trace species in the atmosphere, the rate of which is defined as the ionising capacity. Larger air ions are produced out of the initial charge carriers by processes such as clustering or attachment to pre-existing aerosol particles. This study aimed (1 to identify the key factors responsible for the variability in ionising radiation and in the observed air ion concentrations, (2 to reveal the linkage between them and (3 to provide an in-depth analysis into the effects of ionising radiation on air ion formation, based on measurement data collected during 2003–2006 from a boreal forest site in southern Finland. In general, gamma radiation dominated the ion production in the lower atmosphere. Variations in the ionising capacity came from mixing layer dynamics, soil type and moisture content, meteorological conditions, long-distance transportation, snow cover attenuation and precipitation. Slightly similar diurnal patterns to variations in the ionising capacity were observed in air ion concentrations of the cluster size (0.8–1.7 nm in mobility diameters. However, features observed in the 0.8–1 nm ion concentration were in good connection to variations of the ionising capacity. Further, by carefully constraining perturbing variables, a strong dependency of the cluster ion concentration on the ionising capacity was identified, proving the functionality of ionising radiation in air ion production in the lower atmosphere. This relationship, however, was only clearly observed on new particle formation (NPF days, possibly indicating that charges after

  17. Ionising radiations, radioactive materials and the fire services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Button, J.C.E.

    1981-05-01

    Extensive experience has shown that ionizing radiations and radioactive materials can be used safely in a wide variety of applications, provided a number of precautions are implemented. Transport of radioactive materials is common and regulations designed to ensure safety in such transport have resulted in an excellent safety record. Pre-planning for fire situations in buildings where radioactive materials are known to be present is very desirable. An Australian Standard, AS2243, recommends that Station Officers of the local fire brigade be appraised of the hazards and the need to take particular care in areas marked with ionizing radiation warning signs

  18. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, W; Fantuzzi, E; Harrison, R; Schuhmacher, H; Vanhavere, F; Alves, J; Bottollier Depois, J F; Fattibene, P; Knežević, Ž; Lopez, M A; Mayer, S; Miljanić, S; Neumaier, S; Olko, P; Stadtmann, H; Tanner, R; Woda, C

    2016-02-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS website (www.eurados.org). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The ionising radiation effect on reactivation of antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikij, I.L.; Manskij, A.A.; Krasnopyorova, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of gamma-radiation on the molecular structure of antibiotics was studied with a view to extending their useful life beyond the current expiration period. The following antibiotics were examined: penicillin, bicillin-3,5, streptomycine, and ampioxe. The samples were irradiated by Co-60 gamma-radiation from a research irradiator. Doses of 0.1, 1, 5, 7, and 10 Gy were applied. The processes were elucidated using the classical method of 2-divisible serial dilutions and IR-spectroscopy. All the measurements were carried out at 300 K. The IR-spectra revealed that the chemical structure of new and old antibiotics is identical; the change in the antibiotic activity is generally a result of deformation of the molecule or change in its conformation; the reactivation process returns the molecule to its previous state and the activity of antibiotic after reactivation meets established standards. Hence, this method can be used for the reactivation of expired antibiotics

  20. The non ionizing radiations; Les rayonnements non ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchia, P. [Institut National de la Sante, Lab. de Physique, Rome (Italy); Souques, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service des Etudes Medicales, 75 - Paris (France); Lambrozo, J. [EDF/GDF, Service des Etudes Medicales, 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    The biological effects of non ionizing radiations are studied in this part. The magnetic fields and the cardiac implants, melatonin secretion among the electricians exposed to magnetic fields of 50 hz, the effects of electromagnetic fields in professional medium, evaluation of the effect of an exposure to a signal of a mobile phone (GSM 900) on the skin are the different subjects discussed. (N.C.)

  1. Health effects of low dose ionising radiation - recent advances and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of this unusual interdisciplinary conference encompass the work of doctors, industrialists and civil servants. The discussion covers the investigation and quantification of dose response relationships for the various damaging effects of low level ionising radiation and a unified system for expressing biological damage, together with the results of epidemiological studies using models and data from the UK, Europe, Australia and the USA (including data base systems for assembling and validating data), the effects of background radiation (gamma ray and radon exposure), clustering studies, safety standards, radioactive waste discharge control and limitation through legislation and the monitoring of radioactivity in food. (author)

  2. Effect of ionising radiation exposure on structure and permeability of epithelial junctions in rat ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrum, F.; Dublineau, I.; Grison, S.; Strup, C.; Griffiths, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of the digestive tract to ionising radiation results in both morphological and functional alterations of the small intestine. However little is known about the effect of irradiation on the junctions playing a major role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier integrity. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate, in rat ileum, the effect of radiation exposure on the permeability of the epithelial barrier in parallel with the localization of certain inter- and intra-cellular proteins of tight and adherent junctions

  3. Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2014-07-10

    This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications\\/relevance of the effect.

  4. Cytogenetic monitoring of nuclear workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Slapsyte, G.; Mierauskiene, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome aberration (CA) analysis using Giemsa techniques was performed in blood lymphocytes of 84 nuclear workers with cumulative doses of 1-632 mSv during employment periods of 1-25 y. The control group comprised 82 healthy male donors. An estimated CA frequency in the total radiation-exposed group was significantly higher when compared with the controls (2.27 vs. 1.76 CA/100 cells, p 0.05). However, significant increase in the total CA frequency was determined in workers with additional internal exposure (2.54 CA/100 cells, p < 0.05) and those with registered neutron doses (2.95 CA/100 cells, p < 0.01). No correlation was found between CA frequency and occupational exposure dose. Borderline significant correlation was found between duration of employment and total CA (r = 0.218, p = 0.046, Fig. 2) and chromosome-type aberration (r = 0.265, p = 0.015) frequency. (authors)

  5. Improved communication, understanding of risk perception and ethics related to ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Tanja; Raskob, Wolfgang; Jourdain, Jean-Rene

    2016-06-06

    In Europe today, institutions, media and the general public exchange information about ionizing radiation and associated risks. However, communication about ionising radiation with the general public has to be further improved, as has been previously highlighted by international responses to the 2011 accident in Japan. This article reports the main activities and findings in this field from the following three FP7 projects: EAGLE, PREPARE and OPERRA and discussed by a broad spectrum of stakeholders at the conference RICOMET 2015. These projects, among other aims, also investigate how communication about ionising radiation in different fields could be improved and harmonised, how radiological risks are perceived, how to encourage ethical considerations in all fields of nuclear applications and what kind of transdisciplinary research is needed. The projects relate to several domains; the first relates to education, training and communication, the second to nuclear emergency preparedness and response, and the third to research and development in the radiation protection field. Incorporation of stakeholder engagement activities such as the RICOMET conference broadens social and ethical aspects and takes them into account during coordination activities as well as during core scientific and nuclear research and development performed in the projects. These activities offered opportunities for moving closer to a citizen-centred ideal of risk communication in particular and nuclear research and development in general.

  6. Radiation in the workplace-a review of studies of the risks of occupational exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Many individuals are, or have been, exposed to ionising radiation in the course of their work and the epidemiological study of occupationally irradiated groups offers an important opportunity to complement the estimates of risks to health resulting from exposure to radiation that are obtained from other populations, such as the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Moreover, workplace exposure to radiation usually involves irradiation conditions that are of direct relevance to the principal concern of radiological protection: protracted exposure to low level radiation. Further, some workers have been exposed to radioactive material that has been inadvertently taken into the body, and the study of these groups leads to risk estimates derived directly from the experience of those irradiated by these 'internal emitters', intakes of α-particle-emitters being of particular interest. Workforces that have been the subject of epidemiological study include medical staff, aircrews, radium dial luminisers, underground hard-rock miners, Chernobyl clean-up workers, nuclear weapons test participants and nuclear industry workers. The first solid epidemiological evidence of the stochastic effects of irradiation came from a study of occupational exposure to medical x-rays that was reported in 1944, which demonstrated a large excess risk of leukaemia among US radiologists; but the general lack of dose records for early medical staff who tended to experience the highest exposures hampers the derivation of risks per unit dose received by medical workers. The instrument dial luminisers who inadvertently ingested large amounts of radium-based paint and underground hard-rock miners who inhaled large quantities of radon and its decay products suffered markedly raised excess risks of, respectively, bone and lung cancers; the miner studies have provided standard risk estimates for radon-induced lung cancer. The large numbers of nuclear industry

  7. A front-end ASIC for ionising radiation monitoring with femto-amp capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voulgari, E.; Noy, M.; Anghinolfi, F.; Perrin, D.; Krummenacher, F.; Kayal, M.

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-low leakage current Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) called Utopia (Ultralow Picoammeter) has been designed and fabricated in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS, in order to be used as the front-end for ionising radiation monitoring at CERN. It is based on the topology of a Current to Frequency Converter (CFC) through charge balancing and demonstrates a wide dynamic range of 8.5 decades without range changing. Due to a design aimed at minimising input leakage currents, input currents as low as 01 fA can be measured

  8. The low dose gamma ionising radiation impact upon cooperativity of androgen-specific proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filchenkov, Gennady N; Popoff, Eugene H; Naumov, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with effects of the ionising radiation (γ-IR, 0.5 Gy) upon serum testosterone (T), characteristics of testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG) and androgen receptor (AR) in parallel with observation of androgen (A) responsive enzyme activity - hexokinase (HK). The interdependence or relationships of T-levels with parameters of the proteins that provide androgenic regulation are consequently analyzed in post-IR dynamics. The IR-stress adjustment data reveal expediency of TeBG- and AR-cooperativity measurements for more precise assessments of endocrine A-control at appropriate emergencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Draft guidance notes for the protection of persons against ionising radiations arising from veterinary use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    These guidance notes have been prepared for those who use ionising radiation for diagnostic purposes in veterinary practice, either in private practices or in larger institutions. Ancillary activities such as the testing and calibration of equipment are also covered by these notes so far as they are carried out on the same premises. The guidance notes indicate procedures for the protection of all persons who may be exposed as a result of these practices, that is to say all employed and self-employed persons, apprentices and students, and members of the public. (author)

  10. Microdosimetric constraints on specific adaptation mechanisms to reduce DNA damage caused by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.; Heusser, P.; Vijayalaxmi

    1990-01-01

    The protective effect of pre-exposure of lymphocytes to ionising radiation indicates the presence of 'adaptive repair' in mammalian cells. Microdosimetric considerations, however, raise some doubts on the advantage of such a cellular mechanism for specifically reducing the radiation damage caused by environmental exposures. Contrary to most chemicals which endanger the integrity of the mammalian genome, the local dose and dose rate from ionising radiation at the cellular level remain quite high, even at lowest exposures. A single electron or alpha particle passing through a cell nucleus already yields nuclear doses of up to about 3 mGy and 400 mGy, respectively. Macroscopic doses below these nuclear doses from a single event will only reduce the fraction of cell nuclei encountering the passage of a particle but not the dose or dose rate in the affected volume. At environmental doses in the range of 1 to 5 mGy per annum, the time between two consecutive hits in a specific cell nucleus is in the range of months to years. Very low concentrations of bleomycin, a drug with high affinity to DNA, also triggers an adaptive response. This points to a more general stress response mechanism which may benefit the cell even at environmental levels of radioactivity, e.g. by protecting the integrity of DNA from attacks by chemicals, by endogenous radicals, by acids from anoxia, etc. (author)

  11. Lactobacilli and ionising radiation: an example of the application to meat and meat products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzapfel, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    Ionising radiation provides a practical pasteurisation method for the terminal treatment of refrigerated vacuum-packaged meat products with the aim of shelf life extension. However, the relatively high radiation resistance (γ-D 10 = 0.70-1.2 kGy) of typical meat Lactobacilli, especially Lb. sake, selectively favours their total domination after treatments with 5 kGy. Typical meat strains show higher resistance (in term of γ-D 10 values the decimal reduction value due to irradiation) in the log (exponential) than in the stationary phase. This phenomenon was observed both in semi-synthetic broth and in meat, and may be explained in terms of a DNA repair mechanism operative during the exponential phase. Packaging under different gas atmospheres resulted in increased resistance to radiation in presence of N 2 , whilst the highest death rate was observed in presence of CO 2 . (orig.) [de

  12. DNA double-strand breaks as potential indicators for the biological effects of ionising radiation exposure from cardiac CT and conventional coronary angiography: a randomised, controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, Dominik; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael; Knebel, Fabian [Charite Medical School, Department of Cardiology, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively compare induced DNA double-strand breaks by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). 56 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were randomised to undergo either CCA or cardiac CT. DNA double-strand breaks were assessed in fluorescence microscopy of blood lymphocytes as indicators of the biological effects of radiation exposure. Radiation doses were estimated using dose-length product (DLP) and dose-area product (DAP) with conversion factors for CT and CCA, respectively. On average there were 0.12 {+-} 0.06 induced double-strand breaks per lymphocyte for CT and 0.29 {+-} 0.18 for diagnostic CCA (P < 0.001). This relative biological effect of ionising radiation from CCA was 1.9 times higher (P < 0.001) than the effective dose estimated by conversion factors would have suggested. The correlation between the biological effects and the estimated radiation doses was excellent for CT (r = 0.951, P < 0.001) and moderate to good for CCA (r = 0.862, P < 0.001). One day after radiation, a complete repair of double-strand breaks to background levels was found in both groups. Conversion factors may underestimate the relative biological effects of ionising radiation from CCA. DNA double-strand break assessment may provide a strategy for individualised assessments of radiation. (orig.)

  13. An important step forward in continuous spectroscopic imaging of ionising radiations using ASICs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessler, P. [11 rue Rabelais, 92170 Vanves (France); Coffin, J. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Eberle, H. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Raad Iseli, C. de [Smart Silicon Systems SA, Ch. de la Graviere 6, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hilt, B. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Huss, D. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Krummenacher, F. [Smart Silicon Systems SA, Ch. de la Graviere 6, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Lutz, J.R. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Prevot, G. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Renouprez, A. [Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne (France); Sigward, M.H. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Schwaller, B. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Voltolini, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    1999-01-21

    Characterization results are given for an original ASIC allowing continuous acquisition of ionising radiation images in spectroscopic mode. Ionising radiation imaging in general and spectroscopic imaging in particular must primarily be guided by the attempt to decrease statistical noise, which requires detection systems designed to allow very high counting rates. Any source of dead time must therefore be avoided. Thus, the use of on-line corrections of the inevitable dispersion of characteristics between the large number of electronic channels of the detection system, shall be precluded. Without claiming to achieve ultimate noise levels, the work described is focused on how to prevent good individual acquisition channel noise performance from being totally destroyed by the dispersion between channels without introducing dead times. With this goal, we developed an automatic charge amplifier output voltage offset compensation system which operates regardless of the cause of the offset (detector or electronic). The main performances of the system are the following: the input equivalent noise charge is 190 e rms (input non connected, peaking time 500 ns), the highest gain is 255 mV/fC, the peaking time is adjustable between 200 ns and 2 {mu}s and the power consumption is 10 mW per channel. The agreement between experimental data and theoretical simulation results is excellent.

  14. An important step forward in continuous spectroscopic imaging of ionising radiations using ASICs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessler, P.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Raad Iseli, C. de; Hilt, B.; Huss, D.; Krummenacher, F.; Lutz, J.R.; Prevot, G.; Renouprez, A.; Sigward, M.H.; Schwaller, B.; Voltolini, C.

    1999-01-01

    Characterization results are given for an original ASIC allowing continuous acquisition of ionising radiation images in spectroscopic mode. Ionising radiation imaging in general and spectroscopic imaging in particular must primarily be guided by the attempt to decrease statistical noise, which requires detection systems designed to allow very high counting rates. Any source of dead time must therefore be avoided. Thus, the use of on-line corrections of the inevitable dispersion of characteristics between the large number of electronic channels of the detection system, shall be precluded. Without claiming to achieve ultimate noise levels, the work described is focused on how to prevent good individual acquisition channel noise performance from being totally destroyed by the dispersion between channels without introducing dead times. With this goal, we developed an automatic charge amplifier output voltage offset compensation system which operates regardless of the cause of the offset (detector or electronic). The main performances of the system are the following: the input equivalent noise charge is 190 e rms (input non connected, peaking time 500 ns), the highest gain is 255 mV/fC, the peaking time is adjustable between 200 ns and 2 μs and the power consumption is 10 mW per channel. The agreement between experimental data and theoretical simulation results is excellent

  15. Modelling the propagation of effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation from individuals to populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, F. [Laboratory of Environmental Modelling, DEI/SECRE/LME, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache, Building 159, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.alonzo@irsn.fr; Hertel-Aas, T. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1432 Aas (Norway); Gilek, M. [School of Life Sciences, Soedertoern University College, 14189 Huddinge (Sweden); Gilbin, R. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Oughton, D.H. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1432 Aas (Norway); Garnier-Laplace, J. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2008-09-15

    This study evaluated the potential effect of ionising radiation on population growth using simple population models and parameter values derived from chronic exposure experiments in two invertebrate species with contrasting life-history strategies. In the earthworm Eisenia fetida, models predicted increasing delay in population growth with increasing gamma dose rate (up to 0.6 generation times at 11 mGy h{sup -1}). Population extinction was predicted at 43 mGy h{sup -1}. In the microcrustacean Daphnia magna, models predicted increasing delay in population growth with increasing alpha dose rate (up to 0.8 generation times at 15.0 mGy h{sup -1}), only after two successive generations were exposed. The study examined population effects of changes in different individual endpoints (including survival, number of offspring produced and time to first reproduction). Models showed that the two species did not respond equally to equivalent levels of change, the fast growing daphnids being more susceptible to reduction in fecundity or delay in reproduction than the slow growing earthworms. This suggested that susceptibility of a population to ionising radiation cannot be considered independent of the species' life history.

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation in chromosome aberration detection in subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeljezic, D.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.

    2005-01-01

    For more than two decades, chromosomal aberration analysis has been used to detect structural chromosomal aberrations as sensitive biodosimeters of occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Its use is also recommended by the World Health Organisation. Changes in chromosome structure detected by that method are considered to be early biomarkers of a possible malignant disease. Aberrations detected by the method are unstable and can be found in the lymphocytes of irradiated personnel only within a limited time after exposure. To detect stable chromosomal aberrations, which persist after exposure, multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridisation has to be used. Using DNA probes labelled with different fluorochromes, it dyes each pair of chromosomes with different colour. Due to the dynamic of unstable aberration formation, chromosomal aberration analysis is more suitable in genome damage assessment of recent exposures. On the other hand, fluorescence in situ hybridisation gives the information on chromosome instability caused by long-term occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Considering the high costs of fluorescence in situ hybridisation and the uncertainty of the result, it should be used in biodosimetry only when it is absolutely necessary.(author)

  17. Risks of low dose ionising radiation exposures Riesgos derivados de la exposición a dosis bajas de radiación ionizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Real Gallego

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although ionising radiation has been shown to have several beneficial applications for humans, it can also produce detrimental effects in humans and the environment. To adequately protect man and environment from the potential harmful effects of ionising radiation, is essential to know in detail the biological effects produced by it, its characteristics and the various factors that influence these effects. That is the objective of this article, describe the current status of knowledge about biological effects induced by ionising radiation, with special emphasis on those effects occurring after low dose exposures.La radiación ionizante ha mostrado tener diversas aplicaciones beneficiosas para el hombre, pero también puede dañar la salud de las personas y el medio ambiente. Para proteger adecuadamente al hombre de los posibles efectos nocivos de la radiación ionizante es imprescindible conocer en detalle los efectos biológicos producidos por esta, sus características y los distintos factores que influyen en dichos efectos. Ese es el objetivo de este artículo: describir el estado actual del conocimiento sobre los efectos biológicos que puede producir la radiación ionizante, con especial énfasis en aquellos efectos que se producen tras la exposición a dosis bajas.

  18. Characterisation of ionisation chambers for a mixed radiation field and investigation of their suitability as radiation monitors for the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Perrin, D; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring of the radiation environment is one of the key tasks in operating a high-energy accelerator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The radiation fields consist of neutrons, charged hadrons as well as photons and electrons with energy spectra extending from those of thermal neutrons up to several hundreds of GeV. The requirements for measuring the dose equivalent in such a field are different from standard uses and it is thus necessary to investigate the response of monitoring devices thoroughly before the implementation of a monitoring system can be conducted. For the LHC, it is currently foreseen to install argon- and hydrogen-filled high-pressure ionisation chambers as radiation monitors of mixed fields. So far their response to these fields was poorly understood and, therefore, further investigation was necessary to prove that they can serve their function well enough. In this study, ionisation chambers of type IG5 (Centronic Ltd) were characterised by simulating their response functions by means of detailed FLUKA calculations as well as by calibration measurements for photons and neutrons at fixed energies. The latter results were used to obtain a better understanding and validation of the FLUKA simulations. Tests were also conducted at the CERF facility at CERN in order to compare the results with simulations of the response in a mixed radiation field. It is demonstrated that these detectors can be characterised sufficiently enough to serve their function as radiation monitors for the LHC.

  19. First Glossary of Modern Physics and Ionising Radiation Protection in Croatian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodilo, M.; Petkovic, T.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation and encouragement for the Glossary were given as the research theme for the joint seminar between the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing and Rudjer Boskovic Institute, within a postgraduate course subject ''Detectors and electronic instrumentation for particle physics''. A basic motivation is due to a lack of specialized literature in Croatian language in the field of protection of ionising radiation as well as the incompleteness of Croatian terminology in the same field. That is a general problem all over the World because the most glossaries are usually connected either with nuclear power plants or with an application of ionising radiation in medicine. On the other hand, a necessity for the specialized literature for radiation protection which follows a development of modern particle physics and its detection technique is rapidly growing up. A work and development on the Glossary were faced with serious difficulties, since various translations of foreign words and acronyms have already been used by various authors in Croatian literature. Different interpretations of the same term or concept, from diverse sources, had to be very often reconciled. However, the biggest challenge was finding proper Croatian words for the foreign terms, concepts, properties, and quantities which have not yet been commonly used so far in Croatian papers or/and Croatian legislative acts. According to our knowledge this seems to be the first comprehensive Glossary, describing the field of ionising radiation protection and bringing of 300 related entries (terms and guidelines). That is, certainly, the first characteristic Thesaurus in Croatian which includes background of modern physics and chemistry, particle phenomenology and its measurement, all dedicated to the radiological protection of workers, environment and people of the World. A Glossary brings a wide spectrum of terms of broad area of chemistry, radiation protection, nuclear and particle physics. A

  20. Germany (Federal Republic). Ministry of the Interior. Order on protection against damage due to ionising radiation. Radiation Protectin Order. StrlSchV 20 Oct. 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-02-01

    The order is arranged in parts, entitled: introductory provisions; control provisions (handling radioactive matter, the carriage of radioactive matter, the import and export of radioactive matter, the construction and operation of installation for generating ionising radiation, employees and other persons working under supervision, design approval); safety regulations (general regulations, protection of the population and the environment against the hazards of ionising radiation, occupational exposure to radiation, radiation protection areas, physical protection and control, medical supervision, instruments for measuring radiation, other safety regulations); fines; and final provisions. (U.K.)

  1. Applying the ionising radiation regulations to radon in the UK workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    As a response to the identification of a health risk from workplace radon in the UK, the Ionising Radiations Regulations include the protection of workers from excessive levels of radon. Employers are required to make risk assessments, and the interpretation of the Health and Safety Executive is that the regulations apply to workplace premises in locations already designated as Radon Affected Areas for domestic purposes, with the difference that in workplaces, it is the maximum winter radon concentration rather than the annual average which is the parameter of interest. This paper discusses the rationale behind the current regulatory environment, outlines the role and duties of Accredited Radiation Protection Advisers and summarises the strategies necessary to conform to the regulations. (authors)

  2. Guidance notes for the protection of persons against ionising radiations arising from medical and dental use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Guidance notes have been prepared by the NRPB, the Health Departments and the Health and Safety Executive for the protection of all persons against ionising radiations arising from medical and dental use. The guidance notes are a guide to good radiation protection practice consistent with regulatory requirements. The areas covered include medical and dental radiology, diagnostic X-ray equipment for medical and dental radiography, beam therapy and remotely controlled after-loading, brachytherapy, diagnostic and therapeutic uses of unsealed radioactive substances, diagnostic uses of sealed or other solid radioactive sources, patients leaving hospital after administration of radioactive substances, precautions after death of a patient whom radioactive substances have been administered, storage and movement of radioactive substances, disposal of radioactive waste and contingency planning and emergency procedures. (U.K.)

  3. The ionising radiations: a daily reality Las radiaciones ionizantes: una realidad cotidiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gallego Díaz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduce the nature of the radioactive substances and of the ionising radiation, the effects that they cause on the matter and the available media for their detection and measure, as well as the sources of natural radiation, to which the human being are exposed. Next, in the more detailed part of this paper, it is described the wide range of ionising radiations uses in: medicine, agriculture, earth sciences, biology and in some other scientific fields, that allow to pose its impact in the perspective of facing the ones from natural sources. The article concludes that for avoiding damages it is necessary proper protection against the radioactive substances, but avoiding limitation their beneficial uses in the various ranges described. For finishing this paper, the basic principles of radiation protection are described, due to they are the its principal aim.Este trabajo introduce la naturaleza de las sustancias radiactivas y de la radiación ionizante, los efectos que causa sobre la materia y los medios disponibles para su detección y medida, así como las fuentes de radiación naturales a las que los seres humanos estamos expuestos. Seguidamente, en el apartado más amplio del trabajo, se describen las múltiples aplicaciones de las radiaciones ionizantes en la medicina, la agricultura, la industria, las ciencias de la tierra, la biología y otras ramas, lo que permite poder poner su impacto en perspectiva frente al de las fuentes naturales. La tesis final del artículo es que para evitar sufrir daños resulta necesario protegerse adecuadamente de los efectos nocivos de la radiación y las sustancias radiactivas, pero sin limitar innecesariamente su utilización beneficiosa en los numerosos ámbitos descritos. Ese es el objetivo fundamental de la protección radiológica, cuyos principios básicos se presentan para terminar.

  4. Alteration of the digestive motility linked with radiation-induced inflammatory processes in rats; Alterations de la motricite digestive associees aux processus inflammatoires induits par les rayonnements ionisants chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, C

    2000-12-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation, whether accidental or for medical reasons, may lead to gastro-intestinal injury, characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. The aetiology of radiation-induced diarrhea remains to date unclear. In this study, we have investigated the acute effects of a 10 Gy abdominal irradiation on rat digestive functions. The objective of the first study was to evaluate the role of sensory afferent neurons, capsaicin-sensitive, on morphological changes and the inflammatory response following exposure. Three days after irradiation, we observed an inflammatory response characterized by neutrophils infiltration and mast cells de-granulation. No effect of capsaicin pre-treatment was seen on these parameters. However, neutrophils infiltration was increased as early as one day after irradiation in capsaicin-treated rats. No difference in severity of diarrhea was observed after denervation nor in morphological changes. These data demonstrate that abdominal irradiation results in diarrhea concomitant with an inflammatory response, and that sensory innervation does not play a major protective role. The objective of the rest of the work was in the first instance to characterize radiation-induced alterations of intestinal and colonic motility leading to diarrhea and secondly to evaluate the role of serotonin in such disorders. Perturbations in intestinal (MMC) and colonic (LSB) motor profiles were observed from the first day onwards. Migrating motor complexes (MMC) were completely disrupted at three days at the same time as the onset of diarrhea. In addition to inhibition of LSB, colonic fluid absorptive capacity was decreased and serotonin colonic tissue levels were increased three days after irradiation. Radiation-induced diarrhea was reduced by treatment with an antagonist of 5-HT{sub 3} receptors, granisetron, as were alterations of colonic motility and serotonin tissue levels. However, this treatment did not significantly ameliorate

  5. Statutory Instruments No 144 of 1994. European Communities (Protection of outside workers from ionising radiation) Regulations, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    These Regulations implement Council Directive 90/641 EURATOM of 4 December, 1990 on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas. The Regulations provide for the radiation protection of workers liable to receive an exposure of high radiation levels while working away from their employers' premises. The Regulations also apply to workers who come from, or who go to work in, another Member State of the European Community

  6. Testing of the effect of the entry beam tube windows of the silicon detectors of the ionisation radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopestansky, J.; Tykva, R.; Stanek, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with testing of the entry beam tube windows of the silicon detectors of the ionisation radiation with surface barrier.The influence of the parameters of basic material and modified technologic preparation on the size and homogeneity of the windows was tested

  7. Effects of low-dose ionising radiation on pituitary adenoma: is there a role for L-type calcium channel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia]. E-mail: santosr@cdtn.br

    2005-10-15

    Pituitary adenomas constitute about 6-18% of brain tumours in adults. Activation of voltage gated calcium currents can account for growth hormone over secretion in some GH-secreting pituitary adenomas that produce an acromegaly appearance and increase mortality. Ca{sup 2+} ions, as mediators of intracellular signalling, are crucial for the development of apoptosis. However, the role of [Ca{sup 2+}] in the development of apoptosis is ambiguous. In this study, the effects of low-dose ionising gamma radiation ({sup 60} Co) on rat pituitary adenoma cells survival and proliferation and the role of calcium channels on the apoptosis radio-induced were evaluated. Doses as low as 3 Gy were found to inhibit GH3 cell proliferation. Even though there was a significant number of live cells,168 hours following irradiation, they were not able to proliferate. The results indicate that the blockade of extracellular calcium influx through these channels does not interfere in the radiation-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. (author)

  8. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation (note). A new European integrated project, 2006-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, S.; Wright, E.G.; Hildebrandt, G.; Kadhim, M.; Little, M.P.; Prise, K.M.; Belyakov, O.V.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The general objectives of the NOTE project are: (1) to investigate the mechanisms of nontargeted effects, in particular, bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response; (2) to investigate if and how non-targeted effects modulate the cancer risk in the low dose region, and whether they relate to protective or harmful functions; (3) to investigate if ionising radiation can cause non-cancer diseases or beneficial effects at low and intermediate doses; (4) to investigate individual susceptibility and other factors modifying non-targeted responses; (5) to assess the relevance of non-targeted effects for radiation protection and to set the scientific basis for a modern, more realistic, radiation safety system; (6) to contribute to the conceptualisation of a new paradigm in radiation biology that would cover both the classical direct (DNA-targeted) and non-targeted (indirect) effects. The NOTE brings together 19 major European and Canadian groups involved in the discovery, characterisation and mechanistic investigation of non-targeted effects of ionising radiation in cellular, tissue and animal models. The NOTE research activities are organised in six work packages. Four work packages (WPs 2-5) are problem-oriented, focussing on major questions relevant for the scientific basis of the system of radiation protection: WP2 Mechanisms of non-targeted effects, WP3 Non-cancer diseases, WP4 Factors modifying non-targeted responses, WP5 Modelling of non-targeted effects. The integration activities provided by WP6 strengthen the collaboration by supporting the access to infrastructures, mobility and training. WP7 provides dissemination and exploitation activities in the form of workshops and a public website. Managerial activities (WP1) ensure the organisation and structures for decision making, monitoring of progress, knowledge management and efficient flow of information and financing. Coordinator of the NOTE project is Prof

  9. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisko Salomaa

    2006-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  10. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisko Salomaa [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  11. Revisiting Bragg's X-ray microscope: scatter based optical transient grating detection of pulsed ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Paganin, David M; Hall, Chris J

    2011-06-01

    Transient optical gratings for detecting ultrafast signals are routine for temporally resolved photochemical investigations. Many processes can contribute to the formation of such gratings; we indicate use of optically scattering centres that can be formed with highly variable latencies in different materials and devices using ionising radiation. Coherent light scattered by these centres can form the short-wavelength-to-optical-wavelength, incoherent-to-coherent basis of a Bragg X-ray microscope, with inherent scope for optical phasing. Depending on the dynamics of the medium chosen, the way is open to both ultrafast pulsed and integrating measurements. For experiments employing brief pulses, we discuss high-dynamic-range short-wavelength diffraction measurements with real-time optical reconstructions. Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Law on protection against ionising radiation and nuclear safety in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznik, B.; Krizman, M.; Skrk, D.; Tavzes, R.

