WorldWideScience

Sample records for involvement chromosome anomalies

  1. XYY chromosome anomaly and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, M; MacBeth, R; Varma, S L

    1998-02-07

    Sex chromosome anomalies have been associated with psychoses, and most of the evidence is linked to the presence of an additional X chromosome. We report a patient with XYY chromosome anomaly who developed schizophrenia.

  2. Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Numerous anomalies involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…

  3. Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Numerous anomalies involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…

  4. Improved prenatal detection of chromosomal anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Hjort-Pedersen, Karina; Henriques, Carsten U;

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal screening for karyotype anomalies takes place in most European countries. In Denmark, the screening method was changed in 2005. The aim of this study was to study the trends in prevalence and prenatal detection rates of chromosome anomalies and Down syndrome (DS) over a 22-year period....

  5. Pure Duplication of the Distal Long Arm of Chromosome 15 with Ebstein Anomaly and Clavicular Anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel O'Connor; Amel Al-Murrani; Salim Aftimos; Philip Asquith; Roberto Mazzaschi; Dominique Eyrolle-Guignot; George, Alice M.; Love, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    This report is of a patient with pure trisomy of 15q24-qter who presents with the rare Ebstein anomaly and a previously unreported skeletal anomaly. Chromosome microarray analysis allowed high-resolution identification of the extent of the trisomy and provided a means of achieving higher-resolution breakpoint data. The phenotypic expression of unbalanced chromosomal regions is a complex phenomenon, and fine mapping of the involved region, as described here, is only a first step on the path to...

  6. Chromosomal anomalies in the etiology of anorectal malformations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelis, Carlo; de Blaauw, Ivo; Brunner, Han

    2011-11-01

    Anorectal malformation (ARM) is a severe congenital anomaly that can occur either isolated or in association with other congenital abnormalities. It has a heterogeneous etiology with contribution of both genetic and environmental factors, although the etiological factors remain largely unknown. Several chromosomal abnormalities have been described in patients with an ARM. These chromosomal abnormalities could point to specific genes involved in the development of the anorectal canal and associated structures. This paper reviews the chromosomal abnormalities described in ARM and may act as a starting point to identify chromosomal regions containing putative anorectal development genes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pure duplication of the distal long arm of chromosome 15 with ebstein anomaly and clavicular anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Rachel; Al-Murrani, Amel; Aftimos, Salim; Asquith, Philip; Mazzaschi, Roberto; Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique; George, Alice M; Love, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    This report is of a patient with pure trisomy of 15q24-qter who presents with the rare Ebstein anomaly and a previously unreported skeletal anomaly. Chromosome microarray analysis allowed high-resolution identification of the extent of the trisomy and provided a means of achieving higher-resolution breakpoint data. The phenotypic expression of unbalanced chromosomal regions is a complex phenomenon, and fine mapping of the involved region, as described here, is only a first step on the path to its full understanding. Overexpression of the LINGO-1 and CSPG4 genes has been implicated in developmental delay seen in other patients with trisomy of 15q24-qter, but our patient is currently too young to ascertain developmental progress. The genetic underpinning of Ebstein anomaly and the skeletal anomaly reported here is unclear based on our high-resolution dosage mapping.

  8. Pure Duplication of the Distal Long Arm of Chromosome 15 with Ebstein Anomaly and Clavicular Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel O'Connor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report is of a patient with pure trisomy of 15q24-qter who presents with the rare Ebstein anomaly and a previously unreported skeletal anomaly. Chromosome microarray analysis allowed high-resolution identification of the extent of the trisomy and provided a means of achieving higher-resolution breakpoint data. The phenotypic expression of unbalanced chromosomal regions is a complex phenomenon, and fine mapping of the involved region, as described here, is only a first step on the path to its full understanding. Overexpression of the LINGO-1 and CSPG4 genes has been implicated in developmental delay seen in other patients with trisomy of 15q24-qter, but our patient is currently too young to ascertain developmental progress. The genetic underpinning of Ebstein anomaly and the skeletal anomaly reported here is unclear based on our high-resolution dosage mapping.

  9. Chromosomal anomalies in infertile azoospermic and oligospermic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantari P

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome analyses were performed on 70 infertile Azoospermic and Oligospermic (<20 million/ml men, and also cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes by high resolution banding method were analysed as well. It is revealed 8 (11.43 percent men with chromosomal abnormality. There were 31.4 percent patients with azoospermia and 68.6 percent with oligospermia from several thousands to 20×10^6 million/ml and their duration of infertility was at least 2 years. All patients with numerical chromosome anomalies had azoospermia and the most frequent anomaly was 47, XXY chromosomal constitution (klinfelter's syndrome, found in 8.57 percent of patients. We found that chromosomal anomalies found in this study were sex chromosome anomalies and an increased rate of numerical chromosomal abnormalities was among men with azoospermia. As a conclusion, we suggest that all men with azoospermia be considered for cytogenetical evaluation. 

  10. Structural chromosomal anomalies detected by prenatal genetic diagnosis: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcaş, Simona; Crişan, C D; Andreescu, Nicoleta; Stoian, Monica; Motoc, A G M

    2013-01-01

    The prenatal diagnosis is currently widely spread and facilitates the acquiring of important genetic information about the fetus by a rate extremely accelerate and considered without precedent. In this paper, we like to present our experience concerning the genetic diagnosis and counseling offered for pregnancies in which a structural chromosomal aberration was found. The study group is formed by 528 prenatal samples of amniotic fluid and chorionic villi, received by our laboratory from 2006 through October 2012 for cytogenetic diagnosis. The appropriate genetic investigation was selected based on the indications for prenatal diagnosis. The cases with structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were analyzed as regard to the maternal age, gestational age, referral indications and type of chromosomal anomaly found. A total number of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were identified in the study group. Out of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants, six deletions and microdeletions, four situations with abnormal long "p" arm of acrocentric chromosomes, two duplications, two reciprocal translocations, two inversions, two additions, one Robertsonian translocation associating trisomy 13, one 9q heteromorphism and one complex chromosome rearrangement were noticed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Romanian study in which the diagnostic strategies and the management of the prenatal cases with structural rearrangements are presented. The data provided about the diagnosis strategy and the management of the prenatal cases with structural chromosomal anomalies represents a useful tool in genetic counseling of pregnancies diagnosed with rare structural chromosomal anomalies.

  11. Maternal age-specific risk of non-chromosomal anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loane, M.; Dolk, H.; Morris, Joan K.

    To determine the excess risk of non-chromosomal congenital anomaly (NCA) among teenage mothers and older mothers. Population-based prevalence study using data from EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 23 regions of Europe in 15 countries, covering a total of 1.75 million births from 2000 to 2004.

  12. Maternal age-specific risk of non-chromosomal anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loane, M.; Dolk, H.; Morris, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the excess risk of non-chromosomal congenital anomaly (NCA) among teenage mothers and older mothers. Population-based prevalence study using data from EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 23 regions of Europe in 15 countries, covering a total of 1.75 million births from 2000 to 2004.

  13. Chromosomal anomalies: The experience of the Congenital Anomalies Registry of the Valencia Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimeno-Martos, S; Cavero-Carbonell, C; López-Maside, A; Bosch-Sánchez, S; Martos-Jiménez, C; Zurriaga, O

    2016-01-01

    ...) in the Valencia Region, in less than one year olds, during the period 2007-2011. Live births, still births and termination of pregnancy due to foetal anomaly between 2007 and 2011 with chromosomal CA...

  14. A neonate with the Pelger-Huët anomaly, cleft lip and palate, and agenesis of the corpus callosum, with a chromosomal microdeletion involving 1q41 to 1q42.12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, R D; Yaish, H M

    2012-03-01

    We observed a neonate with cleft lip and palate, 13 sets of ribs, agenesis of the corpus callosum, slightly small penis, hypoglycemia, and what initially appeared to be a marked leukocyte 'left shift' on complete blood count, but which was actually a Pelger-Huët anomaly. A chromosomal microdeletion was identified at1q41-42.12.

  15. De novo pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 in congenital anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kim, Bo-Young; Yu, Jae Eun

    2010-09-01

    The pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 is one of the most common structural balanced chromosomal variations and has been found in both normal populations and patients with various abnormal phenotypes and diseases. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the clinical impact of inv(9)(p11q13). We studied the karyotypes of 431 neonates with congenital anomalies at the Pediatric Clinic in Ajou University Hospital between 2004 and 2008 and retrospectively reviewed their clinical data. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 60 patients (13.9%). The most common type of structural abnormality was inv(9)(p11q13), found in eight patients. Clinical investigation revealed that all eight cases with inv(9)(p11q13) had various congenital anomalies including: polydactyly, club foot, microtia, deafness, asymmetric face, giant Meckel's diverticulum, duodenal diaphragm, small bowel malrotation, pulmonary stenosis, cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, and intrauterine growth restriction. The cytogenetic analysis of parents showed that all of the cases were de novo heterozygous inv(9)(p11q13). Since our results indicate that the incidence of inv(9)(p11q13) in patients with congenital anomalies was not significantly different from the normal population, inv(9)(p11q13) does not appear to be pathogenic with regard to the congenital anomalies. Some other, to date unknown, causes of the anomalies remain to be identified.

  16. [Contribution of molecular cytogenetics to the diagnosis of chromosome anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, G

    1999-01-09

    MOLECULAR CYTOGENETICS: New fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques have been developed using fluorescent non-radioactive DNA probes. FISH: Based on the complementary of nucleotides FISH enables visualization and localization of a DNA fragment on chromosomes by hybridizing the complementary DNA sequence, the probe. Many types of tissues can be analyzed, for example hematopoietic cells in blood or bone marrow, amniotic cells, trophoblasts, fibroblasts, gamete or tumoral cells. Molecular cytogenetics can be used to characterize chromosome anomalies in many fields of cytogenetics (constitutional studies, prenatal diagnosis, hematology, oncology).

