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Sample records for ion-material interaction code

  1. Ion-solid interactions for materials modification and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poker, D.B.; Ila, D.; Cheng, Y.T.; Harriott, L.R.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-01-01

    Topics ranged from the very fundamental ion-solid interactions to the highly device-oriented semiconductor applications. Highlights of the symposium featured in this volume include: nanocrystals in insulators, plasma immersion ion implantation. Focused ion beams, molecular dynamics simulations of ion-surface interactions, ion-beam mixing of insulators, GeV ion irradiation, electro-optical materials, polymers, tribological materials, and semiconductor processing. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  2. Ion-materials interactions and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlow, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of energetic ions and other charged particles with solid matter leads to a wealth of physical processes. This thesis comprises a collection of papers and an introductory commentary, which explore some aspects of how these interactions may be used for: (i) Characterisation of thin surface layers of material, (ii) characterisation of energetic charged particles, and (iii) modification of materials by ion bombardment. In (i) Elastic Recoil Detection using a detector system for measurement of Time of Flight and kinetic energy of recoiling target atoms has been developed as a quantitative method for elemental depth profiling of thin (0.5-1 μm) surface layers. This method has been applied to the study of reactions of metal/III-V structures, which are of importance for the semiconductor industry. (ii) MeV-ion - materials interactions have been used as the basis for developing Si p-i-n detectors for the CHICSi programme which will undertake experimental studies of heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. This involved development and testing of extremely thin (10-12 μm) Si ΔE detectors for characterising light- and intermediate mass charged particles as well as calibration of Si p-i-n detectors and their susceptibility to radiation damage. (iii) Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with resonant nuclear reactions has been used to study modification of material with ion beams. In the first study, the accumulation of fluorine in BF 2 + ion implanted WSi 2 solid diffusion sources was investigated. The second study investigated if there was a correlation between photoluminescence and segregation of hydrogen to buried heterojunctions in plasma-etched III-V quantum-well structures. The ion bombardment in this case was during etching in an Ar+CH 4 plasma using an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source. (author)

  3. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.; Mattus, Catherine H.; Dole, Leslie Robert

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a 'primer' on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a 'bench-scale' laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the 'primer,' a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

  4. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  5. A Monte Carlo computer code for evaluating energy loss of 10 keV to 10 MeV ions in amorphous silicon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramli, H.; Elbounagui, O.; Misdaq, M.A.; Merzouki, A.

    2007-01-01

    The basic concepts of a computer simulation code for determining the energy loss of ions in the 10 keV to 10 MeV energy range in amorphous silicon materials were presented and discussed. Data obtained were found in good agreement with those obtained by using a SRIM programme. Electronic and nuclear energy losses were evaluated. Variation of the energy loss as a function of the incident ion energy were studied. This new computer code is a good tool for evaluating stopping powers of various materials for light and heavy ions

  6. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katrík, P., E-mail: p.katrik@gsi.de [GSI Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 (Germany); Mustafin, E. [GSI Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, D-64289 (Germany); Pavlovič, M. [FEI STU Bratislava, Ilkovičova 3, SK-81219 (Slovakia); Strašík, I. [GSI Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u {sup 238}U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  7. Particle and heavy ion transport code system; PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niita, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Intermediate and high energy nuclear data are strongly required in design study of many facilities such as accelerator-driven systems, intense pulse spallation neutron sources, and also in medical and space technology. There is, however, few evaluated nuclear data of intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions. Therefore, we have to use some models or systematics for the cross sections, which are essential ingredients of high energy particle and heavy ion transport code to estimate neutron yield, heat deposition and many other quantities of the transport phenomena in materials. We have developed general purpose particle and heavy ion transport Monte Carlo code system, PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System), based on the NMTC/JAM code by the collaboration of Tohoku University, JAERI and RIST. The PHITS has three important ingredients which enable us to calculate (1) high energy nuclear reactions up to 200 GeV, (2) heavy ion collision and its transport in material, (3) low energy neutron transport based on the evaluated nuclear data. In the PHITS, the cross sections of high energy nuclear reactions are obtained by JAM model. JAM (Jet AA Microscopic Transport Model) is a hadronic cascade model, which explicitly treats all established hadronic states including resonances and all hadron-hadron cross sections parametrized based on the resonance model and string model by fitting the available experimental data. The PHITS can describe the transport of heavy ions and their collisions by making use of JQMD and SPAR code. The JQMD (JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics) is a simulation code for nucleus nucleus collisions based on the molecular dynamics. The SPAR code is widely used to calculate the stopping powers and ranges for charged particles and heavy ions. The PHITS has included some part of MCNP4C code, by which the transport of low energy neutron, photon and electron based on the evaluated nuclear data can be described. Furthermore, the high energy nuclear

  8. Event Generators for Simulating Heavy Ion Interactions of Interest in Evaluating Risks in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Victor; Empl, Anton; Lee, Kerry; Smirmov, Georgi; Zapp, Neal; Ferrari, Alfredo; Tsoulou, Katerina; Roesler, Stefan; hide

    2005-01-01

    Simulating the Space Radiation environment with Monte Carlo Codes, such as FLUKA, requires the ability to model the interactions of heavy ions as they penetrate spacecraft and crew member's bodies. Monte-Carlo-type transport codes use total interaction cross sections to determine probabilistically when a particular type of interaction has occurred. Then, at that point, a distinct event generator is employed to determine separately the results of that interaction. The space radiation environment contains a full spectrum of radiation types, including relativistic nuclei, which are the most important component for the evaluation of crew doses. Interactions between incident protons with target nuclei in the spacecraft materials and crew member's bodies are well understood. However, the situation is substantially less comfortable for incident heavier nuclei (heavy ions). We have been engaged in developing several related heavy ion interaction models based on a Quantum Molecular Dynamics-type approach for energies up through about 5 GeV per nucleon (GeV/A) as part of a NASA Consortium that includes a parallel program of cross section measurements to guide and verify this code development.

  9. Towards a heavy-ion transport capability in the MARS15 Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Gudima, K.K.; Mashnik, S.G.; Rakhno, I.L.; Striganov, S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to meet the challenges of new accelerator and space projects and further improve modelling of radiation effects in microscopic objects, heavy-ion interaction and transport physics have been recently incorporated into the MARS15 Monte Carlo code. A brief description of new modules is given in comparison with experimental data. The MARS Monte Carlo code is widely used in numerous accelerator, detector, shielding and cosmic ray applications. The needs of the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, Large Hadron Collider, Rare Isotope Accelerator and NASA projects have recently induced adding heavy-ion interaction and transport physics to the MARS15 code. The key modules of the new implementation are described below along with their comparisons to experimental data.

  10. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  11. PHITS-a particle and heavy ion transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niita, Koji; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nose, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a summary of the recent development of the multi-purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS. In particular, we discuss in detail the development of two new models, JAM and JQMD, for high energy particle interactions, incorporated in PHITS, and show comparisons between model calculations and experiments for the validations of these models. The paper presents three applications of the code including spallation neutron source, heavy ion therapy and space radiation. The results and examples shown indicate PHITS has great ability of carrying out the radiation transport analysis of almost all particles including heavy ions within a wide energy range

  12. SU-E-T-323: The FLUKA Monte Carlo Code in Ion Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, I [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly used in the ion beam therapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code demands accurate and reliable physical models for the transport and the interaction of all components of the mixed radiation field. This contribution will address an overview of the recent developments in the FLUKA code oriented to its application in ion beam therapy. Methods: FLUKA is a general purpose MC code which allows the calculations of particle transport and interactions with matter, covering an extended range of applications. The user can manage the code through a graphic interface (FLAIR) developed using the Python programming language. Results: This contribution will present recent refinements in the description of the ionization processes and comparisons between FLUKA results and experimental data of ion beam therapy facilities. Moreover, several validations of the largely improved FLUKA nuclear models for imaging application to treatment monitoring will be shown. The complex calculation of prompt gamma ray emission compares favorably with experimental data and can be considered adequate for the intended applications. New features in the modeling of proton induced nuclear interactions also provide reliable cross section predictions for the production of radionuclides. Of great interest for the community are the developments introduced in FLAIR. The most recent efforts concern the capability of importing computed-tomography images in order to build automatically patient geometries and the implementation of different types of existing positron-emission-tomography scanner devices for imaging applications. Conclusion: The FLUA code has been already chosen as reference MC code in many ion beam therapy centers, and is being continuously improved in order to match the needs of ion beam therapy applications. Parts of this work have been supported by the European

  13. Biophysical aspects of heavy ion interactions in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Ludewigt, B.; Phillips, M.; Alpen, E.L.; Powers-Risius, P.; DeGuzman, R.J.; Townsend, L.W.; Wilson, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The biological effects of high energy, high charge nuclei (HZE particles) occupy a central role in the management of space radiation hazards due to galactic cosmic rays. For the energy range of interest, the mean free path for nuclear interactions of these heavy ions is comparable to the thickness of the material traversed, and a significant fraction of stopping particles will undergo a nuclear reaction with the nuclei of the stopping material. Transport methods for HZE particles are dependent on models of the interaction of man-made systems with the space environment to an even greater extent than methods used for other types of radiation. Hence, there is a major need to validate these transport codes by comparison with experimental data. The basic physical properties of HZE particles will be reviewed and illustrated with the results of nuclear fragmentation experiments performed with 670A MeV neon ions incident on a water absorber and with measurements of multiple Coulomb scattering of uranium beams in copper. Finally, the extent to which physical measurements yield radiobiological predictions is illustrated for the example of neon

  14. Model to estimate fractal dimension for ion-bombarded materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, A., E-mail: hu77@purdue.edu; Hassanein, A.

    2014-03-15

    Comprehensive fractal Monte Carlo model ITMC-F (Hu and Hassanein, 2012 [1]) is developed based on the Monte Carlo ion bombardment simulation code, i.e., Ion Transport in Materials and Compounds (ITMC) code (Hassanein, 1985 [2]). The ITMC-F studies the impact of surface roughness on the angular dependence of sputtering yield. Instead of assuming material surfaces to be flat or composed of exact self-similar fractals in simulation, we developed a new method to describe the surface shapes. Random fractal surfaces which are generated by midpoint displacement algorithm and support vector machine algorithm are combined with ITMC. With this new fractal version of ITMC-F, we successfully simulated the angular dependence of sputtering yield for various ion-target combinations, with the input surface roughness exponent directly depicted from experimental data (Hu and Hassanein, 2012 [1]). The ITMC-F code showed good agreement with the experimental data. In advanced, we compare other experimental sputtering yield with the results from ITMC-F to estimate the surface roughness exponent for ion-bombarded material in this research.

  15. Experimental studies and modelling of cation interactions with solid materials: application to the MIMICC project. (Multidimensional Instrumented Module for Investigations on chemistry-transport Coupled Codes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardin, Emmanuelle

    1999-01-01

    The study of cation interactions with solid materials is useful in order to define the chemistry interaction component of the MIMICC project (Multidimensional Instrumented Module for Investigations on chemistry-transport Coupled Codes). This project will validate the chemistry-transport coupled codes. Database have to be supplied on the cesium or ytterbium interactions with solid materials in suspension. The solid materials are: a strong cation exchange resin, a natural sand which presents small impurities, and a zirconium phosphate. The cation exchange resin is useful to check that the surface complexation theory can be applied on a pure cation exchanger. The sand is a natural material, and its isotherms will be interpreted using pure oxide-cation system data, such as pure silica-cation data. Then the study on the zirconium phosphate salt is interesting because of the increasing complexity in the processes (dissolution, sorption and co-precipitation). These data will enable to approach natural systems, constituted by several complex solids which can interfere on each other. These data can also be used for chemistry-transport coupled codes. Potentiometric titration, sorption isotherms, sorption kinetics, cation surface saturation curves are made, in order to obtain the different parameters relevant to the cation sorption at the solid surface, for each solid-electrolyte-cation system. The influence of different parameters such as ionic strength, pH, and electrolyte is estimated. All the experimental curves are fitted with FITEQL code based on the surface complexation theory using the constant capacitance model, in order to give a mechanistic interpretation of the ion retention phenomenon at the solid surface. The speciation curves of all systems are plotted, using the FITEQL code too. Systems with an increasing complexity are studied: dissolution, sorption and coprecipitation coexist in the cation-salt systems. Then the data obtained on each single solid, considered

  16. Ion Implantation and Synthesis of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nastasi, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ion implantation is one of the key processing steps in silicon integrated circuit technology. Some integrated circuits require up to 17 implantation steps and circuits are seldom processed with less than 10 implantation steps. Controlled doping at controlled depths is an essential feature of implantation. Ion beam processing can also be used to improve corrosion resistance, to harden surfaces, to reduce wear and, in general, to improve materials properties. This book presents the physics and materials science of ion implantation and ion beam modification of materials. It covers ion-solid interactions used to predict ion ranges, ion straggling and lattice disorder. Also treated are shallow-junction formation and slicing silicon with hydrogen ion beams. Topics important for materials modification, such as ion-beam mixing, stresses, and sputtering, are also described.

  17. GORGON - a computer code for the calculation of energy deposition and the slowing down of ions in cold materials and hot dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, K.A.; Moritz, N.; Tahir, N.A.

    1983-11-01

    The computer code GORGON, which calculates the energy deposition and slowing down of ions in cold materials and hot plasmas is described, and analyzed in this report. This code is in a state of continuous development but an intermediate stage has been reached where it is considered useful to document the 'state of the art' at the present time. The GORGON code is an improved version of a code developed by Zinamon et al. as part of a more complex program system for studying the hydrodynamic motion of plane metal targets irradiated by intense beams of protons. The improvements made in the code were necessary to improve its usefulness for problems related to the design and burn of heavy ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion targets. (orig./GG) [de

  18. Materials Science with Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bernas, Harry

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces materials scientists and designers, physicists and chemists to the properties of materials that can be modified by ion irradiation or implantation. These techniques can help design new materials or to test modified properties; novel applications already show that ion-beam techniques are complementary to others, yielding previously unattainable properties. Also, ion-beam interactions modify materials at the nanoscale, avoiding the often detrimental results of lithographic or chemical techniques. Here, the effects are related to better-known quasi-equilibrium thermodynamics, and the consequences to materials are discussed with concepts that are familiar to materials science. Examples addressed concern semiconductor physics, crystal and nanocluster growth, optics, magnetism, and applications to geology and biology.

  19. A Monte Carlo code for ion beam therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Initially developed for applications in detector and accelerator physics, the modern Fluka Monte Carlo code is now used in many different areas of nuclear science. Over the last 25 years, the code has evolved to include new features, such as ion beam simulations. Given the growing use of these beams in cancer treatment, Fluka simulations are being used to design treatment plans in several hadron-therapy centres in Europe.   Fluka calculates the dose distribution for a patient treated at CNAO with proton beams. The colour-bar displays the normalized dose values. Fluka is a Monte Carlo code that very accurately simulates electromagnetic and nuclear interactions in matter. In the 1990s, in collaboration with NASA, the code was developed to predict potential radiation hazards received by space crews during possible future trips to Mars. Over the years, it has become the standard tool to investigate beam-machine interactions, radiation damage and radioprotection issues in the CERN accelerator com...

  20. Development of particle and heavy ion transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niita, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS) is 3 dimension general purpose Monte Carlo simulation codes for description of transport and reaction of particle and heavy ion in materials. It is developed on the basis of NMTC/JAM for design and safety of J-PARC. What is PHITS, it's physical process, physical models and development process of PHITC code are described. For examples of application, evaluation of neutron optics, cancer treatment by heavy particle ray and cosmic radiation are stated. JAM and JQMD model are used as the physical model. Neutron motion in six polar magnetic field and gravitational field, PHITC simulation of trace of C 12 beam and secondary neutron track of small model of cancer treatment device in HIMAC and neutron flux in Space Shuttle are explained. (S.Y.)

  1. Extensions to the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the modeling of debris oxidation and materials interactions preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.; Davis, K.L.

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary designs are proposed for extending the SCDAP/RELAP5 code so that it models (a) the oxidation of slumping fuel rod material and cohesive and porous debris and (b) the interaction of PWR control rod materials with the other materials in a reactor core. These extensions have the purpose of improving the code's calculation of the damage progression and hydrogen production that takes place during the early phase of a severe accident

  2. Ion beams in materials processing and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    This book covers ion beam application in modern materials research, offering the basics of ion beam physics and technology and a detailed account of the physics of ion-solid interactions for ion implantation, ion beam synthesis, sputtering and nano-patterning.

  3. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  4. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Chernov, A.; Frolov, T.; Magee, E.; Rudd, R.; Umansky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  5. Materials analysis fast ions

    CERN Document Server

    Denker, A; Rauschenberg, J; Röhrich, J; Strub, E

    2006-01-01

    Materials analysis with ion beams exploits the interaction of ions with the electrons and nuclei in the sample. Among the vast variety of possible analytical techniques available with ion beams we will restrain to ion beam analysis with ion beams in the energy range from one to several MeV per mass unit. It is possible to use either the back-scattered projectiles (RBS – Rutherford Back Scattering) or the recoiled atoms itself (ERDA – Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis) from the elastic scattering processes. These techniques allow the simultaneous and absolute determination of stoichiometry and depth profiles of the detected elements. The interaction of the ions with the electrons in the sample produces holes in the inner electronic shells of the sample atoms, which recombine and emit X-rays characteristic for the element in question. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) has shown to be a fast technique for the analysis of elements with an atomic number above 11.

  6. DART, a BCA code to assess and compare primary irradiation damage in nuclear materials submitted to neutron and ion flux - 02002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneville, L.; Simeone, D.

    2016-01-01

    When a material is subjected to a flux of high-energy particles, its constituent atoms can be knocked from their equilibrium positions with a wide range of energies, depending on the exact nature of the collision. The spectrum of damage energy, derived from the exact knowledge of the recoil spectra for each nuclear reaction occurring in the solid, constitutes a vital data set required for understanding how materials evolve under irradiation. The knowledge of such damage energy is relevant to compare the impact of different facilities on the structural behavior and relevant properties of materials. The DART code was developed for two distinct reasons: the first one was a correct determination of the Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) spectrum from reliable cross section data libraries and the second was a crude estimation of the damage energy induced by different irradiations. This last term can be a quick estimation of radiation damage produced in the same material by different nuclear plants and particle accelerators. Based on the Binary Collision Approximation, this code allows computing the primary spectra produced by neutrons, ions and electrons as well as the damage energy deposited by these particles in a poly atomic material. It is then a tool to compare radiation damage induced in nuclear reactors as well as in ion beam facilities. This brief paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  7. Continuous Materiality: Through a Hierarchy of Computational Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichen Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The legacy of Cartesian dualism inherent in linguistic theory deeply influences current views on the relation between natural language, computer code, and the physical world. However, the oversimplified distinction between mind and body falls short of capturing the complex interaction between the material and the immaterial. In this paper, we posit a hierarchy of codes to delineate a wide spectrum of continuous materiality. Our research suggests that diagrams in architecture provide a valuable analog for approaching computer code in emergent digital systems. After commenting on ways that Cartesian dualism continues to haunt discussions of code, we turn our attention to diagrams and design morphology. Finally we notice the implications a material understanding of code bears for further research on the relation between human cognition and digital code. Our discussion concludes by noticing several areas that we have projected for ongoing research.

  8. Fast ions and hot electrons in the laser--plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitomer, S.J.; Jones, R.D.; Begay, F.; Ehler, A.W.; Kephart, J.F.; Kristal, R.

    1986-01-01

    Data on the emission of energetic ions produced in laser--matter interactions have been analyzed for a wide variety of laser wavelengths, energies, and pulse lengths. Strong correlation has been found between the bulk energy per AMU for fast ions measured by charge cups and the x-ray-determined hot electron temperature. Five theoretical models have been used to explain this correlation. The models include (1) a steady-state spherically symmetric fluid model with classical electron heat conduction, (2) a steady-state spherically symmetric fluid model with flux limited electron heat conduction, (3) a simple analytic model of an isothermal rarefaction followed by a free expansion, (4) the lasneX hydrodynamics code [Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 2, 85 (1975)], calculations employing a spherical expansion and simple initial conditions, and (5) the lasneX code with its full array of absorption, transport, and emission physics. The results obtained with these models are in good agreement with the experiments and indicate that the detailed shape of the correlation curve between mean fast ion energy and hot electron temperature is due to target surface impurities at the higher temperatures (higher laser intensities) and to the expansion of bulk target material at the lower temperatures (lower laser intensities)

  9. Ion beam modification of solids ion-solid interaction and radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Wesch, Werner

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the method of ion beam modification of solids in realization, theory and applications in a comprehensive way. It provides a review of the physical basics of ion-solid interaction and on ion-beam induced structural modifications of solids. Ion beams are widely used to modify the physical properties of materials. A complete theory of ion stopping in matter and the calculation of the energy loss due to nuclear and electronic interactions are presented including the effect of ion channeling. To explain structural modifications due to high electronic excitations, different concepts are presented with special emphasis on the thermal spike model. Furthermore, general concepts of damage evolution as a function of ion mass, ion fluence, ion flux and temperature are described in detail and their limits and applicability are discussed. The effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on structural modifications of solids such as damage formation, phase transitions and amorphization is reviewed for ins...

  10. INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHOI, M.; CHAN, V.S.; CHIU, S.C.; OMELCHENKO, Y.A.; SENTOKU, Y.; STJOH, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES. Existing tokamaks such as DIII-D and future experiments like ITER employ both NB injection (NBI) and ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) for auxiliary heating and current drive. The presence of energetic particles produced by NBI can result in absorption of the Ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) power. ICRF can also interact with the energetic beam ions to alter the characteristics of NBI momentum deposition and resultant impact on current drive and plasma rotation. To study the synergism between NBI and ICRF, a simple physical model for the slowing-down of NB injected fast ions is implemented in a Monte-Carlo rf orbit code. This paper presents the first results. The velocity space distributions of energetic ions generated by ICRF and NBI are calculated and compared. The change in mechanical momentum of the beam and an estimate of its impact on the NB-driven current are presented and compared with ONETWO simulation results

  11. Ion-nanostructure interaction. Comparing simulation and experiment towards surface structuring using nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland-Moritz, Henry

    2016-10-18

    Nanotechnology is a buzzword in context of the proceeding miniaturization of devices and their components. Nanoparticles (NPs) can nowadays easily be synthesized from different material compositions by different chemical and physical processes. However, most of these techniques work close to or at the thermal equilibrium. One subsequent approach to tune materials beyond equilibrium conditions is ion beam irradiation. An important effect of this approach is sputtering. Sputtering is enhanced in NPs compared to their bulk counterparts due to their large surface-to-volume ratio, especially when the ion range matches the NP size. In this work, the sputtering effects of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} ion irradiated Au nanoparticles are investigated in detail by Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a variety of experiments. The sputtering of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NPs was investigated as a function of ion energy, NP size and impact parameter by the MC code iradina and MD code parcas. The simulation results are directly compared to experiments using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Au NPs on top of Si, whereat the sputter yields are significantly enhanced compared to the MC simulations. Additionally, the interaction of NPs and substrate were investigated by Rutherford backscatter spectrometry (RBS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A new MC code was developed to study the redeposition of sputtered atoms of Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NP arrays on neighboring NPs. The redeposition can lead to growth of NPs with diameters of 1 nm in vicinity of ∝50 nm NP. These simulations are directly compared to an in situ experiment. Nanostructures, spherical NPs as well as nanowires (NWs) are used as irradiation masks to structure lithium niobate (LNO) using the ion beam enhanced etching (IBEE) technique. The aspect ratio of the obtained structures can be enhanced by a second IBEE step

  12. Ion implantation range and energy deposition codes COREL, RASE4, and DAMG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.

    1977-07-01

    The FORTRAN codes COREL, RASE4 and DAMG2 can be used to calculate quantities associated with ion implantation range and energy deposition distributions within an amorphous target, or for ions incident far from low index directions and planes in crystalline targets. RASE4 calculates the projected range, R/sub p/, the root mean square spread in the projected range, ΔR/sub p/, and the root mean square spread of the distribution perpendicular to the projected range ΔR/sub perpendicular to/. These parameters are calculated as a function of incident ion energy, E, and the instantaneous energy of the ion, E'. They are sufficient to determine the three dimensional spatial distribution of the ions in the target in the Gaussian approximation when the depth distribution is independent of the lateral distribution. RASE4 can perform these calculations for targets having up to four different component atomic species. The code COREL is a short, economical version of RASE4 which calculates the range and straggling variables for E' = 0. Its primary use in the present package is to provide the average range and straggling variables for recoiling target atoms which are created by the incident ion. This information is used by RASE4 in calculating the redistribution of deposited energy by the target atom recoils. The code DAMG2 uses the output from RASE4 to calculate the depth distribution of energy deposition into either atomic processes or electronic processes. With other input DAMG2 can be used to calculate the depth distribution of any energy dependent interaction between the incident ions and target atoms. This report documents the basic theory behind COREL, RASE4 and DAMG2, including a description of codes, listings, and complete instructions for using the codes, and their limitations

  13. Ninth international conference on ion beam modification of materials. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The conference focused on new developments and current status in the use of ion beams for modification of materials including: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; materials modifications and techniques; biomedical and industrial applications; low energy processes; point defects and damage, nanocrystals in insulators, plasma immersion ion implantation, molecular dynamics simulations of ion-surface interactions, ion-beam mixing of insulators, GeV ion irradiation, electro-optical materials, polymers, tribological materials, and semiconductor processing. The handbook contains the workshop's program, abstracts and an author index. Separate abstracts were prepared for all papers in this volume

  14. Ninth international conference on ion beam modification of materials. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The conference focused on new developments and current status in the use of ion beams for modification of materials including: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; materials modifications and techniques; biomedical and industrial applications; low energy processes; point defects and damage, nanocrystals in insulators, plasma immersion ion implantation, molecular dynamics simulations of ion-surface interactions, ion-beam mixing of insulators, GeV ion irradiation, electro-optical materials, polymers, tribological materials, and semiconductor processing. The handbook contains the workshop`s program, abstracts and an author index. Separate abstracts were prepared for all papers in this volume.

  15. Application of the S"3M code in transport of ion beams in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, J.; Pavlovic, M.; Sagatova, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, the basic processes of interaction of ion beams with matter are explained with emphasis on their statistical analysis. The tools for this analysis have been implemented in the S"3M code that is described in this paper. The statistical modules of the S"3M code are demonstrated using a particular application for research and development of fast-neutron semiconductor detectors as an example. (authors)

  16. Distribution of products in polymer materials induced by ion-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Masaki; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hama, Yoshimasa; Hamanaka, Ken-ichi; Matsumoto, Hideya

    1997-03-01

    The depth profile of double bond formed in low density polyethylene (LDPE) sheet by ion beams irradiation was observed by a micro FT-IR spectrometer in order to investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependency on radiation effects to polymer materials. The distribution of double bond formation in LDPE by irradiation of light ions as H+ was found to be same with the dose distribution calculated from TRIM code, and the yield was also same with that by gamma-rays irradiation, which means that the LET dependency is very small. However, the distribution of double bond to depth was much different from the calculated depth-dose in heavy ions irradiation as Ar and Kr. Then, the dose evaluation was difficult from the TRIM code calculation for heavy ions. (author)

  17. The materiality of Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soon, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    This essay studies the source code of an artwork from a software studies perspective. By examining code that come close to the approach of critical code studies (Marino, 2006), I trace the network artwork, Pupufu (Lin, 2009) to understand various real-time approaches to social media platforms (MSN......, Twitter and Facebook). The focus is not to investigate the functionalities and efficiencies of the code, but to study and interpret the program level of code in order to trace the use of various technological methods such as third-party libraries and platforms’ interfaces. These are important...... to understand the socio-technical side of a changing network environment. Through the study of code, including but not limited to source code, technical specifications and other materials in relation to the artwork production, I would like to explore the materiality of code that goes beyond technical...

  18. Ion irradiation studies of construction materials for high-power accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafin, E.; Seidl, T.; Plotnikov, A.; Strašík, I.; Pavlović, M.; Miglierini, M.; Stanćek, S.; Fertman, A.; Lanćok, A.

    The paper reviews the activities and reports the current results of GSI-INTAS projects that are dealing with investigations of construction materials for high-power accelerators and their components. Three types of materials have been investigated, namely metals (stainless steel and copper), metallic glasses (Nanoperm, Finemet and Vitrovac) and organic materials (polyimide insulators and glass fiber reinforced plastics/GFRP). The materials were irradiated by different ion beams with various fluencies and energies. The influence of radiation on selected physical properties of these materials has been investigated with the aid of gamma-ray spectroscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), conversion electrons Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), optical spectroscopy (IR and UV/VIS) and other analytical methods. Some experiments were accompanied with computer simulations by FLUKA, SHIELD and SRIM codes. Validity of the codes was verified by comparison of the simulation results with experiments. After the validation, the codes were used to complete the data that could not be obtained experimentally.

  19. Building 1D resonance broadened quasilinear (RBQ) code for fast ions Alfvénic relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Duarte, Vinicius; Berk, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    The performance of the burning plasma is limited by the confinement of superalfvenic fusion products, e.g. alpha particles, which are capable of resonating with the Alfvénic eigenmodes (AEs). The effect of AEs on fast ions is evaluated using a resonance line broadened diffusion coefficient. The interaction of fast ions and AEs is captured for cases where there are either isolated or overlapping modes. A new code RBQ1D is being built which constructs diffusion coefficients based on realistic eigenfunctions that are determined by the ideal MHD code NOVA. The wave particle interaction can be reduced to one-dimensional dynamics where for the Alfvénic modes typically the particle kinetic energy is nearly constant. Hence to a good approximation the Quasi-Linear (QL) diffusion equation only contains derivatives in the angular momentum. The diffusion equation is then one dimensional that is efficiently solved simultaneously for all particles with the equation for the evolution of the wave angular momentum. The evolution of fast ion constants of motion is governed by the QL diffusion equations which are adapted to find the ion distribution function.

  20. Fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. A compact introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Wolfhard

    2017-01-01

    Since Rutherford's famous paper which first described the scattering of α-particles in matter, the field of ion-solid interaction has matured by now during one entire century. First theoretical concepts addressing particle penetration of solids were given by Thomson and Bohr. Quantum theory entered the field in treatments of ion stopping by Born and Bethe. Still on classical grounds, transport theory was first introduced in a paper on multiple scattering by Bothe. The discovery of nuclear fission launched theoretical studies by Bohr on the scattering and stopping of fission products. A further milestone in the understanding of particle penetration phenomena is the 1948 paper by Bohr. On this basis, the theoretical understanding was enhanced in the early 1960's in particular by a series of papers by Lindhard. Simultaneously, an increasing amount of experimental studies on ion stopping and scattering were launched in connection with the development of ion acceleration devices and corresponding equipment for particle detection. During this period, also first computer simulation studies came up which later proved to be an utmost efficient tool for the description of collisional phenomena in ion-solid interaction. The relevance for numerous applications became evident, such as for the compositional and structural analysis of thin films and near-surface layers, for semiconductor technology, and nuclear fission and fusion technology. This caused increasing interest not only in the penetration and the scattering of the impinging ions, but also in the modification of the irradiated material due to ion implantation, radiation damage and surface erosion by sputtering. Consequently, ion-solid interaction established around 1970 internationally as a quickly expanding field at the intersection of solid-state physics and nuclear physics. Numerous reviews and textbooks are available which cover the fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. Torrens reviewed the knowledge about

  1. Fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. A compact introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Wolfhard [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research

    2017-09-01

    Since Rutherford's famous paper which first described the scattering of α-particles in matter, the field of ion-solid interaction has matured by now during one entire century. First theoretical concepts addressing particle penetration of solids were given by Thomson and Bohr. Quantum theory entered the field in treatments of ion stopping by Born and Bethe. Still on classical grounds, transport theory was first introduced in a paper on multiple scattering by Bothe. The discovery of nuclear fission launched theoretical studies by Bohr on the scattering and stopping of fission products. A further milestone in the understanding of particle penetration phenomena is the 1948 paper by Bohr. On this basis, the theoretical understanding was enhanced in the early 1960's in particular by a series of papers by Lindhard. Simultaneously, an increasing amount of experimental studies on ion stopping and scattering were launched in connection with the development of ion acceleration devices and corresponding equipment for particle detection. During this period, also first computer simulation studies came up which later proved to be an utmost efficient tool for the description of collisional phenomena in ion-solid interaction. The relevance for numerous applications became evident, such as for the compositional and structural analysis of thin films and near-surface layers, for semiconductor technology, and nuclear fission and fusion technology. This caused increasing interest not only in the penetration and the scattering of the impinging ions, but also in the modification of the irradiated material due to ion implantation, radiation damage and surface erosion by sputtering. Consequently, ion-solid interaction established around 1970 internationally as a quickly expanding field at the intersection of solid-state physics and nuclear physics. Numerous reviews and textbooks are available which cover the fundamentals of ion-solid interaction. Torrens reviewed the knowledge

  2. Development of general-purpose particle and heavy ion transport monte carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Niita, Koji

    2002-01-01

    The high-energy particle transport code NMTC/JAM, which has been developed at JAERI, was improved for the high-energy heavy ion transport calculation by incorporating the JQMD code, the SPAR code and the Shen formula. The new NMTC/JAM named PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System) is the first general-purpose heavy ion transport Monte Carlo code over the incident energies from several MeV/nucleon to several GeV/nucleon. (author)

  3. Spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction in an ion beam shepherd mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Filippo; Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a study of the interaction between a spacecraft, a plasma thruster plume and a free floating object, in the context of an active space debris removal mission based on the ion beam shepherd concept. The analysis is performed with the EP2PLUS hybrid code and includes the evaluation of the transferred force and torque to the target debris, its surface sputtering due to the impinging hypersonic ions, and the equivalent electric circuit of the spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction. The electric potential difference that builds up between the spacecraft and the debris, the ion backscattering and the backsputtering contamination of the shepherd satellite are evaluated for a nominal scenario. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate quantitatively the effects of electron thermodynamics, ambient plasma, heavy species collisions, and debris position.

  4. A hybrid gyrokinetic ion and isothermal electron fluid code for astrophysical plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazura, Y.; Barnes, M.

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes a new code for simulating astrophysical plasmas that solves a hybrid model composed of gyrokinetic ions (GKI) and an isothermal electron fluid (ITEF) Schekochihin et al. (2009) [9]. This model captures ion kinetic effects that are important near the ion gyro-radius scale while electron kinetic effects are ordered out by an electron-ion mass ratio expansion. The code is developed by incorporating the ITEF approximation into AstroGK, an Eulerian δf gyrokinetics code specialized to a slab geometry Numata et al. (2010) [41]. The new code treats the linear terms in the ITEF equations implicitly while the nonlinear terms are treated explicitly. We show linear and nonlinear benchmark tests to prove the validity and applicability of the simulation code. Since the fast electron timescale is eliminated by the mass ratio expansion, the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition is much less restrictive than in full gyrokinetic codes; the present hybrid code runs ∼ 2√{mi /me } ∼ 100 times faster than AstroGK with a single ion species and kinetic electrons where mi /me is the ion-electron mass ratio. The improvement of the computational time makes it feasible to execute ion scale gyrokinetic simulations with a high velocity space resolution and to run multiple simulations to determine the dependence of turbulent dynamics on parameters such as electron-ion temperature ratio and plasma beta.

  5. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M. [Catholic Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Oranj, L. Mokhtari [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness.

  6. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S.; Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M.; Oranj, L. Mokhtari

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness

  7. Ion-surface interaction: simulation of plasma-wall interaction (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salou, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The wall materials of magnetic confinement in fusion machines are exposed to an aggressive environment; the reactor blanket is bombarded with a high flux of particles extracted from the plasma, leading to the sputtering of surface material. This sputtering causes wall erosion as well as plasma contamination problems. In order to control fusion reactions in complex reactors, it is thus imperative to well understand the plasma-wall interactions. This work proposes the study of the sputtering of fusion relevant materials. We propose to simulate the charged particles influx by few keV single-charged ion beams. This study is based on the catcher method; to avoid any problem of pollution (especially in the case of carbon) we designed a new setup allowing an in situ Auger electron spectroscopy analysis. The results provide the evolution of the angular distribution of the sputtering yield as a function of the ion mass (from helium to xenon) and its energy (from 3 keV to 9 keV). (author) [fr

  8. Ion beam modification of biological materials in nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L. D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2012-07-01

    Ion interaction with biological objects in nanoscale is a novel research area stemming from applications of low-energy ion beams in biotechnology and biomedicine. Although the ion beam applications in biotechnology and biomedicine have achieved great successes, many mechanisms remain unclear and many new applications are to be explored. We have carried out some research on exploring the mechanisms and new applications besides attaining ion beam induction of mutation breeding and gene transformation. In the studies on the mechanisms, we focused our investigations on the direct interaction in nanoscale between ions and biological living materials. Our research topics have included the low-energy ion range in DNA, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on DNA topological form change and mutation, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on the cell envelope and gene transformation, and molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-low-energy ion irradiation of DNA. In the exploration of new applications, we have started experiments on ion irradiation or bombardment, in the nanoscaled depth or area, of human cells for biomedical research. This paper introduces our experiments and reports interesting results.

  9. Ion beam modification of biological materials in nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ion interaction with biological objects in nanoscale is a novel research area stemming from applications of low-energy ion beams in biotechnology and biomedicine. Although the ion beam applications in biotechnology and biomedicine have achieved great successes, many mechanisms remain unclear and many new applications are to be explored. We have carried out some research on exploring the mechanisms and new applications besides attaining ion beam induction of mutation breeding and gene transformation. In the studies on the mechanisms, we focused our investigations on the direct interaction in nanoscale between ions and biological living materials. Our research topics have included the low-energy ion range in DNA, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on DNA topological form change and mutation, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on the cell envelope and gene transformation, and molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-low-energy ion irradiation of DNA. In the exploration of new applications, we have started experiments on ion irradiation or bombardment, in the nanoscaled depth or area, of human cells for biomedical research. This paper introduces our experiments and reports interesting results.

  10. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V.; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N.; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for U-238(50+) and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  11. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for 238 U 50+ and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  12. Particle-solid interactions and 21st century materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, L.C.; Lupke, G.; Tolk, N.H.; Lopez, R.; Haglund, R.F.; Haynes, T.E.; Boatner, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    The basic physics that governs the interaction of energetic ion beams with solids has its roots in the atomic and nuclear physics of the last century. The central formalism of Jens Lindhard, describing the 'particle-solid interaction', provides a valuable quantitative guide to statistically meaningful quantities such as energy loss, ranges, range straggling, channeling effects, sputtering coefficients, and damage intensity and profiles. Modern materials modification (nanoscience, solid state dynamics) requires atomic scale control of the particle-solid interaction. Two recent experimental examples are discussed: (1) the control of the size distribution of nanocrystals formed in implanted materials and (2) the investigation of the site-specific implantation of hydrogen into silicon. Both cases illustrate unique solid-state configurations, created by ion implantation, that address issues of current materials science interest

  13. Plasma-surface interaction in negative hydrogen ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Motoi

    2018-05-01

    A negative hydrogen ion source delivers more beam current when Cs is introduced to the discharge, but a continuous operation of the source reduces the beam current until more Cs is added to the source. This behavior can be explained by adsorption and ion induced desorption of Cs atoms on the plasma grid surface of the ion source. The interaction between the ion source plasma and the plasma grid surface of a negative hydrogen ion source is discussed in correlation to the Cs consumption of the ion source. The results show that operation with deuterium instead of hydrogen should require more Cs consumption and the presence of medium mass impurities as well as ions of the source wall materials in the arc discharge enlarges the Cs removal rate during an ion source discharge.

  14. Ionomers for Ion-Conducting Energy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Ralph

    For ionic actuators and battery separators, it is vital to utilize single-ion conducting ionomers that avoid the detrimental polarization of other ions. Single-ion conducting ionomers are synthesized based on DFT calculations, with low glass transition temperatures (facile dynamics) to prepare ion-conducting membranes for battery separators that conduct Li+ or Na+. Characterization by X-ray scattering, dielectric spectroscopy, FTIR, NMR and linear viscoelasticity collectively develop a coherent picture of ionic aggregation and both counterion and polymer dynamics. 7Li NMR diffusion measurements find that diffusion is faster than expected by conductivity using the Nernst-Einstein equation, which means that the majority of Li diffusion occurs by ion pairs moving with the polymer segmental motion. Segmental motion only contributes to ionic conduction in the rare event that one of these ion pairs has an extra Li (a positive triple ion). This leads us to a new metric for ion-conducting soft materials, the product of the cation number density p0 and their diffusion coefficient D; p0D is the diffusive flux of lithium ions. This new metric has a maximum at intermediate ion content that corresponds to the overlap of ion pair polarizability volumes. At higher ion contents, the ion pairs interact strongly and form larger aggregation states that retard segmental motion of both mobile ion pairs and triple ions.

  15. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam

  16. FIFPC, a fast ion Fokker--Planck code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, R.H.; Callen, J.D.; Rome, J.A.; Smith, J.

    1976-07-01

    A computer code is described which solves the Fokker--Planck equation for the velocity space distribution of fast ions injected into a tokamak plasma. The numerical techniques are described and use of the code is outlined. The program is written in FORTRAN IV and is modularized in order to provide greater flexibility to the user. A program listing is provided and the results of sample cases are presented

  17. Ion mobilities and ion-atom interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatland, I.R.

    1982-01-01

    The techniques for measuring the mobilities of ions in gases, relating interaction potentials to mobilities, and determining potentials from experimental mobilities are reviewed. Applications are presented for positive alkali ions and negative halogen ions in inert gases. (Auth.)

  18. A 3d particle simulation code for heavy ion fusion accelerator studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Bangerter, R.O.; Callahan, D.A.; Grote, D.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Haber, I.

    1990-01-01

    We describe WARP, a new particle-in-cell code being developed and optimized for ion beam studies in true geometry. We seek to model transport around bends, axial compression with strong focusing, multiple beamlet interaction, and other inherently 3d processes that affect emittance growth. Constraints imposed by memory and running time are severe. Thus, we employ only two 3d field arrays (ρ and φ), and difference φ directly on each particle to get E, rather than interpolating E from three meshes; use of a single 3d array is feasible. A new method for PIC simulation of bent beams follows the beam particles in a family of rotated laboratory frames, thus ''straightening'' the bends. We are also incorporating an envelope calculation, an (r, z) model, and 1d (axial) model within WARP. The BASIS development and run-time system is used, providing a powerful interactive environment in which the user has access to all variables in the code database. 10 refs., 3 figs

  19. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERM Code (GCR Event-Based Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERM code calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERM code also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERM code accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERM code for application to thick target experiments. The GERM code provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their

  20. Influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on double-layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Recently a Poisson-Helmholtz-Boltzmann (PHB) model [Bohinc , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.031130 85, 031130 (2012)] was developed by accounting for solvent-mediated nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions. Nonelectrostatic interactions are described by a Yukawa-like pair potential. In the present work, we modify the PHB model by adding steric effects (finite ion size) into the free energy to derive governing equations. The modified PHB model is capable of capturing both ion specificity and ion crowding. This modified model is then employed to study the capacitance of the double layer. More specifically, we focus on the influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on charging a double layer near a flat surface in the presence of steric effects. We numerically compute the differential capacitance as a function of the voltage under various conditions. At small voltages and low salt concentrations (dilute solution), we find out that the predictions from the modified PHB model are the same as those from the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, indicating that nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions and steric effects are negligible. At moderate voltages, nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions play an important role in determining the differential capacitance. Generally speaking, nonelectrostatic interactions decrease the capacitance because of additional nonelectrostatic repulsion among excess counterions inside the double layer. However, increasing the voltage gradually favors steric effects, which induce a condensed layer with crowding of counterions near the electrode. Accordingly, the predictions from the modified PHB model collapse onto those computed by the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory considering steric effects alone. Finally, theoretical predictions are compared and favorably agree with experimental data, in particular, in concentrated solutions, leading one to conclude that the modified PHB model adequately predicts the diffuse

  1. QR Code: An Interactive Mobile Advertising Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela Sibel Bayrak Meydanoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Easy and rapid interaction between consumers and marketers enabled by mobile technology prompted  an increase in the usage of mobile media as an interactive marketing tool in recent years. One of the mobile technologies that can be used in interactive marketing for advertising is QR code (Quick Response Code. Interactive advertising brings back some advantages for the companies that apply it. For example, interaction with consumers provides significant information about consumers' preferences. Marketers can use information obtained from consumers for various marketing activities such as customizing advertisement messages, determining  target audience, improving future products and services. QR codes used in marketing campaigns can provide links to specific websites in which through various tools (e.g. questionnaires, voting information about the needs and wants of customers are collected. The aim of this basic research is to illustrate the contribution of  QR codes to the realization of the advantages gained by interactive advertising.

  2. Heavy-ion transport codes for radiotherapy and radioprotection in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancusi, Davide

    2006-06-01

    Simulation of the transport of heavy ions in matter is a field of nuclear science that has recently received attention in view of its importance for some relevant applications. Accelerated heavy ions can, for example, be used to treat cancers (heavy-ion radiotherapy) and show some superior qualities with respect to more conventional treatment systems, like photons (x-rays) or protons. Furthermore, long-term manned space missions (like a possible future mission to Mars) pose the challenge to protect astronauts and equipment on board against the harmful space radiation environment, where heavy ions can be responsible for a significant share of the exposure risk. The high accuracy expected from a transport algorithm (especially in the case of radiotherapy) and the large amount of semi-empirical knowledge necessary to even state the transport problem properly rule out any analytical approach; the alternative is to resort to numerical simulations in order to build treatment-planning systems for cancer or to aid space engineers in shielding design. This thesis is focused on the description of HIBRAC, a one-dimensional deterministic code optimised for radiotherapy, and PHITS (Particle and Heavy- Ion Transport System), a general-purpose three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code. The structure of both codes is outlined and some relevant results are presented. In the case of PHITS, we also report the first results of an ongoing comprehensive benchmarking program for the main components of the code; we present the comparison of partial charge-changing cross sections for a 400 MeV/n 40 Ar beam impinging on carbon, polyethylene, aluminium, copper, tin and lead targets

  3. Color-Coded Batteries - Electro-Photonic Inverse Opal Materials for Enhanced Electrochemical Energy Storage and Optically Encoded Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-07-01

    For consumer electronic devices, long-life, stable, and reasonably fast charging Li-ion batteries with good stable capacities are a necessity. For exciting and important advances in the materials that drive innovations in electrochemical energy storage (EES), modular thin-film solar cells, and wearable, flexible technology of the future, real-time analysis and indication of battery performance and health is crucial. Here, developments in color-coded assessment of battery material performance and diagnostics are described, and a vision for using electro-photonic inverse opal materials and all-optical probes to assess, characterize, and monitor the processes non-destructively in real time are outlined. By structuring any cathode or anode material in the form of a photonic crystal or as a 3D macroporous inverse opal, color-coded "chameleon" battery-strip electrodes may provide an amenable way to distinguish the type of process, the voltage, material and chemical phase changes, remaining capacity, cycle health, and state of charge or discharge of either existing or new materials in Li-ion or emerging alternative battery types, simply by monitoring its color change. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  5. QR Code: An Interactive Mobile Advertising Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Ela Sibel Bayrak Meydanoglu

    2013-01-01

    Easy and rapid interaction between consumers and marketers enabled by mobile technology prompted  an increase in the usage of mobile media as an interactive marketing tool in recent years. One of the mobile technologies that can be used in interactive marketing for advertising is QR code (Quick Response Code). Interactive advertising brings back some advantages for the companies that apply it. For example, interaction with consumers provides significant information about consumers' preference...