    2003-01-01

    The existing legislation related to nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia was introduced in 80's. The necessity for the new law is based on the new radiation safety standards (ICRP 60) and the intention of Slovenia to harmonize the legislation with the European Union. The harmonization means adoption of the basic safety standards and other relevant directives and regulations of Euratom. The nuclear safety section of this law is based on the legally binding international conventions ratified by Slovenia. The general approach is similar to that of some members of Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD). The guidelines of the law were set by the Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning, Nuclear Safety Administration, and Ministry of Health. The expert group of the Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning and the Ministry of Health together with the representatives of the users of the ionising sources and representatives of the nuclear sector, prepared the draft of the subject law. The emphasis in this paper is given to main topics and solutions related to the control of the occupationally exposed workers, radiation safety, licensing, nuclear and waste safety, and radiation protection of people and patients. (authors)

  13. Veterinary applications of ionising radiation HERCA Task Force on Veterinary Applications. Main results of the Questionnaire 'National regulatory requirements with regard to veterinary medical applications of ionising radiation' and conclusions of the TF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Berlamont, Jolien; Michalczak, Herbert; Balogh, Lajos; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2013-11-01

    In the fall of 2012, the subject of radiation protection in veterinary medicine was raised during the meeting of the HERCA Board. Issues with regard to this subject had been brought to the attention of HERCA by the European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging (ECVDI). In October 2012, the Board decided to charge a small Task Force (TF) to further explore the issues in this field. This TF drew up a questionnaire which looked at the general radiation protection regulatory requirements in veterinary medicine applications of ionizing radiation. The results of this study showed large differences in the requirements applicable in the HERCA member countries. The TF also noticed the increasing use of more complex imaging procedures and of different radio-therapeutic modalities, which may imply greater risks of exposure of humans to ionising radiation. These results were presented during the HERCA Board meeting in Berlin, Germany and on which the Board decided to establish a Working Group on veterinary applications of ionising radiations (WG Vet). The main results of the Questionnaire 'National regulatory requirements with regard to veterinary medicine applications of ionising radiation' is attached in Appendix

  14. Nuclear and cytoplasmic signalling in the cellular response to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumiel, Irena

    2001-01-01

    DNA is the universal primary target for ionising radiation; however, the cellular response is highly diversified not only by differential DNA repair ability. The monitoring system for the ionising radiation-inflicted DNA damage consists of 3 apparently independently acting enzymes which are activated by DNA breaks: two protein kinases, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) and a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, PARP-1. These 3 enzymes are the source of alarm signals, which affect to various extents DNA repair, progression through the cell cycle and eventually the pathway to cell death. Their functions probably are partly overlapping. On the side of DNA repair their role consists in recruiting and/or activating the repair enzymes, as well as preventing illegitimate recombination of the damaged sites. A large part of the nuclear signalling pathway, including the integrating role of TP53 has been revealed. Two main signalling pathways start at the plasma membrane: the MAPK/ERK (mitogen and extracellular signal regulated protein kinase family) 'survival pathway' and the SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase) 'cell death pathway'. The balance between them is likely to determine the cell's fate. An additional important 'survival pathway' starts at the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-IR), involves phosphoinositide- 3 kinase and Akt kinase and is targeted at inactivation of the pro-apoptotic BAD protein. Interestingly, over-expression of IGF-IR almost entirely abrogates the extreme radiation sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia cells. When DNA break rejoining is impaired, the cell is unconditionally radiation sensitive. The fate of a repair-competent cell is determined by the time factor: the cell cycle arrest should be long enough to ensure the completion of repair. Incomplete repair or misrepair may be tolerated, when generation of the death signal is prevented. So, the character and timing

  15. Nailfold Capillaroscopic Monitoring as Preventive Medicine in Subjects Exposed to Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennarola, R.; Perdereau, B.; Trenta, G.; Cosset, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Capillaroscopy consists of in vivo observation of microvessels using special microscopes with a short focal length. Normally, when looking at the nail fold, where capillaroscopy is commonly used, the capillaries ares arranged like hairpins, lined up in parallel or obliquely to the field of vision in three or four layers above the subpapillary venous network, approximately 20 loops per mm''2. Ionising radiation can badly damage the skin and underlying tissues. The capillary network is among the first structures to show an effect. Moderate doses of radiation cause damage endothelial cells with hypertrophy or hyperplasia of endothelial cells, which can block capillaries while having little effect on larger vessels. Occlusion of capillaries impedes blood flow no only in nearby tissue but also in areas farther away. Capillaroscopic examination of the nail fold is irreplaceable in the field of radioprotection especially in cases of exposure of the hands. Nailfold capillaroscopic monitoring lets us observe the degree to which qualitative and quantitative alterations of the capillaries are a function of the evolution of the lesion. Therefore, for biological monitoring of subjects exposed to radiation the authors propose to use this microvascular quantitative analysis of the nailfold region. Experience, matured over many years by our team, highlights the relation between the sum of repeated exposure and the importance of tissue alterations evidenced by microcirculation. (Author) 9 refs

  16. The Assessment of DNA Damage in Poultry Spermatozoa after Exposure to Low Doses of Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuba, V.; Milic, M.; Pejakovic Hlede, J.; Gottstein, Z.; Karadjole, M.; Miljanic, S.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dose-related induction of DNA strand breaks in spermatozoa following in vitro exposure to ionising radiation represents sperm DNA integrity as an important parameter in the evaluation of semen functionality. Maintaining of normal sperm becomes even more important when it is known that DNA in semen samples is already fragmentated in certain amount in human and turkey semen and that it lacks DNA repair mechanisms making DNA damage irreversible. The aim of this paper was to provide an insight in the amount of DNA damage detected in chicken spermatozoa (5 cocks, 45 weeks old) of heavy line after radiation with doses of 0.3, 0.5, 1 and 2 Gy gamma radiation and to address the question of the potential ecological consequences of the damage that was measured with comet assay. Scored parameters included tail intensity, tail length and tail moment. Results showed sensitivity of comet assay technique that detected significant DNA damage even after exposure to 0.3 Gy, but also showed no dose-related responses after 0.5, 1 and 2 Gy. Distribution of damaged cells was widely spread for the higher doses, showing the influence of possible adaptive response, but for further conclusions, larger studies are needed to answer that question.(author)

  17. Mutation to ouabain-resistance in Chinese hamster cells: induction by ethyl methanesulphonate and lack of induction by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, J.; Stephens, M.A.; Stretch, A.

    1978-01-01

    The spontaneous frequency of mutants resistant to growth inhibition by ouabian (OUAsup(R) mutants) was found to be about 5.10 -5 per viable cell in uncloned cultures of Chinese hamster V79-4 cells. In freshly-isolated clones or cultures started from a few cells this frequency was initially reduced to about 1.10 -6 in 1 mM ouabain. No increase in the frequency of OUAsup(R) mutants was found in cultures treated with γ-rays despite exploration of such variables as radiation dose, ouabain concentration, post-treatment interval before selection, cell density in selective medium, and clonal state of the cells at the time of adding ouabain (in situ vs. respreading method). A similar negative result was found for accelerated helium ions, for which the mutagenic effectiveness per unit dose has been shown to be about 10 times higher than γ-rays for the induction of thioguanine-resistant mutants in these cells. Recent evidence is reviewed in support of the suggestion that ionising radiation is unable to induce OUAsup(R) mutants because of the severity of the genetic damage it causes. (Auth.)

  18. Occupational radiation injuries from ionising rays recorded in the Federal Republic of Germany during the period between 1953 and 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffke, R.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation of 218 occupational diseases, which were reported between 1953 and 1979 and officially recognised as being caused by ionising rays, showed these to be made up chiefly by skin disorders (61%, equally distributed over acute and chronic forms), even though considerable percentage shares were also calculated for haematological ailments (15%) and bronchial carcinomas developed by uranium miners. There was a total of 42 deaths, 32 of which were ascribed to uranium mining and 10 to haematological diseases. In all, the annual rate of occupational diseases attributed to ionising rays shows a tendency to decline, even though the number of individuals exposed to radiation is increasing. The incidence of radiation injuries was calculated to be in the order of 0.01% for persons at risk of occupational radiation exposure. (orig./EDB) [de

  19. The Design of Diagnostic Medical Facilities where Ionising Radiation is used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, J.; O'Reilly, G.; O'Connor, U.; Gallagher, A.; Sheahan, N.; Fennell, S.

    2009-06-01

    The original Code of Practice on The Design of Diagnostic Medical Facilities Using Ionising Radiation was first published by the Nuclear Energy Board in 1988. In the intervening years the 'Blue Book' as it became known has served the medical community well as the sector has expanded and modernised and the late Dr Noel Nowlan, then Chief Executive of the Nuclear Energy Board, deserves much credit for initiating this pioneering contribution to radiation safety in Ireland. There have been significant developments since its publication in terms of the underlying radiation protection legislation, regulatory practice as well as developments in new technologies that have given rise to the need for a revision of the Code. This revised Code is based on a comprehensive draft document produced by the Haughton Institute under contract to the RPII and was finalised following extensive consultations with the relevant stakeholders. The revised Code includes a brief review of the current legislative framework and its specific impact on the management of building projects (Chapters 1 and 2), a presentation of the main types of radiological (Chapter 3) and nuclear medicine (Chapter 4) facilities, a treatment of the technical aspects of shielding calculations (Chapter 5) and a discussion of the practical aspects of implementing shielding solutions in a building context (Chapter 6). The primary purpose of the Code is to assist in the design of diagnostic facilities to the highest radiation protection standards in order to ensure the safety of workers and members of the public and the delivery of a safe service to patients. Diagnostic radiology is a dynamic environment and the Code is intended to be used in consultation with the current literature, an experienced Radiation Protection Advisor and a multidisciplinary project team

  20. Regulatory control and challenges in Medical facilities using ionising radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Medical facilities utilising ionising radiation sources for diagnostic and treatment of cancer are regulated under the provisions of Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules, 2004 promulgated under the Atomic Energy Act 1962. The Competent Authority for the enforcement of the rules is Chairman, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Practice specific codes are issued by AERB for medical facilities such as Radiotherapy, Nuclear Medicine and Radiology. Regulatory process for control of medical facilities covers the entire life cycle of the radiation sources in three stages viz pre-Iicensing, during useful life and decommissioning and disposal. Pre-Iicensing requirements include use of type approved sources and equipment, approval of design layout of the facility and installation, exclusive (safe and secure) source storage facility when the equipment is not in use, radiation (area/individual) monitoring devices, qualified, trained and certified manpower, emergency response plans and commitment from the licensee for the safe disposal of disused/decayed sources. Compliance to these requirements makes the applicant eligible to obtain license from AERB for the operation of the medical facility. During the use of radiation sources, specific prior approval of the Competent Authority is required in respect of every source replacement, sale, transfer, transport, import and export. Further, all licensees are required to send the periodic safety Status reports to AERB as well as reporting of any off normal events. AERB conducts inspection of the facilities to ensure compliance with the safety requirements during operation of the facility. Violation of safety norms by licensee attracts enforcement action which includes suspension, modification or withdrawal of licensee for operation of the facility. Upon completion of the useful life of the source, the licensee decommissions the facility and returns the source to the original supplier. For returning the source, prior

  1. Framework for the Protection of the Environment from Ionising Radiation (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, P.; Brown, J.E.; Larsson, M

    2000-07-01

    A framework is proposed for the protection of the environment from ionising radiation. Key components include the assessment of the environmental transfer of radionuclides and uptake of radionuclides by organisms, the adaptation of existing dosimetric models to calculate absorbed doses and studies concerning dose-effects relationships for selected organisms. The proposed framework will also make use of 'reference' organisms, selection of which will be based on a number of criteria, e.g. radiosensitivity, ubiquity, and will involve the development of standardised biota exposure units which might integrate the Relative Biological Effect (RBE) of the radiation under consideration. In the second part of the study, initial efforts have been made to develop a computerised system in order to provide a simple example of how components of this framework may be formulated. An equilibrium absorbed dose constant model has been used for high LET (Linear Energy Transfer) radionuclides combined with the application of an absorbed fraction for {gamma}-emitting radionuclides. Generalised specific activity information for selected radionuclides from Norwegian marine environments have been used as model input data. For the radionuclides considered, total doses for marine organisms (lobster, mussels, seaweed) ranged between 1.35-2.5 mGy.y{sup -1}, mainly attributable to {sup 40}K and {sup 210}Po. Such levels are well below those where observable effects might be expected. (author)

  2. Impact of chronic, low-level ionising radiation exposure on terrestrial invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingston, J.; Wood, M.D.; Copplestone, D.; Zinger, I. [Liverpool Univ., School of Biological Sciences, Merseyside (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    There is a need to confirm that the environment is being adequately protected from the mixture of contaminants released into it. In the field of environmental radioactivity, tools have been developed to assess the impacts of ionising radiation on wildlife. The scientific data upon which these assessments are based is, however, lacking. New documentation has been produced by the UK Environment Agency to provide guidelines on structuring experiments (using environmentally relevant doses) and select suitable non-human species and endpoints for study. It is anticipated that this documentation will be used to direct future experiments in this field. This paper presents the results of the first of these experiments. Numbers of the earthworm Eisenia fetida and the wood louse Porcellio scaber were segregated and constantly exposed to one of six radiation doses (background, 0.1, 0.4, 1.5, 4.0 and 8.0 mGyh{sup -1}) for a total of 16 and 14 weeks respectively. The endpoints of mortality, number of viable offspring and average weight of an individual were recorded and the results of this study will be discussed here. (author)

  3. Effect of penetrating ionising radiation on the mechanical properties of pericardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daar, Eman, E-mail: e.daar@surrey.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Woods, E. [Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, Pond Street, Hampstead, London NW3 2QG (United Kingdom); Keddie, J.L. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-21

    The pericardium is an anistropic composite material made up of collagen and elastin fibres embedded in an amorphous matrix mainly composed of proteoglycan and hyaluronan. The collagen fibres are arranged in layers, with different directions of alignment in each layer, giving rise to interesting mechanical properties of pericardium, including the ability to undergo large deformation during performance of regular physiological functions. The present study aims to investigate the effect of penetrating photon ionising radiation on bovine pericardium tissue, being part of a study of the effect of cardiac doses received in breast radiotherapy and the possibility that this can give rise to cardiovascular complications. Irradiation doses in the range 5-80 Gy were used. To characterise the various mechanical properties [elastic modulus, stress relaxation, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and fracture] a uniaxial tensile test method was applied. The preliminary results reflect the wide inter-sample variations that are expected in dealing with tissues, with only a weak indication of increase in the UTS of the pericardium tissue with increase in radiation dose. Such an effect has also been observed by others, with reduction in UTS at doses of 80 Gy.

  4. Surveillance of health care workers exposed to ionising radiation: Rimed pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The project so-called RIMED aimed to set up epidemiological surveillance of health care workers exposed to ionizing radiation. A pilot study was conducted in a sample of hospital personnel to examine the possibility of identifying exposed subjects in order to analyse mortality patterns according to occupational characteristics such as medical departments or occupations in a historical cohort. Seven hospitals participated in this pilot study. Health-care workers who had worn a dosimeter up to December 2003 were to be included in this cohort. The subjects' identification data were obtained from the SISERI (Systeme d'information de la surveillance de l'exposition aux rayonnements ionisants - Ionizing Radiation Exposure Monitoring Information System) database managed by the Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire - Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute (IRSN). The SISERI system was in a 'pilot' phase in 2004. According to SISERI database, a total of 5126 subjects were found to have worn a dosimeter up to December 2003. The subjects' identification data were completed by the administrative services of the hospitals and occupational physicians searched for subjects' occupational data. Information required for the vital status search was satisfactorily completed only for 38% of the cohort subjects. This pilot study showed that obtaining data from SISERI database completed by hospital administrative data in 2004 led to a database of insufficient quality for epidemiological surveillance. The Institut de veille sanitaire (French Institute of Public Health Surveillance) recommends that transmission by the employers of some specific personal or occupational data of the exposed subjects should be made compulsory. In this way, SISERI system should be able to constitute any database with required quality for epidemiological surveillance of ionizing radiation exposed subjects. (authors)

  5. A cascade method of training for the revised CEGB Radiological Safety Rules and the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.R.; John, P.G.L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to achieve compliance with the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 the CEGB has introduced a revised set of Radiological Safety Rule. These Rules are for implementation at all sites under the Board's control where ionising radiations are used. It was a requirement that the new Safety Rules be brought into operation on a common date and to a consistent standard of performance throughout the industry; this necessitated a considerable training programme to familiarise and inform some 8,000 staff working at a large number of locations. The training week of identified groups of staff varied widely, according to their different levels of authority and responsibility. The paper sets out the means by which the chosen cascade method of training was selected and developed, and gives details of the modular package of training material which was produced. It also relates how the management objectives were met within the constraints of an uncompromising time schedule. (author)

  6. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation. The development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. Proceedings of the third international symposium on the protection of the environment from ionising radiation (SPEIR 3). Unedited papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    In recent years, awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased, as evidenced by new and developing international policies for environmental protection, starting with the Rio Declaration of 1992. In the context of ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is largely based on providing for the protection of humans, but this is being critically reviewed in several international fora. It is in this context that the Third International Symposium on Protection of the Environment from Ionising Radiation (SPEIR 3) was held between 22 and 26 July 2002, in Darwin, Australia. The symposium focused on issues related to the development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. The symposium programme included sessions dedicated to: ongoing research on the effects, responses and mechanisms of the interactions of ionizing radiation with biota; policy and ethical dimensions of the development of a framework for environmental radiation protection; and the development and use of methods and models for evaluating radiation as a stressor to the environment. Three workshops were held to allow for detailed discussion of each of these subjects. This symposium was the third in a series. The first International Symposium on Ionising Radiation: Protection of the Natural Environment, was held in Stockholm, Sweden, 20-24 May 1996. This symposium was organized jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada, and the proceedings were published by the Akademitryck AB, Edsbruk, Sweden in 1996. The second International Symposium on Ionizing Radiation: Environmental Protection Approaches for Nuclear Facilities, was held in Ottawa, Canada, 10-14 May 1999, and was organized by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the Supervising Scientists Group of Environment Australia, and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI). The proceedings were published in April

  7. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation. The development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. Proceedings of the third international symposium on the protection of the environment from ionising radiation (SPEIR 3). Unedited papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased, as evidenced by new and developing international policies for environmental protection, starting with the Rio Declaration of 1992. In the context of ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is largely based on providing for the protection of humans, but this is being critically reviewed in several international fora. It is in this context that the Third International Symposium on Protection of the Environment from Ionising Radiation (SPEIR 3) was held between 22 and 26 July 2002, in Darwin, Australia. The symposium focused on issues related to the development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. The symposium programme included sessions dedicated to: ongoing research on the effects, responses and mechanisms of the interactions of ionizing radiation with biota; policy and ethical dimensions of the development of a framework for environmental radiation protection; and the development and use of methods and models for evaluating radiation as a stressor to the environment. Three workshops were held to allow for detailed discussion of each of these subjects. This symposium was the third in a series. The first International Symposium on Ionising Radiation: Protection of the Natural Environment, was held in Stockholm, Sweden, 20-24 May 1996. This symposium was organized jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada, and the proceedings were published by the Akademitryck AB, Edsbruk, Sweden in 1996. The second International Symposium on Ionizing Radiation: Environmental Protection Approaches for Nuclear Facilities, was held in Ottawa, Canada, 10-14 May 1999, and was organized by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the Supervising Scientists Group of Environment Australia, and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI). The proceedings were published in April

  8. A value-critical assessment of the policy construction of hazard and risk for the safe use of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, A.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a critique of the concept of ionising radiation safety policy from value perspectives that differ from those of the rationalist scientific. It attempts to present a social interpretation of the constitution of the present methods of policy composition that are primarily based on a conservative, orthodox, scientific paradigm. A modification of this process is then offered to integrate social discourse into the policy construction without compromising the value of the scientific input. 6 refs

  9. Cancer mortality risk of nuclear power workers due to the exposure of ionising radiation in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G.; Hammer, G.P.; Blettner, M.

    2006-01-01

    A cohort study of German nuclear power workers was set up to investigate overall and cancer mortality risk related to a chronic exposure to ionising radiation of low-level dose. The German study was performed as a part of an international study carried out by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon. First results of the international study have been published recently [1]. German data are not yet included in this analysis. The German cohort consists of 4844 employees from 10 nuclear power plants. All persons who worked in these nuclear power plants in 1991 or started employment between 1991 und 1997 are included (except for employees of one plant, whose observation period started in 1992). These persons accumulated about 31,000 person years. Overall, 68 deaths were observed in the observation period between 1.1.1991-31.12.1997. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were computed for all causes of death, all cancers, cardiovascular diseases, external causes, and all other causes. Overall, a strong healthy worker effect was observed (SMR=0.52 [95% CI: 0.41;0.67]). No increase in total cancer mortality was seen (SMR=0.85 [95% CI: 0.53;1.30]). However, numbers are too small for stable risk estimates and further effort is under way to complete the cohort in terms of power plants and to extend the follow-up until 2005. (authors)

  10. Cancer mortality risk of nuclear power workers due to the exposure of ionising radiation in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G. [Berufsgenossenschaft der Feinmechanik und Elektrotechnik, Koln (Germany); Hammer, G.P.; Blettner, M. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat Mainz, Institut fur Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik des Klinikums (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    A cohort study of German nuclear power workers was set up to investigate overall and cancer mortality risk related to a chronic exposure to ionising radiation of low-level dose. The German study was performed as a part of an international study carried out by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon. First results of the international study have been published recently [1]. German data are not yet included in this analysis. The German cohort consists of 4844 employees from 10 nuclear power plants. All persons who worked in these nuclear power plants in 1991 or started employment between 1991 und 1997 are included (except for employees of one plant, whose observation period started in 1992). These persons accumulated about 31,000 person years. Overall, 68 deaths were observed in the observation period between 1.1.1991-31.12.1997. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were computed for all causes of death, all cancers, cardiovascular diseases, external causes, and all other causes. Overall, a strong healthy worker effect was observed (SMR=0.52 [95% CI: 0.41;0.67]). No increase in total cancer mortality was seen (SMR=0.85 [95% CI: 0.53;1.30]). However, numbers are too small for stable risk estimates and further effort is under way to complete the cohort in terms of power plants and to extend the follow-up until 2005. (authors)

  11. Revisiting Bragg's X-ray microscope: Scatter based optical transient grating detection of pulsed ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K.; Paganin, David M.; Hall, Chris J.

    2011-01-01

    Transient optical gratings for detecting ultrafast signals are routine for temporally resolved photochemical investigations. Many processes can contribute to the formation of such gratings; we indicate use of optically scattering centres that can be formed with highly variable latencies in different materials and devices using ionising radiation. Coherent light scattered by these centres can form the short-wavelength-to-optical-wavelength, incoherent-to-coherent basis of a Bragg X-ray microscope, with inherent scope for optical phasing. Depending on the dynamics of the medium chosen, the way is open to both ultrafast pulsed and integrating measurements. For experiments employing brief pulses, we discuss high-dynamic-range short-wavelength diffraction measurements with real-time optical reconstructions. Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered. -- Research highlights: → It is timely that the concept of Bragg's X-ray microscope be revisited. → Transient gratings can be used for X-ray all-optical information processing. → Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered.

  12. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on general obligations in medical and dental practices using ionising radiation; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to medical and dental practices with ionising radiation used for medical exposures. The regulations are also applicable to exposures of persons who knowingly and willingly, other than as part of their occupation, support and comfort patients undergoing medical exposure.

  13. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on general obligations in medical and dental practices using ionising radiation; issued on April 28, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to medical and dental practices with ionising radiation used for medical exposures. The regulations are also applicable to exposures of persons who knowingly and willingly, other than as part of their occupation, support and comfort patients undergoing medical exposure

  14. The multiple stressor effect in zebrafish embryos from simultaneous exposure to ionising radiation and cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C Y P; Choi, V W Y; Lam, A C L; Yu, K N; Cheng, S H

    2013-01-01

    Living organisms are exposed to a mixture of environmental stressors, and the resultant effects are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work, we studied the multiple stressor effect in embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) from simultaneous exposure to ionising radiation (alpha particles) and cadmium through quantification of apoptotic signals at 24 h postfertilisation (hpf) revealed by vital dye acridine orange staining. For each set of experiments, 32–40 dechorionated embryos were deployed, which were divided into four groups each having 8–10 embryos. The four groups of embryos were referred to as (1) the control group (C), which received no further treatments after dechorionation; (2) the Cd-dosed and irradiated group (CdIr), which was exposed to 100 μM Cd from 5 to 24 hpf, and also received about 4.4 mGy from alpha particles at 5 hpf; (3) the irradiated group (Ir), which received about 4.4 mGy from alpha particles at 5 hpf; and (4) the Cd-dosed group (Cd), which was exposed to 100 μM Cd from 5 to 24 hpf. In general, the CdIr, Ir and Cd groups had more apoptotic signals than the C group. Within the 12 sets of experimental results, two showed significant synergistic effects, one showed a weakly synergistic effect and nine showed additive effects. The multiple stressor effect of 100 μM Cd with ∼4.4 mGy alpha-particle radiation resulted in an additive or synergistic effect, but no antagonistic effect. The failure to identify significant synergistic effects for some sets of data, and thus their subsequent classification as additive effects, might be a result of the relatively small magnitude of the synergistic effects. The results showed that the radiation risk could be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal, and as such a realistic human radiation risk assessment should in general take into account the multiple stressor effects. (paper)

  15. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry; Proprietes thermoluminescentes du diamant CVD: applications a la dosimetrie des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitfils, A

    2007-09-15

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  16. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations; Il centro di taratura per le radiazioni ionizzanti di Bologna. Parte 1: Fotoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteventi, F.; Sermenghi, I. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The report describes all the facilities available at the the service of the ENEA Calibration Service for Ionising Radiations at Bologna (Italy). It gives a detailed description of all equipment qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters. [Italian] Il presente lavoro descrive i servizi e le attivita' del Centro di Taratura dell'ENEA di Bologna, in particolare delle attrezzature qualificate per la metrologia fotonica, dei campioni di misura e delle procedure adottate per la taratura degli strumenti e dei dosimetri.

  17. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  18. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomaa, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  19. Radiation safety in the nuclear medicine department: impact of the UK Ionising Radiations Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    The new 1985 regulations and guidance on radiation protection in the U.K. are discussed in relation to the needs for controlled areas in the nuclear medicine department and patient wards, admittance to hospital to comply with legislation, classification of workers, patient waiting rooms, handling flood sources, pregnancy and breast feeding. (U.K.)

  20. An enhanced ionising radiation monitoring and detecting technique in radiotherapy units of hospitals using wireless sensor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a solution of ionising radiation monitoring based on the concept of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN), is presented. Radiation dose rate measured by the sensor node is sent to the monitoring station through ZigBee wireless network operated on 2.4 GHz unlicensed Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band. The system is calibrated for use for ionizing radiation dose rate range of between amount of ionising radiation observed in radiotherapy unit of a hospital and 1.02 mSv/h. Power consumption of the sensor node is kept low by operating the node ZigBee radio with low duty cycle: i.e. by keeping the radio awake only during data transmission/reception. Two ATmega8 microcontrollers, one each for sensor node and the monitoring station, are programmed to perform interfacing, data processing, and control functions. The system range of coverage is 124m for outdoor (line of site) deployment and 56.8m for indoor application where 5 brick walls separated the sensor node and the monitoring station. Range of coverage of the system is extendable via the use of ZigBee router (s)

  1. Assessing the surroundings for effects of ionising radiation on the granting of permits, DOVIS A. Emissions to air and water

    CERN Document Server

    Blaauboer, R O

    2002-01-01

    In the Netherlands, as in most other countries, one generally needs a permit to produce (including the manufacture, processing, control and storage), to apply or to dispose of radioactive materials, or to use equipment that produces ionising radiation. This permit must be in accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act. Limits that are set for radioactive material can be found in the Decree on radiation protection ('Besluit stralings-bescherming') which has been in force since March 1, 2002. Along with the application for a permit, calculation results have to be submitted on the radiation dose that members of the public receive as a consequence of (possible) emissions of radioactive material (into the atmosphere or surface water) or as a consequence of external irradiation. Fairly rough estimates, based on simple rules, will often be satisfactory. These rules can be found in an annex of a Ministerial Order on the assessment of consequences of ionising radiation (mr-AGIS). However, in some cases this will not be ade...

  2. Predicting the effects of ionising radiation on ecosystems by a generic model based on the Lotka-Volterra equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes a model for predicting the population dynamics of the main components (resources and consumers) of terrestrial ecosystems exposed to ionising radiation. The ecosystem is modelled by the Lotka-Volterra equations with consumer competition. Linear dose-response relationships without threshold are assumed to relate the values of the model parameters to the dose rates. The model accounts for the migration of consumers from areas characterised by different levels of radionuclide contamination. The criteria to select the model parameter values are motivated by accounting for the results of the empirical studies of past decades. Examples of predictions for long-term chronic exposure are reported and discussed.

  3. The report of the French Academy of Science: 'Problems associated with the effects of low doses of ionising radiation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1998-01-01

    In 1995 the French Academy of Science published a report on 'Problems associated with low doses of ionising radiation'. This report aroused interest among French-speaking scientists and a translation in English was published a year later. The report pointed out that an important issue in radioprotection was not whether to accept or reject the linear no-threshold model but rather to test its validity. The aim of this review is to analyse the report and its recommendations, and to briefly indicate the progress which has been made and the questions which remain open. Three areas of the report are covered in this review: DNA repair, carcinogenesis and epidemiological data. (author)

  4. Internet-based ICRP resource for healthcare providers on the risks and benefits of medical imaging that uses ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, S; Applegate, K E; Perez, M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 Working Party was to update the 2001 web-based module 'Radiation and your patient: a guide for medical practitioners' from ICRP. The key elements of this task were: to clearly identify the target audience (such as healthcare providers with an emphasis on primary care); to review other reputable sources of information; and to succinctly publish the contribution made by ICRP to the various topics. A 'question-and-answer' format addressing practical topics was adopted. These topics included benefits and risks of imaging using ionising radiation in common medical situations, as well as pertaining to specific populations such as pregnant, breast-feeding, and paediatric patients. In general, the benefits of medical imaging and related procedures far outweigh the potential risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. However, it is still important to ensure that the examinations are clinically justified, that the procedure is optimised to deliver the lowest dose commensurate with the medical purpose, and that consideration is given to diagnostic reference levels for particular classes of examinations. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics.

  5. Proposal for a Graded Authorisation Model for the Use of Ionising Radiation in Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-10-15

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland RPII intends to refocus, streamline and modernise its regulation of the use of ionising radiation in Ireland. This report provides detailed proposals for establishing a graded approach to authorisation in which regulators will be able to focus on higher risk practices by simplifying requirements placed on those of lower risk, without compromising the safety or security of the Irish population. These proposals build on RPII strategic analyses that seek to navigate a course between the competing pressures of public sector reform and the rapid technological changes in medical and nuclear arenas, which challenge the licensing and advisory functions of RPII. A graded approach to authorisation provides the potential for a sustainable basis for future regulation in Ireland. Such an approach would be in line with the forthcoming EURATOM Basic Safety Standards and with general current regulatory trends, which are moving away from one-size-fits-all approaches towards more adaptive, interactive and transparent regulation. In seeking this reform, the RPII also aims to fully utilize the benefits of the internet and electronic communications and to improve the transparency of its processes. These proposals have been developed using a robust, comprehensive project methodology involving a root and branch analysis of current and potential future approaches to authorisation. A series of facilitated workshops were held, punctuated by intensive periods of focused co-enquiry, involving all members of the RPII Regulatory Service. This approach made the fullest use of the decades of expertise and knowledge of these staff. It also provided the platform for developing a common vision of a graded approach to authorisation; for agreeing the criteria for differentiating between levels of authorisation; for collecting the necessary evidence for decision-making and for identifying the implications of these decisions. The graded approach presented

  6. Proposal for a Graded Authorisation Model for the Use of Ionising Radiation in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland RPII intends to refocus, streamline and modernise its regulation of the use of ionising radiation in Ireland. This report provides detailed proposals for establishing a graded approach to authorisation in which regulators will be able to focus on higher risk practices by simplifying requirements placed on those of lower risk, without compromising the safety or security of the Irish population. These proposals build on RPII strategic analyses that seek to navigate a course between the competing pressures of public sector reform and the rapid technological changes in medical and nuclear arenas, which challenge the licensing and advisory functions of RPII. A graded approach to authorisation provides the potential for a sustainable basis for future regulation in Ireland. Such an approach would be in line with the forthcoming EURATOM Basic Safety Standards and with general current regulatory trends, which are moving away from one-size-fits-all approaches towards more adaptive, interactive and transparent regulation. In seeking this reform, the RPII also aims to fully utilize the benefits of the internet and electronic communications and to improve the transparency of its processes. These proposals have been developed using a robust, comprehensive project methodology involving a root and branch analysis of current and potential future approaches to authorisation. A series of facilitated workshops were held, punctuated by intensive periods of focused co-enquiry, involving all members of the RPII Regulatory Service. This approach made the fullest use of the decades of expertise and knowledge of these staff. It also provided the platform for developing a common vision of a graded approach to authorisation; for agreeing the criteria for differentiating between levels of authorisation; for collecting the necessary evidence for decision-making and for identifying the implications of these decisions. The graded approach presented

  7. Investigation of cellular signalling responses to non-ionising radiation in melanocytes by microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, G.M.; Pedley, J.; Martyn, A.C.; Fraser, L.M.; Banducci, K.J.; Parsons, P.G.; Breit, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer resulting from the abnormal proliferation and spread of specialised pigment cells in the skin, known as melanocytes. Extensive epidemiological and molecular evidence suggests that a major risk factor for melanoma formation is exposure to non-ionising radiation in the form of solar ultra-violet (UV) light. However, the exact role of solar UV in the development of melanoma is unclear. To elucidate the molecular events that occur in melanocytes following solar UV exposure and determine how they lead to melanoma development, cDNA microarray analysis was used to analyse the gene expression profile of normal melanocytes, melanocytes exposed to simulated solar UV and melanoma cells. The development of cDNA microarray technology has allowed gene expression profiling at the mRNA level to be conducted for many thousands of genes simultaneously by hybridising an array of known sequences with labelled cDNA reverse transcribed form the sample RNA. Gene expression analysis was performed for over 13,000 genes. More than 500 genes were identified as differentially expressed in melanocytes following a single UV exposure, although overall there was a general suppression of transcription. Genes that were up-regulated included oncogenes and cytoskeletal genes; in contrast, genes encoding protein tyrosine kinases and apoptosis effectors were down-regulated. Many of the genes identified as being differentially expressed represent novel UV-regulated targets. Repeated exposure to solar UV resulted in the elevation in expression of a novel member of the transforming growth factor-b (TGF-b) superfamily, the Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1). Our results have shown that MIC-1 is up-regulated by solar UV in melanocytes, and is highly expressed (>3 fold) in a number of metastatic melanoma cell lines (31/61) in comparison to primary melanocytes. Furthermore functional, dimerised MIC-1 was found to be secreted by melanocytes, and secreted levels were

  8. Derivation of hazardous doses for amphibians acutely exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuma, Shoichi; Watanabe, Yoshito; Kawaguchi, Isao; Takata, Toshitaro; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Ban-nai, Tadaaki; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Derivation of effect benchmark values for each taxonomic group, which has been difficult due to lack of experimental effects data, is required for more adequate protection of the environment from ionising radiation. Estimation of effects doses from nuclear DNA mass and subsequent species sensitivity distribution (SSD) analysis were proposed as a method for such a derivation in acute irradiation situations for assumed nuclear accident scenarios. As a case study, 5% hazardous doses (HD 5 s), at which only 5% of species are acutely affected at 50% or higher lethality, were estimated on a global scale. After nuclear DNA mass data were obtained from a database, 50% lethal doses (LD 50 s) for 4.8 and 36% of the global Anura and Caudata species, respectively, were estimated by correlative equations between nuclear DNA mass and LD 50 s. Differences between estimated and experimental LD 50 s were within a factor of three. The HD 5 s obtained by the SSD analysis of these estimated LD 50 s data were 5.0 and 3.1 Gy for Anura and Caudata, respectively. This approach was also applied to the derivation of regional HD 5 s. The respective HD 5 s were 6.5 and 3.2 Gy for Anura and Caudata inhabiting Japan. This HD 5 value for the Japanese Anura was significantly higher than the global value, while Caudata had no significant difference in global and Japanese HD 5 s. These results suggest that this approach is also useful for derivation of regional benchmark values, some of which are likely different from the global values. - Highlights: ► A possible method was proposed for derivation of an effect benchmark value for each taxonomic group. ► 50% lethal doses were estimated from nuclear DNA mass in amphibian species. ► 5% hazardous doses (HD 5 s) were estimated by species sensitivity distribution. ► Respective HD 5 s were 5.0 and 3.1 Gy for Anura and Caudata globally. ► Respective HD 5 s were 6.5 and 3.2 Gy for Anura and Caudata inhabiting Japan.