  17. [Chromosomal anomalies: The experience of the Congenital Anomalies Registry of the Valencia Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-Martos, S; Cavero-Carbonell, C; López-Maside, A; Bosch-Sánchez, S; Martos-Jiménez, C; Zurriaga, O

    2016-04-01

    To describe the temporal trend and distribution of chromosomal congenital abnormalities (CA) in the Valencia Region, in less than one year olds, during the period 2007-2011. Live births, still births and termination of pregnancy due to foetal anomaly between 2007 and 2011 with chromosomal CA (Q90-Q99.9 codes of the 10th International Classification of Diseases -British Paediatric Association) were selected from the CA population-based Registry of Valencia Region The prevalence per 10,000 births for the chromosomal CA and for the different types of chromosomal syndromes with 95% confidence intervals was calculated. The analysis was performed by calculating prevalences and data were compared using Pearson Chi-squared test. A total of 895 cases were found, representing a prevalence of 33.5 per 10,000 births (95% CI: 31.0-35.9), highlighting five syndromes: Down's, Edward's, Patau, Turner and Klinefelter. The prevalence of chromosomal CA and Down's syndrome were stable over the period, except in 2010. Down's was the most frequent chromosomal CA (67% of the cases), and the most frequent termination of pregnancy type was for foetal anomaly (69%). Cardiac heart defects represented 70.3% of the associated congenital anomalies. Mothers of children with chromosomal CA were mainly Spanish (73.3%). The age group of mothers over 39 years had a higher prevalence (133.0 per 10,000 births). The province of Castellón had the highest prevalence, 39.1 per 10,000 births. The prevalence has remained stable over the five years, excluding the significant decline in 2010, for chromosomal CA detected and two of the major syndromes. The chromosomal CA are an important public health problem as they represent 15% of all CA identified in the Valencia Region, and agrees with the European data. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Maternal age-specific risk of non-chromosomal anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loane, M; Dolk, H; Morris, J K;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the excess risk of non-chromosomal congenital anomaly (NCA) among teenage mothers and older mothers. DESIGN AND SETTING: Population-based prevalence study using data from EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 23 regions of Europe in 15 countries, covering a total of 1......, and relative risk (RR) of NCA and 84 standard NCA subgroups compared with mothers aged 25-29. RESULTS: The crude prevalence of all NCA was 26.5 per 1000 births in teenage mothers (... and 22.6 for mothers 40-44 years. The RR adjusted for country for teenage mothers was 1.11 (95% CI 1.06-1.17); 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.02) for mothers 35-39; and 1.01 (95% CI 0.95-1.07) for mothers 40-44. The pattern of maternal age-related risk varied significantly between countries: France, Ireland...

  19. Childhood cancer risk in those with chromosomal and non-chromosomal congenital anomalies in Washington State: 1984-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Marlena S; Lupo, Philip J; Chow, Eric J; Scheurer, Michael E; Plon, Sharon E; Danysh, Heather E; Spector, Logan G; Carozza, Susan E; Doody, David R; Mueller, Beth A

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a congenital anomaly is associated with increased childhood cancer risk, likely due to large effects of Down syndrome and chromosomal anomalies for leukemia. Less is known about associations with presence of non-chromosomal anomalies. Records of children diagnosed with cancer at anomalies were assessed from birth records and diagnosis codes in linked hospital discharge data. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for cancer, and for specific cancer types in relation to the presence of any anomaly and specific anomalies. Having any congenital anomaly was associated with an increased risk of childhood cancer (OR: 1.46, 95% CI 1.28-1.65). Non-chromosomal anomalies were also associated with increased childhood cancer risk overall (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.18-1.54), and with increased risk of several cancer types, including neuroblastoma, renal, hepatoblastoma, soft-tissue sarcoma, and germ cell tumors. Increasing number of non-chromosomal anomalies was associated with a stronger risk of childhood cancer (OR for 3+ anomalies: 3.11, 95% CI: 1.54-6.11). Although central nervous system (CNS) anomalies were associated with CNS tumors (OR: 6.05, 95% CI 2.75-13.27), there was no strong evidence of other non-chromosomal anomalies being specifically associated with cancer occurring in the same organ system or anatomic location. Non-chromosomal anomalies increased risk of several cancer types. Additionally, we found that increasing number of non-chromosomal anomalies was associated with a stronger risk of cancer. Pooling similar data from many regions would increase power to identify specific associations in order to inform molecular studies examining possible common developmental pathways in the etiologies of birth defects and cancer.

  20. Pregnancy Outcome following Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosomal Anomaly: A Record Linkage Study of 26,261 Pregnancies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, Myrthe; Cooper, Sally-Ann; McGowan, Ruth; Nelson, Scott M; Pell, Jill P

    2016-01-01

    ... and terminated with chromosomal anomalies. However, we are unaware of any population studies examining pregnancy terminations after diagnosis of chromosomal anomalies that has included all aneuploidies and the influence of maternal factors...

  1. Molecular cytogenetics of human germ cell tumours : i(12p) and related chromosomal anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts van Kessel, A; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Sinke, R J; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, J W; de Jong, B

    1993-01-01

    Human testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) comprise a heterogeneous group of solid neoplasms. These tumours are characterized by a highly specific chromosomal anomaly, i.e. an isochromosome of the short arm of chromosome 12. At present, this i(12p) chromosome has been observed in about 80% of TGCTs.

  2. The effect of maternal age on chromosomal anomaly rate and spectrum in recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Maribel; Borrell, Antoni; Garcia-Posada, Raul; Borobio, Virginia; Muñoz, Miriam; Creus, Montserrat; Soler, Anna; Sanchez, Aurora; Balasch, Juan

    2012-10-01

    Is there any effect of maternal age on chromosomal anomaly rate and spectrum in recurrent miscarriage? There was no significant difference in the chromosome abnormality rate between sporadic and recurrent miscarriage but the chromosome abnormality rate increased significantly with maternal age. About 50-70% of non-recurrent miscarriages occur because of a chromosomal anomaly, but no agreement about the effect of either maternal age or the number of previous miscarriages on the chromosomal anomaly rate has been reached. A retrospective cohort of 353 miscarriages successfully karyotyped in the same center between 2002 and 2011, grouped according to the number of miscarriages and maternal age. Among the 353 women, 153 were below 35 years (73 with sporadic, 48 with two and 32 with recurrent miscarriage) and 200 were 35 years or more (81 with sporadic, 55 with two and 64 with recurrent miscarriage). The chromosomal anomaly rate and the anomaly spectrum were compared between sporadic and recurrent miscarriage, within the two maternal age groups, using the chi-square test and the Bonferroni correction for all the P-values. Risk of chromosomal anomaly was estimated for maternal age, number of miscarriages and previous live births by multivariate binary logistic regression analysis. Sporadic and recurrent miscarriage did not show significantly different chromosomal anomaly rates (68 versus 60%) and maternal age was the only statistically significant predictor of the chromosomal anomaly risk we identified. Some trends were observed in the chromosomal anomaly spectrum when sporadic was compared with recurrent miscarriage: recurrent miscarriage exhibited a decrease in viable trisomies (37 versus 11%) and an increase in non-viable trisomies (38 versus 57%) in women >35 years, together with an increase in unbalanced structural anomalies (4.9 versus 29%) in younger women. The mixed origin of our study population, and the limited number of recurrent miscarriages, particularly in

  3. Nuclear anomalies, chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rates in cultured lymphocytes of head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alex; Dey, Rupraj; Bhuria, Vikas; Banerjee, Shouvik; Ethirajan, Sivakumar; Siluvaimuthu, Ashok; Saraswathy, Radha

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are extremely complex disease types and it is likely that chromosomal instability is involved in the genetic mechanisms of its genesis. However, there is little information regarding the background levels of chromosome instability in these patients. In this pilot study, we examined spontaneous chromosome instability in short-term lymphocyte cultures (72 hours) from 72 study subjects - 36 newly diagnosed HNC squamous cell carcinoma patients and 36 healthy ethnic controls. We estimated chromosome instability (CIN) using chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis and nuclear level anomalies using the Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus Cytome Assay (CBMN Cyt Assay). The proliferation rates in cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were assessed by calculating the Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI). Our results showed a significantly higher mean level of spontaneous chromosome type aberrations (CSAs), chromatid type aberration (CTAs) dicentric chromosomes (DIC) and chromosome aneuploidy (CANEUP) in patients (CSAs, 0.0294±0.0038; CTAs, 0.0925±0.0060; DICs, 0.0213±0.0028; and CANEUPs, 0.0308±0.0035) compared to controls (CSAs, 0.0005±0.0003; CTAs, 0.0058±0.0015; DICs, 0.0005±0.0003; and CANEUPs, 0.0052±0.0013) where pnuclear anomalies showed significantly higher mean level of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) among cases (MNi, 0.01867±0.00108; NPBs, 0.01561±0.00234; NBUDs, 0.00658±0.00068) compared with controls (MNi, 0.00027±0.00009; NPBs, 0.00002±0.00002; NBUDs, 0.00011±0.00007).The evaluation of CBPI supported genomic instability in the peripheral blood lymphocytes showing a significantly lower proliferation rate in HNC patients (1.525±0.005552) compared to healthy subjects (1.686±0.009520 ) (pproliferation in the cultured peripheral lymphocytes of solid tumors could be biomarkers to predict malignancy in early stages.

  4. Supernumerary ring chromosomes derived from the long arm of chromosome 12 as the primary cytogenetic anomaly in a rare soft tissue chondroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadan, F F; Mascarello, J T; Newbury, R O; Dennis, T; Spallone, P; Stock, A D

    2000-04-15

    Supernumerary ring chromosomes varying with respect to both size and number were found as the primary cytogenetic anomaly in a rare benign soft tissue chondroma resected from the floor of the mouth of a 3-year-old girl. Reverse fluorescence in situ hybridization paint probes prepared by polymerase chain reaction from microdissected rings produced fluorescent signal over two large but discontinuous parts of the chromosome 12 long arm, subdivided into four regions. This case expands the spectrum of mesenchymal neoplasms in which ring chromosomes have been described as the primary genetic anomaly. A review of the literature reporting similar findings in other soft tissue tumors further supports the possibility that low-level amplification of chromosome 12 long-arm regions may contribute to abnormal cellular proliferation in a variety of mesenchymal tumors. Genes implicated in the control of the cell cycle such as sarcoma amplified sequence (SAS), the human homolog of the murine double-minute type 2 gene (MDM-2), proto-oncogenes CHOP/GADD153, GLI, A2MR, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4), and the high mobility group (HMGIC) gene implicated in mesenchymal tumorigenesis are all located on the long arm of chromosome 12. Chromosomal abnormalities involving the 12q13-q15 region are associated with a wide range of benign soft tissue tumors and sarcomas.

  5. Chromosomal anomalies and additional sonographic findings in fetuses with open neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Lutfiye Eren Ensari; Malatyalioglu, Erdal; Sakinci, Mehmet; Tosun, Migraci; Bildircin, Fatma Devran; Ogur, Gonul; Karayel, Metin

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the results and the necessity of chromosome analysis in fetuses prenatally detected with a neural tube defect and to determine the significance of ultrasonographic evaluation for the identification of underlying or accompanying chromosomal anomalies. Ninety fetuses that underwent prenatal and/or postnatal chromosome analysis after being diagnosed with open neural tube defects (NTD) between the years 2006 and 2010 in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Ondokuz Mayis University School of Medicine were included in this study. Detailed fetal ultrasonography was performed in all cases in order to investigate any additional anomalies. Karyotype was determined in the prenatal period by amniocentesis in 72 (80%) of the 90 fetuses, and by cordocentesis in 5 (5.5%). In 13 (13.3%) fetuses, karyotype was determined in the postnatal period by blood sampling. Fourteen (15.5%) of the 90 fetuses were diagnosed with acrania/anencephaly, 14 (15.5%) with encephalocele, 2 (2.2%) with iniencephaly, 60 (66.6%) with open spina bifida. None of the 90 fetuses with open NTD who had undergone chromosome analysis was diagnosed with chromosomal anomalies. None of the 19 (21.1%) fetuses diagnosed with additional ultrasound findings had a chromosomal abnormality, either. Seventy-one (78.9%) fetuses having sonograhically isolated NTD were also isolated in postmortem examination. In fetuses with open NTD, we could not find the chromosomal anomaly rate as high as reported in previous literature. The necessity of fetal karyotyping should be questioned especially in isolated cases.