  6. Monte Carlo simulation for neutron yield produced by bombarding thick targets with high energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oranj, Leila Mokhtari; Oh, Joo Hee; Yoon, Moo Hyun; Lee, Hee Seock [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    One of radiation shielding issues at heavy-ion accelerator facilities is to estimate neutron production by primary heavy ions. A few Monte Carlo transport codes such as FLUKA and PHITS can work with primary heavy ions. Recently IBS/RISP((Rare Isotope Science Project) started to design a high-energy, high-power rare isotope accelerator complex for nuclear physics, medical and material science and applications. There is a lack of experimental and simulated data about the interaction of major beam, {sup 238}U with materials. For the shielding design of the end of first accelerating section section, we calculate a differential neutron yield using the FLUKA code for the interaction of 18.5 MeV/u uranium ion beam with thin carbon stripper of 1.3 μm). The benchmarking studies were also done to prove the yield calculation for 400 MeV/n {sup 131}Xe and other heavy ions. In this study, the benchmarking for Xe-C, Xe-Cu, Xe-Al, Xe-Pb and U-C, other interactions were performed using the FLUKA code. All of results show that the FLUKA can evaluate the heavy ion induced reaction with good uncertainty. For the evaluation of neutron source term, the calculated neutron yields are shown in Fig. 2. The energy of Uranium ion beam is only 18.5 MeV/u, but the energy of produced secondary neutrons was extended over 100 MeV. So the neutron shielding and the damage by those neutrons is expected to be serious. Because of thin stripper, the neutron intensity at forward direction was high. But the the intensity of produced secondary photons was relatively low and mostly the angular property was isotropic. For the detail shielding design of stripper section of RISP rare istope accelerator, the benchmarking study and preliminary evaluation of neutron source term from uranium beam have been carried out using the FLUKA code. This study is also compared with the evaluation results using the PHITS code performed coincidently. Both studies shows that two monte carlo codes can give a good results for

  7. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  8. Setup of an ion-beam facility for the nanostructuration of 2D materials with highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopster, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the interaction of highly charged ions with surfaces. When an ion approaches a surface, its potential energy is deposited into the surface via a cascade of electronic processes. A strong electronic excitation of the surface results, which is localized in a nanometer sized region. As a consequence of further mechanisms, this excitation may lead to nanostructures being of topographic, structural or chemical modifications of the material. During this work, a setup of a complete ion beamline was constructed. The beamline offers production, focussing and charge separation of ion beams as well as irradiations of surfaces with highly charged ions. Additionally, new methods for beam profile and particle density analysis via Raman microscopy on graphene are presented. Experimental results of highly charged ions impinging on 2D materials provide the second part of this work. Ion induced nanostructures on lamellar materials, i.e. MoS 2 as well as single layers of graphene, could be identified and analyzed. Each of them were triggered by the potential energy of the ions. Processes of the ion surface interaction could be deduced qualitatively from the data. Local regions of enhanced friction on graphene could be detected by Friction Force Microscopy after irradiations. Thresholds for defect creation were established regarding the potential energy, which depend strongly on the kinetic energy of the ions. In terms of the over the barrier model, this dependency could be related to the time of flight the ion spends above the surface. Defects on irradiated graphene as well as on free standing graphene were analyzed via Raman microscopy. Possible dependencies of the defect diameters and nature on the layer number as well as on the presence of a substrate were proved. It was shown, that graphene becomes locally hydrogenated by the impact of highly charged ions. Such a chemical modification leads to an enhanced friction as well as to an appearance of defect modes

  9. Heavy-ion transport codes for radiotherapy and radioprotection in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancusi, Davide

    2006-06-15

    Simulation of the transport of heavy ions in matter is a field of nuclear science that has recently received attention in view of its importance for some relevant applications. Accelerated heavy ions can, for example, be used to treat cancers (heavy-ion radiotherapy) and show some superior qualities with respect to more conventional treatment systems, like photons (x-rays) or protons. Furthermore, long-term manned space missions (like a possible future mission to Mars) pose the challenge to protect astronauts and equipment on board against the harmful space radiation environment, where heavy ions can be responsible for a significant share of the exposure risk. The high accuracy expected from a transport algorithm (especially in the case of radiotherapy) and the large amount of semi-empirical knowledge necessary to even state the transport problem properly rule out any analytical approach; the alternative is to resort to numerical simulations in order to build treatment-planning systems for cancer or to aid space engineers in shielding design. This thesis is focused on the description of HIBRAC, a one-dimensional deterministic code optimised for radiotherapy, and PHITS (Particle and Heavy- Ion Transport System), a general-purpose three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code. The structure of both codes is outlined and some relevant results are presented. In the case of PHITS, we also report the first results of an ongoing comprehensive benchmarking program for the main components of the code; we present the comparison of partial charge-changing cross sections for a 400 MeV/n {sup 40}Ar beam impinging on carbon, polyethylene, aluminium, copper, tin and lead targets.

  10. Ion beams provided by small accelerators for material synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackova, Anna; Havranek, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    The compact, multipurpose electrostatic tandem accelerators are extensively used for production of ion beams with energies in the range from 400 keV to 24 MeV of almost all elements of the periodic system for the trace element analysis by means of nuclear analytical methods. The ion beams produced by small accelerators have a broad application, mainly for material characterization (Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry, Particle Induced X ray Emission analysis, Nuclear Reaction Analysis and Ion-Microprobe with 1 μm lateral resolution among others) and for high-energy implantation. Material research belongs to traditionally progressive fields of technology. Due to the continuous miniaturization, the underlying structures are far beyond the analytical limits of the most conventional methods. Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques provide this possibility as they use probes of similar or much smaller dimensions (particles, radiation). Ion beams can be used for the synthesis of new progressive functional nanomaterials for optics, electronics and other applications. Ion beams are extensively used in studies of the fundamental energetic ion interaction with matter as well as in the novel nanostructure synthesis using ion beam irradiation in various amorphous and crystalline materials in order to get structures with extraordinary functional properties. IBA methods serve for investigation of materials coming from material research, industry, micro- and nano-technology, electronics, optics and laser technology, chemical, biological and environmental investigation in general. Main research directions in laboratories employing small accelerators are also the preparation and characterization of micro- and nano-structured materials which are of interest for basic and oriented research in material science, and various studies of biological, geological, environmental and cultural heritage artefacts are provided too.

  11. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes by activation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, Vera

    2012-12-18

    With the increasing energies and intensities of heavy-ion accelerator facilities, the problem of an excessive activation of the accelerator components caused by beam losses becomes more and more important. Numerical experiments using Monte Carlo transport codes are performed in order to assess the levels of activation. The heavy-ion versions of the codes were released approximately a decade ago, therefore the verification is needed to be sure that they give reasonable results. Present work is focused on obtaining the experimental data on activation of the targets by heavy-ion beams. Several experiments were performed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung. The interaction of nitrogen, argon and uranium beams with aluminum targets, as well as interaction of nitrogen and argon beams with copper targets was studied. After the irradiation of the targets by different ion beams from the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI, the γ-spectroscopy analysis was done: the γ-spectra of the residual activity were measured, the radioactive nuclides were identified, their amount and depth distribution were detected. The obtained experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD. The discrepancies and agreements between experiment and simulations are pointed out. The origin of discrepancies is discussed. Obtained results allow for a better verification of the Monte Carlo transport codes, and also provide information for their further development. The necessity of the activation studies for accelerator applications is discussed. The limits of applicability of the heavy-ion beam-loss criteria were studied using the FLUKA code. FLUKA-simulations were done to determine the most preferable from the radiation protection point of view materials for use in accelerator components.

  12. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. Thomas [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  13. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic code for the interaction of intense heavy ion beams with matter based on the code CONCHAS SPRAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, V.; Rentzsch, T.; Maruhn, J.

    1988-04-01

    In this report we describe a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code applicable to the problems stated. In section II we describe the algorithm solving the hydrodynamic equations. In section III we present test calculations involving the propagation of shocks and contact discontinuities as well as the growth of a Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI). Section IV includes all the modifications and supplements required to use the code to investigate the interaction of intense HI beams with matter. Numcerical simulations of experiments using the RFQ facility and the planned SIS-ESR at GSI are finally discussed in section V. (orig./HSI)

  14. Electronic structures in ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical bond generated by the interaction between low energy ion and base was investigated by ab initio molecular orbital method. The effects of ion charge were studied by calculation of this method. When carbon ion approached to graphite base (C 24 H 12 ), the positive ion and the neutral atom covalently bonded, but the negative ion did not combine with it. When carbon ion was injected into h-BN base (B 12 N 12 H 12 , hexagonal system boron nitride), the positive ion and the neutron atom formed covalent bond and the van der Waals binding, and the negative ion interacted statically with it. (S.Y.)

  15. Strength evaluation code STEP for brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Futakawa, Masatoshi.

    1997-12-01

    In a structural design using brittle materials such as graphite and/or ceramics it is necessary to evaluate the strength of component under complex stress condition. The strength of ceramic materials is said to be influenced by the stress distribution. However, in the structural design criteria simplified stress limits had been adopted without taking account of the strength change with the stress distribution. It is, therefore, important to evaluate the strength of component on the basis of the fracture model for brittle material. Consequently, the strength evaluation program, STEP, on a brittle fracture of ceramic materials based on the competing risk theory had been developed. Two different brittle fracture modes, a surface layer fracture mode dominated by surface flaws and an internal fracture mode by internal flaws, are treated in the STEP code in order to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture. The STEP code uses stress calculation results including complex shape of structures analyzed by the generalized FEM stress analysis code, ABAQUS, so as to be possible to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture for the structures having complicate shapes. This code is, therefore, useful to evaluate the structural integrity of arbitrary shapes of components such as core graphite components in the HTTR, heat exchanger components made of ceramics materials etc. This paper describes the basic equations applying to the STEP code, code system with a combination of the STEP and the ABAQUS codes and the result of the verification analysis. (author)

  16. Three Dimensional Explicit Model for Cometary Tail Ions Interactions with Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bermani, M. J. F.; Alhamed, S. A.; Khalaf, S. Z.; Ali, H. Sh.; Selman, A. A.

    2009-06-01

    The different interactions between cometary tail and solar wind ions are studied in the present paper based on three-dimensional Lax explicit method. The model used in this research is based on the continuity equations describing the cometary tail-solar wind interactions. Three dimensional system was considered in this paper. Simulation of the physical system was achieved using computer code written using Matlab 7.0. The parameters studied here assumed Halley comet type and include the particle density rho, the particles velocity v, the magnetic field strength B, dynamic pressure p and internal energy E. The results of the present research showed that the interaction near the cometary nucleus is mainly affected by the new ions added to the plasma of the solar wind, which increases the average molecular weight and result in many unique characteristics of the cometary tail. These characteristics were explained in the presence of the IMF.

  17. High-energy ion implantation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    High-energy ion implantation is an extremely flexible type of surface treatment technique, in that it offers the possibility of treating almost any type of target material or product with ions of almost any chemical species, or combinations of chemical species. In addition, ion implantations can be combined with variations in temperature during or after ion implantation. As a result, the possibility of approaching a wide variety of surface-related materials science problems exists with ion implantation. This paper will outline factors pertinent to application of high-energy ion implantation to surface engineering problems. This factors include fundamental advantages and limitations, economic considerations, present and future equipment, and aspects of materials science

  18. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  19. Heavy ion elastic scattering of code : OPTHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Divatia, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code, OPTHI has been designed to calculate nuclear optical model elastic cross sections for the scattering of heavy ions. The program has been designed to be utilitarian rather than capable of giving an exact description of elastic scattering. Input format is described and the program listing is given. (M.G.B.)

  20. Report on the Oak Ridge workshop on Monte Carlo codes for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awes, T.C.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    In order to make detailed predictions for the case of purely hadronic matter, several Monte Carlo codes have been developed to describe relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Although these various models build upon models of hadron-hadron interactions and have been fitted to reproduce hadron-hadron collision data, they have rather different pictures of the underlying hadron collision process and of subsequent particle production. Until now, the different Monte Carlo codes have, in general, been compared to different sets of experimental data, according to which results were readily available to the model builder or which Monte Carlo code was readily available to an experimental group. As a result, it has been difficult to draw firm conclusions about whether the observed deviations between experiments and calculations were due to deficiencies in the particular model, experimental discrepancies, or interesting effects beyond a simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions. For this reason, it was decided that it would be productive to have a structured confrontation between the available experimental data and the many models of high-energy nuclear collisions in a manner in which it could be ensured that the computer codes were run correctly and the experimental acceptances were properly taken into account. With this purpose in mind, a Workshop on Monte Carlo Codes for Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions was organized at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from September 12--23, 1988. This paper reviews this workshop. 11 refs., 6 figs

  1. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The age old method of physically taking an inventory of materials by listing each item's identification number has lived beyond its usefulness. In this age of computerization, which offers the local grocery store a quick, sure, and easy means to inventory, it is time for nuclear materials facilities to automate accountability activities. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At that time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable; however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented

  2. Characterization of the interaction between therapeutical carbon ions and bone-like materials and related impact on treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Anna; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt (Germany); Carlino, Antonio [University of Palermo (Italy); Kaderka, Robert; Kraemer, Michael; La Tessa, Chiara; Scifoni, Emanuele [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most common and effective therapies for cancer. The treatment planning system for ions TRiP98 was developed at GSI, Darmstadt. In TRiP98, the interaction between primary radiation and tissue is modeled from experimental data measured in water and rescaled to other tissue. This approximation is not accurate enough for biological materials whose elemental composition besides density deviates significantly from water. The nuclear attenuation of carbon beams in bone-like materials was measured and an estimation of the fragmentation cross section was done. In parallel, the dose profile inhomogeneity predicted by TRiP98 at the interface between water and bones was investigated and measured at HIT (Heidelberg). A 3D treatment plan was delivered in a water phantom equipped with bone targets. Pin-point ionization chambers and X-ray dosimetric films were used for measuring the dose at different positions. As a further step, the measured cross sections of carbon ions in bone have been implemented in TRiP98. The comparison of the dose profiles calculated with the standard and benchmarked versions of the treatment planning will give an estimate of the improvement.

  3. Numerical simulation of ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper, based on examples from the author's contribution, aims to illustrate the role of ballistic simulations of the interaction between an ion beam and a surface in the characterization of surface properties. Several aspects of the ion-surface interaction have been modelled to various levels of sophistication by computer simulation. Particular emphasis is given to the ion scattering in the impact mode, in the multiple scattering regime and at grazing incidence, as well as to the Auger emission resulting from electronic excitation. Some examples are then given in order to illustrate the use of the combination between simulation and experiment to study the ion-surface interaction and surface properties. Ion-induced Auger emission, the determination of potentials and of overlay structures are discusse. The possibility to tackle dynamical surface properties by menas of a combination between molecular dynamics, ballistic simulations and ion scattering measurements in then briefly discussed. (orig.)

  4. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At this time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable, however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented

  5. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    ) and the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM), the NRC/Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) raised numerous safety-related issues regarding elevated-temperature structural integrity criteria. Most of these issues remained unresolved today. These critical licensing reviews provide a basis for the evaluation of underlying technical issues for future advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Major materials performance issues and high temperature design methodology issues pertinent to the ARR are addressed in the report. The report is organized as follows: the ARR reference design concepts proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory and four industrial consortia were reviewed first, followed by a summary of the major code qualification and licensing issues for the ARR structural materials. The available database is presented for the ASME Code-qualified structural alloys (e.g. 304, 316 stainless steels, 2.25Cr-1Mo, and mod.9Cr-1Mo), including physical properties, tensile properties, impact properties and fracture toughness, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, microstructural stability during long-term thermal aging, material degradation in sodium environments and effects of neutron irradiation for both base metals and weld metals. An assessment of modified versions of Type 316 SS, i.e. Type 316LN and its Japanese version, 316FR, was conducted to provide a perspective for codification of 316LN or 316FR in Subsection NH. Current status and data availability of four new advanced alloys, i.e. NF616, NF616+TMT, NF709, and HT-UPS, are also addressed to identify the R&D needs for their code qualification for ARR applications. For both conventional and new alloys, issues related to high temperature design methodology are described to address the needs for improvements for the ARR design and licensing. Assessments have shown that there are significant data gaps for the full qualification and licensing of the ARR structural materials. Development and evaluation of

  6. Materials Modification Under Ion Irradiation: JANNUS Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serruys, Y.; Trocellier, P.; Ruault, M.-O.; Henry, S.; Kaietasov, O.; Trouslard, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nano-Science and Nuclear Simulation) is a project designed to study the modification of materials using multiple ion beams and in-situ TEM observation. It will be a unique facility in Europe for the study of irradiation effects, the simulation of material damage due to irradiation and in particular of combined effects. The project is also intended to bring together experimental and modelling teams for a mutual fertilisation of their activities. It will also contribute to the teaching of particle-matter interactions and their applications. JANNUS will be composed of three accelerators with a common experimental chamber and of two accelerators coupled to a 200 kV TEM

  7. The LIONS code (version 1.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, P.

    1993-01-01

    The new LIONS code (Lancement d'IONS or Ion Launching), a dynamical code implemented in the SPIRaL project for the CIME cyclotron studies, is presented. The various software involves a 3D magnetostatic code, 2D or 3D electrostatic codes for generation of realistic field maps, and several dynamical codes for studying the behaviour of the reference particle from the cyclotron center up to the ejection and for launching particles packets complying with given correlations. Its interactions with the other codes are described. The LIONS code, written in Fortran 90 is already used in studying the CIME cyclotron, from the center to the ejection. It is designed to be used, with minor modifications, in other contexts such as for the simulation of mass spectrometer facilities

  8. Recent Developments in the Code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2018-01-01

    The code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was developed to simulate detailed stochastic radiation track structures of ions of different types and energies. Many new capabilities were added to the code during the recent years. Several options were added to specify the times at which the tracks appear in the irradiated volume, allowing the simulation of dose-rate effects. The code has been used to simulate energy deposition in several targets: spherical, ellipsoidal and cylindrical. More recently, density changes as well as a spherical shell were implemented for spherical targets, in order to simulate energy deposition in walled tissue equivalent proportional counters. RITRACKS is used as a part of the new program BDSTracks (Biological Damage by Stochastic Tracks) to simulate several types of chromosome aberrations in various irradiation conditions. The simulation of damage to various DNA structures (linear and chromatin fiber) by direct and indirect effects has been improved and is ongoing. Many improvements were also made to the graphic user interface (GUI), including the addition of several labels allowing changes of units. A new GUI has been added to display the electron ejection vectors. The parallel calculation capabilities, notably the pre- and post-simulation processing on Windows and Linux machines have been reviewed to make them more portable between different systems. The calculation part is currently maintained in an Atlassian Stash® repository for code tracking and possibly future collaboration.

  9. Report of the 1991 workshop on particle-material interactions for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Annual Workshop on Particle-Material Interactions in the Working Group of the Research Committee on A and M Data was held at the head-quarters of JAERI, Tokyo, on December 12-13, 1991. The purpose of the Workshop was to obtain future prospects for the activities of the Working Group, by discussing current states and problems in the research on particle-material interactions relevant to the thermocontrolled fusion. The present report contains 16 papers presented at the Workshop, which are mainly concerned with plasma-facing materials in ITER, radiation damage in carbon materials, trapping, emission and permeation of hydrogen in metals, and heavy ion-solid surface interactions. (author)

  10. LATTICE: an interactive lattice computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.

    1976-10-01

    LATTICE is a computer code which enables an interactive user to calculate the functions of a synchrotron lattice. This program satisfies the requirements at LBL for a simple interactive lattice program by borrowing ideas from both TRANSPORT and SYNCH. A fitting routine is included

  11. Ion beam analysis and modern materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Leonard C.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Modern research has provided the means of creating materials structures controlled at the atomic scale. Familiar examples include the formation of hetero-structures grown with atomic precision, nanostructures with designed electronic properties and new organic structures employing the richness of organic chemistry. The current forefront of such materials research includes the creation of new materials for energy and electronics applications. The electron transport properties of these diverse materials, and hence their performance, is invariably linked by the basic interactions at the interface. Interfaces are the critical component, and least understood aspect, of almost all such materials-based structures. Ion beam analysis, and its role in interfacial definition, will be described in the context of a number of such forefront projects underway at the Rutgers Institute for Advanced Materials, Devices and Nanotechnology (IAMDN). These include: 1) quantitative analysis of self-assembled monolayers on organic single crystals resulting in enhanced surface mobility and more effective organic field effect transistors, 2) monolayer scale interfacial analysis of complex oxide hetero-structures to elucidate the properties of the enhanced two-dimensional electron mobility and 3) characterization of the semiconductor- dielectric interface in the SiC/SiO2 system, with application for energy efficient power transmission. Despite extraordinary advances in synthesis, interface properties continue as an uncontrolled region of hetero-materials formation. Their understanding requires the detailed analysis of a complement of tools including ion beam analysis. Fellow Researchers: R. A. Bartynski, L.C.Feldman, E. Garfunkel, T. Gustafsson, H.D. Lee, D. Mastrogiovanni, V. Podzorov, L. S. Wielunski, J. R. Williams(Auburn), G. Liu, J. Williams, S. Dhar. (author)

  12. Dynamic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) uses a continuous, focused beam of primary ions to remove material from the surface of a sample by sputtering. The fraction of sputtered material that is ionized is extracted Identifies all elements or isotopes present in a material, from hydrogen to uranium. Different primary-ion

  13. Direct G-code manipulation for 3D material weaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, S.; Tanaka, H.

    2017-04-01

    The process of conventional 3D printing begins by first build a 3D model, then convert to the model to G-code via a slicer software, feed the G-code to the printer, and finally start the printing. The most simple and popular 3D printing technique is Fused Deposition Modeling. However, in this method, the printing path that the printer head can take is restricted by the G-code. Therefore the printed 3D models with complex pattern have structural errors like holes or gaps between the printed material lines. In addition, the structural density and the material's position of the printed model are difficult to control. We realized the G-code editing, Fabrix, for making a more precise and functional printed model with both single and multiple material. The models with different stiffness are fabricated by the controlling the printing density of the filament materials with our method. In addition, the multi-material 3D printing has a possibility to expand the physical properties by the material combination and its G-code editing. These results show the new printing method to provide more creative and functional 3D printing techniques.

  14. A full wave code for ion cyclotron waves in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1996-02-01

    The code TORIC solves the finite Larmor radius wave equations in the ion cyclotron frequency range in arbitrary axisymmetric toroidal geometry. The model used describes the compressional and torsional Alfven waves (or, depending on the parallel phase velocity, the kinetic counterpart of the latter), and ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion near the first ion cyclotron harmonic. In the ion response the broadening of the absorption regions due to the finite width of the cyclotron resonance of individual ions in toroidal geometry is taken into account. The parallel component of the wave electric field is evaluated on the same footing as the transverse ones; the response of the electrons includes Landau damping, Transit Time damping and the mixed term. The numerical approach uses a spectral representation of the solution in the poloidal angle θ, and cubic finite elements in the radial variable ψ. Great flexibility is provided in the way ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion are damped when their wavelength becomes comparable with the ion Larmor radius, in the regularization of Alfven resonances, and in the treatment of the outer plasma layers. As an option, we have also implemented the Order Reduction Algorithm, which provides a particularly fast, yet accurate evaluation of the power deposition profiles in toroidal geometry. Thee present report describes the model and its numerical implementation, and provides the information needed to use the code. A few examples illustrating applications of TORIC are also included. (orig.)

  15. Electron-deficient anthraquinone derivatives as cathodic material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Taniki, Ryosuke; Masuda, Asuna; Honma, Itaru; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-10-01

    We studied the electronic and structural properties of electron-deficient anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives, Me4N4AQ and TCNAQ, and investigated their charge-discharge properties in lithium ion batteries along with those of AQ. Cyclic voltammogram, X-ray structure analysis and theoretical calculations revealed that these three acceptors have different features, such as different electron-accepting properties with different reduction processes and lithium coordination abilities, and different packing arrangements with different intermolecular interactions. These differences greatly affect the charge-discharge properties of lithium ion batteries that use these compounds as cathode materials. Among these compounds, Me4N4AQ showed a high charge/discharge voltage (2.9-2.5 V) with high cyclability (>65% of the theoretical capacity after 30 cycles; no decrease after 15 cycles). These results provide insight into more in-depth design principles for lithium ion batteries using AQ derivatives as cathodic materials.

  16. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  17. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  18. New scope covered by PHITS. Particle and heavy ion transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Niita, Koji; Iwase, Hiroshi; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    PHITS is a general high energy transport calculation code from hadron to heavy ions, which embedded in NMTC-JAM with JQMD code. Outline of PHITS and many application examples are stated. PHITS has been used by the shielding calculations of J-PARC, GSI, RIA and Big-RIPS and the good results were reported. The evaluation of exposure dose of astronauts, airmen, proton and heavy ion therapy, and estimation of error frequency of semiconductor software are explained as the application examples. Relation between the event generator and Monte Carlo method and the future are described. (S.Y.)

  19. A model for the build-up of disordered material in ion bombarded Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    A new model based on experimental observation is developed for the build-up of disordered material in ion bombarded silicon. The model assumes that disordered zones are created in a background of migrating point defects, these zones then act as neutral sinks for such defects which interact with the zones and cause recrystallization. A simple steady state rate theory is developed to describe the build-up of disordered material with ion dose as a function of temperature. In general the theory predicts two distinct behaviour patterns depending on the temperature and the ion mass, namely a linear build-up with dose to complete disorder for heavy bombarding ions and a build-up to saturation at a relatively low level for light ions such as protons. However, in some special circumstances a transition region is predicted where the build-up of disorder approximately follows a (dose)sup(1/2) relationship before reverting to a linear behaviour at high dose. (author)

  20. Early time interaction of lithium ions with the solar wind in the AMPTE mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Goodrich, C.C.; Mankofsky, A.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1986-01-01

    The early time interaction of an artificially injected lithium cloud with the solar wind is simulated with a one-dimensional hybrid code. Simulation results indicate that the lithium cloud presents an obstacle to the solar wind flow, forming a shock-like interaction region. Several notable features are found: (1) The magnetic field is enhanced up to a factor of about 6 followed by a magnetic cavity downstream. (2) Solar wind ions are slowed down inside the lithium cloud, with substantial upstream reflection. (3) Most of the lithium ions gradually pick up the velocity of the solar wind and move downstream. (4) Intense and short-wavelength electric fields exist ahead of the interaction region. (5) Strong electron heating occurs within the lithium clouds. (6) The convection electric field in the in the solar wind is modulated in the interaction region. The simulation results are in remarkable agreement with in situ spacecraft measurements made during lithium releases in the solar wind by the AMPTE (Active magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers) Program

  1. Interactive QR code beautification with full background image embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lijian; Wu, Song; Liu, Sijiang; Jiang, Bo

    2017-06-01

    QR (Quick Response) code is a kind of two dimensional barcode that was first developed in automotive industry. Nowadays, QR code has been widely used in commercial applications like product promotion, mobile payment, product information management, etc. Traditional QR codes in accordance with the international standard are reliable and fast to decode, but are lack of aesthetic appearance to demonstrate visual information to customers. In this work, we present a novel interactive method to generate aesthetic QR code. By given information to be encoded and an image to be decorated as full QR code background, our method accepts interactive user's strokes as hints to remove undesired parts of QR code modules based on the support of QR code error correction mechanism and background color thresholds. Compared to previous approaches, our method follows the intention of the QR code designer, thus can achieve more user pleasant result, while keeping high machine readability.

  2. Nanocomposite anode materials for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Kim Il, Tae; Allcorn, Eric

    2016-06-14

    The disclosure relates to an anode material for a sodium-ion battery having the general formula AO.sub.x--C or AC.sub.x--C, where A is aluminum (Al), magnesium (Mg), titanium (Ti), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), zirconium (Zr), molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), niobium (Nb), tantalum (Ta), silicon (Si), or any combinations thereof. The anode material also contains an electrochemically active nanoparticles within the matrix. The nanoparticle may react with sodium ion (Na.sup.+) when placed in the anode of a sodium-ion battery. In more specific embodiments, the anode material may have the general formula M.sub.ySb-M'O.sub.x--C, Sb-MO.sub.x--C, M.sub.ySn-M'C.sub.x--C, or Sn-MC.sub.x--C. The disclosure also relates to rechargeable sodium-ion batteries containing these materials and methods of making these materials.

  3. Polyanion-Type Electrode Materials for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qiao; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Sodium-ion batteries, representative members of the post-lithium-battery club, are very attractive and promising for large-scale energy storage applications. The increasing technological improvements in sodium-ion batteries (Na-ion batteries) are being driven by the demand for Na-based electrode materials that are resource-abundant, cost-effective, and long lasting. Polyanion-type compounds are among the most promising electrode materials for Na-ion batteries due to their stability, safety, and suitable operating voltages. The most representative polyanion-type electrode materials are Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 and NaTi 2 (PO 4 ) 3 for Na-based cathode and anode materials, respectively. Both show superior electrochemical properties and attractive prospects in terms of their development and application in Na-ion batteries. Carbonophosphate Na 3 MnCO 3 PO 4 and amorphous FePO 4 have also recently emerged and are contributing to further developing the research scope of polyanion-type Na-ion batteries. However, the typical low conductivity and relatively low capacity performance of such materials still restrict their development. This paper presents a brief review of the research progress of polyanion-type electrode materials for Na-ion batteries, summarizing recent accomplishments, highlighting emerging strategies, and discussing the remaining challenges of such systems.

  4. Polyanion‐Type Electrode Materials for Sodium‐Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qiao; Wu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Sodium‐ion batteries, representative members of the post‐lithium‐battery club, are very attractive and promising for large‐scale energy storage applications. The increasing technological improvements in sodium‐ion batteries (Na‐ion batteries) are being driven by the demand for Na‐based electrode materials that are resource‐abundant, cost‐effective, and long lasting. Polyanion‐type compounds are among the most promising electrode materials for Na‐ion batteries due to their stability, safety, and suitable operating voltages. The most representative polyanion‐type electrode materials are Na3V2(PO4)3 and NaTi2(PO4)3 for Na‐based cathode and anode materials, respectively. Both show superior electrochemical properties and attractive prospects in terms of their development and application in Na‐ion batteries. Carbonophosphate Na3MnCO3PO4 and amorphous FePO4 have also recently emerged and are contributing to further developing the research scope of polyanion‐type Na‐ion batteries. However, the typical low conductivity and relatively low capacity performance of such materials still restrict their development. This paper presents a brief review of the research progress of polyanion‐type electrode materials for Na‐ion batteries, summarizing recent accomplishments, highlighting emerging strategies, and discussing the remaining challenges of such systems. PMID:28331782

  5. Materials science education: ion beam modification and analysis of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Robert; Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2012-08-01

    The Center for Irradiation of Materials (CIM) at Alabama A&M University (http://cim.aamu.edu) was established in 1990 to serve the University in its research, education and services to the need of the local community and industry. CIM irradiation capabilities are oriented around two tandem-type ion accelerators with seven beam lines providing high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, MeV focus ion beam, high-energy ion implantation and irradiation damage studies, particle-induced X-ray emission, particle-induced gamma emission and ion-induced nuclear reaction analysis in addition to fully automated ion channeling. One of the two tandem ion accelerators is designed to produce high-flux ion beam for MeV ion implantation and ion irradiation damage studies. The facility is well equipped with a variety of surface analysis systems, such as SEM, ESCA, as well as scanning micro-Raman analysis, UV-VIS Spectrometry, luminescence spectroscopy, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, IV/CV systems, mechanical test systems, AFM, FTIR, voltammetry analysis as well as low-energy implanters, ion beam-assisted deposition and MBE systems. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how the facility is used in material science education, as well as providing services to university, government and industry researches.

  6. Basic atomic interactions of accelerated heavy ions in matter atomic interactions of heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstikhina, Inga; Winckler, Nicolas; Shevelko, Viacheslav

    2018-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the recent experimental and theoretical results on interactions of heavy ions with gaseous, solid and plasma targets from the perspective of atomic physics. The topics discussed comprise stopping power, multiple-electron loss and capture processes, equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state fractions in penetration of fast ion beams through matter including relativistic domain. It also addresses mean charge-states and equilibrium target thickness in ion-beam penetrations, isotope effects in low-energy electron capture, lifetimes of heavy ion beams, semi-empirical formulae for effective cross sections. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students working in atomic, plasma and accelerator physics.

  7. Dose distribution around ion track in tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the energy deposition micro-specialty of ions in body-tissue or tissue equivalent material (TEM). Methods: The water vapor was determined as the tissue equivalent material, based on the analysis to the body-tissue, and Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the behavior of proton in the tissue equivalent material. Some features of the energy deposition micro-specialty of ion in tissue equivalent material were obtained through the analysis to the data from calculation. Results: The ion will give the energy by the way of excitation and ionization in material, then the secondary electrons will be generated in the progress of ionization, these electron will finished ions energy deposition progress. When ions deposited their energy, large amount energy will be in the core of tracks, and secondary electrons will devote its' energy around ion track, the ion dose distribution is then formed in TEM. Conclusions: To know biological effects of radiation , the research to dose distribution of ions is of importance(significance). (authors)

  8. Interaction of low-energy highly charged ions with matter; Wechselwirkung niederenergetischer hochgeladener Ionen mit Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzel, Rainer

    2010-06-09

    The thesis presented herein deals with experimental studies of the interaction between highly charged ions and neutral matter at low collision energies. The energy range investigated is of great interest for the understanding of both charge exchange reactions between ions comprising the solar wind and various astrophysical gases, as well as the creation of near-surface nanostructures. Over the course of this thesis an experimental setup was constructed, capable of reducing the kinetic energy of incoming ions by two orders of magnitude and finally focussing the decelerated ion beam onto a solid or gaseous target. A coincidence method was employed for the simultaneous detection of photons emitted during the charge exchange process together with the corresponding projectile ions. In this manner, it was possible to separate reaction channels, whose superposition presumably propagated large uncertainties and systematic errors in previous measurements. This work has unveiled unexpectedly strong contributions of slow radiative decay channels and clear evidence of previously only postulated decay processes in charge exchange-induced X-ray spectra. (orig.)

  9. Features of RAPTA-SFD code modelling of chemical interactions of basic materials of the WWER active zone in accident conditions with severe fuel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Sokolov, N.B.; Salatov, A.V.; Nechaeva, O.A.; Andreyeva-Andrievskaya, L.N.; Vlasov, F.Yu.

    1996-01-01

    A brief description of RAPTA-SFD code intended for computer simulations of WWER-type fuel elements (simulator or absorber element) in conditions of accident with severe damage of fuel. Presented are models of chemical interactions of basic materials of the active zone, emphasized are special feature of their application in carrying out of the CORA-W2 experiment within the framework of International Standard Problem ISP-36. Results obtained confirm expediency of phenomenological models application. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  10. Nonelastic nuclear reactions induced by light ions with the BRIEFF code

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, H

    2010-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade (INC) code BRIC has been extended to compute nonelastic reactions induced by light ions on target nuclei. In our approach the nucleons of the incident light ion move freely inside the mean potential of the ion in its center-of-mass frame while the center-of-mass of the ion obeys to equations of motion dependant on the mean nuclear+Coulomb potential of the target nucleus. After transformation of the positions and momenta of the nucleons of the ion into the target nucleus frame, the collision term between the nucleons of the target and of the ion is computed taking into account the partial or total breakup of the ion. For reactions induced by low binding energy systems like deuteron, the Coulomb breakup of the ion at the surface of the target nucleus is an important feature. Preliminary results of nucleon production in light ion induced reactions are presented and discussed.

  11. The role of the ion-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions in the formation of the two-ion average force interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ajrian, E A; Sidorenko, S N

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion-molecule and intermolecular interactions on the formation of inter-ion average force potentials is investigated within the framework of a classical ion-dipole model of electrolyte solutions. These potentials are shown to possess the Coulomb asymptotics at large distances while in the region of mean distances they reveal creation and disintegration of solvent-shared ion pairs. The calculation results provide a qualitatively authentic physical picture which is experimentally observed in strong electrolytes solutions. In particular, an increased interaction between an ion and a molecule enhances formation of ion pairs in which the ions are separated by one solvent molecule

  12. C60 ion sputtering of layered organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shard, Alexander G.; Green, Felicia M.; Gilmore, Ian S.

    2008-01-01

    Two different organic materials, Irganox1010 and Irganox3114, were vacuum deposited as alternating layers. The layers of Irganox3114 were thin (∼2.5 nm) in comparison to the Irganox1010 (∼55 or ∼90 nm); we call these 'organic delta layers'. Both materials are shown to have identical sputtering yields and the alternating layers may be used to determine some of the important metrological parameters for cluster ion beam depth profiling of organic materials. The sputtering yield for C 60 ions is shown to diminish with ion dose. Comparison with atomic force microscopy data from films of pure Irganox1010, demonstrates that the depth resolution is limited by the development of topography. Secondary ion intensities are a well-behaved function of sputtering yield and may be employed to obtain useful analytical information. Organic delta layers are shown to be valuable reference materials for comparing the capabilities of different cluster ion sources and experimental arrangements for the depth profiling of organic materials.

  13. Verbal-spatial and visuospatial coding of power-space interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiang; Zhu, Lei

    2018-05-10

    A power-space interaction, which denotes the phenomenon that people responded faster to powerful words when they are placed higher in a visual field and faster to powerless words when they are placed lower in a visual field, has been repeatedly found. The dominant explanation of this power-space interaction is that it results from a tight correspondence between the representation of power and visual space (i.e., a visuospatial coding account). In the present study, we demonstrated that the interaction between power and space could be also based on a verbal-spatial coding in absence of any vertical spatial information. Additionally, the verbal-spatial coding was dominant in driving the power-space interaction when verbal space was contrasted with the visual space. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Volume 6 of the supplement ''atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion'' to the journal ''Nuclear Fusion'' includes critical assessments and results of original experimental and theoretical studies on inelastic collision processes among the basic and dominant impurity constituents of fusion plasmas. Processes considered in the 15 papers constituting this volume are: electron impact excitation of excited Helium atoms, electron impact excitation and ionization of plasma impurity ions and atoms, electron-impurity-ion recombination and excitation, ionization and electron capture in collisions of plasma protons and impurity ions with the main fusion plasma neutral components helium and atomic and molecular hydrogen. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Benchmarking Heavy Ion Transport Codes FLUKA, HETC-HEDS MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronningen, Reginald Martin [Michigan State University; Remec, Igor [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Heilbronn, Lawrence H. [University of Tennessee-Knoxville

    2013-06-07

    Powerful accelerators such as spallation neutron sources, muon-collider/neutrino facilities, and rare isotope beam facilities must be designed with the consideration that they handle the beam power reliably and safely, and they must be optimized to yield maximum performance relative to their design requirements. The simulation codes used for design purposes must produce reliable results. If not, component and facility designs can become costly, have limited lifetime and usefulness, and could even be unsafe. The objective of this proposal is to assess the performance of the currently available codes PHITS, FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and HETC-HEDS that could be used for design simulations involving heavy ion transport. We plan to access their performance by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data of benchmark quality. Quantitative knowledge of the biases and the uncertainties of the simulations is essential as this potentially impacts the safe, reliable and cost effective design of any future radioactive ion beam facility. Further benchmarking of heavy-ion transport codes was one of the actions recommended in the Report of the 2003 RIA R&D Workshop".

  16. Construction of ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Kenziro; Ohtsuka, Hidewo; Yamada, Rayji; Abe, Tetsuya; Sone, Kazuho

    1977-09-01

    A Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research was installed at Plasma Engineering Laboratory, Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research, JAERI, in March 1977. Its maximum accelerating voltage is 400 kV. The accelerator has some outstanding features compared with the conventional type. Described are setup of the accelerator specification of the major components, safety system and performance. (auth.)

  17. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-01-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand

  18. ICAN Computer Code Adapted for Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been involved in developing composite micromechanics and macromechanics theories over the last three decades. These activities have resulted in several composite mechanics theories and structural analysis codes whose applications range from material behavior design and analysis to structural component response. One of these computer codes, the Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN), is designed primarily to address issues related to designing polymer matrix composites and predicting their properties - including hygral, thermal, and mechanical load effects. Recently, under a cost-sharing cooperative agreement with a Fortune 500 corporation, Master Builders Inc., ICAN was adapted to analyze building materials. The high costs and technical difficulties involved with the fabrication of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites sometimes limit their use. Particulate-reinforced composites can be thought of as a viable alternative. They are as easily processed to near-net shape as monolithic materials, yet have the improved stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness that is characteristic of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. For example, particlereinforced metal-matrix composites show great potential for a variety of automotive applications, such as disk brake rotors, connecting rods, cylinder liners, and other hightemperature applications. Building materials, such as concrete, can be thought of as one of the oldest materials in this category of multiphase, particle-reinforced materials. The adaptation of ICAN to analyze particle-reinforced composite materials involved the development of new micromechanics-based theories. A derivative of the ICAN code, ICAN/PART, was developed and delivered to Master Builders Inc. as a part of the cooperative activity.

  19. Phosphate Framework Electrode Materials for Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yongjin; Zhang, Jiexin; Xiao, Lifen; Ai, Xinping; Cao, Yuliang; Yang, Hanxi

    2017-05-01

    Sodium ion batteries (SIBs) have been considered as a promising alternative for the next generation of electric storage systems due to their similar electrochemistry to Li-ion batteries and the low cost of sodium resources. Exploring appropriate electrode materials with decent electrochemical performance is the key issue for development of sodium ion batteries. Due to the high structural stability, facile reaction mechanism and rich structural diversity, phosphate framework materials have attracted increasing attention as promising electrode materials for sodium ion batteries. Herein, we review the latest advances and progresses in the exploration of phosphate framework materials especially related to single-phosphates, pyrophosphates and mixed-phosphates. We provide the detailed and comprehensive understanding of structure-composition-performance relationship of materials and try to show the advantages and disadvantages of the materials for use in SIBs. In addition, some new perspectives about phosphate framework materials for SIBs are also discussed. Phosphate framework materials will be a competitive and attractive choice for use as electrodes in the next-generation of energy storage devices.

  20. An extended formula for the energy spectrum of sputtered atoms from a material irradiated by light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, T.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamura, Y.; Kawamura, T.; Kenmotsu, T.

    2004-10-01

    We extend a formula proposed by Kenmotsu et al. (hereafter Paper I), which fits with the energy spectrum of atoms sputtered from a heavy material hit by low-energy light ions (H + , D + , T + , He + ) by taking into account an inelastic energy loss neglected in Paper I. We assume that primary knock-on atoms produced by ions backscattered at large angles do not lose energy while penetrating the material up to the surface, instead of the energy-loss model used in Paper I. The extended formula is expressed in terms of a normalized energy-distribution function and is compared with the data calculated with the ACAT code for 50 eV, 100 eV and 1 keV D + ions impinging on a Fe target. Our formula fits well with the data in a wide range of incident energy. (author)

  1. Ion beam profiling from the interaction with a freestanding 2D layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Shorubalko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a great potential of the focused ion beam (FIB technology for the nanometer-scale patterning of a freestanding two-dimensional (2D layer. Experimentally determined sputtering yields of the perforation process can be quantitatively explained using the binary collision theory. The main peculiarity of the interaction between the ion beams and the suspended 2D material lies in the absence of collision cascades, featured by no interaction volume. Thus, the patterning resolution is directly set by the beam diameters. Here, we demonstrate pattern resolution beyond the beam size and precise profiling of the focused ion beams. We find out that FIB exposure time of individual pixels can influence the resultant pore diameter. In return, the pore dimension as a function of the exposure dose brings out the ion beam profiles. Using this method of determining an ion-beam point spread function, we verify a Gaussian profile of focused gallium ion beams. Graphene sputtering yield is extracted from the normalization of the measured Gaussian profiles, given a total beam current. Interestingly, profiling of unbeknown helium ion beams in this way results in asymmetry of the profile. Even triangular beam shapes are observed at certain helium FIB conditions, possibly attributable to the trimer nature of the beam source. Our method of profiling ion beams with 2D-layer perforation provides more information on ion beam profiles than the conventional sharp-edge scan method does.

  2. A computer code 'BEAM' for the ion optics calculation of the JAERI tandem accelerator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shiroh; Takeuchi, Suehiro

    1987-11-01

    The computer code BEAM is described, together with an outline of the formalism used for the ion optics calculation. The purpose of the code is to obtain the optimum parameters of devices, with which the ion beam is transported through the system without losses. The procedures of the calculation, especially those of searching for the parameters of quadrupole lenses, are discussed in detail. The flow of the code is illustrated as a whole and its constituent subroutines are explained individually. A few resultant beam trajectories and the parameters used to obtain them are shown as examples. (author)

  3. BREIT code: Analytical solution of the balance rate equations for charge-state evolutions of heavy-ion beams in matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winckler, N., E-mail: n.winckler@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Rybalchenko, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shevelko, V.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Al-Turany, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Kollegger, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Stöhlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institute Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    A detailed description of a recently developed BREIT computer code (Balance Rate Equations of Ion Transportation) for calculating charge-state fractions of ion beams passing through matter is presented. The code is based on the analytical solutions of the differential balance equations for the charge-state fractions as a function of the target thickness and can be used for calculating the ion evolutions in gaseous, solid and plasma targets. The BREIT code is available on-line and requires the charge-changing cross sections and initial conditions in the input file. The eigenvalue decomposition method, applied to obtain the analytical solutions of the rate equations, is described in the paper. Calculations of non-equilibrium and equilibrium charge-state fractions, performed by the BREIT code, are compared with experimental data and results of other codes for ion beams in gaseous and solid targets. Ability and limitations of the BREIT code are discussed in detail.

  4. Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. V. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2014-03-01

    A wide variety of atomic, molecular, radiative and plasma-wall interaction processes involving a mixture of atoms, ions and molecules occur in the plasmas produced in nuclear fusion experiments. In the low temperature divertor and near wall region, molecules and molecular ions are formed. The plasma particles react with electrons and with each other. Plasma modelling requires cross-sections and rate coefficients for all these processes, and in addition spectral signatures to support interpretation of data from fusion experiments. The mission of the International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Data Section (IAEA/NDS) in the area of atomic and molecular data is to enhance the competencies of Member States in their research into nuclear fusion through the provision of internationally recommended atomic, molecular, plasma-material interaction and material properties databases. One mechanism by which the IAEA pursues this mission is the Coordinated Research Project (CRP). The present volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion contains contributions from participants in the CRP 'Atomic and Molecular Data for Plasma Modelling' (2004-2008). This CRP was concerned with data for processes in the near wall and divertor plasma and plasma-wall interaction in fusion experiments, with focus on cross-sections for molecular reactions. Participants in the CRP came from 14 different institutes, many with strong ties to fusion plasma modelling and experiment. D. Humbert of the Nuclear Data Section was scientific secretary of the CRP. Participants' contributions for this volume were collected and refereed after the conclusion of the CRP

  5. Selective layer-free blood serum ionogram based on ion-specific interactions with a nanotransistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumarasamy, R.; Hartkamp, R.; Siboulet, B.; Dufrêche, J.-F.; Nishiguchi, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Clément, N.

    2018-05-01

    Despite being ubiquitous in the fields of chemistry and biology, the ion-specific effects of electrolytes pose major challenges for researchers. A lack of understanding about ion-specific surface interactions has hampered the development and application of materials for (bio-)chemical sensor applications. Here, we show that scaling a silicon nanotransistor sensor down to 25 nm provides a unique opportunity to understand and exploit ion-specific surface interactions, yielding a surface that is highly sensitive to cations and inert to pH. The unprecedented sensitivity of these devices to Na+ and divalent ions can be attributed to an overscreening effect via molecular dynamics. The surface potential of multi-ion solutions is well described by the sum of the electrochemical potentials of each cation, enabling selective measurements of a target ion concentration without requiring a selective organic layer. We use these features to construct a blood serum ionogram for Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, in an important step towards the development of a versatile, durable and mobile chemical or blood diagnostic tool.

  6. Additional extensions to the NASCAP computer code, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, M. J.; Cooke, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The ION computer code is designed to calculate charge exchange ion densities, electric potentials, plasma temperatures, and current densities external to a neutralized ion engine in R-Z geometry. The present version assumes the beam ion current and density to be known and specified, and the neutralizing electrons to originate from a hot-wire ring surrounding the beam orifice. The plasma is treated as being resistive, with an electron relaxation time comparable to the plasma frequency. Together with the thermal and electrical boundary conditions described below and other straightforward engine parameters, these assumptions suffice to determine the required quantities. The ION code, written in ASCII FORTRAN for UNIVAC 1100 series computers, is designed to be run interactively, although it can also be run in batch mode. The input is free-format, and the output is mainly graphical, using the machine-independent graphics developed for the NASCAP code. The executive routine calls the code's major subroutines in user-specified order, and the code allows great latitude for restart and parameter change.

  7. Electrode Materials for Lithium/Sodium-Ion Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of electrode materials for lithium/sodium ion batteries and their structural stability during lithium/sodium insertion/extraction are the two essential issues that have limited battery application in the fields requiring long cycle life and high safety. During her PhD studies, Yanbin...... Shen systematically investigated the controlled synthesis of electrode materials for lithium/sodium ion batteries. She also investigated their formation mechanisms and structural evolution during the operation of batteries using in situ/operando X-ray diffraction techniques. The research findings...... provide insights into formation mechanisms of Li4Ti5O12 anode material from both hydrothermal and solid-state reaction. The results also contribute to a thorough understanding of the intercalation and decay mechanisms of O3/P2 layered sodium cathode materials in sodium ion batteries....

  8. Fred: a GPU-accelerated fast-Monte Carlo code for rapid treatment plan recalculation in ion beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavi, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Pioli, S.; Mairani, A.; Magro, G.; Molinelli, S.; Ciocca, M.; Battistoni, G.; Patera, V.

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam therapy is a rapidly growing technique for tumor radiation therapy. Ions allow for a high dose deposition in the tumor region, while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. For this reason, the highest possible accuracy in the calculation of dose and its spatial distribution is required in treatment planning. On one hand, commonly used treatment planning software solutions adopt a simplified beam-body interaction model by remapping pre-calculated dose distributions into a 3D water-equivalent representation of the patient morphology. On the other hand, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, which explicitly take into account all the details in the interaction of particles with human tissues, are considered to be the most reliable tool to address the complexity of mixed field irradiation in a heterogeneous environment. However, full MC calculations are not routinely used in clinical practice because they typically demand substantial computational resources. Therefore MC simulations are usually only used to check treatment plans for a restricted number of difficult cases. The advent of general-purpose programming GPU cards prompted the development of trimmed-down MC-based dose engines which can significantly reduce the time needed to recalculate a treatment plan with respect to standard MC codes in CPU hardware. In this work, we report on the development of fred, a new MC simulation platform for treatment planning in ion beam therapy. The code can transport particles through a 3D voxel grid using a class II MC algorithm. Both primary and secondary particles are tracked and their energy deposition is scored along the trajectory. Effective models for particle-medium interaction have been implemented, balancing accuracy in dose deposition with computational cost. Currently, the most refined module is the transport of proton beams in water: single pencil beam dose-depth distributions obtained with fred agree with those produced by standard MC codes within 1-2% of the

  9. Ion-ion interaction and energy transfer of 4+ transuranium ions in cerium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, G.K.; Beitz, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamics of excited 5f electron states of the transuranium ions Cm 4+ and Bk 4+ in CeF 4 are compared. Based on time- and wavelength-resolved laser-induced fluorescence, excitation energy transfer processes have been probed. Depending on concentration and electronic energy level structure of the studied 4+ transuranium ion, the dominant energy transfer mechanisms were identified as cross relaxation, exciton-exciton annihilation, and trapping. Energy transfer rates derived from the fitting of the observed fluorescence decays to theoretical models, based on electric multipolar ion-ion interactions, are contrasted with prior studies of 4f states of 3+ lanthanide and 3d states of transition metal ions. 16 refs., 1 tab

  10. Oxide materials as positive electrodes of lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhonina, Elena V; Pervov, Vladislav S; Dubasova, Valeriya S

    2004-01-01

    The published data on oxide materials as positive electrodes for lithium-ion batteries are described systematically. The mechanisms of structural changes in cathode materials occurring during the operation of lithium-ion batteries and the problems concerned with their selection are discussed. Modern trends in optimising cathode materials and lithium-ion batteries on the whole are considered.