  9. Comparative evaluation of different approaches to environmental protection against ionising radiation in view of practicability and consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Hornung, L.; Mundigl, S.; Kirchner, G.

    2006-01-01

    International organisations, including ICRP, IAEA and UNSCEAR, and the international scientific community are currently engaged in work on the protection of non-human species against ionising radiation as a complement to the existing framework centred on humans. The basic ideas and conceptual approaches developed during the last decade substantially agree with each other. The EC funded FASSET project (Framework for Assessment of Environmental Impact) summarizes and reviews the current knowledge of radiation effects on biota, provides basic dosimetric models for fauna and flora and suggests an assessment framework. Protection of the environment against ionising radiation, on the one hand, aims to close a conceptual gap in radiation protection. Therefore, current frameworks for environmental protection conceptually follow radiation protection of man. On the other hand, preservation of natural resources, habitats and the biological diversity are common objectives of environmental protection against radioactive as well as chemical pollutants, suggesting an integrated approach based on the fundamental ideas of conventional environmental protection. In essence, a conceptual framework encompassing protection of man as well as of fauna and flora against chemical and radioactive pollutants would be highly desirable in view of coherence, consistency and transparency. Such an umbrella concept communicates the positive message that similar issues are treated in a conceptually similar manner, thus facilitating scientific justification and public communication and increasing acceptance. This paper discusses different concepts and approaches to radiation protection of man, radiation protection of non-human biota and environmental protection against chemical pollutants, identifies common principles and differences, addresses conflicting requirements and evaluates the feasibility and limitations of such an encompassing framework. (authors)

  10. Ionising radiation metrology : Physical basis for the radiation protection in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, J. M. los; Brosed, A.; Fernandez, F.

    2004-01-01

    Applying radiological protection principles and, in particular optimisation, requires a system of metrological references internationally traceable and to which be traced at the national level, through a well defined calibration chain. In this paper on overview of the activities done in the national standards laboratory and in the calibration laboratories existing in Spain is presented. As a conclusion it is established that, although the necessities at the protection level are reasonably covered for α, β, X and γ radiation, the lack of a neutronic reference laboratory is detected, to give metrological support to the two laboratories with capability for making irradiations or determinations of neutronic doses, currently operating in the country. (Author) 19 refs

  11. Delayed behavioral dysfunctions following exposure to ionising radiation: role of neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haridas, Seenu; Kumar, Mayank; Manda, Kailash

    2014-01-01

    Being a terminally differentiated organ, the brain has been considered to be a radioresistant one. Traditionally, delayed radiation-induced CNS damage was hypothesized as chiefly attributable to impaired vascular endothelial system and neuroinflammatory glial cell populations. In the recent decades, preclinical studies have focused on the hippocampal dentate gyrus, one of two discrete sites of the brain where adult neurogenesis takes place. Neurogenesis, in such area of the brain takes place throughout the adulthood and makes the brain highly vulnerable to the radiation. Recent investigations, including our own reports indicated that radiation ablates hippocampal neurogenesis, alters neuronal function, and induces neuroinflammation. Since the hippocampus is involved in learning and memory, behavioral adaptation and HPA axis regulation, damage by radiation leads to severe behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study aimed at evaluating the delayed effects of gamma-irradiation on the cognitive and affective functions, which were further corroborated to changes in neurogenesis. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to whole body irradiation as well as cranial irradiation by gamma-rays at different sub-lethal doses. The behavioral tests, consisting spontaneous motor activity, open field test, novel object recognition test, forced swim test and Morris water maze were performed at 1 month and 5 months post-exposure. Neurogenic potential was evaluated using flow-cytometry (FC) and immuno-histo-chemistry (IHC). The results indicated the significant changes in the affective and cognitive functions at delayed time points of radiation exposure. Profound alteration in the anxiety and depressive phenotype was observed following irradiation. Additionally, both long term and short term memory functions were disrupted, which were attributable to changes in the neurogenic potential as reported in the terms of BrdU positive cells using FC and IHC. Present investigation clearly

  12. Radio-oxidation of an EPDM elastomer under weak or strong ionising radiations: measurement and modelling of dioxygen consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dely, N.

    2005-10-01

    Usually, the irradiation of polymers under ionising radiations occurs in air that is in the presence of oxygen. This leads to a radio oxidation process and to oxygen consumption. Our material is an EPDM elastomer (ethylene propylene 1,4 hexadiene) used as insulator in control-command cables in nuclear plants (Pressurised Water Reactor). A specific device has been conceived and built up during this PhD work for measuring very small oxygen consumptions with an accuracy of around 10%. Ionising radiations used are electrons at 1 MeV and carbon ions at 11 MeV per nucleon. Under both electron and ion irradiations, the influence of oxygen pressure on oxygen consumption has been studied in a very large range: between 1 and 200 mbar. In both cases, the yield of oxygen consumption is constant in-between 200 and 5 mbar. Then, at lower pressures, it decreases appreciably. On the other hand, the oxygen consumption during ion irradiation is four times smaller than during electron irradiation. This emphasizes the role of the heterogeneity of the energy deposition at a nano-metric scale. The adjustment of the experimental results obtained during electron irradiation with the general homogeneous steady-state kinetic model has allowed extracting all the values of the kinetic parameters for the chosen mechanism of radio oxidation. The knowledge of these numbers will allow us to face our results obtained during ion irradiation with a heterogeneous kinetic model under development. (author)

  13. Field studies on long term ecosystem consequences of ionising radiation and chemical pollutants (EANOR Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oughton, D. [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD (Norway); Evseeva, T. [Institute of Biology RAS (Russian Federation); Erenturk, S. [Istanbul Technical University (Turkey)

    2014-07-01

    -barcoding, invertebrate DNA barcoding, DNA methylation, and other molecular endpoints is ongoing, together with studies of possible adaptation of plants, invertebrates and microorganisms. Preliminary results show significant differences in diversity for many species between contaminated and reference sites. However, more research is needed to draw conclusions about the cause of such observations. Nevertheless, by combining a through site characterisation and exposure assessment with a variety of ecologically relevant biomarker and endpoint measurements, the data produced should be a valuable contribution to international activities looking at the impacts of chronic exposure of ionising radiation on non-human species. Project participants: Elena Belykh, Anna Kaneva, Boris Kondratenok, Alla Kolesnikova, Alexey Kurdin, Tatinana Majstrenko, Taskayeva Anastasia Oleshya Vakhrusheva, Illa Velegzhaninov, Vladimir Zainullin (IoB, Komi Republic, Russia); S. Haciyakupoglu (Istanbul Technical University, Turkey); Rahime Oral, Sabriye Yusan, Filiz Gur Filiz (Ege University, Turkey); Murat Belivermis, Onder Kilic (Istanbul University, Turkey); Fatma Kocbas (Celal Bayar University, Turkey); Mustafa Akiner, (Rize University, Turkey); Claire Coutris, Erik Joner (Bioforsk, Norway); Turid Hertel-Aas, Emmanuel Lapied, Yevgeniya Tomkiv, Brit Salbu, Lindis Skipperud (Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, UMB, Norway). Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  14. A study of the direct effects of ionising and far ultraviolet radiation on nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, A.A.

    1987-03-01

    This thesis reports the results of a study of the direct effects of gamma and far UV radiation on nucleic acid model systems. For the gamma study, frozen aqueous solutions of 2'-deoxyribonucleosides were chosen as the model systems which best mimic possible radiation chemical events via the direct effects occuring in DNA in vivo. In Chapter I, we report and discuss the results of the study of the direct effects of gamma radiation on thymidine including the isolation and identification of the chemical modifications induced, and describe experiments designed to probe the mechanisms involved in their formation. In Chapters II and III, we extend the study to other 2'-deoxyribo-nucleosides, 2'-deoxycytidine and 2'-deoxyadenosine. Chapter IV presents the results of the study of the direct effects of far UV light on thymidine, a project designed to complement the gamma study and hopefully to bring additional insight into the mechanisms of formation of those products common to both radiation energies. In particular, the mechanisms of the formation of the spore photoproduct, a lesion known to be formed in DNA in vivo, have been elucidated. The study of the direct effects of gamma radiation on thymidine and 2'-deoxycytidine revealed the formation of several new products. Chapter V reports an analysis of the configurational and conformational properties of these molecules. (author)

  15. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked – the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that “stress” can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called “non-targeted” mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the “health” of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed

  16. Influence of SNP Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes on the Level of Persistent Damage in Human Lymphocytes After Exposure to 2 Gy of Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milic, M.; Rozgaj, R.; Kasuba, V.; Kubelka, D.; Angelini, S.; Hrelia, P.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in cell response to ionising radiation could be result of changes in gene expression and/or polymorphisms of DNA repair genes. The aim of the study was to estimate the DNA damage level in human lymphocytes after exposure to 2 Gy of ionising radiation. Medical workers occupationally exposed to low doses of ionising radiation (N = 20) and matched controls (N 20) were genotyped for polymorphic hOGG1, XRCC1, APE1, XPD10, XPD23, XRCC3, PARP1 and MGMT genes. Micronucleus (MN) test was used for the estimation of DNA damage before and after radiation. Incidence of MN in irradiated samples positively correlated with age and negatively with polymorphic variants of XPD23. Significant difference was observed between irradiated homozygotes (HO) and heterozygotes (HE). HO and HE APE1 differed in MN before exposure. HO and polymorphic variants of XPD10 differed in MN after exposure. Gender showed different MN in the exposed group after exposure. Age correlated positively with MN after exposure, working probation and received dose. Multiple regression analysis revealed connection between polymorphic variants of APE1 and XRCC3 with MN before exposure. These results confirm the value of micronucleus assay in DNA damage estimation and suggest possible use of polymorphic genes in monitoring of individuals professionaly exposed to ionising radiation. (author)

  17. Radiation protection standards: a summary of the biological effects of ionising radiation and principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This leaflet in the NRPB At-a-Glance-Series briefly summarises the biological effects of radiation, harm and sensitivity to radiation, radiation protection principles, acceptability of risk and the control of doses to workers, the public and in medical procedures in the UK. (UK)

  18. The estimation of risks from the induction of recessive mutations after exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, A.G.; Edwards, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Induced recessive mutations can cause harm by (1) partnership with a defective allele already established in the population; (2) partnership with another recessive mutation induced at the same locus; (3) the formation of homozygous descendants, that is, identify by descent; and (4) heterozygous effects. Calculations based on a combination of data from observations on human populations and from mouse experiments suggest that an extra genetically significant dose of 1 cGy X or γ irradiation received by each parent in a stable population with a million liveborn offspring would induce up to 1200 extra recessive mutations. From partnership effects, about one extra case of recessive disease would be expected in the following 10 generations. Homozygosity resulting from identity by descent could not normally occur until the fourth generation after exposure but, on certain assumptions, about ten extra cases of recessive disease would be expected from this cause by the tenth generation. In the same period, about 250 recessive alleles would be eliminated in heterozygotes given 2.5% heterozygous disadvantage. These deleterious heterozygous effects should not be combined with those of dominants, as has been done in some previous risk estimates. It is considered unlikely that many radiation induced recessives would show heterozygous advantage. Certain dominants should be excluded from calculations of mutational risk because they are unlikely to be maintained by mutation. (author)

  19. Late effects of ionising radiation on the central nervous system of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, B.M.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis investigated the role of neuroglial cells in the pathogenesis of delayed radionecrosis of the rat central nervous system (CNS) for up to one year after irradiation. The observed radiation induced changes in the cell kinetics of the subependymal plate of the brain were considered to be important in the development of white matter necrosis. White matter necrosis was apparent in the dorsal, ventral and lateral columns of the cervical cord but in the lumbar cord necrosis was only observed in the nerve bundles of the nerve roots. The glial cell population of the cervical cord was not static and a loss of oligodendrocytes appeared to be important in the development of white matter necrosis. Schwann cells also appeared to be involved in the development of nerve root necrosis of the lumbar cord. It is concluded that a gradual loss of radiation damaged, slowly turning-over supporting cells is the mechanism resulting in the development of late radiation necrosis in the mammalian CNS. The applications of these findings are considered. (UK)

  20. Method for determining the irradiation dose deposited in a scintillator by ionising radiation and associated device - WO 2013060745 A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining an irradiation dose deposited in a scintillator (5) by ionising radiation, said method comprising the steps of: irradiating the scintillator (5) for a pre-determined time; detecting an instant at which the scintillator (5) is excited, using a first photodetector (11); subsequently, detecting an instant at which a scintillation photon is received, using a second photodetector (14) operating in single photon counting mode; identifying each sequence formed by the detection of an excitation instant by the first photodetector (11) and the detection of a reception instant by the second photodetector (14) at a coincidence event; counting the number of coincidence events; and obtaining the irradiation dose deposited during the irradiation time as a function of the number of coincidence events counted and a pre-determined proportionality factor. (authors)

  1. Fourth IRMF comparison of calibrations of portable gamma-ray dose- rate monitors 2001-2002 Ionising radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, V E

    2002-01-01

    The Ionising Radiations Metrology Forum (IRMF) organised a fourth comparison of calibrations of gamma-ray dose-rate monitors in which fifteen establishments in the UK participated. The exercise involved the circulation of three gamma-ray monitors for calibration in the fields produced using sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 6 sup 0 Co. The instruments used were an Electra with MC 20 probe, a Mini-Instruments Mini-rad 1000 and a Siemens electronic personal dosemeter Mk 2 (EPD). The responses relative to 'true' dose equivalent rate were calculated by the individual participants and submitted to the for analysis along with details of the facilities and fields employed. Details of the estimated uncertainties were also reported. The results are compared and demonstrate generally satisfactory agreement between the participating establishments. However, the participants' treatment of uncertainties needs improvement and demonstrates a need for guidance in this area.

  2. Radiation protection and safety in medical use of ionising radiation in Republic of Bulgaria - Harmonisation of the national legislation with Euratom directives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingilizova, K.; Vassileva, J.; Rupova, I.; Pavlova, A.

    2005-01-01

    From February 2002 to November 2003 the National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection conducted a PHARE twinning project 'Radiation Protection and Safety at Medical Use of Ionising Radiation'. The main purposes of the project were the harmonisation of Bulgarian legislation in the field of radiation protection with EC Directives 96/29 and 97/43 Euratom, and the establishment of appropriate institutional infrastructure and administrative framework for their implementation. This paper presents the main results of the project: elaboration of Ordinance for Protection of Individuals from Medical Exposure; performance of a national survey of distribution of patient doses in diagnostic radiology and of administered activities in nuclear medicine and establishment of national reference levels for the most common diagnostic procedures. (authors)

  3. For the development of therapy with ionising radiation in tooth, mouth and jaw medicine. An historical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, T.

    1983-01-01

    Based on the corresponding literature study, the development of therapy with ionising radiation, especially in the areas of tooth, mouth and jaw medicine, is reported from the discovery of X-rays up till the present. First from 1915 on did the X-ray antiphlogistic irradiation with in importance, from 1925 to about 1940 it played a domineering role, after the war was hardly still in use and since 1970 is considered in the stomatological sector obsolete. In comparison, already in 1905 there were individual successes in tumor therapy using X radiation. After many failures and competition with the method of radium therapy in the following years, a new upswing in X-radiation came starting in around 1930 with the introduction of the Chaoul contact therapy. The high point of this development is the introduction of supervolt therapy starting around 1965. It is the result of comprehensive research in the area of radiation physics. As a result of further developed techniques there were soon combined and competing procedures available, whose results, however, have not been adequately compared and documented. From 1970 on electronic data processing has primarily taken over individual irradiation planning (cobalt 60 and electron irradiation), predictions about clinically relevant therapy successes are not present at this time. (TRV) [de

  4. The combined effect of diabetes and ionising radiation on the retinal vasculature of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, T.A.; Amoaku, W.M.K.; Archer, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    The clinical impression that pre-existing diabetes exacerbates radiation injury to the retinal vasculature was studied in STZ diabetic rats. Half of 2 groups of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and 1 group of normal animals had their right eyes irradiated with 1000 cGy of 90 KVP x-rays. The prevalence of acellular capillaries in trypsin digests of the retinal vasculature was quantified for each of the 6 groups of animals at 6.5 months post-irradiation. The prevalence of acellular capillaries in both non-irradiated diabetic groups was significantly higher than in controls while the irradiated animals in each of the three main categories showed a statistically significant increase compared to their non-irradiated equivalents. (author)

  5. Ionising radiation effect on the luminescence emission of inorganic and biogenic calcium carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boronat, C. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Virgos, M.D. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [CSIC, Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Aragonite and biogenic Ca-carbonates could be used as a TL dosimeters. • TL can be employed for retrospective dosimetry purposes. • Calcium carbonates show an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity. • The stability of the radiation–induced TL remains, at least, till 700 h. - Abstract: As known, the luminescence emission of mineral phases could be potentially employed for dosimetric purposes in the case of radiological terrorism or radiation accident where conventional monitoring is not available. In this sense, this paper reports on the thermo- (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both biogenic (common periwinkle – littorina littorera – shell made of calcite 90% and aragonite 10%) and inorganic (aragonite 100%) Ca-rich carbonates previously characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Whereas the aragonite sample displays the main CL waveband peaked in the red region (linked to point defects), the more intense emission obtained from the common periwinkle shell appears at higher energies (mainly associated with structural defects). The UV-blue TL emission of the samples, regardless of the origin, displays (i) an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity, (ii) linear dose response in the range of interest (up to 8 Gy), (iii) reasonable stability of the TL signal after 700 h of storage with an initial decay of ca. 88% for the mineral sample and 60% for the biogenic sample and maintaining the stability from 150 h onwards. (iv) The tests of thermal stability of the TL emission performed in the range of 180–320 °C confirm a continuum in the trap system.

  6. Ionising radiation effect on the luminescence emission of inorganic and biogenic calcium carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boronat, C.; Correcher, V.; Virgos, M.D.; Garcia-Guinea, J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Aragonite and biogenic Ca-carbonates could be used as a TL dosimeters. • TL can be employed for retrospective dosimetry purposes. • Calcium carbonates show an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity. • The stability of the radiation–induced TL remains, at least, till 700 h. - Abstract: As known, the luminescence emission of mineral phases could be potentially employed for dosimetric purposes in the case of radiological terrorism or radiation accident where conventional monitoring is not available. In this sense, this paper reports on the thermo- (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both biogenic (common periwinkle – littorina littorera – shell made of calcite 90% and aragonite 10%) and inorganic (aragonite 100%) Ca-rich carbonates previously characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Whereas the aragonite sample displays the main CL waveband peaked in the red region (linked to point defects), the more intense emission obtained from the common periwinkle shell appears at higher energies (mainly associated with structural defects). The UV-blue TL emission of the samples, regardless of the origin, displays (i) an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity, (ii) linear dose response in the range of interest (up to 8 Gy), (iii) reasonable stability of the TL signal after 700 h of storage with an initial decay of ca. 88% for the mineral sample and 60% for the biogenic sample and maintaining the stability from 150 h onwards. (iv) The tests of thermal stability of the TL emission performed in the range of 180–320 °C confirm a continuum in the trap system.

  7. Appraisal of alternative skin model for the study of epidermal restoration following exposure to various environmental stress agents: ionising radiation and UV B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoir, M.

    2006-06-01

    Human skin is a major target tissue for ionising radiation (IR) and UV B. We developed a skin explant model and used 2 types of keratinocytes to study survival and oxidative stress induced by these radiations. We examined oxidative damages by measuring R.O.S. produced and cellular anti-oxidant defenses induced. We observed into skin exposed to IR a modulation of genes expression implied in the control of oxidative stress, confirmed by the decrease of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities. The imbalance observed between anti- and pro-apoptotic genes expression shows that keratinocytes apoptosis may be partly dependent on radio-induced R.O.S. production. We showed the difference of radiosensitivity between N.H.E.K. and Ha Ca.T., which may be linked to their differential oxidative responses. In addition, during re-epithelialising, we demonstrated that activated N.H.E.K. after IR express keratin 6, release pro-inflammatory cytokines and proliferate, without modification of their differentiation. Treatment of N.H.E.K. with geranyl geranylacetone (G.G.A.) has a beneficial effect on their radio-induced activation by increasing IL-1 release, their migration in scrapped area and their survival. G.G.A. has an anti apoptotic ability (induction of Hsp70- caspase-3 pathway) and migratory properties (P38/RhoA activation) on N.H.E.K., but after IR, only caspase-3 pathway is induced. This work thus contributes to the understanding of cutaneous damages after IR and G.G.A. mechanism of action which accelerates re-epithelialising. (author)

  8. Occupational exposure to ionising radiation 1990-1996. Analysis of doses reported to the Health and Safety Executive's Central Index of Dose Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Central Index of Dose Information (CIDI) is the Health and Safety Executive's (HSE's) national database of occupational exposure to ionising radiation. It is operated under contract by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). CIDI receives annually, from Approved Dosimetry Services (ADS) summaries of radiation doses recorded for employees designated as classified persons in the United Kingdom. This is the second analysis of dose summary information to be published. (author)

  9. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haton, C.

    2005-06-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  10. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis

  11. Computer modelling of radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostunov, Igor K.; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects are now well established consequences of exposure of living cells to ionising radiation. It has been observed that cells not directly hit by radiation tracks may still exhibit radiation effects. We present a quantitative modelling of the radiation-induced bystander effect based on a diffusion model of spreading the bystander signal. The model assumes the bystander factor to be a protein of low molecular weight, given out by the hit cell, diffusing in the medium and reacting with non-hit cells. The model calculations successfully predict the results of cell survival in an irradiated conditioned medium. The model predicts the shape of dose-effect relationship for cell survival and oncogenic transformation induced by broad-beam and micro-beam irradiation by alpha-particles. (author)

  12. Combination treatment with ionising radiation and gefitinib ('Iressa', ZD1839), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, significantly inhibits bladder cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, AJ; Mchugh, LA; Tulchinsky, E.; Kriajevska, M.; Mellon, JK

    2007-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is the principal bladder-preserving monotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Seventy percent of muscle-invasive bladder cancers express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is associated with poor prognosis. Ionising radiation (IR) stimulates EGFR causing activation of cytoprotective signalling cascades and thus may be an underlying cause of radioresistance in bladder tumours. We assessed the ability of IR to activate EGFR in bladder cancer cells and the effect of the anti-EGFR therapy, gefitinib on potential radiation-induced activation. Subsequently we assessed the effect of IR on signalling pathways downstream of EGFR. Finally we assessed the activity of gefitinib as a monotherapy, and in combination with IR, using clonogenic assay in vitro, and a murine model in vivo. IR activated EGFR and gefitinib partially inhibited this activation. Radiation-induced activation of EGFR activated the MAPK and Akt pathways. Gefitinib partially inhibited activation of the MAPK pathway but not the Akt pathway. Treatment with combined gefitinib and IR significantly inhibited bladder cancer cell colony formation more than treatment with gefitinib alone (p=0.001-0.03). J82 xenograft tumours treated with combined gefitinib and IR showed significantly greater growth inhibition than tumours treated with IR alone (p=0.04). Combining gefitinib and IR results in significantly greater inhibition of invasive bladder cancer cell colony formation in vitro and significantly greater tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Given the high frequency of EGFR expression by bladder tumours and the low toxicity of gefitinib there is justification to translate this work into a clinical trial. (author)

  13. Radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Harumi

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active process of gene-directed cellular self-destruction that can be induced in many cell types via numerous physiological and pathological stimuli. We found that interphasedeath of thymocytes is a typical apoptosis showing the characteristic features of apoptosis including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation. Moderate dose of radiation induces extensive apoptosis in rapidly proliferating cell population such as the epithelium of intestinal crypt. Recent reports indicate that the ultimate form of radiation-induced mitotic death in several cells is also apoptosis. One of the hallmarks of apoptosis is the enzymatic internucleosomal degradation of chromatin DNA. We identified an endonuclease responsible for the radiation-induced DNA degradation in rat thymocytes. The death-sparing effects of interrupting RNA and protein synthesis suggested a cell genetic program for apoptosis. Apoptosis of thymocytes initiated by DNA damage, such as radiation and radio mimetic substance, absolutely requires the protein of p53 cancer suppresser gene. The cell death induced by glucocorticoid, or aging, has no such requirement. Expression of oncogene bcl-2 rescues cells from the apoptosis. Massive apoptosis in radiosensitive cells induced by higher dose radiation may be fatal. It is suggested that selective apoptotic elimination of cells would play an important role for protection against carcinogenesis and malformation through removal of cells with unrepaired radiation-induced DNA damages. Data to evaluate the significance of apoptosis in the radiation risk are still poor. Further research should be done in order to clarify the roles of the cell death on the acute and late effects of irradiation. (author)

  14. Food ionisation. Realities and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, G.

    1994-06-01

    The ionisation of food is a treatment using a certain type of energy. the radiations used in the industrial treatments are limited to three sources. The gamma radiations, the x radiations and the electrons beams emitted with accelerators. The physical treatments by ionizing radiations have for aim to cleanse and to increase the conservation time of food. Now, the applications in agriculture and food industry, are still marginal. The industrial using ionisation are these ones that did not find any alternative decontamination method. The barriers are more scientific or technical or economical than a question of regulation or behaviour. (N.C.)

  15. Potential role of intense ionising radiation sources in municipal sludge management and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, K.

    1980-01-01

    Magnitude of the problem of safe disposal of sewage and sludge is explained. With rapid increase in the quantum of generated municipal and industrial wastes, their disposal on land or in sea is becoming harmful to public health, hazardous to aquatic life and disturbing to ecological balance. These wastes can be recycled, but to make this recycling beneficial and at the same time harmless to public health, the wastes must be disinfected. Radiation disinfection of sewage and sludge is examined as one of the ways of disinfection. Irradiation can be carried out with gamma radiation or energised electrons. Techniques of radiation disinfection and radiation doses required for disinfection are discussed. Case studies of a few radiation plants for sludge disinfection are presented. They include the Palmdale Plant in Florida, Sandia Irradiator at Albuqurque, New Mexico, Energised Electron Facility at Deer Island, Boston - all these in U.S.A., and the Munich Plant in West Germany. Mention has been made to the work in progress in India on the design of irradiators. Reference has been made to the proposed electron irradiation system for destruction of toxic chemicals such as PCB in drinking water and for disinfection of secondary water. Economics of radiation disinfection is also discussed and it is noted that the radiation process can become economically competitive when cheap sources of radiation become available. (M.G.B.)

  16. Effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fievet, B.; Devos, A.; Voiseux, C.; Leconte-Pradines, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete' Nucleaire (France); Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The Cotentin peninsula (Normandy, France) hosts nuclear industry facilities which operate with controlled discharges of radionuclides in the marine environment. Compared to natural radioactivity, the increase by artificial radionuclides is small but constant. As a consequence, marine species are chronically exposed to low additional doses of ionizing radiation (IR). The effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides were investigated in early stages of development of the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas. On the basis of literature, mollusks are expected to be particularly resistant to acute IR (UNSCEAR, 1996. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annex. 86 p). Two different chronic exposure conditions consisted in external ({sup 137}Cs) and internal ({sup 241}Am) irradiation for two weeks. Biological endpoints were analyzed in parallel at both the integrated (growth) and molecular (target stress gene expression) levels. To identify potential biological targets of IR, oysters were first exposed to very high dose rates and radionuclide activities with the perspective to reduce the levels and to derive dose-response curves. Although the initial exposure levels ({sup 137}Cs 30 000 μGy.h{sup -1}; {sup 241}Am 57 000 Bq.L{sup -1}) were many orders of magnitude higher than those encountered in the natural environment, no significant change in the measured parameters was observed. This result was surprising because data from the literature showed that exposure of mussel Mytilus edulis to {sup 3}H at lower doses rates (10-100 μGy.h{sup -1}) induced DNA damage in hemocytes (Jha et al., 2005. Impact of low doses of tritium on the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis: Genotoxic effects and tissue-specific bioconcentration. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 586, 47-57). To understand this apparent discrepancy between those two filtering bivalves, a new experiment was performed to compare the response

  17. S.I. No 17 of 1972, Factories Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) Regulations, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-03-01

    The purpose of the Regulations in general is to prescribe measures which must be taken to ensure the adequate protection of persons employed in factories and other places to which the Factories Act 1955 applies, against ionizing radiations arising from radioactive substances sealed in a container and from any machine or apparatus including irradiating apparatus that is intended to produce ionizing radiations in which charged particles are accelerated by a voltage of not less than 5 kilovolts. The Schedule lays down the maximum permissible doses of radiation for the different categories of workers. The Regulations entered into force on 1 March 1972 [fr

  18. Cellular responses in primary epidermal cultures from oncorhynchus mykiss following the combined exposure of ionising radiation and a heavy metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyng, F.M.; Ni Shuilleabhain, S.; Davoren, M.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms of toxicant action on biological systems are difficult to identify when more than one contaminant is involved due to potential synergistic and antagonistic effects. There is a general paucity of research into the effect of radiation exposure in tandem with common environmental contaminants due to the inherent difficulties involved. In vitro cell cultures are particularly suited to the study of toxic mechanisms due to their proximity to toxic modes of action and the absence of the multiple defence mechanisms present in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures are particularly beneficial in this area of research as they still maintain many of their tissue specific functions. The objective of this study was to distinguish different mechanisms of cell death (growth arrest, apoptosis, primary and secondary necrosis and proliferation), following combination exposure to ionising radiation and a heavy metal (ZnCl 2 ). The model system employed was a primary cell culture of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) epidermal tissue which has been previously used to study the effects of various environmental agents in this laboratory. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified morphologically while proliferation was assessed immuno-cyto-chemically using an anti PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) antibody. While radiation doses up to and including 10 Gy had no effect on growth, exposure to ZnCl 2 produced a significant dose dependent reduction in growth (10, 50, 75, 100 and 200 ppm ZnCl 2 ). Preliminary results indicate no significant effect on growth following a combined exposure of 5 Gy + 50 ppm ZnCl 2 . These results may have important implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to multiple contaminant exposures. (author)

  19. A framework for assessing the impact of ionising radiation on non-human species ICRP Publication 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2003-01-01

    In its 1990 Recommendations, the ICRP indicated that it believed that the standards of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable would ensure that other species are not put at risk. The ICRP considers that its system of radiological protection has provided a fairly good indirect protection of the human habitat. However, no internationally agreed criteria or policies explicitly address protection of the environment from ionising radiation, and it is difficult to determine or demonstrate whether or not the environment is adequately protected from potential impacts of radiation under different circumstances. The present report suggests a framework, based on scientific and ethical-philosophical principles, by which a policy for the protection of non-human species could be achieved. The primary purpose of developing such a framework is to fill a conceptual gap in radiological protection; it does not reflect any particular concern over environmental radiation hazards. The proposed framework is designed to harmonise with the ICRP's approach to the protection of human beings, but does not intend to set regulatory standards. Instead, the proposed framework is intended to be a practical tool to provide high-level advice and guidance for regulators and operators. An agreed set of quantities and units, a set of reference dose models, reference dose-per-unit-intake (or unit exposure), and reference fauna and flora are required to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose and between dose and certain categories of effect, for a few, clearly defined types of animals and plants. As a first step, a small set of reference fauna and flora with supporting databases will be developed by the ICRP. Others can then develop more area- and situation-specific approaches to assess and manage risks to non-human species

  20. Gene expression profiling of PBL in response to ionising radiation and modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) can be extremely harmful for human cells since an improper DNA-damage response (DDR) to IR can contribute to carcinogenesis...