  6. Detection of chromosomal anomalies in endometrial atypical hyperplasia and carcinoma by using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Junqi; Weber, Deena; Cochran, Richard; Hossain, Deloar; Bostwick, David G

    2010-04-25

    Endometrial cancer is the most common pelvic gynecological malignancy. The diagnosis of well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma, atypical hyperplasia, and hyperplasia is often challenging. The authors sought to investigate the utility of chromosomal anomalies for the detection of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma using multitarget fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples were collected by endometrial Tao brush and processed by liquid-based cytological preparation protocol from consecutive cases to include 50 benign, 50 hyperplasia without atypia, 47 atypical hyperplasia, and 53 endometrial cancers. Each was hybridized using fluorescence-labeled DNA probes to chromosomes 1, 8, and 10. The FISH signals were enumerated in 100 cells per case, and the chromosomal anomalies were correlated with pathologic findings, including histologic diagnoses on matched endometrial tissue samples. Numeric chromosomal anomalies were found in 0% (0 of 50) of benign, 20% (10 of 50) of hyperplasia, 74% (35 of 47) of atypical hyperplasia, and 87% (46 of 53) of carcinoma specimens. The mean percentage of cells with chromosomal changes was 55% in cancer specimens, which was significantly higher than that in hyperplasia without atypia (13%, P chromosomal anomaly was gain of chromosome 1. FISH anomalies had an overall sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 90% for the detection of atypical hyperplasia and/or endometrial carcinoma. There was no association with grade of endometrial carcinoma. Multitarget FISH appears to be useful for the differential diagnosis of hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia, and endometrial adenocarcinoma, with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. It is also a potential tool for the early detection of neoplastic cells in endometrial cytology specimens. Endometrial hyperplasia with FISH-detected chromosomal anomalies may represent a clinically significant subset of cases that warrant close clinical follow-up. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  7. Complex rearrangement of chromosomes 6 and 11 as the sole anomaly in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gines, C; Cerda-Nicolas, M; Kepes, J; Donat, J; Gil-Benso, R; Llombart-Bosch, A

    2000-10-15

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system is a rare childhood tumor with a distinct histologic appearance and an aggressive clinical course. Few tumors have been analyzed cytogenetically. The only consistent chromosomal abnormality identified in some of these tumors has been monosomy or deletions of chromosome 22; in others, a normal chromosome 22 was present. The authors report an atypical teratoid/rhabdoid neoplasm of the central nervous system with a novel complex rearrangement affecting chromosomes 6 and 11 as the sole anomaly. The involvement of region 11p15 could be important in the pathogenesis of this entity.

  8. Syndromic non-compaction of the left ventricle: associated chromosomal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, M C; Bernardini, L; Gagliardi, M G; Versacci, P; Baban, A; Capolino, R; Dentici, M L; Roberti, M C; Angioni, A; Novelli, A; Marino, B; Dallapiccola, B

    2013-10-01

    Non-compaction of the left ventricle (NCLV) is a cardiomyopathy characterized by prominent left ventricular trabeculae and deep intertrabecular recesses. Associated extracardiac anomalies occur in 14-66% of patients of different series, while chromosomal anomalies were reported in sporadic cases. We investigated the prevalence of chromosomal imbalances in 25 syndromic patients with NCLV, using standard cytogenetic, subtelomeric fluorescent in situ hybridization, and array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses. Standard chromosome analysis disclosed an abnormality in three (12%) patients, including a 45,X/46,XX mosaic, a 45,X/46,X,i(Y)(p11) mosaic, and a de novo Robertsonian 13;14 translocation in a child affected by hypomelanosis of Ito. Cryptic chromosome anomalies were found in six (24%) cases, including 1p36 deletion in two patients, 7p14.3p14.1 deletion, 18p subtelomeric deletion, 22q11.2 deletion associated with velo-cardio-facial syndrome, and distal 22q11.2 deletion, each in one case. These results recommend accurate clinical evaluation of patients with NCLV, and suggest that chromosome anomalies occur in about one third of syndromic NCLV individuals, without metabolic/neuromuscular disorder. Array-CGH analysis should be included in the diagnostic protocol of these patients, because different submicroscopic imbalances are causally associated with this disorder and can pinpoint candidate genes for this cardiomyopathy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Fetal persistent left superior vena cava in cases with and without chromosomal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liu; Xie, Hong-Ning; Zhu, Yun-Xiao; Li, Li-Juan; Peng, Ruan; Zheng, Ju

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study are to determine and compare the prevalence of persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) in chromosomally normal and abnormal fetuses and to evaluate the potential of PLSVC as a screening marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Women undergoing routine fetal sonographic examinations were evaluated once for the presence of PLSVC. PLSVC was diagnosed on the basis of the identification of an additional vessel in the left of the pulmonary artery in a three-vessel trachea view. Associated abnormalities, karyotypes, and outcomes were analyzed. A total of 164 (0.7%, 164/25 171) cases of PLSVC were detected and successfully followed-up. The detection rates were 0.5% (81/17 535) and 1.1% (83/7636) in the low-risk and high-risk cases, respectively. The incidence of PLSVC was lower among the chromosomally or clinically normal (0.4%, 110/24 914) compared with chromosomally abnormal fetuses (7.8%, 20/257, p chromosomal anomalies, a rate that was higher than those fetuses with chromosomal normal (61.8%, 68/110). Persistent left superior vena cava is more common among chromosomally abnormal than normal fetuses, and PLSVC fetuses with other defects are more highly associated with chromosomal disorders than isolated PLSVC fetuses. Isolated PLSVC is a benign vascular anomaly and may not affect outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of a de novo 9p terminal chromosomal deletion in a fetus with major congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Chien; Chen, Chih-Ping; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lai, Yu-Ju; Tien, Chau-Yang; Su, Her-Young

    2014-12-01

    We describe a prenatal ultrasonography diagnosis of omphalocele and symbrachydactyly in a fetus and review the literature on prenatal diagnosis of 9p terminal chromosomal deletions. A 31-year-old woman (gravida 3, para 1) was referred for genetic counseling because a fetal omphalocele had been detected. Prenatal ultrasonography at 17+ weeks of gestational age revealed a singleton female fetus with biometry equivalent to 18 weeks with an omphalocele. In addition, symbrachydactyly was also noted in the right arm; the wrist bones as well as the metacarpals were missing. A chromosomal study was arranged for a congenital anomaly involving omphalocele. We obtained Giemsa-banded chromosomes from fetal tissue cells, and an abnormal male karyotype with a terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 at band 9p13 was noted. After delivery, the fetus showed omphalocele, symbrachydactyly, trigonocephaly, sex reversal, a long philtrum, low-set ears, telecanthus, and a frontal prominence. Prenatal diagnosis of abnormal ultrasound findings with omphalocele and symbrachydactyly should include the differential diagnosis of a chromosome 9p deletion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Thoracic involvement in generalised lymphatic anomaly (or lymphangiomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Luisi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA, also known as lymphangiomatosis, is a rare disease caused by congenital abnormalities of lymphatic development. It usually presents in childhood but can also be diagnosed in adults. GLA encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from single-organ involvement to generalised disease. Given the rarity of the disease, most of the information regarding it comes from case reports. To date, no clinical trials concerning treatment are available. This review focuses on thoracic GLA and summarises possible diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  12. The variability in the decision of termination of pregnancy for sex chromosome anomalies in France

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : Prenatal counseling for sex chromosome anomalies (SCA) is complex. The observed rate of TOP (termination of pregnancy) varies worldwide and even within countries. The objectives of this vignette study were to quantify agreement between ten prenatal diagnosis centers in Paris and identify reasons for disagreement.METHODS : We submitted online three cases of Turner syndrome, one case of Klinefelter syndrome, one 47, XYY, one mosaicsm 46,XY/45,X and two cases of 47,XXX to one obst...

  13. Low grade mosaic for a complex supernumerary ring chromosome 18 in an adult patient with multiple congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogeboom A Jeannette M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases have been reported of patients with a ring chromosome 18 replacing one of the normal chromosomes 18. Less common are patients with a supernumerary ring chromosomes 18. High resolution whole genome examination in patients with multiple congenital abnormalities might reveal cytogenetic abnormalities of an unexpected complexity. Results We report a 24 years old male patient with lower spinal anomalies, hypospadia, bifid scrotum, cryptorchism, anal atresia, kidney stones, urethra anomalies, radial dysplasia, and a hypoplastic thumb. Some of the anomalies overlap with the VACTERL association. Chromosome analysis of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed an additional ring chromosome in 13% of the metaphases. Both parents had a normal karyotype, demonstrating the de novo origin of this ring chromosome. FISH analysis using whole chromosome paints showed that the additional chromosomal material was derived from chromosome 18. Chromosome analysis of cultured fibroblasts revealed only one cell with the supernumerary ring chromosome in the 400 analyzed. To characterize the ring chromosome in more detail peripheral blood derived DNA was analyzed using SNP-arrays. The array results indicated a 5 Mb gain of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 18q10-q11.2. FISH analysis using BAC-probes located in the region indicated the presence of 6 signals on the r(18 chromosome. In addition, microsatellite analysis demonstrated that the unique supernumerary ring chromosome was paternally derived and both normal copies showed biparental disomy. Conclusions We report on an adult patient with multiple congenital abnormalities who had in 13% of his cells a unique supernumerary ring chromosome 18 that was composed of 6 copies of the 5 Mb gene rich region of 18q11.

  14. Hunter-McAlpine craniosynostosis phenotype associated with skeletal anomalies and interstitial deletion of chromosome 17q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.; Prescott, K.; Milner, R. [Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Syndromic craniosynostosis is frequently associated with skeletal abnormalities, but the biological basis for this association is unclear. Molecular genetic studies have the biological basis for this association is unclear. Molecular genetic studies have identified a number of loci and at least one candidate gene, the MSX2 gene. We recently encountered a 9 y.o. boy with moderate mental retardation, congenital craniosynostosis, and multiple skeletal anomalies. Physical features strongly suggested Hunter-McAlpine syndrome (HMS). Specifically, he had triangular facies with a small mouth prominent chin, bulbous nose, thin vermillion border, malaligned and malformed teeth, and low set, rudimentary ears. Skeletal features included: bilambdoidal, bicoronal, and sagittal craniosynostosis; right preaxial polydactyly; bilateral talipes; coxa valga; genu valgum; bilateral fusion of the hamate and capitate; scoliosis; and small, irregular middle phalangeal epiphyses. High resolution chromosome analysis revealed an interstitial deletion of G negative material of subbands q23.1{r_arrow}23.3 or q23.3{r_arrow}q24.2 of a No. 17 homologue. HMS, a presumed autosomal dominant disorder associated with characteristic facies, variable degrees of mental retardation, craniosynostosis, and minor acral-skeletal anomalies, proved to be the most likely explanation for this patient`s findings. We propose that our patient has a new mutation for HMS with more severe skeletal involvement than previously reported. Linkage studies are in progress to test the hypothesis that familial HMS may be localized to chromosome 17.