  11. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This issues of the Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion contains 9 papers on atomic and molecular processes in the edge region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas, including spectroscopic data for fusion edge plasmas; electron collision processes with plasma edge neutrals; electron-ion collisions in the plasma edge; cross-section data for collisions of electrons with hydrocarbon molecules; dissociative and energy transfer reactions involving vibrationally excited hydrogen or deuterium molecules; an assessment of ion-atom collision data for magnetic fusion plasma edge modeling; an extended scaling of cross sections for the ionization of atomic and molecular hydrogen as well as helium by multiply-charged ions; ion-molecule collision processes relevant to fusion edge plasmas; and radiative losses and electron cooling rates for carbon and oxygen plasma impurities. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Measurement of Charged Particle Interactions in Spacecraft and Planetary Habitat Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Cary J.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate models of health risks to astronauts on long-duration missions outside the geomagnetosphere will require a full understanding of the radiation environment inside a spacecraft or planetary habitat. This in turn requires detailed knowledge of the flux of incident particles and their propagation through matter, including the nuclear interactions of heavy ions that are a part of the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR). The most important ions are likely to be iron, silicon, oxygen, and carbon. Transport of heavy ions through complex shielding materials including self-shielding of tissue modifies the radiation field at points of interest (e.g., at the blood-forming organs). The incident flux is changed by two types of interactions: (1) ionization energy loss, which results in reduced particle velocity and higher LET (Linear Energy Transfer); and (2) nuclear interactions that fragment the incident nuclei into less massive ions. Ionization energy loss is well understood, nuclear interactions less so. Thus studies of nuclear fragmentation at GCR-like energies are needed to fill the large gaps that currently exist in the database. These can be done at only a few accelerator facilities where appropriate beams are available. Here we report results from experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan (HIMAC). Recent efforts have focused on extracting charge-changing and fragment production cross sections from silicon beams at 400, 600, and 1200 MeV/nucleon. Some energy dependence is observed in the fragment production cross sections, and as in other data sets the production of fragments with even charge numbers is enhanced relative to those with odd charge numbers. These data are compared to the NASA-LaRC model NUCFRG2. The charge-changing cross section data are compared to recent calculations using an improved model due to Tripathi, which accurately predicts the

  13. Review of multi-dimensional large-scale kinetic simulation and physics validation of ion acceleration in relativistic laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hui-Chun; Hegelich, B.M.; Fernandez, J.C.; Shah, R.C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Jung, D.; Yin, L.; Albright, B.J.; Bowers, K.; Kwan, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Two new experimental technologies enabled realization of Break-out afterburner (BOA) - High quality Trident laser and free-standing C nm-targets. VPIC is an powerful tool for fundamental research of relativistic laser-matter interaction. Predictions from VPIC are validated - Novel BOA and Solitary ion acceleration mechanisms. VPIC is a fully explicit Particle In Cell (PIC) code: models plasma as billions of macro-particles moving on a computational mesh. VPIC particle advance (which typically dominates computation) has been optimized extensively for many different supercomputers. Laser-driven ions lead to realization promising applications - Ion-based fast ignition; active interrogation, hadron therapy.

  14. Plasma-material interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma-interactive components must be resistant to erosion processes, efficient in heat removal, and effective in minimizing tritium inventory and permeation. As long as plasma edge temperatures are 50 eV, no one material can satisfy the diverse requirements imposed by these plasma materials interactions. The only solution is the design of duplex, or even more complicated, structures. The material that faces the plasma should be low atomic number, with acceptable erosion and evaporation characteristics. The substrate material must have high thermal conductivity for heat removal. Finally, materials must be selected judiciously for tritium compatibility. In conclusion, materials play a critical role in the achievement of safe and economical magnetic fusion energy. Improvements in materials have already led to many advances in present day device operation, but additional innovative materials solutions are required for the critical plasma materials interaction issues in future power reactors

  15. Electron and ion cyclotron heating calculations in the tandem-mirror modeling code MERTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    To better understand and predict tandem-mirror experiments, we are building a comprehensive Mirror Equilibrium Radial Transport and Heating (MERTH) code. In this paper we first describe our method for developing the code. Then we report our plans for the installation of physics packages for electron- and ion-cyclotron heating of the plasma

  16. Development of Monte Carlo input code for proton, alpha and heavy ion microdosimetric trac structure simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglass, M.; Bezak, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Radiobiology science is important for cancer treatment as it improves our understanding of radiation induced cell death. Monte Carlo simulations playa crucial role in developing improved knowledge of cellular processes. By model Ii ng the cell response to radiation damage and verifying with experimental data, understanding of cell death through direct radiation hits and bystander effects can be obtained. A Monte Carlo input code was developed using 'Geant4' to simulate cellular level radiation interactions. A physics list which enables physically accurate interactions of heavy ions to energies below 100 e V was implemented. A simple biological cell model was also implemented. Each cell consists of three concentric spheres representing the nucleus, cytoplasm and the membrane. This will enable all critical cell death channels to be investigated (i.e. membrane damage, nucleus/DNA). The current simulation has the ability to predict the positions of ionization events within the individual cell components on I micron scale. We have developed a Geant4 simulation for investigation of radiation damage to cells on sub-cellular scale (∼I micron). This code currently allows the positions of the ionisation events within the individual components of the cell enabling a more complete picture of cell death to be developed. The next stage will include expansion of the code to utilise non-regular cell lattice. (author)

  17. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800 0 C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm 2 ), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction

  18. Plasma Surface Interactions Common to Advanced Fusion Wall Materials and EUV Lithography - Lithium and Tin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Alman, D. A.; Jurczyk, B. E.; Stubbers, R.; Coventry, M. D.; Neumann, M. J.; Olczak, W.; Qiu, H.

    2004-09-01

    Advanced plasma facing components (PFCs) are needed to protect walls in future high power fusion devices. In the semiconductor industry, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources are needed for next generation lithography. Lithium and tin are candidate materials in both areas, with liquid Li and Sn plasma material interactions being critical. The Plasma Material Interaction Group at the University of Illinois is leveraging liquid metal experimental and computational facilities to benefit both fields. The Ion surface InterAction eXperiment (IIAX) has measured liquid Li and Sn sputtering, showing an enhancement in erosion with temperature for light ion bombardment. Surface Cleaning of Optics by Plasma Exposure (SCOPE) measures erosion and damage of EUV mirror samples, and tests cleaning recipes with a helicon plasma. The Flowing LIquid surface Retention Experiment (FLIRE) measures the He and H retention in flowing liquid metals, with retention coefficients varying between 0.001 at 500 eV to 0.01 at 4000 eV.

  19. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-01-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP( ) summary.html

  20. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for Red Phosphorous Based Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serving as conductive matrix and stress buffer, the carbon matrix plays a pivotal role in enabling red phosphorus to be a promising anode material for high capacity lithium ion batteries and sodium ion batteries. In this paper, nitrogen-doping is proved to effective enhance the interface interaction between carbon and red phosphorus. In detail, the adsorption energy between phosphorus atoms and oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbon is significantly reduced by nitrogen doping, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption mechanisms are further revealed on the basis of DFT (the first density functional theory calculations. The RPNC (red phosphorus/nitrogen-doped carbon composite material shows higher cycling stability and higher capacity than that of RPC (red phosphorus/carbon composite anode. After 100 cycles, the RPNC still keeps discharge capacity of 1453 mAh g−1 at the current density of 300 mA g−1 (the discharge capacity of RPC after 100 cycles is 1348 mAh g−1. Even at 1200 mA g−1, the RPNC composite still delivers a capacity of 1178 mAh g−1. This work provides insight information about the interface interactions between composite materials, as well as new technology develops high performance phosphorus based anode materials.

  1. Versatile computational capability for ion-solid interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    A two step calculating technique is used to determine the distribution of implanted ions in solids. First, the instantaneous ion depth distribution is determined at any given energy as the ions slow to a stop in the target material. Second, at each energy in the slowing-down process, the rate at which the ions deposit energy is determined

  2. H- ion production from different converter materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-10-01

    For heating plasmas and for current drive in some fusion reactors, high energy neutral beams may be required. The high neutralization efficiency of H - or D - ions makes them favorable to form neutral atoms with energies in excess of 160 keV. It has been shown that a steady-state H - ion beam with current greater than 1 A can be generated by a surface conversion type source with Mo being used as the converter material. In order to achieve the proper cesium coverage and thereby increasing the H - ion yield, the application of porous cesium-dispensing converters is being investigated. It is also possible to optimize the H - production by choosing the proper converter material. In this paper, we compare the negative ion yield generated by different materials (such as Mo, Ti, V, Nb, Pt, Pd, Rh, Cu, Ta, Al, Au, LaB 6 and stainless-steel) in the pure hydrogen and cesium-hydrogen modes of operation

  3. Simulating the performance of a distance-3 surface code in a linear ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Colin J.; Li, Muyuan; Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Wu, Yukai; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Duan, Luming; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the feasibility of implementing a small surface code with 9 data qubits and 8 ancilla qubits, commonly referred to as surface-17, using a linear chain of 171Yb+ ions. Two-qubit gates can be performed between any two ions in the chain with gate time increasing linearly with ion distance. Measurement of the ion state by fluorescence requires that the ancilla qubits be physically separated from the data qubits to avoid errors on the data due to scattered photons. We minimize the time required to measure one round of stabilizers by optimizing the mapping of the two-dimensional surface code to the linear chain of ions. We develop a physically motivated Pauli error model that allows for fast simulation and captures the key sources of noise in an ion trap quantum computer including gate imperfections and ion heating. Our simulations showed a consistent requirement of a two-qubit gate fidelity of ≥99.9% for the logical memory to have a better fidelity than physical two-qubit operations. Finally, we perform an analysis of the error subsets from the importance sampling method used to bound the logical error rates to gain insight into which error sources are particularly detrimental to error correction.

  4. submitter BREIT code: Analytical solution of the balance rate equations for charge-state evolutions of heavy-ion beams in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Winckler, N; Shevelko, V P; Al-Turany, M; Kollegger, T; Stöhlker, Th

    2017-01-01

    A detailed description of a recently developed BREIT computer code (Balance Rate Equations of Ion Transportation) for calculating charge-state fractions of ion beams passing through matter is presented. The code is based on the analytical solutions of the differential balance equations for the charge-state fractions as a function of the target thickness and can be used for calculating the ion evolutions in gaseous, solid and plasma targets. The BREIT code is available on-line and requires the charge-changing cross sections and initial conditions in the input file. The eigenvalue decomposition method, applied to obtain the analytical solutions of the rate equations, is described in the paper. Calculations of non-equilibrium and equilibrium charge-state fractions, performed by the BREIT code, are compared with experimental data and results of other codes for ion beams in gaseous and solid targets. Ability and limitations of the BREIT code are discussed in detail.

  5. Electronic excitation effects on secondary ion emission in highly charged ion-solid interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekioka, T.; Terasawa, M.; Mitamura, T.; Stoeckli, M.P.; Lehnert, U.; Fehrenbach, C.

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the secondary ion emission from the surface of conductive materials bombarded by highly charged heavy ions, we have done two types of experiments. First, we have measured the yield of the sputtered ions from the surface of solid targets of conductive materials (Al, Si, Ni, Cu) bombarded by Xe q+ (q=15-44) at 300 keV (v p =0.30 a.u) and at 1.0 MeV (v p =0.54 a.u). In view of the secondary ion yields as a function of the potential energy of the projectile, the increase rates below q=35, where the potential energy amounts to 25.5 keV, were rather moderate and showed a prominent increase above q=35. These phenomena were rather strong in the case of the metal targets. Second, we have measured the energy dependence of the yield of the sputtered ions from the surface of solid targets of conductive materials (C, Al) bombarded by Xe q+ (q=30,36,44) between 76 keV (v p =0.15 a.u) and 6.0 MeV (v p =1.3 a.u). A broad enhancement of the secondary ion yield has been found for Al target bombarded by Xe 44+ . From these experimental results, the electronic excitation effects in conductive materials for impact of slow highly charged heavy ions bearing high potential energy is discussed

  6. Implementation and verification of nuclear interactions in a Monte-Carlo code for the Procom-ProGam proton therapy planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuchenko, V.I.; Makarova, A.S.; Ryazantsev, O.B.; Samarin, S.I.; Uglov, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Proton interaction with an exposed object material needs to be modeled with account for three basic processes: electromagnetic stopping of protons in matter, multiple coulomb scattering and nuclear interactions. Just the last type of processes is the topic of this paper. Monte Carlo codes are often used to simulate high-energy particle interaction with matter. However, nuclear interaction models implemented in these codes are rather extensive and their use in treatment planning systems requires huge computational resources. We have selected the IThMC code for its ability to reproduce experiments which measure the distribution of the projected ranges of nuclear secondary particles generated by proton beams in a multi-layer Faraday cup. The multi-layer Faraday cup detectors measure charge rather than dose and allow distinguishing between electromagnetic and nuclear interactions. The event generator used in the IThMC code is faster, but less accurate than any other used in testing. Our model of nuclear reactions demonstrates quite good agreement with experiment in the context of their effect on the Bragg peak in therapeutic applications

  7. Multi-physics modeling of plasma-material interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Ane; Green, David; Canik, John; Younkin, Timothy; Blondel, Sophie; Wirth, Brian; Drobny, Jon; Curreli, Davide

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-material interactions (PMI) can degrade both plasma and material properties. Often, PMI modeling focuses on either the plasma or surface. Here, we present an integrated model with high-fidelity codes coupled within the IPS framework that self-consistently addresses PMI. The model includes, calculation of spatially resolved influx of plasma and impurities to the surface and their implantation; surface erosion and roughening; evolution of implanted species and sub-surface composition; and transport of eroded particles across the plasma and their re-deposition. The model is applied and successfully compared to dedicated PISCES linear device experiments, where a tungsten (W) target was exposed to helium (He) plasma. The present contribution will focus on the analysis of W erosion, He retention and sub-surface gas bubble and surface composition evolution, under the different He plasma conditions across the surface that are calculated by impurity transport modeling. Impact of code coupling, reflected as interplay between surface erosion, fuel / impurity implantation and retention, and evolution of target composition, as well as sensitivity of these processes to plasma exposure conditions is also analyzed in detail. This work is supported by the US DOE under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  8. Interaction of langmuir and ion acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Jae

    1991-01-01

    Interaction of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves in a plasma is described by Landau-Ginzburg type of equation when the group velocity of the Langmuir wave is equal to the wave velocity of ion acoustic wave. (Author)

  9. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  10. The use of low energy ion beams for the growth and processing of solid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, D.G.; Al-Bayati, A.H.; Gordon, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Low energy ion bombardment forms the basis of ion assisted etching and growth of materials in plasma and ion beam systems. The growing demands for low temperature, highly controlled processing has led a rapid increase in both the application of low energy beams and the study of the fundamental ion surface interactions involved. The growth in the practical applications of ion beams in the few eV to a few hundred eV range has presented new problems in the production and transport of ion beams and has led to the development of highly specialised, ultra-low energy systems. These technological developments, in conjunction with the improvements in understanding of fundamental processes have widened the range of applications of low energy beams. (author) 52 refs

  11. Ion - biomolecule interactions and radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlathoelter, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The biological effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not a mere result of the direct impact of high energy quanta of radiation. Secondary particles such as low energy electrons, radicals and (multiply charged) ions are formed within the track. The interaction of these secondary particles with biologically relevant molecules is responsible for a large fraction of biological radiation damage to a cell, as well. Singly and multiply charged ions can be of importance as both, primary and secondary particles, and are known to cause severe biological damage. For instance, in heavy ion therapy and proton therapy the pronounced Bragg peak of fast (typically a few 100 MeV/u) ions in biological tissue is utilized. The Bragg peak is located at a depth, where the ions (mostly C q+ or protons) are slowed down to about 100 keV/u and have their maximum linear energy transfer (LET) to the medium. This depth is reasonably well defined and depends on the initial ion kinetic energy. Since the ions are rapidly stopped in this energy range, penetration beyond the Bragg peak is weak and it is thus possible to 'scan' the Bragg peak through a malignant tumour without excessive damage of the surrounding tissue by mere variation of the ion kinetic energy (i.e. the penetration depth). Severe biological damage is almost only possible, when the track of a primary quantum of ionizing radiation crosses the nucleus of a cell. Particularly the induction of double strand breaks of DNA or clustered DNA lesions is potentially lethal or mutagenic. A primary particle interacting with individual molecules within this environment leads to molecular excitation, ionization and fragmentation. In the process, the primary particle looses energy and slow secondary electrons and ions are formed, which might induce further damage. For a deep understanding of biological radiation damage on the level of individual molecules it is thus important to quantify excitation, ionization and

  12. Primary Displacement Damage Calculation Induced by Neutron and Ion Using Binary Collision Approximation Techniques (Marlowe Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, F.; Ortiz, C. J.; Vila, R.

    2012-01-01

    Irradiation Experimental Area of TechnoFusion will emulate the extreme irradiation fusion conditions in materials by means of three ion accelerators: one used for self-implanting heavy ions (Fe, Si, C,...) to emulate the displacement damage induced by fusion neutrons and the other two for light ions (H and He) to emulate the transmutation induced by fusion neutrons. This Laboratory will play an essential role in the selection of functional materials for DEMO reactor since it will allow reproducing the effects of neutron radiation on fusion materials. Ion irradiation produces little or no residual radioactivity, allowing handling of samples without the need for special precautions. Currently, two different methods are used to calculate the primary displacement damage by neutron irradiation or by ion irradiation. On one hand, the displacement damage doses induced by neutrons are calculated considering the NRT model based on the electronic screening theory of Linhard. This methodology is commonly used since 1975. On the other hand, for experimental research community the SRIM code is commonly used to calculate the primary displacement damage dose induced by ion irradiation. Therefore, both methodologies of primary displacement damage calculation have nothing in common. However, if we want to design ion irradiation experiments capable to emulate the neutron fusion effect in materials, it is necessary to develop comparable methodologies of damage calculation for both kinds of radiation. It would allow us to define better the ion irradiation parameters (Ion, current, Ion energy, dose, etc) required to emulate a specific neutron irradiation environment. Therefore, our main objective was to find the way to calculate the primary displacement damage induced by neutron irradiation and by ion irradiation starting from the same point, that is, the PKA spectrum. In order to emulate the neutron irradiation that would prevail under fusion conditions, two approaches are contemplated: a) on

  13. Interaction of energetic ions with high-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gericke, D.O.; Edie, D.; Grinenko, A.; Vorberger, J.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The talk will review the importance of energetic ions in different inertial confinement fusion scenarios: i) heavy ion beams are very efficient drivers that can deliver the energy for compression in indirect as well as direct drive approaches; ii) the interaction of α-particles, that are created in a burning plasma, with the surrounding cold plasma is essential for creating a burn wave; iii) laser-produced ion beams are also a strong candidate to create the hot spot needed for fast ignition. In all applications the ions interact with dense matter that is characterized by strongly coupled ions and (possibly) partially degenerate electrons. Moreover, the coupling between beam ions and target electrons can be strong as well. Under these conditions, standard approaches for the beam-plasma interactions process are known to fail. The presentation will demonstrate how advanced models for the energy loss of ions in dense plasmas can resolve the issues mentioned above. These models are largely built on quantum kinetic theory that is able to describe degeneracy and strong coupling in a systematic way. In particular, strong interactions require a quantum description for electron-ion collisions in dense plasma environments, which is done by direct solutions of the Schroedinger equation. Degeneracy and collective excitations can be included via the Lenard-Balescu description where strong interactions may be included via a pseudo-potential approach. Finally, results are shown for all three fusion applications described above. The effects related to strong coupling and degeneracy mainly concern the end of the stopping range where the beam ion dose not have enough energy to excite all possible degrees of freedom and, thus, certain processes are frozen out. However, we also find a significant reduction of the range for swift heavy ions in the GeV-range when stopping in dense matter is considered. The stopping range of α-particles in the

  14. Nanostructured Materials for Li-Ion Batteries and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifei Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue “Nanostructured Materials for Li-Ion Batteries and Beyond” of Nanomaterials is focused on advancements in the synthesis, optimization, and characterization of nanostructured materials, with an emphasis on the application of nanomaterials for building high performance Li-ion batteries (LIBs and future systems.[...

  15. Cluster ion-surface interactions: from meV to MeV energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlund, Kai; Meinander, Kristoffer; Jaervi, Tommi T.; Peltola, Jarkko; Samela, Juha [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The nature of cluster ion-surface interactions changes dramatically with the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster species. In this talk I review some of our recent work on the nature of cluster-surface interactions spanning an energy range from a few MeV/cluster to about 1 MeV/cluster and cluster sizes in the range of 10 - 1000 atoms/cluster. In the energy range of a few MeV/cluster ion, the kinetic energy of the incoming ion is insignificant compared to the energy gained when the surface potential energy at the cluster-surface interface is released and partly translated into kinetic energy. Even in this energy regime I show that surprisingly drastic effects can occur. When the energy of the incoming cluster is raised to a few eV/atom, the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster starts to affect the deposition. It will cause the cluster to entirely reform on impact. When the energy is raised to the range of keV's/cluster, the clusters start to penetrate the sample, fairly similar to conventional ion implantation. However, in dense targets the cluster ions may stick close to each other long enough to cause a significant enhancement of the heat spike in the material. Finally, I show that at kinetic energies around 1 MeV/cluster the cluster enhancement of the heat spike may lead to dramatic surface effects.

  16. OCV Hysteresis in Li-Ion Batteries including Two-Phase Transition Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Roscher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between batteries' state of charge (SOC and open-circuit voltage (OCV is a specific feature of electrochemical energy storage devices. Especially NiMH batteries are well known to exhibit OCV hysteresis, and also several kinds of lithium-ion batteries show OCV hysteresis, which can be critical for reliable state estimation issues. Electrode potential hysteresis is known to result from thermodynamical entropic effects, mechanical stress, and microscopic distortions within the active electrode materials which perform a two-phase transition during lithium insertion/extraction. Hence, some Li-ion cells including two-phase transition active materials show pronounced hysteresis referring to their open-circuit voltage. This work points out how macroscopic effects, that is, diffusion limitations, superimpose the latte- mentioned microscopic mechanisms and lead to a shrinkage of OCV hysteresis, if cells are loaded with high current rates. To validate the mentioned interaction, Li-ion cells' state of charge is adjusted to 50% with various current rates, beginning from the fully charged and the discharged state, respectively. As a pronounced difference remains between the OCV after charge and discharge adjustment, obviously the hysteresis vanishes as the target SOC is adjusted with very high current rate.

  17. GRAVE: An Interactive Geometry Construction and Visualization Software System for the TORT Nuclear Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeman, E.D.

    2000-01-01

    A software system, GRAVE (Geometry Rendering and Visual Editor), has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform interactive visualization and development of models used as input to the TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional visualization displays are included. Display capabilities include image rotation, zoom, translation, wire-frame and translucent display, geometry cuts and slices, and display of individual component bodies and material zones. The geometry can be interactively edited and saved in TORT input file format. This system is an advancement over the current, non-interactive, two-dimensional display software. GRAVE is programmed in the Java programming language and can be implemented on a variety of computer platforms. Three- dimensional visualization is enabled through the Visualization Toolkit (VTK), a free-ware C++ software library developed for geometric and data visual display. Future plans include an extension of the system to read inputs using binary zone maps and combinatorial geometry models containing curved surfaces, such as those used for Monte Carlo code inputs. Also GRAVE will be extended to geometry visualization/editing for the DORT two-dimensional transport code and will be integrated into a single GUI-based system for all of the ORNL discrete ordinates transport codes

  18. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  19. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  20. MatMCNP: A Code for Producing Material Cards for MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saavedra, Karen C. [American Structurepoint, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A code for generating MCNP material cards (MatMCNP) has been written and verified for naturally occurring, stable isotopes. The program allows for material specification as either atomic or weight percent (fractions). MatMCNP also permits the specification of enriched lithium, boron, and/or uranium. In addition to producing the material cards for MCNP, the code calculates the atomic (or number) density in atoms/barn-cm as well as the multiplier that should be used to convert neutron and gamma fluences into dose in the material specified.

  1. Bone cell-material interactions on metal-ion doped polarized hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodhak, Subhadip; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the influence of Mg 2+ and Sr 2+ dopants on in vitro bone cell-material interactions of electrically polarized hydroxyapatite [HAp, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ] ceramics with an aim to achieve additional advantage of matching bone chemistry along with the original benefits of electrical polarization treatment relevant to biomedical applications. To achieve our research objective, commercial phase pure HAp has been doped with MgO, and SrO in single, and binary compositions. All samples have been sintered at 1200 deg. C for 2 h and subsequently polarized using an external d.c. field (2.0 kV/cm) at 400 deg. C for 1 h. Combined addition of 1 wt.% MgO/1 wt.% SrO in HAp has been most beneficial in enhancing the polarizability in which stored charge was 4.19 μC/cm 2 compared to pure HAp of 2.23 μC/cm 2 . Bone cell-material interaction has been studied by culturing with human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) for a maximum of 7 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of cell morphology reveal that favorable surface properties and dopant chemistry lead to good cellular adherence and spreading on negatively charged surfaces of both Sr 2+ and Mg 2+ doped HAp samples over undoped HAp. MTT assay results at 7 days show the highest viable cell densities on the negatively charged surfaces of binary doped HAp samples, while positive charged doped HAp surfaces exhibit limited cellular growth in comparison to neutral surfaces.

  2. Development and application of a tree-code in simulation scenarios of the plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berberich, Benjamin

    2012-03-01

    Processes in the plasma edge layer of magnetic fusion devices occur on widely disparate length- and time-scales. Also recently developed features in this particular region, such as stochastic magnetic fields, underline the necessity for three dimensional, full-kinetic simulation tools. Contemporary programs often deploy ad hoc assumptions and approximations for microscopic phenomena for which self-consistent ab initio models in principle exist, but are still computationally too expensive or complex to implement. Recently, mesh-free methods have matured into a new class of tools for such first-principles computations which thanks to their geometric flexibility are highly promising for tackling complicated TOKAMAK regions. In this work we have develop the massively parallel Tree-Code PEPC-B (Pretty Efficient Parallel Coulomb solver) into a new tool for plasma material interaction studies. After a brief overview of the working principles of Tree-Codes two main topic groups are addressed: First the leap-frog Boris integration scheme is discussed and its numerical limitations are pointed out. To overcome these limitations the method is enhanced to a guiding-center integrator. As a proof of principal, numerical experiments are conducted reproducing the anticipated drift kinetic aspects of particle orbits. It turns out that this new technique is much less sensitive to large time steps than the original concept was. One major drawback of mesh-free methods which hinders their direct use for plasma-edge simulations is the difficulty in representing solid structures and associated boundary conditions. Therefore, an alternative concept is proposed using charge carrying Wall-Particles, which fits naturally in the mesh-free doctrine. These developments incorporate the second main topic group of this report. To prove the physical correctness of this new idea, a quasi one dimensional plasma-wall interface scenario is chosen. By studying the system with great detail, good agreement

  3. Role of ion simulation in CTR materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolfi, F.V. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of ion simulation in the U.S. fusion power development program, evaluates various ion and neutron simulation techniques, emphasizes the need for quantitative correlation between ion and high-energy neutron radiation damage, and outlines the essential features of ion/neutron simulation experiments on candidate first-wall materials

  4. Modeling ion exchange in clinoptilolite using the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1992-06-01

    Assessing the suitability of Yucca Mtn., NV as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste requires the means to simulate ion-exchange behavior of zeolites. Vanselow and Gapon convention cation-exchange models have been added to geochemical modeling codes EQ3NR/EQ6, allowing exchange to be modeled for up to three exchangers or a single exchanger with three independent sites. Solid-solution models that are numerically equivalent to the ion-exchange models were derived and also implemented in the code. The Gapon model is inconsistent with experimental adsorption isotherms of trace components in clinoptilolite. A one-site Vanselow model can describe adsorption of Cs or Sr on clinoptilolite, but a two-site Vanselow exchange model is necessary to describe K contents of natural clinoptilolites

  5. Analytical and Numerical Studies of the Complex Interaction of a Fast Ion Beam Pulse with a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, high energy physics, etc. Comprehensive analytical, numerical, and experimental studies are underway to investigate the complex interaction of a fast ion beam with a background plasma. The positively charged ion beam attracts plasma electrons, and as a result the plasma electrons have a tendency to neutralize the beam charge and current. A suite of particle-in-cell codes has been developed to study the propagation of an ion beam pulse through the background plasma. For quasi-steady-state propagation of the ion beam pulse, an analytical theory has been developed using the assumption of long charge bunches and conservation of generalized vorticity. The analytical results agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The visualization of the data obtained in the numerical simulations shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry into and ex it from the plasma

  6. Intercalation of Mg-ions in layered V2O5 cathode materials for rechargeable Mg-ion batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Daniel Risskov; Johannesen, Pætur; Christensen, Christian Kolle

    The development of functioning rechargeable Mg-ion batteries is still in its early stage, and a coarse screening of suitable cathode materials is still on-going. Within the intercalation-type cathodes, layered crystalline materials are of high interest as they are known to perform well in Li-ion...... intercalation batteries and are also increasingly being explored for Na-ion batteries. Here, we present an investigation of the layered material orthorhombic V2O5, which is a classical candidate for an ion-intercalation material having a high theoretical capacity1. We present discharge-curves for the insertion...... discharge. This indicates that the degradation is highly associated with formation of ion-blocking layers on the anode....

  7. A New Approach to Authoring Interactive Curricular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Wolfgang

    1999-11-01

    A persistent problem facing educational software authors is that programming has no top. In other words, the moment a program is finished a potential user will ask for an enhancement or modification to use the program in a new context. Scriptable general-purpose applets, such as Physlets, provide a partial solution since the user can specify the applet's behavior provided that the applet author has anticipated the need. But this is not enough. Curriculum authors usually want to process the data and to present it in various formats. Over the past year the functionality of Physlets has been greatly extended through the use of inter-applet communication. This makes it possible to use a modular object-oriented approach for the design of interactive curricular material. Many Physlets, including Animator, EField, BField, and Faraday, are now capable of generating data in response to an internal clock or in response to user actions. This data can then be passed to a bar graph, a table of numeric values, or an x-y graph using one line of JavaScript to establish the communication link. This technique is very flexible since the code to process and present the data is written in an interpreted runtime environment. Furthermore, web servers can customize the code as the document is being delivered for applications such as testing and online homework. Examples of interactive curricular material that makes use of these techniques will be presented.

  8. Plasma immersion ion implantation into insulating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiubo; Yang Shiqin

    2006-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is an effective surface modification tool. During PIII processes, the objects to be treated are immersed in plasmas and then biased to negative potential. Consequently the plasma sheath forms and ion implantation may be performed. The pre-requirement of plasma implantation is that the object is conductive. So it seems difficult to treat the insulating materials. The paper focuses on the possibilities of plasma implantation into insulting materials and presents some examples. (authors)

  9. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of ∼ 1.0 μm at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi 0.85 Co 0.15 O 2 anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5μm FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  10. Cross sections for pion, proton, and heavy-ion production from 800 MeV protons incident upon aluminum and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicello, J.F. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (USA)); Schillaci, M.E.; Liu Lonchang (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    When high-energy cosmic rays interact with electronics or other materials in a spacecraft, including the occupants themselves, pions are produced as secondary particles. These secondary pions interact further in the materials producing nuclear secondaries, including nuclear recoils and heavy-ion tertiaries. The secondary pions and the the tertiary particles are capable of producing single-event upsets and other damage in integrated circuits and damage in biological systems. Negative pions stopping in materials are particularly effective because of their unique ability to produce short-range heavy particles from pion stars. With the Los Alamos National Laboratory's version of the intranuclear cascade evaporation code, VEGAS, we have calculated the number of pions produced per energy interval per incident proton from 800 MeV protons on aluminum-27 and silicon-28 along with corresponding results for neutrons, protons, and heavier ions. (orig.).

  11. Materials research with ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    This report gives a series of helpful programs which are used in materials research with ion beams. In this context algorithms which can substitute table books are dealt with. This is true for the programs DEDX and PRAL; they are used in order to determine the energy loss of ions in solid bodies, their working range and straggling. Furthermore, simulator routines and analyzers are described. The program TRIM simulates the physical phenomena which occur with the penetration of high-energy ions into solid bodies. In this context electronic excitations, phonons and lattice distortions which are caused by the ions are dealt with. For the experimental ion implantation it is interesting to know the final distribution of the simulated ions in the solid body. The program RBS simulates the Rutherford spectrum of ions which are scattered from a solid body which may consist of up to nine elements and up to one hundred layers. The unknown composition of a solid body can be determined in direct comparison with the experimental spectrum. The program NRA determines concentration and penetrative distribution of an impurity by means of the experimental nuclear reaction spectrum of this impurity. All programs are written in FORTRAN 77. (orig./MM) [de

  12. Study on Energetic Ions Behavior in Plasma Facing Materials at Lower Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Sugiyama, T.; Akahori, S.; Kodama, H.; Tega, E.; Sasaki, M.; Oyaidu, M.; Kimura, H.; Okuno, K.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus equipped with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) was constructed to study interactions of energetic hydrogen isotopes with plasma facing materials. It is a remarkable feature of the apparatus that energetic ion implantation is carried out at around 150K to study reactions of energetic ions with matrix by suppressing the reactions of thermalized ions. Using this apparatus, TDS experiments for pyrolytic graphite implanted with energetic D 2 ions at 173 and 373K were carried out. The experimental results suggest that the deuterium implanted was released through a four-step release processes, involving three D 2 and one CD x (x = 2, 3 and 4) desorption processes. Two deuterium and CD x desorption processes were observed in the temperature range from 700 to 1200 K. In addition, a new deuterium desorption process was observed for the deuterium-implanted sample at 173 K. This has never been observed for deuterium-implanted graphite implanted at temperatures higher than room temperature

  13. User manual of FUNF code for fissile material data calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingshang

    2006-03-01

    The FUNF code (2005 version) is used to calculate fast neutron reaction data of fissile materials with incident energies from about 1 keV up to 20 MeV. The first version of the FUNF code was completed in 1994. the code has been developed continually since that time and has often been used as an evaluation tool for setting up CENDL and for analyzing the measurements of fissile materials. During these years many improvements have been made. In this manual, the format of the input parameter files and the output files, as well as the functions of flag used in FUNF code, are introduced in detail, and the examples of the format of input parameters files are given. FUNF code consists of the spherical optical model, the Hauser-Feshbach model, and the unified Hauser-Feshbach and exciton model. (authors)

  14. Porous graphene for high capacity lithium ion battery anode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yusheng, E-mail: xxwysheng@163.com [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhang, Qiaoli; Jia, Min; Yang, Dapeng [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Wang, Jianjun; Li, Meng [College of Science, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Zhang, Jing [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Sun, Qiang [School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous graphene sheet as Li storage media. • Excellent mobility both along in-plane and out-plane directions. • The interactions can be easily tuned by an applied strain. - Abstract: Based on density functional theory calculations, we studied the Li dispersed on porous graphene (PG) for its application as Li ion battery anode material. The hybridization of Li atoms and the carbon atoms enhanced the interaction between Li atoms and the PG. With holes of specific size, the PG can provide excellent mobility with moderate barriers of 0.37–0.39 eV. The highest Li storage composite can be LiC{sub 0.75}H{sub 0.38} which corresponds to a specific capacity of 2857.7 mA h/g. Both specific capacity and binding energy are significantly larger than the corresponding value of graphite, this makes PG a promising candidate for the anode material in battery applications. The interactions between the Li atoms and PG can be easily tuned by an applied strain. Under biaxial strain of 16%, the binding energy of Li to PG is increased by 17% compared to its unstrained state.

  15. Interactions of heavy ions with biomolecules: a dynamical microscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengshou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou

    2006-01-01

    The status of studying biology system therapy with X-rays, γ-rays, neutron, proton, and heavy ions is reviewed. The depth dose profile, called Bragg profile, makes heavy ion an ideal tool for radiotherapy. The physical process of therapy with heavy ions is analyzed and a 3-step interaction processes of heavy ions with biomolecules is proposed, that is, nuclear fragmentation in nuclear interaction, electron excitation in Coulomb interaction, and the biomolecules relaxation in surroundings, finally leads to a new structure of biomolecule. Since this physical process is the base of the following chemical process and biological process, a dynamical microscopic approach is strongly demanded to be built. (authors)

  16. Trajectory effects in multiply charged ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebius, H.; Huang, W.; Schuch, R.

    1999-01-01

    Ar ions of 4.3 keV q in were scattered at large angles (θ=75 degree sign ) from a clean oriented surface. By selecting Ar projectiles having a large ionization potential and by using a large scattering angle only ions scattered at the first atomic layer of the surface were detected. Scattered ion energy spectra show peaks of single scattering and double scattering of the Ar projectile ions from one or two surface Au atoms, and the distribution attributed to double collisions splits into two peaks when the scattering plane coincides with a crystallographic plane. Simulations with a MARLOWE code allowed for interpretation of the structure in the double collision peak by in-plane and zig-zag double collisions. Differences in the relative peak heights between the experiment and a MARLOWE simulation were partly explained by different neutralization probabilities with varying trajectories. Yield changes with increasing charge states show interesting possibilities for future experiments with highly charged ions

  17. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of space radiation on the crews of long duration space missions must take into account the interactions of high energy atomic nuclei in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding and in the bodies of the astronauts. These heavy ions (i.e. heavier than hydrogen), while relatively small in number compared to the total galactic cosmic ray (GCR) charged particle flux, can produce disproportionately large effects by virtue of their high local energy deposition: a single traversal by a heavy charged particle can kill or, what may be worse, severely damage a cell. Research into the pertinent physics and biology of heavy ion interactions has consequently been assigned a high priority in a recent report by a task group of the National Research Council. Fragmentation of the incident heavy ions in shielding or in the human body will modify an initially well known radiation field and thereby complicate both spacecraft shielding design and the evaluation of potential radiation hazards. Since it is impractical to empirically test the radiation transport properties of each possible shielding material and configuration, a great deal of effort is going into the development of models of charged particle fragmentation and transport. Accurate nuclear fragmentation cross sections (probabilities), either in the form of measurements with thin targets or theoretical calculations, are needed for input to the transport models, and fluence measurements (numbers of fragments produced by interactions in thick targets) are needed both to validate the models and to test specific shielding materials and designs. Fluence data are also needed to characterize the incident radiation field in accelerator radiobiology experiments. For a number of years, nuclear fragmentation measurements at GCR-like energies have been carried out at heavy ion accelerators including the LBL Bevalac, Saturne (France), the Synchrophasotron and Nuklotron (Dubna, Russia), SIS-18 (GSI, Germany), the

  18. Status of ion beam data analysis and simulation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauhala, E. [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: eero.rauhala@helsinki.fi; Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional No. 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Fazinic, S. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Thompson, M. [Department of MS and E/Bard Hall 328, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2006-03-15

    The status of ion beam data analysis codes dedicated to Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis and non-resonant nuclear reaction analysis, is reviewed. The most important methods and approaches employed are discussed. The stopping power and scattering cross-section databases used, the ion-target interaction physics, the experimental and detection system characteristics and the structure of samples all have a strong impact on the analytical results. The models and algorithms used by different codes are reviewed and discussed in detail. Limitations in existing codes and perspectives for further developments are presented. The importance of ascertaining the correctness and accuracy of different methods and codes used in ion beam data analysis is stressed.

  19. Ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions in lithium imidazolide electrolytes studied by Raman spectroscopy and DFT models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheers, Johan; Niedzicki, Leszek; Zukowska, Grażyna Z; Johansson, Patrik; Wieczorek, Władysław; Jacobsson, Per

    2011-06-21

    Molecular level interactions are of crucial importance for the transport properties and overall performance of ion conducting electrolytes. In this work we explore ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions in liquid and solid polymer electrolytes of lithium 4,5-dicyano-(2-trifluoromethyl)imidazolide (LiTDI)-a promising salt for lithium battery applications-using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. High concentrations of ion associates are found in LiTDI:acetonitrile electrolytes, the vibrational signatures of which are transferable to PEO-based LiTDI electrolytes. The origins of the spectroscopic changes are interpreted by comparing experimental spectra with simulated Raman spectra of model structures. Simple ion pair models in vacuum identify the imidazole nitrogen atom of the TDI anion to be the most important coordination site for Li(+), however, including implicit or explicit solvent effects lead to qualitative changes in the coordination geometry and improved correlation of experimental and simulated Raman spectra. To model larger aggregates, solvent effects are found to be crucial, and we finally suggest possible triplet and dimer ionic structures in the investigated electrolytes. In addition, the effects of introducing water into the electrolytes-via a hydrate form of LiTDI-are discussed.

  20. Application of the code Slac to the study of Ion Extraction Systems in Neutral Injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.; Liniers, M.; Guasp, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this study different extraction geometries for intense ion beams have been analyzed with the code SLAC, in view of its possible application to the neutral injectors of TJ-II. With this aim, we have introduced several modifications in the code in order to correctly simulate the transition between the ion source plasma and the extraction region, which has great impact on the beam optics. These modifications include the introduction of a population of Boltzmann electrons in the transition region, and the implementation of an option to simulate the thermal velocity of the ions in the source. We have found a better agreement between the results obtained with the new version of the code and the experimental data in two well known systems. With this new version of the code two different studies have been carried out: in the first place an optimization of the ATF injectors extraction system for its use on TJ-II, leading to an optimum value of the gap in the energy range 30-40 KeV, and in the second place a systematic study of extraction geometries at 40 KeV. As a result of this second study we have found the combinations of parameters that can be used under different working conditions (e.g. different pulse lengths), leading to acceptable values of the beam divergence. (Author)

  1. Ion-exchange properties of zeolite/glass hybrid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Kohei; Fukushima, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid materials were prepared from ground glass powder and various zeolites such as A-type, mordenite, X-type, and Y-type zeolites, and their ion removal effect was investigated. The hybrid materials of A-type, Y-type, and mordenite zeolites showed similar Sr"2"+ removal rates from aqueous solutions. The removal rate of Sr"2"+ ions increased as the amount of zeolite in the hybrid materials increased. Compared with other hybrid materials, the hybrid materials of X-type zeolite showed higher Sr"2"+ removal rates, especially for zeolite content greater than 25%. As the amount of X-type zeolite in the hybrid materials increased, the Sr"2"+ removal rate increased greatly, with a 100% removal rate when the content of X-type zeolite exceeded 62.5%. (author)

  2. APIPIS: the Atomic Physics Ion-Photon Interaction System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.; Kostroun, V.O.

    1985-01-01

    A proposed new facility for the study of highly charged heavy ions is described. The basic elements of APIPIS, the Atomic Physics Ion-Photon Interaction System, are: (1) a source of multiply-charged ions; (2) a linear accelerator; (3) a synchrotron storage ring; and (4) a source of high brightness x rays. The placement of a heavy ion storage ring at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source will provide unique opportunities for the study of photo-excitation of heavy ions

  3. Nickel-Tin Electrode Materials for Nonaqueous Li-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Grant M.; Durand, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Experimental materials made from mixtures of nickel and tin powders have shown promise for use as the negative electrodes of rechargeable lithium-ion electrochemical power cells. During charging (or discharging) of a lithium-ion cell, lithium ions are absorbed into (or desorbed from, respectively) the negative electrode, typically through an intercalation or alloying process. The negative electrodes (for this purpose, designated as anodes) in state-of-the-art Li-ion cells are made of graphite, in which intercalation occurs. Alternatively, the anodes can be made from metals, in which alloying can occur. For reasons having to do with the electrochemical potential of intercalated lithium, metallic anode materials (especially materials containing tin) are regarded as safer than graphite ones; in addition, such metallic anode materials have been investigated in the hope of obtaining reversible charge/discharge capacities greater than those of graphite anodes. However, until now, each of the tin-containing metallic anode formulations tested has been found to be inadequate in some respect.

  4. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-05-05

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes.

  5. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-01-01

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes

  6. Verification of IVA5 computer code for melt-water interaction analysis. Pt. 2. Three-phase flows with melt fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    1999-01-01

    In order to qualify IVA5 for applications in the field of the melt-water interactions in nuclear reactor safety, we analyzed the achievable accuracy by predicting phenomena that are within this class. Comparison with FARO and PREMIX experiments characterized with dynamic fragmentation of the participating materials together With the comparison with the variety of experiments documented in part 1 of this work qualified IVA5 as a code representing the state-of-the-art in the field of the multiphase flows. The code is capable of predicting multi-phase flow behavior in complicated 3D geometries and industrial networks. The code is able to predict melt-water interaction in well quantified uncertainty region. Reducing the uncertainty band needs future sophistication in the directions specified in this work. (author)

  7. Interactive game programming with Python (CodeSkulptor)

    OpenAIRE

    Ajayi, Richard Olugbenga

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, several types of gaming platforms have been created to encourage a more organised and friendly atmosphere for game lovers in various works of life, culture, and environment. This thesis focuses on the concept of interactive programming using Python. It encourages the use of Python to create simple interactive games applications based on basic human concept and ideas. CodeSkulptor is a browser-based IDE programming environment and uses the Python programming language. O...

  8. Graphene-Based Materials for Lithium-Ion Hybrid Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanfeng; Chang, Huicong; Zhang, Miao; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-09-23

    Lithium-ion hybrid supercapacitors (LIHSs), also called Li-ion capacitors, have attracted much attention due to the combination of the rapid charge-discharge and long cycle life of supercapacitors and the high energy-storage capacity of lithium-ion batteries. Thus, LIHSs are expected to become the ultimate power source for hybrid and all-electric vehicles in the near future. As an electrode material, graphene has many advantages, including high surface area and porous structure, high electric conductivity, and high chemical and thermal stability, etc. Compared with other electrode materials, such as activated carbon, graphite, and metal oxides, graphene-based materials with 3D open frameworks show higher effective specific surface area, better control of channels, and higher conductivity, which make them better candidates for LIHS applications. Here, the latest advances in electrode materials for LIHSs are briefly summarized, with an emphasis on graphene-based electrode materials (including 3D graphene networks) for LIHS applications. An outlook is also presented to highlight some future directions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Helium Ion Microscope: A New Tool for Sub-nanometer Imaging of Soft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, B.; Smallwood, C. R.; Evans, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution inspection of surface details is needed in many biological and environmental researches to understand the Soil organic material (SOM)-mineral interactions along with identifying microbial communities and their interactions. SOM shares many imaging characteristics with biological samples and getting true surface details from these materials are challenging since they consist of low atomic number materials. FE-SEM imaging is the main imagining technique used to image these materials in the past. These SEM images often show loss of resolution and increase noise due to beam damage and charging issues. Newly developed Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), on the other hand can overcome these difficulties and give very fine details. HIM is very similar to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) but instead of using electrons as a probe beam, HIM uses helium ions with energy ranges from 5 to 40 keV. HIM offers a series of advantages compared to SEM such as nanometer and sub-nanometer image resolutions (about 0.35 nm), detailed surface topography, high surface sensitivity, low Z material imaging (especially for polymers and biological samples), high image contrast, and large depth of field. In addition, HIM also has the ability to image insulating materials without any conductive coatings so that surface details are not modified. In this presentation, several scientific applications across biology and geochemistry will be presented to highlight the effectiveness of this powerful microscope. Acknowledgements: Research was performed using the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. Work was supported by DOE-BER Mesoscale to Molecules Bioimaging Project FWP# 66382.

  10. Analysis of the sodium concrete interactions with the NABE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soule, N.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental studies have been performed in France to investigate sodium-concrete interactions: thermal decomposition of concrete, specific chemical reactions, experimentation in liquid and vapour phase, sodium-concrete interaction without liner protection. Simultaneously computer codes have been developed in order to study the response of the containment building of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor to a sodium pool fire worsened by a sodium-concrete interaction: the NABE code. This code takes into account: a) sodium combustion; b) thermal decomposition of concrete with associated chemical reactions: (liquid sodium-vapour water reaction, liquid sodium-carbon dioxide reaction, liquid sodium-solid compounds of concrete, hydrogen combustion); c) chemical reactions in vapour phase; d) decay heat; e) gas aerosol inlets/outlets; f) aerosol behaviour (sedimentation, diffusion, leak); g) thermal exchanges. An example of a situation, typical of assessment of beyond design basis situations in LMFBR, is given. (author)

  11. Recent Progress in Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajun Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and commercialization of lithium ion batteries is rooted in material discovery. Promising new materials with high energy density are required for achieving the goal toward alternative forms of transportation. Over the past decade, significant progress and effort has been made in developing the new generation of Li-ion battery materials. In the review, I will focus on the recent advance of tin- and silicon-based anode materials. Additionally, new polyoxyanion cathodes, such as phosphates and silicates as cathode materials, will also be discussed.