  1. Identification of miRNAs involved in cell response to ionising radiation and modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) can be extremely harmful for human cells since an improper DNA-damage response (DDR) to IR can contribute to carcinogenesis...

  2. Measurements of the ionising radiation level at a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulik, P.; Kowalska, M.; Golnik, N.; Budzynska, A.; Dziuk, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radiation level measurements at workplaces in a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/ CT examinations. This study meticulously determines the staff radiation exposure in a PET/CT facility by tracking the path of patient movement. The measurements of the instantaneous radiation exposure were performed using an electronic radiometer with a proportional counter that was equipped with the option of recording the results on line. The measurements allowed for visualisation of the staff's instantaneous exposure caused by a patient walking through the department after the administration of "1"8F-FDG. An estimation of low doses associated with each working step and the exposure during a routine day in the department was possible. The measurements were completed by determining the average radiation level using highly sensitive thermoluminescent detectors. (authors)

  3. Study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, R; Beresford, N A; Agüero, A; Broed, R; Brown, J; Iospje, M; Robles, B; Suañez, A

    2004-12-01

    Uncertainty in estimations of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation may arise from a number of sources including values of the model parameters, empirical data, measurement errors and biases in the sampling. The significance of the overall uncertainty of an exposure assessment will depend on how the estimated dose compares with reference doses used for risk characterisation. In this paper, we present the results of a study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota using some of the models and parameters recommended in the FASSET methodology. The study was carried out for semi-natural terrestrial, agricultural and marine ecosystems, and for four radionuclides (137Cs, 239Pu, 129I and 237Np). The parameters of the radionuclide transfer models showed the highest sensitivity and contributed the most to the uncertainty in the predictions of doses to biota. The most important ones were related to the bioavailability and mobility of radionuclides in the environment, for example soil-to-plant transfer factors, the bioaccumulation factors for marine biota and the gut uptake fraction for terrestrial mammals. In contrast, the dose conversion coefficients showed low sensitivity and contributed little to the overall uncertainty. Radiobiological effectiveness contributed to the overall uncertainty of the dose estimations for alpha emitters although to a lesser degree than a number of transfer model parameters.

  4. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Association Contract covers a range of research domains that are important to the Radiation Protection Research Action, especially in the areas 'Evaluation of Radiation Risks' and 'Understanding Radiation Mechanisms and Epidemiology'. Three research projects concentrate on radiation dosimetry research and two projects on the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis. The following list gives an overview on the topics and responsible scientific project leaders of the Association Contract: Study of radiation fields and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Dose reconstruction. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Experimental data for the induction of cancer by radiation of different qualities. (orig.)

  5. The use of ionising radiation from 60CO gamma source in controlling mouldiness in dried cocoa beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appiah, Victoria

    2001-01-01

    Mouldiness in stored cocoa beans in Ghana and the production of aflatoxin have been studied. Based on actual weight of discarded beans, mouldy beans have been estimated to constitute 0.13 % and 0.00002 % of marketable beans at the farmers' level and the buying agents' depots respectively in the Tafo District. This is contrasted with an estimated value of 0.16 % obtained in a questionnaire type study involving farmers. Estimated mouldy beans at the Tema port was 0.69 % per year (based on the cut test) representing a financial loss of $1,688,637.19 per year at $989/T should the mouldy beans be discarded. Fifty-eight (58) internally- and externally- borne fungal species were isolated from dried cocoa beans. Of these, forty-eight (48) were internally- borne and ten (10) were superficial. Twenty-nine (29) of the internally occurring fungi have been recorded for the first time on cocoa beans in Ghana. Twenty-six (26) of the fungi isolated belong to Aspergillus group. They included A. parasiticus and A. flavus, which can produce aflatoxins. Five (5) belong to Penicillium, eight (8) to Fusarium and nineteen (19) to other species. Ionising radiation effectively controlled fungi associated with mouldiness in cocoa beans in a dose - dependent manner. A radiation dose of 6 kGy completely inactivated the moulds. A. flavus and A. tamarii were the most radiation - resistant moulds encountered. The moisture content of the beans before, during and after irradiation influenced the effect of radiation. The relative humidity during storage and the type of packaging also influenced the radiation effect. Conidia of A. flavus subjected to moist heat at temperatures 20 0 C to 60 0 C for 2.5, 5 and 10 min respectively were not significantly affected by heating up to 50 0 C. Heating an aqueous conidial suspension at 60 0 C for at least 2.5 min reduced the number of fungal colonies by at least 5 log cycles when the suspension was assayed on agar plate media. Heating at 59 0 C for 10 min

  6. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliat, F.

    2007-05-01

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  7. Orthopaedic surgeries - assessment of ionising radiations exposure in health care workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, E.S.; Uva, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: 1. Objectives: The health care workers are exposed to ionizing radiations during their activities. In the operating rooms, the ionizing radiations are used in orthopaedic surgery and the dose depends on some factors, like the characteristics of the equipment. This study aims to: Estimate the occupational dose of ionizing radiations exposure of the orthopaedic doctors and nurses during the orthopaedic surgeries, in a Portuguese operating room; Sensitize the health care workers to use the individual dosimeter and to adopt radiation preventive measures. 2. Population and methods The study was conducted on nine Orthopaedic doctors and two nurses of an operating room of a hospital in Lisbon neighborhoods. We made a risk evaluating concerning: the radiations dose in different points, corresponding to gonads, hands and crystalline lens levels of all the professionals, during the surgeries; the average period of radiation in the orthopaedic surgeries; the number of annual orthopaedic surgeries, looking for that in the surgeries registers, to estimate the annual ionizing radiations dose of each orthopaedic doctor and nurse. 3. Results The annual doses estimated at different levels for orthopaedic doctors were the following: gonads: between 20,63 and 68,75 mGy; hands: 4,95 16,50 mGy; crystalline lens: 8,25 27,50 mGy). For the orthopaedic nurses: gonads: 130,63 151,25 mGy; hands: 31,35 36,30 mGy; crystalline lens 52,25 60,25 mGy. 4. Conclusions Although the location and positions of health care workers are not the same during the different surgeries and the equipment has an automatic control of the X ray emission, the annual ionizing radiations dose exposure for health care workers is an important one. The risk rating justifies the use of individual dosimeters for better individual dose assessment as part of an ionizing radiations prevention program. As a matter of fact preventive measures begin with a good quantitative risk assessment of

  8. The effects of low-level ionising radiation on primary explant cultures of rainbow trout Pronephros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olwell, P.; Ni Shuilleabhain, S.; Mothersill, C.; Seymour, C.; Cottell, D.C.; Lyng, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been known that the haematopoietic tissue of mammals is one of the most radiosensitive tissues. In vitro studies on prawn have also shown that low doses of radiation has an extremely deleterious effect on cells cultured from this animal's blood forming tissues. This raises the question on the relative effects of radiation between animals from different species. One of the most important aquatic animals, from both an economic and ecologic point of view, is the fish. With this in mind, primary cultures of the blood forming tissues of rainbow trout were exposed to radiation followed by a morphological comparison between control and irradiated cultures. The cultured cells were characterised as macrophages following incubation with non-specific fluorescent beads and human apoptotic PMN. The cells demonstrated both specific and non-specific phagocytosis, by consuming the non-indigenous bodies, and were classified as phagocytic leucocytes. These cells were found in two morphological forms, stretched and rounded. It was shown that there was a commensurate increase in the number of stretched cells following application of radiation. Radiation was also shown to cause a dose-dependent increase in the amounts of apoptosis and necrosis in cells over time. The phagocytic efficacy of the irradiated leucocytes compared to controls was also investigated. (author)

  9. Health effects of low-level ionising radiation: biological basis for risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The biological basis for risk assessment is discussed. The risks of carcinogenic effects, teratogenic effects, and genetic (heritable) effects are estimated to vary in proportion with the dose of radiation in the low-dose domain; however, the risks also appear to vary with the LET of the radiation, age at the time of irradiation, and other variables. Although the data suffice to place the risks in perspective with other hazards of modern life, further research to refine the reliability of the risk assessment is called for. (author)

  10. The FASSET Framework for assessment of environmental impact of ionising radiation in European ecosystems-an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C-M

    2004-01-01

    The FASSET project was launched in November 2000 under the EC 5th Framework Programme to develop a framework for the assessment of environmental impact of ionising radiation in European ecosystems. It involved 15 organisations in seven European countries and delivered its final report in spring 2004. The project set out to organise radioecological and radiobiological data into a logical structure that would facilitate the assessment of likely effects on non-human biota resulting from known or postulated depositions of radionuclides in the environment. The project included an overview of 20 pathway-based environmental assessment systems targeted at radioactive substances, or at hazardous substances in general. The resulting framework includes the following fundamental elements: source characterisation; description of seven major European ecosystems; selection of a number of reference organisms on the basis of prior ecosystem and exposure analysis; environmental transfer analysis; dosimetric considerations; effects analysis; and general guidance on interpretation including consideration of uncertainties. The project has used existing information supplemented with development in some areas, e.g. Monte Carlo calculations to derive dose conversion coefficients, model development, and the building of an effects database (FRED, the FASSET Radiation Effects Database). On the basis of experience from FASSET and other recent programmes, it can be concluded that (i) there is substantial agreement in terms of conceptual approaches between different frameworks currently in use or proposed, (ii) differences in technical approaches can be largely attributed to differences in ecosystems of concern or in national regulatory requirements, (iii) sufficient knowledge is available to scientifically justify assessments following the Framework structure, but (iv) significant data gaps exist for environmental transfer of key nuclides as well as for effects data for key wildlife groups at

  11. Examination, characterisation and analysis techniques for the knowledge and the conservation / restoration of cultural heritage - importance of ionising radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaine; J. L.

    2004-01-01

    For the examination, characterisation and analysis of cultural heritage artefacts or art objects and their component materials, the conservation scientist needs a palette of non destructive and non invasive techniques, in order to improve our knowledge concerning their elaboration, their evolution and/or degradation during time, and to give rational basis for their restoration and conservation. A general survey and illustrations showing the usefulness of these techniques will be presented. Among these methods, many are based on the use of ionising radiation. 1. Radiography (using X-rays, gamma rays, beta particles, secondary electrons, neutrons), electron emission radiography, tomodensimetry, 2. Scanning electron microscope associated with X-ray spectrometry, 3. X-ray diffraction, 4. Synchrotron radiation characterisation, 5. X-ray fluorescence analysis, 6. Activation analysis, 7. Ion beam analysis (PIXE, PIGE, RBS, secondary X-ray fluorescence), 8. Thermoluminescence dating, 9. Carbon-14 dating. These methods are used alone or in connection with other analytical methods. Any kind of materials can be encountered, for instance: i. stones, gems, ceramics, terracotta, enamels, glasses, i i. wood, paper, textile, bone, ivory, i i i. metals, jewellery, i v. paint layers, canvas and wooden backings, pigments, dyers, oils, binding media, varnishes, glues. Some examples will be taken, among recent work done at the Centre of Research and Restoration of the Museums of France (C2RMF), from various geographical origins, various ages and different art disciplines. This will illustrate the kind of assistance that science and technology can provide to a better knowledge of mankind's cultural heritage and also to the establishment of rational basis for its better conservation for the future generations. (Author)

  12. The ionising radiation effect on physico-chemical properties of organosilicon oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnopyorova, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics of organosilicon oils, as dielectric constant, viscosity, and refractive index, have been measured before and after the gamma irradiation with the doses of 10 3 to 10 6 Gray. The organosilicons studied were PMS-1, PMS-5, PMS-VV, and PMFS. All the measurements were performed with 60 Co in open test tubes as a source of gamma radiation. The structure modifications in oil molecules depending on irradiation dose have been studied with IR spectrometry. When comparing the main characteristics of the studied organosilicons before and after the irradiation one may arrange them into the following sequence with the increasing of their resistance to the gamma radiation: PMS-VV 6 GRay. For the liquids PMS-1 and PMS-VV it is found that the increasing of their viscosity with the dose absorbed obeys exponential law: ν ν 0 exp (K γ .D), where ν 0 and ν are the viscosities of the sample before and after the irradiation, respectively; D is the absorbed radiation dose; K γ is the radiation damage factor. (author)

  13. Pre-Service Teachers' Subject Knowledge of and Attitudes about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colclough, Nicholas Denys; Lock, Roger; Soares, Allan

    2011-01-01

    This study focussed on secondary school (11-18 years) pre-service teachers' (n = 73) knowledge of and attitudes towards risks associated with alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. A multi-method approach was used with physics, chemistry, biology, and history graduates undertaking the one-year initial teacher training, Post Graduate Certificate in…

  14. Biological effects of exposure to non-ionising electromagnetic fields and radiation: III radiofrequency and microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, R.D.; Kowalczuk, C.I.; Sienkiewicz, Z.J.

    1991-12-01

    The biological effects of experimental exposure to radiofrequency (RF) and microwave radiation above 100 kHz are reviewed with the intention of providing a summary of effects directly relevant to considerations of the health and safety of exposed people. The biological bases for restricting exposures are also briefly discussed. Studies of the possible effects of electromagnetic field exposure on human populations are described in a separate report. The majority of the biological effects of acute exposure to radiofrequency (RF) and microwave radiation are consistent with responses to induced heating, resulting either from frank rises in tissue or body temperature of about 1 0 C or more, or from responses involved in minimising the total heat load. Most responses have been reported at specific energy absorption rates (SARs) above about 1-2 W kg -1 in different animal species exposed under various environmental conditions. These animal, particularly primate, data indicate the sorts of responses that are likely to occur in humans subject to a sufficient heat load. In addition, most animal and cell culture data indicate that RF and microwave exposure is not mutagenic and so will not result in somatic mutation or in hereditary effects; such exposure is therefore unlikely to initiate cancers. With some exceptions that are described below, restrictions on the acute exposure of humans to RF or microwave radiation should be based on the acute responses to raised body temperature. It seems probable that healthy people can tolerate short-term (minute-hour) rises in body temperature of up to about 1 0 C. This rise is well below the maximum tolerable increase but nevertheless represents a significant thermal load. The evidence suggests that the exposure of resting humans in moderate environments at whole-body SARs of 1 W kg -1 , and up to 4 W kg -1 for short periods, will result in body temperature rises of less than 1 0 C. A restriction of whole-body SAR for healthy people to 0

  15. Inter-comparison of safety culture within selected practices in Ghana utilising ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanu, A.; Schandorf, C.; Darko, E. O.; Boadu, M.; Emi-Reynolds, G.; Awudu, A. R.; Gyekye, P. K.; Kpeglo, D. O.

    2010-01-01

    The safety culture of selected practices and facilities in Ghana utilising radiation sources or radiation emitting devices has been assessed using a performance indicator, which provided status information on management and operating staff commitment to safety. The questionnaire was based on the following broad areas: general safety considerations, safety policy at the facility level, safety practices at the facility level, definition of responsibility, staff training, safety of the physical structure of the facility and the emergency plans. The analysis showed that the percentage levels of commitment to safety for the respective practices are as follows: conventional radiography, 23.3-90.0%; research reactor, 73.3 %; gamma irradiation facility, 53.3%; radiotherapy, 76.7%; X-ray scanner, 80.0%; gamma scanner, 76.7%; industrial radiography 86.7% and nuclear density practice, 78%. None of the practices or facilities was able to satisfy all the requirements that will ensure a 100% level of safety culture. (authors)

  16. Specific spheres of application of ionising radiation effects, some realized results and comparative advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderac, R.

    2007-01-01

    The papers discusses some results of ionizing radiation effects in realization of non-destructive methods, achieved progress from the aspect of innovation, comparative results with previously used methods, etc. A review is given of methods based on alpha-radiography, auto-alpha radiography, beta-radiography, X-ray-fluorescent analysis, X- and gamma radiography, and photos of specific samples of neutron radiography [sr

  17. The hazards of using ionising radiation for non-malignant conditions - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, Tracy

    1989-01-01

    A case study is presented in which a patient received low dose radiotherapy at seven months for a non-malignant cavernous haemangioma on the upper chest. She subsequently developed three separate malignancies before the age of 40 years: a thyroid carcinoma, a breast carcinoma and a basal cell carcinoma of the skin on the upper chest. This case illustrates the hazards of using ionizing radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions. (U.K.)

  18. About particular use of ionizing radiations; Des usages particuliers des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    Different uses of ionizing radiations are reviewed: tracers techniques, nuclear gauges, dating by carbon 14, silica doping, use of gamma irradiation for the density measurement in civil engineering, use of a electron capture detector to study by gas chromatography chlorinated contaminants in environment, neutron activation as environmental gauge, analysis of lead in paint and pollutants in ground and dusts, help for work of art valuation by x spectrometry. (N.C.)

  19. Diagnostic medical exposures: advice on exposure to ionising radiation during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The NRPB offers advice on exposure to ionizing radiation during pregnancy, based on data published since 1985. In providing this advice the Board has considered risks to the developing embryo and fetus of death, malformation, mental impairment, cancer (solid tumours and leukaemias) and genetic damage from irradiation after the first missed menstrual period. The possible risks from irradiation of the early (up to 3-4 weeks) conceptus and from gonodal irradiation of patients is also covered in the present advice. (Author)

  20. Guidance notes for the protection of persons against ionising radiations arising from veterinary use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These notes are not intended to provide detailed guidance on all the conditions that apply to veterinary practice but rather to indicate the types of arrangements which should be employed in order to comply with the main requirements of the Regulations. They also aim to establish a pattern by which good radiological practice can be achieved and radiation doses to veterinary surgeons, radiographic staff, and anyone else involved, minimised. (author)

  1. Calibrations and evaluation of the quality assurance during 1999 at the National Laboratory for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Israelsson, Karl-Erik; Kylloenen, Jan-Erik; Samuelson, Goeran

    2000-06-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute is the National Laboratory for the dosimetric quantities kerma, absorbed dose and dose equivalent. The activity is based on established calibration procedures and a quality assurance program for the used standards. This report gives a brief summary of the calibrations performed during 1999 and a more detailed description and analysis of the quality assurance during this year. The report makes it easier to draw conclusions about the long-term stability and possible malfunctions

  2. S.I. No 249 of 1972, Factories Ionising Radiations (Unsealed Radioactive Substances) Regulations, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-12-01

    The Regulations which entered into force on 1 December 1972 apply to factories in which a process involving the use of unsealed radioactive substances is carried on and where the total activity of the unsealed radioactive substances exceeds specified levels, or where there are objects contaminated in excess of certain levels. The Schedules specify the maximum radiation doses and the maximum permissible levels of contamination and provide for a classification of radionuclides [fr

  3. How do monomeric components of a polymer gel dosimeter respond to ionising radiation: A steady-state radiolysis towards preparation of a 3D polymer gel dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozicki, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Ionising radiation-induced reactions of aqueous single monomer solutions and mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in a steady-state condition are presented below and above gelation doses in order to highlight reactions in irradiated 3D polymer gel dosimeters, which are assigned for radiotherapy dosimetry. Both monomers are shown to undergo radical polymerisation and cross-linking, which result in the measured increase in molecular weight and radius of gyration of the formed polydisperse polymer coils. The formation of nanogels was also observed for Bis solutions at a low concentration. In the case of PEGDA-Bis mixtures, co-polymerisation is suggested as well. At a sufficiently high radiation dose, the formation of a polymer network was observed for both monomers and their mixture. For this reason a sol-gel analysis for PEGDA and Bis was performed gravimetrically and a proposition of an alternative to this method employing a nuclear magnetic resonance technique is made. The two monomers were used for preparation of 3D polymer gel dosimeters having the acronyms PABIG and PABIG nx . The latter is presented for the first time in this work and is a type of the formerly established PABIG polymer gel dosimeter. The elementary characteristics of the new composition are presented, underlining the ease of its preparation, low dose threshold, and slightly increased sensitivity but lower quasi-linear range of dose response in comparison to PABIG. - Highlights: → Steady-state radiolysis of Bis, PEGDA and Bis-PEGDA is examined. → High Mw products are formed at low absorbed doses. → Formation of Bis nanogels is likely; PEGDA solutions form hydrogels. → NMR technique can be used for sol-gel analysis. → Features of 3D polymer gel dosimeters made from PEGDA and Bis are shown.

  4. Individual response to ionising radiation: What predictive assay(s) to choose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granzotto, A.; Viau, M.; Devic, C.; Maalouf, M.; Thomas, Ch.; Vogin, G.; Foray, N.; Granzotto, A.; Vogin, G.; Balosso, J.; Joubert, A.; Maalouf, M.; Vogin, G.; Colin, C.; Malek, K.; Balosso, J.; Colin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Individual response to ionizing radiation is an important information required to apply an efficient radiotherapy treatment against tumour and to avoid any adverse effects in normal tissues. In 1981, Fertil and Malaise have demonstrated that the post-irradiation local tumor control determined in vivo is correlated with clonogenic cell survival assessed in vitro. Furthermore, these authors have reminded the relevance of the concept of intrinsic radiosensitivity that is specific to each individual organ (Fertil and Malaise, 1981) [1]. To date, since clonogenicity assays are too time-consuming and do not provide any other molecular information, a plethora of research groups have attempted to determine the molecular bases of intrinsic radiosensitivity in order to propose reliable and faster predictive assays. To this aim, several approaches have been developed. Notably, the recent revolution in genomic and proteomics technologies is providing a considerable number of data but their link with radiosensitivity still remains to be elucidated. On another hand, the systematic screening of some candidate genes potentially involved in the radiation response is highlighting the complexity of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of DNA damage sensing and signalling and shows that an abnormal radiation response is not necessarily due to the impairment of one single protein. Finally, more modest approaches consisting in focusing some specific functions of DNA repair seem to provide more reliable clues to predict over-acute reactions caused by radiotherapy. In this review, we endeavored to analyse the contributions of these major approaches to predict human radiosensitivity. (authors)

  5. ICRP 's view on protection of non-human species from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing its existing recommendations for radiological protection. Up till now, it has not published any recommendations as to how assessment or management of radiation effects in non-human organisms should be carried out. The Commission set up a Task Group in the year 2000 to address this issue, and recently adopted the Task Group's report. The report addresses the role that ICRP could play in this important and developing area, building on the approach that has been developed for human protection. ICRP will develop a small set of Reference Fauna and Flora, plus their relevant databases to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose, and between dose and certain categories of effect. The concept of Reference Fauna and Flora is similar to that of Reference Man used for human radiological protection, in that it is intended to act as a basis for calculations and decision-making. The decision by the Commission to develop a framework for the assessment of radiation effects in non-human species has not been driven by any particular concern over environmental radiation hazards. It has rather been developed to fill a conceptual gap in radiological protection, and to clarify how ICRP can contribute to the attainment of society's goals of environmental protection by developing a protection policy based on scientific and ethical-philosophical principles. (author)

  6. Radiation-induced myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaenshirt, H [Heidelberg Univ. (F.R. Germany). Neurologische Klinik

    1975-10-01

    12 cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after /sup 60/Co teletherapy are reported on. Among these were 10 thoracal lesions, one cerviothoracal lesion, and one lesion of the medulla oblongata. In 9 cases, Hodgkin's disease had been the primary disease, tow patients had been irradiated because of suspected vertebral metastases of cancer of the breast, and one patient had suffered from a glomus tumour of the petrous bone. The spinal doses had exceeded the tolerance doses recommended in the relevant literature. There was no close correlation between the radiation dose and the course of the disease. The latency periods between the end of the radiotherapy and the onset of the neurological symptons varied from 6 to 16 mouths and were very constant in 7 cases with 6 to 9 months. The segmental height of the lesion corresponded to the level of irradiation. The presenting symptons of radiation-induced myelopathy are buruing dysaesthesias and Brown-Sequard's paralysis which may develop into transverse lesion of the cord with paraplegia still accompanied by dissociated perception disorders. The disease developed intermittently. Disturbances of the bladder function are frequent. The fluid is normal in most cases. Myelographic examinations were made in 8 cases. 3 cases developed into stationary cases exhibiting. Brown-Sequard syndrome, while 9 patients developed transverse lesion of the cord with paraplegia. 3 patients have died; antopsy findings are given for two of these. In the pathogenesis of radiation-induced myelopathy, the vascular factor is assumed to be of decisive importance.

  7. Ionising radiation effect on the luminescence emission of inorganic and biogenic calcium carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, C.; Correcher, V.; Virgos, M. D.; Garcia-Guinea, J.

    2017-06-01

    As known, the luminescence emission of mineral phases could be potentially employed for dosimetric purposes in the case of radiological terrorism or radiation accident where conventional monitoring is not available. In this sense, this paper reports on the thermo- (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both biogenic (common periwinkle - littorina littorera - shell made of calcite 90% and aragonite 10%) and inorganic (aragonite 100%) Ca-rich carbonates previously characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Whereas the aragonite sample displays the main CL waveband peaked in the red region (linked to point defects), the more intense emission obtained from the common periwinkle shell appears at higher energies (mainly associated with structural defects). The UV-blue TL emission of the samples, regardless of the origin, displays (i) an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity, (ii) linear dose response in the range of interest (up to 8 Gy), (iii) reasonable stability of the TL signal after 700 h of storage with an initial decay of ca. 88% for the mineral sample and 60% for the biogenic sample and maintaining the stability from 150 h onwards. (iv) The tests of thermal stability of the TL emission performed in the range of 180-320 °C confirm a continuum in the trap system.

  8. An overview of measuring and modelling dose and risk from ionising radiation for medical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tootell, Andrew; Szczepura, Katy; Hogg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper gives an overview of the methods that are used to calculate dose and risk from exposure to ionizing radiation as a support to other papers in this special issue. Background: The optimization of radiation dose is a legal requirement in medical exposures. This review paper aims to provide the reader with knowledge of dose by providing definitions and concepts of absorbed, effective and equivalent dose. Criticisms of the use of effective dose to infer the risk of an exposure to an individual will be discussed and an alternative approach considering the lifetime risks of cancer incidence will be considered. Prior to any dose or risk calculation, data concerning the dose absorbed by the patient needs to be collected. This paper will describe and discuss the main concepts and methods that can be utilised by a researcher in dose assessments. Concepts behind figures generated by imaging equipment such as dose-area-product, computed tomography dose index, dose length product and their use in effective dose calculations will be discussed. Processes, advantages and disadvantages in the simulation of exposures using the Monte Carlo method and direct measurement using digital dosimeters or thermoluminescent dosimeters will be considered. Beyond this special issue, it is proposed that this paper could serve as a teaching or CPD tool for personnel working or studying medical imaging

  9. Characterisation of a novel immunophilin-like gene, repressed by low doses of ionising radiation; identification of interacting proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The effects of low dose ionising radiation on the DIR1 gene and subsequent cellular effects have been well established (Robson et al., 1997, 1999, 2000). In this study, we aimed to further characterise the DIR1 gene and protein, using bioinformatic and experimental approaches. Analysis of the 5' upstream region of the DIR1 gene, revealed a promising putative promoter-containing region of 309bp, located 1034bp upstream of the open reading frame. The analysis also revealed 88 transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), some of which have been shown to have their activity modulated following exposure to both ionising and UV radiation. The original transcription start site (TSS), was demonstrated to be incorrect by using primer extension analysis, which located the start site at 229bp upstream of the DIR1 gene. However, subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed two TSS sites at 86 and 220bp respectively, which correlated with the true TSS. The DIR1 protein was shown to differ from the immunophilin proteins in terms of structure and active sites, with the exception of the highly conserved TPR domains. The protein was shown to contain putative protein kinase C (PKC) and caesin kinase II (CKII) sites. However, no band was observed for the DIR1 protein with a PKC assay and the CKII assay demonstrated a 21409.5 count per minute (cpm) for DIR1 in comparison to a 617384.07 cpm for the positive control, therefore demonstrating that the DIR1 protein is not phosphorylated by either enzyme. The expressed His-tagged DIR1 protein was shown by western blot to be insoluble and also demonstrated a 21.9KDa increase in molecular weight at 60KDa in comparison to the predicted size of 38.2KDa. Expression of a HA-tagged DIR1 protein in mammalian L132 cells revealed that the protein was localised to the cytoplasm with aggregation around the nuclear membrane. Subsequent immunocytochemistry results following 0.2 Gray (Gy) irradiation demonstrated that the protein translocated to the nucleus

  10. Abundance and diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in lakes exposed to Chernobyl-derived ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.F.; Nagorskaya, L.L.; Smith, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Littoral (lake shore) macroinvertebrate communities were studied in eight natural lakes affected by fallout from the Chernobyl accident. The lakes spanned a range in 137 Cs contamination from 100 to 15500 kBq m -2 and estimated external dose rates ranged from 0.13 to 30.7 μGy h -1 . General linear models were used to assess whether abundance of individuals, taxon richness, Berger-Parker dominance and Shannon-Wiener diversity varied across the lakes. Step-wise multiple regressions were used to relate variation in total abundance, taxon richness, Berger-Parker dominance, Shannon-Wiener diversity, taxon richness within major groups of macroinvertebrates and abundance of the more common individual taxa to the measured environmental characteristics (conductivity, pH, total hardness and phosphate; lake area, lake maximum depth and total external dose) of the lakes. No evidence was found in this study that the ecological status of lake communities has been influenced by radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl accident. Indeed, the most contaminated lake, Glubokoye, contained the highest richness of aquatic invertebrates. Taxon richness in the eight study lakes varied from 22 (Svyatskoe no. 7) to 42 (Glubokoye) which spans a range typical for uncontaminated lakes in the region. Since 90 Sr is readily-absorbed by Mollusca, estimated dose rates to this group exceeded those for other invertebrate groups in two lakes (Perstok and Glubokoye). However this study found no association between mollusc diversity or abundance of individual snail species and variation between lakes in the external radiation dose. Indeed Glubokoye, the lake most contaminated by 90 Sr, had the highest richness of freshwater snails per sample (an average of 8.9 taxa per sample). - Highlights: → We studied the effect of radiation on macroinvertebrates in Chernobyl affected lakes. → Abundance, taxon richness, Berger-Parker dominance, Shannon-Wiener diversity evaluated. → No relationship between

  11. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarapultseva, Elena I.; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2016-01-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000 mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000 mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F 0 and F 1 Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100 mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F 0 Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000 mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F 2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000 mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F 2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000 mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F 2 progeny of irradiated F 0 Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays. - Highlights: • Viability of irradiated daphnids and their F 1 progeny is compromised. • Viability of the F 2 progeny of irradiated parents is not affected. • Total fertility of irradiated daphnids and their F 1 progeny declines with the dose. • Total fertility of the F 2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000 mGy is compromised. • The decreased fertility among the F 2 progeny is transgenerational phenomenon.

  12. Pulvinic synthesis and evaluation of pulvinic derivatives like agents of protection against radiation ionising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heurtaux, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    This work is devoted to the by-products preparation of mushrooms pigments, the pulvinic acids then to the evaluation of their oxidizing properties in the aim to find new compounds susceptible to be employed as protective drugs against ionizing radiation. An efficient method of symmetric pulvinic acids has been finalized. It is based on a double condensation of silylated cetenes acetals with oxalyl chloride. The treatment of the products got by D.B.U. leads to esters of corresponding pulvinic acids that are then saponified. The oxidizing properties have been studied. Then, the interaction between the pulvinic by-products and DNA are studied. Finally, the evaluation of radioprotective properties of the different synthesized compounds on different models (bacteria, eucaryotes cell and animal) is presented. (N.C.)

  13. Towards a unified system for expression of biological damage by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.; Chen, C.Z.; Kadiri, L.; Younis, A.