  15. Beyond Trisomy 21: Additional Chromosomal Anomalies Detected through Routine Aneuploidy Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Metcalfe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal screening is often misconstrued by patients as screening for trisomy 21 alone; however, other chromosomal anomalies are often detected. This study aimed to systematically review the literature and use diagnostic meta-analysis to derive pooled detection and false positive rates for aneuploidies other than trisomy 21 with different prenatal screening tests. Non-invasive prenatal testing had the highest detection (DR and lowest false positive (FPR rates for trisomy 13 (DR: 90.3%; FPR: 0.2%, trisomy 18 (DR: 98.1%; FPR: 0.2%, and 45,X (DR: 92.2%; FPR: 0.1%; however, most estimates came from high-risk samples. The first trimester combined test also had high DRs for all conditions studied (trisomy 13 DR: 83.1%; FPR: 4.4%; trisomy 18 DR: 91.9%; FPR: 3.5%; 45,X DR: 70.1%; FPR: 5.4%; triploidy DR: 100%; FPR: 6.3%. Second trimester triple screening had the lowest DRs and highest FPRs for all conditions (trisomy 13 DR: 43.9%; FPR: 8.1%; trisomy 18 DR: 70.5%; FPR: 3.3%; 45,X DR: 77.2%; FPR: 9.3%. Prenatal screening tests differ in their ability to accurately detect chromosomal anomalies. Patients should be counseled about the ability of prenatal screening to detect anomalies other than trisomy 21 prior to undergoing screening.

  16. Chromosomal microarrays testing in children with developmental disabilities and congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Lay-Son

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Clinical use of microarray-based techniques for the analysis of many developmental disorders has emerged during the last decade. Thus, chromosomal microarray has been positioned as a first-tier test. This study reports the first experience in a Chilean cohort. METHODS: Chilean patients with developmental disabilities and congenital anomalies were studied with a high-density microarray (CytoScan(tm HD Array, Affymetrix, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA. Patients had previous cytogenetic studies with either a normal result or a poorly characterized anomaly. RESULTS: This study tested 40 patients selected by two or more criteria, including: major congenital anomalies, facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, and intellectual disability. Copy number variants (CNVs were found in 72.5% of patients, while a pathogenic CNV was found in 25% of patients and a CNV of uncertain clinical significance was found in 2.5% of patients. CONCLUSION: Chromosomal microarray analysis is a useful and powerful tool for diagnosis of developmental diseases, by allowing accurate diagnosis, improving the diagnosis rate, and discovering new etiologies. The higher cost is a limitation for widespread use in this setting.

  17. Pregnancy outcome after genetic counselling for prenatal diagnosis of unexpected chromosomal anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Maurizio; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Ponchia, Rossella; Petrella, Marilena; Andrisani, Alessandra; Tenconi, Romano

    2006-01-01

    Couples undergoing invasive prenatal diagnosis (PD) are informed and concerned mainly about autosomal trisomies. However, unexpected chromosomal abnormalities (UCA) are a frequent finding at PD. We have analysed the psychological and practical consequences in the couples counselled in our centre because of the identification of foetal UCA at PD. The study was carried out on a sample of 52 couples referred for genetic counselling in the period 1997-2000. The couples underwent a structured interview and two self-report instruments to measure anxiety and psychological characteristics. The couples have been divided into three groups: (1) low risk - without or with negligible risk, (2) mild risk - with mild risk or mild clinical phenotype and (3) sex chromosome anomaly. All couples received the diagnosis of chromosomal anomaly from the obstetrician without any other comments and were referred to our service for genetic counselling. Most couples felt fear (11/17 in the LR group, 5/7 in the MR group and 12/21 in the SCA group), while sadness was lower frequently felt by those parents-to-be in the LR group. Our study suggests that a specific counselling that mentions the possibility of UCA is mandatory before PD, and the cost-benefit estimate of PD should take into account the psychological implications of UCA detection.

  18. Multiple vascular anomalies involving renal, testicular and suprarenal arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations of blood vessels of the abdomen is important during operative, diagnostic and endovascular pro- cedures. During routine dissection of the abdominal cavity, we came across multiple vascular anomalies involving renal, suprarenal and testicular arteries. The left kidney was supplied by two renal arteries originating together from the abdomi- nal aorta, and the right kidney was supplied by two accessory renal arteries, one of which was arising from the right renal artery and the other one from the aorta (about 2 inches below the origin of the renal artery. Accessory renal veins were present on both sides. The right testicular artery was arising from the lower accessory renal artery. The left testicular artery was looping around the inferior tributary of the left renal vein, whereby forming a sharp kink. The left middle suprarenal artery was diving into three small branches; the upper two branches were supplying the left suprarenal gland, whereas the lower branch was supplying the left kidney. Furthermore, detailed literature and the clinical and surgical importance of the case are discussed. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 168-171

  19. Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  20. [Prevalence of selected congenital anomalies in the Czech Republic: renal and cardiac anomalies and congenital chromosomal aberrations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šípek, Antonín; Gregor, Vladimír; Horáček, Jiří; Šípek, Antonín; Langhammer, Pavel

    2013-09-01

    Edwards syndrome was on the rise while that of postnatally diagnosed cases was declining. The rate of prenatally diagnosed cases rose from 63% to 96% over the last two years. The mean prevalence rate of postnatally diagnosed cases was 0.72 per 10,000 live births and the mean overall prevalence rate was 3.78 per 10,000 live births. Similarly, the rate of prenatally diagnosed Patau syndrome increased from 30% in 1997 to 100% in 2009 and the rate of postnatally diagnosed cases was declining. The mean prevalence rate of postnatally diagnosed cases was 0.40 per 10,000 live births and the mean overall prevalence rate was 1.38 per 10,000 live births. The overall prevalence rates of the monitored diagnoses from the group of congenital kidney disease (cystic kidney disease and renal agenesis/hypoplasia) were on the rise in the monitored -period mainly due to advances in imaging technologies (ultrasonography) and their use in both prenatal and postnatal diagnosis. Increase in postnatally diagnosed cases can be attributed primarily to the reporting of less severe cases (cystic kidney disease) or unilateral anomalies (renal agenesis and hypoplasia). As for the monitored congenital heart defects, advances in ultrasonographic imaging diagnosis played a considerable role in the increase of cases. The overall prevalence rate show a slow upward trend, but there is a significant decline in postnatally diagnosed cases due to prenatal diagnosis of a severe anomaly, left heart hypoplasia. As for congenital chromosomal aberrations, several interconnected factors influenced the final rate. Firstly, the proportion of prenatally diagnosed cases increases due to quantitative and qualitative improvements of the screening tests. They resulted in greater efficiency of prenatal diagnosis and, at the same time, in less need for invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures. Another factor is increase in average age at first birth and in the first birth rate for women aged over 35 years resulting in higher

  1. The role of cytokines in first trimester pregnancy losses with fetal chromosomal anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Esin; Karaarslan, Serap; Gene, Mine; Gur, Esra B; Sahin, Nur; Guclu, Serkan

    2015-11-01

    The contribution of local inflammation to the pathophysiology of abnormal choromosomally miscarriages remains unclear The objective of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response at the maternofetal interface of women presenting with first trimester miscarriage with abnormal choromosomally Level of TNF-α , IL-6 ve IL-17 were asseyed using immunohistochemistry technique at decidual and placental bed biopsy samples from 23 women with elective termination of pregnancy 21 euploid and 18 aneuploid missed miscarriages. Immunostainig for TNF-α, IL-6 ve IL-17 has been evaluated semi-quantitatively by 'quickscore' method. We found that the intensity of TNF-α staining was high in the miscarriage group, and this has been found in previous studies. Unlike some previous studies, the intensity of IL-6 staining was higher in the miscarriage groups only in decidual glandular epithelium. The intensity of IL-6 staining was found to be higher in the miscarriage group with chromosome anomaly than in the miscarriage group without chromosome anomaly. There was no significant difference in IL-17 levels between any of the groups. Cytokines are considered to play an important role in the maintenance of pregnancy but the exact mechanism between them and the mutual regulation relationship were not been fully understood, which need our further study.

  2. Y-chromosome loss as the sole karyotypic anomaly with 3'RARalpha submicroscopic deletion in a case of M3r subtype of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongsheng; Xue, Yongquan; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jinlan; Wu, Yafang; Bai, Shuxiao

    2009-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the presence of a chromosomal rearrangement involving retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) gene generating the X-RARalpha fusion. We describe here a unique RARalpha gene rearrangement in a patient with M3r subtype of APL. Conventional cytogenetic analysis revealed Y-chromosome loss as the sole karyotypic anomaly. No X-RARalpha fusion was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using PML/RARalpha dual-color dual-fusion translocation probe set, or RARalpha dual-color break apart rearrangement probe or reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, FISH using RARalpha dual-color break apart rearrangement probe showed a deletion of the entire 3'-end of one allele of RARalpha gene. To our knowledge, this is the first documented APL with 3'RARalpha submicroscopic deletion which is not associated with X-RARalpha fusion. The molecular consequences of this anomaly remain to be elucidated.

  3. Identification of the human chromosomal region containing the iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly locus by genomic-mismatch scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, F; Mears, A J; Guo, S W; Pearce, W G; Walter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Genome-mismatch scanning (GMS) is a new method of linkage analysis that rapidly isolates regions of identity between two genomes. DNA molecules from regions of identity by descent from two relatives are isolated based on their ability to form extended mismatch-free heteroduplexes. We have applied this rapid technology to identify the chromosomal region shared by two fifth-degree cousins with autosomal dominant iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly (IGDA), a rare ocular neurocristopathy. Markers on the short arm of human chromosome 6p were recovered, consistent with the results of conventional linkage analysis conducted in parallel, indicating linkage of IGDA to 6p25. Control markers tested on a second human chromosome were not recovered. A GMS error rate of approximately 11% was observed, well within an acceptable range for a rapid, first screening approach, especially since GMS results would be confirmed by family analysis with selected markers from the putative region of identity by descent. These results demonstrate not only the value of this technique in the rapid mapping of human genetic traits, but the first application of GMS to a multicellular organism. Images Figure 2 PMID:9245991

  4. Complex chromosome 17p rearrangements associated with low-copy repeats in two patients with congenital anomalies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Stankiewicz, P.; Yatsenko, S.A.; Crawford, E.; Creswick, H.; Proud, V.K.; Vries, B. de; Pfundt, R.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Zackowski, J.; Bi, W.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Lupski, J.R.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent molecular cytogenetic data have shown that the constitution of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) may be more complicated than previously thought. The complicated nature of these rearrangements challenges the accurate delineation of the chromosomal breakpoints and mechanisms involved. H

  5. Chromosome 18q22.2-->qter deletion and a congenital anomaly syndrome with multiple vertebral segmentation defects.

    OpenAIRE

    Dowton, S B; Hing, A V; Sheen-Kaniecki, V; Watson, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    Multiple vertebral segmentation defects occur in a group of conditions variably associated with anomalies of other organ systems. This report describes a female child in whom a deletion of chromosome 18 (18q22.2-->qter) is associated with congenital anomalies including multiple vertebral segmentation defects resembling sporadic spondylocostal dysplasia. The child also has unilateral renal agenesis and unilateral fibular aplasia. The association of severe multiple vertebral segmentation defect...