  12. Computer codes in particle transport physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of transport and interaction of various particles in complex media and wide energy range (from 1 MeV up to 1 TeV) is very complicated problem that requires valid model of a real process in nature and appropriate solving tool - computer code and data library. A brief overview of computer codes based on Monte Carlo techniques for simulation of transport and interaction of hadrons and ions in wide energy range in three dimensional (3D) geometry is shown. Firstly, a short attention is paid to underline the approach to the solution of the problem - process in nature - by selection of the appropriate 3D model and corresponding tools - computer codes and cross sections data libraries. Process of data collection and evaluation from experimental measurements and theoretical approach to establishing reliable libraries of evaluated cross sections data is Ion g, difficult and not straightforward activity. For this reason, world reference data centers and specialized ones are acknowledged, together with the currently available, state of art evaluated nuclear data libraries, as the ENDF/B-VI, JEF, JENDL, CENDL, BROND, etc. Codes for experimental and theoretical data evaluations (e.g., SAMMY and GNASH) together with the codes for data processing (e.g., NJOY, PREPRO and GRUCON) are briefly described. Examples of data evaluation and data processing to generate computer usable data libraries are shown. Among numerous and various computer codes developed in transport physics of particles, the most general ones are described only: MCNPX, FLUKA and SHIELD. A short overview of basic application of these codes, physical models implemented with their limitations, energy ranges of particles and types of interactions, is given. General information about the codes covers also programming language, operation system, calculation speed and the code availability. An example of increasing computation speed of running MCNPX code using a MPI cluster compared to the code sequential option

  13. Modelling of fluid-solid interaction using two stand-alone codes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, Jan H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed for the modelling of fluid-solid interaction in applications where fluid forces dominate. Data are transferred between two stand-alone codes: a dedicated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code capable of free surface modelling...

  14. Distribution of Components in Ion Exchange Materials Taken from the K East Basin and Leaching of Ion Exchange Materials by Nitric/Hydrofluoric Acid and Nitric/Oxalic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid followed by mixed nitric/oxalic acid leach treatments to decontaminate ion exchange materials that have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East (KE)Basin sludge. The ion exchange materials contain organic ion exchange resins and zeolite inorganic ion exchange material. Based on process records, the ion exchange resins found in the K Basins is a mixed-bed, strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite NRW-037. The zeolite material is Zeolon-900, a granular material composed of the mineral mordenite. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the ion exchange material can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Elutriation and washing steps are designed to remove the organic resins from the K Basin sludge. To help understand the effects of the anticipated separation steps, tests were performed with well-rinsed ion exchange (IX) material from KE Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed IX having small quantities of added KE canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). Tests also were performed to determine the relative quantities of organic and inorganic IX materials present in the H-08 K Basin sludge material. Based on chemical analyses of the separated fractions, the rinsed and dry IX material H-08 BEAD G was found to contain 36 weight percent inorganic material (primarily zeolite). The as-received (unrinsed) and dried H-08 material was estimated to contain 45 weight percent inorganic material

  15. Materials science issues of plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastasi, M.; Faehl, R.J.; Elmoursi, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ion beam processing, including ion implantation and ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), are established surface modification techniques which have been used successfully to synthesize materials for a wide variety of tribological applications. In spite of the flexibility and promise of the technique, ion beam processing has been considered too expensive for mass production applications. However, an emerging technology, Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII), has the potential of overcoming these limitations to become an economically viable tool for mass industrial applications. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma and then pulsed-biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for intricate target geometries without complicated fixturing. If the bias is a relatively high negative potential (20--100 kV) ion implantation will result. At lower voltages (50--1,200 V), deposition occurs. Potential applications for PSII are in low-value-added products such as tools used in manufacturing, orthopedic devices, and the production of wear coatings for hard disk media. This paper will focus on the technology and materials science associated with PSII

  16. Validation of comprehensive space radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinn, J.L.; Simonsen, L.C.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    1998-01-01

    The HZETRN code has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials on spacecraft in the space environment. Most of the more important nuclear and atomic processes are now modeled and evaluation within a complex spacecraft geometry with differing material components, including transition effects across boundaries of dissimilar materials, are included. The atomic/nuclear database and transport procedures have received limited validation in laboratory testing with high energy ion beams. The codes have been applied in design of the SAGE-III instrument resulting in material changes to control injurious neutron production, in the study of the Space Shuttle single event upsets, and in validation with space measurements (particle telescopes, tissue equivalent proportional counters, CR-39) on Shuttle and Mir. The present paper reviews the code development and presents recent results in laboratory and space flight validation

  17. Track structure of protons and other light ions in liquid water: applications of the LIonTrack code at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, G; Galassi, M E; Tilly, N; Ahnesjö, A; Fernández-Varea, J M

    2013-06-01

    The LIonTrack (Light Ion Track) Monte Carlo (MC) code for the simulation of H(+), He(2+), and other light ions in liquid water is presented together with the results of a novel investigation of energy-deposition site properties from single ion tracks. The continuum distorted-wave formalism with the eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS) is employed to generate the initial energy and angle of the electrons emitted in ionizing collisions of the ions with H2O molecules. The model of Dingfelder et al. ["Electron inelastic-scattering cross sections in liquid water," Radiat. Phys. Chem. 53, 1-18 (1998); "Comparisons of calculations with PARTRAC and NOREC: Transport of electrons in liquid water," Radiat. Res. 169, 584-594 (2008)] is linked to the general-purpose MC code PENELOPE/penEasy to simulate the inelastic interactions of the secondary electrons in liquid water. In this way, the extended PENELOPE/penEasy code may provide an improved description of the 3D distribution of energy deposits (EDs), making it suitable for applications at the micrometer and nanometer scales. Single-ionization cross sections calculated with the ab initio CDW-EIS formalism are compared to available experimental values, some of them reported very recently, and the theoretical electronic stopping powers are benchmarked against those recommended by the ICRU. The authors also analyze distinct aspects of the spatial patterns of EDs, such as the frequency of nearest-neighbor distances for various radiation qualities, and the variation of the mean specific energy imparted in nanoscopic targets located around the track. For 1 MeV/u particles, the C(6+) ions generate about 15 times more clusters of six EDs within an ED distance of 3 nm than H(+). On average clusters of two to three EDs for 1 MeV/u H(+) and clusters of four to five EDs for 1 MeV/u C(6+) could be expected for a modeling double strand break distance of 3.4 nm.

  18. Nonlinear interaction of an ion flux with plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.A.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pistunovich, V.I.; Soboleva, T.K.; Yushamanov, P.N.

    The present report discusses the interaction of an ion beam, formed during the charge exchange of injected neutral atoms, with a plasma. Methods of analytical study by means of quasi-linear equations as well as two-dimensional numerical modelling are used. It is shown that at a beam velocity U 0 /C/sub s/ approximately less than 1 / 2 , the relaxation process may be described by using the theory of quasi-linear relaxation of electron beams, at U 0 /C/sub s/ approximately greater than 10; one can neglect the slowing down of the ion beam and consider only the angular spread. An analytical dependence of the spread angle on time was obtained. On the basis of the ion beam relaxation theory evolved, experiments on charge exchange of plasma fluxes on a gas target are analyzed. It is shown that the anomalous scattering of the plasma flux observed in a series of experiments may be explained by the interaction of ions of the flux with ion-acoustic oscillations of the target plasma. Consideration of damping of ion-acoustic noise by the plasma electrons and ions leads to a limitation of the relaxation of the angular distribution function. The relationships obtained are in good agreement with the experimental results

  19. Ion backscattering techniques applied in materials science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of Ion Backscattering Technique (IBT) to material analysis have expanded rapidly during the last decade. It is now regarded as an analysis tool indispensable for a versatile materials research program. The technique consists of simply shooting a beam of monoenergetic ions (usually 4 He + ions at about 2 MeV) onto a target, and measuring their energy distribution after backscattering at a fixed angle. Simple Rutherford scattering analysis of the backscattered ion spectrum yields information on the mass, the absolute amount and the depth profile of elements present upto a few microns of the target surface. The technique is nondestructive, quick, quantitative and the only known method of analysis which gives quantitative results without recourse to calibration standards. Its major limitations are the inability to separate elements of similar mass and a complete absence of chemical-binding information. A typical experimental set up and spectrum analysis have been described. Examples, some of them based on the work at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have been given to illustrate the applications of this technique to semiconductor technology, thin film materials science and nuclear energy materials. Limitations of IBT have been illustrated and a few remedies to partly overcome these limitations are presented. (auth.)

  20. Ion Beams: A Powerful Tool for Making New Functional Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ion beams play an important role in semiconductor industry, which utilizes ion implantation and irradiation for materials modification. Ion sputtering technique is used to fabricate multifunctional coatings and multilayers. Using ion implantation, there is a continued effort for fabrication of quantum bit structures for future quantum computers. Availability of focused ion beams (FIBs) has widened the applications of ion beams and nanostructured functional materials are being fabricated using FIBs. Various quantum structures can be fabricated using FIB. Ferromagnetism can either be induced or destroyed in special layered structures using ion irradiation. The magnetic exchange bias phenomenon is of tremendous utility in magnetic recording. Issues of lateral diffusion in nanoscale doping of semiconductors by FIB and an example of exchange bias enhancement by ion irradiation are discussed.

  1. Screened ion-ion interaction in mercury-chain compounds: Single chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, M.M.; Griffin, A.

    1985-01-01

    At room temperature, the mercury chains in Hg/sub 3-delta/AsF 6 exhibit phonons characteristic of a one-dimensional lattice. We calculate the screening of the Hg ion-ion interaction in a single chain by electrons moving in a cylindrical potential of finite radius, within the random-phase approximation. The resulting Bohm-Staver-type expression for the phonon velocity is (Z 2 mN/sub I//MN/sub e/)/sup 1/2/v/sub F/, where Z is the Hg ionic charge and N/sub I/ (N/sub e/) is the number of ions (electrons) per unit length. Use of the Tomonaga-Luttinger solution for the electronic response function (keeping only the small-momentum scattering processes) just renormalizes the Fermi velocity in this expression

  2. Development and application of a tree-code in simulation scenarios of the plasma-wall interaction; Entwicklung und Anwendung eines Tree-Codes in Simulationsszenarios der Plasma-Wand-Wechselwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberich, Benjamin

    2012-03-15

    Processes in the plasma edge layer of magnetic fusion devices occur on widely disparate length- and time-scales. Also recently developed features in this particular region, such as stochastic magnetic fields, underline the necessity for three dimensional, full-kinetic simulation tools. Contemporary programs often deploy ad hoc assumptions and approximations for microscopic phenomena for which self-consistent ab initio models in principle exist, but are still computationally too expensive or complex to implement. Recently, mesh-free methods have matured into a new class of tools for such first-principles computations which thanks to their geometric flexibility are highly promising for tackling complicated TOKAMAK regions. In this work we have develop the massively parallel Tree-Code PEPC-B (Pretty Efficient Parallel Coulomb solver) into a new tool for plasma material interaction studies. After a brief overview of the working principles of Tree-Codes two main topic groups are addressed: First the leap-frog Boris integration scheme is discussed and its numerical limitations are pointed out. To overcome these limitations the method is enhanced to a guiding-center integrator. As a proof of principal, numerical experiments are conducted reproducing the anticipated drift kinetic aspects of particle orbits. It turns out that this new technique is much less sensitive to large time steps than the original concept was. One major drawback of mesh-free methods which hinders their direct use for plasma-edge simulations is the difficulty in representing solid structures and associated boundary conditions. Therefore, an alternative concept is proposed using charge carrying Wall-Particles, which fits naturally in the mesh-free doctrine. These developments incorporate the second main topic group of this report. To prove the physical correctness of this new idea, a quasi one dimensional plasma-wall interface scenario is chosen. By studying the system with great detail, good agreement

  3. Interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a dense plasma: heating and transport of electrons and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toupin, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing the acceleration and transport of the plasma electrons and ions during the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a dense plasma. Our main tool was numerical simulation with kinetic particle-in-cell codes. During the interaction, the target surface electrons are accelerated up to high energies inward the target. The electron acceleration mechanisms are proved to strongly depend on the density profile deformation due to the ion motion. This motion has been studied as well and different acceleration mechanisms have been identified: pushing in of the target surface by the laser ponderomotive pressure, acceleration by an electrostatic shock or by breaking of an ion acoustic wave, acceleration by the space charge force induced by radial expulsion of the electrons out of a channel drilled in a slightly overcritical plasma. The electrons and ions accelerated at the target surface penetrate inward the target and interact with it. The competition between the focussing due to the self-generated magnetic field, driven by the very important electron current, and the scattering induced by collisions has been analyzed. In a homogeneous, hot plasma, the existence of an optimum current for which the propagation length without scattering is maximum, has been demonstrated. The electron drag-back effect of the axial electric field is also proved to be more significant than the friction due to collisions. By penetrating into the target, the accelerated ions can produce neutrons if the target is deuterated. A strong correlation between the ion acceleration mechanisms and the angle and energy distributions of the produced neutrons has been underlined. (author) [fr

  4. SIMIFR: A code to simulate material movement in the Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.M.; Orechwa, Yuri.

    1991-01-01

    The SIMIFR code has been written to simulate the movement of material through a process. This code can be used to investigate inventory differences in material balances, assist in process design, and to produce operational scheduling. The particular process that is of concern to the authors is that centered around Argonne National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor. This is a process which involves the irradiation of fissile material for power production, and the recycling of the irradiated reactor fuel pins into fresh fuel elements. To adequately simulate this process it is necessary to allow for locations which can contain either discrete items or homogeneous mixtures. It is also necessary to allow for a very flexible process control algorithm. Further, the code must have the capability of transmuting isotopic compositions and computing internally the fraction of material from a process ending up in a given location. The SIMIFR code has been developed to perform all of these tasks. In addition to simulating the process, the code is capable of generating random measurement values and sampling errors for all locations, and of producing a restart deck so that terminated problems may be continued. In this paper the authors first familiarize the reader with the IFR fuel cycle. The different capabilities of the SIMIFR code are described. Finally, the simulation of the IFR fuel cycle using the SIMIFR code is discussed. 4 figs

  5. Influence of the interaction of ions-dust grains on ion acoustic wave and dust acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Jianjun; Liu Jinyuan; Ma Tengcai

    2004-01-01

    Based on a set of hydrodynamic equations and a linear time-dependent perturbation theory, the influence of the interaction of ions-dust grains on ion acoustic wave IAW and dust acoustic wave DAW in dusty plasma is analyzed. The results show that the interaction makes IAW more stable and DAW less stable

  6. Evaluation of an expence of materials during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, M.G.; Zlobin, N.; Zotov, A.V.; Vasilev, V.I.; Vasilev, I.P.

    2003-01-01

    Ion implantation is used for a surface modification. The implantation dose must be sufficient to obtain the required properties of a processed surface, but should not be exceeded to prevent over-expenditure of implanted materials. The latter is especially important when noble metals are used as an implanted material. The ion implanter includes a vacuum chamber, source of metal ions (target) and a vacuum pumping-out system. Ions of a plasma-forming gas sputter the target and ions of metal are then accelerated and implanted into surface treated. Ion implantation dose can be calculated from operation parameters such as ion beam current density and duration of implanting. The presence of the plasma-forming gas in the ion flow makes it difficult to determine the expenditure of an implanted metal itself. The objective of this paper is the more accurate definition of an expense of an implanted metal. Mass- spectrometric analysis of an ion beam together with the weighing of the target was used to determine the expense of an implanted metal. It was found that, depending on the implantation parameters, on average around 50% of a total ion flow are metal ions. Results obtained allow more precise definition of an implantation dose. Thus, over- expenditure of implanted metals can be eliminated. (author)

  7. Effect of electrode materials on a negative ion production in a cesium seeded negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Morishita, Takutoshi; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Hanada, Masaya; Iga, Takashi; Inoue, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Imai, Tsuyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Effects of plasma grid materials on the negative ion production efficiency in a cesium seeded ion source have been experimentally studied. Grid materials of Au, Ag, Cu, Ni, and Mo were examined. A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was utilized in the experiment to avoid contamination of tungsten from filament cathode. Relations between the negative ion currents and work functions of the grid were measured for these materials. Influence of the contamination by tungsten on the grid was also investigated. If was clarified that the negative ion production efficiency was determined only by the work function of the grid. The efficiency did not depend on the material itself. The lowest work function of 1.42 eV was obtained for Au grid with Cs, and a high H{sup -} production efficiency of 20.7 mA/kW was measured. This efficiency is about 1.3 times larger than that of Cs/Mo and Cs/Cu. Further improvement of the production efficiency was observed by covering the plasma grid with tungsten and cesium simultaneously. Such co-deposition of W and Cs on the plasma grid produced the negative ion production efficiency of 1.7 times higher than that from the tungsten grid simply covered with Cs. (author)

  8. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  9. High-current heavy-ion accelerator system and its application to material modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Lee, C.G.; Umeda, Naoki; Okubo, Nariaki; Iwamoto, Eiji

    2001-01-01

    A high-current heavy-ion accelerator system has been developed to realize intense particle fluxes for material modification. The facility of a tandem accelerator attained 1 mA-class ion current both for negative low-energy ions and positive high-energy ions. The negative ion source of the key device is of the plasma-sputter type, equipped with mutli-cusp magnets and Cs supply. The intense negative ions are either directly used for material irradiation at 60 keV or further accelerated up to 6 MeV after charge transformation. Application of negative ions, which alleviates surface charging, enables us to conduct low-energy high-current irradiation on insulating substrates. Since positive ions above the MeV range are irrelevant for Coulomb repulsion, the facility as a whole meets the needs of high-current irradiation onto insulators over a wide energy range. Application of high flux ions provides technological merits not only for efficient implantation but also for essentially different material kinetics, which may become an important tool of material modification. Other advantages of the system are co-irradiation by intense laser and in-situ detection of kinetic processes. For examples of material modifications, we present nanoparticle fabrication in insulators, and synergistic phenomena by co-irradiation due to ions and photons. (author)

  10. Beam-Material Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N.V.

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high- intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target , and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and envir onment in challenging current and future application

  11. Beam-Material Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Cerutti, F. [CERN

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high-intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target, and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and environment in challenging current and future applications.

  12. Anisotropic microporous supports impregnated with polymeric ion-exchange materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Dwayne; Babcock, Walter C.; Tuttle, Mark

    1985-05-07

    Novel ion-exchange media are disclosed, the media comprising polymeric anisotropic microporous supports containing polymeric ion-exchange or ion-complexing materials. The supports are anisotropic, having small exterior pores and larger interior pores, and are preferably in the form of beads, fibers and sheets.

  13. Current status of investigations on molten fuel: Coolant interaction, material movement and relocation in LMFBRs in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksha, Yu.; Kuznetsov, I.

    1994-01-01

    The paper contains information on experimental studies and calculation codes, related to molten fuel-coolant interaction, material movement and relocation. Some calculation results for the BN-800 type reactor are presented. (author)

  14. Material interactions with the Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment: Accurate reaction rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentine, James T.; Leger, Lubert J.

    1987-01-01

    To resolve uncertainties in estimated LEO atomic oxygen fluence and provide reaction product composition data for comparison to data obtained in ground-based simulation laboratories, a flight experiment has been proposed for the space shuttle which utilizes an ion-neutral mass spectrometer to obtain in-situ ambient density measurements and identify reaction products from modeled polymers exposed to the atomic oxygen environment. An overview of this experiment is presented and the methodology of calibrating the flight mass spectrometer in a neutral beam facility prior to its use on the space shuttle is established. The experiment, designated EOIM-3 (Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials, third series), will provide a reliable materials interaction data base for future spacecraft design and will furnish insight into the basic chemical mechanisms leading to atomic oxygen interactions with surfaces.

  15. Video over DSL with LDGM Codes for Interactive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith Al-Jobouri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital Subscriber Line (DSL network access is subject to error bursts, which, for interactive video, can introduce unacceptable latencies if video packets need to be re-sent. If the video packets are protected against errors with Forward Error Correction (FEC, calculation of the application-layer channel codes themselves may also introduce additional latency. This paper proposes Low-Density Generator Matrix (LDGM codes rather than other popular codes because they are more suitable for interactive video streaming, not only for their computational simplicity but also for their licensing advantage. The paper demonstrates that a reduction of up to 4 dB in video distortion is achievable with LDGM Application Layer (AL FEC. In addition, an extension to the LDGM scheme is demonstrated, which works by rearranging the columns of the parity check matrix so as to make it even more resilient to burst errors. Telemedicine and video conferencing are typical target applications.

  16. Radiation stability of sodium titanate ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenna, B.T.

    1980-02-01

    Sodium titanate and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin are being considered as ion exchangers to remove 90 Sr and actinides from the large volume of defense waste stored at Hanford Site in Washington. Preliminary studies to determine the radiation effect on Sr +2 and I - capacity of these ion-exchange materials were conducted. Samples of sodium titanate powder, sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin, as well as the nitrate form of macroreticular anion resin were irradiated with up to 2 x 10 9 Rads of 60 Co gamma rays. Sodium titanate cation capacity decreased about 50% while the sodium titanate loaded macroeticular resin displayed a dramatic decrease in cation capacity when irradiated with 10 8 -10 9 Rad. The latter decrease is tentatively ascribed to radiation damage to the organic portion which subsequently inhibits interaction with the contained sodium titanate. The anion capacity of both macroreticular resin and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin exhibited significant decreases with increasing radiation exposure. These results suggest that consideration should be given to the potential effects of radiation degradation if column regeneration is to be used. 5 figures, 2 tables

  17. Graphene-Based Composites as Cathode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libao Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the superior mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties, graphene was a perfect candidate to improve the performance of lithium ion batteries. Herein, we review the recent advances in graphene-based composites and their application as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. We focus on the synthesis methods of graphene-based composites and the superior electrochemical performance of graphene-based composites as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries.

  18. Irradiation effects induced by multiply charged heavy ions on astrophysical materials such as crystals and ices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlinay, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The solar system and the interstellar medium are permanently exposed to radiations such as solar wind and cosmic rays. The interaction between energetic particles and astrophysical materials (ices, silicates and carbon-based materials) plays an important role in several astrophysical phenomena. Laboratory experiments correlated to observational data may allow a better understanding of these phenomena. The aim of this thesis was to study the effect of slow and fast heavy ions on lithium fluoride and on astrophysical materials such as ices and silicates. We focused on the sputtering phenomenon. The present study was performed with a time of flight imaging technique (XY-TOF-SIMS) at the CIMAP-GANIL laboratory. The major fraction of secondary ions is found to be emitted in the form of clusters. Several parameters affect sputtering: the stopping power regime, the thickness of the target, the incident angle and, for low highly charged ions, the projectile charge. Our laboratory simulations exhibit the possibility that sputtered particles contribute to the formation of Mercury's and Jupiter's moons exosphere. (author)

  19. Electro-osmosis over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempt to bring out a generalized formulation for electro-osmotic flows over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions. To this end, we start with modified electro-chemical potential of the individual species and subsequently use it to derive modified Nernst-Planck equation accounting for the ionic fluxes generated because of the presence of non-electrostatic potential. We establish what we refer to as the Poisson-Helmholtz-Nernst-Planck equations, coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations, to describe the complete transport process. Our analysis shows that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions between the ions results in an excess body force on the fluid, and modifies the osmotic pressure as well, which has hitherto remained unexplored. We further apply our analysis to a simple geometry, in an effort to work out the Smoluchowski slip velocity for thin electrical double layer limits. To this end, we employ singular perturbation and develop a general framework for the asymptotic analysis. Our calculations reveal that the final expression for slip velocity remains the same as that without accounting for non-electrostatic interactions. However, the presence of non-electrostatic interactions along with ion specificity can significantly change the quantitative behavior of Smoluchowski slip velocity. We subsequently demonstrate that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions may significantly alter the effective interfacial potential, also termed as the "Zeta potential." Our analysis can potentially act as a guide towards the prediction and possibly quantitative determination of the implications associated with the existence of non-electrostatic potential, in an electrokinetic transport process.

  20. STM and transport measurements of highly charged ion modified materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomeroy, J.M.; Grube, H.; Perrella, A.C.; Gillaspy, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Careful measurements of highly charged ions (HCIs) colliding with gases and surfaces have provided glimpses of intense electronic interactions, but a comprehensive model for the interaction mechanisms, time scales, and resultant nano-features that bridges materials systems is yet to be realized. At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, new apparatus is now connected to the HCI beamline to allow preparation of clean, atomically flat surfaces of single crystals, e.g. gold, tungsten and silicon, and deposition and patterning of thin films, e.g. high resistivity oxides, ferromagnetic metals, normal metals and superconductors. Experiments reported here focus on the electronic and morphological structure of HCI induced nano-features. Current activities are focused on using in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM) on Au(1 1 1) and (separately) ex situ transport measurements to study electronic properties within HCI modified magnetic multilayer systems. Specifically, we are fabricating magnetic multilayers similar to magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) (important in advanced magnetic field sensors and superconducting Josephson junction devices) and using HCIs to adjust critical electronic properties. The electrical response of the tunnel junction to HCIs provides a novel approach to performing HCI-induced nanostructure ensemble measurements

  1. Divalent Ion Parameterization Strongly Affects Conformation and Interactions of an Anionic Biomimetic Polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Michael D.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2016-03-10

    The description of peptides and the use of molecular dynamics simulations to refine structures and investigate the dynamics on an atomistic scale are well developed. Through a consensus in this community over multiple decades, parameters were developed for molecular interactions that only require the sequence of amino-acids and an initial guess for the three-dimensional structure. The recent discovery of peptoids will require a retooling of the currently available interaction potentials in order to have the same level of confidence in the predicted structures and pathways as there is presently in the peptide counterparts. Here we present modeling of peptoids using a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and atomistic resolution classical forcefield (FF) to span the relevant time and length scales. To properly account for the dominant forces that stabilize ordered structures of peptoids, namely steric-, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions mediated through sidechain-sidechain interactions in the FF model, those have to be first mapped out using high fidelity atomistic representations. A key feature here is not only to use gas phase quantum chemistry tools, but also account for solvation effects in the condensed phase through AIMD. One major challenge is to elucidate ion binding to charged or polar regions of the peptoid and its concomitant role in the creation of local order. Here, similar to proteins, a specific ion effect is observed suggesting that both the net charge and the precise chemical nature of the ion will need to be described. MDD was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales) Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Research was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MDB acknowledges support from US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material & Engineering. CJM acknowledges

  2. RAYIC - a numerical code for the study of ion cyclotron heating of large Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1984-02-01

    The code RAYIC models coupling, propagation and absorption of e.m. waves in large axisymmetric plasmas in the ion cyclotron frequency domain. It can be used both to investigate the waves behaviour, and as a source of the power deposition profiles for use in transport codes. The present user manual, after a brief summary of the physical model, presents the structure of RAYIC, the complete list of input-output variables (calling sequence), and some examples of the output which can be obtained from the code. (orig.)

  3. Li-adsorption on doped Mo2C monolayer: A novel electrode material for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Veenu; Tankeshwar, K.; Saini, Hardev S.

    2018-04-01

    A first principle calculation has been used to study the electronic and magnetic properties of pristine and N/Mn-doped Mo2C with and without Li-adsorption. The pseudopotential method implemented in SIESTA code based on density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) as exchange-correlation (XC) potential has been employed. Our calculated results revealed that the Li gets favorably adsorbed on the hexagonal centre in pristine Mo2C and at the top of C-atom in case of N/Mn-doped Mo2C. The doping of Mn and N atom increases the adsorption of Li in Mo2C monolayer which may results in enhancement of storage capacity in Li-ion batteries. The metallic nature of Li-adsorbed pristine and N/Mn-doped Mo2C monolayer implies a good electronic conduction which is crucial for anode materials for its applications in rechargeable batteries. Also, the open circuit voltage for single Li-adsorption in doped Mo2C monolayer comes in the range of 0.4-1.0 eV which is the optimal range for any material to be used as an anode material. Our result emphasized the enhanced performance of doped Mo2C as an anode material in Li-ion batteries.

  4. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chernyshova, M.; Gribkov, V. A.; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E.; Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Maslyaev, S. A.; Bondarenko, G.G.; Vilémová, Monika; Matějíček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 113, December (2016), s. 109-118 ISSN 0920-3796 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Radiation damageability * Materials tests * Plasma focus * Plasma streams * Ion beams * Laser interferometrya Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379616306858

  5. Two modified versions of the speciation code PHREEQE for modelling macromolecule-proton/cation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    There is a growing need to consider the influence of organic macromolecules on the speciation of ions in natural waters. It is recognized that a simple discrete ligand approach to the binding of protons/cations to organic macromolecules is not appropriate to represent heterogeneities of binding site distributions. A more realistic approach has been incorporated into the speciation code PHREEQE which retains the discrete ligand approach but modifies the binding intensities using an electrostatic (surface complexation) model. To allow for different conformations of natural organic material two alternative concepts have been incorporated: it is assumed that (a) the organic molecules form rigid, impenetrable spheres, and (b) the organic molecules form flat surfaces. The former concept will be more appropriate for molecules in the smaller size range, while the latter will be more representative for larger size molecules or organic surface coatings. The theoretical concept is discussed and the relevant changes to the standard PHREEQE code are explained. The modified codes are called PHREEQEO-RS and PHREEQEO-FS for the rigid-sphere and flat-surface models respectively. Improved output facilities for data transfer to other computers, e.g. the Macintosh, are introduced. Examples where the model is tested against literature data are shown and practical problems are discussed. Appendices contain listings of the modified subroutines GAMMA and PTOT, an example input file and an example command procedure to run the codes on VAX computers

  6. Track structure for low energy ions including charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2002-01-01

    The model and development is described of a new generation of Monte Carlo track structure codes. The code LEAHIST simulates full slowing down of low-energy proton history tracks in the range 1 keV-1 MeV and the code LEAHIST simulates low-energy alpha particle history tracks in the range 1 keV-8 MeV in water. All primary ion interactions are followed down to 1 keV and all electrons to 1 eV. Tracks of secondary electrons ejected by ions were traced using the electron code KURBUC. Microdosimetric parameters derived by analysis of generated tracks are presented. (author)

  7. Phosphorene as an anode material for Na-ion batteries: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, Vadym V; Malyi, Oleksandr I; Persson, Clas; Wu, Ping

    2015-06-07

    We systematically investigate a novel two-dimensional nanomaterial, phosphorene, as an anode for Na-ion batteries. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the Na adsorption energy, specific capacity and Na diffusion barriers on monolayer phosphorene. We examine the main trends in the electronic structure and mechanical properties as a function of Na concentration. We find a favorable Na-phosphorene interaction with a high theoretical Na storage capacity. We find that Na-phosphorene undergoes semiconductor-metal transition at high Na concentration. Our results show that Na diffusion on phosphorene is fast and anisotropic with an energy barrier of only 0.04 eV. Owing to its high capacity, good stability, excellent electrical conductivity and high Na mobility, monolayer phosphorene is a very promising anode material for Na-ion batteries. The calculated performance in terms of specific capacity and diffusion barriers is compared to other layered 2D electrode materials, such as graphene, MoS2, and polysilane.

  8. New directions for ion beam processing of optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, C W; Budai, J D; Zhu, J G; Withrow, S P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Recent developments in the use of ion implantation to modify the properties of optical materials are summarized. The use of ion implantation to form nanocrystal and quantum dots is emphasized. (author)

  9. Ion source techniques for high-speed processing of material surface by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo

    1990-01-01

    The present paper discusses some key or candidate techniques for future ion source development and such ion sources developed by the author. Several types of microwave ion sources for producing low charge state ions have been developed in Japan. When a microwave plasma cathode developed by the author is adapted to a Kaufman type ion source, the electron emission currents are found to be 2.5 A for argon gas and 0.5-0.9 A for oxygen gas. An alternative ionization method for metal atoms is strongly required for high-speed processing of material surface by metal-ion beams. Detailed discussion is made of collisional ionization of vaporized atoms, and negative-ion production (secondary negative-ion emission by sputtering). An impregnated electrode type liquid-metal ion source developed by the author, which has a porous tip structure, is described. The negative-ion production efficiency is quite high. The report also presents a neutral and ionized alkaline-metal bombardment type heavy negative-ion source, which consists of a cesium plasma ion source, suppressor, target electrode, negative-ion extraction electrode, and einzel lens. (N.K.)

  10. A review of the radiation stability of ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive literature survey on the radiation stability of synthetic organic ion exchangers was published in this journal (Vol. 97, No. 1.). This paper is a brief review of the major findings of this survey along with similar information on synthetic inorganic ion exchangers. The primary goal of this literature survey is to review present knowledge on the effects of ionizing radiations on synthetic ion exchange materials used in radiochemical processing. The information available in the literature shows some general trends in observed qualitative effects by different types of organic and inorganic ion exchange materials. (author)

  11. Enhanced Laser Cooling of Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Composite Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You-Hua, Jia; Biao, Zhong; Xian-Ming, Ji; Jian-Ping, Yin

    2008-01-01

    We predict enhanced laser cooling performance of rare-earth-ions-doped glasses containing nanometre-sized ul-traBne particles, which can be achieved by the enhancement of local Geld around rare earth ions, owing to the surface plasma resonance of small metallic particles. The influence of energy transfer between ions and the particle is theoretically discussed. Depending on the particle size and the ion emission quantum efficiency, the enhancement of the absorption is predicted. It is concluded that the absorption are greatly enhanced in these composite materials, the cooling power is increased as compared to the bulk material

  12. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  13. New polyanion-based cathode materials for alkali-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoobnejad Asl, Hooman

    A number of new materials have been discovered through exploratory synthesis with the aim to be studied as the positive electrode (cathode) in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. The focus has been set on the ease of synthesis, cost and availability of active ingredients in the battery, and decent cycle-life performance through a combination of iron and several polyanionic ligands. An emphasis has been placed also on phosphite (HPO32-) as a polyanionic ligand, mainly due to the fact that it has not been studied seriously before as a polyanion for cathode materials. The concept of mixed polyanions, for example, boro-phosphate and phosphate-nitrates were also explored. In each case the material was first made and purified via different synthetic strategies, and the crystal structure, which dominantly controls the performance of the materials, has been extensively studied through Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction (SCXRD) or synchrotron-based Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD). This investigation yielded four new compositions, namely Li3Fe 2(HPO3)3Cl, LiFe(HPO3)2, Li0.8Fe(H2O)2B[P2O8]•H 2O and AFePO4NO3 (A = NH4/Li, K). Furthermore, for each material the electrochemical performance for insertion of Li+ ion has been studied by means of various electrochemical techniques to reveal the nature of alkali ion insertion. In addition Na-ion intercalation has been studied for boro-phosphate and AFePO4NO3. Additionally a novel synthesis procedure has been reported for tavorite LiFePO4F 1-x(OH)x, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 1, an important class of cathode materials. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the importance of crystal structure on the cathode performance through structural and compositional effects. Moreover these findings may contribute to the energy storage community by providing insight into the solid-state science of electrode material synthesis and proposing new alternative compositions based on sustainable materials.

  14. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code coupled with the local effect model for biological calculations in carbon ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mairani, A [University of Pavia, Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, and INFN, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Brons, S; Parodi, K [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center and Department of Radiation Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Sommerer, F [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Fasso, A [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kraemer, M; Scholz, M, E-mail: Andrea.Mairani@mi.infn.i [GSI Biophysik, Planck-Str. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-08-07

    Clinical Monte Carlo (MC) calculations for carbon ion therapy have to provide absorbed and RBE-weighted dose. The latter is defined as the product of the dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). At the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung as well as at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the RBE values are calculated according to the local effect model (LEM). In this paper, we describe the approach followed for coupling the FLUKA MC code with the LEM and its application to dose and RBE-weighted dose calculations for a superimposition of two opposed {sup 12}C ion fields as applied in therapeutic irradiations. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data of CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cell survival and the outcomes of the GSI analytical treatment planning code TRiP98. Some discrepancies have been observed between the analytical and MC calculations of absorbed physical dose profiles, which can be explained by the differences between the laterally integrated depth-dose distributions in water used as input basic data in TRiP98 and the FLUKA recalculated ones. On the other hand, taking into account the differences in the physical beam modeling, the FLUKA-based biological calculations of the CHO cell survival profiles are found in good agreement with the experimental data as well with the TRiP98 predictions. The developed approach that combines the MC transport/interaction capability with the same biological model as in the treatment planning system (TPS) will be used at HIT to support validation/improvement of both dose and RBE-weighted dose calculations performed by the analytical TPS.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Xue, J.M. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Zhang, Y., E-mail: Zhangy1@ornl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Morris, J.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhu, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Gao, Y.; Wang, Y.G.; Yan, S. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Weber, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ion-solid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (<{approx}25 keV/nucleon) in light elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

  16. The Contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) Warm-Up Segments in Assessing Parent-Child Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Jenelle R.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the inclusion of uncoded segments in the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, an analogue observation of parent-child interactions. The relationships between warm-up and coded segments were assessed, as well as the segments' associations with parent ratings of parent and child behaviors. Sixty-nine non-referred…

  17. Underlying role of mechanical rigidity and topological constraints in physical sputtering and reactive ion etching of amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Gyanendra; Dhungana, Shailesh; Nordell, Bradley J.; Caruso, Anthony N.; Paquette, Michelle M.; Lanford, William A.; King, Sean W.

    2018-05-01

    Analytical expressions describing ion-induced sputter or etch processes generally relate the sputter yield to the surface atomic binding energy (Usb) for the target material. While straightforward to measure for the crystalline elemental solids, Usb is more complicated to establish for amorphous and multielement materials due to composition-driven variations and incongruent sublimation. In this regard, we show that for amorphous multielement materials, the ion-driven yield can instead be better understood via a consideration of mechanical rigidity and network topology. We first demonstrate a direct relationship between Usb, bulk modulus, and ion sputter yield for the elements, and then subsequently prove our hypothesis for amorphous multielement compounds by demonstrating that the same relationships exist between the reactive ion etch (RIE) rate and nanoindentation Young's modulus for a series of a -Si Nx :H and a -Si OxCy :H thin films. The impact of network topology is further revealed via application of the Phillips-Thorpe theory of topological constraints, which directly relates the Young's modulus to the mean atomic coordination () for an amorphous solid. The combined analysis allows the trends and plateaus in the RIE rate to be ultimately reinterpreted in terms of the atomic structure of the target material through a consideration of . These findings establish the important underlying role of mechanical rigidity and network topology in ion-solid interactions and provide additional considerations for the design and optimization of radiation-hard materials in nuclear and outer space environments.

  18. RADTRAN II: revised computer code to analyze transportation of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.; Daniel, S.L.

    1982-10-01

    A revised and updated version of the RADTRAN computer code is presented. This code has the capability to predict the radiological impacts associated with specific schemes of radioactive material shipments and mode specific transport variables

  19. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  20. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  1. Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated AqueousSolutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the PitzerIon-Interaction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel , Carl

    2006-12-15

    In this report, we present: -- The Pitzer ion-interactiontheory and models -- Input file requirements for using the TOUGHREACTPitzer ion-interaction model and associated databases -- Run-time errormessages -- Verification test cases and application examples. For themain code structure, features, overall solution methods, description ofinput/output files for parameters other than those specific to theimplemented Pitzer model, and error messages, see the TOUGHREACT User'sGuide (Xu et al., 2005). The TOUGHREACT Pitzer version runs on aDEC-alpha architecture CPU, under OSF1 V5.1, with Compaq Digital FortranCompiler. The compiler run-time libraries are required for execution aswell as compilation. The code also runs on Intel Pentium IV andhigher-version CPU-based machines with Compaq Visual Fortran Compiler orIntel Fortran Compiler (integrated with the Microsoft DevelopmentEnvironment). The minimum hardware configuration should include 1 GB RAMand 1 GB (2 GB recommended) of available disk space.

  2. Leadership Class Configuration Interaction Code - Status and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, James

    2011-10-01

    With support from SciDAC-UNEDF (www.unedf.org) nuclear theorists have developed and are continuously improving a Leadership Class Configuration Interaction Code (LCCI) for forefront nuclear structure calculations. The aim of this project is to make state-of-the-art nuclear structure tools available to the entire community of researchers including graduate students. The project includes codes such as NuShellX, MFDn and BIGSTICK that run a range of computers from laptops to leadership class supercomputers. Codes, scripts, test cases and documentation have been assembled, are under continuous development and are scheduled for release to the entire research community in November 2011. A covering script that accesses the appropriate code and supporting files is under development. In addition, a Data Base Management System (DBMS) that records key information from large production runs and archived results of those runs has been developed (http://nuclear.physics.iastate.edu/info/) and will be released. Following an outline of the project, the code structure, capabilities, the DBMS and current efforts, I will suggest a path forward that would benefit greatly from a significant partnership between researchers who use the codes, code developers and the National Nuclear Data efforts. This research is supported in part by DOE under grant DE-FG02-87ER40371 and grant DE-FC02-09ER41582 (SciDAC-UNEDF).

  3. Novel Nanocomposite Materials for Advanced Li-Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Cai

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured materials lie at the heart of fundamental advances in efficient energy storage and/or conversion, in which surface processes and transport kinetics play determining roles. Nanocomposite materials will have a further enhancement in properties compared to their constituent phases. This Review describes some recent developments of nanocomposite materials for high-performance Li-ion rechargeable batteries, including carbon-oxide nanocomposites, polymer-oxide nanocomposites, metal-oxide nanocomposites, and silicon-based nanocomposites, etc. The major goal of this Review is to highlight some new progress in using these nanocomposite materials as electrodes to develop Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability.

  4. Use of a hybrid code for global-scale plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of the use of a hybrid code to model the Earth's magnetosphere on a global scale. The typical hybrid code calculates the interaction of fully kinetic ions and a massless electron fluid with the magnetic field. This code also includes a fluid ion component to approximate the cold ionospheric plasma that spatially overlaps with the discrete particle component. Other innovative features of the code include a numerically generated curvilinear coordinate system and subcycling of the magnetic field update to the particle push. These innovations allow the code to accommodate disparate time and distance scales. The demonstration is a simulation of the noon meridian plane of the magnetosphere. The code exhibits the formation of fast and slow-mode shocks and tearing reconnection at the magnetopause. New results include particle acceleration in the cusp and nearly field aligned currents linking the cusp and polar ionosphere. The paper also describes a density depletion instability and measures to avoid it. 27 refs., 4 figs

  5. The progress of the electrode materials development for lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Kai; Dai Shouhui; Wan Yuhua

    2001-01-01

    The structure and the charge-discharge principle of Li-ion battery are briefly discussed; the progress of electrode materials for Li-ion battery is reviewed in detail. Graphite has found wide applications in commercial Li-ion batteries, however, the hard carbon, especially the carbon with hydrogen is the most promising anode material for Li-ion battery owing to its high capacity, which has now become hot spot of investigation. Following the LiCoO 2 , LiMn 2 O 4 spinel compound becomes the most powerful contestant. On the basis of the authors' results, the synthesis methods of LiMn 2 O 4 and its characterizations are compared. Moreover, the structural properties of intercalation electrode materials that are related to the rechargeable capacity and stability during cycling of lithium ions are also discussed

  6. Surface Modification Technique of Cathode Materials for LI-ION Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yongzhong; Han, Jinduo; Jing, Yan; Jin, Shan; Qi, Taiyuan

    Cathode materials for Li-ion battery LiMn2O4 and LiCo0.1Mn1.9O4 were prepared by soft chemical method. Carbon, which was made by decomposing organic compounds, was used as modifying agent. Cathode material matrix was mixed with water solution that had contained organic compound such as cane sugar, soluble amylum, levulose et al. These mixture were reacted at 150 200 °C for 0.5 4 h in a Teflon-lined autoclave to get a series of homogeneously C-coated cathode materials. The new products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (IR). Morphology of cathode materials was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transition electron microscope (TEM). The new homogeneously C-coated products that were used as cathode materials of lithium-ion battery had good electrochemical stability and cycle performance. This technique has free-pollution, low cost, simpleness and easiness to realize the industrialization of the cathode materials for Li-ion battery.

  7. Ion-atom interactions probed by photofragment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, H.

    1984-01-01

    Photofragment spectroscopy studies energetic and dynamical properties of molecular states interacting with dissociation continuum. So far, data for eighteen diatomic molecular ions have been gathered by this technique. This paper is a review of these investigations, introduced by a discussion of the experimental methods used. The wealth of information accessible by ion photofragment spectroscopy challenges the experimentalist in the application of innovative techniques and the theoretician for less approximate accounts of the Hamiltonian. (Auth.)

  8. Does an electronic continuum correction improve effective short-range ion-ion interactions in aqueous solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Ellen E.; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2018-06-01

    Non-polarizable force fields for hydrated ions not always accurately describe short-range ion-ion interactions, frequently leading to artificial ion clustering in bulk aqueous solutions. This can be avoided by adjusting the nonbonded anion-cation or cation-water Lennard-Jones parameters. This approach has been successfully applied to different systems, but the parameterization is demanding owing to the necessity of separate investigations of each ion pair. Alternatively, polarization effects may effectively be accounted for using the electronic continuum correction (ECC) of Leontyev et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 8024 (2003)], which involves scaling the ionic charges with the inverse square-root of the water high-frequency dielectric permittivity. ECC has proven to perform well for monovalent salts as well as for divalent salts in water. Its performance, however, for multivalent salts with higher valency remains unexplored. The present work illustrates the applicability of the ECC model to trivalent K3PO4 and divalent K2HPO4 in water. We demonstrate that the ECC models, without additional tuning of force field parameters, provide an accurate description of water-mediated interactions between salt ions. This results in predictions of the osmotic coefficients of aqueous K3PO4 and K2HPO4 solutions in good agreement with experimental data. Analysis of ion pairing thermodynamics in terms of contact ion pair (CIP), solvent-separated ion pair, and double solvent-separated ion pair contributions shows that potassium-phosphate CIP formation is stronger with trivalent than with divalent phosphate ions.

  9. Coulomb interaction rules timescales in potassium ion channel tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De March, N.; Prado, S. D.; Brunnet, L. G.

    2018-06-01

    Assuming the selectivity filter of KcsA potassium ion channel may exhibit quantum coherence, we extend a previous model by Vaziri and Plenio (2010 New J. Phys. 12 085001) to take into account Coulomb repulsion between potassium ions. We show that typical ion transit timescales are determined by this interaction, which imposes optimal input/output parameter ranges. Also, as observed in other examples of quantum tunneling in biological systems, the addition of moderate noise helps coherent ion transport.

  10. EMPIRE-II 2.18, Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions Induced Cross-Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Michal Wladyslaw; Panini, Gian Carlo

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined optical, Multi-step Direct (TUL), Multi-step Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus(Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha-particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions and extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions. IAEA1169/06: This version corrects an error in the Absoft compile procedure. 2 - Method of solution: For projectiles with A<5 EMPIRE calculates fusion cross section using spherical optical model transmission coefficients. In the case of Heavy Ion induced reactions the fusion cross section can be determined using various approaches including simplified coupled channels method (code CCFUS). Pre-equilibrium emission is treated in terms of quantum-mechanical theories (TUL-MSD and NVWY-MSC). MSC contribution to the gamma emission is taken into account. These calculations are followed by statistical decay with arbitrary number of subsequent particle emissions. Gamma-ray competition is considered in detail for every decaying compound nucleus. Different options for level densities are available including dynamical approach with collective effects taken into account. EMPIRE contains following third party codes converted into subroutines: - SCAT2 by O. Bersillon, - ORION and TRISTAN by H. Lenske and H. Wolter, - CCFUS by C.H. Dasso and S. Landowne, - BARMOM by A. Sierk. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The code can be easily adjusted to the problem by changing dimensions in the dimensions.h file. The actual limits are set by the available memory. In the current formulation up to 4 ejectiles plus gamma are allowed. This limit can be relaxed

  11. Research and development of advanced materials using ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Susumu [Nagasaki Inst. of Applied Science, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A wide range of research and development activities of advanced material synthesis using ion beams will be discussed, including ion beam applications to the state-of-the-art electronics from giant to nano electronics. (author)

  12. Modification of Polymer Materials by Ion Bombardment: Case Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielinski, D. M.; Jagielski, J.; Lipinski, P.; Pieczynska, D.; Ostaszewska, U.; Piatkowska, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses possibility of application of ion beam bombardment for modification of polymers. Changes to composition, structure and morphology of the surface layer produced by the treatment and their influence on engineering and functional properties of wide range of polymer materials are presented. Special attention has been devoted to modification of tribological properties. Ion bombardment results in significant reduction of friction, which can be explained by increase of hardness and wettability of polymer materials. Hard but thin enough skin does not result in cracking but improves their abrasion resistance. Contrary to conventional chemical treatment ion beam bombardment works even for polymers hardly susceptible to modification like silicone rubber or polyolefines.

  13. Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Noise Prediction Code Technical Documentation and User's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, David A.; Mathews, Douglas C.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the improvements and enhancements made by Pratt & Whitney to two NASA programs which together will calculate noise from a rotor wake/stator interaction. The code is a combination of subroutines from two NASA programs with many new features added by Pratt & Whitney. To do a calculation V072 first uses a semi-empirical wake prediction to calculate the rotor wake characteristics at the stator leading edge. Results from the wake model are then automatically input into a rotor wake/stator interaction analytical noise prediction routine which calculates inlet aft sound power levels for the blade-passage-frequency tones and their harmonics, along with the complex radial mode amplitudes. The code allows for a noise calculation to be performed for a compressor rotor wake/stator interaction, a fan wake/FEGV interaction, or a fan wake/core stator interaction. This report is split into two parts, the first part discusses the technical documentation of the program as improved by Pratt & Whitney. The second part is a user's manual which describes how input files are created and how the code is run.