    1987-01-01

    Limitations to current systems of radiation dosimetry are discussed. Analyses of a wide range of published data on inactivation of enzymes, viruses, bacteria, plant and mammalian cells by electrons, X and γ-rays, and accelerated ions leads to the conclusion that the main radiosensitive sites in higher cells are the double-stranded segments of DNA. The probability of damage is determined by the mean free path for ionization along the charged particle tracks and is optimum when the spacing matches the mean chord length (2 nm) through a DNA segment. Interpretation of these findings leads to the possibility of a more accurate unified system of dosimetry and to the specification of absolute biological effectiveness. (author)

  14. A preliminary study of issues and practices concerning pregnancy and ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2009-01-01

    A literature review in relation to irradiation of patients and staff during pregnancy was carried out. A number of publications describing procedures to be followed in the case of a pregnant patient who needs to have a radiological examination and in the case of pregnant staff who work in a department where they could be exposed to radiation were reviewed. A review of existing practices in 13 European countries was carried out by sending a questionnaire to representatives in each country. From the review, it was found that the existing practices with respect to irradiation of patients and staff during pregnancy vary enormously. There is no harmonisation on this issue at the European level. From the literature review and the review of practices, a number of ethical issues were identified and exposed and a number of conclusions were drawn. (authors)

  15. Protection against ionising radiation and synergism with thiols by zinc aspartate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floersheim, G.L.; Floersheim, P.

    1986-01-01

    Pre-treatment with zinc aspartate protected mice against the lethal effects of radiation and raised the LD 50 from 8 gy to 12.2 Gy. Zinc chloride and zinc sulphate were clearly less active. The radioprotective effect of zinc aspartate was equivalent to cysteamine and slightly inferior to S,2-aminoethylisothiourea (AET). Zinc aspartate displayed a similar therapeutic index to the thiols but could be applied at an earlier time before irradiation. Synergistic effects occurred with the combined administration of zinc aspartate and thiols. By giving zinc aspartate with cysteamine, the LD 50 was increased to 13.25 Gy and, by combining it in the optimal protocol with AET, to 17.3 Gy. The radioprotection by zinc and its synergism with thiols is explained by the stabilisation of thiols through the formation of zinc complexes. (author)

  16. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  17. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  18. Radiation induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will focus on delayed genetic effects occurring in the progeny of cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. We have developed a model system for investigating those genetic effects occurring multiple generations after radiation exposure. The presentation will describe some of the delayed effects observed after radiation exposures including delayed chromosomal rearrangements, and recombination events as determined by a plasmid based assay system. We will present new data on how changes in gene expression as measured by differential display and DNA microarray analysis provides a mechanism by which cells display a memory of irradiation, and introduce candidate genes that may play a role in initiating and perpetuation the unstable phenotype. These results will be discussed in terms of the recently described non-targeted Death Inducing Effect (DIE) where by secreted factors from clones of unstable cells can elicit effects in non irradiated cells and may serve to perpetuate the unstable phenotype in cells that themselves were not irradiated

  19. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants

  20. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  1. Updated estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Mark P; Wakeford, Richard; Kendall, Gerald M

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of childhood leukaemia remains generally unknown, although exposure to moderate and high levels of ionising radiation, such as was experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan or from radiotherapy, is an established cause. Risk models based primarily upon studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors imply that low-level exposure to ionising radiation, including to ubiquitous natural background radiation, also raises the risk of childhood leukaemia. In a recent paper (Wakeford et al 2009 Leukaemia 23 770-6) we estimated the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain attributable to natural background radiation to be about 20%. In this paper we employ the two sets of published leukaemia risk models used previously, but use recently published revised estimates of natural background radiation doses received by the red bone marrow of British children to update the previous results. Using the newer dosimetry we calculate that the best estimate of the proportion of cases of childhood leukaemia in Great Britain predicted to be attributable to this source of exposure is 15-20%, although the uncertainty associated with certain stages in the calculation (e.g. the nature of the transfer of risk between populations and the pertinent dose received from naturally occurring alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides) is significant. The slightly lower attributable proportions compared with those previously derived by Wakeford et al (Leukaemia 2009 23 770-6) are largely due to the lower doses (and in particular lower high LET doses) for the first year of life.

  2. Using ionising radiation against terrorism and contrabandage determination of the occurring dose values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hupe, O.; Ankerhold, U.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Presently the combat against terrorism and contrabandage is gaining in importance. This leads to a growing need for human inspections for weapons or chemical substances like drugs or explosives at e.g. airports and federal buildings. Up to now, this has been done mainly by pat search or the use of metal detectors. But the installed metal detection systems can have a high rate of false alerts, caused e.g. by belt buckles, leading to a high rate of time consuming manual follow-up checks. Also, it is not possible to detect chemical substances or modern plastic weapons. Therefore, a lot of efforts have been made to develop reliable technologies for passenger and cargo controls. Up to now, the demands placed on control systems for the use in routine are fulfilled only by X-ray screening systems. X-ray scanners have been used successfully for several years for personnel controls (checks) at diamond mines and prisons or as cargo scanner. So far, however, these systems have not been used frequently for human inspections, e.g. at airports. In general, two aspects must be considered wit h regard to the use of X-ray personnel scanners: the privacy aspect, because the body shape is seen, and the radiation protection aspect. For radiation protection purposes, and to observe the prescribed dose limits, it is extremely important to know the dose a person gets knowingly when passing a personnel scanner or, as a stowaway, a cargo scanner. Within the scope of a research project measurements were performed on different types of personnel and cargo scanners, using the transmission and backscattering method. All scanners investigated work with a high dose rate and use a short irradiation time. Because of this technique, reliable values of the personal and ambient dose equivalent, H p (10) and H * (10), could be determined only with a specially developed measuring system (presented in a poster at this conference). The scanner systems and dose values

  3. Pre-service Teachers' Subject Knowledge of and Attitudes about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys Colclough, Nicholas; Lock, Roger; Soares, Allan

    2011-02-01

    This study focussed on secondary school (11-18 years) pre-service teachers' (n = 73) knowledge of and attitudes towards risks associated with alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. A multi-method approach was used with physics, chemistry, biology, and history graduates undertaking the one-year initial teacher training, Post Graduate Certificate in Education course at a university in central England. A novel research tool, involving interviews about real concrete contexts and first-hand data collection with radioactive sources, was employed to gain insights into a sub-set of the sample (n = 12) of pre-service teachers' subject knowledge of and attitudes towards risk. The subject knowledge of all the pre-service teachers was also measured using a Certainty of Response Index instrument; multiple-choice questions with associated confidence indicators. Although the physicists displayed the higher levels of knowledge, they also demonstrated limitations in their knowledge and held misconceptions such as irradiation being confused with contamination. Physics graduates hold more rational attitudes and a greater willingness to accept risk while the attitudes of graduates in the other subject disciplines are more disparate. These findings raise questions about the extent to which pre-service science and history teachers have the knowledge necessary to teach this topic. The article concludes with discussion of the implications these findings have for initial teacher training, continuing professional development needs for teachers already in the profession, and curriculum developers.

  4. Virtual reality interactive simulator for training health care professionals in the use of ionising radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Jaime B. de; Silveira, Jefferson Lima da, E-mail: jaimecarvalho4318@hotmail.com [Centro Universitário Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mól, Antônio Carlos de Abreu; Legey, Ana Paula; Santo, André Cotelli E.; Marins, Eugenio; Nascimento, Ana Cristina de Holanda; Suita, Júlio Cezar [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine requires a rigorous attention to procedures in order to minimize the risks to the health care professional and to the patient. Risk minimization involves the training of the professional and the adequacy of the facilities. Virtual Reality (VR) is an already consolidated tool for training procedures, including those of the health sciences. In this context, an interactive VR simulator representing a radiotherapy room (bunker) for training health care professionals and the inspectors of such facilities was developed. This VR model allows the user to perform the normal activities on the operation and the inspection procedures of the facility. The model was based on the blueprints of a real radiotherapy clinic. The virtual model of the radiotherapy bunker, developed at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering, was presented to experts of the General Coordination of Medical and Industrial Facilities of CNEN and is in the process of receiving small modifications to the specific needs for its adequateness, as a training tool, in a training course, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), for inspectors of radiotherapy installations. This work shows the possibility of using Virtual Reality in the development of training tools for professionals working in radioactive installations. (author)

  5. Effect of ionising radiation on shelf life and potency of herbal raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama Bhat, P.; Prajna, P.S.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Padyana, Subramanya; Maurya, D.K.

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal herbs are involving from fringe to mainstream use with a greater number of people seeking remedies and health approaches free from side effects caused by synthetic chemicals. Unfortunately, the number of reports of people experiencing negative effects, caused by the use of herbal drugs, has also been increasing. There may be various reasons for such problems, poor quality of herbal medicines due to insufficient attention being paid to the quality assurance and control of these products. Plants are associated with their own microflora, in addition to that soil and air act as main inoculum source for causing contamination in crude herbs along with other field practices like harvesting, handling and packing. The study was aimed to determine the type, level of bacterial and fungal load and feasibility of electron beam irradiation to hygenise the commonly used herbal raw materials using electron beam radiation with three different dosages viz., 8 kGy, 12 kGy, 15 kGy. Irradiated and control samples were analysed for microbial load and biochemical compositions. In present study, microbial load was proportionately reduced with increase in dosage compared to non-irradiated samples. Results indicated that non-irradiated samples were highly contaminated with microbial load. E. coli and Staphylococcus spp. were predominant among the bacterial contaminants at varying levels. The fungi enumerated from raw materials includes species of Penicillium, Rhizopus, Mucor and Aspergillus. Minimum variation was recorded in the carbohydrate, protein, phenolic, tannin and ascorbic acid content of the herb samples with irradiation treatment. (author)

  6. Test and further development of a silicon picsel detector for detecting ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, P.

    1990-12-01

    The concept of a silicon detector with a MOSFET as an integrating amplification element (DEP-MOSFET) is introduced. The method of functioning of different version and a picture cell (picsel) detector, which makes energy and location resolution possible, is discussed. Quantitative relationships which describe the operation of the component as a detector, and quantitative relationships for the energy resolution of a DEP-MOSFET are derived theoretically. Measurements provide the proof of the detection function of different versions and the confirmation of the results of the theoretical model. The excellent noise properties of DEP-MOSFET detectors with closed structure are pointed out. The further development of the explained detector concept by integration of a JFET as the amplifying element (here introduced in the form of a computer simulation and quantitative relationships which describe the behaviour as a detector) promises progress with regard to energy resolution and radiation resistance, and offers the possibility of producing a picsel detector made from closed structures with little technological effort. (orig.) [de

  7. Virtual reality interactive simulator for training health care professionals in the use of ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Jaime B. de; Silveira, Jefferson Lima da; Mól, Antônio Carlos de Abreu; Legey, Ana Paula; Santo, André Cotelli E.; Marins, Eugenio; Nascimento, Ana Cristina de Holanda; Suita, Júlio Cezar

    2017-01-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine requires a rigorous attention to procedures in order to minimize the risks to the health care professional and to the patient. Risk minimization involves the training of the professional and the adequacy of the facilities. Virtual Reality (VR) is an already consolidated tool for training procedures, including those of the health sciences. In this context, an interactive VR simulator representing a radiotherapy room (bunker) for training health care professionals and the inspectors of such facilities was developed. This VR model allows the user to perform the normal activities on the operation and the inspection procedures of the facility. The model was based on the blueprints of a real radiotherapy clinic. The virtual model of the radiotherapy bunker, developed at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering, was presented to experts of the General Coordination of Medical and Industrial Facilities of CNEN and is in the process of receiving small modifications to the specific needs for its adequateness, as a training tool, in a training course, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), for inspectors of radiotherapy installations. This work shows the possibility of using Virtual Reality in the development of training tools for professionals working in radioactive installations. (author)

  8. Transgenerational epigenetics of parental exposure to ionising radiation and other mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have established that epigenetic changes play an important role in many common human diseases, including cancer. Given that the epigenetic landscape of the mammalian cell is not fixed and undergoes massive reprogramming during development, it can potentially be affected by a variety of environmental factors. As the majority of the de novo epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation, are faithfully reproduced during DNA replication, they are transmissible through many cell divisions and, in some cases, can be passed from parents to their offspring. An increasing body of experimental evidence from animal and human studies suggests that environmentally-induced epigenetic changes can be inherited by subsequent generations and can result in transgenerational phenotypic alterations, including predisposition to common diseases

  9. Carcinogenic risk assessment and management of ionising radiation, asbestos and nickel: a comparative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Oudiz, A.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the similarities as well as the differences of risk assessment and management of ionizing radiation, asbestos and nickel in France. The comparison has been performed at three levels of analysis: concepts, regulation and practices. Ionizing radiation (IR) is compared with asbestos as far as occupational exposure is concerned and to nickel and nickel compounds as far as general population exposure is concerned. The three main stages of risk assessment were considered: hazard identification, exposure-risk relationship, exposure assessment. Alternative risk management policies were reviewed. The main results are the following: At the conceptual level, the risk assessment and management frameworks present many similarities: exposure-risk relationships exist, and low dose extrapolation is considered as legitimate. Comparison of protection strategies can be carried out with reference to the 'optimization' principle developed for IR. At the regulatory level, the status of the IR dose limits differs from the status of the exposure limit values set for asbestos and nickel. For IR, compliance with the dose limit cannot be seen as the final objective of protection: the burden is put on the requirement to maintain the doses as low as reasonably achievable, social and economical factors being taken into account (ALARA). In most of the situations, actual exposure to IR in industry appear to be significantly lower than the dose limit. In the case of asbestos and nickel, the exposure limit values are very low and compliance with the limits is indeed a quite ambitious objective. At the practical level, some noticeable differences exist as far as the decision aiding procedures are concerned. A process which may be considered as an ALARA approach is applied, in the case of nickel: seeking for the 'best available technologies', defining and implementing with stakeholdes regional plans for air quality. In the case of asbestos, the predictive

  10. Radiation risk statement in the participant information for a research protocol that involves exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) is required to scrutinise the protocols of clinical drug trials that recruit patients as participants. If the study involves exposing the participants to ionizing radiation the information provided to the participant should contain a radiation risk statement that is understandable by the Committee and the participant. The information that should be included in the risk statement is available from a variety of published sources and is discussed. The ARPANSA Code of Practice Exposure of Humans to Ionizing Radiation for Research Purposes (2005) states explicitly what the responsibilities of the researcher and the HREC are. Some research protocols do not provide the information required by good radiation protection practice and explicitly called for by the Code. Nine points (including: state that ionizing radiation is involved; that the radiation is additional to standard care; the effective dose to be received; the dose compared to natural background; the dose to the most exposed organs; a statement of risk; the benefits accruing from the exposure; ask the participant about previous exposures; name a contact person from whom information may be sought) that should be considered for inclusion in the participant information are presented and discussed. An example of a radiation risk statement is provided

  11. 2008 activity report of the French metrology - Ionising radiation; Rapport d'activite 2008 de la metrologie francaise - Rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-07-01

    The activities of this section are entrusted to the Henry Becquerel national laboratory (LNE-LNHB), the national laboratory of metrology of the CEA-Saclay, and to the laboratory of dose metrology (LMDN) under the management of IRSN-Cadarache. They treat of ionizing radiations metrology in the domains of activity, photons and charged particles dosimetry, and basic data. This article summarizes the 2008 works carried out at both laboratories: international actions and comparisons, instrumentation improvements, establishment of national references. (J.S.)

  12. Molecular requirements for the combined effects of TRAIL and ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Patrizia; Jendrossek, Verena; Durand, Elise; Gruber, Charlotte; Budach, Wilfried; Belka, Claus

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previously it was shown that combination of death ligand TRAIL and irradiation strongly increases cell kill in several human tumour cell lines. Since Bcl-2 overexpression did not strongly interfere with the efficacy, components of the mitochondrial death pathway are not required for an effective combined treatment. In the present study the minimal molecular prerequisites for the efficacy of a combined treatment were determined. Materials and methods: Apoptosis induction in control, caspase-8 and FADD negative Jurkat cells, BJAB control and FADD-DN cells was analysed by FACS. Activation of caspase-8, -10 and -3 and cleavage of PARP was determined by immunoblotting. TRAIL receptors were activated using recombinant human TRAIL. Surface expression of TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5 was analysed by FACS. Results: Jurkat T-cells express the agonistic DR5 receptor but not DR4. Presence of FADD was found to be essential for TRAIL induced apoptosis. Caspase-8 negative cells show very low rates of apoptosis after prolonged stimulation with TRAIL. No combined effects of TRAIL with irradiation could be found in FADD-DN over expressing and FADD deficient cells. However, the combination of TRAIL and irradiation clearly lead to a combined effect in caspase-8 negative Jurkat cells, albeit with reduced death rates. In these cells activation of the alternative initiator caspase-10 could be detected after combined treatment. Conclusion: Our data show that a combined therapy with TRAIL and irradiation will only be effective in cells expressing at least one agonistic TRAIL receptor, FADD and caspase-8 or caspase-10

  13. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  14. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapultseva, Elena I. [Department of Biology, Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering NRNU MEPhI, Studgorodok,1, Obninsk, Kaluga Region 249040 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe Highway, 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina Str. 3, 11933 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000 mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000 mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F{sub 0} and F{sub 1}Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100 mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F{sub 0}Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000 mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F{sub 2} total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000 mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F{sub 2} progeny of parents exposed to 10,000 mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F{sub 2} progeny of irradiated F{sub 0}Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays. - Highlights: • Viability of irradiated daphnids and their F{sub 1} progeny is compromised. • Viability of the F{sub 2} progeny of irradiated parents is not affected. • Total fertility of irradiated daphnids and their F{sub 1} progeny declines with the dose. • Total fertility of the F{sub 2} progeny of parents exposed to 10,000 mGy is compromised. • The decreased fertility among the F{sub 2} progeny is transgenerational phenomenon.

  15. Requirements for the approval of dosimetry services under the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985: Pt. 2: Internal radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Guidance for dosimetry services on the requirements for approval by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is provided in three parts. This part sets out the procedures and criteria that will be used by HSE in the assessment of dosimetry services seeking approval in relation to internal radiations (including radon decay products). (author)

  16. Advanced methodologies of evaluating the radiation sources and ionising radiation shieldings for reducing the irradiation in nuclear field personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantazi, D.; Mateescu, S.; Stanciu, M.

    2003-01-01

    One of the technical measures of protection against ionizing radiations is the radiation shielding. The process of implementing modern and efficient methods of evaluating the radiation shielding implies advanced calculation methods. That means using from simpler 1-D or 2-D computing codes such as MicroShield or QAD up to systems of codes such as SCALE (containing several independent modules) or the Monte Carlo multipurpose and many particles, MCNP, transport code. The main objective of this work is to present the Monte Carlo based evaluation of the dose rates from the CANDU type spent fuel all along the path of its handling up to intermediate storage. These values will be then compared with the values obtained from calculations with different computing programs. To obtain this objective two problems were approached: - establishing geometrical models according to the definition used by MCNP code so that the characteristics of CANDU type nuclear fuel are taking into account; - checking the validity of the proposed models by comparing the MCNP results with those obtained with other computing codes specific for shielding evaluation and radiation dose calculation

  17. Requirements for the approval of dosimetry services under the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985: Pt. 1: External radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Guidance for dosimetry services on the requirements for approval by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is provided in three parts. This part sets out the procedures and criteria that will be used by HSE in the assessment of dosimetry services seeking approval in relation to external radiations (including accidents). (author)

  18. Ionising-radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hames, G.E.; Reed, J.; Robertson, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    A scintillation crystal/photodiode assembly for the detection of x- and γ-rays is described comprising a single crystal of zinc-tungstate grown from a melt and optically coupled to a photodiode. The crystal is doped with a trace element, for example Ag or Sb, to eliminate the characteristic rose/amber colour of the pure crystal. (U.K.)

  19. Lactobacilli and ionising radiation: an example of the application to meat and meat products. Laktobazillen und ionisierende Strahlung als Beispiel einer Anwendung auf Fleisch und Fleischprodukte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, W.H. (Inst. fuer Hygiene und Toxikologie, Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung, Karlsruhe (Germany))

    1992-01-01

    Ionising radiation provides a practical pasteurisation method for the terminal treatment of refrigerated vacuum-packaged meat products with the aim of shelf life extension. However, the relatively high radiation resistance ([gamma]-D[sub 10] = 0.70-1.2 kGy) of typical meat Lactobacilli, especially Lb. sake, selectively favours their total domination after treatments with 5 kGy. Typical meat strains show higher resistance (in term of [gamma]-D[sub 10] values the decimal reduction value due to irradiation) in the log (exponential) than in the stationary phase. This phenomenon was observed both in semi-synthetic broth and in meat, and may be explained in terms of a DNA repair mechanism operative during the exponential phase. Packaging under different gas atmospheres resulted in increased resistance to radiation in presence of N[sub 2], whilst the highest death rate was observed in presence of CO[sub 2]. (orig.)

  20. Radiation-induced nondisjunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    The methodology and results of epidemiological studies of the effects of preconception diagnostic x-rays of the abdomen on chromosome segregation in humans are described. The vast majority of studies show the same positive, though not significant, trend to increased nondisjunction among the offspring of irradiated women. The results of the various studies, however, cannot be pooled because of differing methodologies used. Abnormal chromosome segregation during mitotic division has been inducted experimentally by the in vitro exposure of human lymphocytes to a low dose of 50 R gamma irradiation. First meiotic nondisjunction has been successfully induced by whole body exposure of female mice to a low dose of radiation. The question of time-related repair of the mechanism involved in chromosome segregation is raised

  1. Appraisal of alternative skin model for the study of epidermal restoration following exposure to various environmental stress agents: ionising radiation and UV B; Evaluation d'un modele alternatif de peau dans l'etude de l'atteinte epidermique apres exposition a differents agents de stress environnementaux: rayonnements ionisants (RI) et ultra-violets B (UVB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoir, M

    2006-06-15

    Human skin is a major target tissue for ionising radiation (IR) and UV B. We developed a skin explant model and used 2 types of keratinocytes to study survival and oxidative stress induced by these radiations. We examined oxidative damages by measuring R.O.S. produced and cellular anti-oxidant defenses induced. We observed into skin exposed to IR a modulation of genes expression implied in the control of oxidative stress, confirmed by the decrease of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities. The imbalance observed between anti- and pro-apoptotic genes expression shows that keratinocytes apoptosis may be partly dependent on radio-induced R.O.S. production. We showed the difference of radiosensitivity between N.H.E.K. and Ha Ca.T., which may be linked to their differential oxidative responses. In addition, during re-epithelialising, we demonstrated that activated N.H.E.K. after IR express keratin 6, release pro-inflammatory cytokines and proliferate, without modification of their differentiation. Treatment of N.H.E.K. with geranyl geranylacetone (G.G.A.) has a beneficial effect on their radio-induced activation by increasing IL-1 release, their migration in scrapped area and their survival. G.G.A. has an anti apoptotic ability (induction of Hsp70- caspase-3 pathway) and migratory properties (P38/RhoA activation) on N.H.E.K., but after IR, only caspase-3 pathway is induced. This work thus contributes to the understanding of cutaneous damages after IR and G.G.A. mechanism of action which accelerates re-epithelialising. (author)

  2. Appraisal of alternative skin model for the study of epidermal restoration following exposure to various environmental stress agents: ionising radiation and UV B; Evaluation d'un modele alternatif de peau dans l'etude de l'atteinte epidermique apres exposition a differents agents de stress environnementaux: rayonnements ionisants (RI) et ultra-violets B (UVB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoir, M

    2006-06-15

    Human skin is a major target tissue for ionising radiation (IR) and UV B. We developed a skin explant model and used 2 types of keratinocytes to study survival and oxidative stress induced by these radiations. We examined oxidative damages by measuring R.O.S. produced and cellular anti-oxidant defenses induced. We observed into skin exposed to IR a modulation of genes expression implied in the control of oxidative stress, confirmed by the decrease of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities. The imbalance observed between anti- and pro-apoptotic genes expression shows that keratinocytes apoptosis may be partly dependent on radio-induced R.O.S. production. We showed the difference of radiosensitivity between N.H.E.K. and Ha Ca.T., which may be linked to their differential oxidative responses. In addition, during re-epithelialising, we demonstrated that activated N.H.E.K. after IR express keratin 6, release pro-inflammatory cytokines and proliferate, without modification of their differentiation. Treatment of N.H.E.K. with geranyl geranylacetone (G.G.A.) has a beneficial effect on their radio-induced activation by increasing IL-1 release, their migration in scrapped area and their survival. G.G.A. has an anti apoptotic ability (induction of Hsp70- caspase-3 pathway) and migratory properties (P38/RhoA activation) on N.H.E.K., but after IR, only caspase-3 pathway is induced. This work thus contributes to the understanding of cutaneous damages after IR and G.G.A. mechanism of action which accelerates re-epithelialising. (author)

  3. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Khakimov, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  4. A system for protecting the environment from ionising radiation: selecting reference fauna and flora, and the possible dose models and environmental geometries that could be applied to them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentreath, R J; Woodhead, D S

    2001-09-28

    In order to demonstrate, explicitly, that the environment can be protected with respect to controlled sources of ionising radiation, it is essential to have a systematic framework within which dosimetry models for fauna and flora can be used. And because of the practical limitations on what could reasonably be modelled and the amount of information that could reasonably be obtained, it is also necessary to limit the application of such models to a 'set' of fauna and flora within a reference' context. This paper, therefore, outlines the factors that will need to be considered to select such 'reference' fauna and flora, and describes some of the factors and constraints necessary to develop the associated dosimetry models. It also describes some of the most basic environmental geometrics within which the dose models could be set in order to make comparisons amongst different radiation sources.

  5. A system for protecting the environment from ionising radiation. Selecting reference fauna and flora, and the possible dose models and environmental geometries that could be applied to them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentreath, R.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    In order to demonstrate, explicitly, that the environment can be protected with respect to controlled sources of ionising radiation, it is essential to have a systematic framework within which dosimetry models for fauna and flora can be used. And because of the practical limitations on what could reasonably be modelled and the amount of information that could reasonably be obtained, it is also necessary to limit the application of such models to a 'set' of fauna and flora within a 'reference' context. This paper, therefore, outlines the factors that will need to be considered to select such 'reference' fauna and flora, and describes some of the factors and constraints necessary to develop the associated dosimetry models. It also describes some of the most basic environmental geometries within which the dose models could be set in order to make comparisons amongst different radiation sources

  6. Radiation-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a new technique for obtaining information non-invasively on the composition and structures of a material or body by detecting radiation-induced thermoacoustic image features. This is accomplished by utilizing the acoustic wave generated by sudden thermal stress. The sudden thermal stress is induced by a pulse of radiation which deposits energy causing a rapid, but very small, rise of temperature (typically, ΔT approximately 10sup(-6) - 10sup(-5) deg C). The radiation may be ionizing radiation, such as high energy electrons, photons (x-rays), neutrons, or other charged particles or it may be non-ionizing radiation, such as R.F. and microwave electromagnetic radiation and ultrasonic radiation. The choice of radiation depends on the nature of the body to be imaged and the type of information desired

  7. Atmospheric ionisation in Snowdonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aplin, K L [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH UK (United Kingdom); Williams, J H, E-mail: k.aplin1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Envirodata-Eyri, Bryn Goleu, Penmaen Park, Llanfairfechan, Gwynedd LL33 0RL (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-23

    Atmospheric ionisation from natural radioactivity and cosmic rays has been measured at several sites in Snowdonia from 2005-present. The motivation for this project was a combination of public engagement with science, and research into the effects of ionisation on climate. A four-component atmospheric radiometer instrument is co-located with the ionisation detectors and the data is remotely logged and displayed on the Web. Atmospheric ionisation from natural radioactivity varies with local geology, and the cosmic ray ionisation component is modulated by solar activity and altitude. Variations due to all these effects have been identified and are described.

  8. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfared, A.S.; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation. (author)

  9. Radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeyama, Yukihide; Abiko, Seisho; Kurokawa, Yasushi; Okamura, Tomomi; Watanabe, Kohsaku; Inoue, Shinichi; Fujii, Yasuhiro.

    1993-01-01

    We reported a patient who suffered from cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation therapy for astrocytoma located at the left temporal lobe. An eleven year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting received partial removal of a tumor. Histological diagnosis of the tumor was astrocytoma (grade II). His preoperative cerebral angiograms showed mass sign solely, without stenosis or occlusion of the cerebral vessel. Postoperatively, he was treated with irradiation therapy involving the whole brain with a total of 30 Gy, and gamma knife therapy. Six months after irradiation, he started suffering from frequent cerebral ischemic attacks, but there was no regrowth of the tumor visible on CT scans. Cerebral angiograms were made again, and revealed multifocal stenoses in the bilateral internal carotid arteries, middle cerebral arteries, and the anterior cerebral artery. His symptoms did not improve after conservative treatment with steroids, calcium antagonist, or low molecular weight dextran. Although he received a superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomoses bilaterally, multiple cerebral infarctions appeared. Although irradiation therapy is acceptable in patients with brain tumor, cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation should be considered as one of the most important complications, and the risk incurred by irradiation therapy should lead to more careful consideration and caution when treating intracranial brain tumors, especially in children. From our experience, the usefulness of bypass surgery for radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy is still controversial. (author)

  10. Ionisation and dissociation of water induced by swift multicharged ions; Etude de l'ionisation et de la dissociation d'H{sub 2}O induites par collision avec des ions multicharges rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, S

    2006-02-15

    Ionization and dissociation of water molecules and water clusters induced by 11.7 MeV/A Ni{sup 25+} ions were carried out by imaging techniques. Branching ratios, ionisation cross sections and Kinetic Energy Released distributions have been measured together with fragmentation dynamics studies. Multiple ionization represents approximately 30% of the ionizing events. Double ionization produces in significant way atomic oxygen, considered as a possible precursor of the large production of HO{sub 2} radical in liquid water radiolysis by ions of high Linear Energy Transfer. We evidence a strong selectivity of bond breakage in the case of ion-induced HOD fragmentation. Once the molecule doubly ionized, the breakage of the O-H bond is found 6.5 times more probable than that of the O-D bond. A semi-classical calculation simulating the fragmentation dynamics on the potential energy surface of the ground-state of di-cation H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} makes possible to as well reproduce the preferential nature of the breakage of the O-H bond as the position and the shift of the kinetic energy distributions. First results concerning interaction with water clusters are also reported. Measurements in coincidence are carried out giving access to correlation, with the distributions in energy and angle of the emitted fragments. Mass spectrum points fast intra-cluster proton transfer, leading to the emission of protonated clusters. (author)

  11. Effect of Mercuric Nitrate on Repair of Radiation-induced DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paneka, Agnieszka; Antonina, Cebulska Wasilewska [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Han, Min; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    High concentrations of mercury can cause serious damage to the nervous system, immune system, kidneys and liver in humans. And mercury is toxic to developing embryos because mercury ions can penetrate the blood.placenta barrier to reach the embryo. Studies from human monitoring of occupational exposure to mercury vapours have shown that mercury can alter the ability of lymphocytes to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate, on the molecular and cytogenetic levels, the effect of exposure to mercury ions on the kinetics of the repair process of DNA damage induced by ionising radiation.

  12. Ionising radiations. Joint consultative document. Supplementary proposals for provision on radiological protection and draft advice from the National Radiological Protection Board to the Health and Safety Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The consultative document is in two parts. Part 1 indicates the amendments to the first consultative document which would be required in order to implement (in the United Kingdom) the 1978 Draft Euratom Directive (on Basic Safety Standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionising radiations). Part 2 deals with the system of dose limitation contained within the Euratom Directive. This aspect is discussed, in relation to the Articles of the Directive, under the following headings: limitation of doses for controllable exposures, limits of doses for exposed workers, limitation of doses for apprentices and students, planned special exposures, dose limits for members of the public. The Commission of the European Communities proposals for a draft Directive on Radiological Protection are reproduced as an Appendix, without Annexes. (U.K.)

  13. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors l-deprenyl and clorgyline protect nonmalignant human cells from ionising radiation and chemotherapy toxicity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seymour, C B

    2003-11-17

    l-Deprenyl (R-(-)-deprenyl, selegiline) is an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) that is known to protect nerve cells from a variety of chemical and physical insults. As apoptosis is a common mechanism of radiation-induced cell death, the effect of l-deprenyl on the survival of cultured cells and tissue explants was studied following exposure to gamma radiation. The results obtained were compared with the effects of the less-selective MAO-B inhibitor pargyline and the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline. l-Deprenyl at a concentration of 10(-9) M protected the nontumorigenic cell line (HaCaT) and normal human urothelial explants from the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation, but did not protect tumorigenic human cell lines HaCaT-ras, HPV-transfected human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells), or PC3. Human bladder carcinoma explants were not protected. Clorgyline showed a smaller protective effect of normal cells, whereas pargyline had no effect. Radiation-induced delayed effects (genomic instability measured as delayed cell death) were prevented in normal cells by l-deprenyl but, interestingly, deprenyl appeared to increase the amount of delayed death in the tumorigenic cell lines. Studies using l-deprenyl prior to the exposure of nonmalignant cells to cisplatin showed that cell death due to this agent was also reduced. Treatment of cultures of nontumorigenic cells with l-deprenyl or clorgyline significantly increased the levels of the protein Bcl-2 following irradiation, but there was no such effect on the already-elevated levels of this protein in the tumour samples. Since the Bcl-2 has been shown to be an inhibitor of apoptosis or programmed cell death, this would imply that the protective effects of l-deprenyl and clorgyline involve activation of antiapoptotic pathways within the normal cell. This hypothesis is supported by data showing reduced levels of apoptosis in HaCAT cells and in normal bladder explant cultures following treatment with l-deprenyl.