  6. Chromosome 18q22.2-->qter deletion and a congenital anomaly syndrome with multiple vertebral segmentation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, S B; Hing, A V; Sheen-Kaniecki, V; Watson, M S

    1997-05-01

    Multiple vertebral segmentation defects occur in a group of conditions variably associated with anomalies of other organ systems. This report describes a female child in whom a deletion of chromosome 18 (18q22.2-->qter) is associated with congenital anomalies including multiple vertebral segmentation defects resembling sporadic spondylocostal dysplasia. The child also has unilateral renal agenesis and unilateral fibular aplasia. The association of severe multiple vertebral segmentation defects with 18q- in this patient suggests the possibility that a gene important for somite formation or vertebral differentiation maps to this segment of chromosome 18.

  7. Association between venous leg ulcers and sex chromosome anomalies in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattringer, Cornelia; Scheurecker, Christine; Höpfl, Reinhard; Müller, Hansgeorg

    2010-11-01

    We report here two cases of men, aged 46 and 23 years, with refractory chronic venous leg ulcers in association with sex chromosome aberrations: one with a 47,XXY/48,XXXY karyotype (Klinefelter syndrome) and the other with a 47,XYY karyotype (Jacob syndrome). In both patients, the occurrence of leg ulcers was the reason for seeking medical care; their medical history was other-wise unremarkable. Chromosomal analyses were performed due to the unusually young age for development of venous leg ulcers. The pathophysiology behind the occurrence of venous leg ulcers in patients with numerical aberrations of the sex chromosomes is incompletely understood. Involvement of elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in the pathogenesis of venous leg ulcers has been reported in patients with Klinefelter syndrome. Notably, our patient with 47,XXY/48,XXXY presented with androgen deficiency but normal plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity.

  8. Outcome of microdissection testicular sperm extraction in azoospermic patients with Klinefelter syndrome and other sex-chromosomal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Chiba, Koji; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2013-08-01

    It has been indicated that approximately 20% of azoospermic patients have chromosomal anomalies, 90% of which are sex-chromosome abnormalities. Even azoospermic patients with sex-chromosomal anomalies might be able to father children using an advanced assisted reproductive technique such as microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). To evaluate the effect of micro-TESE in azoospermic patients with various sex-chromosomal anomalies, we reviewed their clinical results. A chromosomal survey using the G-banding technique was performed on males whose semen analysis demonstrated azoospermia at the Division of Male Infertilities at our institution between January 2004 and December 2009. Forty-two of these subjects demonstrated sex-chromosomal anomalies. The mean patient age was 34.4 ± 4.3 years. We classified them into two groups: Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) and other sex-chromosome abnormalities. Thirty-five patients showed Klinefelter syndrome and seven patients showed other sex-chromosome abnormalities. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone (T) levels were 36.3 ± 14.0 IU/L, 15.8 ± 6.7 IU/L, and 3.2 ± 2.0 ng/ml in Klinefelter syndrome, and 20.8 ± 10.4 IU/L, 8.2 ± 5.2 IU/L and 4.1 ± 1.5 ng/ml in other sex-chromosome abnormalities, respectively. The mean testicular volume was 4.0 ± 2.1 ml in Klinefelter syndrome and 9.9 ± 4.6 ml in other sex-chromosome abnormalities. Serum FSH and LH in Klinefelter syndrome were significantly higher than those in other sex-chromosome abnormalities, and the mean testicular volume in Klinefelter syndrome was significantly smaller than that in other sex-chromosome abnormalities. The sperm retrieval rate (SRR) for micro-TESE showed no significant difference between the two groups (42.4% vs. 42.9%). In this study, the outcome of micro-TESE appeared not to differ between Klinefelter syndrome and other sex-chromosome

  9. Nuchal translucency distributions for different chromosomal anomalies in a large unselected population cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Marianne; Ekelund, Charlotte K; Petersen, Olav Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    and compared with the normal/no karyotype group. RESULTS: A total of 215 223 singleton pregnancies were included in the cohort; 10548 had a normal karyotype and 1286 had an aberration. Plots of the NT measurements showed that like trisomy 21, 18 and 13 and monosomy X, the distribution for the unbalanced...... translocations was shifted towards larger NTs. The distributions for the balanced translocations, the uncommon trisomies and the triploidies more closely resembled that of the normal/no karyotype population. CONCLUSION: Fetuses with aneuploidies have NT distributions visually different from normal fetuses......, with the exception of triploidies and uncommon autosomal trisomies. The distributions differ in shape according to type of chromosomal anomaly. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Further evidence for a relationship between the 5p15 chromosome region and the oculoauriculovertebral anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Siggberg, Linda; Knuutila, Sakari; von Koskull, Harriet; Taskinen, Mervi; Peippo, Maarit

    2008-10-01

    The oculoauriculovertebral anomaly (OAV) or Goldenhar syndrome is a malformation complex that has been described in several chromosomal rearrangements. Among them a deletion of the terminal 5p has recurred in seven previous patients. We wish to report on an additional such patient in order to reinforce the significance of this genomic region in the cause of at least a subgroup of OAV cases. Future studies, particularly in the OAV patients with a lateral facial cleft, might define one genetic background of the disorder. Our patient had a complex translocation chromosome 45,XX, inv(2) (q32q37)mat, dic(5;21) (p15.3;q22.3)dn, resulting in a terminal 5p deletion, a terminal deletion of 21q demonstrated by FISH studies, and a duplication of 21q22.11-q22.12 documented by molecular karyotyping. In addition to OAV she developed myelodysplasia treated with bone marrow transplantation. We discuss her clinical findings with reference to her karyotype findings and review the patients with OAV and a terminal deletion of 5p. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  12. Atypical lipomatous tumor with structural rearrangements involving chromosomes 3 and 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Jun; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Kamachi, Yuki; Naito, Masatoshi

    2014-06-01

    Atypical lipomatous tumor (ALT) is an intermediate (locally aggressive) mesenchymal neoplasm with the potential to dedifferentiate to higher grades over time. It is cytogenetically characterized by the presence of one or more supernumerary ring and giant marker chromosomes. These abnormal chromosomes invariably contain amplified sequences derived from the 12q14-15 region. We describe a unique cytogenetic finding of ALT arising in the right lower back of a 42-year-old man. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a predominantly fatty mass with irregularly thickened, linear, swirled, and nodular septa. Contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images showed significant enhancement of the non-adipose areas. A sub-extensive resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor consisted predominantly of mature fat cells with atypical stromal cells and multivacuolated lipoblasts. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for p16 (diffuse and strong signal) and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (focal and weak signal) but negative for murine double-minute 2. Cytogenetic analysis displayed a t(3;8)(q28;q13) translocation as the sole anomaly or concomitant with a few other numerical and structural alterations. There has been no evidence of local recurrence two months after surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of ALT with structural aberrations involving chromosomes 3 and 8, associated with an absence of 12q rearrangements. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. A cluster of familial malignant mesothelioma with del(9p) as the sole chromosomal anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musti, Marina; Cavone, Domenica; Aalto, Yan; Scattone, Anna; Serio, Gabriella; Knuutila, Sakari

    2002-10-01

    We describe a family of three sisters affected by malignant mesothelioma (MM) (2 pleural and 1 peritoneal) and one brother affected by pleural plaques. All members of the family had been subjected to previous asbestos exposure of environmental-residential type. For 13 years, from 1951 to 1964, their housing was provided by the father's employer, an asbestos cement factory, and the factory warehouse was on the ground floor of the building they lived in. DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded MM samples was used to search for chromosomal alterations by a comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) method. In two cases, a loss at 9p was found to be the only change. The loss at 9p is a frequent event in malignant mesothelioma and the fact that this anomaly was diagnosed in two sisters as the only alteration suggests that this region may be the site of one or more oncosuppressor genes that could play an important role in the development of MM and in inducing greater genetic susceptibility to the carcinogenic effects of asbestos.

  14. Pregnancy Outcome following Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosomal Anomaly: A Record Linkage Study of 26,261 Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Myrthe; Cooper, Sally-Ann; McGowan, Ruth; Nelson, Scott M; Pell, Jill P

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the influence of changes in the age at which women give birth, and of developments in prenatal screening and diagnosis on the number of pregnancies diagnosed and terminated with chromosomal anomalies. However, we are unaware of any population studies examining pregnancy terminations after diagnosis of chromosomal anomalies that has included all aneuploidies and the influence of maternal factors. The aims of this study were to examine the association between results of prenatal tests and pregnancy termination, and the proportion of foetuses with and without chromosomal anomalies referred for invasive diagnostic tests over time. Diagnostic information of 26,261 prenatal invasive tests from all genetic service laboratories in Scotland from 2000 to 2011 was linked to Scottish Morbidity Records to obtain details on pregnancy outcome. Binary logistic regression was carried out to test the associations of year and type of diagnosis with pregnancy termination, while controlling for maternal age, neighbourhood deprivation and parity. There were 24,155 (92.0%) with no chromosomal anomalies, 1,483 (5.6%) aneuploidy diagnoses, and 623 (2.4%) diagnoses of anomaly that was not aneuploidy (including translocations and single chromosome deletions). In comparison with negative test results, pregnancies diagnosed with trisomy were most likely to be terminated (adjusted OR 437.40, 95% CI 348.19-549.46) followed by other aneuploid anomalies (adjusted OR 95.94, 95% CI 69.21-133.01). During the study period, fewer pregnancies that were diagnosed with aneuploidy were terminated, including trisomy diagnoses (adjusted OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26-0.73). Older women were less likely to terminate (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.28, 0.42), and parity was also an independent predictor of termination. In keeping with previous findings, while the number of invasive diagnostic tests declined, the proportion of abnormal results increased from 6.09% to 10.88%. Systematic advances in

  15. Aggressive osteoblastoma: a case report involving a unique chromosomal aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Allyson C; Rezeanu, Luminita; Klein, Michael J; Pitt, Michael J; Buecker, Peter; Hersh, Joseph H; Buchino, John J; Siegal, Gene P

    2010-06-01

    Osteoblastomas are rare bone-producing neoplasms that generally occur in the young and can be misdiagnosed as an osteosarcoma if correlation with clinical history, radiology, and histology is not carefully considered or if the several variants of osteoblastoma are not recognized. These variants lie on a morphologic spectrum between conventional osteoblastoma and osteosarcoma. Aggressive osteoblastoma is one such subtype. As the name implies, the histologic features of aggressive osteoblastoma may appear malignant, and its biologic behavior may separate it from conventional osteoblastoma. We report a case of aggressive osteoblastoma occurring in the femoral diaphysis of a 12-year-old girl; this osetoblastoma was dyssynchronous from the radiologic appearance and a diagnostic challenge. Cytogenetic evaluation of the neoplasm revealed a pseudodiploid clone with a balanced translocation involving chromosomes 4, 7, and 14. Using the premise that cytogenetics might be useful as a diagnostic tool for a more specific classification, we reviewed the literature in order to compare our findings with known chromosomal aberrations.