  14. MIAMI: Microscope and ion accelerator for materials investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinks, J. A.; Berg, J. A. van den; Donnelly, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    A transmission electron microscope (TEM) with in situ ion irradiation has been built at the University of Salford, U.K. The system consists of a Colutron G-2 ion source connected to a JEOL JEM-2000FX TEM via an in-house designed and constructed ion beam transport system. The ion source can deliver ion energies from 0.5 to 10 keV for singly charged ions and can be floated up to 100 kV to allow acceleration to higher energies. Ion species from H to Xe can be produced for the full range of energies allowing the investigation of implantation with light ions such as helium as well as the effects of displacing irradiation with heavy inert or self-ions. The ability to implant light ions at energies low enough such that they come to rest within the thickness of a TEM sample and to also irradiate with heavier species at energies sufficient to cause large numbers of atomic displacements makes this facility ideally suited to the study of materials for use in nuclear environments. TEM allows the internal microstructure of a sample to be imaged at the nanoscale. By irradiating in situ it is possible to observe the dynamic evolution of radiation damage which can occur during irradiation as a result of competing processes within the system being studied. Furthermore, experimental variables such as temperature can be controlled and maintained throughout both irradiation and observation. This combination of capabilities enables an understanding of the underlying atomistic processes to be gained and thus gives invaluable insights into the fundamental physics governing the response of materials to irradiation. Details of the design and specifications of the MIAMI facility are given along with examples of initial experimental results in silicon and silicon carbide.

  15. Four faces of the interaction between ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dóra; Rovó, Petra; Jákli, Imre; Császár, Attila G; Perczel, András

    2017-07-15

    Non-covalent interactions between ions and aromatic rings play an important role in the stabilization of macromolecular complexes; of particular interest are peptides and proteins containing aromatic side chains (Phe, Trp, and Tyr) interacting with negatively (Asp and Glu) and positively (Arg and Lys) charged amino acid residues. The structures of the ion-aromatic-ring complexes are the result of an interaction between the large quadrupole moment of the ring and the charge of the ion. Four attractive interaction types are proposed to be distinguished based on the position of the ion with respect to the plane of the ring: perpendicular cation-π (CP ⊥ ), co-planar cation-π (CP ∥ ), perpendicular anion-π (AP ⊥ ), and co-planar anion-π (AP ∥ ). To understand more than the basic features of these four interaction types, a systematic, high-level quantum chemical study is performed, using the X -  + C 6 H 6 , M +  + C 6 H 6 , X -  + C 6 F 6 , and M +  + C 6 F 6 model systems with X -  = H - , F - , Cl - , HCOO - , CH 3 COO - and M +  = H + , Li + , Na + , NH4+, CH 3 NH3+, whereby C 6 H 6 and C 6 F 6 represent an electron-rich and an electron-deficient π system, respectively. Benchmark-quality interaction energies with small uncertainties, obtained via the so-called focal-point analysis (FPA) technique, are reported for the four interaction types. The computations reveal that the interactions lead to significant stabilization, and that the interaction energy order, given in kcal mol -1 in parentheses, is CP ⊥ (23-37) > AP ⊥ (14-21) > CP ∥ (9-22) > AP ∥ (6-16). A natural bond orbital analysis performed leads to a deeper qualitative understanding of the four interaction types. To facilitate the future quantum chemical characterization of ion-aromatic-ring interactions in large biomolecules, the performance of three density functional theory methods, B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M06-2X, is tested against the FPA benchmarks

  16. Ion beam analysis fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nastasi, Michael; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Ion Beam Analysis: Fundamentals and Applications explains the basic characteristics of ion beams as applied to the analysis of materials, as well as ion beam analysis (IBA) of art/archaeological objects. It focuses on the fundamentals and applications of ion beam methods of materials characterization.The book explains how ions interact with solids and describes what information can be gained. It starts by covering the fundamentals of ion beam analysis, including kinematics, ion stopping, Rutherford backscattering, channeling, elastic recoil detection, particle induced x-ray emission, and nucle

  17. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshova, M., E-mail: maryna.chernyshova@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gribkov, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V.N.; Maslyaev, S.A. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.G. [National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow (Russian Federation); Vilemova, M.; Matejicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Materials perspective for use in mainstream nuclear fusion facilities were studied. • Powerful streams of hot plasma and fast ions were used to induce irradiation. • High temporal, spatial, angular and spectral resolution available in experiments. • Results of irradiation were investigated by number of analysis techniques. - Abstract: A process of irradiating and ablating solid-state targets with hot plasma and fast ion streams in two Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices – PF-6 and PF-1000 was examined by applying a number of diagnostics of nanosecond time resolution. Materials perspective for use in chambers of the mainstream nuclear fusion facilities (mainly with inertial plasma confinement like NIF and Z-machine), intended both for the first wall and for constructions, have been irradiated in these simulators. Optical microscopy, SEM, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, images in secondary electrons and in characteristic X-ray luminescence of different elements, and X-ray elemental analysis, gave results on damageability for a number of materials including low-activated ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, β-alloy of Ti, as well as two types of W and a composite on its base. With an increase of the number of shots irradiating the surface, its morphology changes from weakly pronounced wave-like structures or ridges to strongly developed ones. At later stages, due to the action of the secondary plasma produced near the target materials they melted, yielding both blisters and a fracturing pattern: first along the grain and then “in-between” the grains creating an intergranular net of microcracks. At the highest values of power flux densities multiple bubbles appeared. Furthermore, in this last case the cracks were developed because of microstresses at the solidification of melt. Presence of deuterium within the irradiated ferritic steel surface nanolayers is explained by capture of deuterons in lattice defects of the types of impurity atoms

  18. Proton-ion collisions: behind the scenes of an exotic interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Protons to the right, ions to the left: the basic principle of proton-ion collisions at the LHC might seem straightforward. However, this is an almost unprecedented mode of collider operation, certainly unique at the energy provided by the LHC. In addition to being a remarkable technical achievement, this interaction between a proton and an ion can potentially contribute a lot to the understanding of the properties of matter in its primordial state.   Prior to last week, the LHC had only collided protons with protons and lead ions with lead ions. These were indeed the two operational schemes the LHC was designed for. However, since science can often evolve in directions that were not necessarily expected at the beginning of a project, over the years the scientific community has become more and more interested in the hybrid type of interaction – that between protons and ions. Last week’s collisions were only a test for the teams involved in the operation of the LHC, in prepara...

  19. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doe, Robert Ellis; Downie, Craig Michael; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George Hamilton; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin Aslaug; Eaglesham, David

    2016-07-26

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqueous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  20. ANTHEM: a two-dimensional multicomponent self-consistent hydro-electron transport code for laser-matter interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The ANTHEM code for the study of CO 2 -laser-generated transport is outlined. ANTHEM treats the background plasma as coupled Eulerian thermal and ion fluids, and the suprathermal electrons as either a third fluid or a body of evolving collisional PIC particles. The electrons scatter off the ions; the suprathermals drag against the thermal background. Self-consistent E- and B-fields are computed by the Implicit Moment Method. The current status of the code is described. Typical output from ANTHEM is discussed with special application to Augmented-Return-Current CO 2 -laser-driven targets

  1. Advanced characterization of materials using swift ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabacniks, Manfredo H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Swift ion beams are powerful non destructive tools for material analysis especially thin films. In spite of their high energy, usually several MeV/u, little energy is deposited by the ion on the sample. Energetic ions also use to stop far away (or outside) the inspected volume, hence producing negligible damage to the sample. Ion beam methods provide quantitative trace element analysis of any atomic element (and some isotopes) in a sample and are able to yield elemental depth profiles with spatial resolution of the order of 10mm. Relying on nuclear properties of the atoms, these methods are insensitive to the chemical environment of the element, consequently not limited by matrix effects. Ion beam methods are multielemental, can handle insulating materials, are quick (an analysis usually takes less than 15 minutes), and need little (if any) sample preparation. Ion beams are also sensitive to surface roughness and sample porosity and can be used to quickly inspect these properties in a sample. The Laboratory for Ion Beam Analysis of the University of Sao Paulo, LAMFI, is a multi-user facility dedicated to provide Ion Beam Methods like PIXE, RBS, FRS and NRA techniques for the analysis of materials and thin films. Operating since 1994, LAMFI is being used mostly by many researchers from within and outside USP, most of them non specialists in ion beam methods, but in need of ion beam analysis to carry out their research. At LAMFI, during the last 9 years, more than 50% of the accelerator time was dedicated to analysis, usually PIXE or RBS. 21% was down time and about 14% of the time was used for the development of ion beam methods which includes the use of RBS for roughness characterization exploring the shading of the beam by structures on the surface and by modeling the RBS spectrum as the product of a normalized RBS spectrum and a height density distribution function of the surface. Single element thick target PIXE analysis is being developed to obtain the thin

  2. Advanced characterization of materials using swift ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabacniks, Manfredo H.

    2011-01-01

    Swift ion beams are powerful non destructive tools for material analysis especially thin films. In spite of their high energy, usually several MeV/u, little energy is deposited by the ion on the sample. Energetic ions also use to stop far away (or outside) the inspected volume, hence producing negligible damage to the sample. Ion beam methods provide quantitative trace element analysis of any atomic element (and some isotopes) in a sample and are able to yield elemental depth profiles with spatial resolution of the order of 10mm. Relying on nuclear properties of the atoms, these methods are insensitive to the chemical environment of the element, consequently not limited by matrix effects. Ion beam methods are multielemental, can handle insulating materials, are quick (an analysis usually takes less than 15 minutes), and need little (if any) sample preparation. Ion beams are also sensitive to surface roughness and sample porosity and can be used to quickly inspect these properties in a sample. The Laboratory for Ion Beam Analysis of the University of Sao Paulo, LAMFI, is a multi-user facility dedicated to provide Ion Beam Methods like PIXE, RBS, FRS and NRA techniques for the analysis of materials and thin films. Operating since 1994, LAMFI is being used mostly by many researchers from within and outside USP, most of them non specialists in ion beam methods, but in need of ion beam analysis to carry out their research. At LAMFI, during the last 9 years, more than 50% of the accelerator time was dedicated to analysis, usually PIXE or RBS. 21% was down time and about 14% of the time was used for the development of ion beam methods which includes the use of RBS for roughness characterization exploring the shading of the beam by structures on the surface and by modeling the RBS spectrum as the product of a normalized RBS spectrum and a height density distribution function of the surface. Single element thick target PIXE analysis is being developed to obtain the thin

  3. Sorption-spectroscopic and test methods for the determination of metal ions on the solid-phase of ion-exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvin, Sergey B; Dedkova, Valentina P; Shvoeva, Ol'ga P

    2000-01-01

    Data on sorption-spectroscopic and test methods for the determination of metal ions on the solid-phase of ion-exchange materials published over the past decade are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of ion-exchange materials are discussed. The detection limits and selectivity of these techniques are described. The bibliography includes 151 references.

  4. First measurements of the ion energy distribution at the divertor strike point during DIII-D disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, P.B.; Brooks, N.H.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.; Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Whyte, D.

    1995-12-01

    Plasma/wall interaction studies are being carried out using the Divertor Materials Exposure System (DiMES) on DIII-D. The objective of the experiment is to determine the kinetic energy and flux of deuterium ions reaching the divertor target during argon-induced radiative disruptions. The experiment utilizes a special slotted ion analyzer mounted over a Si sample to collect the fast charge-exchange (CX) deuterium neutrals emitted within the recycled cold neutral layer (CNL) which serves as a CX target for the incident ions. A theoretical interpretation of the experiment reveals a strong forward pitch-angle dependence in the approaching ion distribution function. The depth distribution of the trapped D in the Si sample was measured using low-energy direct recoil spectroscopy. Comparison with the TRIM code using monoenergetic ions indicated that the best fit to the data was obtained for an ion energy of 100 eV

  5. Reaction path of energetic materials using THOR code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durães, L.; Campos, J.; Portugal, A.

    1998-07-01

    The method of predicting reaction path, using THOR code, allows for isobar and isochor adiabatic combustion and CJ detonation regimes, the calculation of the composition and thermodynamic properties of reaction products of energetic materials. THOR code assumes the thermodynamic equilibria of all possible products, for the minimum Gibbs free energy, using HL EoS. The code allows the possibility of estimating various sets of reaction products, obtained successively by the decomposition of the original reacting compound, as a function of the released energy. Two case studies of thermal decomposition procedure were selected, calculated and discussed—pure Ammonium Nitrate and its based explosive ANFO, and Nitromethane—because their equivalence ratio is respectively lower, near and greater than the stoicheiometry. Predictions of reaction path are in good correlation with experimental values, proving the validity of proposed method.

  6. An effective method to screen sodium-based layered materials for sodium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Zihe; Yao, Sai; Chen, An; Zhao, Xudong; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    Due to the high cost and insufficient resource of lithium, sodium-ion batteries are widely investigated for large-scale applications. Typically, insertion-type materials possess better cyclic stability than alloy-type and conversion-type ones. Therefore, in this work, we proposed a facile and effective method to screen sodium-based layered materials based on Materials Project database as potential candidate insertion-type materials for sodium ion batteries. The obtained Na-based layered materials contains 38 kinds of space group, which reveals that the credibility of our screening approach would not be affected by the space group. Then, some important indexes of the representative materials, including the average voltage, volume change and sodium ion mobility, were further studied by means of density functional theory computations. Some materials with extremely low volume changes and Na diffusion barriers are promising candidates for sodium ion batteries. We believe that our classification algorithm could also be used to search for other alkali and multivalent ion-based layered materials, to accelerate the development of battery materials.

  7. Novel lanthanide doped micro- and mesoporous solids. Characterization of ion-host-interactions, species distribution and luminescence properties using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessner, Andre

    2010-12-01

    In this work lanthanide-doped microporous zeolites, microporous-mesoporous hybrid materials and mesoporous silicates were investigated regarding their luminescence properties and the ion-host-interactions using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Thereby, time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) provide information in the wavelength and time domain. For the analysis of the TRES a broad set of analytic methods was applied and thus a corresponding ''toolbox'' developed. Fitting of the luminescence decays was performed with a discrete number of exponentials and supported by luminescence decay times distributions. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra (TRANES), an advancement of TRES, could be used for the determination of the number of emissive lanthanide species in porous materials for the first time. Calculation of the decay-associated spectra (DAS) allowed the correlation of spectral information with luminescence decay times and thus delivered the luminescence spectra of the different europium species. For europium(III) we could use in addition the time-dependent asymmetry ratio and spectral evolution of the 5 D 0 - 7 F 0 -transition with time to obtain further information about the distribution of the lanthanide ions in the host material. Luminescence decay times and spectra allowed conclusions on the number of OH-oscillators in and the symmetry of the first coordination sphere. For the microporous and microporous-mesoporous materials were found different lanthanide species, which were characterized by the above mentioned methods. These lanthanide species can be found on different positions in the host material. One position is located deep in the pore system. Here, lanthanide ions are hardly accessible for water and mainly coordinated by framework oxygens. This results in long luminescence decay times and distorted coordination spheres. The second position can be found near or on the outer surface or in the mesopores. Lanthanide ions located here, are

  8. Investigation of structural materials of reactors using high-energy heavy-ion irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguang

    2007-01-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials of fission/fusion reactors is mainly attributed to the evolution of intensive atom displacement damage induced by energetic particles (n, α and/or fission fragments) and high-rate helium doping by direct α particle bombardments and/or (n, α) reactions. It can cause severe degradation of reactor structural materials such as surface blistering, bulk void swelling, deformation, fatigue, embrittlement, stress erosion corrosion and so on that will significantly affect the operation safety of reactors. However, up to now, behavior of structural materials at the end of their service can hardly be fully tested in a real reactor. In the present work, damage process in reactor structural materials is briefly introduced, then the advantages of energetic ion implantation/irradiation especially high-energy heavy ion irradiation are discussed, and several typical examples on simulation of radiation effects in reactor candidate structural materials using high-energy heavy ion irradiations are pronounced. Experimental results and theoretical analysis suggested that irradiation with energetic particles especially high-energy heavy ions is very useful technique for simulating the evolution of microstructures and macro-properties of reactor structural materials. Furthermore, an on-going plan of material irradiation experiments using high energy H- and He-ions based on the Heavy Ion Research Facilities in Lanzhou (HIRFL) is also briefly interpreted. (authors)

  9. Applications of the lahet simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, L.; Gavron, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.

  10. Applications of the LAHET simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, L.S.; Gavron, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article

  11. ISOGEN: Interactive isotope generation and depletion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkata Subbaiah, Kamatam

    2016-01-01

    ISOGEN is an interactive code for solving first order coupled linear differential equations with constant coefficients for a large number of isotopes, which are produced or depleted by the processes of radioactive decay or through neutron transmutation or fission. These coupled equations can be written in a matrix notation involving radioactive decay constants and transmutation coefficients, and the eigenvalues of thus formed matrix vary widely (several tens of orders), and hence no single method of solution is suitable for obtaining precise estimate of concentrations of isotopes. Therefore, different methods of solutions are followed, namely, matrix exponential method, Bateman series method, and Gauss-Seidel iteration method, as was followed in the ORIGEN-2 code. ISOGEN code is written in a modern computer language, VB.NET version 2013 for Windows operating system version 7, which enables one to provide many interactive features between the user and the program. The output results depend on the input neutron database employed and the time step involved in the calculations. The present program can display the information about the database files, and the user has to select one which suits the current need. The program prints the 'WARNING' information if the time step is too large, which is decided based on the built-in convergence criterion. Other salient interactive features provided are (i) inspection of input data that goes into calculation, (ii) viewing of radioactive decay sequence of isotopes (daughters, precursors, photons emitted) in a graphical format, (iii) solution of parent and daughter products by direct Bateman series solution method, (iv) quick input method and context sensitive prompts for guiding the novice user, (v) view of output tables for any parameter of interest, and (vi) output file can be read to generate new information and can be viewed or printed since the program stores basic nuclide concentration unlike other batch jobs. The sample

  12. Profiling hydrogen in materials using ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, J.F.; Wu, C.P.; Williams, P.

    1977-01-01

    Over the last few years many ion beam techniques have been reported for the profiling of hydrogen in materials. Nine of these were evaluated using similar samples of hydrogen ion-implanted into silicon. When possible the samples were analyzed using two or more techniques to confirm the ion-implanted accuracy. The results of this analysis which has produced a consensus profile of H in silicon which is useful as a calibration standard are reported. The analytical techniques used have capabilities ranging from very high depth resolution (approximately 50 A) and high sensitivity (less than 1 ppM) to deep probes for hydrogen which can sample throughout thin sheets

  13. Solvent effects on ion-receptor interactions in the presence of an external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2016-11-09

    In this work we investigated the influence of an external electric field on the arrangement of the solvent shells around ions interacting with a carbon-based receptor. Our survey reveals that the mechanism of interaction between a monoatomic ion and a π-type ion receptor varies by the variation in the solvent polarity, the nature of the ion, and the strength of the external field. The characteristics of the ion-surface interaction in nonpolar solvents are similar to those observed in a vacuum. However, in water, we identified two mechanisms. Soft and polarizable ions preferentially interact with the π-receptor. In contrast, two bonded states were found for hard ions. A fully solvated ion, weakly interacting with the receptor at weak field, and a strong π-complex at the strong-field regime were identified. An abrupt variation in the potential energy surface (PES) associated with the rearrangement of the solvation shell on the surface of the receptor induced by an external field was observed both in implicit and explicit solvent environments. The electric field at which the solvation shell breaks is proportional to the hardness of the ion as has been suggested recently based on experimental observations.

  14. The FLUKA code for space applications Recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, V; Battistoni, G; Campanella, M; Carboni, M; Cerutti, F; Empl, A; Fassò, A; Ferrari, A; Gadioli, E; Garzelli, M V; Lee, K; Ottolenghi, A; Pelliccioni, M; Pinsky, L S; Ranft, J; Roesler, S; Sala, P R; Wilson, T L

    2004-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code is widely used for fundamental research, radioprotection and dosimetry, hybrid nuclear energy system and cosmic ray calculations. The validity of its physical models has been benchmarked against a variety of experimental data over a wide range of energies, ranging from accelerator data to cosmic ray showers in the earth atmosphere. The code is presently undergoing several developments in order to better fit the needs of space applications. The generation of particle spectra according to up-to- date cosmic ray data as well as the effect of the solar and geomagnetic modulation have been implemented and already successfully applied to a variety of problems. The implementation of suitable models for heavy ion nuclear interactions has reached an operational stage. At medium/high energy FLUKA is using the DPMJET model. The major task of incorporating heavy ion interactions from a few GeV/n down to the threshold for inelastic collisions is also progressing and promising results h...

  15. Smart materials for energy storage in Li-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf E Abdel-Ghany

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced lithium-ion batteries contain smart materials having the function of insertion electrodes in the form of powders with specific and optimized electrochemical properties. Different classes can be considered: the surface modified active particles at either positive or negative electrodes, the nano-composite electrodes and the blended materials. In this paper, various systems are described, which illustrate the improvement of lithium-ion batteries in term of specific energy and power, thermal stability and life cycling.

  16. Dynamic behaviour of interphases and its implication on high-energy-density cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangda; Dolocan, Andrei; Oh, Pilgun; Celio, Hugo; Park, Suhyeon; Cho, Jaephil; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Undesired electrode–electrolyte interactions prevent the use of many high-energy-density cathode materials in practical lithium-ion batteries. Efforts to address their limited service life have predominantly focused on the active electrode materials and electrolytes. Here an advanced three-dimensional chemical and imaging analysis on a model material, the nickel-rich layered lithium transition-metal oxide, reveals the dynamic behaviour of cathode interphases driven by conductive carbon additives (carbon black) in a common nonaqueous electrolyte. Region-of-interest sensitive secondary-ion mass spectrometry shows that a cathode-electrolyte interphase, initially formed on carbon black with no electrochemical bias applied, readily passivates the cathode particles through mutual exchange of surface species. By tuning the interphase thickness, we demonstrate its robustness in suppressing the deterioration of the electrode/electrolyte interface during high-voltage cell operation. Our results provide insights on the formation and evolution of cathode interphases, facilitating development of in situ surface protection on high-energy-density cathode materials in lithium-based batteries. PMID:28443608

  17. Modeling warm dense matter experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR code and the move toward exascale computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.; Liu, W.; Barnard, J.; Friedman, A.; Logan, G.; Eder, D.; Fisher, A.; Masters, N.; Bertozzi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li + ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related computational changes on general modeling codes in fusion. (authors)

  18. High fluence effects on ion implantation stopping and range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Tek, Z.; Oeztarhan, A.; Akbas, N.; Brown, I.G.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a code STOPPO which can be used to modify the more-widely used ion implantation codes to more accurately predict the mean nuclear and electronic stopping power, preferential sputtering and range of heavy ions in monatomic target materials. In our simulations an effective atomic number and effective atomic mass are introduced into conveniently available analytical stopping cross-sections and a better fitting function for preferential sputtering yield is carefully evaluated for each ion implantation. The accuracy of the code confirmed experimentally by comparison with measured Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) concentration profiles for 130 keV Zr ions implanted into Be to fluences of 1 x 10 17 , 2 x 10 17 and 4 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 . We find a steady increase in the mean nuclear and electronic stopping powers of the target; the increase in nuclear stopping power is much greater than the increase in electronic stopping power

  19. Investigation of Ion-Solvent Interactions in Nonaqueous Electrolytes Using in Situ Liquid SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Su, Mao; Yu, Xiaofei; Zhou, Yufan; Wang, Jungang; Cao, Ruiguo; Xu, Wu; Wang, Chongmin; Baer, Donald R.; Borodin, Oleg; Xu, Kang; Wang, Yanting; Wang, Xue-Lin; Xu, Zhijie; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2018-02-06

    Ion-solvent interactions in non-aqueous electrolytes are of fundamental interest and practical importance, yet debates regarding ion preferential solvation and coordination numbers persist. In this work, in situ liquid SIMS was used to examine ion-solvent interactions in three representative electrolytes, i.e., lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) at 1.0 M in ethylene carbonate (EC)-dimethyl carbonate (DMC), and lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) at both low (1.0 M) and high (4.0 M) concentrations in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME). In the positive ion mode, solid molecular evidence strongly supports the preferential solvation of Li+ by EC. Besides, from the negative spectra, we also found that PF6- forms association with EC, which has been neglected by previous studies due to the relatively weak interaction. While in both LiFSI in DME electrolytes, no evidence shows that FSI- is associated with DME. Furthermore, strong salt ion cluster signals were observed in the 1.0 M LiPF6 in EC-DMC electrolyte, suggesting that a significant amount of Li+ ions stay in vicinity of anions. In sharp comparison, weak ion cluster signals were detected in dilute LiFSI in DME electrolyte, suggesting most ions are well separated, in agreement with our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results. These findings indicate that with virtues of little bias on detecting positive and negative ions and the capability of directly analyzing concentrated electrolytes, in situ liquid SIMS is a powerful tool that can provide key evidence for improved understanding on the ion-solvent interactions in non-aqueous electrolytes. Therefore, we anticipate wide applications of in situ liquid SIMS on investigations of various ion-solvent interactions in the near future.

  20. Physics of electron and lithium-ion transport in electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Musheng; Xu Bo; Ouyang Chuying

    2016-01-01

    The physics of ionic and electrical conduction at electrode materials of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are briefly summarized here, besides, we review the current research on ionic and electrical conduction in electrode material incorporating experimental and simulation studies. Commercial LIBs have been widely used in portable electronic devices and are now developed for large-scale applications in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and stationary distributed power stations. However, due to the physical limits of the materials, the overall performance of today’s LIBs does not meet all the requirements for future applications, and the transport problem has been one of the main barriers to further improvement. The electron and Li-ion transport behaviors are important in determining the rate capacity of LIBs. (topical review)

  1. Documentation for TRACE: an interactive beam-transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, K.R.; Rusthoi, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    TRACE is an interactive, first-order, beam-dynamics computer program. TRACE includes space-charge forces and mathematical models for a number of beamline elements not commonly found in beam-transport codes, such as permanent-magnet quadrupoles, rf quadrupoles, rf gaps, accelerator columns, and accelerator tanks. TRACE provides an immediate graphic display of calculative results, has a powerful and easy-to-use command procedure, includes eight different types of beam-matching or -fitting capabilities, and contains its own internal HELP package. This report describes the models and equations used for each of the transport elements, the fitting procedures, and the space-charge/emittance calculations, and provides detailed instruction for using the code

  2. Advanced Electric and Magnetic Material Models for FDTD Electromagnetic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Brian R; Nelson, Scott D

    2005-01-01

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which requires nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes an...

  3. Investigations on Cs-free alternative materials for negative hydrogen ion formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurutz, Uwe

    2017-01-19

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) represents a main auxiliary heating and current drive system for thermonuclear fusion devices. For ITER, a total heating power of up to 33 MW will be delivered for up to one hour pulses at particle energies of up to 1 MeV by two NBI systems. The respective ion sources will therefore have to allow for the extraction and acceleration of negative hydrogen ions at a current density of 200 A/m{sup 2} from a low pressure low temperature hydrogen plasma. Also for the succeeding demonstration reactor DEMO the application of NBI is currently discussed. Respective systems will, however, have to fulfil even higher demands, like higher powers (up to 135 MW), longer pulse lengths (2 h or even cw operation), and more restrictive constrains regarding the reliability and stability. Today efficient NBI negative hydrogen ion sources are based mainly on the conversion of positive hydrogen ions and/or hydrogen atoms at a grid surface coated with caesium. Cs is used for reducing the grid's work function which significantly enhances the particle conversion probability. However, the alkali metal is chemically very reactive and easily forms compounds with residual gas impurities. Furthermore, complex redistribution dynamics of the deposited Cs layer is given. This inherently links the application of Cs with a temporal and spatial non-stability of the negative ion yield, which contradicts the required reliability of a DEMO NBI system. Thus, for DEMO, Cs-free alternative materials for negative ion formation are investigated within this work at a flexible laboratory experiment. An ECR discharge is used which provides comparable parameters (pressure, densities, particle fluxes and -energies) to the NBI ion sources. Negative ion formation is measured above different material samples via laser photodetachment together with global plasma parameters using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The plasma parameters are used for modelling the

  4. Investigations on Cs-free alternative materials for negative hydrogen ion formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurutz, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) represents a main auxiliary heating and current drive system for thermonuclear fusion devices. For ITER, a total heating power of up to 33 MW will be delivered for up to one hour pulses at particle energies of up to 1 MeV by two NBI systems. The respective ion sources will therefore have to allow for the extraction and acceleration of negative hydrogen ions at a current density of 200 A/m 2 from a low pressure low temperature hydrogen plasma. Also for the succeeding demonstration reactor DEMO the application of NBI is currently discussed. Respective systems will, however, have to fulfil even higher demands, like higher powers (up to 135 MW), longer pulse lengths (2 h or even cw operation), and more restrictive constrains regarding the reliability and stability. Today efficient NBI negative hydrogen ion sources are based mainly on the conversion of positive hydrogen ions and/or hydrogen atoms at a grid surface coated with caesium. Cs is used for reducing the grid's work function which significantly enhances the particle conversion probability. However, the alkali metal is chemically very reactive and easily forms compounds with residual gas impurities. Furthermore, complex redistribution dynamics of the deposited Cs layer is given. This inherently links the application of Cs with a temporal and spatial non-stability of the negative ion yield, which contradicts the required reliability of a DEMO NBI system. Thus, for DEMO, Cs-free alternative materials for negative ion formation are investigated within this work at a flexible laboratory experiment. An ECR discharge is used which provides comparable parameters (pressure, densities, particle fluxes and -energies) to the NBI ion sources. Negative ion formation is measured above different material samples via laser photodetachment together with global plasma parameters using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The plasma parameters are used for modelling the inherently

  5. Biosorption of strontium ions from aqueous solution using modified eggshell materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metwally, Sayed S.; Rizk, Hoda E.; Gasser, Mona S. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Hot Laboratories Center

    2017-07-01

    Green composites emphasize renewable starting materials for better economy using biomass materials. Therefore, low-cost composite biosorbent was prepared by modification of eggshell material using heteropoly acid for removal of strontium ions from aqueous solution. The resulted composite was characterized and evaluated for the sorption process using the batch technique. Low concentration of strontium ions was used to evaluate the sorption sensitivity of the prepared composite. The obtained experimental results illustrated that the modification process of eggshell material enhanced the percent uptake from 49.9 to 95.7%. From kinetic studies, the sorption of strontium ions follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The isotherm studies indicated that Langmuir is more applicable than Freundlich isotherm. Moreover, Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm was studied. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption process is spontaneous and has endothermic nature. Strontium ions can be desorbed from the modified eggshell using HNO{sub 3}, desorption percent was found to be 96.4%; the results revealed the reusability of the modified eggshell for further sorption.

  6. Interaction of candidate plasma facing materials with tokamak plasma in COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Havránek, Vladimír; Naydenkova, Diana; Klevarová, Veronika; Petersson, P.; Gasior, P.; Hakola, A.; Rubel, M.; Fortuna, E.; Kolehmainen, J.; Tervakangas, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 493, September (2017), s. 102-119 ISSN 0022-3115. [International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/15./. Aix-en-Provence, 18.05.2015-22.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : erosion * COMPASS tokamak * plasma-material interaction * ion beam analysis Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics; JF - Nuclear Energetics (UJF-V) OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering ; Nuclear related engineering (UJF-V) Impact factor: 2.048, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0022311517301708

  7. Progress of laser-plasma interaction simulations with the particle-in-cell code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Hitoshi; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Taguchi, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    As the laser-plasma interaction is a non-equilibrium, non-linear and relativistic phenomenon, we must introduce a microscopic method, namely, the relativistic electromagnetic PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulation code. The PIC code requires a huge number of particles to validate simulation results, and its task is very computation-intensive. Thus simulation researches by the PIC code have been progressing along with advances in computer technology. Recently, parallel computers with tremendous computational power have become available, and thus we can perform three-dimensional PIC simulations for the laser-plasma interaction to investigate laser fusion. Some simulation results are shown with figures. We discuss a recent trend of large-scale PIC simulations that enable direct comparison between experimental facts and computational results. We also discharge/lightning simulations by the extended PIC code, which include various atomic and relaxation processes. (author)

  8. A Monte Carlo track structure code for low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, S; Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Hoshi, M; Ishikawa, M; Shizuma, K

    2002-01-01

    A code is described for simulation of protons (100 eV to 10 MeV) track structure in water vapor. The code simulates molecular interaction by interaction for the transport of primary ions and secondary electrons in the form of ionizations and excitations. When a low velocity ion collides with the atoms or molecules of a target, the ion may also capture or lose electrons. The probabilities for these processes are described by the quantity cross-section. Although proton track simulation at energies above Bragg peak (>0.3 MeV) has been achieved to a high degree of precision, simulations at energies near or below the Bragg peak have only been attempted recently because of the lack of relevant cross-section data. As the hydrogen atom has a different ionization cross-section from that of a proton, charge exchange processes need to be considered in order to calculate stopping power for low energy protons. In this paper, we have used state-of-the-art Monte Carlo track simulation techniques, in conjunction with the pub...

  9. Transportation of ions through cement based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterji, S.

    1994-01-01

    Transportation of ions, both anions and cations, through cement based materials is one of the important processes in their durability and as such has been studied very extensively. It has been studied from the point of view of the reinforcement corrosion, alkali-silica reaction, sulfate attack on cement and concrete, as well as in the context of the use of the cement based materials in the disposal of nuclear waste. In this paper the fundamental equations of diffusion, i.e. Fick's two equations, Nernst and Nernst-Planck equations have been collected. Attention has been drawn to the fact that Fick's two equations are valid for non-ionic diffusants and that for ions the relevant equations are those of Nernst and Nernst-Planck. The basic measurement techniques have also been commented upon

  10. Slow, target associated particles produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamovich, M I; Aggarwal, M M; Alexandrov, Y A; Andreeva, N P; Anson, Z V; Arora, R; Avetyan, F A; Badyal, S K; Basova, E; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bogdanov, V G; Bubnov, V I; Burnett, T H; Cai, X; Chasnikov, I Y; Chernova, L P; Chernyavsky, M M; Dressel, B; Eligbaeva, G Z; Eremenko, L E; Friedlander, E M; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S; Gerassimov, S G; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V; Heckman, H H; Huang, H; Jakobsson, B; Judek, B; Kachroo, S; Kadyrov, F G; Kalyachkina, G S; Kanygina, E K; Karabova, M; Kaul, G L; Kaur, M; Kharlamov, S P; Koss, Y; Krasnov,; Kumar,; Lal, P; Larionova,; Lepetan,; Lindstrom,; Liu,; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J; Lukicheva, N S; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Marutyan,; Maslennikova, N V; Mittra, I S; Mookerjee, S; Mueller, C; Nasrulaeva, H; Nasyrov, S H; Navotny, V S; Orlova, G I; Otterlund, I; Palsania, H S; Peresadko, N G; Petrov, N V; Plyushchev, V A; Qian, W Y; Raniwala,; EMU01 Collaboration

    1991-06-20

    The slow, target associated particles produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions are a quantitative probe of the cascading processes in the spectator parts of the target nucleus. These processes are directly influenced by the proper timescale for the formation of hadronic matter. In this letter we show experimental data on singly and multiply charged particles, with velocities smaller than 0.7c, produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions in nuclear emulsion. (orig.).

  11. Web- and system-code based, interactive, nuclear power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. D.; Jain, P.; Rizwan, U.

    2006-01-01

    Using two different approaches, on-line, web- and system-code based graphical user interfaces have been developed for reactor system analysis. Both are LabVIEW (graphical programming language developed by National Instruments) based systems that allow local users as well as those at remote sites to run, interact and view the results of the system code in a web browser. In the first approach, only the data written by the system code in a tab separated ASCII output file is accessed and displayed graphically. In the second approach, LabVIEW virtual instruments are coupled with the system code as dynamic link libraries (DLL). RELAP5 is used as the system code to demonstrate the capabilities of these approaches. From collaborative projects between teams in geographically remote locations to providing system code experience to distance education students, these tools can be very beneficial in many areas of teaching and R and D. (authors)

  12. Two dimensional simulation of ion beam-plasm interaction | Echi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hybrid plasma simulation is a model in which different components of the plasma are treated differently. In this work the ions are treated as particles while the electrons are treated as a neutralizing background fluid through which electric signals may propagate. Deuterium ion beams incident on the tritium plasma interact ...

  13. Bench-Scale Studies with Argentine Ion Exchange Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), as well as international atomic energy commission, facilities use ion exchange materials for purification of aqueous streams in the nuclear industry. Unfortunately, the use of the ion exchange materials creates a waste stream that can be very high in both organic and radioactive constituents. Therefore, disposal of the spent resins often becomes an economic problem because of the large volumes of resin produced and the relatively few technologies that are capable of economically stabilizing this waste. Vitrification of this waste stream presents a reasonable disposable alternative because of its inherent destruction capabilities, the volume reductions obtainable, and the durable product that it produces

  14. Light ions and ozone - generation and interactions with living organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriha, V.; Aubrecht, L.

    2005-01-01

    With directly in the living organism born ions exception, LNI coming through three phases: ionisation, attachment by the electronegative molecules and the clusters formation due to local electrostatic interactions. The quantitative analysis of physical parameters leads to conclusion that we cannot find any physical property (till known) explaining the positive affect of LNI on living organisms. Analysis of possible mechanism produces several hypotheses of LNI-organism interaction. A simplified semi-quantitative model of respiratory tract was developed for estimation of ions and ozone interaction with living organisms. A formation of oxygen radicals and products of their chain-reactions in intrinsic conditions is discussed

  15. WKB: an interactive code for solving differential equations using phase integral methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    A small code for the analysis of ordinary differential equations interactively through the use of Phase Integral Methods (WKB) has been written for use on the DEC 10. This note is a descriptive manual for those interested in using the code

  16. Interaction of High Flash Point Electrolytes and PE-Based Separators for Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Kaufmann, Christoph; Müller, Marcus; Hanemann, Thomas

    2015-08-27

    In this study, promising electrolytes for use in Li-ion batteries are studied in terms of interacting and wetting polyethylene (PE) and particle-coated PE separators. The electrolytes are characterized according to their physicochemical properties, where the flow characteristics and the surface tension are of particular interest for electrolyte-separator interactions. The viscosity of the electrolytes is determined to be in a range of η = 4-400 mPa∙s and surface tension is finely graduated in a range of γL = 23.3-38.1 mN∙m(-1). It is verified that the technique of drop shape analysis can only be used in a limited matter to prove the interaction, uptake and penetration of electrolytes by separators. Cell testing of Li|NMC half cells reveals that those cell results cannot be inevitably deduced from physicochemical electrolyte properties as well as contact angle analysis. On the other hand, techniques are more suitable which detect liquid penetration into the interior of the separator. It is expected that the results can help fundamental researchers as well as users of novel electrolytes in current-day Li-ion battery technologies for developing and using novel material combinations.

  17. Review of intense-ion-beam propagation with a view toward measuring ion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.

    1982-01-01

    The subject of this review is intense ion beam propagation and the possibilities of measuring time dependent ion energy in the beam. Propagation effects discussed include charge separation, charge and current autoneutralization, electron thermalization and current neutralization decay. The interaction of a plasma beam with material obstacles, like collimators, and with transverse magnetic fields is also described. Depending on beam energy, density and pulse length, these interactions can include material ablation with plasmadynamic flow and undeflected propagation across transverse magnetic fields by a polarization drift. On the basis of this review I conclude that three diagnostics: a single floating potential probe, net current probes (Faraday cups) and a Rutherford scattering spectrometer appear capable of giving prompt, time dependent ion energy measurements

  18. Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 73 m 3 of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on solvent

  19. Thermal interactions of a molten core debris pool with surrounding structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, L. Jr.; Cheung, F.B.; Farhadieh, R.; Stein, R.P.; Gabor, J.D.; Bingle, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results on individual aspects of the overall problem of the interaction of a large mass of LMFBR core debris with concrete or other materials are reviewed. Results of recent heat transfer experiments with molten UO 2 have indicated the importance of internal thermal radiation and methods to take account of this are developed. Effects of gas release and density difference are considered. The GROWS-2 Code is used to illustrate the effects of various assumptions

  20. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop's program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants

  1. Elastic and inelastic surface effects on ion penetration and the resulting sputtering and backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The computer code ITMC (Ion Transport in Materials and Compounds) has been developed to study in detail the transport of charged particles in solid materials and surface related phenomena such as sputtered atoms and backscattered ions. The code is based on Monte Carlo methods to follow the path and the damage produced by the charged particles in three dimension as they slow down in target materials. Single-element targets as well as alloys with possible different surface and bulk compositions or with layered structures of different materials can be used. Various models developed to calculate the inelastic energy losses with target electrons can be used in the code. Most known interatomic potentials can also be used to calculate the elastic energy losses. The major advantages of the code are its ability and flexibility to use and compare various models of elastic and inelastic energy losses in any target with different compounds and different surface and bulk composition

  2. Study of electron vibrational interaction parameters in chlorophosphate activated with Eu2+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoyar, Priyanka D.; Dhoble, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of theoretical study of photoluminescence of Eu 2+ ions activated chlorophosphate M 5.17 (PO 4 ) 3 Cl 5 :Eu 2+ with M = Ca, Sr and Ba estimating electron-vibrational interaction (EVI) parameters such as Huang–Rhys factor, effective phonon energy, Stokes shift and zero phonon line position. Validity of the calculated result was established by modeling the emission line which was found to be in good agreement with the measured photoluminescence spectrum of Eu 2+ doped chorophosphates. - Highlights: • The EVI parameters such as Huang–Rhys factor, effective phonon energy and zero phonon line position were estimated. • Eu 2+ ion emission observed in chlorophosphate. • Material analyzed in this work have intermediate Huang–Rhys factor, high Stokes shift and low effective phonon energy

  3. Experimental benchmark of the NINJA code for application to the Linac4 H- ion source plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briefi, S.; Mattei, S.; Rauner, D.; Lettry, J.; Tran, M. Q.; Fantz, U.

    2017-10-01

    For a dedicated performance optimization of negative hydrogen ion sources applied at particle accelerators, a detailed assessment of the plasma processes is required. Due to the compact design of these sources, diagnostic access is typically limited to optical emission spectroscopy yielding only line-of-sight integrated results. In order to allow for a spatially resolved investigation, the electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code NINJA has been developed for the Linac4 ion source at CERN. This code considers the RF field generated by the ICP coil as well as the external static magnetic fields and calculates self-consistently the resulting discharge properties. NINJA is benchmarked at the diagnostically well accessible lab experiment CHARLIE (Concept studies for Helicon Assisted RF Low pressure Ion sourcEs) at varying RF power and gas pressure. A good general agreement is observed between experiment and simulation although the simulated electron density trends for varying pressure and power as well as the absolute electron temperature values deviate slightly from the measured ones. This can be explained by the assumption of strong inductive coupling in NINJA, whereas the CHARLIE discharges show the characteristics of loosely coupled plasmas. For the Linac4 plasma, this assumption is valid. Accordingly, both the absolute values of the accessible plasma parameters and their trends for varying RF power agree well in measurement and simulation. At varying RF power, the H- current extracted from the Linac4 source peaks at 40 kW. For volume operation, this is perfectly reflected by assessing the processes in front of the extraction aperture based on the simulation results where the highest H- density is obtained for the same power level. In surface operation, the production of negative hydrogen ions at the converter surface can only be considered by specialized beam formation codes, which require plasma parameters as input. It has been demonstrated that

  4. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singkarat, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X-Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  5. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singkarat, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J.; Rhodes, M.W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2015-01-01

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X–Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  6. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singkarat, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Wijaikhum, A. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Intarasiri, S. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Bootkul, D. [Department of General Science, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Rhodes, M.W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X–Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  7. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov; Egle, B. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zenobia, S. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10{sup 14} ions/(cm{sup 2} s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  8. Adsorption of fluoride ions onto naturally occurring earth materials ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Batch sorption system using two naturally occurring earth materials (EM) as adsorbents was investigated to remove fluoride ions from aqueous solution. The system variables studied include initial concentration of the sorbate, agitation time, adsorbent dose, pH, co-ions and temperature. The experimental data fitted well to ...

  9. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion is devoted to atomic collision processes of helium atoms and of beryllium and boron atoms and ions in fusion plasmas. Most of the articles included in this volume are extended versions of the contributions presented at the IAEA experts' meetings on Atomic Data for Helium Beam Fusion Alpha Particle Diagnostics and on the Atomic Database for Beryllium and Boron, held in June 1991 at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, or have resulted from the cross-section data analyses and evaluations performed by the working groups of these meetings. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. CACTI: free, open-source software for the sequential coding of behavioral interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Lisa H; Hallgren, Kevin A; Houck, Jon M; Moyers, Theresa B

    2012-01-01

    The sequential analysis of client and clinician speech in psychotherapy sessions can help to identify and characterize potential mechanisms of treatment and behavior change. Previous studies required coding systems that were time-consuming, expensive, and error-prone. Existing software can be expensive and inflexible, and furthermore, no single package allows for pre-parsing, sequential coding, and assignment of global ratings. We developed a free, open-source, and adaptable program to meet these needs: The CASAA Application for Coding Treatment Interactions (CACTI). Without transcripts, CACTI facilitates the real-time sequential coding of behavioral interactions using WAV-format audio files. Most elements of the interface are user-modifiable through a simple XML file, and can be further adapted using Java through the terms of the GNU Public License. Coding with this software yields interrater reliabilities comparable to previous methods, but at greatly reduced time and expense. CACTI is a flexible research tool that can simplify psychotherapy process research, and has the potential to contribute to the improvement of treatment content and delivery.

  11. Sense-antisense (complementary) peptide interactions and the proteomic code; potential opportunities in biology and pharmaceutical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew D

    2015-02-01

    A sense peptide can be defined as a peptide whose sequence is coded by the nucleotide sequence (read 5' → 3') of the sense (positive) strand of DNA. Conversely, an antisense (complementary) peptide is coded by the corresponding nucleotide sequence (read 5' → 3') of the antisense (negative) strand of DNA. Research has been accumulating steadily to suggest that sense peptides are capable of specific interactions with their corresponding antisense peptides. Unfortunately, although more and more examples of specific sense-antisense peptide interactions are emerging, the very idea of such interactions does not conform to standard biology dogma and so there remains a sizeable challenge to lift this concept from being perceived as a peripheral phenomenon if not worse, into becoming part of the scientific mainstream. Specific interactions have now been exploited for the inhibition of number of widely different protein-protein and protein-receptor interactions in vitro and in vivo. Further, antisense peptides have also been used to induce the production of antibodies targeted to specific receptors or else the production of anti-idiotypic antibodies targeted against auto-antibodies. Such illustrations of utility would seem to suggest that observed sense-antisense peptide interactions are not just the consequence of a sequence of coincidental 'lucky-hits'. Indeed, at the very least, one might conclude that sense-antisense peptide interactions represent a potentially new and different source of leads for drug discovery. But could there be more to come from studies in this area? Studies on the potential mechanism of sense-antisense peptide interactions suggest that interactions may be driven by amino acid residue interactions specified from the genetic code. If so, such specified amino acid residue interactions could form the basis for an even wider amino acid residue interaction code (proteomic code) that links gene sequences to actual protein structure and function, even

  12. Some high-current ion sources for materials modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.

    1989-01-01

    Ion sources for materials modification have evolved through three distinct generations. The first generation was adopted from research accelerators. These cold-cathode plasma-discharge devices generate beam currents of less than 100 μA. The hot-cathode plasma-discharge ion sources, originally developed for isotope separation, comprise the second generation. They produce between 100 μA and 10 mA of beam current. The third generation ion sources give beam currents in excess of 10 mA. This technology, transferred from industrial accelerators, has already made SIMOX (Separation by IMplanted OXygen) into a commercially viable semiconductor process and promises to do the same for ion implantation of metals and insulators. The author focuses on the third generation technology that will play a key role in the future of ion implantation. 10 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Study of highly charged ion production by electron cyclotron resonance ion source. Interactions of Argon 17+ ions with metallic surface at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, G.

    1992-04-01

    In this thesis divided in 2 parts, the author first presents the operating of MiniMafios 16/18 GHz ECR ion sources and methods of extracted multicharged ion identification and then, studies the highly charged ion interactions with a metallic surface and the formation of 'hollow atoms'. 556 figs., 17 tabs

  14. Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

    2014-12-30

    An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

  15. RADTRAN: a computer code to analyze transportation of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.; Daniel, S.L.

    1977-04-01

    A computer code is presented which predicts the environmental impact of any specific scheme of radioactive material transportation. Results are presented in terms of annual latent cancer fatalities and annual early fatility probability resulting from exposure, during normal transportation or transport accidents. The code is developed in a generalized format to permit wide application including normal transportation analysis; consideration of alternatives; and detailed consideration of specific sectors of industry

  16. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  17. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references

  18. RKKY interaction between Ce ions in CexLa1-xB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2000-01-01

    Ce ions in (Ce x La 1-x )B 6 have a Γ 8 ground multiplet, which is fourfold degenerate and has orbital and spin content. The interaction between Ce ions is of the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) type, which competes with the Kondo screening. The conduction states of the compound are described by three approximately ellipsoidal pockets centered at the X points of the cubic lattice. The RKKY interaction is calculated considering the interference of the three pockets. The interaction strength strongly depends on the relative position of the ions, as well as on the relative orientation of the line joining two ions to the cubic crystalline field axis. The sixteen states of a pair of Ce ions are split by the RKKY interaction into a singlet, a triplet, and a twelvefold degenerate level. The ground state is always either a singlet or a triplet, depending on the sign of the interaction. Using the exact Bethe ansatz solution of a model for a pair of interacting impurities with Γ 8 ground multiplet, we calculate the occupation of the levels, the magnetic-field susceptibility, the specific-heat γ coefficient, and the Wilson ratio for the ground state as a function of the ratio of the RKKY coupling strength to the Kondo temperature along the main crystallographic directions. As a consequence of the RKKY splitting a pair of impurities always has a quadrupolar moment. The implication of the interactions on the quadrupolar order of CeB 6 is also discussed

  19. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 6.0) code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, F.J.; Young, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The integrated Fuel-Coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, four-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a product of the effort to generate a stand-alone version of IFCI, IFCI 6.0. The User's Manual describes in detail the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 6.0. Appendix A is an input manual, provided for the creation of working decks

  20. Electron-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion concentrates on basic physics aspects of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination that occur during electron-ion collisions. Except for cases of illustration along isoelectronic sequences, only multicharged (at least +2) ions will be specifically discussed with some emphasis of unique physics aspects associated with ionic charge. The material presented will be discussed from a primarily experimental viewpoint with most attention to electron-ion interacting beams experiments

  1. Influence of electrolyte ion-solvent interactions on the performances of supercapacitors porous carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, C.; Matei Ghimbeu, C.; Dahbi, M.; Anouti, M.; Lemordant, D.; Béguin, F.; Vix-Guterl, C.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.