  14. Radiation induced crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Otsuhata, Kazushige; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1995-01-01

    The Irradiation temperature effect on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) from room temperature to 380degC was investigated by tensile test and thermal analysis. The behavior of tensile properties and changes of crystallinity on irradiation indicated the formation of a network structure in PTFE by radiation induced crosslinking in inert gas in the molten state just above the melting temperature of PTFE (327degC). The crosslinked PTFE showed a much improved radiation resistance in an atmospheric radiation field. (author)

  15. Radiation-induced enteropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, M.E.; Bauer, J. (Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The incidence of chronic radiation enteritis appears to have risen in recent years due to the increasing utilization of radiotherapy for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. The etiology, pathogenesis, and management of radiation enteritis are discussed. Two case reports exemplify the progressive nature of the disease. Case 1 demonstrates the classical picture of multiple exacerbations and remissions of partial small bowel obstruction and the eventual need for surgical management ten years after radiation therapy. Case 2 presents the more severe sequelae of an acute perforation with a 14-yr latency period. Predisposing factors in the progression of radiation injury include excessive radiation, underlying cardiovascular disease, fixation of the bowel, and an asthenic habitus. In both cases, radiation injury was localized to a discrete segment of bowel; therefore, resection with a primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. In addition, diseased bowel was eliminated and, therefore, would not cause further complications such as intractable bleeding or fistula formation. The review focuses on current knowledge which may be applied to the treatment and prevention of radiation enteritis.

  16. Basic reactions induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the basic reactions resulting from exposure to high energy radiation. In the initial stages energy is absorbed, but not necessarily at random, giving radical and ion species which may then react to promote the final chemical change. However, it is possible to intervene at intermediate stages to modify or reduce the radiation effect. Under certain conditions enhanced reactions are also possible. Several expressions are given to calculate radiation yield in terms of energy absorbed. Some analogies between radiation-induced reactions in polymers, and those studied in radiobiology are outlined. (author)

  17. The critical examination of X-ray generating equipment in diagnostic radiology. Guidance on the interpretation of the Ionising Radiation Regulations 1985, Regulation 32(2)a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Regulation 32(2)a requires an examination, where appropriate, of X-ray equipment and its operating environment, following its installation, repair or modification. In this context 'appropriate' means - 'if there are possible radiation protection implications'. The examination should be carried out before the equipment is brought into use. The intent of the Regulation is to ensure that the installation process does not compromise the radiation safety of the equipment as provided for by its original design and manufacture, and that any persons who might be exposed are adequately protected. However, the scope of the Regulation does not directly cover features controlling the optimisation of dose for a medical exposure. An examination of the equipment relating to the radiation protection consequences of the way it was installed is required. This is termed 'critical', emphasising the need to review the installation to a greater degree than the simple fulfilment of a preconceived test procedure. The involvement of a radiation protection adviser is required as an expert in radiation safety. This document provides guidance on when it is necessary to carry out a critical examination, and on its content. The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 firmly place the responsibility for ensuring that a critical examination is carried out, on the installer of the equipment. However, knowledge of various aspects of the critical examination is also relevant to employers who manage health related facilities, as well as their RPAs, and physicists who carry out equipment tests. Aside from the actual examination itself, there are issues pertaining to purchase contracts, and a knowledge of the satisfactory completion of a critical examination will be relevant to an employer in fulfilling his duties under Regulations 6 and 33. (author)

  18. The critical examination of X-ray generating equipment in diagnostic radiology. Guidance on the interpretation of the Ionising Radiation Regulations 1985, Regulation 32(2)a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Regulation 32(2)a requires an examination, where appropriate, of X-ray equipment and its operating environment, following its installation, repair or modification. In this context 'appropriate' means - 'if there are possible radiation protection implications'. The examination should be carried out before the equipment is brought into use. The intent of the Regulation is to ensure that the installation process does not compromise the radiation safety of the equipment as provided for by its original design and manufacture, and that any persons who might be exposed are adequately protected. However, the scope of the Regulation does not directly cover features controlling the optimisation of dose for a medical exposure. An examination of the equipment relating to the radiation protection consequences of the way it was installed is required. This is termed 'critical', emphasising the need to review the installation to a greater degree than the simple fulfilment of a preconceived test procedure. The involvement of a radiation protection adviser is required as an expert in radiation safety. This document provides guidance on when it is necessary to carry out a critical examination, and on its content. The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 firmly place the responsibility for ensuring that a critical examination is carried out, on the installer of the equipment. However, knowledge of various aspects of the critical examination is also relevant to employers who manage health related facilities, as well as their RPAs, and physicists who carry out equipment tests. Aside from the actual examination itself, there are issues pertaining to purchase contracts, and a knowledge of the satisfactory completion of a critical examination will be relevant to an employer in fulfilling his duties under Regulations 6 and 33. (author)

  19. Predicting the effect of ionising radiation on biological populations: testing of a non-linear Leslie model applied to a small mammal population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the application of a non-linear Leslie model for predicting the effects of ionising radiation on wild populations. The model assumes that, for protracted chronic irradiation, the effect-dose relationship is linear. In particular, the effects of radiation are modelled by relating the increase in the mortality rates of the individuals to the dose rates through a proportionality factor C. The model was tested using independent data and information from a series of experiments that were aimed at assessing the response to radiation of wild populations of meadow voles and whose results were described in the international literature. The comparison of the model results with the data selected from the above mentioned experiments showed that the model overestimated the detrimental effects of radiation on the size of irradiated populations when the values of C were within the range derived from the median lethal dose (L 50 ) for small mammals. The described non-linear model suggests that the non-expressed biotic potential of the species whose growth is limited by processes of environmental resistance, such as the competition among the individuals of the same or of different species for the exploitation of the available resources, can be a factor that determines a more effective response of population to the radiation effects. -- Highlights: • A model to assess the radiation effects on wild population is described. • The model is based on non-linear Leslie matrix. • The model is applied to small mammals living in an irradiated meadow. • Model output is conservative if effect-dose factor estimated from L 50 is used. • Systemic response to stress of populations in competitive conditions may be more effective

  20. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan, S.; Auffray, E.; Battaglieri, M.; Buchanan, E.; Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A.; Colaneri, L.; D`Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Dormenev, V.; Fanchini, E.; Lanza, L.; Novotny, R. W.; Parodi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Sokhan, D.; Tarasov, I.; Zonta, I.

    2015-07-01

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  1. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegan, S., E-mail: fegan@ge.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Auffray, E. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Battaglieri, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Buchanan, E. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Colaneri, L.; D' Angelo, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Vita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dormenev, V. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Fanchini, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lanza, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Novotny, R.W. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); and others

    2015-07-21

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  2. Radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martignoni, K.

    1986-01-01

    Dose assessments for cataract threshold doses are available based on epidemiological studies of radiotherapy patients, survivors of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and of persons with occupational exposure to radiation. According to these, short-term application of low-level LET radiation of a dose ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 Gy may suffice to cause a cataract in the course of a few months or years which results in inpairment of vision (UNSCEAR, 1982). In fractionated irradiation, cataractogenic threshold dose increases to 4 Sv at treatment times between 3 weeks and 3 months, and to more than 5 Sv at more than 3 months (ICRP 41). Densely ionizing radiation must be assumed to have threshold doses between 2 and 20 Sv. An ICRP assessment (ICRP Publ. No. 41, 1984) gives a threshold dose of more than 8 Sv for a vision-impairing cataract if these was protracted irradiation at a low-level dose rate. Concerning radiation protection, a maximum lens dose of 150 mSv per annum was recommended which should not be exceeded. This indicates a maximum of 7.5 Sv of exposure throughout a period of 50 years of working life. (orig./HP) [de

  3. The Utility of Lymphocyte Premature Chromosome Condensation Analysis for Biological Dosimetry Following Accidental Overexposure to Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambrette, V.; Laval, F.; Voisin, P.

    1999-01-01

    Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) appears to have a possible utility for biological dosimetry purposes. The PCC technique may be adapted for cases of suspicion of overexposure where sampling is performed at least one day after an accident. For this purpose, human blood samples were exposed in vitro to 60 Co (0.5 Gy.min -1 ) up to 4 Gy and the PCC technique was performed after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h of DNA repair at 37 deg. C. Analysis of excess PCC fragments distribution showed an overdispersion and the dose-effect relationship was best characterised by linear regression. Radiation-induced damage was reduced to 32% between the first and the second day of repair and to 42% the following day. Statistical precision of the dose was found to be dependent on the irradiation dose and on the number of cells examined. The necessity to establish dose-response relationships after different periods of DNA repair is demonstrated, and the use of PCC excess fragments yield as a bioindicator should take this fact into account. (author)

  4. Overview of programmes for the assessment of risks to the environment from ionising radiation and hazardous chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C; Gilek, M

    2004-01-01

    Within the FASSET project, a review of existing programmes for the assessment of environmental risks from radioactive or hazardous substances was carried out in order to identify appropriate aspects that could be incorporated into the FASSET framework. The review revealed a number of different approaches, arising from the need to balance the information value of the assessment against the availability of data and the need to keep the assessment manageable. Most of the existing assessment programmes fit into a three-phase approach to environmental risk assessment: problem formulation, assessment and risk characterisation. However, the emphasis on particular assessment phases varies between programmes. The main differences between the different programmes are: the degree of specificity to a particular site, the level of detail of the assessment, the point at which a comparison is made between a criterion intended to represent 'what is acceptable' and a measured or predicted quantity, the choice of end-point for the assessment and the relationship between measurement end-points and assessment end-points. The existing assessment programmes are based on a similar general structure, which is suitable for use as a basis for the FASSET framework. However, certain aspects of the assessment of exposure and effects of ionising contaminants, e.g. dosimetry, require further development before incorporation into such a framework

  5. The ionisation balance of C0 to C+4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, H.; Storey, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    The ionisation balance for the ions C 0 -C +4 has been calculated for 10 8 -3 ] 12 and 2 x 10 4 K 5 K. The presence of metastable terms is included in the calculation of the collisional dielectronic recombination and ionisation coefficients. The influence of the observed solar radiation field on the ionisation balance is investigated. Changes in that field do strongly influence the results. (orig.) [de

  6. About the contribution of occupational health's services for risk factors evaluation, medical and dosimetric follow-up in the workers monitoring exposed to ionising radiations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailloeuil, C.; Gonin, M.; Gerondal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: French national regulation (31/03/2003) indicates principles of a global approach about the medical and dosimetric follow-up in the workers monitoring. Legislator insists on risks and expositions trace ability along all professional career and after. The aim of this French specific system is to institute medical clinic aspects in accordance with dosimetry and professional risks. The occupational practitioners are approved practitioners who have followed a specific training. The organisation guarantees that a worker will be followed by one specific practitioner in order to reinforce the quality and the traceability of follow up. Medical supervision is done at taking on and at least once a year. It means to identify and take care of risks and expositions at work stations. If necessary, biological measurements and recommendations about collective and individual protection equipments complete the estimation of risks. On the subject of emergency, first aid is delivered on sites by occupational health personnel, either for classic medical problem or for radiological accident. Furthermore, occupational health personnel assist outside emergency services with whom we have specific conventions. External dosimetric follow-up is done with radiation protection qualified expert of the company. The internal contamination supervision and internal dose evaluation are done by the occupational health services. Measurements either whole body counts or radio-toxicologic analysis are submitted to technical quality process. Beyond the respect of regulatory dose limits, the aim of the dosimetric follow-up is the contribution to the preparation of work places with strong dosimetric focus. Informations at workers are dispensed about every risks and every kinds of risks: ionising radiation health effects, ionising radiation and pregnancy, high exposition, chemical risks, work at heat, asbestos. All data are conserved 50 years after the exposure These data

  7. Investigation of radiation-induced multilayered signalling response of the inflammatory pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babini, G.; Ugolini, M.; Morini, J.; Baiocco, G.; Ottolenghi, A.; Mariotti, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, P.; Liotta, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation exposure of cells might induce the perturbation of cell functions and, in particular, the activation or inhibition of several important pathways. This perturbation can cause the deregulation of both intra- and extra-cellular signalling cascades (such as the inflammatory pathway) and alter not only the behaviour of directly exposed cells but also the neighbouring nonirradiated ones, through the so-called bystander effect. The aim of the present work was to investigate the complex nonlinear interactions between the inflammatory pathway and other strictly interlaced signalling pathways, such as Erk1/2 and Akt/PKB, focusing on the radiation-induced perturbation of such pathways in the dose range of 0 -2 Gy. The results show how radiation affects these interconnected pathways and how confounding factors, such as the change of culture medium, can hide radiation-induced perturbations. (authors)

  8. Accumulation and dissipation of positive charges induced on a PMMA build-up cap of an ionisation chamber by 60Co gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Y.; Takata, N.

    2013-01-01

    The signal current from an ionisation chamber with a PMMA build-up cap decreases with irradiation time due to electric fields produced by positive charges induced on the cap. In the present study, it was confirmed that the signal current decreases faster for irradiation using narrower 60 Co gamma-ray beams. This is because the number of secondary electrons that are emitted from surrounding materials and penetrate the build-up cap is smaller in a narrower gamma-ray beam, so that fewer positive charges are neutralised. The ionisation chamber was first subjected to continuous gamma-ray irradiation for 24 h, following which it was irradiated with shorter periodic gamma-ray bursts while measuring the current signal. This allowed the coefficients of positive charge accumulation and dissipation to be determined. It was found that the dissipation coefficient has a large constant value during gamma-ray irradiation and decreases asymptotically to a small value after irradiation is stopped. From the coefficients, the minimum signal current was calculated, which is the value when accumulation and dissipation balance each other under continuous irradiation. The time required for the signal current to recover following irradiation was also calculated. (authors)

  9. Peculiarities of radiation induced craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sataev, N.M. (Uzbekskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii i Radiologii, Tashkent (USSR))

    1982-03-01

    Due to intracranial implantation of a radiosource in rabbit brain craniopharyngioma appeared. Its specific feature is grandular differentiation of embryonal epithelium of residuals of hypophysical (craniopharyngial) passage and the presence of focuses of blood vessel tumor degeneration of hemangioma type in its stroma. It is suggested that radiation craniopharyngioma is developed along the way of epigenetic changes of cellular elements of embryonal epithelium induced by radiation.

  10. Peculiarities of radiation induced craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sataev, N.M.

    1982-01-01

    Due to intracranial implantation of a radiosource in rabbit brain craniopharyngioma appeared. Its specific feature is grandular differentiation of embryonal epithelium of residuals of hypophysical (craniopharyngial) passage and the presence of focuses of blood vessel tumor degeneration of hemangioma type in its stroma. It is suggested that radiation craniopharyngioma is developed along the way of epigenetic changes of cellular elements of embryonal epithelium induced by radiation

  11. Functional modifications of the enteric nervous system following radiation exposure: short and long term effects; Modifications du fonctionnement du systeme nerveux enterique suite a une exposition aux rayonnements ionisants: effets precoces et a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropenga, A

    2003-09-15

    Exposure of the gastrointestinal tract to ionising radiation induces at short or at long term, digestive dysfunctions, including nausea, diarrhoea, constipation and eventually abdominal pain. The mechanisms implicated remain incompletely understood, but may involve at long term functional modifications of the enteric nervous system (ENS). The mediator 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) is present in entero-chromaffin cells and the ENS and plays an important role in digestive functions. The aim of this work was to follow between 3 days and 3 months after an hemi-body irradiation (10 Gy, X rays) radiation-induced modifications of 5-HT content, 5-HT receptor expression and effects on electrolyte movement in rat distal colon. At 3 days following irradiation, a reduction of total epithelial cells was observed along with a diminution of 5-HT transporter expression. Receptors 5-HT{sub 1A} and 5-HT{sub 2A} expression was diminished concomitant with a reduced response to 5-HT or neural stimulation and an increased importance of the receptor 5-HT{sub 3}. At 7 days crypt total cell number was increased and the importance of receptors 5-HT{sub 2A} and 5-HT{sub 3} in the secretory response was also increased. At later times, between 28 and 43 days, irradiation increased mucosal 5-HT content. This increase can be related to an increase of the number of entero-chromaffin cells at 28 days and is concomitant with the diminution of the importance of the receptor 5-HT{sub 2A} in the secretory response. In conclusion, this project has established for the first time differential expression of 5-HT receptors in the mucosal and muscle layers in the distal colon. Moreover, irradiation induces modifications in 5-HT receptor expression and importance in secretory epithelial responses. Irradiation also disturbs the equilibrium of different cell types by the epithelium in increasing the number of entero-chromaffin cells containing 5-HT. (author)

  12. Collection efficiency of charges in ionization chambers in presence of constant or variable radiation intensity; Efficacite de la collection des charges dans les chambres d'ionisation en presence d'une intensite de rayonnement ionisant constante ou variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decuyper, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of the collection of carriers built up by ionization in standard chambers, is made by varying the value of different acting parameters. In the presence of constant ionization intensity and under a D.C. and A.C. voltage, the effect of geometry, recombination, diffusion and attachment is analyzed. The compensation of thermal neutron D.C. chambers is equally considered. Under a time dependent ionization intensity and D.C. voltage, is then studied the effect of recombination on current response, and on the collection efficiency of all formed charges. (author) [French] L'etude theorique et experimentale de la collection des porteurs crees par ionisation dans les chambres couramment utilisees est entreprise en fonction de la valeur des differents parametres agissants. En presence d'une ionisation constante et sous une tension d'alimentation d'abord continue puis alternative, on analyse l'influence de la geometrie, de la recombinaison, de la diffusion et de l'attachement. La compensation des chambres a courant continu de mesure neutronique est egalement examinee. Ensuite, sous une intensite d'ionisation variable dans le temps et en alimentation continue, on etudie l'effet de la recombinaison sur la reponse en courant et sur l'efficacite de la collection de la charge totale liberee. (auteur)

  13. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants. Petit dejeuner de presse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flury-Herard, A [CEA, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 75 - Paris (France); Boiteux, S; Dutrillaux, B [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 92 (France); Toledano, M [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  14. Radiation-induced myelomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzick, J.

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that radiation can cause myeloid leukemia. However, no excess of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been observed. Myelomatosis, like chronic lymphocytic leukemia, is a tumor of B lymphocytes. To determine whether this disease has a radiogenic origin, we surveyed all cohorts of persons exposed to radiation for which data on cancer-related mortaility are available. An excess of myeloma was found in most cohorts. However, a striking deficit was found in two groups irradiated intensely for uterine neoplasms (three cases observed, 10.71 expected; P = 0.012). All other groups combined had a highly significant excess (50 observed, 22.21 expected; P = 2 x 10 -7 ). The largest relative risk appeared among persons receiving internal doses of α-particles (14 observed, 3.24 expected; P = 2 x 10 -5 ), but a significant excess (13 observed, 6.33 expected; P = 0.026) was also found in patients receiving only therapeutic or diagnostic γ-rays or x-rays. Most cases occurred 15 to 25 years after exposure

  15. Radiation induced emulsion polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannett, V.T.; Stahel, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    High energy radiation is particularly favored for the initiation of emulsion polymerization. The yield of free radicals, for example, from the radiolysis of the aqueous phase, is high; G(radical) values of 5-7. In addition, the rather special kinetics associated with emulsion polymerization lead, in general, to very large kinetic chain lengths, even with 'non-ideal' monomers such as vinyl acetate. Together, high polymerization rates at low doses become possible. There are some important advantages of radiation polymerization compared with chemical initiators, such as potassium persulfate. Perhaps the most important among them is the temperature independence of the initiation step. This makes low temperature polymerization very accessible. With monomers such as vinyl acetate, where chain termination to monomer is predominant, low temperatures lead to often highly desirable higher molecular weights. With styrene, the classical ideally behaved monomer, there are the advantages such as, for example, the feasibility of using cationic monomers. These and some attendant disadvantages are discussed in detail, including pilot plant studies

  16. Food ionisation. Realities and perspectives; L'ionisation alimentaire. Realites et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, G

    1994-06-01

    The ionisation of food is a treatment using a certain type of energy. the radiations used in the industrial treatments are limited to three sources. The gamma radiations, the x radiations and the electrons beams emitted with accelerators. The physical treatments by ionizing radiations have for aim to cleanse and to increase the conservation time of food. Now, the applications in agriculture and food industry, are still marginal. The industrial using ionisation are these ones that did not find any alternative decontamination method. The barriers are more scientific or technical or economical than a question of regulation or behaviour. (N.C.)

  17. Food ionisation. Realities and perspectives; L'ionisation alimentaire. Realites et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, G

    1994-06-01

    The ionisation of food is a treatment using a certain type of energy. the radiations used in the industrial treatments are limited to three sources. The gamma radiations, the x radiations and the electrons beams emitted with accelerators. The physical treatments by ionizing radiations have for aim to cleanse and to increase the conservation time of food. Now, the applications in agriculture and food industry, are still marginal. The industrial using ionisation are these ones that did not find any alternative decontamination method. The barriers are more scientific or technical or economical than a question of regulation or behaviour. (N.C.)

  18. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.; Ballarini, F.; Brugmans, M.

    2000-01-01

    The overall project is organised into seven work packages. WP1 concentrates on the development of mechanistic, quantitative models for radiation oncogenesis using selected data sets from radiation epidemiology and from experimental animal studies. WP2 concentrates on the development of mechanistic, mathematical models for the induction of chromosome aberrations. WP3 develops mechanistic models for radiation mutagenesis, particularly using the HPRT-mutation as a paradigm. WP4 will develop mechanistic models for damage and repair of DNA, and compare these with experimentally derived data. WP5 concentrates on the improvement of our knowledge on the chemical reaction pathways of initial radiation chemical species in particular those that migrate to react with the DNA and on their simulation in track structure codes. WP6 models by track structure simulation codes the production of initial physical and chemical species, within DNA, water and other components of mammalian cells, in the tracks of charged particles following the physical processes of energy transfer, migration, absorption, and decay of excited states. WP7 concentrates on the determination of the start spectra of those tracks considered in WP6 for different impinging radiation fields and different irradiated biological objects. (orig.)

  19. Radiation-induced heart injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the internal between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue. (Evans, G.)

  20. Fracture induced electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, V; Rabinovitch, A; Bahat, D

    2003-01-01

    In our laboratory, we combine accurate electromagnetic radiation (EMR) measurements during fracture of rocks (carbonate and igneous) and transparent materials (glass, PMMA and glass ceramics) with careful fractographic methods. A critical analysis of experimental observations, accumulated here during the last decade together with supporting material from the works of other authors are used in this study to demonstrate the failure of all current models to explain the properties of EMR arising from fracture. The basic elements of a new model are proposed. These are (a) the EMR amplitude increases as long as the crack continues to grow, since new atomic bonds are severed and their contribution is added to the EMR. As a result, the atoms on both sides of the bonds are moved to 'non-equilibrium' positions relative to their steady state ones and begin to oscillate collectively in a manner similar to Debye model bulk oscillations - 'surface vibrational optical waves'; (b) when the crack halts, the waves and the EMR pulse amplitude decay by relaxation. These basic elements are already enough to describe the characteristics of the experimentally obtained isolated individual EMR pulses. These characteristics include the shape of the EMR pulse envelope, and the frequency, time duration and rise - fall time of the pulse

  1. Fracture induced electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, V [Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Rabinovitch, A [Physics Department, Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Bahat, D [Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2003-07-07

    In our laboratory, we combine accurate electromagnetic radiation (EMR) measurements during fracture of rocks (carbonate and igneous) and transparent materials (glass, PMMA and glass ceramics) with careful fractographic methods. A critical analysis of experimental observations, accumulated here during the last decade together with supporting material from the works of other authors are used in this study to demonstrate the failure of all current models to explain the properties of EMR arising from fracture. The basic elements of a new model are proposed. These are (a) the EMR amplitude increases as long as the crack continues to grow, since new atomic bonds are severed and their contribution is added to the EMR. As a result, the atoms on both sides of the bonds are moved to 'non-equilibrium' positions relative to their steady state ones and begin to oscillate collectively in a manner similar to Debye model bulk oscillations - 'surface vibrational optical waves'; (b) when the crack halts, the waves and the EMR pulse amplitude decay by relaxation. These basic elements are already enough to describe the characteristics of the experimentally obtained isolated individual EMR pulses. These characteristics include the shape of the EMR pulse envelope, and the frequency, time duration and rise - fall time of the pulse.

  2. Identification of monohydroxy progesterones produced by CYP106A2 using comparative HPLC and electrospray ionisation collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisurek, Michael; Kang, M.-J.; Hartmann, Rolf W.; Bernhardt, Rita

    2004-01-01

    Two previously uncharacterised products, produced by recombinant CYP106A2 of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 13368 using progesterone as substrate, were identified. For this purpose a combination of comparative HPLC and electrospray ionisation collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry (ESI CID MS) was established and applied for rapid identification of the steroids, which were identified as 11α-hydroxyprogesterone and 9α-hydroxyprogesterone. The pharmaceutical relevance of these steroids is discussed. Furthermore, the hydroxylation activity was quantified for all monohydroxylation products (15β-hydroxyprogesterone, 6β-hydroxyprogesterone, 11α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 9α-hydroxyprogesterone). The V max values for 15β-hydroxyprogesterone, 6β-hydroxyprogesterone, 11α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 9α-hydroxyprogesterone were determined as 337.3 ± 43.7, 22.3 ± 0.9, 17.5 ± 0.9, and 6.5 ± 0.3 nmol product/min/nmol CYP106A2, respectively

  3. Influence of the complexity of radiation-induced DNA damage on enzyme recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Ionising radiation is unique in inducing DNA clustered damage together with the simple isolated lesions. Understanding how these complex lesions are recognised and repaired by the cell is key to understanding the health risks associated with radiation exposure. This study focuses on whether ionising radiation-induced complex single-strand breaks (SSB) are recognised by DNA-PK and PARP, and whether the complexity of DSB influence their ligation by either DNA ligase lV/XRCC4 (LX) complex or T4 DNA ligase. Plasmid DNA, irradiated in aqueous solution using sparsely ionising γ-rays and densely ionising α-particles produce different yields of complex DNA damages, used as substrates for in vitro DNA-PK and PARP activity assays. The activity of DNA-PK to phosphorylate a peptide was determined using HF19 cell nuclear extracts as a source of DNA-PK. PARP ADP-ribosylation activity was determined using purified PARP enzyme. The activation of DNA-PK and PARP by irradiated DNA is due to SSB and not the low yield of DSB (linear plasmid DNA <10%). A ∼2 fold increase in DNA-PK activation and a ∼3-fold reduction in PARP activity seen on increasing the ionising density of the radiation (proportion of complex damage) are proposed to reflect changes in the complexity of SSB and may relate to damage signalling. Complex DSB synthesised as double-stranded oligonucleotides, with a 2 bp 5'-overhang, and containing modified lesions, 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites, at known positions relative to the termini were used as substrates for in vitro ligation by DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 or T4 ligase. The presence of a modified lesion 2 or 3 bp but not 4 bp from the 3'-termini and 2 or 6 bp from the 5'-termini caused a drastic reduction in the extent of ligation. Therefore, the presence of modified lesions near to the termini of a DSB may compromise their rejoining by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) involving the LX complex. (author)

  4. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  5. The place of ionizing radiation in the cancer genesis; La place des rayonnements ionisants dans la genese des cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J. [Societe Francaise d' Energie Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-12-15

    Two different fields are considered: the field of high radiation doses (over 1 Sv), the contribution of ionizing radiation in the carcinogenesis is doubtless and the linear dose-effect relationship is unshakable. but this high doses area is rare ( major accident of civil nuclear, radiotherapy, war with use of nuclear weapon) and escapes to usual standards. The field of low dose irradiation (inferior to 100 MSv) we cannot assure the absence of carcinogen risk of ionizing radiation. We can tell that this risk is very low, very inferior to 5% by sievert accepted by the ICRP in conformance with the precautionary principle. In any case, very inferior to the risk in relation with the big causes of cancer that are addiction to smoking, (30% of cancers), food (30% of cancers), chronic diseases (11% of cancers) and hormonal processes (10% of cancers). (N.C.)

  6. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE-/- Alzheimer's mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, S. J.; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumula...

  7. Guideline for radiation protection in veterinary medicine. Guideline relating to the Ordinance for Protection Against Damage Through Ionising Radiation (Radiation Protection Ordinance - StrlSchV) and the Ordinance for Protection Against X-Ray Radiation (X-Ray Ordinance - RoeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalczak, H.

    2005-05-01

    The Guideline on ''Radiation Protection in Veterinary Medicine'' primarily addresses the supreme Land authorities that are responsible for radiation protection. Its purpose is to harmonise the radiation protection procedures employed by the Laender, thus establishing a nationwide uniform system for monitoring the handling of radioactive substances and ionising radiation applications in veterinary medicine on the basis of the legal regulations in force. In addition the guideline is intended to serve veterinary staff as a source of practical information which explains the radiation protection requirements stipulated by the legal regulations and technical rules. This concerns in particular the rules for the acquisition of the necessary radiation protection skills or the necessary knowledge of radiation protection by the veterinary surgeon performing the application or the staff cooperation in the application

  8. The assessment of ionising radiation impact on the cooling pond freshwater ecosystem non-human biota from the Ignalina NPP operation beginning to shut down and initial decommissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeika, J; Marciulioniene, D; Nedveckaite, T; Jefanova, O

    2016-01-01

    The radiological doses to non-human biota of freshwater ecosystem in the Ignalina NPP cooling pond - Lake Druksiai were evaluated for several cases including the plant's operation period and initial decommissioning activities, using the ERICA 1.2 code with IAEA SRS-19 models integrated approach and tool. Among the Lake Druksiai freshwater ecosystem reference organisms investigated the highest exposure dose rate was determined for bottom fauna - benthic organisms (mollusc-bivalves, crustaceans, mollusc-gastropods, insect larvae), and among the other reference organisms - for vascular plants. The mean and maximum total dose rate values due to anthropogenic radionuclide ionising radiation impact in all investigated cases were lower than the ERICA screening dose rate value of 10 μGy/h. The main exposure of reference organisms as a result of Ignalina NPP former effluent to Lake Druksiai is due to ionizing radiation of radionuclides (60)Co and (137)Cs, of predicted releases to Lake Druksiai during initial decommissioning period - due to radionuclides (60)Co, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, and as a result of predicted releases to Lake Druksiai from low- and intermediate-level short-lived radioactive waste disposal site in 30-100 year period - due to radionuclides (99)Tc and (3)H. The risk quotient expected values in all investigated cases were <1, and therefore the risk to non-human biota can be considered negligible with the exception of a conservative risk quotient for insect larvae. Radiological protection of non-human biota in Lake Druksiai, the Ignalina NPP cooling pond, is both feasible and acceptable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An investigation of the interactions of low doses of ionising radiation and chemical pollutants on Artemia Salina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Benova, K.; Hromada, R.; Falis, M.; Dvorak, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear reactor failures present a risk of global contamination which can be affected by other environmental factors, such as chemicals. The present study has investigated the effect of low doses of gamma radiation in relation to the presence of low doses of Cr and Cd. (authors)

  10. Occupational exposures to ionising radiation in the region of Anatolia, Turkey for the period 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenduez, H.; Zeyrek, C. T.; Aksu, L.; Isak, S.

    2004-01-01

    For this study, the individual annual dose information on classified workers who are occupationally exposed to extended radiation sources in Turkey, was assessed and analysed by the Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Centre dosimetry service at the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority for the years 1995-1999. The radiation workers monitored are divided into three main work sectors: conventional industry (8.24%), medicine (90.20%) and research-education (1.56%). The average annual dose for all workers in each particular sector was 0.14, 0.38 and 0.08 mSv, respectively, in 1995-1999. This paper contains the detailed analysis of occupational exposure. The statistical analysis provided includes the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distributions of the dose over the different sectors and the number of workers who have exceeded any of the established dose levels. (authors)

  11. Draft guidance notes for the protection of persons against ionising radiations arising from medical and dental use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    These guidance notes are presented under the following headings: 1) Limitation of radiation dose. 2) Administrative measures for radiological protection. 3) Medical surveillance. 4) Operational measures for radiological protection. 5) The request for a radiological examination or treatment, whether directly associated or not with illness or injury, together with consideration of the problems of dealing with patients of a reproductive age. 6) Diagnostic use of X-rays. 7) Dental radiography. 8) Therapeutic uses of radiation beams, remotely-operated after-loading equipment and extra-corporeal blood irradiators and neutron activation analysis. 9) Brachytherapy. 10) Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of unsealed radioactive substances. 11) Diagnostic uses of closed sources. 12) The use of nuclear-powered cardiac pacemakers. 13) Patients leaving a hospital after administration of radioactive substances. 14) Precautions after death.. 15) Storage and movement of radioactive materials. 16) Disposal of radioactive waste. 17) Emergency procedures. (U.K.)