  16. Robin sequence associated with karyotypic mosaicism involving chromosome 22 abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, C.F.; Jastrzab, J.M.; Centu, E.S. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Robin sequence is characterized by cleft palate, hypoplastic mandible, glossoptosis and respiratory difficulties. The Robin sequence may be observed as an isolated defect or as part of about 33 syndromes; however, to our knowledge, it has never been reported associated with chromosome 22 abnormalities. We examined a two-month-old black boy with a severe case of Robin sequence. Exam revealed a small child with hypoplastic mandible, glossoptosis, high palate and respiratory difficulty with continuous apnea episodes resulting in cyanotic lips and nails. In order to relieve the upper airway obstruction, his tongue was attached to the lower lip. Later a tracheostomy was performed. On follow-up exam, this patient was found to have developmental delay. Cytogenetic studies of both peripheral blood and fibroblast cells showed mosaicism involving chromosome 22 abnormalities which were designated as follows: 45,XY,-22/46,XY,-22,+r(22)/46,XY. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies confirmed the identity of the r(22) and showed the presence of the DiGeorge locus (D22575) but the absence of the D22539 locus which maps to 22q13.3. Reported cases of r(22) show no association with Robin sequence. However, r(22) has been associated with flat bridge of the nose, bulbous tip of the nose, epicanthus and high palate, all characteristics that we also observed in this case. These unusual cytogenetic findings may be causally related to the dysmorphology found in the patient we report.

  17. Rare chromosome abnormalities, prevalence and prenatal diagnosis rates from population-based congenital anomaly registers in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen; Boyd, Patricia A; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Nelen, Vera; Garne, Ester; Khoshnood, Babak; Doray, Berenice; Rissmann, Anke; Mullaney, Carmel; Calzolari, Elisa; Bakker, Marian; Salvador, Joaquin; Addor, Marie-Claude; Draper, Elizabeth; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence and types of rare chromosome abnormalities (RCAs) in Europe for 2000-2006 inclusive, and to describe prenatal diagnosis rates and pregnancy outcome. Data held by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies database were analysed on all the cases from 16 population-based registries in 11 European countries diagnosed prenatally or before 1 year of age, and delivered between 2000 and 2006. Cases were all unbalanced chromosome abnormalities and included live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. There were 10,323 cases with a chromosome abnormality, giving a total birth prevalence rate of 43.8/10,000 births. Of these, 7335 cases had trisomy 21,18 or 13, giving individual prevalence rates of 23.0, 5.9 and 2.3/10,000 births, respectively (53, 13 and 5% of all reported chromosome errors, respectively). In all, 473 cases (5%) had a sex chromosome trisomy, and 778 (8%) had 45,X, giving prevalence rates of 2.0 and 3.3/10,000 births, respectively. There were 1,737 RCA cases (17%), giving a prevalence of 7.4/10,000 births. These included triploidy, other trisomies, marker chromosomes, unbalanced translocations, deletions and duplications. There was a wide variation between the registers in both the overall prenatal diagnosis rate of RCA, an average of 65% (range 5-92%) and the prevalence of RCA (range 2.4-12.9/10,000 births). In all, 49% were liveborn. The data provide the prevalence of families currently requiring specialised genetic counselling services in the perinatal period for these conditions and, for some, long-term care.

  18. Fetal extracardiac anomalies associated with congenital cardiac diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Bum Ha; Cho, Jung Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Song, Mi Jin [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    To evaluate the incidence of associated extracardiac anomalies in fetuses with congenital heart defects on fetal echocardiography, and to estimate the incidence of chromosomal abnormalities according to the extracardiac anomalies. From Jan. 1999 to Dec. 2001, 101 fetuses with prenatally diagnosed extracardiac anomalies and congenital cardiac diseases were selected for study. The mean gestational age at the time of the ultrasound exam was about 25 weeks. Associated extracardiac anomalies were classified into CNS, face and neck, thorax, abdomen, genitourinary system, musculoskeletal, other and multi-systemic anomalies groups. Chromosomal studies including chorionic villi sampling, amniocentesis, cordocentesis, and postnatal exam were correlated. Musculoskeletal anomalies were the most commonly associated extracardiac anomalies (n=28, 27.7%). Abdominal anomaly (n=26, 25.7%), central nervous system anomaly (n=25, 24.8%), genitourinary anomaly(n=12, 11.9%), thoracic anomaly (n=4, 4%), face and neck anomaly (n=3, 3%) were found. Twenty eight fetuses showed other anomalies (n=28, 27.7%). Multi-systemic anomalies were also common (n=20, 19.8%). Fetal anomalies involving two systems were noted in 15 fetuses, and anomalies of more than three systems were not uncommon (5 fetuses). Chromosomal study of 38 fetuses revealed 19 fetuses with abnormal karyotypes (50%). For 19 fetuses with abnormal karyotypes, central nervous system anomalies and musculoskeletal anomalies were the most frequently associated with extracardiac abnormalities (n=9). Multi-systemic anomalies were associated in 9 of the 19 fetuses. In fetuses with cardiac defects, the musculoskeletal, abdomen and CNS anomalies were commonly associated with extracardiac anomalies. Various extracardiac anomalies such as, head and neck anomalies, CNS anomalies, musculoskeletal anomalies, and multi-organ anomalies were highly correlated with chromosomal abnormalities, and so this relationship requires chromosomal study.

  19. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  20. A complex chromosome rearrangement involving four chromosomes, nine breakpoints and a cryptic 0.6-Mb deletion in a boy with cerebellar hypoplasia and defects in skull ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, R S; Cernach, M C S P; Sfakianakis, T E; Takeno, S S; Nardozza, L M M; Rossi, C; Bhatt, S S; Liehr, T; Melaragno, M I

    2013-01-01

    Constitutional complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are considered rare cytogenetic events. Most apparently balanced CCRs are de novo and are usually found in patients with abnormal phenotypes. High-resolution techniques are unveiling genomic imbalances in a great percentage of these cases. In this paper, we report a patient with growth and developmental delay, dysmorphic features, nervous system anomalies (pachygyria, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and cerebellum), a marked reduction in the ossification of the cranial vault, skull base sclerosis, and cardiopathy who presents a CCR with 9 breakpoints involving 4 chromosomes (3, 6, 8 and 14) and a 0.6-Mb deletion in 14q24.1. Although the only genomic imbalance revealed by the array technique was a deletion, the clinical phenotype of the patient most likely cannot be attributed exclusively to haploinsufficiency. Other events must also be considered, including the disruption of critical genes and position effects. A combination of several different investigative approaches (G-banding, FISH with different probes and SNP array techniques) was required to describe this CCR in full, suggesting that CCRs may be more frequent than initially thought. Additionally, we propose that a chain chromosome breakage mechanism may have occurred as a single rearrangement event resulting in this CCR. This study demonstrates the importance of applying different cytogenetic and molecular techniques to detect subtle rearrangements and to delineate the rearrangements at a more accurate level, providing a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in CCR formation and a better correlation with phenotype.

  1. Involvement of the chromosomal region 11q13 in renal oncocytoma : Case report and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuhaus, C; Dijkhuizen, T; vandenBerg, E; Storkel, S; Stockle, M; Mensch, B; Huber, C; Decker, HJ

    Renal oncocytomas comprise a cytogenetically heterogeneous group of tumors consisting potentially of cytogenetic distinguishable subgroups. Review of the literature revealed loss of chromosome 1 and Y as a possible anomaly for at least one subset of oncocytomas. The frequent finding of

  2. Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics of Chromosomal Anomalies and Congenital Contiguous Gene Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies exert significant impact on individuals and their families, with particularly negative effects on their quality of life. However, studies focusing on the psychological and behavioral characteristics of children with congenital anomalies are still limited, though this information is indispensable for the educational support of such children. In this paper, we reviewed articles dealing with psychological, behavioral and socioemotionalcharacteristics of children with congeni...

  3. Ring Chromosome 7 Presenting with Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Multiple Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yin Tsai

    2005-09-01

    Conclusion: Ring chromosome 7 is extremely rare and our case might be the 15th and youngest case in the medical literature. Our case had multicystic kidney and imperforate anus, which have not been reported previously. Prenatal diagnosis of ring chromosome 7 is very difficult. When fetuses present with severe IUGR, oligohydramnios and multicystic kidney, chromosomal aberrations should be kept in mind, and perinatal cytogenetic workup is warranted.

  4. West syndrome associated with a novel chromosomal anomaly; partial trisomy 8P together with partial monosomy 9P, resulting from a familial unbalanced reciprocal translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygı, Semra; Demir, Şenay; Alehan, Fusun; Sahin, Feride Iffet

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome is classified according to the underlying etiology into an acquired West syndrome, a congenital/developmental West syndrome, and West syndrome of unknown etiology. Causes of a congenital/developmental West syndrome are extensive and include chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient carrying a derivative chromosome originating from the reciprocal unbalanced translocation t (8;9) (p11.2;p22) and presenting with macrocephaly, West syndrome, severe mental motor retardation and hypotonia. As far as we know, this is a new chromosomal anomaly associated with West syndrome.

  5. Smoking-induced chromosomal segregation anomalies identified by FISH analysis of sperm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, Ciro Silveira; Juchniuk de Vozzi, Maria Silvina; Dos Santos, Silvio Avelino; Vasconcelos, Maria Aparecida C; de Paz, Cláudia Cp; Squire, Jeremy A; Martelli, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    .... Previous studies have shown that toxic substances from cigarette smoke induce structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations in vitro and could potentially increase levels of aneusomy in sperm...

  6. Rare chromosome abnormalities, prevalence and prenatal diagnosis rates from population-based congenital anomaly registers in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen; Boyd, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence and types of rare chromosome abnormalities (RCAs) in Europe for 2000-2006 inclusive, and to describe prenatal diagnosis rates and pregnancy outcome. Data held by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies database were analysed on all the...... currently requiring specialised genetic counselling services in the perinatal period for these conditions and, for some, long-term care.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 11 January 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2011.246....