    2014-10-01

    The development of advanced and safe electrochemical supercapacitors or hybrid supercapacitors combining a battery electrode material such as graphite and a porous carbon electrode implies the use of new electrolytes containing a tetra-alkylammonium or lithium salt dissolved preferentially in a safe and environmentally friendly solvent such as alkylcarbonates. In those systems, the carbon porosity of the activated carbon electrode controls the electrochemical behavior of the whole device. In this work, it is demonstrated that electrolytes containing highly polarizing ions such as Li+ dissolved in polar solvents such as alkylcarbonates do not completely loss their solvation shell at the opposite of what is observed for poorly solvated cations like TEABF4. As a consequence, the optimal carbon pore size for obtaining the largest energy density, while keeping a high power density, is wider when strongly solvated cations, like Li+ are used than for conventional organic electrolytes using acetonitrile as solvent and TEA+ as salt cations. TEA+ cations are easily desolvated and hence are able to penetrate in small pores matching the dimensions of bare ions. The dissimilarity of behavior of alkylcarbonates and acetonitrile based electrolytes highlights the importance of ion-solvent interactions when searching the optimal porous texture for the electrode material.

  2. Numerical modeling of the Linac4 negative ion source extraction region by 3D PIC-MCC code ONIX

    CERN Document Server

    Mochalskyy, S; Minea, T; Lifschitz, AF; Schmitzer, C; Midttun, O; Steyaert, D

    2013-01-01

    At CERN, a high performance negative ion (NI) source is required for the 160 MeV H- linear accelerator Linac4. The source is planned to produce 80 mA of H- with an emittance of 0.25 mm mradN-RMS which is technically and scientifically very challenging. The optimization of the NI source requires a deep understanding of the underling physics concerning the production and extraction of the negative ions. The extraction mechanism from the negative ion source is complex involving a magnetic filter in order to cool down electrons’ temperature. The ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) code is used to address this problem. The ONIX is a selfconsistent 3D electrostatic code using Particles-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) approach. It was written to handle the complex boundary conditions between plasma, source walls, and beam formation at the extraction hole. Both, the positive extraction potential (25kV) and the magnetic field map are taken from the experimental set-up, in construction at CERN. This contrib...

  3. Effects on Ion Cyclotron Emission of the Orbit Topology Changes from the Wave-Particle Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsten, T.; Holmstroem, K.; Johnson, T.; Bergkvist, T.; Laxaback, M.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that non-relaxed distribution functions can give rise to excitation of magnetosonic waves by ion cyclotron interactions when the distribution function increases with respect to the perpendicular velocity. We have found that in a toroidal plasma also collisional relaxed distribution functions of central peaked high-energy ions can destabilise magnetosonic eigenmodes by ion cyclotron interactions, due to the change in localisation of the orbits establishing inverted distribution functions with respect to energy along the characteristics describing the cyclotron interactions. This can take place by interactions with barely co-passing and marginally trapped high-energy ions at the plasma boundary. The interactions are enhanced by tangential interactions, which can also prevent the interactions to reach the stable part of the characteristics where they interact with more deeply trapped orbits. (author)

  4. Protein-material interactions: From micro-to-nano scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapikouni, Theodora S.; Missirlis, Yannis F.

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a survey on the significance of protein-material interactions, the mechanisms which control them and the techniques used for their study. Protein-surface interactions play a key role in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, biosensor technology and chromatography, while it is related to various undesired effects such as biofouling and bio-prosthetic malfunction. Although the effects of protein-surface interaction concern the micro-scale, being sometimes obvious even with bare eyes, they derive from biophysical events at the nano-scale. The sequential steps for protein adsorption involve events at the single biomolecule level and the forces driving or inhibiting protein adsorption act at the molecular level too. Following the scaling of protein-surface interactions, various techniques have been developed for their study both in the micro- and nano-scale. Protein labelling with radioisotopes or fluorescent probes, colorimetric assays and the quartz crystal microbalance were the first techniques used to monitor protein adsorption isotherms, while the surface force apparatus was used to measure the interaction forces between protein layers at the micro-scale. Recently, more elaborate techniques like total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), surface plasmon resonance, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) have been applied for the investigation of protein density, structure or orientation at the interfaces. However, a turning point in the study of protein interactions with the surfaces was the invention and the wide-spread use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) which can both image single protein molecules on surfaces and directly measure the interaction force

  5. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sarvesh, E-mail: sarvesh@iuac.res.in; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  6. Effective regeneration of anode material recycled from scrapped Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Xuelei; Song, Dawei; Miao, Yanli; Song, Jishun; Zhang, Lianqi

    2018-06-01

    Recycling high-valuable metal elements (such as Li, Ni, Co, Al and Cu elements) from scrapped lithium ion batteries can bring significant economic benefits. However, recycling and reusing anode material has not yet attracted wide attention up to now, due to the lower added-value than the above valuable metal materials and the difficulties in regenerating process. In this paper, a novel regeneration process with significant green advance is proposed to regenerate anode material recycled from scrapped Li-ion batteries for the first time. After regenerated, most acetylene black (AB) and all the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC) in recycled anode material are removed, and the surface of anode material is coated with pyrolytic carbon from phenolic resin again. Finally, the regenerated anode material (graphite with coating layer, residual AB and a little CMC pyrolysis product) is obtained. As expected, all the technical indexs of regenerated anode material exceed that of a midrange graphite with the same type, and partial technical indexs are even closed to that of the unused graphite. The results indicate the effective regeneration of anode material recycled from scrapped Li-ion batteries is really achieved.

  7. Advanced Electrode Materials for High Energy Next Generation Li ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayner, Cary Michael

    Lithium ion batteries are becoming an increasingly ubiquitous part of modern society. Since their commercial introduction by Sony in 1991, lithium-ion batteries have grown to be the most popular form of electrical energy storage for portable applications. Today, lithium-ion batteries power everything from cellphones and electric vehicles to e-cigarettes, satellites, and electric aircraft. Despite the commercialization of lithium-ion batteries over twenty years ago, it remains the most active field of energy storage research for its potential improvement over current technology. In order to capitalize on these opportunities, new materials with higher energy density and storage capacities must be developed. Unfortunately, most next-generation materials suffer from rapid capacity degradation or severe loss of capacity when rapidly discharged. In this dissertation, the development of novel anode and cathode materials for advanced high-energy and high-power lithium-ion batteries is reported. In particular, the application of graphene-based materials to stabilize active material is emphasized. Graphene, a unique two-dimensional material composed of atomically thin carbon sheets, has shown potential to address unsatisfactory rate capability, limited cycling performance and abrupt failure of these next-generation materials. This dissertation covers four major subjects: development of silicon-graphene composites, impact of carbon vacancies on graphene high-rate performance, iron fluoride-graphene composites, and ternary iron-manganese fluoride synthesis. Silicon is considered the most likely material to replace graphite as the anode active material for lithium-ion batteries due to its ability to alloy with large amounts of lithium, leading to significantly higher specific capacities than the graphite standard. However, Si also expands in size over 300% upon lithiation, leading to particle fracture and isolation from conductive support, resulting in cell failure within a few

  8. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-04-30

    We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

  9. Recycling positive-electrode material of a lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloop, Steven E.

    2017-11-21

    Examples are disclosed of methods to recycle positive-electrode material of a lithium-ion battery. In one example, the positive-electrode material is heated under pressure in a concentrated lithium hydroxide solution. After heating, the positive-electrode material is separated from the concentrated lithium hydroxide solution. After separating, the positive electrode material is rinsed in a basic liquid. After rinsing, the positive-electrode material is dried and sintered.

  10. Environmental construction of nano-material design codes. The example of simulation codes used in the CMD workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Mikiya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Kizu, Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Generally it is well known that the R and D works on new materials or devices will play a central role on the evolution of future society. But, the old ways based on the empirical and experimental approach have already reached the limit, especially for dealing with a strange substance and material. The structure of a substance and material is needed to be dealt with in detail by quantum mechanics, because the limit on accuracy has come in sight in the calculation using a classical theory. The research on the latest electronic state calculation technique founded on quantum mechanics made a great advance as the technique of solving these problems as well as the technique of a computational materials design. It enables the prediction of material properties because it is based on First Principles. Therefore, in the future it is expected to have a very high possibility of becoming a breakthrough in such a situation. In this article, the example calculation results by PC cluster on the codes (MACHIKANEYAMA-2000, OSAKA-2000) used in the CMD (Computational Materials Design) workshop, held on Sep. 19-21, at ITBL-Building and International Institute for Advanced Studies under the auspices of the University of Osaka, are described. Furthermore, the graphical user interfaces on the codes are examined. (author)

  11. Tensor interaction in heavy-ion scattering. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, H.; Johnson, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Heidelberg shape-effect model for heavy-ion tensor interactions is reformulated and generalized using the Hooton-Johnson formulation. The generalized semiclassical model (the turning-point model) predicts that the components of the tensor analysing power anti Tsub(2q) have certain relations with each other for each type of tensor interaction (Tsub(R), Tsub(P) and Tsub(L) types). The predicted relations between the anti Tsub(2q) are very simple and have a direct connection with the properties of the tensor interaction at the turning point. The model predictions are satisfied in quantum-mechanical calculations for 7 Li and 23 Na elastic scattering from 58 Ni in the Fresnel-diffraction energy region. As a consequence of this model, it becomes possible to single out effects from a Tsub(P)- or Tsub(L)-type tensor interaction in polarized heavy-ion scattering. The presence of a Tsub(P)-type tensor interaction is suggested by measured anti T 20 /anti T 22 ratios for 7 Li + 58 Ni scattering. In the turning-point model the three types of tensor operator are not independent, and this is found to be true also in a quantum-mechanical calculation. The model also predicts relations between the components of higher-rank tensor analysing power in the presence of a higher-rank tensor interaction. The rank-3 tensor case is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  12. Activated graphene as a cathode material for Li-ion hybrid supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Meryl D; Murali, Shanthi; Quarles, Neil; Zhu, Yanwu; Potts, Jeffrey R; Zhu, Xianjun; Ha, Hyung-Wook; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2012-03-14

    Chemically activated graphene ('activated microwave expanded graphite oxide', a-MEGO) was used as a cathode material for Li-ion hybrid supercapacitors. The performance of a-MEGO was first verified with Li-ion electrolyte in a symmetrical supercapacitor cell. Hybrid supercapacitors were then constructed with a-MEGO as the cathode and with either graphite or Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) (LTO) for the anode materials. The results show that the activated graphene material works well in a symmetrical cell with the Li-ion electrolyte with specific capacitances as high as 182 F g(-1). In a full a-MEGO/graphite hybrid cell, specific capacitances as high as 266 F g(-1) for the active materials at operating potentials of 4 V yielded gravimetric energy densities for a packaged cell of 53.2 W h kg(-1).

  13. Material report in support to RCC-MRX code 2010 stainless steel parts and products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancelet, Olivier; Lebarbe, Thierry; Dubiez-Le Goff, Sophie; Bonne, Dominique; Gelineau, Odile

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Material Report dedicated to stainless steels parts and products issued by AFCEN (Association Francaise pour les regles de Conception et de Construction des Materiels des Chaudieres Electro-Nucleaires) in support to RCC-MRx 2010 Code. The RCC-MRx Code is the result of the merger of the RCC-MX 2008, developed in the context of the research reactor Jules Horowitz Reactor project, in the RCC-MR 2007, which set up rules applicable to the design of components operating at high temperature and to the Vacuum Vessel of ITER (a presentation of RCC-MRx 2010 Code is the subject of another paper proposed in this Congress; it explains in particular the status of this Code). This Material Report is part of a set of Criteria of RCC-MRx (this set of Criteria is under construction). The Criteria aim at explaining the design and construction rules of the Code. They cover analyses rules as well as part procurement, welding, methods of tests and examination and fabrication rules. The Material Report particularly provides justifications and explanations on requirements and features dealing with parts and products proposed in the Code. The Material Report contains the following information: Introduction of the grade(s): codes and standards and Reference Procurement Specifications covering parts and products, applications and experience gained, - Physical properties, - Mechanical properties used for design calculations (base metal and welds): basic mechanical properties, creep mechanical properties, irradiated mechanical properties, - Fabrication: experience gained, metallurgy, - Welding: weldability, experience gained during welding and repair procedure qualifications, - Non-destructive examination, - In-service behaviour. In the article, examples of data supplied in the Material Report dedicated to stainless steels will be exposed. (authors)

  14. [INVITED] Luminescent QR codes for smart labelling and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, João F. C. B.; António, L. C. F.; Correia, S. F. H.; Fu, L. S.; Pinho, A. S.; Brites, C. D. S.; Carlos, L. D.; André, P. S.; Ferreira, R. A. S.

    2018-05-01

    QR (Quick Response) codes are two-dimensional barcodes composed of special geometric patterns of black modules in a white square background that can encode different types of information with high density and robustness, correct errors and physical damages, thus keeping the stored information protected. Recently, these codes have gained increased attention as they offer a simple physical tool for quick access to Web sites for advertising and social interaction. Challenges encompass the increase of the storage capacity limit, even though they can store approximately 350 times more information than common barcodes, and encode different types of characters (e.g., numeric, alphanumeric, kanji and kana). In this work, we fabricate luminescent QR codes based on a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate coated with organic-inorganic hybrid materials doped with trivalent terbium (Tb3+) and europium (Eu3+) ions, demonstrating the increase of storage capacity per unit area by a factor of two by using the colour multiplexing, when compared to conventional QR codes. A novel methodology to decode the multiplexed QR codes is developed based on a colour separation threshold where a decision level is calculated through a maximum-likelihood criteria to minimize the error probability of the demultiplexed modules, maximizing the foreseen total storage capacity. Moreover, the thermal dependence of the emission colour coordinates of the Eu3+/Tb3+-based hybrids enables the simultaneously QR code colour-multiplexing and may be used to sense temperature (reproducibility higher than 93%), opening new fields of applications for QR codes as smart labels for sensing.

  15. Novel wave/ion beam interaction approach to isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Lowder, R.S.; Schwager, L.A.; Barr, W.L.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-02-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental studies have been made related to the possibility of employing an externally imposed electrostatic potential wave to separate isotopes. This wave/ion interaction is a sensitive function of the wave/ion difference velocity and for the appropriate wave amplitude and wave speed, a lighter faster isotope will be reflected by the wave to a higher energy while leaving heavier, slower isotopes virtually undisturbed in energy -- allowing subsequent ion separation by simple energy discrimination. In these experiments, a set of some 200 individual, electrodes, which surrounded a microamp beam of neon ions, was used to generate the wave. Measurements of the wave amplitudes needed for ion reflection and measurements of the final energies of those reflected ions are consistent with values expected from simple kinetic arguments and with the more detailed results of numeric simulations

  16. Interface chemistry of nanostructured materials: ion adsorption on mesoporous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles; Xu, Huifang; Pohl, Phil; Yang, Yi; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents a part of our work on understanding the effect of nanoscale pore space confinement on ion sorption by mesoporous materials. Acid-base titration experiments were performed on both mesoporous alumina and alumina particles under various ionic strengths. The point of zero charge (PZC) for mesoporous alumina was measured to be approximately 9.1, similar to that for nonmesoporous alumina materials, indicating that nanoscale pore space confinement does not have a significant effect on the PZC of pore surfaces. However, for a given pH deviation from the PZC, (pH-PZC), the surface charge per mass on mesoporous alumina was as much as 45 times higher than that on alumina particles. This difference cannot be fully explained by the surface area difference between the two materials. Our titration data have demonstrated that nanoscale confinement has a significant effect, most likely via the overlap of the electric double layer (EDL), on ion sorption onto mesopore surfaces. This effect cannot be adequately modeled by existing surface complexation models, which were developed mostly for an unconfined solid-water interface. Our titration data have also indicated that the rate of ion uptake by mesoporous alumina is relatively slow, probably due to diffusion into mesopores, and complete equilibration for sorption could take 4-5 min. A molecular simulation using a density functional theory was performed to calculate ion adsorption coefficients as a function of pore size. The calculation has shown that as pore size is reduced to nanoscales (<10 nm), the adsorption coefficients of ions can vary by more than two orders of magnitude relative to those for unconfined interfaces. The prediction is supported by our experimental data on Zn sorption onto mesoporous alumina. Owing to their unique surface chemistry, mesoporous materials can potentially be used as effective ion adsorbents for separation processes and environmental cleanup.

  17. Comparative Issues of Cathode Materials for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Julien

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available After an introduction to lithium insertion compounds and the principles of Li-ion cells, we present a comparative study of the physical and electrochemical properties of positive electrodes used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs. Electrode materials include three different classes of lattices according to the dimensionality of the Li+ ion motion in them: olivine, layered transition-metal oxides and spinel frameworks. Their advantages and disadvantages are compared with emphasis on synthesis difficulties, electrochemical stability, faradaic performance and security issues.

  18. Heavy ion beam factory for material science based on the KEK digital accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Ken, E-mail: takayama@post.kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Adachi, Toshikazu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Arai, Teruo; Arakawa, Dai [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Asao, Hiroyuki [NEC Network-Sensor, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8501 (Japan); Barata, Yuji; Harada, Shinya [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tokyo City University, Todoroki, Tokyo 158-8586 (Japan); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Iwata, Taiki; Kadokura, Eiichi; Kwakubo, Tadamichi; Kubo, Tomio [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Leo, Kwee Wah [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Liu, Xingguaung [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Mochiki, Koichi [Tokyo City University, Todoroki, Tokyo 158-8586 (Japan); Munemoto, Naoya [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Okada, Yoshihito [NEC Network-Sensor, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8501 (Japan); Okamura, Katsuya [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); and others

    2013-11-01

    The KEK digital accelerator (DA) is an alternative to high-voltage electrostatic accelerators and conventional cyclotrons and synchrotrons, which are commonly used as swift heavy ion beam drivers. Compared with conventional accelerators, KEK-DA is capable of delivering a wider variety of ion species with various energies, as a result of its intrinsic properties. It is expected to serve as a heavy ion beam factory for research in materials science. Plans for its utilization include unique application programs, such as laboratory-based space science using virtual cosmic rays, heavy-ion mutagenesis in microorganisms, deep ion implantation, and modification of materials, which may be categorized into systematic studies of the spatial and temporal evolution of the locally and highly excited states of materials.

  19. The nuclear interaction analysis methods for diagnostics of high power ion beam technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhkov, V A; Grushin, I I; Remnev, G E [Nuclear Physics Inst., Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The complex of Nuclear Interaction Analysis Methods including charged particle activation analysis (CPAA and HIAA), spectrometry of ion induced gamma-emission (PIGE and HIIGE) , characteristic X-ray emission (PIXE), and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), have been used for diagnostics of the High Power Ion Beam (HPIB) assisted technologies. Accelerated ion beams from the EG-2.5 electrostatic generator and U-120 cyclotron were used for implementation of the techniques. The complex allows a lot of problems of elemental and isotopic analysis to be addressed. First, it is the determination of micro- and macrocomponents of modified materials; second, determination of surface density of thin films, multilayers and coatings, total surface gaseous contamination and amounts of the elements implanted in specimens; third, measurement of concentration depth profiles of the elements. Experiments have shown that the preferable application of nuclear analysis methods allows us to avoid the considerable errors arising when the concentration depth profiles of elements are measured by SIMS or AES in studies of mass transfer processes induced by HPIBs. (author). 1 tab., 2 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Transport of heavy ions in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvazian, A.; Shahbandari Gouchani, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we have investigated the interaction of heavy ions (U) with a target (Au). In inertial confinement fusion method Interaction between heavy ion beam and target was simulated, Numerical analysis of the Boltzmann Fokker Planck equation used in order to optimize the material of the target and Energy deposition of ion beam to electrons and ions of target and The thickness of the target were calculated.

  1. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  2. Basic requirements of mechanical properties for nuclear pressure vessel materials in ASME-BPV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Dong; Yao Weida

    2011-01-01

    The four basic aspects of strengths, ductility, toughness and fatigue strengths can be summarized for overall mechanical properties requirements of materials for nuclear pressure-retaining vessels in ASME-BPV code. These mechanical property indexes involve in the factors of melting, manufacture, delivery conditions, check or recheck for mechanical properties and chemical compositions, etc. and relate to degradation and damage accumulation during the use of materials. This paper specifically accounts for the basic requirements and theoretic basis of mechanical properties for nuclear pressure vessel materials in ASME-BPV code and states the internal mutual relationships among the four aspects of mechanical properties. This paper focuses on putting forward at several problems on mechanical properties of materials that shall be concerned about during design and manufacture for nuclear pressure vessels according to ASME-BPV code. (author)

  3. NMR study of electrode materials for lithium ion-batteries; Etude par RMN de materiaux d'electrode pour batteries lithium-ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chazel, C.

    2006-01-15

    This work is devoted to the study of LiMO{sub 2} et LiM{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M: transition metal) intercalation compounds used as electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Solid state NMR allows one to characterise the local environment of the lithium ions present in these phases by the use of the hyperfine interactions due to the presence of some electron spin density coming from localised electrons (Fermi-contact shift) or itinerant electrons (Knight shift) on the lithium nucleus. By following the transformation of the LiNiO{sub 2} layered phase into the LiNi{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel material using lithium NMR, we studied the nature of the asymmetric signal observed for LiNiO{sub 2}, and the influence of the departure from the ideal stoichiometry; we showed a coupled ion/electron hopping in Li{sub X}NiO{sub 2} phases linked to Li/vacancy and Ni{sup 3+}/Ni{sup 4+} ordering, and finally showed the existence of structural defects within the LiNi{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase obtained by thermal treatment of Li{sub 0.5}NiO{sub 2}. Lithium NMR of the intercalated materials obtained from the LiTi{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} spinels showed a metallic behaviour for Li{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4} with a Knight shift of the NMR signal similar to that of LiTi{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and signals intermediate in nature between Knight and Fermi-contact shifts for Li{sub 7}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. (author)

  4. Interfaces and Materials in Lithium Ion Batteries: Challenges for Theoretical Electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasnatscheew, Johannes; Wagner, Ralf; Winter, Martin; Cekic-Laskovic, Isidora

    2018-04-18

    Energy storage is considered a key technology for successful realization of renewable energies and electrification of the powertrain. This review discusses the lithium ion battery as the leading electrochemical storage technology, focusing on its main components, namely electrode(s) as active and electrolyte as inactive materials. State-of-the-art (SOTA) cathode and anode materials are reviewed, emphasizing viable approaches towards advancement of the overall performance and reliability of lithium ion batteries; however, existing challenges are not neglected. Liquid aprotic electrolytes for lithium ion batteries comprise a lithium ion conducting salt, a mixture of solvents and various additives. Due to its complexity and its role in a given cell chemistry, electrolyte, besides the cathode materials, is identified as most susceptible, as well as the most promising, component for further improvement of lithium ion batteries. The working principle of the most important commercial electrolyte additives is also discussed. With regard to new applications and new cell chemistries, e.g., operation at high temperature and high voltage, further improvements of both active and inactive materials are inevitable. In this regard, theoretical support by means of modeling, calculation and simulation approaches can be very helpful to ex ante pre-select and identify the aforementioned components suitable for a given cell chemistry as well as to understand degradation phenomena at the electrolyte/electrode interface. This overview highlights the advantages and limitations of SOTA lithium battery systems, aiming to encourage researchers to carry forward and strengthen the research towards advanced lithium ion batteries, tailored for specific applications.

  5. High capacity anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Herman A.; Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbon; Masarapu, Charan; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Suject

    2015-11-19

    High capacity silicon based anode active materials are described for lithium ion batteries. These materials are shown to be effective in combination with high capacity lithium rich cathode active materials. Supplemental lithium is shown to improve the cycling performance and reduce irreversible capacity loss for at least certain silicon based active materials. In particular silicon based active materials can be formed in composites with electrically conductive coatings, such as pyrolytic carbon coatings or metal coatings, and composites can also be formed with other electrically conductive carbon components, such as carbon nanofibers and carbon nanoparticles. Additional alloys with silicon are explored.

  6. Oxidized graphene as an electrode material for rechargeable metal-ion batteries – a DFT point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrota, Ana S.; Pašti, Igor A.; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: In line with a growing interest in the use of graphene-based materials for energy storage applications and active research in the field of rechargeable metal-ion batteries we have performed a DFT based computational study of alkali metal atoms (Li, Na and K) interaction with an oxidized graphene. The presence of oxygen surface groups (epoxy and hydroxyl) alters the chemisorption properties of graphene. In particular, we observe that the epoxy groups are redox active and enhance the alkali metal adsorption energies by a factor of 2 or more. When an alkali metal atom interacts with hydroxyl-graphene the formation of metal-hydroxide is observed. In addition to a potential boost of metal ion storage capability, oxygen functional groups also prevent the precipitation of the metal phase. By simulating lithiation/de-lithiation process on epoxy-graphenes, it was concluded that the oxidized graphene can undergo structural changes during battery operation. Our results suggest that the content and the type of oxygen surface groups should be carefully tailored to maximize the performance of metal-ion batteries. This is mainly related to the control of the oxidation level in order to provide enough active centers for metal ion storage while preserving sufficient electrical conductivity

  7. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code coupled with the local effect model for biological calculations in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Kraemer, M; Sommerer, F; Parodi, K; Scholz, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Fasso, A

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Monte Carlo (MC) calculations for carbon ion therapy have to provide absorbed and RBE-weighted dose. The latter is defined as the product of the dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). At the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung as well as at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the RBE values are calculated according to the local effect model (LEM). In this paper, we describe the approach followed for coupling the FLUKA MC code with the LEM and its application to dose and RBE-weighted dose calculations for a superimposition of two opposed C-12 ion fields as applied in therapeutic irradiations. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data of CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cell survival and the outcomes of the GSI analytical treatment planning code TRiP98. Some discrepancies have been observed between the analytical and MC calculations of absorbed physical dose profiles, which can be explained by the differences between the laterally integrated depth-d...

  8. Applications of inorganic ion-exchange materials in managing radioactivity wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jiaheng; Li Xingliang; Li Shoujian

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces the application of abio-ion exchange materials in managing radioactivity wastewater, which would be useful for latter research of new inorganic materials that used in managing radioactivity wastewater. (authors)

  9. Structural code benchmarking for the analysis of impact response of nuclear material shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories has initiated a program to benchmark thermal and structural codes that are available to the nuclear material transportation community. The program consists of the following five phrases: (1) code inventory and review, (2) development of a cask-like set of problems, (3) multiple independent numerical analyses of the problems, (4) transfer of information, and (5) performance of experiments to obtain data for comparison with the numerical analyses. This paper will summarize the results obtained by the independent numerical analyses. The analyses indicate the variability that can be expected both due to differences in user-controlled parameters and from code-to-code differences. The results show that in purely elastic analyses, differences can be attributed to user controlled parameters. Model problems involving elastic/plastic material behavior and large deformations, however, have greater variability with significant differences reported for implicit and explicit integration schemes in finite element programs. This variability demonstrates the need to obtain experimental data to properly benchmark codes utilizing elastic/plastic material models and large deformation capability

  10. New developments on Monte Carlo simulation code for the calculation of Atom Displacements Induced rates by High Energy Electrons in Solid Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiani, Daniela D.; Cruz, Carlos M.; Pinnera, Ibrahin; Abreu, Yamiel; Leyva, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    New developments and simulations on regard to the interactions of incident gamma radiation over solids materials using the MCSAD (Monte Carlo Simulation of Atom Displacement) code are presented. In this code Monte Carlo algorithms are applied in order to sample all electrons and gamma interaction processes occurring during their transport through a solid target, especially those connected to the output of atom displacements events. Particularly, it is calculated the limit angle to elastic scattering for the electrons on a new approach, which allows correctly the splitting of the electron single processes at higher scattering angles. On this way, the probability of single electron scattering processes transferring high recoil atomic energy leading to atom displacement effects is calculated and consequently sampled in the MCSAD code. In addition, it is considered some other new theoretical aspects in order to improve previous versions, like the one concerning the selection of threshold energy for displacements at a given atom site in dependence of the atom recoil direction. (Author)

  11. Ultra-relativistic ion acceleration in the laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yongsheng; Wang Naiyan; Tang Xiuzhang; Shi Yijin [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Xueqing Yan [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-09-15

    An analytical relativistic model is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration in the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with thin-foil plasmas. It is found that there is a critical value of the ion momentum to make sure that the ions are trapped by the light sail and accelerated in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) region. If the initial ion momentum is smaller than the critical value, that is in the classical case of RPA, the potential has a deep well and traps the ions to be accelerated, as the same described before by simulation results [Eliasson et al., New J. Phys. 11, 073006 (2009)]. There is a new ion acceleration region different from RPA, called ultra-relativistic acceleration, if the ion momentum exceeds the critical value. In this case, ions will experience a potential downhill. The dependence of the ion momentum and the self-similar variable at the ion front on the acceleration time has been obtained. In the ultra-relativistic limit, the ion momentum at the ion front is proportional to t{sup 4/5}, where t is the acceleration time. In our analytical hydrodynamical model, it is naturally predicted that the ion distribution from RPA is not monoenergetic, although the phase-stable acceleration mechanism is effective. The critical conditions of the laser and plasma parameters which identify the two acceleration modes have been achieved.

  12. Ultra-relativistic ion acceleration in the laser-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongsheng; Wang Naiyan; Tang Xiuzhang; Shi Yijin; Xueqing Yan

    2012-01-01

    An analytical relativistic model is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration in the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with thin-foil plasmas. It is found that there is a critical value of the ion momentum to make sure that the ions are trapped by the light sail and accelerated in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) region. If the initial ion momentum is smaller than the critical value, that is in the classical case of RPA, the potential has a deep well and traps the ions to be accelerated, as the same described before by simulation results [Eliasson et al., New J. Phys. 11, 073006 (2009)]. There is a new ion acceleration region different from RPA, called ultra-relativistic acceleration, if the ion momentum exceeds the critical value. In this case, ions will experience a potential downhill. The dependence of the ion momentum and the self-similar variable at the ion front on the acceleration time has been obtained. In the ultra-relativistic limit, the ion momentum at the ion front is proportional to t 4/5 , where t is the acceleration time. In our analytical hydrodynamical model, it is naturally predicted that the ion distribution from RPA is not monoenergetic, although the phase-stable acceleration mechanism is effective. The critical conditions of the laser and plasma parameters which identify the two acceleration modes have been achieved.

  13. Implementation of decommissioning materials conditional clearance process to the OMEGA calculation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachar, Matej; Necas, Vladimir; Daniska, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The activities performed during nuclear installation decommissioning process inevitably lead to the production of large amount of radioactive material to be managed. Significant part of materials has such low radioactivity level that allows them to be released to the environment without any restriction for further use. On the other hand, for materials with radioactivity slightly above the defined unconditional clearance level, there is a possibility to release them conditionally for a specific purpose in accordance with developed scenario assuring that radiation exposure limits for population not to be exceeded. The procedure of managing such decommissioning materials, mentioned above, could lead to recycling and reuse of more solid materials and to save the radioactive waste repository volume. In the paper an a implementation of the process of conditional release to the OMEGA Code is analyzed in details; the Code is used for calculation of decommissioning parameters. The analytical approach in the material parameters assessment, firstly, assumes a definition of radiological limit conditions, based on the evaluation of possible scenarios for conditionally released materials, and their application to appropriate sorter type in existing material and radioactivity flow system. Other calculation procedures with relevant technological or economical parameters, mathematically describing e.g. final radiation monitoring or transport outside the locality, are applied to the OMEGA Code in the next step. Together with limits, new procedures creating independent material stream allow evaluation of conditional material release process during decommissioning. Model calculations evaluating various scenarios with different input parameters and considering conditional release of materials to the environment are performed to verify the implemented methodology. Output parameters and results of the model assessment are presented, discussed and conduced in the final part of the paper

  14. The ion implantation of metals and engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1978-01-01

    An entirely new method of metal finishing, by the process of ion implantation, is described. Introduced at first for semiconductor device applications, this method has now been demonstrated to produce major and long-lasting improvements in the durability of material surfaces, as regards both wear and corrosion. The process is distinct from that of ion plating, and it is not a coating technique. After a general description of ion implantation examples are given of its effects on wear behaviour (mostly in steels and cemented carbides) and on corrosion, in a variety of metals and alloys. Its potential for producing decorative finishes is mentioned briefly. The equipment necessary for carrying out ion implantation for engineering applications has now reached the prototype stage, and manufacture of plant for treating a variety of tools and components is about to commence. These developments are outlined. (author)

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of secondary electron emission due to ion beam milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahady, Kyle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tan, Shida [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Greenzweig, Yuval [Intel Israel Ltd., Haifa (Israel); Livengood, Richard [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Raveh, Amir [Intel Israel Ltd., Haifa (Israel); Fowlkes, Jason D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rack, Philip [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of secondary electron emission resulting from focused ion beam milling of a copper target. The basis of this study is a simulation code which simulates ion induced excitation and emission of secondary electrons, in addition to simulating focused ion beam sputtering and milling. This combination of features permits the simulation of the interaction between secondary electron emission, and the evolving target geometry as the ion beam sputters material. Previous ion induced SE Monte Carlo simulation methods have been restricted to predefined target geometries, while the dynamic target in the presented simulations makes this study relevant to image formation in ion microscopy, and chemically assisted ion beam etching, where the relationship between sputtering, and its effects on secondary electron emission, is important. We focus on a copper target, and validate our simulation against experimental data for a range of: noble gas ions, ion energies, ion/substrate angles and the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. We then provide a detailed account of the emission of secondary electrons resulting from ion beam milling; we quantify both the evolution of the yield as high aspect ratio valleys are milled, as well as the emission of electrons within these valleys that do not escape the target, but which are important to the secondary electron contribution to chemically assisted ion induced etching.

  16. Structural Analysis of DNA Interactions with Magnesium Ion Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ponkumar; P. Duraisamy; N. Iyandurai

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: In the present study, FT Raman spectroscopy had been used to extend our knowledge about Magnesium ion - DNA interactions at various volume ratios (1:50, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5). Approach: The analysis of FT Raman data supported the existence of structural specificities in the interaction and also the stability of DNA secondary structure. Results: Results from the Raman spectra clearly indicate that the interaction of Magnesium ion with DNA is mainly through the phosphate groups...

  17. Energies of rare-earth ion states relative to host bands in optical materials from electron photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Charles Warren

    There are a vast number of applications for rare-earth-activated materials and much of today's cutting-edge optical technology and emerging innovations are enabled by their unique properties. In many of these applications, interactions between the rare-earth ion and the host material's electronic states can enhance or inhibit performance and provide mechanisms for manipulating the optical properties. Continued advances in these technologies require knowledge of the relative energies of rare-earth and crystal band states so that properties of available materials may be fully understood and new materials may be logically developed. Conventional and resonant electron photoemission techniques were used to measure 4f electron and valence band binding energies in important optical materials, including YAG, YAlO3, and LiYF4. The photoemission spectra were theoretically modeled and analyzed to accurately determine relative energies. By combining these energies with ultraviolet spectroscopy, binding energies of excited 4fN-15d and 4fN+1 states were determined. While the 4fN ground-state energies vary considerably between different trivalent ions and lie near or below the top of the valence band in optical materials, the lowest 4f N-15d states have similar energies and are near the bottom of the conduction band. As an example for YAG, the Tb3+ 4f N ground state is in the band gap at 0.7 eV above the valence band while the Lu3+ ground state is 4.7 eV below the valence band maximum; however, the lowest 4fN-15d states are 2.2 eV below the conduction band for both ions. We found that a simple model accurately describes the binding energies of the 4fN, 4fN-1 5d, and 4fN+1 states. The model's success across the entire rare-earth series indicates that measurements on two different ions in a host are sufficient to predict the energies of all rare-earth ions in that host. This information provides new insight into electron transfer transitions, luminescence quenching, and valence

  18. Modelling radiation fields of ion beams in tissue-like materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burigo, Lucas Norberto

    2014-01-01

    Fast nuclei are ionizing radiation which can cause deleterious effects to irradiated cells. The modelling of the interactions of such ions with matter and the related effects are very important to physics, radiobiology, medicine and space science and technology. A powerful method to study the interactions of ionizing radiation with biological systems was developed in the field of microdosimetry. Microdosimetry spectra characterize the energy deposition to objects of cellular size, i.e., a few micrometers. In the present thesis the interaction of ions with tissue-like media was investigated using the Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) developed at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies. MCHIT is a Geant4-based application intended to benchmark the physical models of Geant4 and investigate the physical properties of therapeutic ion beams. We have implemented new features in MCHIT in order to calculate microdosimetric quantities characterizing the radiation fields of accelerated nucleons and nuclei. The results of our Monte Carlo simulations were compared with recent experimental microdosimetry data. In addition to microdosimetry calculations with MCHIT, we also investigated the biological properties of ion beams, e.g. their relative biological effectiveness (RBE), by means of the modified Microdosimetric-Kinetic model (MKM). The MKM uses microdosimetry spectra in describing cell response to radiation. MCHIT+MKM allowed us to study the physical and biological properties of ion beams. The main results of the thesis are as follows: MCHIT is able to describe the spatial distribution of the physical dose in tissue-like media and microdosimetry spectra for ions with energies relevant to space research and ion-beam cancer therapy; MCHIT+MKM predicts a reduction of the biological effectiveness of ions propagating in extended medium due to nuclear fragmentation reactions; We predicted favourable biological dose-depth profiles for monoenergetic helium and

  19. Modeling of intense pulsed ion beam heated masked targets for extreme materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, John J.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Intense, pulsed ion beams locally heat materials and deliver dense electronic excitations that can induce material modifications and phase transitions. Material properties can potentially be stabilized by rapid quenching. Pulsed ion beams with pulse lengths of order ns have recently become available for materials processing. Here, we optimize mask geometries for local modification of materials by intense ion pulses. The goal is to rapidly excite targets volumetrically to the point where a phase transition or local lattice reconstruction is induced followed by rapid cooling that stabilizes desired material's properties fast enough before the target is altered or damaged by, e.g., hydrodynamic expansion. By using a mask, the longitudinal dimension can be large compared to the transverse dimension, allowing the possibility of rapid transverse cooling. We performed HYDRA simulations that calculate peak temperatures for a series of excitation conditions and cooling rates of silicon targets with micro-structured masks and compare these to a simple analytical model. The model gives scaling laws that can guide the design of targets over a wide range of pulsed ion beam parameters.

  20. Experimental Study on the Interaction Between Contacting Barrier Materials for Containment of Radioactive Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W. H.; Chang, H. C.

    2017-12-01

    The disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes requires use of multi-barriers for isolation of the wastes from the biosphere. Typically, the engineered barriers are composed of a concrete vault, buffer and backfill materials. Zhishin clay and Black Hill bentonite were used as raw clay material in making buffer and backfill materials in this study. These clays were compacted to make buffer material, or mixed with Taitung area argillite to produce backfill material for potential application as barriers for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The interaction between concrete barrier and the buffer/backfill material is simulated by an accelerated migration test to investigate the effect of contacting concrete on the expected functions of buffer/backfill material. The results show buffer material close to the contact with concrete exhibits significant change in the ratio of calcium/sodium exchange capacity, due to the move of calcium ions released from the concrete. The shorter the distance from the contacting interface, the ratio of the calcium/sodium concentration in buffer/backfill materials increases. The longer the distance from the interface, the effect of the contact on alteration in clays become less significant. Also, some decreases in swelling capacity in the buffer/backfill material near the concrete-backfill interface are noted. Finally, a comparison is made between Zhisin clay and Balck Hill bentonite on the interaction between concrete and the two clays. Black Hill bentonite was found to be influenced more by the interaction, because of the higher content of montmorillonite. On the other hand, being a mixture of clay and sand, backfill material is less affected by the decalsification of concrete at the contact than buffer material.

  1. Current R and D status on material motion and interactions relevant to core disruptive accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Satoru [Safety Engineering Division, O-arai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, O-arai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, the current status of research and development activities are briefly reviewed on evaluation of material-coolant interactions and material movement and relocation relevant to the safety of liquid-metal fast reactors. Since the status of European activities are well summarized in other papers submitted to the present meeting, the activities in Japan and the United States are highlighted in this paper. The review includes: out-of-pile experiments, in-pile experiments and relevant computer code development. It is emphasized that improved understanding on material motion has contributed to establishing more realistic and rational safety evaluation methods, where various mitigation mechanisms are inherently effective. (author)

  2. Comparison of swelling for structural materials on neutron and ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, B.A.

    1986-03-01

    The swelling of V-base alloys, Type 316 stainless steel, Fe-25Ni-15Cr alloys, ferritic steels, Cu, Ni, Nb-1% Zr, and Mo on neutron irradiation is compared with the swelling for these materials on ion irradiation. The results of this comparison show that utilization of the ion-irradiation technique provides for a discriminative assessment of the potential for swelling of candidate materials for fusion reactors.

  3. Nanocomposite Materials for the Sodium-Ion Battery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yaru; Lai, Wei-Hong; Miao, Zongcheng; Chou, Shu-Lei

    2018-02-01

    Clean energy has become an important topic in recent decades because of the serious global issues related to the development of energy, such as environmental contamination, and the intermittence of the traditional energy sources. Creating new battery-related energy storage facilities is an urgent subject for human beings to address and for solutions for the future. Compared with lithium-based batteries, sodium-ion batteries have become the new focal point in the competition for clean energy solutions and have more potential for commercialization due to the huge natural abundance of sodium. Nevertheless, sodium-ion batteries still exhibit some challenges, like inferior electrochemical performance caused by the bigger ionic size of Na + ions, the detrimental volume expansion, and the low conductivity of the active materials. To solve these issues, nanocomposites have recently been applied as a new class of electrodes to enhance the electrochemical performance in sodium batteries based on advantages that include the size effect, high stability, and excellent conductivity. In this Review, the recent development of nanocomposite materials applied in sodium-ion batteries is summarized, and the existing challenges and the potential solutions are presented. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  5. Bibliographic data on surface processes in particle-material interactions published in Japan, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesi, Kazuo; Nagai, Siro; Ozawa, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    Data on surface processes in particle-material interactions for fusion technology have been surveyed and collected over 24 publications which have been published during January, 1986 - December, 1987 in Japan. The bibliographic data in the form of data sheets were sent to the International Data Center in IAEA. This report presents 97 selected data sheets arranged in the order of codes of relevant phenomena. A list of literature is given. (author) 159 refs

  6. Development of the object-oriented analysis code for the estimation of material balance in pyrochemical reprocessing process (2). Modification of the code for the analysis of holdup of nuclear materials in the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Nobuo; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2001-04-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing is thought to be promising process for FBR fuel cycle mainly from the economical viewpoint. However, the material behavior in the process is not clarified enough because of the lack of experimental data. The authors have been developed the object-oriented analysis code for the estimation of material balance in the process, which has the flexible applicability for the change of process flow sheet. The objective of this study is to modify the code so as to analyze the holdup of nuclear materials in the pyrochemical process from the viewpoint of safeguard, because of the possibility of larger amount of the holdup in the process compared with aqueous process. As a result of the modification, the relationship between the production of nuclear materials and its holdup in the process can be evaluated by the code. (author)

  7. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-01-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement

  8. Two dimensional code for modeling of high ione cyclotron harmonic fast wave heating and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grekov, D.; Kasilov, S.; Kernbichler, W.

    2016-01-01

    A two dimensional numerical code for computation of the electromagnetic field of a fast magnetosonic wave in a tokamak at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency has been developed. The code computes the finite difference solution of Maxwell equations for separate toroidal harmonics making use of the toroidal symmetry of tokamak plasmas. The proper boundary conditions are prescribed at the realistic tokamak vessel. The currents in the RF antenna are specified externally and then used in Ampere law. The main poloidal tokamak magnetic field and the ''kinetic'' part of the dielectric permeability tensor are treated iteratively. The code has been verified against known analytical solutions and first calculations of current drive in the spherical torus are presented.

  9. Applications of pulsed energy sources and hydrodynamic response to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, F.; Nelson, W.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic response of materials to pulsed, relativistic electron beams was studied for materials science applications over two decades ago. Presently, intense light ion beams are being explored for materials science applications. These include the Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST) of materials for producing stronger and more corrosion-resistant materials and the evaporative deposition of polycrystalline thin films. Laser sources are also being extensively utilized as pulsed energy sources in medical science and in clinical applications. In particular, laser-tissue interactions are being investigated for laser angioplasty and surgery as well as cancer therapy. The understanding of the energy deposition and hydrodynamic response of a wide range of materials is essential to the success of these applications. In order to address these materials science applications, the authors are utilizing and developing high quality, energy deposition-hydrodynamic code techniques which can aid in the design and interpretation of experiments. Consequently, the authors strongly encourage the development of 3-dimensional, species-selective diagnostic techniques, e.g. Resonant Holographic Interferometry Spectroscopy (RHIS), to be used in analyzing the ablation plume in the thin film deposition experiments. In this presentation they show the results and discuss the limitations of calculations for these materials applications. They also discuss the status of the RHIS diagnostic

  10. Novel lanthanide doped micro- and mesoporous solids. Characterization of ion-host-interactions, species distribution and luminescence properties using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy; Neuartige Lanthanoid-dotierte mikro- und mesoporoese Feststoffe. Charakterisierung von Ion-Wirt-Wechselwirkungen, Speziesverteilung und Lumineszenzeigenschaften mittels zeitaufgeloester Lumineszenzspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessner, Andre

    2010-12-15

    In this work lanthanide-doped microporous zeolites, microporous-mesoporous hybrid materials and mesoporous silicates were investigated regarding their luminescence properties and the ion-host-interactions using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Thereby, time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) provide information in the wavelength and time domain. For the analysis of the TRES a broad set of analytic methods was applied and thus a corresponding ''toolbox'' developed. Fitting of the luminescence decays was performed with a discrete number of exponentials and supported by luminescence decay times distributions. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra (TRANES), an advancement of TRES, could be used for the determination of the number of emissive lanthanide species in porous materials for the first time. Calculation of the decay-associated spectra (DAS) allowed the correlation of spectral information with luminescence decay times and thus delivered the luminescence spectra of the different europium species. For europium(III) we could use in addition the time-dependent asymmetry ratio and spectral evolution of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 0}-transition with time to obtain further information about the distribution of the lanthanide ions in the host material. Luminescence decay times and spectra allowed conclusions on the number of OH-oscillators in and the symmetry of the first coordination sphere. For the microporous and microporous-mesoporous materials were found different lanthanide species, which were characterized by the above mentioned methods. These lanthanide species can be found on different positions in the host material. One position is located deep in the pore system. Here, lanthanide ions are hardly accessible for water and mainly coordinated by framework oxygens. This results in long luminescence decay times and distorted coordination spheres. The second position can be found near or on the outer surface or in the

  11. Fundamental aspects of laser and ion-beam interactions with solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.L.

    1982-01-01

    In the first part of the thesis laser-beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed. In the second part ion-beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed and mainly the mixing of atoms due to ion bombardment. A study of ion-beam mixing of Cu-Au and Cu-W systems is described in order to illustrate the mechanism for ion beam mixing. As Cu-Au are miscible whereas Cu-W systems are not, and both systems have comparable mass numbers, comparison provides a test for current theories on ion-beam mixing. The results of experiments where 300 keV Kr 4+ ion-bombardment at a dose of 5x10 15 cm -2 has been applied to initiate mixing of a single layer structure and sandwich samples for both systems are described. Room temperature irradiations with a dose of 5x10 15 cm -2 show that Cu-Au mix readily, whereas a small mixing effect is observed for Cu-W systems. A comparable amount of mixing for Cu-Au induced by laser or ion beams is found whereas no mixing of Cu-W induced by laser irradiation is observed, which is in agreement with the criteria for formation of metastable solid solutions due to pulsed laser treatment. (Auth.)

  12. Nickel Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticles as a Low Cost Cathode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omarova, Marzhana; Koishybay, Aibolat; Yesibolati, Nulati; Mentbayeva, Almagul; Umirov, Nurzhan; Ismailov, Kairat; Adair, Desmond; Babaa, Moulay-Rachid; Kurmanbayeva, Indira; Bakenov, Zhumabay

    2015-01-01

    Potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate KNi[Fe(CN) 6 ] (NiHCF) was synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method and investigated as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of pure phase of agglomerated NiHCF nanoparticles of about 20–50 nm in size. The material exhibited stable cycling performance as a cathode in a lithium half-cell within a wide range of current densities, and a working potential around 3.3 V vs. Li + /Li. The lithium ion diffusion coefficient in this system was determined to be in a range of 10 −9 to 10 −8 cm 2 s −1 , which is within the values for the cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries with high rate capability. Considering promising electrochemical performance and attractive lithium-ion diffusion properties of this material along with its economical benefits and simplified preparation, NiHCF could be considered as a very promising cathode for large scale lithium-ion batteries.