  12. Significance of 8-oxoG in the spectrum of DNA damages caused by ionising radiation of different quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2007), s. 113-115 ISSN 0144-8420. [Symposium on Microdosimetry /14./. Venezia, 13.11.2005-18.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4048401; GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : DNA damage * 8-oxoguanine * ionizing radiation * theoretical modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  13. An empirical model for the induction of double strand breaks in DNA by the indirect' action of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.; Hill, S.J.A.

    1994-01-01

    For calculation of radiation effects at low doses near environmental levels it is necessary to model both ''direct'' and ''indirect'' effects along single charged particle tracks in the equilibrium spectrum generated by the radiation field. The modelling approach used here to determine the ''indirect'' contribution to the damage to the DNA in mammalian cells is first to study the transition of damage from the solid to liquid phases at different concentrations of enzyme targets (known to be inactivated by single target, single hit kinetics). The respective contributions from direct and indirect action can then be separated. Results obtained in this laboratory for the inactivation of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase have been supplemented by data taken from the literature. A simple model of the radiation action has been derived. It succeeds in correlating all the data within the range of concentrations, radical scavenger, and LET used. From the results, information is obtained on the role of the dose rate; on diffusion lengths, on the type of radical predominantly responsible (OH·) for the inactivation and on scavenging of radicals. Since water radicals are thought to be the main cause of indirect damage in mammalian cells it is a simple step to deduce from the enzyme results the probability of induction of single and double strand breaks in the DNA by making the assumption that basically the same radical kinetics are involved and then applying Poisson probabilities. (author)

  14. Radiation induced estane polymer crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, M.; Foster, P.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure of polymeric materials to radiation has been known to induce the effects of crosslinking and degradation. The crosslinking phenomena comes about when two long chain polymers become linked together by a primary bond that extends the chain and increases the viscosity, molecular weight and the elastic modules of the polymer. This process has been observed in relatively short periods of time with fairly high doses of radiation, on the order of several megarads/hour. This paper address low dose exposure over long periods of time to determine what the radiation effects are on the polymeric binder material in PBX 9501. An experimental sample of binder material without explosives will be placed into a thermal and radiation field produced from a W-48 put mod 0. Another sample will be placed in a thermal environment without the radiation. The following is the test plan that was submitted to the Pantex process. The data presented here will be from the first few weeks of exposure and this test will be continued over the next few years. Subsequent data will hopefully be presented in the next compatibility and aging conference

  15. On the biophysical interpretation of lethal DNA lesions induced by ionising radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel; Stewart, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2006), s. 169-172 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : clustered DNA lesions * V79 cells * proton tracks * DNA damage * DNA repair * radiobiological modelling Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2006

  16. Behavior of the physician in the case of fetal exposition to ionising radiations due to medical indication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppin, W.

    1982-01-01

    The 3-tier Concept presented here should contribute to the formation of a consensus of opinion concerning the hazards of radiation dose to pregnant women. It is applicable in the first instance to those directly involved, namely radiologists, gynaecologists and pregnant women. The physician-in-charge should be be responsible for all treatment up to the dose of 20 Cy, which is in one opinion a harmless level of in-utero exposure. Even if errors in dose estimation are taken into account, there exist sufficient safety reserves for the protection of the fetus. Omission of enquiry would mean that the feelings of insecurity, fear and anxiety in pregnant women would no longer arise. This procedure could also make a positive and objective contribution towards the lessening of fear of radiation in other areas. In addition it is our view that, given this sole responsibility, physicians would become more aware of and concerned with the problems of radiological protection. In no way should this concept make light of clearly present hazards. (orig.) [de

  17. Metallothionein and glutathione in Lymnaea stagnalis determine the specificity of responses to the effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnatyshyna, L.; Falfushynska, H.; Stoliar, O.; Bodilovska, O.; Oleynik, O.; Golubev, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to distinguish the stress-related molecular response of the pulmonate mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis from the Chernobyl area in comparison with the consequences of other harmful effects, including the short-term effects of radiation and heating. Specimens inhabiting ponds near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the cooling channel of the electric power station and the soil reclamation channel (groups R, T and C, correspondingly), and specimens adapted to laboratory conditions (a control group (CL), a disposable group exposed to 2 mGy X-ray radiation over the body (RL), and a group exposed to 25 deg. C for 4 days (TL)) were compared. Despite high variability of responses, Principle Component Analysis distinctly separated the laboratory and feral groups into two sets. In the feral groups, low levels of the stress-related and metal-binding protein metallothionein (MT), protein carbonyls and lactate dehydrogenase in the digestive gland were indicated. The main separating criteria selected by classification and regression tree analysis were the protein carbonyls, cholinesterase and MT. Molluscs from group R were clearly distinguished by the lowest levels of MT, Mn-superoxide dismutase and lactate dehydrogenase, and the highest level of glutathione, demonstrating that the oppression of the gene-determined stress-related response and its partially metabolic compensation can be possible markers for chronic environmental effects of irradiation. (authors)

  18. Radioprotective effect of methanolic root extract of Loeseneriella arnottiana on radiation induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajna, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Intense exposure to ionization radiation by accidental, occupational or therapeutical purpose causes cellular damage mainly by formation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) or by free radicals. Humans are intentionally exposed to ionising radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. The use of ionising radiation in cancer therapy may lead to transient and/or permanent injury to normal tissues within the treatment field. To increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy, various modes of radioprotection have been developed that selectively reduce cytotoxic effects to normal tissues. Because radiation-induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to the harmful effects of free radicals, molecules with radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radioprotectors. Loeseneriella arnottiana, a member of family Hippocrateaceae, is a climbing shrub used by traditional medicine practitioners. To study the antioxidant activity and radioprotective effect of methanolic root extract of Loeseneriella arnottiana against electron beam radiation induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Loeseneriella arnottiana roots were dried and extracted using methanol by solvent extraction method. Antioxidant activity was measured by DPPH method. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay parameters. The lymphocytes were incubated for one hour with two different concentrations 10 μg and 50 μg of root extract before exposure to 2 Gy electron beam radiation. 30 μg of methanolic root extract of Loeseneriella arnottiana exhibited 96% radical scavenging activity comparable to 15 μg of ascorbic acid. In reducing power assay it showed dose dependent increase in absorbance indicating that extract is capable of donating hydrogen atoms. Pretreatment of lymphocytes with 10 μg and 50 μg of root extract before irradiation resulted in reduction in the Comet length, Olive tail moment, percentage of DNA in tail when compared to the radiation control group. Results of this

  19. Estimates of Health Detriments and Tissue Weighting Factors for Hong Kong Populations from Low Dose, Low Dose Rate and Low LET Ionising Radiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    The total health detriments and the tissue weighting factors for the Hong Kong populations from low dose, low dose rate and low LET ionising radiation exposure are obtained according to the methodology recommended in ICRP Publication 60. The probabilities of fatal cancers for the general (ages 0-90) and working (ages 20-64) populations due to lifetime exposure at low dose and low dose rate are 4.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 3.6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 respectively, comparing with the ICRP 60 estimates of 5.0 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 4.0 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . The corresponding total health detriments for the general and working populations are 6.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 4.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 respectively comparing with the ICRP 60 estimates of 7.3 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 5.6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . Tissue weighting factors for the general population are 0.01 (bone surface and skin), 0.02 (liver, oesophagus and thyroid), 0.04 (bladder and breast), 0.08 (remainder), 0.10 (stomach), 0.11 (bone marrow), 0.15 (colon), 0.19 (lung) and 0.21 (gonads) and for the working population are 0.01 (bone surface and skin), 0.03 (liver, oesophagus and thyroid), 0.04 (breast), 0.06 (remainder), 0.07 (bladder), 0.08 (colon), 0.14 (bone marrow and stomach), 0.16 (lung) and 0.20 (gonads). (author)

  20. Interaction of ionising radiation and acidulants on the growth of the microflora of a vacuum-packaged chilled meat product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Andrássy, E.

    1993-01-01

    Microbiological effects of gamma irradiation dose of 2 kGy, with and without reduction of pH to 5.3-5.2, have been investigated with a vacuum-packaged, minced meat product prepared from pork and beef with spices and cereal fillings. Either glucono-delta-lactone or ascorbic acid were used as acidulants. Experimental batches were stored at 0-2 degrees C for 4 weeks. Effect of temperature abuse condition was also studied by transferring packages for one week to 10 degrees C after 2-week holding at 0-2 degrees C. The irradiation caused two decimal reduction of the aerobic viable cell count determined after incubation at room temperature and four decimal reduction in the Enterobacteriaceae count. Lactic acid bacteria appeared to be more radiation resistant and became the dominant component of the microflora during storage. Combination of pH-reduction and irradiation prevented growth of Enterobacteriaceae even at 10 degrees C incubation. (author)

  1. The use of ionising radiation for the treatment of injuries to flexor tendons and supporting ligaments in horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, P.W.

    1979-01-01

    A technique was developed using radioactive isotopes as a source of radiation for the treatment of injuries to the superficial and deep flexor tendons and the associated ligaments in the horse. The treatment area was sub-divided so that different dosages could be applied over the limb as necessary. A plaster of Paris impression was taken on the whole area to be treated. In the isotope laboratory a plaster negative was made and loaded with the dose of radioactive isotope. The loaded cast was then strapped to the horse's limb for the calculated time, usually about three days. A total of 42 horses were treated and follow up information was obtained from 28. Twenty-five animals raced again: two relapsed before racing and one was destroyed with navicular disease. Ten of the 42 horses had been treated by firing before irradiation. Five of these returned to racing but the history of four of them was not known. (author)

  2. Health and biological effects of non-ionizing radiations; Effets biologiques et sanitaires des rayonnements non ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Seze, R.; Souques, M.; Aurengo, A.; Bach, V.; Burais, N.; Cesarini, J.P.; Cherin, A.; Decobert, V.; Dubois, G.; Hours, M.; Lagroye, I.; Leveque, Ph.; Libert, J.P.; Lombard, J.; Loos, N.; Mir, L.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Thuroczy, G.; Wiart, J.; Lehericy, St.; Pelletier, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Douki, Th.; Guibal, F.; Tordjman, I.; Gaillot de Saintignon, J.; Collard, J.F.; Scoretti, R.; Magne, I.; Veyret, B.; Katrib, J.

    2011-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day on the biological and health effects of non-ionizing radiations. Sixteen presentations out of 17 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - NMR: biological effects and implications of Directive 2004/40 on electromagnetic fields (S. Lehericy); 2 - impact of RF frequencies from mobile telephone antennas on body homeostasis (A. Pelletier); 3 - expression of stress markers in the brain and blood of rats exposed in-utero to a Wi-Fi signal (I. Lagroye); 4 - people exposure to electromagnetic waves: the challenge of variability and the contribution of statistics to dosimetry (J. Wiart); 5 - status of knowledge about electromagnetic fields hyper-sensitivity (J.P. Marc-Vergnes; 6 - geno-toxicity of UV radiation: respective impact of UVB and UVA (T. Douki); 7 - National day of prevention and screening for skin cancers (F. Guibal); 8 - UV tan devices: status of knowledge about cancer risks (I. Tordjman, and J. Gaillot de Saintignon); 9 - modulation of brain activity during a tapping task after exposure to a 3000 {mu}T magnetic field at 60 Hz (M. Souques and A. Legros); 10 - calculation of ELF electromagnetic fields in the human body by the finite elements method (R. Scoretti); 11 - French population exposure to the 50 Hz magnetic field (I. Magne); 12 - LF and static fields, new ICNIRP recommendations: what has changed, what remains (B. Veyret); 13 - risk assessment of low energy lighting systems - DELs and CFLs (J.P. Cesarini); 14 - biological effects to the rat of a chronic exposure to high power microwaves (R. De Seze); 15 - theoretical and experimental electromagnetic compatibility approaches of active medical implants in the 10-50 Hz frequency range: the case of implantable cardiac defibrillators (J. Katrib); French physicians and electromagnetic fields (M. Souques). (J.S.)

  3. Radiation induced sulfur dioxide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The biggest source of air pollution is the combustion of fossil fuels, were pollutants such as particulate, sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and volatile organic compounds (VOC) are emitted. Among these pollutants, sulfur dioxide plays the main role in acidification of the environment. The mechanism of sulfur dioxide transformation in the environment is partly photochemical. This is not direct photooxidation, however, but oxidation through formed radicals. Heterogenic reactions play an important role in this transformation as well; therefore, observations from environmental chemistry can be used in air pollution control engineering. One of the most promising technologies for desulfurization of the flue gases (and simultaneous denitrification) is radiation technology with an electron accelerator application. Contrary to the nitrogen oxides (NO x ) removal processes, which is based on pure radiation induced reactions, sulfur dioxide removal depends on two pathways: a thermochemical reaction in the presence of ammonia/water vapor and a radiation set of radiochemical reactions. The mechanism of these reactions and the consequent technological parameters of the process are discussed in this paper. The industrial application of this radiation technology is being implemented in an industrial pilot plant operated by INCT at EPS Kaweczyn. A full-scale industrial plant is currently in operation in China, and two others are under development in Japan and Poland. (author)

  4. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell; Effets des rayonnements ionisants sur la structure et la fonction de la cellule epitheliale intestinale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haton, C

    2005-06-15

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  5. Radiation-induced instability of human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.N.; Demina, Eh.A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is dedicated to the phenomenon of radiation-induced genomic instability where the increased level of genomic changes in the offspring of irradiated cells is characteristic. Particular attention is paid to the problems of genomic instability induced by the low-dose radiation, role of the bystander effect in formation of radiation-induced instability, and its relationship with individual radiosensitivity. We believe that in accordance with the paradigm of modern radiobiology the increased human individual radiosensitivity can be formed due to the genome instability onset and is a significant risk factor for radiation-induced cancer

  6. Policy, development and delivery of education and training programmes in radiation protection: a crucial contribution to the safe use of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Need for radiation protection knowledge, skills and competences: Today’s situation - Over past years: decrease in number of high-level competences in radiation protection. However, increased attention to RP is needed: more technologies (and more frequently used) rely on ionizing radiation. Actions: Fill the gap - Increase awareness that knowledge of RP science and adequate skills are important (at all levels in medical, industry, research, …). Prepare for future needs - Support of young students and professionals in their need to gain and maintain high level radiation protection competences. Attract new people: Provide adequate E and T - Develop good infrastructure for education and training: → to combat the decline in expertise; → to assure high level of future RP knowledge and skills; → Overall safe use of ionizing radiation

  7. Folic acid deficiency increases chromosomal instability, chromosome 21 aneuploidy and sensitivity to radiation-induced micronuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetstra, Sasja; Thomas, Philip; Salisbury, Carolyn; Turner, Julie; Fenech, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Folic acid deficiency can lead to uracil incorporation into DNA, hypomethylation of DNA, inefficient DNA repair and increase chromosome malsegregation and breakage. Because ionising radiation increases demand for efficient DNA repair and also causes chromosome breaks we hypothesised that folic acid deficiency may increase sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome breakage. We tested this hypothesis by using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in 10 day WIL2-NS cell cultures at four different folic acid concentrations (0.2, 2, 20, and 200 nM) that span the 'normal' physiological range in humans. The study showed a significant dose-dependent increase in frequency of binucleated cells with micronuclei and/or nucleoplasmic bridges with decreasing folic acid concentration (P < 0.0001, P = 0.028, respectively). These biomarkers of chromosomal instability were also increased in cells irradiated (1.5 Gy γ-rays) on day 9 relative to un-irradiated controls (P < 0.05). Folic acid deficiency and γ-irradiation were shown to have a significant interactive effect on frequency of cells containing micronuclei (two-way ANOVA, interaction P 0.0039) such that the frequency of radiation-induced micronucleated cells (i.e. after subtracting base-line frequency of un-irradiated controls) increased with decreasing folic acid concentration (P-trend < 0.0001). Aneuploidy of chromosome 21, apoptosis and necrosis were increased by folic acid deficiency but not by ionising radiation. The results of this study show that folate status has an important impact on chromosomal stability and is an important modifying factor of cellular sensitivity to radiation-induced genome damage

  8. Radiation-induced centers in inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brekhovskikh, S.M.; Tyul'nin, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The nature, structure and formation mechanisms of radiation-induced colour centers, EPR, luminescence, generated ionizing radiation in nonorganic oxide glasses are considered. Experimental material covering both fundamental aspects of radiation physics and glass chemistry, and aspects intimately connected with the creation of new materials with the given radiation-spectral characteristics, with possibilities to prepare radiation-stable and radiation-sensitive glasses is systematized and generalized. Considerable attention is paid to the detection of radiation-induced center binding with composition, glass structures redox conditions for their synthesis. Some new possibilities of practical application of glasses with radiation-induced centers, in particular, to record optical information are reflected in the paper

  9. Ionising radiation protection in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubelka, D.; Svilicic, N.; Kralik Markovinovic, I.; Trifunovic, D.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of sources are examined within legal time frames and data are exchanged through prescribed procedures. Lightning installations present separate problem. As no examination data are available for the majority of sources, there is reasonable doubt that prescribed measures for their surveillance and safety are not enforced. Data with state border sanitary inspections are exchanged according to prescribed procedures. In some cases, documents lack required information. Dosimetry surveillance of persons working in controlled areas is done by three authorised services. They report to the Institute through prescribed procedures. According to available data, only 5% of dosimeters are not returned by institutions for longer than three months after the prescribed submission deadline. This is a significant improvement in respect to previous years, but is still unsatisfactory. It is necessary to determine a location for the central storage of radioactive waste and disused sources on the national level in order to establish Regulations on waste management and on used and sealed radioactive sources. Forming of draft plan for accidents with radioactive sources and its implementation is important. Current dosimetry surveillance suggests that about 82% of persons working in the controlled areas receive doses below 0.1 mSv per year.(author)

  10. Radiation induced liver disease: A clinical update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.; Madan, R.; Chander, S.; Kilambi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) or radiation hepatitis is a sub-acute form of liver injury due to radiation. It is one of the most dreaded complications of radiation which prevents radiation dose escalation and re irradiation for hepatobiliary or upper gastrointestinal malignancies. This complication should be kept in mind whenever a patient is planned for irradiation of these malignancies. Although, incidence of RILD is decreasing due to better knowledge of liver tolerance, improved investigation modalities and modern radiation delivery techniques, treatment options are still limited. In this review article, we have focussed on pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention and management of RILD

  11. Individual response to ionising radiation: What predictive assay(s) to choose?; Reponse individuelle aux radiations ionisantes: quel(s) test(s) predictif(s) choisir?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granzotto, A.; Viau, M.; Devic, C.; Maalouf, M.; Thomas, Ch.; Vogin, G.; Foray, N. [Inserm, U836, groupe de radiobiologie, institut des neurosciences, chemin Fortune-Ferrini, 38042 Grenoble (France); Granzotto, A.; Vogin, G.; Balosso, J. [Centre de hadrontherapie Etoile, 69008 Lyon (France); Joubert, A. [Societe Magelis, 84160 Cadenet (France); Maalouf, M. [Centre national d' etudes spatiales, 75001 Paris (France); Vogin, G.; Colin, C. [EA 3738, faculte de medecine, Lyon-Sud, 69921 Oullins (France); Malek, K.; Balosso, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU A.-Michallon, 38042 Grenoble (France); Colin, C. [Service de radiologie, CHU Lyon-Sud, 69490 Pierre-Benite (France)

    2011-02-15

    Individual response to ionizing radiation is an important information required to apply an efficient radiotherapy treatment against tumour and to avoid any adverse effects in normal tissues. In 1981, Fertil and Malaise have demonstrated that the post-irradiation local tumor control determined in vivo is correlated with clonogenic cell survival assessed in vitro. Furthermore, these authors have reminded the relevance of the concept of intrinsic radiosensitivity that is specific to each individual organ (Fertil and Malaise, 1981) [1]. To date, since clonogenicity assays are too time-consuming and do not provide any other molecular information, a plethora of research groups have attempted to determine the molecular bases of intrinsic radiosensitivity in order to propose reliable and faster predictive assays. To this aim, several approaches have been developed. Notably, the recent revolution in genomic and proteomics technologies is providing a considerable number of data but their link with radiosensitivity still remains to be elucidated. On another hand, the systematic screening of some candidate genes potentially involved in the radiation response is highlighting the complexity of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of DNA damage sensing and signalling and shows that an abnormal radiation response is not necessarily due to the impairment of one single protein. Finally, more modest approaches consisting in focusing some specific functions of DNA repair seem to provide more reliable clues to predict over-acute reactions caused by radiotherapy. In this review, we endeavored to analyse the contributions of these major approaches to predict human radiosensitivity. (authors)

  12. Radiation-induced gene responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  13. Diseases induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The instruction sheet for medical examinations presents information on clinical symptoms and diagnostic procedures relating to the following cases: 1. Acute radiation injury due to whole-body exposure; 2. acute, local radiation injury due to partial body exposure; 3. chronic general affections due to whole-body exposure; 4. chronic, local affections due to partial body exposure; 5. delayed radiation effects. (HP) [de

  14. Ionizing radiation M.O.S. dosimeters: sensibility and stability; Dosimetres M.O.S. de rayonnements ionisants: sensibilite et stabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessinn, F

    1993-12-01

    This thesis is a contribution to the study of the ionizing radiation responsivity of P.O.M.S. dosimeters. Unlike the development of processing hardening techniques, our works goal were to increase, on the one hand, the M.O.S. dosimeters sensitivity in order to detect small radiation doses and on the other hand, the stability with time and temperature of the devices, to minimize the absorbed-dose estimation errors. With this aim in mind, an analysis of all processing parameters has been carried out: the M.O.S. dosimeter sensitivity is primarily controlled by the gate oxide thickness and the irradiation electric field. Thus, P.M.O.S. transistors with 1 and 2 {mu}m thick silica layers have been fabricated for our experiments. The radiation response of our devices in the high-field mode satisfactorily fits a D{sub ox}{sup 2} power law. The maximum sensitivity achieved (9,2 V/Gy for 2{mu}m devices) is close to the ideal value obtained when considering only an unitary carrier-trapping level, and allows to measure about 10{sup -2} Gy radiation doses. Read-time stability has been evaluated under bias-temperature stress conditions: experiments underscore slow fading, corresponding to 10{sup -3} Gy/h. The temperature response has also been studied: the analytical model we have developed predicts M.O.S. transistors threshold voltage variations over the military specifications range [-50 deg. C, + 150 deg. C]. Finally, we have investigated the possibilities of irradiated dosimeters thermal annealing for reusing. It appears clearly that radiation-induced damage annealing is strongly gate bias dependent. Furthermore, dosimeters radiation sensitivity seems not to be affected by successive annealings. (author). 146 refs., 58 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Keiichiro; Fukuma, Hisatoshi; Beppu, Yasuo; Hirota, Teruyuki; Shinohara, Norio.

    1982-01-01

    Criteria for the diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcoma have been previously described. All cases must have a history of irradiation and the second neoplasm must have arisen in the area of the radiation field. A latent period of several years must have elapsed after irradiation before clinical evidence of a second malignant neoplasm. Most important thing is that, all suspected cases must have been proved histologically. We have experienced 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma, they were 42-years-old man who developed an osteosarcoma of the lumbar spine at the field of postoperative irradiation for seminoma 7 years previously, 69-years-old woman who developed a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the buttock at the field of radical radiation for uterine carcinoma 7 years previously and 59-years-old woman who developed an extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the abdominal wall at the field of postoperative irradiation for uterine sarcoma 7 years previously. The last case is very rare and only 8 cases of radiation-induced extraskeletal osteosarcoma have been reported. Since there has been a definite trend in the treatment of cancer toward employing radiation for more favorable cases, in addition to technical improvements in the administration of radiotherapy and more modern equipment, survival data may have been altered considerably in many malignant tumors. Accordingly, more radiation-induced tumors may be encountered in the future. The clinical presentation and histopathology of these radiation-induced sarcomas are presented with a review of the literature. (author)

  16. Radiation induced sarcomas of bone following therapeutic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Chu, F.C.H.; Woodward, H.Q.; Huvos, A.

    1983-01-01

    Because of new therapeutic trends of multi-modality and the importance of late effects, we have updated our series of radiation induced bone sarcomas seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center over the past four decades. A total of 37 cases of bone sarcoma arising from normal bone in the irradiated field was analyzed. The median for latent period from irradiation to diagnosis of bone sarcoma was 11 years with a minimum latent period of four years. The median radiation dose for the bone sarcoma was 6000 rad in 6 weeks with a minimum total radiation dose of 3000 rad in 3 weeks. We have found nine patients who developed bone sarcomas in the radiation field after successful treatment of Hodgkin's disease. Criteria for radiation induced bone sarcomas and the magnitude of the risk of bone sarcomas are briefly discussed

  17. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure

  18. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in silicon in a simplified phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, S.; Lazanu, I.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of primary radiation-induced defects has been previously estimated considering both the explicit mechanisms of the primary interaction between the incoming particle and the nuclei of the semiconductor lattice, and the recoil energy partition between ionisation and displacements, in the frame of the Lindhard theory. The primary displacement defects are vacancies and interstitials that are essentially unstable in silicon. They interact via migration, recombination, annihilation or produce other defects. In the present work, the time evolution of the concentration of defects induced by pions in medium and high resistivity silicon for detectors is modelled, after irradiation. In some approximations, the differential equations representing the time evolution processes could be decoupled. The theoretical equations so obtained are solved analytically in some particular cases, with one free parameter, for a wide range of particle fluences and/or for a wide energy range of incident particles, for different temperatures; the corresponding stationary solutions are also presented

  19. The specific features of self-action of high-power laser radiation propagating through a fully ionised cold plasma and the development of modulation instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshkevich, Viktor A; Kartashev, Ya V; Vysloukh, Victor A

    2000-01-01

    The specific features of the propagation of soliton-like light beams through a fully ionised two-dimensional cold plasma are considered employing analytical and numerical methods commonly used in nonlinear optics. Exact soliton profiles for the lower and upper soliton branches are found numerically in the presence of optical bistability. It is shown that the interaction of incoherent soliton-like laser beams in such a plasma may result both in the destruction of one of the beams and in production of new ones. The regime of the modulation instability of a plane wave propagating through a cold laser-produced plasma is studied. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  20. Better flocculants by radiation induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laizier, J.; Gaussens, G.

    1978-01-01

    The use of radiation induced polymerization should theoritically allow to prepare better flocculants. The testings of several products prepared by such a process shows that better properties are indeed obtained: better efficiencies, lower amounts needed, better overall properties [fr

  1. Ionizing radiation induced malignancies in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1997-01-01

    Using data on gene and chromosome alterations in human cancers, it is proposed that most radiation induced cancers are a consequence of recessive mutations of tumor suppressor genes. This explains the long delay between radiation exposure and the cancer onset. As a consequence, radiation induced cancers belong to groups of tumors where no specific translocations (forming or activating oncogenes) but multiple unbalanced chromosome rearrangements (deletions unmasking recessive mutations) exist. This explains why osteosarcomas, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chondrosarcomas are frequently induced, but not liposarcoma, Ewing sarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas, among others. A single exception confirms this rule: papillary thyroid cancer, frequently induced in exposed children, in which structural rearrangements frequently form a RET/PTC3 fusion gene. This fusion gene is the results of the inversion of a short segment of chromosome 10, and it is assumed that such rearrangement (small para-centric inversion) can easily occur after exposure to radiations, at contrast with translocations between to genes belonging to different chromosomes. (author)

  2. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P; Paretzke, H G; Roth, P [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Michael, B D [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Gray Lab.; O` Sullivan, D [Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies (Ireland)

    1999-12-31

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  3. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Michael, B.D. [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Gray Lab.; O`Sullivan, D. [Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies (Ireland)

    1998-12-31

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  4. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P.

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  5. Radiation-induced degradation of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, E.

    1988-01-01

    This article outlines the fundamentals of radiation-induced degradation of noxious substances in drinking water and waste water and discusses the relevant literature. Radiation methods present a number of advantages and disadvantages, which should carefully be considered in each case. In many cases, there seems to be merit in combining the radiation method with other techniques, as e.g. ozone treatement and biodegradation. 30 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  6. Label-free protein profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) heart tissue reveals immediate mitochondrial impairment after ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimzadeh, Omid; Scherthan, Harry; Yentrapalli, Ramesh; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Ueffing, Marius; Conrad, Marcus; Neff, Frauke; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Aubele, Michaela; Buske, Christian; Atkinson, Michael J; Hauck, Stefanie M; Tapio, Soile

    2012-04-18

    Qualitative proteome profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is advancing the field of clinical proteomics. However, quantitative proteome analysis of FFPE tissue is hampered by the lack of an efficient labelling method. The usage of conventional protein labelling on FFPE tissue has turned out to be inefficient. Classical labelling targets lysine residues that are blocked by the formalin treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a quantitative proteomics analysis of FFPE tissue by combining the label-free approach with optimised protein extraction and separation conditions. As a model system we used FFPE heart tissue of control and exposed C57BL/6 mice after total body irradiation using a gamma ray dose of 3 gray. We identified 32 deregulated proteins (p≤0.05) in irradiated hearts 24h after the exposure. The proteomics data were further evaluated and validated by bioinformatics and immunoblotting investigation. In good agreement with our previous results using fresh-frozen tissue, the analysis indicated radiation-induced alterations in three main biological pathways: respiratory chain, lipid metabolism and pyruvate metabolism. The label-free approach enables the quantitative measurement of radiation-induced alterations in FFPE tissue and facilitates retrospective biomarker identification using clinical archives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of radiation-induced apoptosis in radiation oncology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.A.; Emery, G.C.; Ozsahin, M.; Menz, R.; Knesplova, L.; Larsson, B.

    1997-01-01

    A rapid assay of the ability of lymphocytes to respond to radiation-induced damage is presented. Age and genetic dependence of radiation response have been quantified. The assay is sensitive to low doses of radiation. Its ability to assess the cytotoxic response of blood capillaries to radiation has been evaluated. (author)

  8. Ionisation induced collapse of minihaloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Trevor

    2013-08-01

    In order to analyse the turbine blade life, the damage due to the combined thermal and mechanical loads should be adequately accounted for. This is more challenging when detailed component geometry is limited. Therefore, a compromise between the level of geometric detail and the complexity of the lifing method to be implemented would be necessary. This research focuses on how the life assessment of aero engine turbine blades can be done, considering the balance between available design inputs and adequate level of fidelity. Accordingly, the thesis contributes to developing a generic turbine blade lifing method that is based on the engine thermodynamic cycle; as well as integrating critical design/technological factors and operational parameters that influence the aero engine blade life. To this end, thermo-mechanical fatigue was identified as the critical damage phenomenon driving the life of the turbine blade.. The developed approach integrates software tools and numerical models created using the minimum design information typically available at the early design stages. Using finite element analysis of an idealised blade geometry, the approach captures relevant impacts of thermal gradients and thermal stresses that contribute to the thermo-mechanical fatigue damage on the gas turbine blade. The blade life is evaluated using the Neu/Sehitoglu thermo-mechanical fatigue model that considers damage accumulation due to fatigue, oxidation, and creep. The leading edge is examined as a critical part of the blade to estimate the damage severity for different design factors and operational parameters. The outputs of the research can be used to better understand how the environment and the operating conditions of the aircraft affect the blade life consumption and therefore what is the impact on the maintenance cost and the availability of the propulsion system. This research also finds that the environmental (oxidation) effect drives the blade life and the blade coolant side was the critical location. Furthermore, a parametric and sensitivity study of the Neu/Sehitoglu model parameters suggests that in addition to four previously reported parameters, the sensitivity of the phasing to oxidation damage would be critical to overall blade life..