  7. Chromosomal anomaly spectrum in early pregnancy loss in relation to presence or absence of an embryonic pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Monica; Arigita, Marta; Bennasar, Mar; Soler, Anna; Sanchez, Aurora; Borrell, Antoni

    2010-12-01

    To compare the cytogenetic findings in a series of missed miscarriages evaluated by chorionic villus sampling, in relation to embryonic pole presence (embryonic or anembryonic). Prospective cross-sectional study. Tertiary referral hospital. Women presenting with a missed miscarriage. Transcervical chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic studies in the chorionic villi with use of the semidirect method. Embryonic pole presence or absence assessed by transvaginal ultrasound examination. Type of chromosomal anomalies found in both subgroups. Although the chromosomal abnormality rate was similar for miscarriages with absent or present embryo (61% vs. 68% respectively), frequencies for viable autosomal trisomies (2.3% vs. 19%) and monosomy X (0% vs. 9.2%) were significantly lower when no embryonic pole was seen. Viable autosomal trisomies and monosomies X appear not to be a common cause of miscarriage with an early fetal demise (anembryonic miscarriage). Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. X microchromosome with additional chromosome anomalies found in Ullrich-Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydner, K.L.; Sciorra, L.J. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Singer-Granick, C. [Hahnemann Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-27

    Using standard cytogenetic methods coupled with molecular techniques, the following karyotype mos 45,X/46,XXq+/46,X-mar(X)/47,XXq+, +mar(X), was identified in a patient with Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS). High-resolution banding (n = 650) of the metaphase chromosomes yielded a breakpoint at q28 on the Xq+ rearranged chromosome. FISH was used to determine the presence of Y-containing DNA in the Xq+ and the mar(X) chromosomes. The following molecular probes were used: DYZ1, DYZ3, and spectrum orange WCP Y. The lack of specific hybridization of these probes was interpreted as a low risk of gonadoblastoma in this patient. Using X-chromosome- and centromere-specific probes, FISH demonstrated the presence of hybridizing material on both rearranged chromosomes, the Xq+ and mar(X). Finally, we determined that the mar(X) and Xq+ chromosomes contained telomeres in the absence of any interstitial telomeric hybridizing material. A micro-X chromosome is present in this UTS patient. Delineation of events leading toward the mechanisms responsible for the multiple DNA rearrangements required to generate the micro-X and Xq+ chromosomes awaits future studies. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. VACTERL association-type anomalies in a male neonate with a Y-chromosome abnormality

    OpenAIRE

    Bhagat, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The acronym VACTERL describes the non-random co-occurrence of three of the following anomalies: vertebral (V), anal (A), cardiac (C), tracheoesophageal fistula with or without oesophageal atresia (TE), renal (R) and limb defects (L). Here, we report a newborn baby with VACTERL-type anomalies along with a single umbilical artery. The additional interesting findings include development dysplasia of the right hip, dislocation of the left knee and the left club foot. The karyotype revealed 46, X,...

  10. Meiotic abnormalities in metaphase I human spermatocytes from infertile males: frequencies, chromosomes involved, and the relationships with polymorphic karyotype and seminal parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Zaida Sarrate; Francesca Vidal; Joan Blanco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look in depth at the relationship between meiotic anomalies and male infertility, such as the determination of the chromosomes involved or the correlation with patient features. For this purpose, a total of 31 testicular tissue samples from individuals consulting for fertility problems were analyzed. Metaphase I cells were evaluated using a sequential methodology combining Leishman stained procedures and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols. The ...

  11. Cenani-Lenz syndrome-like limb anomaly with more severe involvement of left side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousef

    2012-07-13

    The authors describe a case of Cenani-Lenz syndrome, in a 3-month-old girl of non-consanguineous parents of Afghani origin. Digital anomalies consist of sandactyly of the fingers of both hands, disorganised phalanges more severe involvement of the left side without radioulnar synostosis. Although our patient lacks facial dysmorphic features reported previously. The cases of patients with CLS need to be carefully evaluated and described to determine if there is distinctive accompanying facial phenotype.

  12. Detection of fetal chromosomal anomalies: does nuchal translucency measurement have added value in the era of non-invasive prenatal testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenbelt, K D; Diemel, B D M; Koster, M P H; Manten, G T R; Siljee, J; Schuring-Blom, G H; Page-Christiaens, G C M L

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine what percentage of fetal chromosomal anomalies remains undetected when first trimester combined testing is replaced by non-invasive prenatal testing for trisomies 13, 18, and 21. We focused on the added clinical value of nuchal translucency (NT) measurement. Data on fetal karyotype, ultrasound findings, and pregnancy outcome of all pregnancies with an NT measurement ≥3.5 mm were retrospectively collected from a cohort of 25,057 singleton pregnancies in which first trimester combined testing was performed. Two hundred twenty-five fetuses (0.9 %) had an NT ≥3.5 mm. In 24 of these pregnancies, a chromosomal anomaly other than trisomy 13, 18, or 21 was detected. Eleven resulted in fetal demise, and ten showed fetal ultrasound anomalies. In three fetuses with normal ultrasound findings, a chromosomal anomaly was detected, of which one was a triple X. In three out of 25,057 pregnancies (0.01%), non-invasive prenatal testing and fetal ultrasound would have missed a chromosomal anomaly that would have been identified by NT measurement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Recurrence-associated chromosomal anomalies in meningiomas: Single-institution study and a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Och, Waldemar; Szmuda, Tomasz; Sikorska, Beata; Springer, Janusz; Jaskólski, Dariusz; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Liberski, Paweł P

    Complete removal of a meningioma (MG) does not guarantee relapse-free survival. Alterations on several chromosomes responsible for MG recurrence were suggested, although their role was not validated by a systematic review. Following the analysis of own 161 cases, all previously published data has been collected for evidence synthesis. Based on own series, WHO grade >I (odds ratio (OR)=92.0; 95%CI: 19.1-443.5) and a combination of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 1p and 14q (OR=10.2; 95%CI: 19-55.7) were the independent recurrence-specific prognosticators. The deleterious role of LOH on 1p/14q was demonstrated in a subset of parasagittal and falcine MGs. A total of 742 cases and 10 studies were pooled for the Individual Patient Data and Aggregate Data models of meta-analysis, respectively. The prognostic role of WHO classification (OR=90.4) and anomaly of chromosome 14 (OR=3.5) was confirmed. LOH on 14 showed lesser impact on recurrence than suggested by the WHO grading (area under the curve 0.65 for LOH vs. 0.74 for WHO). Fixed effect model of meta-analysis provided high summarized OR values for 1p (OR=5.4; 95%CI: 3.6-8.1) and 14q (OR=7.6; 95%CI: 4.3-13.6), and low for chromosome 22 (OR=1.6; 95%CI: 1.1-2.4). Final appraisal of recurrence-associated chromosomal alterations indicated that arms 1p and 14q deserve attention while predicting MG recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. West syndrome associated with a novel chromosomal anomaly; partial trisomy 8P together with partial monosomy 9P, resulting from a familial unbalanced reciprocal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Ilknur Erol; Semra Saygi; Senay Demir; Fusun Alehan; Feride Iffet Sahin

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome is classified according to the underlying etiology into an acquired West syndrome, a congenital/developmental West syndrome, and West syndrome of unknown etiology. Causes of a congenital/developmental West syndrome are extensive and include chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient carrying a derivative chromosome originating from the reciprocal unbalanced translocation t (8;9) (p11.2;p22) and presenting with macrocephaly, West syndrome, severe mental motor retardation and h...

  15. Interstitial deletions of the short arm of chromosome 4 in patients with a similar combination of multiple minor anomalies and mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.M.; Pillers, D.A.M.; Magenis, R.E. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-17

    Interstitial deletions of chromosome 4 have been described rarely and have had variable presentations. We describe the phenotypic characteristics associated with interstitial deletion of the p14-16 region of chromosome 4 in 7 patients with multiple minor anomalies in common, and with mental retardation. A review of published cases of interstitial deletions of the short arm of chromosome 4 is provided. These deletions present a distinct phenotype which is different from that of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. 52 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow as primary cause of aplastic or hypoplastic conditions and peripheral cytopenia: disorders due to secondary impairment of RUNX1 and MPL genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome changes in the bone marrow (BM of patients with persistent cytopenia are often considered diagnostic for a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Comprehensive cytogenetic evaluations may give evidence of the real pathogenetic role of these changes in cases with cytopenia without morphological signs of MDS. Results Chromosome anomalies were found in the BM of three patients, without any morphological evidence of MDS: 1 an acquired complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a boy with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA; the rearrangement caused the loss of exons 2–8 of the RUNX1 gene with subsequent hypoexpression. 2 a constitutional complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital thrombocytopenia; the rearrangement led to RUNX1 disruption and hypoexpression. 3 an acquired paracentric inversion of chromosome 1, in which two regions at the breakpoints were shown to be lost, in a boy with aplastic anaemia; the MPL gene, localized in chromosome 1 short arms was not mutated neither disrupted, but its expression was severely reduced: we postulate that the aplastic anaemia was due to position effects acting both in cis and in trans, and causing Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia (CAMT. Conclusions A clonal anomaly in BM does not imply per se a diagnosis of MDS: a subgroup of BM hypoplastic disorders is directly due to chromosome structural anomalies with effects on specific genes, as was the case of RUNX1 and MPL in the patients here reported with diagnosis of SAA, thrombocytopenia, and CAMT. The anomaly may be either acquired or constitutional, and it may act by deletion/disruption of the gene, or by position effects. Full cytogenetic investigations, including a-CGH, should always be part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with BM aplasia/hypoplasia and peripheral cytopenias.

  17. Clinical and biological characteristics of adult de novo and secondary acute myeloid leukemia with balanced 11q23 chromosomal anomaly or MLL gene rearrangement compared to cases with unbalanced 11q23 anomaly: confirmation of the existence of different entities with 11q23 breakpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archimbaud, E; Charrin, C; Magaud, J P; Campos, L; Thomas, X; Fière, D; Rimokh, R

    1998-01-01

    Although the presence of a chromosome 11q23 breakpoint is of recognized poor prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, its prognostic significance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been the object of conflicting reports, perhaps reflecting the possibility of different entities. It has been found that only typical and generally balanced 11q23 chromosomal anomalies involve the MLL gene while atypical and generally unbalanced do not. To determine whether these two categories of AML patients had different initial characteristics and evolution, supporting different pathogenetic mechanisms, we analyzed clinical and biologic characteristics of newly diagnosed AML patients with balanced 11q23 breakpoint and/or MLL rearrangement seen over a 10-year period in our institution and compared them to cases with unbalanced 11q23 anomaly seen over the same period. These two categories of patients were compared with newly diagnosed patients with normal karyotype and no MLL rearrangement when tested, seen over the same period of time and treated similarly. Over this period, 442 newly diagnosed adult (> 15 years) AML seen in our institution had a successful karyotype performed before any therapy. Thirty-six cases (8%) had a chromosome 11q23 breakpoint including 19 cases with a balanced translocation or inversion and 17 cases with an unbalanced anomaly. Eighty-seven recently diagnosed cases of AML, for whom frozen cellular material was available, were analyzed by Southern blot for the presence of MLL gene rearrangement. Fourteen cases (16% of the tested cases) had a rearrangement of the MLL gene, including seven cases with an apparently successful karyotype not showing any 11q23 breakpoint and two cases with no available karyotype. The only case with unbalanced 11q23 chromosomal anomaly which was tested had no MLL rearrangement. There was a clear-cut clinical difference between the 28 patients having a balanced 11q23 anomaly/MLL rearrangement and the 17 patients having an unbalanced

  18. Detection of fetal chromosomal anomalies : Does nuchal translucency measurement have added value in the era of non-invasive prenatal testing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, K. D.; Diemel, B. D M; Koster, M. P H; Manten, G. T R; Siljee, J.; Schuring-Blom, G. H.; Page-Christiaens, G. C M L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to determine what percentage of fetal chromosomal anomalies remains undetected when first trimester combined testing is replaced by non-invasive prenatal testing for trisomies 13, 18, and 21. We focused on the added clinical value of nuchal translucency

  19. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E; Bridger, Joanna M; Sullivan, Beth A

    2010-08-12

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  20. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  1. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  2. Meiotic abnormalities in metaphase I human spermatocytes from infertile males: frequencies, chromosomes involved, and the relationships with polymorphic karyotype and seminal parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Sarrate

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to look in depth at the relationship between meiotic anomalies and male infertility, such as the determination of the chromosomes involved or the correlation with patient features. For this purpose, a total of 31 testicular tissue samples from individuals consulting for fertility problems were analyzed. Metaphase I cells were evaluated using a sequential methodology combining Leishman stained procedures and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols. The number of chromosomal units and chiasmata count per bivalent were established and a hierarchical cluster analysis of the individuals was performed. The relationship of the seminogram and the karyotype over recombination were evaluated using Poisson regression models. Results obtained in this study show a significant percentage of infertile individuals with altered meiotic behavior, mostly specified as a reduction in chiasmata count in medium and large chromosomes, the presence of univalents, and the observation of tetraploid metaphases. Moreover, the number and the type of anomalies were found to be different between cells of the same individual, suggesting the coexistence of cell lines with normal meiotic behavior and cell lines with abnormalities. In addition, chromosomal abnormalities in metaphase I are significantly associated with oligozoospermia and/or polymorphic karyotype variants.