  13. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-11-21

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this paper, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  14. Integration and visualization of non-coding RNA and protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Junge, Alexander; Refsgaard, Jan Christian; Garde, Christian; Pan, Xiaoyong; Santos Delgado, Alberto; Anthon, Christian; Alkan, Ferhat; von Mering, Christian; Workman, Christopher; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gorodkin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) fulfill a diverse set of biological functions relying on interactions with other molecular entities. The advent of new experimental and computational approaches makes it possible to study ncRNAs and their associations on an unprecedented scale. We present RAIN (RNA Association and Interaction Networks) - a database that combines ncRNA-ncRNA, ncRNA-mRNA and ncRNA-protein interactions with large-scale protein association networks available in the STRING database. By int...

  15. Color matters--material ejection and ion yields in UV-MALDI mass spectrometry as a function of laser wavelength and laser fluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The success of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) as a widely employed analytical tool in the biomolecular sciences builds strongly on an effective laser-material interaction that is resulting in a soft co-desorption and ionization of matrix and imbedded biomolecules. To obtain a maximized ion yield for the analyte(s) of interest, in general both wavelength and fluence need to be tuned to match the specific optical absorption profile of the used matrix. However, commonly only lasers with fixed emission wavelengths of either 337 or 355 nm are used for MALDI-MS. Here, we employed a wavelength-tunable dye laser and recorded both the neutral material ejection and the MS ion data in a wide wavelength and fluence range between 280 and 377.5 nm. α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA), 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA), α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) were investigated as matrices, and several peptides as analytes. Recording of the material ejection was achieved by adopting a photoacoustic approach. Relative ion yields were derived by division of photoacoustic and ion signals. In this way, distinct wavelength/fluence regions can be identified for which maximum ion yields were obtained. For the tested matrices, optimal results were achieved for wavelengths corresponding to areas of high optical absorption of the respective matrix and at fluences about a factor of 2-3 above the matrix- and wavelength-dependent ion detection threshold fluences. The material ejection as probed by the photoacoustic method is excellently fitted by the quasithermal model, while a sigmoidal function allows for an empirical description of the ion signal-fluence relationship.

  16. Novel Energy Sources -Material Architecture and Charge Transport in Solid State Ionic Materials for Rechargeable Li ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katiyar, Ram S; Gómez, M; Majumder, S B; Morell, G; Tomar, M S; Smotkin, E; Bhattacharya, P; Ishikawa, Y

    2009-01-19

    Since its introduction in the consumer market at the beginning of 1990s by Sony Corporation ‘Li-ion rechargeable battery’ and ‘LiCoO2 cathode’ is an inseparable couple for highly reliable practical applications. However, a separation is inevitable as Li-ion rechargeable battery industry demand more and more from this well serving cathode. Spinel-type lithium manganate (e.g., LiMn2O4), lithium-based layered oxide materials (e.g., LiNiO2) and lithium-based olivine-type compounds (e.g., LiFePO4) are nowadays being extensively studied for application as alternate cathode materials in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Primary goal of this project was the advancement of Li-ion rechargeable battery to meet the future demands of the energy sector. Major part of the research emphasized on the investigation of electrodes and solid electrolyte materials for improving the charge transport properties in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Theoretical computational methods were used to select electrodes and electrolyte material with enhanced structural and physical properties. The effect of nano-particles on enhancing the battery performance was also examined. Satisfactory progress has been made in the bulk form and our efforts on realizing micro-battery based on thin films is close to give dividend and work is progressing well in this direction.

  17. Mn 3 O 4 −Graphene Hybrid as a High-Capacity Anode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hailiang

    2010-10-13

    We developed two-step solution-phase reactions to form hybrid materials of Mn3O4 nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets for lithium ion battery applications. Selective growth of Mn3O 4 nanoparticles on RGO sheets, in contrast to free particle growth in solution, allowed for the electrically insulating Mn3O4 nanoparticles to be wired up to a current collector through the underlying conducting graphene network. The Mn3O4 nanoparticles formed on RGO show a high specific capacity up to ∼900 mAh/g, near their theoretical capacity, with good rate capability and cycling stability, owing to the intimate interactions between the graphene substrates and the Mn 3O4 nanoparticles grown atop. The Mn3O 4/RGO hybrid could be a promising candidate material for a high-capacity, low-cost, and environmentally friendly anode for lithium ion batteries. Our growth-on-graphene approach should offer a new technique for the design and synthesis of battery electrodes based on highly insulating materials. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Mean range and energy of 28Si ions some Makrofol track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, S.; Mishra, R.; Tripathy, S.P.; Mawar, A.K.; Dwivedi, K.K.; Khathing, D.T.; Srivastava, A.; Avasthi, D.K.

    2000-01-01

    The rate of energy loss of the impinging ion as it passes through succeeding layers of the target material gives information regarding the nature of material and helps to calculate the range of the ions in a thick target in which the ions are stopped. Here the range, energy loss of 118 MeV 28 Si were measured in Makrofol-N, Makrofol-G and Makrofol-KG, using nuclear track technique. The experimental range data are compared with the theoretical values obtained from different computer codes. (author)

  19. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  20. Development of Teaching Materials for a Physical Chemistry Experiment Using the QR Code

    OpenAIRE

    吉村, 忠与志

    2008-01-01

    The development of teaching materials with the QR code was attempted in an educational environment using a mobile telephone. The QR code is not sufficiently utilized in education, and the current study is one of the first in the field. The QR code is encrypted. However, the QR code can be deciphered by mobile telephones, thus enabling the expression of text in a small space.Contents of "Physical Chemistry Experiment" which are available on the Internet are briefly summarized and simplified. T...

  1. On the use of the HOTSPOT code for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattinger, D.; Sarussi, R.; Tzarfati, Y.; Levinson, S.; Tshuva, A.

    2004-01-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics code was created by LLNL in order to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. The HOTSPOT code is a first order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT code produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions, and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly. Four general programs, Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension, calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel or fire, or an area contamination event. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides, calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground survey measurements, and screening of alpha emitters in the Lung. We believe that the HOTSPOT code is extremely valuable in providing reasonable and reliable guidance for a diversity of application. For example, we demonstrate the release of 241 Am(20Ci) to the atmosphere

  2. The Aster code; Code Aster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The Aster code is a 2D or 3D finite-element calculation code for structures developed by the R and D direction of Electricite de France (EdF). This dossier presents a complete overview of the characteristics and uses of the Aster code: introduction of version 4; the context of Aster (organisation of the code development, versions, systems and interfaces, development tools, quality assurance, independent validation); static mechanics (linear thermo-elasticity, Euler buckling, cables, Zarka-Casier method); non-linear mechanics (materials behaviour, big deformations, specific loads, unloading and loss of load proportionality indicators, global algorithm, contact and friction); rupture mechanics (G energy restitution level, restitution level in thermo-elasto-plasticity, 3D local energy restitution level, KI and KII stress intensity factors, calculation of limit loads for structures), specific treatments (fatigue, rupture, wear, error estimation); meshes and models (mesh generation, modeling, loads and boundary conditions, links between different modeling processes, resolution of linear systems, display of results etc..); vibration mechanics (modal and harmonic analysis, dynamics with shocks, direct transient dynamics, seismic analysis and aleatory dynamics, non-linear dynamics, dynamical sub-structuring); fluid-structure interactions (internal acoustics, mass, rigidity and damping); linear and non-linear thermal analysis; steels and metal industry (structure transformations); coupled problems (internal chaining, internal thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, chaining with other codes); products and services. (J.S.)

  3. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials used in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation damage to process materials used in radioactive waste management has been a topic of little interest in the past. In recent years, as a result of the increasing number of accidents reported in the open literature, there has been some desire to examine the radiation decomposition of ion exchange materials and its consequences to the interim and long-term management of radioactive wastes. Extensive literature surveys and some confirmatory laboratory investigations conducted conclusively demonstrate that radiation damage to ion exchangers has the potential to cause problems of corrosion, elution of adsorbed ionic species, generation of flammable and explosive gaseous products and agglomeration of particulates to form rigid monoliths. This paper is an overview of present knowledge and a presentation of the results of our investigations of this phenomenon. The distinct lack of systematic studies to evaluate the problems of radiation damage to process materials used in the consolidation and isolation of high specific activity radionuclides still leaves considerable gaps in our knowledge of the processes and consequences of radiation effects on ion exchangers used in radioactive waste management

  4. Elementary processes in plasma-surface interactions with emphasis on ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalm, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Elementary processes occurring at solid surfaces immersed in low pressure plasmas are reviewed. In particular mechanisms leading to anisotropic or directional etching are discussed. The crucial role of ion bombardment is emphasized. First a brief summary of the interaction of (excited) neutrals, ions and electrons with targets is given. Next various aspects of sputter-etching with noble gas and reactive ions are surveyed. Finally it will be argued that synergistic effects, invoked by ion bombardment of a surface under simultaneous exposure to a reactive gas flux, are foremost important in explaining anisotropic plasma etching. It is shown that the role of the ions is not merely to stimulate the chemical reaction path but rather that the active gas flow chemically enhances the sputtering. (author)

  5. Sheath physics and materials science results from recent plasma source ion implantation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.R.; Radtke, J.L.; Dodd, R.A.; Worzala, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a surface modification technique which has been optimized for ion-beam processing of materials. PSII departs radically from conventional implantation by circumventing the line of sight restriction inherent in conventional ion implantation. The authors used PSII to implant cutting tools and dies and have demonstrated substantial improvements in lifetime. Recent results on plasma physics scaling laws, microstructural, mechanical, and tribological properties of PSII-implanted materials are presented

  6. A 2-100 keV, UHV ion impact spectrometer for ion-solid interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.A. Van den; Armour, D.G.; Verheij, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    A 2 to 100 keV ion accelerator has been constructed as part of an ion impact spectrometer in which a number of analytical techniques have been combined to allow a comprehensive study of the interaction of low- and medium-energy ions with solids to be carried out under carefully controlled conditions. The overall requirements of the ion beam system in terms of ion species, beam purity, uniformity, energy spread and intensity were dictated by the interest in carrying out low-energy ion scattering, Rutherford back-scattering and thermal desorption experiments. The accelerator design utilises the principle of low-energy extraction and mass analysis, and post-acceleration up to the required high energy. The ions are produced in a duoplasmatron ion source and a parallel beam is obtained after mass selection, utilising a quadrupole triplet lens in conjunction with a 60 0 stigmatic focusing magnetic analyser. Proton and rare gas ion beams of 1 to 100 nA are routinely obtained on target. The 54 cm diameter, UHV target chamber is pumped by a 270 1 s -1 turbo-molecular pump in conjunction with an in-line titanium sublimator, and typical base pressures of 1 to 4 x 10 -11 Torr are achieved. The target is supported in a precision, three-axis goniometer and the detection system, at present comprising a 90 mm mean diameter hemispherical energy analyser and channel electron multiplier, is mounted on a two-axis manipulator. Preliminary measurements using the system have employed the low-energy ion scattering technique to study the oxidation of a Ni(110) surface. (author)

  7. Helicon plasma ion temperature measurements and observed ion cyclotron heating in proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, C. J.; Goulding, R. H.; Isler, R. C.; Martin, E. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caneses, J. F.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Kafle, N.; Rapp, J.

    2018-01-01

    The Prototype-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) linear plasma device is a test bed for exploring and developing plasma source concepts to be employed in the future steady-state linear device Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) that will study plasma-material interactions for the nuclear fusion program. The concept foresees using a helicon plasma source supplemented with electron and ion heating systems to reach necessary plasma conditions. In this paper, we discuss ion temperature measurements obtained from Doppler broadening of spectral lines from argon ion test particles. Plasmas produced with helicon heating alone have average ion temperatures downstream of the Helicon antenna in the range of 3 ± 1 eV; ion temperature increases to 10 ± 3 eV are observed with the addition of ion cyclotron heating (ICH). The temperatures are higher at the edge than the center of the plasma either with or without ICH. This type of profile is observed with electrons as well. A one-dimensional RF antenna model is used to show where heating of the plasma is expected.

  8. PHITS: Particle and heavy ion transport code system, version 2.23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yukio; Iwase, Hiroshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2010-10-01

    A Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System PHITS has been developed under the collaboration of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), RIST (Research Organization for Information Science and Technology) and KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). PHITS can deal with the transport of all particles (nucleons, nuclei, mesons, photons, and electrons) over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries. Geometrical configuration of the simulation can be set with GG (General Geometry) or CG (Combinatorial Geometry). Various quantities such as heat deposition, track length and production yields can be deduced from the simulation, using implemented estimator functions called 'tally'. The code also has a function to draw 2D and 3D figures of the calculated results as well as the setup geometries, using a code ANGEL. Because of these features, PHITS has been widely used for various purposes such as designs of accelerator shielding, radiation therapy and space exploration. Recently PHITS introduces an event generator for particle transport parts in the low energy region. Thus, PHITS was completely rewritten for the introduction of the event generator for neutron-induced reactions in energy region less than 20 MeV. Furthermore, several new tallis were incorporated for estimation of the relative biological effects. This document provides a manual of the new PHITS. (author)

  9. Axisym finite element code: modifications for pellet-cladding mechanical interaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelman, G.P.

    1978-10-01

    Local strain concentrations in nuclear fuel rods are known to be potential sites for failure initiation. Assessment of such strain concentrations requires a two-dimensional analysis of stress and strain in both the fuel and the cladding during pellet-cladding mechanical interaction. To provide such a capability in the FRAP (Fuel Rod Analysis Program) codes, the AXISYM code (a small finite element program developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) was modified to perform a detailed fuel rod deformation analysis. This report describes the modifications which were made to the AXISYM code to adapt it for fuel rod analysis and presents comparisons made between the two-dimensional AXISYM code and the FRACAS-II code. FRACAS-II is the one-dimensional (generalized plane strain) fuel rod mechanical deformation subcode used in the FRAP codes. Predictions of these two codes should be comparable away from the fuel pellet free ends if the state of deformation at the pellet midplane is near that of generalized plane strain. The excellent agreement obtained in these comparisons checks both the correctness of the AXISYM code modifications as well as the validity of the assumption of generalized plane strain upon which the FRACAS-II subcode is based

  10. Relativistic ion acceleration by ultraintense laser interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Koga, J.K.; Nakagawa, K.

    2001-01-01

    There has been a great interest in relativistic particle generation by ultraintense laser interactions with matter. We propose the use of relativistically self-focused laser pulses for the acceleration of ions. Two dimensional PIC simulations are performed, which show the formation of a large positive electrostatic field near the front of a relativistically self-focused laser pulse. Several factors contribute to the acceleration including self-focusing distance, pulse depletion, and plasma density. Ultraintense laser-plasma interactions are capable of generating enormous electrostatic fields of ∼3 TV/m for acceleration of protons with relativistic energies exceeding 1 GeV

  11. New membrane materials for potassium-selective ion-sensitive field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, P.D.; van der Wal, Peter D.; Skowronska-Ptasinska, Maria; van den Berg, Albert; Bergveld, Piet; Sudholter, Ernst; Sudholter, Ernst J.R.; Reinhoudt, David

    1990-01-01

    Several polymeric materials were studied as membrane materials for potassium-selective ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) to overcome the problems related with the use of conventional plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes casted on ISFET gate surfaces. Several acrylate materials,

  12. Investigation of the mechanism of interaction of Lithium 6 ions on Beryllium 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, Mireille

    1962-01-01

    The objective of this research on the interaction of Lithium 6 and Beryllium 9 ions is to obtain new indications on the mode of interaction of these heavy ions, and on the configuration of target nuclei and projectile nuclei. In a first part, the author presents and describes the experimental conditions which comprise a Van de Graaff accelerator, a source, a stripper, and a target. He reports the study of α particles emitted by the reaction between the Lithium and Beryllium ions: description of the experimental installation (irradiation chamber and method), presentation and interpretation of experimental results. In the next part, he reports the study of Lithium 7 and Beryllium 10 nuclides emitted by disintegration of Beryllium 11: description of experimental conditions, variations of cross sections, variation of the cross section rate, and interpretation. The author then addresses the study of the intervention of the mode of interaction by 15 N compound nucleus in the reactions between lithium and beryllium ions: study of intensities of the different spectrum lines, measurement of the Doppler effect produced of the 479 keV line, interpretation of results. In conclusion, the author analyses the mechanism of interaction between lithium and beryllium ions, and discusses different theories: the Newns and Glendenning theories, and the Leigh theory

  13. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented

  14. Faster Heavy Ion Transport for HZETRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.

    2013-01-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN was developed to enable fast and accurate space radiation transport through materials. As more complex transport solutions are implemented for neutrons, light ions (Z heavy ion (Z > 2) transport algorithm in HZETRN is reviewed, and a simple modification is shown to provide an approximate 5x decrease in execution time for galactic cosmic ray transport. Convergence tests and other comparisons are carried out to verify that numerical accuracy is maintained in the new algorithm.

  15. Structuring Interactive Correctness Proofs by Formalizing Coding Idioms

    OpenAIRE

    Gast, Holger

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a novel strategy for developing correctness proofs in interactive software verification for C programs. Rather than proceeding backwards from the generated verification conditions, we start by developing a library of the employed data structures and related coding idioms. The application of that library then leads to correctness proofs that reflect informal arguments about the idioms. We apply this strategy to the low-level memory allocator of the L4 microkernel, a case st...

  16. Novel lithium iron phosphate materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Jelena

    2011-06-15

    Conventional energy sources are diminishing and non-renewable, take million years to form and cause environmental degradation. In the 21st century, we have to aim at achieving sustainable, environmentally friendly and cheap energy supply by employing renewable energy technologies associated with portable energy storage devices. Lithium-ion batteries can repeatedly generate clean energy from stored materials and convert reversely electric into chemical energy. The performance of lithium-ion batteries depends intimately on the properties of their materials. Presently used battery electrodes are expensive to be produced; they offer limited energy storage possibility and are unsafe to be used in larger dimensions restraining the diversity of application, especially in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs). This thesis presents a major progress in the development of LiFePO4 as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Using simple procedure, a completely novel morphology has been synthesized (mesocrystals of LiFePO4) and excellent electrochemical behavior was recorded (nanostructured LiFePO4). The newly developed reactions for synthesis of LiFePO4 are single-step processes and are taking place in an autoclave at significantly lower temperature (200 deg. C) compared to the conventional solid-state method (multi-step and up to 800 deg. C). The use of inexpensive environmentally benign precursors offers a green manufacturing approach for a large scale production. These newly developed experimental procedures can also be extended to other phospho-olivine materials, such as LiCoPO4 and LiMnPO4. The material with the best electrochemical behavior (nanostructured LiFePO4 with carbon coating) was able to deliver a stable 94% of the theoretically known capacity.

  17. Super TOF secondary ion mass spectroscopy using very highly charged primary ions up to Th70+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briere, M.A.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, D.

    1995-01-01

    The LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) has made low emittance beams of slow highly charged ions available for ion-solid interaction studies. Such interactions feature the dominance of electronic over collisional effects, and the shock waves generated by the ionized target atoms can desorb large numbers of large molecular species from the surface. This paper presents the first systematic study of the sputtering process due to the incidence of slow very highly charged ions; Th 70+ ions are extracted from EBIT at 7 keV * q and directed onto thin SiO 2 films on Si. Results suggest secondary ion yields of up to 25 per incident ion for Th 70+ (secondary ion yield is increased over that for singly or moderately charged ions). Correlations of the negative, positive, and negative cluster ion yields show promise for application of highly charged ion induced sputtering for enhanced sensitivity and quantitative (absolute) SIMS analysis of deep submicron scale surface layers and polymeric and biomolecular material analysis

  18. Interactions in ion pairs of protic ionic liquids: Comparison with aprotic ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Shinoda, Wataru; Miran, Md. Shah; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    The stabilization energies for the formation (E form ) of 11 ion pairs of protic and aprotic ionic liquids were studied by MP2/6-311G ** level ab initio calculations to elucidate the difference between the interactions of ions in protic ionic liquids and those in aprotic ionic liquids. The interactions in the ion pairs of protic ionic liquids (diethylmethylammonium [dema] and dimethylpropylammonium [dmpa] based ionic liquids) are stronger than those of aprotic ionic liquids (ethyltrimethylammonium [etma] based ionic liquids). The E form for the [dema][CF 3 SO 3 ] and [dmpa][CF 3 SO 3 ] complexes (−95.6 and −96.4 kcal/mol, respectively) are significantly larger (more negative) than that for the [etma][CF 3 SO 3 ] complex (−81.0 kcal/mol). The same trend was observed for the calculations of ion pairs of the three cations with the Cl − , BF 4 − , TFSA − anions. The anion has contact with the N–H bond of the dema + or dmpa + cations in the most stable geometries of the dema + and dmpa + complexes. The optimized geometries, in which the anions locate on the counter side of the cations, are 11.0–18.0 kcal/mol less stable, which shows that the interactions in the ions pairs of protic ionic liquids have strong directionality. The E form for the less stable geometries for the dema + and dmpa + complexes are close to those for the most stable etma + complexes. The electrostatic interaction, which is the major source of the attraction in the ion pairs, is responsible for the directionality of the interactions and determining the magnitude of the interaction energy. Molecular dynamic simulations of the [dema][TFSA] and [dmpa][TFSA] ionic liquids show that the N–H bonds of the cations have contact with the negatively charged (oxygen and nitrogen) atoms of TFSA − anion, while the strong directionality of the interactions was not suggested from the simulation of the [etma][CF 3 SO 3 ] ionic liquid

  19. Thermal and chemical stabilities of some synthesized inorganic ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Naggar, I.M.; Abou-Mesalam, M.M.; El-Shorbagy, M.M.; Shady, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    Chromium and cerium titanate as inorganic ion exchange materials were synthesized by the reaction of potassium chromate or ammonium eerie nitrate with titanium tetrachloride with molar ratio equal unity. The crystal system of both chromium and cerium titanates were determined and set to be monoclinic and orthorhombic system's, respectively. The chemical composition of both chromium and cerium titanates was determined by X-ray fluorescence technique and based on the data obtained with other different techniques. A molecular formula for chromium and cerium titanates as Cr 2 Ti 12 O 27 . 13H 2 O and Ce 2 Ti 3 O 10 . 7.46H 2 O, respectively, was proposed. Thermal stabilities of both ion exchangers were investigated at different heating temperatures. Also the stability of chromium and cerium titanates for chemical attack was studied in different media. The data obtained showed high thermal and chemical stabilities of chromium and cerium titanate ion exchangers compared with the same group of ion exchange materials. The ion exchange capacities of chromium and cerium titanates at different heating temperature were also investigated

  20. Thermal and chemical stabilities of some synthesized inorganic ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; Abou-Mesalam, M. M.; El-Shorbagy, M.M.; Shady, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromium and cerium titanate as inorganic ion exchange materials were synthesized by the reaction of potassium chromate or ammonium ceric nitrate with titanium tetrachloride with molar ratio equal unity. The crystal system of both chromium and cerium titanates were determined and set to be monoclinic and orthorhombic systems, respectively. The chemical composition of both chromium and cerium titanates were determined by X-ray fluorescence technique and based on the data obtained with other different techniques. We can proposed molecular formula for chromium and cerium titanates as Cr 2 Ti 1 2O27. 13H 2 O and Ce 2 ThO10. 7.46 H 2 O, respectively. Thermal stability of both ion exchangers was investigated at different heating temperatures. Also the stability of chromium and cerium titanates for chemical attack was studied in different media. The data obtained showed high thermal and chemical stabilities of chromium and cerium titanate ion exchangers compared to the same group of ion exchange materials. The ion exchange capacities of chromium and cerium titanates at different heating temperature were investigated

  1. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    atmospheric pressure using several types of low temperature plasma sources, for which radical induced interactions generally dominate due to short mean free paths of ions and VUV photons. For these conditions we demonstrated the importance of environmental interactions when atmospheric pressure plasma sources are used to modify biomolecules. This is evident from both gas phase characterization data and in-situ surface characterization of treated biomolecules. Environmental interactions can produce unexpected outcomes due to the complexity of reactions of reactive species with the atmosphere which determines the composition of reactive fluxes and atomistic changes of biomolecules. Overall, this work clarified a richer spectrum of scientific opportunities and challenges for the field of low temperature plasma-biomolecule surface interactions than initially anticipated, in particular for plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure. The insights produced in this work, e.g. demonstration of the importance of environmental interactions, are generally important for applications of APP to materials modifications. Thus one major contributions of this research has been the establishment of methodologies to more systematically study the interaction of plasma with bio-molecules. In particular, our studies of atmospheric pressure plasma sources using very well-defined experimental conditions enabled to combine atomistic surface modifications of biomolecules with changes in their biological function. The clarification of the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in deactivation of biomolecules during low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma-biomolecule interaction has broad implications, e.g. for the emerging field of plasma medicine. The development of methods to detect the effects of plasma treatment on immune-active biomolecules will be helpful in many future studies.

  2. Formation and reactions of free radicals in the radiolysis of organic materials by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, H.

    2000-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions deposit energy along ion tracks with high density. Chemical effects of the heavy ions may hence differ from that of γ-rays and fast electrons. We can utilize these effects for material modification and fabrication of microstructure. It is necessary to know the dependence of the effects on ion beams and the variation of the effects on materials for developing new application of ion beams. We then studied radical formation in organic solids of alanine and of adipic acid by ion beams irradiation. (author)

  3. Code manual for CONTAIN 2.0: A computer code for nuclear reactor containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, K.K.; Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Gido, R.G.; Tadios, E.L.; Davis, F.J.; Martinez, G.M.; Washington, K.E.; Tills, J.

    1997-12-01

    The CONTAIN 2.0 computer code is an integrated analysis tool used for predicting the physical conditions, chemical compositions, and distributions of radiological materials inside a containment building following the release of material from the primary system in a light-water reactor accident. It can also predict the source term to the environment. CONTAIN 2.0 is intended to replace the earlier CONTAIN 1.12, which was released in 1991. The purpose of this Code Manual is to provide full documentation of the features and models in CONTAIN 2.0. Besides complete descriptions of the models, this Code Manual provides a complete description of the input and output from the code. CONTAIN 2.0 is a highly flexible and modular code that can run problems that are either quite simple or highly complex. An important aspect of CONTAIN is that the interactions among thermal-hydraulic phenomena, aerosol behavior, and fission product behavior are taken into account. The code includes atmospheric models for steam/air thermodynamics, intercell flows, condensation/evaporation on structures and aerosols, aerosol behavior, and gas combustion. It also includes models for reactor cavity phenomena such as core-concrete interactions and coolant pool boiling. Heat conduction in structures, fission product decay and transport, radioactive decay heating, and the thermal-hydraulic and fission product decontamination effects of engineered safety features are also modeled. To the extent possible, the best available models for severe accident phenomena have been incorporated into CONTAIN, but it is intrinsic to the nature of accident analysis that significant uncertainty exists regarding numerous phenomena. In those cases, sensitivity studies can be performed with CONTAIN by means of user-specified input parameters. Thus, the code can be viewed as a tool designed to assist the knowledge reactor safety analyst in evaluating the consequences of specific modeling assumptions

  4. Code manual for CONTAIN 2.0: A computer code for nuclear reactor containment analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, K.K.; Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Gido, R.G.; Tadios, E.L.; Davis, F.J.; Martinez, G.M.; Washington, K.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tills, J. [J. Tills and Associates, Inc., Sandia Park, NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The CONTAIN 2.0 computer code is an integrated analysis tool used for predicting the physical conditions, chemical compositions, and distributions of radiological materials inside a containment building following the release of material from the primary system in a light-water reactor accident. It can also predict the source term to the environment. CONTAIN 2.0 is intended to replace the earlier CONTAIN 1.12, which was released in 1991. The purpose of this Code Manual is to provide full documentation of the features and models in CONTAIN 2.0. Besides complete descriptions of the models, this Code Manual provides a complete description of the input and output from the code. CONTAIN 2.0 is a highly flexible and modular code that can run problems that are either quite simple or highly complex. An important aspect of CONTAIN is that the interactions among thermal-hydraulic phenomena, aerosol behavior, and fission product behavior are taken into account. The code includes atmospheric models for steam/air thermodynamics, intercell flows, condensation/evaporation on structures and aerosols, aerosol behavior, and gas combustion. It also includes models for reactor cavity phenomena such as core-concrete interactions and coolant pool boiling. Heat conduction in structures, fission product decay and transport, radioactive decay heating, and the thermal-hydraulic and fission product decontamination effects of engineered safety features are also modeled. To the extent possible, the best available models for severe accident phenomena have been incorporated into CONTAIN, but it is intrinsic to the nature of accident analysis that significant uncertainty exists regarding numerous phenomena. In those cases, sensitivity studies can be performed with CONTAIN by means of user-specified input parameters. Thus, the code can be viewed as a tool designed to assist the knowledge reactor safety analyst in evaluating the consequences of specific modeling assumptions.

  5. Transferability of polarizable models for ion-water electrostatic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masia, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Studies of ion-water systems at condensed phase and at interfaces have pointed out that molecular and ionic polarization plays an important role for many phenomena ranging from hydrogen bond dynamics to water interfaces' structure. Classical and ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations reveal that induced dipole moments at interfaces (e.g. air-water and water-protein) are usually high, hinting that polarizable models to be implemented in classical force fields should be very accurate in reproducing the electrostatic properties of the system. In this paper the electrostatic properties of three classical polarizable models for ion-water interaction are compared with ab initio results both at gas and condensed phase. For Li + - water and Cl - -water dimers the reproducibility of total dipole moments obtained with high level quantum chemical calculations is studied; for the same ions in liquid water, Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to compute the time evolution of ionic and molecular dipole moments, which are compared with the classical models. The PD2-H2O model developed by the author and coworkers [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 7362] together with the gaussian intermolecular damping for ion-water interaction [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 164505] showed to be the fittest in reproducing the ab initio results from gas to condensed phase, allowing for force field transferability.

  6. Ion Motion in a Plasma Interacting with Strong Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingarten, A.; Grabowski, C.; Chakrabarti, N.; Maron, Y.; Fruchtmant, A.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of a plasma with strong magnetic fields takes place in many laboratory experiments and astrophysical plasmas. Applying a strong magnetic field to the plasma may result in plasma displacement, magnetization, or the formation of instabilities. Important phenomena in plasma, such as the energy transport and the momentum balance, take a different form in each case. We study this interaction in a plasma that carries a short-duration (80-ns) current pulse, generating a magnetic field of up to 17 kG. The evolution of the magnetic field, plasma density, ion velocities, and electric fields are determined before and during the current pulse. The dependence of the plasma limiting current on the plasma density and composition are studied and compared to theoretical models based on the different phenomena. When the plasma collisionality is low, three typical velocities should be taken into consideration: the proton and heavier-ion Alfven velocities (v A p and v A h , respectively) and the EMHD magnetic-field penetration velocity into the plasma (v EMHD ). If both Alfven velocities are larger than v EMHD the plasma is pushed ahead of the magnetic piston and the magnetic field energy is dissipated into ion kinetic energy. If v EMHD is the largest of three velocities, the plasma become magnetized and the ions acquire a small axial momentum only. Different ion species may drift in different directions along the current lines. In this case, the magnetic field energy is probably dissipated into electron thermal energy. When vs > V EMHD > vi, as in the case of one of our experiments, ion mass separation occurs. The protons are pushed ahead of the piston while the heavier-ions become magnetized. Since the plasma electrons are unmagnetized they cannot cross the piston, and the heavy ions are probably charge-neutralized by electrons originating from the cathode that are 'born' magnetized

  7. Possible mechanisms for the interaction of polymeric composite resins with Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between the active groups of polymeric composite resins such as Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid disodium salt P(AM-AA)EDTANa 2 , Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)- montmorillonite P(AM-AA)-montmorillonite, and Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate P(AM-AA)-KNiHCF, with copper sulfate as a test ion has been studied. The spectroscopic studies show that the mechanism of interaction between polymeric composite resins and copper sulfate is a bond formation between the active groups of polymeric chains and copper ion. The bond formation depends on nature of polymeric chains. It was also found that the amide groups form complexes with hydrated cations, while carboxylate group interact by ion exchange mechanism through complex formation. Montmorillonite and hexacyanoferrate of the resins interact with metal ions by ion exchange mechanism

  8. A new ion-beam laboratory for materials research at the Slovak University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Pavol; Dobrovodský, Jozef; Vaňa, Dušan; Beňo, Matúš; Závacká, Anna; Muška, Martin; Halgaš, Radoslav; Minárik, Stanislav; Riedlmajer, Róbert

    2017-10-01

    An ion beam laboratory (IBL) for materials research has been commissioned recently at the Slovak University of Technology within the University Science Park CAMBO located in Trnava. The facility will support research in the field of materials science, physical engineering and nanotechnology. Ion-beam materials modification (IBMM) as well as ion-beam analysis (IBA) are covered and deliverable ion energies are in the range from tens of keV up to tens of MeV. Two systems have been put into operation. First, a high current version of the HVEE 6 MV Tandetron electrostatic tandem accelerator with duoplasmatron and cesium sputtering ion sources, equipped with two end-stations: a high-energy ion implantation and IBA end-station which includes RBS, PIXE and ERDA analytical systems. Second, a 500 kV implanter equipped with a Bernas type ion source and two experimental wafer processing end-stations. The facility itself, operational experience and first IBMM and IBA experiments are presented together with near-future plans and ongoing development of the IBL.

  9. Modelling the interaction of high energy ions with inert matter, living matter, and moving matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuve, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In this report for accreditation to supervise research (HDR), the author proposes a synthetic (and however relatively detailed) overview of his research works in the fields of physics and radiology. The first part addresses works in the field of interaction between ions and inert matter (Monte Carlo simulation of emission induced by ion-solid interaction, simulation by molecular dynamics of pulverization). The second part addresses the interaction between ions and living matter: research strategy, principle of the Local Effect Model (LEM) and influence of its main parameters, LEM experimental assessment, LEM theoretical analysis, role of the cell oxidizing and anti-oxidizing system. The next part addresses the interaction of ions with moving matter: research strategy, lung mechanics modelling and clinical assessments, chest wall mechanics, transformation of movements simulated in 4D scanner imagery

  10. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfvén Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Pinsker, R. I.; Wright, J.

    2005-09-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfvén wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement.

  11. A sorption model for alkalis in cement-based materials - Correlations with solubility and electrokinetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henocq, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    In cement-based materials, radionuclide uptake is mainly controlled by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). This work presents an approach for defining a unique set of parameters of a surface complexation model describing the sorption behavior of alkali ions on the C-S-H surface. Alkali sorption processes are modeled using the CD-MUSIC function integrated in the Phreeqc V.3.0.6 geochemical code. Parameterization of the model was performed based on (1) retention, (2) zeta potential, and (3) solubility experimental data from the literature. This paper shows an application of this model to sodium ions. It was shown that retention, i.e. surface interactions, and solubility are closely related, and a consistent sorption model for radionuclides in cement-based materials requires a coupled surface interaction/chemical equilibrium model. In case of C-S-H with low calcium-to-silicon ratios, sorption of sodium ions on the C-S-H surface strongly influences the chemical equilibrium of the C-S-H + NaCl system by significantly increasing the aqueous calcium concentration. The close relationship between sorption and chemical equilibrium was successfully illustrated by modeling the effect of the solid-to-liquid ratio on the calcium content in solution in the case of C-S-H + NaCl systems.

  12. Oxygen ion implantation induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite RPC detector material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K. V. Aneesh, E-mail: aneesh1098@gmail.com; Ravikumar, H. B., E-mail: hbr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore-570006 (India); Ranganathaiah, C., E-mail: cr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Govt. Research Centre, Sahyadri Educational Institutions, Mangalore-575007 (India); Kumarswamy, G. N., E-mail: kumy79@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Physics, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bangalore-560035 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector materials were exposed to 100 keV Oxygen ion in the fluences of 10{sup 12}, 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Ion implantation induced microstructural changes have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity shows the deposition of high energy interior track and chain scission leads to the formation of radicals, secondary ions and electrons at lower ion implantation fluences (10{sup 12} to10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) followed by cross-linking at 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence due to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite detector material is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate implantation energy and fluence of Oxygen ion on polymer based Bakelite RPC detector material may reduce the leakage current, improves the efficiency, time resolution and thereby rectify the aging crisis of the RPC detectors.

  13. Ion interactions with solids and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    The models developed for studying processing of energy losses in dense medium, in particular some recent results for atomic systems confined in solids and in partially degenerated medium are described. Applications of these models to some cases of ion interaction with thin metallic foils and with dense plasmas are described. The processes of excitation and energy losses in the case of a degenerated electron gas, and in the general case of a plasma with arbitrary degenerescency are considered. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Ion drag force on dust grains in the magnetized edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.; Ikkurthi, V.R.; Melzer, A.

    2009-01-01

    A 3-dimensional Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh (P3M) code [K. Matyash, R. Schneider, F. Taccogna, D. Tskhakaya, J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 458] is applied to simulate a small-size (smaller than a Debye length) spherical dust grain confined in the magnetized plasma near the material wall of a tokamak. Plasma particles (electrons and ions) are treated kinetically (Particle-in-Cell with Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC)), which allows to resolve self-consistently the electrostatic sheath in front of the wall. In order to describe accurately the plasma particles' motion close to the dust grain, the PIC technique is supplemented with Molecular Dynamics (MD), employing an analytic electrostatic potential for the interaction with the dust grain. The charging of a spherical, conducting dust grain confined in the sheath potential close to the wall of a tokamak is simulated. A magnetic field normal to the wall was investigated. The ion drag force resulting from dust grain collisions with the streaming ions is calculated. This force is critical for a realistic description of the dust particle dynamics and transport in fusion plasmas.

  15. Interactions of relativistic heavy ions in thick heavy element targets and some unresolved problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.; Ditlov, V.A.; Pozharova, E.A.; Smirnitskij, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions of relativistic heavy ions with total energies above 30 GeV in thick Cu and Pb targets (≥2 cm) have been studied with various techniques. Radiochemical irradiation experiments using thick Cu targets, both in a compact form or as diluted '2π-Cu targets' have been carried out with several relativistic heavy ions, such as 44 GeV 12 C (JINR, Dubna) and 72 GeV 40 Ar (LBL, Berkeley, USA). Neutron measuring experiments using thick targets irradiated with various relativistic heavy ions up to 44 GeV 12 C have been performed at JINR. In addition, the number of 'black prongs' in nuclear interactions (due to protons with energies less than 30 MeV and emitted from the target-like interaction partner at rest) produced with 72 GeV 22 Ne ions in nuclear emulsion plates has been measured in the first nuclear interaction of the primary 22 Ne ion and in the following second nuclear interaction of the secondary heavy (Z>1) ion. Some essential results have been obtained. 1) Spallation products produced by relativistic secondary fragments in interactions ([44 GeV 12 C or 72 GeV 40 Ar]+Cu) within thick copper yield less products close to the target and much more products far away from the target as compared to primary beam interactions. This applies also to secondary particles emitted into large angles (Θ>10deg). 2) The neutron production of 44 GeV 12 C within thick Cu and Pb targets is beyond the estimated yield as based on experiments with 12 GeV 12 C. These rather independent experimental results cannot be understood with well-accepted nuclear reaction models. They appear to present unresolved problems

  16. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.; Eder, E.; Liu, W.; Barnard, J.; Friedman, A.; Logan, G.; Fisher, A.; Masers, N.; Bertozzi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related

  17. Hybrid 3D model for the interaction of plasma thruster plumes with nearby objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Filippo; Domínguez-Vázquez, Adrián; Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) fluid approach to model the interaction of a plasma plume with a spacecraft and/or any nearby object. Ions and neutrals are modeled with a PIC approach, while electrons are treated as a fluid. After a first iteration of the code, the domain is split into quasineutral and non-neutral regions, based on non-neutrality criteria, such as the relative charge density and the Debye length-to-cell size ratio. At the material boundaries of the former quasineutral region, a dedicated algorithm ensures that the Bohm condition is met. In the latter non-neutral regions, the electron density and electric potential are obtained by solving the coupled electron momentum balance and Poisson equations. Boundary conditions for both the electric current and potential are finally obtained with a plasma sheath sub-code and an equivalent circuit model. The hybrid code is validated by applying it to a typical plasma plume-spacecraft interaction scenario, and the physics and capabilities of the model are finally discussed.

  18. New ion selective materials. Application to the selective extraction of caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre-Reguillon, Alain

    1996-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the synthesis and assessment of ion selective materials. The first part reports the development of a general method of assessment of ion selective materials. In the second part, the author describes different methods used to insolubilize macro-cycles on hydrophilic polymers. The obtained polyurethanes are synthesised. These hydrophilic polymers display interesting complexing properties and selectivities with respect to cations of alkali metals. Then the author addresses the improvement of selectivity with respect to caesium of ion exchange resorcinol-formaldehyde resins. Different factors affecting selectivity are identified, and the concept of molecular print is used to study the improvement of selectivity. The effect of macro-cyclic structures on phenolic resins with respect to caesium is highlighted [fr

  19. Use of inorganic ion exchange materials for the treatment of liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; Zakaria, E.S.; El-Absy, M.A.; Abdel-Hamid, M.M.; Abo-Mesalam, M.M.; Shady, S.A.; Abdelwahab, M.A.; Aly, H.F.

    1997-01-01

    To examine the ion exchange behaviour of the double salts of polybasic acid with tetravalent metals type such as cerium(IV) and tin(IV) antimonates, different samples were prepared, heated at different temperatures and exposed to γ-irradiation. These samples were subject to X-ray, infra-red and thermal analysis. The exchange properties of the studied materials improved on increasing the Sb, Ce or Sn molar ratios and the drying temperature. The rate of the isotopic exchange was controlled by particle diffusion for the metal ions studied and was faster as the heating temperature was increased but slower for materials with a higher exchange capacity. The physical thermodynamic parameters have been evaluated which give some information regarding the mechanism of ion exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. The removal of radioactive isotopes of Na + , Cs + , Sr 2+ , Co 2+ and Eu 3+ was carried out by in-situ precipitation or by using preformed precipitate of tin(IV) and cerium(IV) antimonates. The products of in-situ precipitations act as ion exchange materials with high chemical and radioactive stabilities. The new materials have relatively high capacity compared with CeSb and SnSb. The irradiated cerium(IV) antimonate has been successfully used for the quantitative separation of cesium which suggests its use in the treatment of active liquid waste. (author). 24 refs, 7 figs, 17 tabs

  20. VS4 Nanoparticles Anchored on Graphene Sheets as a High-Rate and Stable Electrode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Qiang; Zhao, Yingying; Yu, Yanhao; Bian, Xiaofei; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Yingjin; Gao, Yu; Chen, Gang

    2018-02-22

    The size and conductivity of the electrode materials play a significant role in the kinetics of sodium-ion batteries. Various characterizations reveal that size-controllable VS 4 nanoparticles can be successfully anchored on the surface of graphene sheets (GSs) by a simple cationic-surfactant-assisted hydrothermal method. When used as an electrode material for sodium-ion batteries, these VS 4 @GS nanocomposites show large specific capacity (349.1 mAh g -1 after 100 cycles), excellent long-term stability (84 % capacity retention after 1200 cycles), and high rate capability (188.1 mAh g -1 at 4000 mA g -1 ). A large proportion of the capacity was contributed by capacitive processes. This remarkable electrochemical performance was attributed to synergistic interactions between nanosized VS 4 particles and a highly conductive graphene network, which provided short diffusion pathways for Na + ions and large contact areas between the electrolyte and electrode, resulting in considerably improved electrochemical kinetic properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Investigation of plasma interaction with carbon based and mixed materials related to next-generation fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Korshunov, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites, tungsten and beryllium are considered at present as candidate-materials for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The presence of various materials, as the divertor and the first wall components, will unavoidably result in the formation of mixed layers on the surfaces of plasma facing components. In this review, processes of plasma interaction with these materials and layers formed by mixing of the materials are considered. Mixed W-Be and W-C layers were prepared by deposition of two species atoms upon a substrate under simultaneous sputtering of two targets by 20 keV Ar + -ions. The thickness of the deposited mixed layers was 100-500 nm. The most important processes investigated here are: a) erosion at threshold energies and at various temperatures, b) erosion at plasma disruption, c) surface modification at normal operation regime and disruption, d) the influence of the surface modification on material erosion, e) erosion product formation at plasma disruption (dust creation), f) hydrogen isotopes retention in materials. An experimental method of determination of sputtering yield under ion bombardment in the near-threshold energy range has been developed. The method is based on the use of special regimes of field ion microscopic analysis. The method has been used for measurement of the sputtering yield of C-C composite, technically pure tungsten, tungsten oxide and mixed W-C layer on the tungsten by deuterium ions. The energy dependences of the sputtering yield of those materials by deuterium ions at energies ranging from 10 to 500 eV was investigated. Temperature dependences of pure and B-doped C-C composites erosion by deuterium ions were investigated. Material erosion was studied in a steady state plasma at the LENTA facility with parameters close to those expected at normal operation of ITER, and in the MKT plasma accelerator simulating plasma disruption. Surface modifications of graphite materials and tungsten

  2. Interaction of a finite-length ion beam with a background plasma: Reflected ions at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onsager, T.G.; Winske, D.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The coupling of a finite-length, field-aligned, ion beam with a uniform background plasma is investigated using one-dimensional hybrid computer simulations. The finite-length beam is used to study the interaction between the incident solar wind and ions reflected from the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, where the reflection process may vary with time. The coupling between the reflected ions and the solar wind is relevant to ion heating at the bow shock and possibly to the formation of hot, flow anomalies and re-formation of the shock itself. The authors find that although there are many similarities between the instabilities driven by the finite-length beam and those predicted by linear theory for an infinite, homogeneous beam, there are also some important differences. Consistent with linear theory, the waves which dominate the interaction are the electromagnetic right-hand polarized resonant and nonresonant modes. However, in addition to the instability growth rates, the length of time that the waves are in contact with the beam is also an important factor in determining which wave mode will dominate the interaction. Whereas linear theory predicts the nonresonant mode to have the larger growth rate for the parameters they investigate, with finite-length beam they find that both the nonresonant and resonant modes contribute to the interaction. They find that the interaction will result in strong coupling, where a significant fraction of the available free energy is converted into thermal energy in a short time, provided the beam is sufficiently dense or sufficiently long

  3. Interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with metal ions in micellar medium using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gujar, Varsha; Pundge, Vijaykumar; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Steady state and life time fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to study the interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with biologically important metal ions i.e. Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} in various micellar media (anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), nonionic TX-100 (triton X-100) and cationic CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide)). It was observed that fluorescence properties of drug remain unaltered in the absence of micellar media with increasing concentration of metal ions. However, addition of Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} caused fluorescence quenching of amiloride in the presence of anionic micelle, SDS. Binding of drug with metal ions at the charged micellar interface could be the possible reason for this pH-dependent metal-mediated fluorescence quenching. There were no remarkable changes observed due to metal ions addition when drug was present in cationic and nonionic micellar medium. The binding constant and bimolecular quenching constant were evaluated and compared for the drug–metal complexes using Stern–Volmer equation and fluorescence lifetime values. - Highlights: • Interaction of amiloride with biologically important metal ions, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. • Monitoring the interaction in various micelle at different pH by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Micelles acts as receptor, amiloride as transducer and metal ions as analyte in the present system. • Interaction study provides pH dependent quenching and binding mechanism of drug with metal ions.

  4. Interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with metal ions in micellar medium using fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujar, Varsha; Pundge, Vijaykumar; Ottoor, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Steady state and life time fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to study the interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with biologically important metal ions i.e. Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ in various micellar media (anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), nonionic TX-100 (triton X-100) and cationic CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide)). It was observed that fluorescence properties of drug remain unaltered in the absence of micellar media with increasing concentration of metal ions. However, addition of Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ and Ni 2+ caused fluorescence quenching of amiloride in the presence of anionic micelle, SDS. Binding of drug with metal ions at the charged micellar interface could be the possible reason for this pH-dependent metal-mediated fluorescence quenching. There were no remarkable changes observed due to metal ions addition when drug was present in cationic and nonionic micellar medium. The binding constant and bimolecular quenching constant were evaluated and compared for the drug–metal complexes using Stern–Volmer equation and fluorescence lifetime values. - Highlights: • Interaction of amiloride with biologically important metal ions, Fe 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ . • Monitoring the interaction in various micelle at different pH by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Micelles acts as receptor, amiloride as transducer and metal ions as analyte in the present system. • Interaction study provides pH dependent quenching and binding mechanism of drug with metal ions

  5. Program EPICSHOW. A computer code to allow interactive viewing of the EPIC data libraries (Version 98-1). Summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    EPICSHOW (Electron Photon Interactive Code - Show Data) is an interactive graphics code that allows users to view and interact with neutron, photon, electron and light charged particle data. Besides on screen graphics the code provides hard copy in the form of tabulated listings and Postscript output files. The code has been implemented on UNIX, IBM-PC, Power MAC, and even Laptop computers. It should be relatively easy to use it on almost any computer. All of the data included in this system is based on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Databases and the neutron and photon data is used in the TART97 Monte Carlo transport code system. (author)

  6. A process for doping an amorphous semiconductor material by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalbitzer, S.; Muller, G.; Spear, W.E.; Le Comber, P.G.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for doping a body of amorphous semiconductor material, the body is held at a predetermined temperature above 20 deg. C which is below the recrystallization temperature of the amorphous semiconductor material during bombardment by accelerated ions of a predetermined doping material. (U.K.)