  9. Radiation-induced renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staab, G.E.; Tegtmeyer, C.J.; Constable, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation is known to produce changes in the small vessels and interstitium of the kidneys resulting in hypertension. Two cases of renal artery stenosis and resultant hypertension secondary to abdominal irradiation are reported and the literature is reviewed

  10. Factories Act 1961, Ionizing Radiations (Unsealed Radioactive Substances) Regulations 1968, Certificate of Approval No.1 (General)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Under the Ionising Radiations (Unsealed Radioactive Substances) Regulations No. 780 of 1968, the Chief Inspector of Factories has wide powers to ensure the protection of workers. By this Certificate he approved, for the purpose of measuring radiation doses, any radiation dosemeter, based on the phenomenon of radiation-induced thermoluminescence, supplied by an approved laboratory. (NEA) [fr

  11. Radiation-induced neurobehavioral dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manda, Kailash

    2013-01-01

    There is a lacuna between sparsely reported immediate effects and the well documented delayed effects on cognitive functions seen after ionizing radiation exposure. We reported the radiation-dose dependent incongruity in the early cognitive changes and its correlation with the structural aberration as reported by imaging study. The delayed effect of radiation was investigated to understand the role of hippocampal neurogenesis in the functional recovery of cognition. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to different doses of γ-radiation and 24 hrs after exposure, the stress and anxiety levels were examined in the Open Field Exploratory Paradigms (OFT). 48hrs after irradiation, the hippocampal dependent recognition memory was observed by the Novel Object Recognition Test (NORT) and the cognitive function related to memory processing and recall was tested using the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM). Visualization of damage to the brain was done by diffusion tensor imaging at 48 hours post-irradiation. Results indicate a complex dose independent effect on the cognitive functions immediately after exposure to gamma rays. Radiation exposure caused short term memory dysfunctions at lower doses which were seen to be abrogated at higher doses, but the long term memory processing was disrupted at higher doses. The Hippocampus emerged as one of the sensitive regions to be affected by whole body exposure to gamma rays, which led to profound immediate alterations in cognitive functions. Furthermore, the results indicate a cognitive recovery process, which might be dependent on the extent of damage to the hippocampal region. While evaluating the delayed effect of radiation on the hippocampal neurogenesis, we observed that higher doses groups showed comparatively more adaptive regenerative neurogenic potential which they could not sustain at later stages. Our studies reported an important hitherto uncovered phenomenon of neurobehavioral dysfunctions in relation to radiation dose. Nevertheless, a

  12. Radiation- induced aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tease, C.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of ionizing radiation to induce aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells has been investigated experimentally in the laboratory mouse using a variety of cytogenetic and genetic methods. These studies have provided unambiguous evidence of induced nondisjunction in both male and female germ cells when the effect of irradiation is screened in meiotic cells or preimplantation embryos. In contrast, however, cytogenetic analyses of post-implantation embryos and genetic assays for induced chromosome gains have not found a significant radiation effect. These apparently contradictory findings may be reconciled if (a) radiation induces tertiary rather than primary trisomy, or (b) induces embryo-lethal genetic damage, such as deletions, in addition to numerical anomalies. Either or both of these explanations may account for the apparent loss during gestation of radiation-induced trisomic embryos. Extrapolating from the information so far available, it seems unlikely that environmental exposure to low doses if low dose rate radiation will result in a detectable increase in the rate of aneuploidy in the human population. (author)

  13. Radiation-induced liver damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, V.A.; Santiago-Delpin, E.A.; Lanaro, A.E.; Castro-Vita, H.; Arroyo, G.; Moscol, J.A.; Gomez, C.; Velazquez, J.; Prado, K.

    1977-01-01

    Due to the recent increase in the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer with or without chemotherapy, the risk of liver radiation damage has become a significant concern for the radiotherapist when the treated tumour is located in the upper abdomen or lower thorax. Clinically evident radiation liver damage may result in significant mortality, but at times patients recover without sequelae. The dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks to the entire liver with 5 fractions per week of 200 rads each, seems to be tolerated well clinically by adult humans. Lower doses may lead to damage when used in children, when chemotherapy is added, as in recent hepatectomy cases, and in the presence of pre-existent liver damage. Reduced fractionation may lead to increased damage. Increased fractionation, limitation of the dose delivered to the entire liver, and restriction of the high dose irradiation volume may afford protection. With the aim of studying the problems of hepatic radiation injury in humans, a project of liver irradiation in the dog is being conducted. Mongrel dogs are being conditioned, submitted to pre-irradiation studies (haemogram, blood chemistry, liver scan and biopsy), irradiated under conditions resembling human cancer therapy, and submitted to post-irradiation evaluation of the liver. Twenty-two dogs have been entered in the study but only four qualify for the evaluation of all the study parameters. It has been found that dogs are susceptible to liver irradiation damage similar to humans. The initial mortality has been high mainly due to non-radiation factors which are being kept under control at the present phase of the study. After the initial experiences, the study will involve variations in total dose and fractionation, and the addition of anticoagulant therapy for possible prevention of radiation liver injury. (author)

  14. Radiation-induced transgenerational instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrova, Yuri E

    2003-10-13

    To date, the analysis of mutation induction has provided an irrefutable evidence for an elevated germline mutation rate in the parents directly exposed to ionizing radiation and a number of chemical mutagens. However, the results of numerous publications suggest that radiation may also have an indirect effect on genome stability, which is transmitted through the germ line of irradiated parents to their offspring. This review describes the phenomenon of transgenerational instability and focuses on the data showing increased cancer incidence and elevated mutation rates in the germ line and somatic tissues of the offspring of irradiated parents. The possible mechanisms of transgenerational instability are also discussed.

  15. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  16. Radiation-induced linking reactions in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoepfl, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three types of measurements are reported relating to chemical reactions in polyethylene induced by ionizing radiation: 1) viscometric and low-angle laser light scattering measurements to determine the effect of a radical scavenger on the yield of links; 2) calorimetric measurements to determine the effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene; and 3) high-resolution solution carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry measurements to determine the nature of the links and the method of their formation. The NMR results present the first direct detection of radiation-induced long-chain branching (Y links) in polyethylene, and place an apparent upper limit on the yield of H-shaped crosslinks that are formed when polyethylene is irradiated to low absorbed doses. The effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that radiation-induced links do not change the heat of fusion of polythylene crystals, but decrease the melt entropy and increase the fold surface free energy per unit area of the crystals. The carbon 13 NMR results demonstrate that long-chain branches (Y links) are formed much more frequently than H-shaped crosslinks at low absorbed doses. The Y links are produced by reactions of alkyl free radicals with terminal vinyl groups in polyethylene

  17. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  18. Radiation-induced polymerization and radiation effect on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, Tadao

    1977-12-01

    The processes of radiation-induced polymerization of monomers and also radiation effects on polymers have been studied by instrumental analyses of electron spin resonance (ESR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron microscopy. In radiation-induced polymerization, graft-copolymerization and absorbed state polymerization were taken up. For graft-copolymerization, monomers such as methylmethacrylate and butadiene were made to react with irradiated polyethylene, and behaviors of the initiating radicals and propagating radicals were followed under the reaction by ESR. For absorbed state polymerization, acrylonitrile/zeolite and methylmethacrylate/zeolite were chosen. Absorbed monomers were irradiated at 77 0 K and polymerized at room temperature. Active species and the concentrations were measured by ESR and the yields of polymer were observed by NMR. In radiation effect on polymers, polyvinylfluoride, polyvinylidenfluoride and polytetrafluoroethylene were taken up. Active species trapped in the polymer matrixes were identified and decay and reactivity of the species were also studied. On the basis of information from the electron microscopy and x-ray analysis, radiation effects on these polymers are described. In polytetrafluoroethylene produced by radiation polymerization, the relation between morphology and polymerization conditions and also the process of crystallization during polymerization were studied. (auth.)

  19. Non-Linearity of dose-effect relationship on the example of cytogenetic effects in plant cells at low level exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudalova, Alla; Geras'kin, Stanislav; Dikarev, Vladimir; Dikareva, Nina; Chernonog, Elena; Copplestone, David; Evseeva, Tatyana

    2006-01-01

    -particles [Nagasawa and Little, 1992; Mothersill et al., 1995]. Other phenomena including genomic instability, low-dose hypersensitivity, and increased radiation resistance effects are also under study [Marples et al., 1997; Kadhim et al., 2004; Bonner, 2004]. The nonlinearity of the dose-effect relationship with low level exposures has been demonstrated in a number of studies where chromosome aberrations were considered as the endpoint of interest. For example, the number of radiation-induced dicentrics in human peripheral blood lymphocytes found in [Pohl-Ruling et al., 1983; Lloyd et al., 1988, 1992] did not exceed the control level at doses below 40 mGy, with some experimental points lying significantly below control values. Essential deviations of chromosome aberrations appearance from linearity in mammals were also shown at higher doses of 100-300 mGy [Luchnik and Sevankaev, 1976; Takahashi et al., 1982]. In other species, deviations of cytogenetic effect induced by low doses from linearity have also been reported. For example, the dose response for cytogenetic effects in Chinese hamster fibroblasts and Vicia faba germs at doses from 0 to 2.5 Gy was shown to be non linear with a plateau at low doses by [Zaichkina et al., 1992]. Dose-effect curves on chromosome aberrations in root meristem cells of Pisum sativum plantlets in the dose range of 0-10 Gy also showed non-linear responses with a plateau for doses up to 1 Gy [Zaka et al., 2002]. However the available information on dose-effect relationships at low doses for non-human species is scarce despite its importance. In their natural environment, some non-human species may be at a higher risk of impact than humans because of differences in ecological niches occupied. [Geras'kin et.al., 2003]. Currently, radiation protection of the environment and maintenance of ecosystem sustainability is of a special concern. and the development of a harmonized approach to human and biota protection has been recognized as a challenge for modern

  20. Non-Linearity of dose-effect relationship on the example of cytogenetic effects in plant cells at low level exposure to ionising radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, Alla; Geras' kin, Stanislav; Dikarev, Vladimir; Dikareva, Nina; Chernonog, Elena [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, RIARAE, 249032 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Copplestone, David [Environment Agency, Millbank Tower, 25th. Floor, 21/24 Millbank, London, SW1P 4XL (United Kingdom); Evseeva, Tatyana [Institute of Biology, Kommunisticheskaya st., 28 Syktyvkar 167610, Komi Republic (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    alpha-particles [Nagasawa and Little, 1992; Mothersill et al., 1995]. Other phenomena including genomic instability, low-dose hypersensitivity, and increased radiation resistance effects are also under study [Marples et al., 1997; Kadhim et al., 2004; Bonner, 2004]. The nonlinearity of the dose-effect relationship with low level exposures has been demonstrated in a number of studies where chromosome aberrations were considered as the endpoint of interest. For example, the number of radiation-induced dicentrics in human peripheral blood lymphocytes found in [Pohl-Ruling et al., 1983; Lloyd et al., 1988, 1992] did not exceed the control level at doses below 40 mGy, with some experimental points lying significantly below control values. Essential deviations of chromosome aberrations appearance from linearity in mammals were also shown at higher doses of 100-300 mGy [Luchnik and Sevankaev, 1976; Takahashi et al., 1982]. In other species, deviations of cytogenetic effect induced by low doses from linearity have also been reported. For example, the dose response for cytogenetic effects in Chinese hamster fibroblasts and Vicia faba germs at doses from 0 to 2.5 Gy was shown to be non linear with a plateau at low doses by [Zaichkina et al., 1992]. Dose-effect curves on chromosome aberrations in root meristem cells of Pisum sativum plantlets in the dose range of 0-10 Gy also showed non-linear responses with a plateau for doses up to 1 Gy [Zaka et al., 2002]. However the available information on dose-effect relationships at low doses for non-human species is scarce despite its importance. In their natural environment, some non-human species may be at a higher risk of impact than humans because of differences in ecological niches occupied. [Geras'kin et.al., 2003]. Currently, radiation protection of the environment and maintenance of ecosystem sustainability is of a special concern. and the development of a harmonized approach to human and biota protection has been recognized

  1. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Concern is expressed over a recent U.K. newspaper report (The Times, 21 January 1977, 5) on the possible hazards of mammography, as women may over-react to the extent of refusing mammography. The problems of radiation risk estimates, particularly at low dose levels, are very briefly reviewed. Recent improvements in mammography techniques have minimised the radiation hazard. Conflicting reports of the mortality rates following mammography screening programmes are discussed. In England and Wales, breast cancer is the commonest cause of death in women aged 35 to 54, and it would be unfortunate if the possible benefits of screening were denied to this age group before the latest mammographic techniques have been fully evaluated. (U.K.)

  2. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J L [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). Postgraduate Medical School

    1977-03-12

    Concern is expressed over a recent U.K. newspaper report (The Times, 21 January 1977, 5) on the possible hazards of mammography, as women may over-react to the extent of refusing mammography. The problems of radiation risk estimates, particularly at low dose levels, are very briefly reviewed. Recent improvements in mammography techniques have minimised the radiation hazard. Conflicting reports of the mortality rates following mammography screening programmes are discussed. In England and Wales, breast cancer is the commonest cause of death in women aged 35 to 54, and it would be unfortunate if the possible benefits of screening were denied to this age group before the latest mammographic techniques have been fully evaluated.

  3. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Haruko; Koizumi, Nobuhiko; Nihei, Kenji; Taguchi, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Haruki.

    1982-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma came to complete remission after combined chemotherapy, intrathecal methotrexate, and whole brain irradiation of 2,400 rad. Two years after diagnosis, he developed it hemiparesis. CT scan showed cerebral infarction and hydrocephalus, and angiography revealed obstruction of the left middle cerebral artery. He survived with marked neurological deficits and no relapse of lymphoma. The literature was reviewed concerning complications after radiation to the brain. (Kondo, M.)

  4. An integrated model for radiation induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Varma, M.

    1994-01-01

    Risk estimates for radiation induced cancer are based on epidemiological data, principally the Japanese A bomb survivors. These estimates for radiation are better known than for any other environmental pollutant, but they do not relate directly to exposure to low doses and low dose rate. Recent rapid advances in molecular genetics, coupled with steady gains in cellular biology, radiation physics and chemistry led to the notion that the time may not be far off when it may be possible to arrive at human cancer risk estimates entirely from laboratory data. Whether risk estimates based on laboratory data will ever replace estimates based on epidemiological studies is an open question. What is clear is that laboratory data can supplement the present risk estimates by providing information on the relative effectiveness of high LET radiations, the importance of dose rate and dose protraction, and by identifying subpopulations which are unusually sensitive or resistant to radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  5. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, T.L.; Bresnan, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-induced internal carotid artery occlusion has not been well recognized previously as a cause of childhood cerebrovascular disease. A child who had received radiation as a neonate for a hemangioma involving the left orbit at the age of 6 years experienced a recurrent right-sided paresis, vascular headaches, and speech difficulties. Angiography showed a hypoplastic left carotid artery with occlusion of both the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Collateral vessels bypassed the occluded-stenotic segments. Review of the literature showed two additional cases of large vessel occlusion in childhood associated with anastomatic telangiectatic vessel development following early radiation therapy of facial hemangioma

  6. Radiation induced peroxidation in model lipid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, K.Z.B.H.M.

    1981-08-01

    In the studies of radiation induced lipid peroxidation, lecithin-liposomes and aqueous micellar solutions of sodium linoleate (or linoleic acid) have been used as models of lipid membrane systems. The liposomes and aqueous linoleate micelles were irradiated in the presence of O 2 and N 2 O/O 2 (80/20 v/v). The peroxidation was initiated using gamma radiation from 60 Co radiation source and was monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance of conjugated diene at 232 nm and by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. The oxidation products were also identified by GLC and GLC-MS analysis. (author)

  7. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references

  8. The genetics of radiation-induced osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, M.; Kuosaite, V.; Nathrath, M.; Atkinson, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Individual genetic variation can influence susceptibility to the carcinogenic effects of many environmental carcinogens. In radiation-exposed populations those individuals with a greater genetically determined susceptibility would be at greater risk of developing cancer. To include this modification of risk into radiation protection schemes it is necessary to identify the genes responsible for determining individual sensitivity. Alpha-particle-induced osteosarcoma in the mouse has been adopted as a model of human radiation carcinogenesis, and genome-wide screens have been conducted for allelic imbalance and genetic linkage. These studies have revealed a series of genes involved in determining the sensitivity to radiogenic osteosarcoma formation. (author)

  9. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  10. Radiation-induced brain damage in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Kokunai, Takashi; Ijichi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Raimondi, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and sequence of the radiation-induced changes in the brain were studied postmortem in 34 children with glioma, 22 of whom underwent central nervous system radiation therapy. Twenty received whole-brain or whole-neuroaxis radiation at a total mean dosage of 4063 cGy. Brain tissue alternations were analyzed histologically by means of various staining methods, including immunohistochemical techniques. The histological features of irradiated brains were compared with those of non-irradiated brains. Microscopic findings included demyelination (seven cases), focal necrosis (six cases), cortical atrophy (four cases), endothelial proliferation (four cases), and telangiectatic vascular proliferation with vascular thickening and oozing of a thick fluid (one case). Such findings were rare in non-irradiated patients. Demyelination was observed earliest in a patient who died 5 months after radiation therapy and was more common after 9 months. Focal necrosis was first observed 9 months post-irradiation but was more advanced and extensive after 1 year. Calcified foci were found only after 60 months. Various vascular changes such as vascular thickening and thrombosis suggested ischemic insult to the brain as a late effect of radiation injury. The results of this study suggest that the immature brain may be more sensitive to radiation than is the adult brain, and that the manifestations of radiation-induced injury depend on the time elapsed after irradiation. (author)

  11. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solly, B

    1964-02-15

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10{sup 17} - 10{sup 19} nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix.

  12. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solly, B.

    1964-02-01

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10 17 - 10 19 nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix

  13. Genetic alterations during radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews radiation-induced genetic alterations and its carcinogenesis, focusing on the previous in vitro assay outcome. A colony formation assay using Syrian hamster fetal cells and focus formation assay using mouse C3H10T1/2 cells are currently available to find malignant transformation of cells. Such in vitro assays has proposed the hypothesis that radiation-induced carcinogenesis arises from at least two-stage processes; i.e., that an early step induced by irradiation plays an important role in promoting the potential to cause the subsequent mutation. A type of genetic instability induced by radiation results in a persistently elevated frequency of spontaneous mutations, so-called the phenomenon of delayed reproductive death. One possible mechanism by which genetic instability arises has been shown to be due to the development of abnormality in the gene group involved in the maintenance mechanism of genome stability. Another possibility has also been shown to stem from the loss of telomere (the extremities of a chromosome). The importance of search for radiation-induced genetic instability is emphasized in view of the elucidation of carcinogenesis. (N.K.)

  14. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages; Role de l'endothelium dans les dommages radio-induits aux tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliat, F

    2007-05-15

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  15. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages; Role de l'endothelium dans les dommages radio-induits aux tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliat, F

    2007-05-15

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  16. Radiation-induced heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroobandt, R; Knieriem, H J; De Wolf, L; Joossens, J V

    1975-01-01

    A 45-year old woman underwent a radical mastectomy in 1965 for carcinoma of the left breast with metastasis in the left axillar lymph nodes. Fifty per cent of the heart received 4,000 rads during postoperative X-ray therapy. Patient developed radiopneumonia and symptoms of acute pericarditis in 1967. Constrictive pericarditis developed gradually from 1972 on. A pericardiectomy was performed in June 1974 and a thickened pericardium could be removed. Light and electron microscopic examination of a surgical biopsy of the left ventricular epi-myocardium revealed epicardial fibrosis, interstitial fibrosis of the myocardium and perivascular fibrosis. The diagnosis of post-radiation pericarditis was made. The myocardial involvement may be responsible for the subsequent clinical course.

  17. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  19. Analysis of the Relation Between Exposure to Ionising Radiation from Computed Tomography Scans in Childhood and Cancer Incidence within the 'Cohorte Enfant Scanner' Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journy, Neige

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful imaging technique that provides great benefits for diagnosis and medical management of patients. Nonetheless, the widespread use of this procedure raises many concerns about the potential adverse effects induced by X-rays exposure, both in clinical practice and in terms of public health. First epidemiological studies have suggested an increased risk of cancer associated with CT scan exposures in childhood or adolescence. The interpretation of these results is, however, controversial, and evidence about radiation-induced risks of cancer is still limited at this level of exposure and during childhood. In France, the 'Enfant Scanner' cohort was set up by IRSN to study the incidence of cancer among more than 100,000 children who received CT scans before the age of 10 in 21 university hospitals. This study is part of the European Epi-CT project - coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer - which includes nine national cohorts set up on the basis of a common protocol. The current thesis, based on the French cohort, focuses on characterizing the exposure of children receiving diagnostic CT scans and quantifying the risk of cancer associated with these exposures. Dosimetric assessment was performed from the radiological protocols used in paediatrics between 2000 and 2011 in the participating hospitals. This study presents the evolution of the exposures during the period and the variability of practices in the radiology departments. The results show that there is a leeway for optimizing the procedures and limiting the exposure of patients, especially for scans of the head that account for most of the examinations in paediatrics. A quantitative assessment of cancer risk potentially induced by CT scans in paediatrics was performed - on the basis of estimates of risk in other contexts of ionizing radiation exposure. The results show that each CT scan could be associated with an excess risk of tumours of the

  20. Radiation-induced cancers in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Fumio

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced cancers in man were divided into three groups, a group in which cancers occurred after atomic bomb exposure, a group in which cancers occurred in radiologists and other medical specialists, and a group in which cancers occurred after exposure to diagnostic radiation, and they were summarized. In atomic bomb survivors leukemia, thyroid cancer, salivary gland cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer occurred so frequently. In addition to them, mortality ratios by malignant lymphoma, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, and by cancer of urinary tract were increased. The incidence of leukemia was decreased in those who treated radiation owing to the development of the protection of occupational exposure, and the incidence of radiation-induced cancers was decreased in patients owing to the improvement of therapy. However, a new problem has arisen as to the occurrence of cancers after medical exposure, such as various histological types of cancers after the treatment of skin diseases on the head, and breast cancer after the treatment of pneumothorax. Dose-to-effect relation, hereditary factors, effect of age, immunological influences and endocrine actions were also studied in each radiation-induced cancer. (Ichikawa, K.)

  1. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy

  2. Radiation-induced heart injury. Radiopathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y; Niibe, H [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-11-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the interval between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue.

  3. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy.

  4. Radiation-induced cancers in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, F [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1978-07-01

    Radiation-induced cancers in man were divided into three groups, a group in which cancers occurred after atomic bomb exposure, a group in which cancers occurred in radiologists and other medical specialists, and a group in which cancers occurred after exposure to diagnostic radiation, and they were summarized. In atomic bomb survivors leukemia, thyroid cancer, salivary gland cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer occurred so frequently. In addition to them, mortality ratios by malignant lymphoma, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, and by cancer of urinary tract were increased. The incidence of leukemia was decreased in those who treated radiation owing to the development of the protection of occupational exposure, and the incidence of radiation-induced cancers was decreased in patients owing to the improvement of therapy. However, a new problem has arisen as to the occurrence of cancers after medical exposure, such as various histological types of cancers after the treatment of skin diseases on the head, and breast cancer after the treatment of pneumothorax. Dose-to-effect relation, hereditary factors, effect of age, immunological influences and endocrine actions were also studied in each radiation-induced cancer.

  5. Effects of intense stratospheric ionisation events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, G.C.; McAfee, J.R.; Crutzen, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    High levels of ionising radiation in the Earth's stratosphere will lead to increased concentrations of nitrogen oxides and decreased concentrations of ozone. Changes in the surface environment will include an increased level, of biologically harmful UV radiation, caused by the ozone depletion, and a decreased level of visible solar radiation, due to the presence of major enhancements in the stratospheric concentration of nitrogen dioxide. These changes have been studied quantitatively, using the passage of the Solar System through a supernova remnant shell as an example. Some of the potential environmental changes are a substantial global cooling, abnormally dry conditions, a reduction in global photosynthesis and a large increase in the flux of atmospheric fixed nitrogen to the surface of the Earth. Such events might have been the cause of mass extinctions in the distant past. (Author)

  6. Radiation Induced Polymerization of Pyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarada Idris; Ratnam, C.T.; Ahmad Ashrif Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the polymerization of pyrrole by gamma irradiation. The pyrrole films were exposed to gamma ray from cobalt 60 source at doses ranging from 0 to 150 kGy. The films were subjected to structural and morphological analyses by using FTIR, SEM and AFM techniques. Similar studies were also made on pristine pyrrole film which serve as control. Results revealed that pyrrole has been successfully polymerized through irradiation induced reactions. The SEM images depicted the formation of cauliflower shape upon gamma irradiation. The structural changes of pyrrole also evidenced by FTIR spectra. Surface topography and roughness of pyrrole before and after gamma irradiation found to show significant differences. (author)

  7. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using 137 Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage into

  8. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D. [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR2027 CNRS, LCR-V28 du CEA, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using {sup 137}Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage

  9. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis

  10. Study of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfring, E.

    2004-06-01

    A method for determining chromosomal aberrations was established for the purpose of examining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of photon radiation with respect to mammary epithelium cells. Cells were exposed to 25 kV X-radiation and to 200 kV X-radiation for comparison and the resulting concentrations of chromosomal aberrations were compared. The RBE M value for radiation-induced fragmentation was found to be 4.2 ± 2.4, while the RBE M value for radiation-induced generation of dicentric chromosomes was found to be 0.5 ± 0.5. In addition to the evaluation of chromosomal aberrations the number of cell cycles undergone by the cells was monitored by means of BrDU staining. As expected, the proportion of cells which underwent more than one cell cycle following exposure to 5 Gy was very low in both cases, amounting to 1.9% (25 kV) and 3.2 (200 kV). Non-radiated cells yielded control values of 26.0% and 12.6%, suggesting variations in external conditions from day to day

  11. Cell cycle arrest induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okaichi, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    1994-01-01

    It is known that various chemical reactions, such as cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and cell killing, can occur within the cells when exposed to ionizing radiation and ultraviolet radiation. Thus protein dynamics involved in such chemical reactions has received considerable attention. In this article, cell cycle regulation is first discussed in terms of the G2/M-phase and the G1/S-phase. Then, radiation-induced cell cycle arrest is reviewed. Cell cycle regulation mechanism involved in the G2 arrest, which is well known to occur when exposed to radiation, has recently been investigated using yeasts. In addition, recent study has yielded a noticeable finding that the G1 arrest can occur with intracellular accumulation of p53 product following ionization radiation. p53 is also shown to play an extremely important role in both DNA repair and cell killing due to DNA damage. Studies on the role of genes in protein groups induced by radiation will hold promise for the elucidation of cell cycle mechanism. (N.K.) 57 refs

  12. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis.

  13. Radiation induced genetic damage in Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which ionizing radiation induces genetic damage in haploid and diploid conidia of Aspergillus nidulans was investigated. Although the linear dose-response curves obtained following low LET irradiation implied a 'single-hit' action of radiation, high LET radiations were much more efficient than low LET radiations, which suggests the involvement of a multiple target system. It was found that the RBE values for non-disjunction and mitotic crossing-over were very different. Unlike mitotic crossing-over, the RBE values for non-disjunction were much greater than for cell killing. This suggests that non-disjunction is a particularly sensitive genetical endpoint that is brought about by damage to a small, probably non-DNA target. Radiosensitisers were used to study whether radiation acts at the level of the DNA or some other cellular component. The sensitisation to electrons and/or X-rays by oxygen, and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole and misonidazole) was examined for radiation induced non-disjunction, mitotic crossing-over, gene conversion, point mutation and cell killing. It was found that these compounds sensitised the cells considerably more to genetic damage than to cell killing. (author)

  14. Mechanisms of transient radiation-induced creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatiletov, Yu.S.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation-induced creep at the transient stage is investigated for metals. The situation, when several possible creep mechanisms operate simultaneously is studied. Among them revealed are those which give the main contribution and determine thereby the creep behaviour. The time dependence of creep rate and its relation to the smelling rate is obtained. The results satisfactorily agree with the available experimental data [ru

  15. Visual sensations induced by Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, P.J.; Pease, V.P.; Bond, V.P.

    1975-01-01

    Pulses of relativistic singly charged particles entering the eyeball induce a variety of visual phenomena by means of Cerenkov radiation generated during their passage through the vitreous. These phenomena are similar in appearance to many of the visual sensations experienced by Apollo astronauts exposed to the cosmic rays in deep space

  16. Reducing radiation induced emesis in abdominal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, K.

    1994-01-01

    In patients with seminoma testes, a comparison was made between radiation induced emesis suffered by patients receiving 'dogleg' radiotherapy with those suffered by patients who received para-aortic radiotherapy. The same comparisons were made between the effects suffered by those patients who received the anti-emetic, Ondansetron, and those suffered by patients who received conventional anti-emetics. (UK)

  17. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature

  18. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far

  19. The Role Of Sevoflurane And Ionising Radiation On THE Level Of Primary DNA Damage Measured In Blood And Different Organs Of Swiss Albino Mice By THE Alkaline Comet Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkovic, V.; Milic, M.; Horvat Knezevic, A.; Halovanovic, S.; Borojevic, N.; Orsolic, N.

    2015-01-01

    Sevoflurane is general anaesthetic suitable for short surgical procedures due to its quick induction of anaesthesia, maintaining spontaneous breathing frequency and hemodynamic stability of patients. However, it can directly trigger the formation of peroxynitrite, significantly increase intracellular levels of H2O2, peroxide, superoxide anion and nitric oxide in peripheral polymorphonuclear neutrophils 1h after the treatment; lowering the levels of intracellular glutathione, and increase radiosensitivity of cells also exposed to ionising radiation (IR). We wanted to evaluate the level of sinergistic effect and possible radiosensitivity DNA damage in blood, and different organs of Swiss albino mice after exposure to both sevoflurane (2.4 percent, 50:50) and the 1Gy gamma-ray radiation generally used in diagnostic purposes after 0, 2, 6 and 24 hours from the combined treatment with alkaline comet assay. Combined exposure to sevoflurane and IR has demonstrated synergistic effect. Due to metabolising of the sevoflurane, there was different sensitivity between blood, liver, kidney and brain cells. (author).

  20. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references

  1. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style

  2. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Wheeler, Kenneth T. [Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Department of Radiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mrobbins@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-07-19

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  3. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  4. Toxic clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers plus radiation-induced toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The operational definition espoused twelve years ago that clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers should be nontoxic interferes with the recognition and research of useful radiation sensitizers. Eight years ago the toxic antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) was reported to be a hypoxic radiation sensitizer and the selective antitumor action of this drug was stressed as potentially creating tumor-targeted radiation sensitization. This rationale of oxidative antitumor drugs as toxic and targeted clinical sensitizers is useful, and has led to the study reported here. The antitumor drug cis-(1,1-cyclobutane-dicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II), or JM-8, is being tested in clinical trials. Cells of S. typhimurium in PBS in the presence of 0.2mM JM-8 are found to be sensitized to irradiation under hypoxic, but not oxic, conditions. JM-8 is nontoxic to bacteria at this concentration, but upon irradiation the JM-8 solution becomes highly toxic. This radiation induced toxicity of JM-8 preferentially develops from hypoxic solution, and thus contributes to the rationale of hypoxic tumor cell destruction

  5. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  6. Molecular epidemiology of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosko, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The role of ionizing radiation in carcinogenesis is discussed. Every cell contains proto-oncogenes, which if damaged may lead to cell transformation. Every cell also contains tumor suppressor genes, which guard against transformation. Thus, transformation would seem to require a double injury to the DNA in a cell. Ionizing radiation is known to be a relatively weak mutagen, but a good clastogen (inducer of chromosome breaks, deletions and rearrangements). Ionizing radiation may therefore be a 'promoter' of cancer, i.e. a stimulant of the clonal expansion of transformed cells, if it kills enough cells to induce compensatory hyperplasia - i.e. rapid growth of cells. Ionizing radiation may be a 'progressor', if it deactivates tumor suppressor genes tending to suppress the growth of existing clones of transformed cells resulting from any of numerous causes. It may therefore be an oversimplification to say that radiation causes cancer; rather, it seems to be a weak initiator, an indirect promoter, and a late-stage progressor. 2 figs

  7. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  8. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  9. EURADOS strategic research agenda. Visions for dosimetry of ionising radiation; Die strategische Forschungsagenda von EURADOS. Visionen fuer die Dosimetrie ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz

    2016-07-01

    Since its foundation in 1981, EURADOS (the European Radiation Dosimetry Group e.V.) has been pursuing the goal to harmonise dosimetric practice of ionizing radiation in Europe, and to promote dosimetric research. As of August 2016, EURADOS had 67 institutional members, and up to 500 individual scientists, organized in eight Working Groups, work on improvements in dosimetry. In 2013, the EURADOS Council installed an ad-hoc editorial group, to identify open questions in radiation dosimetry research and to develop strategies that would allow answering these questions. In a joint effort of all EURADOS Working Groups, proposals were developed and summarized in a EURADOS Report. A short version of this report was published early this year in the peer reviewed international literature, in Radiation Protection Dosimetry. The present paper summarizes the proposals made. It is noted that this first version of the EURADOS Strategic Research Agenda already served as an input for a recent call published in Europe for Radiation Protection Research.

  10. Radiation-induced reactions in polydimethyl siloxanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menhofer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The dissertation reports an investigation into the behaviour of polydimethyl soloxanes (PDMS) subject to the radiation field of a 60 Co-γ radiation source at different irradiation conditions. Several different analytical methods have been applied for the detection of chemical changes in the material and their effects on the polymeric segment mobility. Application of the ESR-spintrap technique identifies the primary radicals x CH 3 , -Si x , and -Si-CH 2 x , induced by the radiolysis of the PDMS. The individual rates of radical formation have been found to be strongly dependent on temperature. (orig./LU) [de

  11. Injection profiles with radiation induced copolymers