  7. Interviewer and respondent interaction in survey interviews : Empirical evidence from behavior coding studies and question wording experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, Yfke

    2010-01-01

    This book sheds light on verbal interaction problems in survey interviews. It is shown how behavior coding, i.e., coding the utterances of interviewer and respondent while they are answering survey questions, can be used to detect interactional problems. Several empirical studies using behavior

  8. Structure carbon materials: clusters, nanotubes, ion-implant polymers and diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapchuk, N.M.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Poklonskij, N.A.; Sviridov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the series of research works dealing with the physics of nanostructured carbon materials, which were awarded a Sevchenko Prize in 2008. The paper considers the mechanism of synthesis of 3D carbon nanospecies and their nanomechanics, magnetic properties of ion-implanted diamonds, as well as the regularities of formation of novel forms of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and metal-carbon nanocomposites via ion bombardment of polymers, as well as electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of ion-implanted polymers an their possible applications in micro- and nanoelectronics. (authors)

  9. Potassium vanadate K0.23V2O5 as anode materials for lithium-ion and potassium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cailing; Luo, Shaohua; Huang, Hongbo; Wang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Yahui; Liu, Yanguo; Zhai, Yuchun; Wang, Zhaowen

    2018-06-01

    A layered potassium vanadate K0.23V2O5 has been successfully prepared by the hydrothermal method and evaluated as an anode material for lithium-ion and potassium-ion batteries. High structural stability is demonstrated by the ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When used as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the K0.23V2O5 exhibits a reversible capacity of 480.4 mAh g-1 at 20 mA g-1 after 100 cycles and 439.7 mAh g-1 at 200 mA g-1 after 300 cycles as well as good cycling stability. Even at a high current density of 800 mA g-1, a high reversible capacity of 202.5 mAh g-1 can be retained, indicating excellent rate performance. Whereas in potassium-ion batteries, it retains a capacity of 121.6 mAh g-1 after 150 cycles at 20 mA g-1 and 97.6 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1 after 100 cycles. Such superior electrochemical performance of K0.23V2O5 can be ascribed to the special flower-like morphology and structure. Overall, the results highlight the great potential of K0.23V2O5 as an anode material for both lithium-ion and potassium-ion batteries.

  10. Synthesis and investigation of novel cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Monica

    Environmental pollution and eventual depletion of fossil fuels and lithium has increased the need for research towards alternative electrical energy storage systems. In this context, research in sodium ion batteries (NIBs) has become more prevalent since the price in lithium has increased due to its demand and reserve location. Sodium is an abundant resource that is low cost, and safe; plus its chemical properties are similar to that of Li which makes the transition into using Na chemistry for ion battery systems feasible. In this study, we report the effects of processing conditions on the electrochemical properties of Na-ion batteries made of the NaCrO2 cathode. NaCrO2 is synthesized via solid state reactions. The as-synthesized powder is then subjected to high-energy ball milling under different conditions which reduces particle size drastically and causes significant degradation of the specific capacity for NaCrO2. X-ray diffraction reveals that lattice distortion has taken place during high-energy ball milling and in turn affects the electrochemical performance of the cathode material. This study shows that a balance between reducing particle size and maintaining the layered structure is essential to obtain high specific capacity for the NaCrO2 cathode. In light of the requirements for grid scale energy storage: ultra-long cycle life (> 20,000 cycles and calendar life of 15 to 20 years), high round trip efficiency (> 90%), low cost, sufficient power capability, and safety; the need for a suitable cathode materials with excellent capacity retention such as Na2MnFe(CN)6 and K2MnFe(CN)6 will be investigated. Prussian blue (A[FeIIIFeII (CN)6]•xH2O, A=Na+ or K+ ) and its analogues have been investigated as an alkali ion host for use as a cathode material. Their structure (FCC) provides large ionic channels along the direction enabling facile insertion and extraction of alkali ions. This material is also capable of more than one Na ion insertion per unit formula

  11. Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Ravva, Mahesh Kumar

    2017-06-29

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of how noncovalent interactions, determined by the chemical structure of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, govern essential aspects of the electronic, optical, and mechanical characteristics of organic semiconductors. We begin by describing general aspects of materials design, including the wide variety of chemistries exploited to control the electronic and optical properties of these materials. We then discuss explicit examples of how the study of noncovalent interactions can provide deeper chemical insights that can improve the design of new generations of organic electronic materials.

  12. The diffusion properties of ion implanted species in selected target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Dellwo, J.; Carter, H.K.; Kormicki, J.; Bartolo, G. di; Batchelder, J.C.; Breitenbach, J.; Chediak, J.A.; Jentoff-Nilsen, K.; Ichikawa, S.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments important to the future success of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) are in progress at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory which are designed to select the most appropriate target material for generating a particular radioactive ion beam (RIB). The 25-MV HHIRF tandem accelerator is used to implant stable complements of interesting radioactive elements into refractory targets mounted in a high-temperature FEBIAD ion source which is open-quotes on-lineclose quotes at the UNISOR facility. The intensity versus time of implanted species, which diffuse from the high-temperature target material (∼1700 degrees C) and are ionized in the FEBIAD ion source, is used to determine release times for a particular projectile/target material combination. From such release data, diffusion coefficients can be derived by fitting the theoretical results obtained by computational solution of Fick's second equation to experimental data. The diffusion coefficient can be used subsequently to predict the release properties of the particular element from the same material in other target geometries and at other temperatures, provided that the activation energy is also known. Diffusion coefficients for Cl implanted into and diffused from CeS and Zr 5 Si 3 and As, Br, and Se implanted into and diffused from Zr 5 Ge 3 have been derived from the resulting intensity versus time profiles. Brief descriptions of the experimental apparatus and procedures utilized in the present experiments and plans for future related experiments are presented

  13. Dynamics of Plasma-Surface Interactions using In-situ Ion Beam Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal was to develop an innovative experimental facility that would allow for the measurement of real-time response of a material surface to plasma bombardment by employing in-situ high-energy ion beam analysis. This facility was successfully developed and deployed at U. Wisconsin-Madison and was named DIONISOS (Dynamics of IONic Implantation and Sputtering on Surfaces). There were several major highlights to the DIONISOS research which we will briefly highlight below. The full technical details of the DIONISOS development, deployment and research results are contained in the Appendices which contain several peer-reviewed publications and a PhD thesis devoted to DIONISOS. The DIONISOS results on deuterium retention in molybdenum were chosen as an invited talk at the 2008 International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Toledo, Spain.

  14. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A.; Borisov, Dmitry P.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment

  15. Borophene as an anode material for Ca, Mg, Na or Li ion storage: A first-principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Dianat, Arezoo; Rahaman, Obaidur; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-10-01

    Borophene, the boron atom analogue to graphene, being atomic thick have been just recently experimentally fabricated. In this work, we employ first-principles density functional theory calculations to investigate the interaction of Ca, Mg, Na or Li atoms with single-layer and free-standing borophene. We first identified the most stable binding sites and their corresponding binding energies as well and then we gradually increased the ions concentration. Our calculations predict strong binding energies of around 4.03 eV, 2.09 eV, 2.92 eV and 3.28 eV between the borophene substrate and Ca, Mg, Na or Li ions, respectively. We found that the binding energy generally decreases by increasing the ions content. Using the Bader charge analysis, we evaluate the charge transfer between the adatoms and the borophene sheet. Our investigation proposes the borophene as a 2D material with a remarkably high capacity of around 800 mA h/g, 1960 mA h/g, 1380 mA h/g and 1720 mA h/g for Ca, Mg, Na or Li ions storage, respectively. This study can be useful for the possible application of borophene for the rechargeable ion batteries.

  16. Extraction of highly charged ions from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for interactions with a gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Fussmann, G.

    2006-01-01

    Highly charged ions are extracted from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for investigations of charge exchange with a gas target. The classical over-the-barrier model for slow highly charged ions describes this process, whereby one or more electrons are captured from the target into Rydberg states of the ion. The excited state relaxes via a radiative cascade of the electron to ground energy. The cascade spectra are characteristic of the capture state. We investigate x-ray photons emitted as a result of interactions between Ar 17+ ions at energies ≤5q keV with Ar atoms. Of particular interest is the velocity dependence of the angular momentum capture state l c

  17. Simulation study of two-ion hybrid resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Tajima, T.

    1986-02-01

    A one-dimensional low-noise, low-frequency electromagnetic particle simulation code that is appropriate for investigation of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is developed. Retaining the hyperbolicity of the electromagnetic waves and exploiting nearly one-dimensional characteristics (perpendicular to the external magnetic field) of the ICRH, we use the guiding center electron approximation for the transverse electronic current calculation. We observe mode conversion of the incoming magnetosonic wave into the electrostatic ion-ion hybrid mode accompanied by strong ion-heating. The dependence of this heating on the different plasma parameters is examined through a series of simulations, focusing mainly on wave incidence from the high field side. Because K/sub parallel/ = 0 in our runs, the conventional Landau damping cannot explain the ion heating. Non-linear mechanisms for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy absorption during radio frequency heating in the ion cyclotron regime. 32 refs., 17 figs

  18. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 7.0) Code User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Michael F.

    1999-01-01

    The integrated fuel-coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, three-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a description of IFCI 7.0. The user's manual describes the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 7.0. Appendix A is an input manual provided for the creation of working decks

  19. The influence of ion bombardment on emission properties of carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepusov, Alexander; Komarskiy, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    When electric-vacuum device works its cathode surface experiences bombardment with ions of residual gases. Effects of ion bombardment impact on surface of field emission cathodes made of carbon materials may essentially change emission properties of such cathodes. It changes emission start electric field strength, voltage vs. current characteristic of material, its relief and electron structure of the surface layer. Field emission cathode operating mode, variation of radiation doses allow to obtain both good effects: maximal electric current, surface recovery – and negative ones: the worst emission properties and surface destruction, amorphization.

  20. The influence of ion bombardment on emission properties of carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepusov, Alexander, E-mail: chepusov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Komarskiy, Alexander, E-mail: aakomarskiy@gmail.com [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Vadim, E-mail: kuznetsov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    When electric-vacuum device works its cathode surface experiences bombardment with ions of residual gases. Effects of ion bombardment impact on surface of field emission cathodes made of carbon materials may essentially change emission properties of such cathodes. It changes emission start electric field strength, voltage vs. current characteristic of material, its relief and electron structure of the surface layer. Field emission cathode operating mode, variation of radiation doses allow to obtain both good effects: maximal electric current, surface recovery – and negative ones: the worst emission properties and surface destruction, amorphization.

  1. Scintillation screen materials for beam profile measurements of high energy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnakumar, Renuka

    2016-06-22

    For the application as a transverse ion beam diagnostics device, various scintillation screen materials were analysed. The properties of the materials such as light output, image reproduction and radiation stability were investigated with the ion beams extracted from heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18. The ion species (C, Ne, Ar, Ta and U) were chosen to cover the large range of elements in the periodic table. The ions were accelerated to the kinetic energies of 200 MeV/u and 300 MeV/u extracted with 300 ms pulse duration and applied to the screens. The particle intensity of the ion beam was varied from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 9} particles per pulse. The screens were irradiated with typically 40 beam pulses and the scintillation light was captured using a CCD camera followed by characterization of the beam spot. The radiation hardness of the screens was estimated with high intensity Uranium ion irradiation. In the study, a linear light output for 5 orders of magnitude of particle intensities was observed from sensitive scintillators and ceramic screens such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The highest light output was recorded by CsI:Tl and the lowest one by Herasil. At higher beam intensity saturation of light output was noticed from Y and Mg doped ZrO{sub 2} screens. The light output from the screen depends not only on the particle intensity but also on the ion species used for irradiation. The light yield (i.e. the light intensity normalised to the energy deposition in the material by the ion) is calculated from the experimental data for each ion beam setting. It is shown that the light yield for light ions is about a factor 2 larger than the one of heavy ions. The image widths recorded exhibit a dependence on the screens material and differences up to 50 % were registered. On radiation stability analysis with high particle intensity of Uranium ions of about 6 x 10{sup 8} ppp, a stable performance in light output and image reproduction was documented from Al

  2. Crystal-field tuning of photoluminescence in two-dimensional materials with embedded lanthanide ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ding; Chen, Weiyin; Zeng, Mengqi; Xue, Haifeng; Chen, Yunxu; Xiao, Yao; Zhang, Tao; Fu, Lei [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Institute for Advanced Studies, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Sang, Xiahan; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xiao, Kai [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Lanthanide (Ln) group elements have been attracting considerable attention owing to the distinct optical properties. The crystal-field surroundings of Ln ions in the host materials can determine their energy level splitting, which is of vital importance to tailor their optical properties. 2D MoS{sub 2} single crystals were utilized as the host material to embed Eu{sup 3+} and energy-level splitting was achieved for tuning its photoluminescence (PL). The high anisotropy of the 2D host materials makes them distort the degenerate orbitals of the Ln ions more efficiently than the symmetrical bulk host materials. A significant red-shift of the PL peak for Eu{sup 3+} was observed. The strategy for tailoring the energy level splitting of Ln ions by the highly designable 2D material crystal field provides a new method to extend their optical properties. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Interaction of low-energy highly charged ions with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzel, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The thesis presented herein deals with experimental studies of the interaction between highly charged ions and neutral matter at low collision energies. The energy range investigated is of great interest for the understanding of both charge exchange reactions between ions comprising the solar wind and various astrophysical gases, as well as the creation of near-surface nanostructures. Over the course of this thesis an experimental setup was constructed, capable of reducing the kinetic energy of incoming ions by two orders of magnitude and finally focussing the decelerated ion beam onto a solid or gaseous target. A coincidence method was employed for the simultaneous detection of photons emitted during the charge exchange process together with the corresponding projectile ions. In this manner, it was possible to separate reaction channels, whose superposition presumably propagated large uncertainties and systematic errors in previous measurements. This work has unveiled unexpectedly strong contributions of slow radiative decay channels and clear evidence of previously only postulated decay processes in charge exchange-induced X-ray spectra. (orig.)

  4. Classifying the mechanisms of electrochemical shock in ion-intercalation materials

    OpenAIRE

    Woodford, William; Carter, W. Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2014-01-01

    “Electrochemical shock” – the electrochemical cycling-induced fracture of materials – contributes to impedance growth and performance degradation in ion-intercalation batteries, such as lithium-ion. Using a combination of micromechanical models and acoustic emission experiments, the mechanisms of electrochemical shock are identified, classified, and modeled in targeted model systems with different composition and microstructure. A particular emphasis is placed on mechanical degradation occurr...

  5. Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.

    1986-11-01

    The Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility (PMITF), recently designed and constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma system with densities around 10 11 cm -3 and electron temperatures of 10-20 eV. The device consists of a mirror cell with high-field-side microwave injection and a heating power of up to 0.8 kW(cw) at 2.45 GHz. The facility will be used for studies of plasma-materials interactions and of particle physics in pump limiters and for development and testing of plasma edge diagnostics

  6. Double folded Yukawa interaction potential between two heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgac, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Dumitrescu, O.

    1980-02-01

    A simple semi-analytical formula for the heavy ion interaction potential within the double-folding model approximation is obtained. The folded interaction is assumed to be expressed in Yukawa terms or the derivatives of them. The densities used can be both experimental or theoretical (of simple ''step-wise'', ''Fermi-Saxon-Woods'' or complicated ''shell model'' structure) densities. A way of inserting the exchange terms is discussed. Numerical calculations for some colliding partners are reported. (author)

  7. Direct observation of interaction between plasma ions and grid-excited pulses in a Q-machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1970-01-01

    The change in velocity-distribution function caused by interaction between ions and density pulses in a Q-machine is observed experimentally.......The change in velocity-distribution function caused by interaction between ions and density pulses in a Q-machine is observed experimentally....

  8. Metal ion interaction with phosphorylated tyrosine analogue monolayers on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petoral, Rodrigo M; Björefors, Fredrik; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2006-11-23

    Phosphorylated tyrosine analogue molecules (pTyr-PT) were assembled onto gold substrates, and the resulting monolayers were used for metal ion interaction studies. The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), both prior to and after exposure to metal ions. XPS verified the elemental composition of the molecular adsorbate and the presence of metal ions coordinated to the phosphate groups. Both the angle-dependent XPS and IRAS results were consistent with the change in the structural orientation of the pTyr-PT monolayer upon exposure to metal ions. The differential capacitance of the monolayers upon coordination of the metal ions was evaluated using EIS. These metal ions were found to significantly change the capacitance of the pTyr-PT monolayers in contrast to the nonphosphorylated tyrosine analogue (TPT). CV results showed reduced electrochemical blocking capabilities of the phosphorylated analogue monolayer when exposed to metal ions, supporting the change in the structure of the monolayer observed by XPS and IRAS. The largest change in the structure and interfacial capacitance was observed for aluminum ions, compared to calcium, magnesium, and chromium ions. This type of monolayer shows an excellent capability to coordinate metal ions and has a high potential for use as sensing layers in biochip applications to monitor the presence of metal ions.

  9. Observation of large-amplitude ion acoustic wave in microwave-plasma interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    1997-01-01

    Large amplitude ion acoustic wave, which is not satisfied with a linear dispersion relationship of ion acoustic wave, is observed in microwave-plasma interaction experiments. This ion acoustic wave is excited around critical density layer and begins to propagate to underdense region with a phase velocity one order faster than sound velocity C s , which is predicted by the linear theory, the phase velocity and the wave length of the wave decreases as it propagates. Finally, it converges to C s and strongly dumps. Diagnostic by the Faraday cup indicates that this ion acoustic wave is accompanied with a hot ion beam. (author)

  10. Facile Preparation of Graphene/SnO₂ Xerogel Hybrids as the Anode Material in Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe-Fei; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yadong; Yang, Fan; Xin, Le; Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Hangyu; Stanciu, Lia; Xie, Jian

    2015-12-16

    SnO2 has been considered as one of the most promising anode materials for Li-ion batteries due to its theoretical ability to store up to 8.4 Li(+). However, it suffers from poor rate performance and short cycle life due to the low intrinsic electrical conductivity and particle pulverization caused by the large volume change upon lithiation/delithiation. Here, we report a facile synthesis of graphene/SnO2 xerogel hybrids as anode materials using epoxide-initiated gelation method. The synthesized hybrid materials (19% graphene/SnO2 xerogel) exhibit excellent electrochemical performance: high specific capacity, stable cyclability, and good rate capability. Even cycled at a high current density of 1 A/g for 300 cycles, the hybrid electrode can still deliver a specific capacity of about 380 mAh/g, corresponding to more than 60% capacity retention. The incorporation of graphene sheets provides fast electron transfer between the interfaces of the graphene nanosheets and the SnO2 and a short lithium ion diffusion path. The porous structure of graphene/xerogel and the strong interaction between SnO2 and graphene can effectively accommodate the volume change and tightly confine the formed Li2O and Sn nanoparticles, thus preventing the irreversible capacity degradation.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy of nanostructures synthesized by laser and charged particle beam interaction with materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G. K.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), because of its ability to image atomic arrangements directly and its ability to give spectroscopic information at similar resolution has emerged as a very powerful tool for understanding the structure of materials at atomic level. TEM has been particularly useful in resolving the interface structures in materials. This form of microscopy is very suitable for resolving the structure and defects in ultrafine microstructures such as those of the nanocrystalline phases. After a brief description of the different characterization abilities of the aberration corrected transmission electron microscope, this presentation describes the results of TEM investigations on nanocrystalline microstructures generated by laser materials interaction and due to interaction of electrons and ions with materials. Excimer laser has become an attractive choice for new and precision application for ablation and deposition in recent times. In this work, a KrF excimer laser having 30 ns pulse width and 600 mJ energy at source has been used to deposit zirconia on Zr-base alloy in order to explore the ability of the thin oxide film to act as a diffusion barrier to hydrogen ingress into the alloy. It has been found that the variation in pressure by an order of three has resulted in maximum influence on the roughness of the laser deposited oxide film that has not been possible to achieve by other parameters within the range of the instrument. Present study has also indicated an interrelation among the roughness, adherence and the film-thickness, where the last one is indicated by the XPS study. Transmission electron microscopy was carried out to study the size, size distribution and defects in the deposited film. Nanocrystalline phases generated by interaction of electron and ion irradiation of Zr based alloys; Ni based alloys and Fe based alloys have been examined in detail by conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results of

  12. Electrostatic Properties and Characterization of Textile Materials Affected by Ion Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranas Juozas ŽILINSKAS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the opportunities of wider characterization of textile materials, fabrics, upholstery fabrics, fibers, yarns or others, which may accumulate electric charge. A non-contact way for electrostatic properties measurement based on affecting those materials by ions with positive or negative charge is described. The method allows to measure simultaneously the time dependences of the surface voltage and the electric charge during the charging process and the time dependences of the surface voltage during the discharging process. From the measured dependencies the following set of parameters was measured or calculated: the surface voltage limiting value, the surface voltage semi-decay time, the maximum deposited charge, the layer capacitance, the energy of the accumulated charge and others. The surface voltage distribution measurement method when the investigated textile material is affected by ion flux was also described. To verify the applicability of the proposed methods for characterization of textile materials in order to determine the above-mentioned parameters of cotton, linen, wool, viscose, acetate, polyester, polyester coated with polytetrafluoroethylene, a series of experiments were performed. The surface voltage distribution measurement method based on affecting textile materials by ions with positive charge was described and a surface voltage distribution of a polyester-cotton upholstery fabric produced by a Jacquard mechanism was presented. The performed experiments demonstrate the possibilities of method application for comparison of the electrostatic properties of different textile materials used for the same tasks or the same materials produced by different technological processes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3828

  13. Ion Acceleration by Ultra-intense Laser Pulse Interacting with Double-layer Near-critical Density Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    A collimated ion beam is generated through the interaction between ultra-intense laser pulse and a double layer plasma. The maximum energy is above 1 GeV and the total charge of high energy protons is about several tens of nC/μm. The double layer plasma is combined with an underdense plasma and a thin overdense one. The wakefield traps and accelerates a bunch of electrons to high energy in the first underdense slab. When the well collimated electron beam accelerated by the wakefield penetrates through the second overdense slab, it enhances target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) and breakout after-burner (BOA) regimes. The mechanism is simulated and analyzed by 2.5 dimensional Particle-in-cell code. Compared with single target TNSA or BOA, both the acceleration gradient and energy transfer efficiency are higher in the double layer regime. (paper)

  14. Ion beam induced modification of exchange interaction and spin-orbit coupling in the Co2FeSi Heusler compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamrle, J; Blomeier, S; Gaier, O; Hillebrands, B; Schneider, H; Jakob, G; Reuscher, B; Brodyanski, A; Kopnarski, M; Postava, K; Felser, C

    2007-01-01

    A Co 2 FeSi (CFS) film with L2 1 structure was irradiated with different fluences of 30 keV Ga + ions. Structural modifications were subsequently studied using the longitudinal (LMOKE) and quadratic (QMOKE) magneto-optical Kerr effect. Both the coercivity and the LMOKE amplitude were found to show a similar behaviour upon irradiation: they are nearly constant up to ion fluences of ∼6 x 10 15 ion cm -2 , while they decrease with further increasing fluences and finally vanish at a fluence of ∼9 x 10 16 ion cm -2 , when the sample becomes paramagnetic. However, contrary to this behaviour, the QMOKE signal nearly vanishes even for the smallest applied fluence of 3 x 10 14 ion cm -2 . We attribute this reduction of the QMOKE signal to an irradiation-induced degeneration of second or higher order spin-orbit coupling, which already happens at small fluences of 30 keV Ga + ions. On the other hand, the reduction of coercivity and LMOKE signal with high ion fluences is probably caused by a reduction of the exchange interaction within the film material

  15. Particle emission induced by the interaction of highly charged slow Xe-ions with a SiO2 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiwietz, G.; Skogvall, B.; Schneider, D.; Clark, M.; DeWitt, D.; McDonald, J.

    1991-01-01

    Sputtering of surface atoms by low energy (a few keV) heavy ions is a commonly used technique in material science and applied physics. In general, sputtering occurs via nuclear energy transfer processes and is determined mainly by the atom-atom interaction potentials. In the energy range of interest these potentials depend only slightly on the charge state of one collision partner if the other is neutral. The development of new ion-sources, however, allows for the use of ions with charged states of q > 50. For these highly charged ions it is conceivable that electronic processes come into play as well. If, for example, the density of charged surface atoms exceeds a certain limit, then particle emission can occur via the electrostatic repulsion of target atoms, the so-called Coulomb explosion. Indications for such electronic effects have been found in a few investigations of ion-induced sputtering Si (q q+ ). However, the order of magnitude of this effect is not clear until now. In this work we present preliminary data on sputtering, ion backscattering, electron and photon emission from SiO 2 surface induced by incident Xe ions of very high charge states (q=30--50). The experiment was performed at the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a time-of-flight (TOF) ion analyzer-system from the Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Berlin

  16. Comet 73P Measurements of Solar Wind Interactions, Cometary Ion Pickup, and Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Rubin, M.; Combi, M. R.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Several fragments of Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 passed near the Earth following a 2006 disintegration episode. Unique measurements regarding the charge state composition and the elemental abundances of both cometary and heliospheric plasma were made during this time by both the ACE/SWICS and Wind/STICS sensors. As the solar wind passed through the neutral cometary coma, it experienced charge exchange that was observed as an increase in the ratio of He+/He++. In addition, particles originating from fragments trailing the major cometary objects were ionized and picked up by the solar wind. The cometary material can be identified by the concentrations of water-group pickup ions having a mass-per-charge ratio of 16-18 amu/e, indicating that these are actively sublimating fragments. Here we present an analysis of cometary composition, spatial distribution, directionality, and heliospheric interactions with a focus on Helium, Carbon (C/O), and water-group ions.

  17. Pickup ion processes associated with spacecraft thrusters: Implications for solar probe plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Adam, E-mail: a.j.clemens@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Chemical thrusters are widely used in spacecraft for attitude control and orbital manoeuvres. They create an exhaust plume of neutral gas which produces ions via photoionization and charge exchange. Measurements of local plasma properties will be affected by perturbations caused by the coupling between the newborn ions and the plasma. A model of neutral expansion has been used in conjunction with a fully three-dimensional hybrid code to study the evolution and ionization over time of the neutral cloud produced by the firing of a mono-propellant hydrazine thruster as well as the interactions of the resulting ion cloud with the ambient solar wind. Results are presented which show that the plasma in the region near to the spacecraft will be perturbed for an extended period of time with the formation of an interaction region around the spacecraft, a moderate amplitude density bow wave bounding the interaction region and evidence of an instability at the forefront of the interaction region which causes clumps of ions to be ejected from the main ion cloud quasi-periodically.

  18. Modelling interaction cross sections for intermediate and low energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toburen, L.H.; Shinpaugh, J.L.; Justiniano, E.L.B.

    2002-01-01

    When charged particles slow in tissue they undergo electron capture and loss processes than can have profound effects on subsequent interaction cross sections. Although a large amount of data exists for the interaction of bare charged particles with atoms and molecules, few experiments have been reported for these 'dressed' particles. Projectile electrons contribute to an impact-parameter-dependent screening of the projectile charge that precludes straightforward scaling of energy loss cross sections from those of bare charged particles. The objective of this work is to develop an analytical model for the energy-loss-dependent effects of screening on differential ionisation cross sections that can be used in track structure calculations for high LET ions. As a first step a model of differential ionisation cross sections for bare ions has been combined with a simple screening model to explore cross sections for intermediate and low energy dressed ions in collisions with atomic and molecular gas targets. The model is described briefly and preliminary results compared to measured electron energy spectra. (author)

  19. Development of a new surface ion-source and ion guide in the ALTO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuong, P.V.

    2009-12-01

    The present work is dedicated to the ALTO project which is the production of neutron-rich gallium isotopes by the ISOL thick-target technique using photo-fission and a surface ion source. We aim at the study of the structure of 82 Ge, 83 Ge, 84 Ge via the β decay of 82 Ga, 83 Ga, and 84 Ga. We focus on the development of a new surface ion source made from materials with a high work function φ which can give high ionisation efficiencies for elements with low ionisation potentials, like alkaline as well as gallium and indium. Tungsten, rhenium and iridium are considered as good candidates for a surface ionizer because the Saha-Langmuir equation indicates high surface ionisation efficiencies for these materials. This has motivated us to equip the surface ion source at ALTO with rhenium and iridium-coated rhenium ionizer tubes of the same dimensions as the surface ion source at ISOLDE. We performed a test experiment to measure the ionisation efficiency for gallium. We also built a simulation code for the ionisation efficiency of the different surface ionisation sources (different materials and dimensions). On the other hand, for future nuclear structure studies of refractory elements such as cobalt or nickel, the ISOL technique with a thick target is no longer suitable. Indeed, the high melting point of these elements makes it difficult to volatilize and release them from a thick target. For such a situation, a technique based on thin targets is needed and the laser ion guide based on a gas cell to slow down, neutralize and stop the recoiling nuclear reaction products combined with a laser beam to re-ionize them selectively, seems a good choice. A code based on the Geant-4 tool-kit has been built to simulate the ionisation of the buffer gas. In this work, we also briefly show the results of the photo-fission yield measurements at ALTO. The fission fragments were ionized in a hot plasma ion source, mass separated and detected by germanium and scintillator detectors

  20. Chemotherapy drugs form ion pores in membranes due to physical interactions with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad; Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Duszyk, Marek; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the effects on membrane of the tubulin-binding chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside and taxol. Electrophysiology recordings across lipid membranes in aqueous phases containing drugs were used to investigate the drug effects on membrane conductance. Molecular dynamics simulation of the chemotherapy drug-lipid complexes was used to elucidate the mechanism at an atomistic level. Both drugs are observed to induce stable ion-flowing pores across membranes. Discrete pore current-time plots exhibit triangular conductance events in contrast to rectangular ones found for ion channels. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that drugs and lipids experience electrostatic and van der Waals interactions for short periods of time when found within each other's proximity. The energies from these two interactions are found to be similar to the energies derived theoretically using the screened Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions between peptides and lipids due to mainly their charge properties while forming peptide-induced ion channels in lipid bilayers. Experimental and in silico studies together suggest that the chemotherapy drugs induce ion pores inside lipid membranes due to drug-lipid physical interactions. The findings reveal cytotoxic effects of drugs on the cell membrane, which may aid in novel drug development for treatment of cancer and other diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Crystal nucleation initiated by transient ion-surface interactions at aerosol interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan D; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2017-07-01

    Particle collisions are a common occurrence in the atmosphere, but no empirical observations exist to fully predict the potential effects of these collisions on air quality and climate projections. The current consensus of heterogeneous crystal nucleation pathways relevant to the atmosphere dictates that collisions with amorphous particles have no effect on the crystallization relative humidity (RH) of aqueous inorganic aerosols because there is no stabilizing ion-surface interaction to facilitate the formation of crystal nuclei. In contrast to this view of heterogeneous nucleation, we report laboratory observations demonstrating that collisions with hydrophobic amorphous organic aerosols induced crystallization of aqueous inorganic microdroplets at high RH, the effect of which was correlated with destabilizing water-mediated ion-specific surface interactions. These same organic aerosols did not induce crystallization once internally mixed in the droplet, pointing toward a previously unconsidered transient ion-specific crystal nucleation pathway that can promote aerosol crystallization via particle collisions.

  2. Vanadium oxide nanotubes as cathode material for Mg-ion batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christian Kolle; Sørensen, Daniel Risskov; Bøjesen, Espen Drath

    Vanadium oxide compounds as cathode material for secondary Li-ion batteries gained interest in the 1970’s due to high specific capacity (>250mAh/g), but showed substantial capacity fading.1 Developments in the control of nanostructured morphologies have led to more advanced materials, and recently...... vanadium oxide nanotubes (VOx-NT) were shown to perform well as a cathode material for Mg-ion batteries.2 The VOx-NTs are easily prepared via a hydrothermal process to form multiwalled scrolls of VO layer with primary amines interlayer spacer molecules.3 The tunable and relative large layer spacing 1-3 nm...... synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measured during battery operation. These results indicate Mg-intercalation in the multiwalled VOx-NTs occurs within the space between the individual vanadium oxide layers while the underlying VOx frameworks constructing the walls are affected only to a minor degree...

  3. Development and feasibility testing of the Pediatric Emergency Discharge Interaction Coding Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet A; Taylor, Alexandra; Chorney, Jill; Porter, Stephen; Murphy, Andrea; MacPhee, Shannon; Bishop, Andrea; Haworth, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Discharge communication is an important aspect of high-quality emergency care. This study addresses the gap in knowledge on how to describe discharge communication in a paediatric emergency department (ED). The objective of this feasibility study was to develop and test a coding scheme to characterize discharge communication between health-care providers (HCPs) and caregivers who visit the ED with their children. The Pediatric Emergency Discharge Interaction Coding Scheme (PEDICS) and coding manual were developed following a review of the literature and an iterative refinement process involving HCP observations, inter-rater assessments and team consensus. The coding scheme was pilot-tested through observations of HCPs across a range of shifts in one urban paediatric ED. Overall, 329 patient observations were carried out across 50 observational shifts. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated in 16% of the observations. The final version of the PEDICS contained 41 communication elements. Kappa scores were greater than .60 for the majority of communication elements. The most frequently observed communication elements were under the Introduction node and the least frequently observed were under the Social Concerns node. HCPs initiated the majority of the communication. Pediatric Emergency Discharge Interaction Coding Scheme addresses an important gap in the discharge communication literature. The tool is useful for mapping patterns of discharge communication between HCPs and caregivers. Results from our pilot test identified deficits in specific areas of discharge communication that could impact adherence to discharge instructions. The PEDICS would benefit from further testing with a different sample of HCPs. © 2017 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Graphene-enhanced hybrid phase change materials for thermal management of Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Pradyumna; Legedza, Stanislav; Dhar, Aditya; Salgado, Ruben; Renteria, Jacqueline; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2014-02-01

    Li-ion batteries are crucial components for progress in mobile communications and transport technologies. However, Li-ion batteries suffer from strong self-heating, which limits their life-time and creates reliability and environmental problems. Here we show that thermal management and the reliability of Li-ion batteries can be drastically improved using hybrid phase change material with graphene fillers. Conventional thermal management of batteries relies on the latent heat stored in the phase change material as its phase changes over a small temperature range, thereby reducing the temperature rise inside the battery. Incorporation of graphene to the hydrocarbon-based phase change material allows one to increase its thermal conductivity by more than two orders of magnitude while preserving its latent heat storage ability. A combination of the sensible and latent heat storage together with the improved heat conduction outside of the battery pack leads to a significant decrease in the temperature rise inside a typical Li-ion battery pack. The described combined heat storage-heat conduction approach can lead to a transformative change in thermal management of Li-ion and other types of batteries.

  5. Interaction of heavy ions beams with hot and dense plasmas. Application to inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, Gilles

    1987-01-01

    The subject of this work is the variation with time, on one of the energy and charge state of an heavy ion beam which through a plasma, and on another side, of a target used in ion inertial confinement fusion. We take in account projectile excitation, and higher order corrections to the Born stopping power formula are calculated. Comparison with experimental results in gas and solid are good. In hot plasma case, non-equilibrium charge states are described. We present an hydrodynamic simulation code of one dimension and three temperatures. We show that the shortening of the heavy ions beams with temperature reinforces the radiative transfer importance. (author) [fr

  6. Multiply charged ions of the oxygen - produced at interaction of laser radiation with two-element solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedilov, M.R.; Bedilov, R.M.; Kamalova, J.O.; Davletov, I.Yu.; Matnazarov, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The interest to study of the oxygen multiply charged ions spectra produced at interaction laser radiation with one and two-element solids, is associate with possibility of creating laser and inertial thermonuclear syntheses, effective sources of multiply charged ions and nuclei atoms elements, plasma lasers, lasers on multiply charged transition, design of radiation-resistant materials and others. The present time many works is devoted to multiply charged ions, obtained from one element targets. Experimental results of study charge and energy spectra multiply charged ions of the oxygen, formed at interaction laser radiation with one and two-element solids are given in this work. Our experiments, we used installation, which is described in [1]. Neodymium laser had following parameters: wavelength 1.06 μm; intensity q = (0.1 h 1000) GW/sm 2 ; angle of incidence = 180. Were study one element Al, and two-element Al 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 targets by a diameter of 10 mm and thickness of 3 mm. Analysis obtained charge and energy spectra of multiply charged ions one (Al) and two-element (Al 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 ) targets depending on intensity of laser radiation and targets components reveal the following: - maximal charge number one element target (Al) at q 500 GW/sm 2 is equal Z max = 6 and all peaks corresponding to charge numbers Z = 1 - 6 well resolved, but two-element targets (Al 2 O 3 ) Z max ions Al decrease before 3. Also it is necessary to note that, Z max ions of the oxygen depend on target components. In case Al 2 O 3 and Y 2 O 3 maximal charge number of oxygen ions are equal Z max = 6 and 3, accordingly; - obtained charge and energy spectra of oxygen ions being included in two-element targets, are indicative of that, general regularities of the change Z max , E max and structures charge and energy spectra depending on q laser are saved. However they hang by target components; - common features and some differences of energy spectra multiply charged oxygen ions

  7. Validation of the THIRMAL-1 melt-water interaction code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, C.C.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The THIRMAL-1 computer code has been used to calculate nonexplosive LWR melt-water interactions both in-vessel and ex-vessel. To support the application of the code and enhance its acceptability, THIRMAL-1 has been compared with available data from two of the ongoing FARO experiments at Ispra and two of the Corium Coolant Mixing (CCM) experiments performed at Argonne. THIRMAL-1 calculations for the FARO Scoping Test and Quenching Test 2 as well as the CCM-5 and -6 experiments were found to be in excellent agreement with the experiment results. This lends confidence to the modeling that has been incorporated in the code describing melt stream breakup due to the growth of both Kelvin-Helmholtz and large wave instabilities, the sizes of droplets formed, multiphase flow and heat transfer in the mixing zone surrounding and below the melt metallic phase. As part of the analysis of the FARO tests, a mechanistic model was developed to calculate the prefragmentation as it may have occurred when melt relocated from the release vessel to the water surface and the model was compared with the relevant data from FARO.

  8. Bio-Nano ECRIS: An electron cyclotron resonance ion source for new materials production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, T. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Minezaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Tanaka, K.; Asaji, T. [Tateyama Machine Co., Ltd., 30 Shimonoban, Toyama, Toyama 930-1305 (Japan); Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Biri, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem Ter 18/c (Hungary); Yoshida, Y. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    We developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for new materials production on nanoscale. Our main target is the endohedral fullerenes, which have potential in medical care, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. In particular, iron-encapsulated fullerene can be applied as a contrast material for magnetic resonance imaging or microwave heat therapy. Thus, our new ECRIS is named the Bio-Nano ECRIS. In this article, the recent progress of the development of the Bio-Nano ECRIS is reported: (i) iron ion beam production using induction heating oven and (ii) optimization of singly charged C{sub 60} ion beam production.

  9. The use of an ion-beam source to alter the surface morphology of biological implant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    An electron-bombardment ion-thruster was used as a neutralized-ion-beam sputtering source to texture the surfaces of biological implant materials. The materials investigated included 316 stainless steel; titanium-6% aluminum, 4% vanadium; cobalt-20% chromium, 15% tungsten; cobalt-35% nickel, 20% chromium, 10% molybdenum; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyoxymethylene; silicone and polyurethane copolymer; 32%-carbon-impregnated polyolefin; segmented polyurethane; silicone rubber; and alumina. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes of all materials after ion-texturing. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to determine the effects of ion-texturing on the surface chemical composition of some polymers. Liquid contact angle data were obtained for ion-textured and untextured polymer samples. Results of tensile and fatigue tests of ion-textured metal alloys are presented. Preliminary data of tissue response to ion-textured surfaces of some metals, polytetrafluoroethylene, alumina, and segmented polyurethane have been obtained.

  10. Angular dependence of high Mach number plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.A.; Brecht, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper a 2-1/2-dimensional hybrid code is used to examine the collisionless large spatial scale (kc/ω pi ∼ 1) low-frequency (ω ∼ ω ci ) interaction initiated by a plasma shell of finite width traveling at high Alfven Mach number relative to a uniform background plasma. Particular attention is given to the angle of the relative velocity relative to the ambient magnetic field for the range of angles O < θ < π/2. An attempt is made to parameterize some of the important physics including the Alfven ion cyclotron instability, the field-aligned electromagnetic ion counter streaming instability, mixing of the plasma shell with the background ions, and structuring of the interaction region. These results are applicable to various astrophysical interactions such as bow shocks and interplanetary shocks

  11. Hydrogen interaction with fusion-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caorlin, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is an outline of the work carried out at JRC Ispra in the Tritium-materials Interaction Laboratory, on the interaction of gaseous hydrogen with several materials of interest in the field of fusion technology. Experimental work is reported and a concise review of relevant theoretical and numerical supporting activity is given as well. A period of about seven years is covered since 1982. Current work and possible future extensions are also briefly mentioned. 11 figs., 18 refs

  12. Codes of practice and protocols for the dosimetry in reference conditions of proton and ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatnitsky, S.; Andreo, P.

    2002-01-01

    The advantages of radiotherapy protons and heavier charged-particle beams, the technological feasibility, and the clinical results obtained so far have led to the establishment of about 20 treatment facilities worldwide and plans to open another 20 proton and light-ion therapy centres in the next five years. In order to meet the expanding capabilities of treatment techniques, considerable effort has been devoted during the last fifteen years to the development of the dosimetry and calibration of such beams. This paper reviews these developments and summarizes the present status of Codes of Practice and protocols for the dosimetry in reference conditions of proton and ion beams. The first dosimetry protocol for heavy-particle radiotherapy beams, AAPM TG 20, was based on the use of Faraday cups and calorimeters, whereas ionization chamber dosimetry received little attention. Following the trends in 'nuclear particle' radiotherapy, TG 20 included recommendations for specifying 'dose to tissue'. The lack of availability of a harmonized set of data for the different particles made this protocol to include data for stopping-powers and for the mean energy required to produce and ion pair in air, W air , from multiple authors, without enough attention being paid to their consistency. The increased focus into proton beams was materialized in the publication of the ECHED Code of Practice, dedicated exclusively to protons, where ionization dosimetry received more attention than in TG 20. It was not until the publication of the Supplement to the ECHED recommendations that ionization chambers having a 60 CO calibration factor were recommended as a reference detector for proton dosimetry, and data supplied for chambers with different wall materials. The emphasis on ionization chamber-based proton dosimetry was complemented with a recommendation for using water as dosimetry phantom material and the necessary data on tissue and water to air stopping-power ratios and W air . One of

  13. The computation of the build-up of long-lived radioisotopes on the surface of primary circuits and the ion exchange material of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, K.

    1980-06-01

    The buildup of radionuclides on the surface of the primary circuits and in the ion exchange material is calculated. The computation is made by the computer code 'CRUD'. The buildup is interesting from the viewpoint of nuclear waste. Oskarshamn 2 is chosen as the reference plant. An extrapolation is made for 20 years of operation. Calculation are givin for Mn54, Fe55, Co60, Ni59, Ni63 and Zn65. The constants of deposition and disharge are determined by fitting the values. (G.B.)

  14. Tritium interactions with steel and construction materials in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    The literature on the interactions of tritium and tritiated water with metals, glasses, ceramics, concrete, paints, polymers and other organic materials is reviewed in this report Some of the processes affecting the amount of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and the conversion of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and conversion of elemental tritium (T 2 ) to tritiated water (HTO), are also briefly outlined. Tritium permeation in steels is fairly well understood, but effects of surface preparation and coatings on sorption are not yet clear. Permeation of T 2 into other metals with cleaned surfaces has been studied thoroughly at high temperature, and the effect of surface oxidation has also been explored. The room-temperature permeation rates of low-permeability metals with cleaned surfaces are much faster than indicated by high-temperature results, because of grain-boundary diffusion. Elastomers have been studied to a certain extent, but some mechanisms of interaction with tritium gas and sorbed tritium are unclear. Ceramics have some of the lowest sorption and permeation rates, but ceramic coatings on stainless steels do not lower permeation or tritium as effectively as coatings obtained by oxidation of the steel, probably because of cracking caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficient. Studies on concrete are in their early stages; they show that sorption of tritiated water on concrete is a major concern in cleanup of releases of elemental tritium into air in tritium handling facilities. Some of the codes for modelling releases and sorption of T 2 and HTO contain unproven assumptions about sorption and T 2 → HTO conversion. Several experimental programs will be required in order to clear up ambiguities in previous work and to determine parameters for materials which have not yet been investigated. (146 refs., tab.)

  15. An experiment on the dynamics of ion implantation and sputtering of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. A.; Kesler, L. A.; Peterson, E. E.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Woller, K. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    A major impediment towards a better understanding of the complex plasma-surface interaction is the limited diagnostic access to the material surface while it is undergoing plasma exposure. The Dynamics of ION Implantation and Sputtering Of Surfaces (DIONISOS) experiment overcomes this limitation by uniquely combining powerful, non-perturbing ion beam analysis techniques with a steady-state helicon plasma exposure chamber, allowing for real-time, depth-resolved in situ measurements of material compositions during plasma exposure. Design solutions are described that provide compatibility between the ion beam analysis requirements in the presence of a high-intensity helicon plasma. The three primary ion beam analysis techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, and nuclear reaction analysis, are successfully implemented on targets during plasma exposure in DIONISOS. These techniques measure parameters of interest for plasma-material interactions such as erosion/deposition rates of materials and the concentration of plasma fuel species in the material surface.

  16. An experiment on the dynamics of ion implantation and sputtering of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. A.; Kesler, L. A.; Peterson, E. E.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Woller, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    A major impediment towards a better understanding of the complex plasma-surface interaction is the limited diagnostic access to the material surface while it is undergoing plasma exposure. The Dynamics of ION Implantation and Sputtering Of Surfaces (DIONISOS) experiment overcomes this limitation by uniquely combining powerful, non-perturbing ion beam analysis techniques with a steady-state helicon plasma exposure chamber, allowing for real-time, depth-resolved in situ measurements of material compositions during plasma exposure. Design solutions are described that provide compatibility between the ion beam analysis requirements in the presence of a high-intensity helicon plasma. The three primary ion beam analysis techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, and nuclear reaction analysis, are successfully implemented on targets during plasma exposure in DIONISOS. These techniques measure parameters of interest for plasma-material interactions such as erosion/deposition rates of materials and the concentration of plasma fuel species in the material surface

  17. Interactive fluka: a world wide web version for a simulation code in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garelli, S.; Giordano, S.; Piemontese, G.; Squarcia, S.

    1998-01-01

    We considered the possibility of using the simulation code FLUKA, in the framework of TERA. We provided a window under World Wide Web in which an interactive version of the code is available. The user can find instructions for the installation, an on-line FLUKA manual and interactive windows for inserting all the data required by the configuration running file in a very simple way. The database choice allows a more versatile use for data verification and update, recall of old simulations and comparison with selected examples. A completely new tool for geometry drawing under Java has also been developed. (authors)

  18. Carbon-Based Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, and Their Hybrid Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fei; Pham, Duy Tho; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-07-20

    A rapidly developing market for portable electronic devices and hybrid electrical vehicles requires an urgent supply of mature energy-storage systems. As a result, lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors have lately attracted broad attention. Nevertheless, it is well known that both devices have their own drawbacks. With the fast development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, various structures and materials have been proposed to overcome the deficiencies of both devices to improve their electrochemical performance further. In this Review, electrochemical storage mechanisms based on carbon materials for both lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors are introduced. Non-faradic processes (electric double-layer capacitance) and faradic reactions (pseudocapacitance and intercalation) are generally explained. Electrochemical performance based on different types of electrolytes is briefly reviewed. Furthermore, impedance behavior based on Nyquist plots is discussed. We demonstrate the influence of cell conductivity, electrode/electrolyte interface, and ion diffusion on impedance performance. We illustrate that relaxation time, which is closely related to ion diffusion, can be extracted from Nyquist plots and compared between lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. Finally, recent progress in the design of anodes for lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and their hybrid devices based on carbonaceous materials are reviewed. Challenges and future perspectives are further discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Observational Coding Systems of Parent-Child Interactions During Painful Procedures: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jinbing; Swanson, Kristen M; Santacroce, Sheila J

    2018-01-01

    Parent interactions with their child can influence the child's pain and distress during painful procedures. Reliable and valid interaction analysis systems (IASs) are valuable tools for capturing these interactions. The extent to which IASs are used in observational research of parent-child interactions is unknown in pediatric populations. To identify and evaluate studies that focus on assessing psychometric properties of initial iterations/publications of observational coding systems of parent-child interactions during painful procedures. To identify and evaluate studies that focus on assessing psychometric properties of initial iterations/publications of observational coding systems of parent-child interactions during painful procedures. Computerized databases searched included PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, and Scopus. Timeframes covered from inception of the database to January 2017. Studies were included if they reported use or psychometrics of parent-child IASs. First assessment was whether the parent-child IASs were theory-based; next, using the Society of Pediatric Psychology Assessment Task Force criteria IASs were assigned to one of three categories: well-established, approaching well-established, or promising. A total of 795 studies were identified through computerized searches. Eighteen studies were ultimately determined to be eligible for inclusion in the review and 17 parent-child IASs were identified from these 18 studies. Among the 17 coding systems, 14 were suitable for use in children age 3 years or more; two were theory-based; and 11 included verbal and nonverbal parent behaviors that promoted either child coping or child distress. Four IASs were assessed as well-established; seven approached well-established; and six were promising. Findings indicate a need for the development of theory-based parent-child IASs that consider both verbal and nonverbal parent behaviors during painful procedures. Findings also

  20. Contact interactions, stress and material symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podio-Guidugli P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An argument is given intimating that, for nonsimple materials, the concepts of contact interaction and material symmetry, as well as the bridging concept of stress, should be carefully revised and generalized. .