  3. Meiotic abnormalities in metaphase I human spermatocytes from infertile males: frequencies, chromosomes involved, and the relationships with polymorphic karyotype and seminal parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrate, Zaida; Vidal, Francesca; Blanco, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look in depth at the relationship between meiotic anomalies and male infertility, such as the determination of the chromosomes involved or the correlation with patient features. For this purpose, a total of 31 testicular tissue samples from individuals consulting for fertility problems were analyzed. Metaphase I cells were evaluated using a sequential methodology combining Leishman stained procedures and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols. The number of chromosomal units and chiasmata count per bivalent were established and a hierarchical cluster analysis of the individuals was performed. The relationship of the seminogram and the karyotype over recombination were evaluated using Poisson regression models. Results obtained in this study show a significant percentage of infertile individuals with altered meiotic behavior, mostly specified as a reduction in chiasmata count in medium and large chromosomes, the presence of univalents, and the observation of tetraploid metaphases. Moreover, the number and the type of anomalies were found to be different between cells of the same individual, suggesting the coexistence of cell lines with normal meiotic behavior and cell lines with abnormalities. In addition, chromosomal abnormalities in metaphase I are significantly associated with oligozoospermia and/or polymorphic karyotype variants.

  4. Complex Variant of Philadelphia Translocation Involving Chromosomes 9, 12, and 22 in a Case with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestiti, F.; Agrati, C.; Chinetti, S.; Di Meco, A.; Cirrincione, S.; Oggionni, M.; Grimi, B.; Maggi, F.; Simoni, G.; Grati, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder included in the broader diagnostic category of myeloproliferative neoplasms, associated with fusion by BCR gene at chromosome 22q11 to ABL1 gene at chromosome 9q34 with the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. In 2–10% of CML cases, the fusion gene arises in connection with a variant translocation, involving chromosomes 9, 22, and one or more different chromosomes; consequently, the Ph chromosome could be masked within a complex chromosome rearrangement. In cases with variant Ph translocation a deletion on der(9) may be more frequently observed than in cases with the classical one. Herein we describe a novel case of CML with complex variant Ph translocation involving chromosomes 9, 12, and 22. We present the hematologic response and cytogenetic response after Imatinib treatment. We also speculated the mechanism which had originated the chromosome rearrangement. PMID:25045550

  5. Complex Variant of Philadelphia Translocation Involving Chromosomes 9, 12, and 22 in a Case with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Malvestiti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder included in the broader diagnostic category of myeloproliferative neoplasms, associated with fusion by BCR gene at chromosome 22q11 to ABL1 gene at chromosome 9q34 with the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome. In 2–10% of CML cases, the fusion gene arises in connection with a variant translocation, involving chromosomes 9, 22, and one or more different chromosomes; consequently, the Ph chromosome could be masked within a complex chromosome rearrangement. In cases with variant Ph translocation a deletion on der(9 may be more frequently observed than in cases with the classical one. Herein we describe a novel case of CML with complex variant Ph translocation involving chromosomes 9, 12, and 22. We present the hematologic response and cytogenetic response after Imatinib treatment. We also speculated the mechanism which had originated the chromosome rearrangement.

  6. Epidemiology of double aneuploidies involving chromosome 21 and the sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Natalia V; Mutton, David E

    2005-04-01

    The chance of two chromosome abnormalities occurring in one conceptus is very small. However, some authors have suggested that double aneuplodies (DAs) might be more common than the product of their individual frequencies. The nonrandomness of such DA events was considered to be evidence that nondisjunction (NDJ) may be genetically determined. Data collected from the National Down syndrome Cytogenetic Register (NDSCR) in England and Wales and from the literature indicate that the frequencies of all nonmosaic DAs, except for 48,XXY,+21, are lower than expected, probably because of strong intrauterine selection against such pregnancies. Collectively, we identified 52 cases of nonmosaic 48,XXY,+21; 28 cases of 48,XYY,+21; and 14 cases of 48,XXX,+21 in liveborns and 13 cases of 48,XXY,+21; four cases of 48,XYY,+21; and two cases of 48,XXX,+21 after prenatal diagnoses. Among these cases, analysis of the published unbiased cytogenetic surveys of liveborn DS revealed 24 cases of 48,XXY,+21; nine cases of 48,XYY,+21; and seven cases of 48,XXX,+21. These figures are different from the expected proportion of 1:1:1 (P XYY,+21 DA, with a mean maternal age of 24.7 (P XYY,+21 cases (P genetic predisposition, may play a more important role in the etiology of the most common DA, 48,XXY,+21.

  7. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. [Performance of different methods of estimating risk screening for chromosomal anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avătăjitei, Maria-Cristina; Moscalu, Mihaela; Martiniuc, Violeta; Onofriescu, M

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, several studies have been carried out on additional ultrasound markers in the first trimester of pregnancy in order to improve detection rate of fetal numerical chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy) and to reduce the rate of false-positive diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of various recommendations for which amniocentesis was performed followed by FISH testing in the diagnosis of aneuploidy. These evaluations were conducted in order to determine whether ultrasound aspects are associated with fetal aneuploidy and to estimate the risk level of individual markers using probability estimation analysis. The study has been carried out at the Clinical Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology "CuzaVodă" Iaşi, at the Laboratory of cytogenetic--prenatal diagnosis, during January 2004-December 2011, on a target group of 1406 pregnant women. As part of this study, 1411 amniocentesis were performed. increased efficiency of screening for fetal aneuploidy in the first trimester of pregnancy is obtained through combined method (maternal age over 35 years, increased nuchal translucency and the presence of double test risk) which has 100% detection rate and a rate false-positive result of 0%. The efficiency of this method is provided also by the relatively high risk (RR = 17.2) and its specificity (Sp = 100%). Making the assessment following the study false positive rate, it appears that a good method of risk assessment for aneuploidy is the combined evaluation of increased nuchal translucency (NT) with maternal age over 35 years (specificity 99.5%, a detection rate of 40% false positive rate of 0.45% and a relative risk of 7.09 for the presence of aneuploidy). The achievement of a correct prenatal diagnosis and the increase of the method efficiency, requires a correct selection of cases with aneuploidy risk assessment, based on the results of ultrasound and biochemical (double test risk) investigations correlated with

  9. Cytogenetic and genetic studies of radiation-induced chromosome damage in mouse oocytes. Part 1. Numerical and structural chromosome anomalies in metaphase II oocytes, pre- and post-implantation embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tease, Charles; Fisher, Graham [MRC Radiobiology Unit, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1996-01-17

    The incidences of X-ray induced numerical and structural chromosome anomalies were screened in a range of developmental stages from metaphase II oocytes through to post-implantation embryos. Following 1 Gy of acute X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes, the rate of hyperploidy (chromosome gain) was found to be elevated over levels in unirradiated controls, at metaphase II, in 1-cell and 3.5 day pre-implantation embryos but not in 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. In the latter, however, the frequency of mosaicism was significantly increased. A similar response of an increase in mosaicism but not in hyperploidy in 8.5 day post-implantation embryos was also found after irradiation of dictyate stage oocytes with 4 Gy of acute X-rays. Significantly elevated frequencies of structural chromosome anomalies were present in metaphase II oocytes and pre-implantation embryonic stages, but could not be detected in block-stained chromosome preparations from 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. However, analysis of chromosome preparations after G-banding showed that almost 14% of 14.5 day foetuses carried a chromosome rearrangement after 1 Gy of X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of radiation-induced chromosome gains are incompatible with embryonic survival but that a proportion of embryos with structural chromosome damage develop past mid-gestation. These latter embryos are therefore potentially capable of contributing to the genetic burden of the next generation.

  10. Characterization of a complex rearrangement involving duplication and deletion of 9p in an infant with craniofacial dysmorphism and cardiac anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bartolo Daniel L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Partial duplication and partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 have each been reported in the literature as clinically recognizable syndromes. We present clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings on a five-week-old female infant with concomitant duplication and terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9. To our knowledge ten such cases have previously been reported. Conventional cytogenetic analysis identified additional material on chromosome 9 at band p23. FISH analysis aided in determining the additional material consisted of an inverted duplication with a terminal deletion of the short arm. Microarray analysis confirmed this interpretation and further characterized the abnormality as a duplication of about 32.7 Mb, from 9p23 to 9p11.2, and a terminal deletion of about 11.5 Mb, from 9p24.3 to 9p23. The infant displayed characteristic features of Duplication 9p Syndrome (hypotonia, bulbous nose, single transverse palmar crease, cranial anomalies, as well as features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome (flat nasal bridge, long philtrum, cardiac anomalies despite the deletion being distal to the reported critical region for this syndrome. This case suggests that there are genes or regulatory elements that lie outside of the reported critical region responsible for certain phenotypic features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome. It also underscores the importance of utilizing array technology to precisely define abnormalities involving the short arm of 9p in order to further refine genotype/phenotype associations and to identify additional cases of duplication/deletion.

  11. Genetic counseling for sex chromosome anomalies (SCAs) in Israel and Germany: assessing medical risks according to the importance of fertility in two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiloni-Dolev, Yael

    2006-12-01

    In this article, I report findings from a comparative study of Israeli and German genetic counselors. Specifically, it concerns counselors' attitudes and risk assessments relating to prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome anomalies (SCAs) such as Klinefelter and Turner syndromes. Data collected through in-depth interviews with counselors in both countries (N = 32) are presented, and the types of claims experts deploy in their personal and professional estimation of the risks involved in SCAs are analyzed. The article concludes by suggesting that the counselors rhetoric concerning SCAs, whose major manifestation is the future infertility of the unborn child as well as their estimations of the related risks, should be situated in a broader cultural context, that of local Israeli and German understandings of the importance of fertility, and not in their professional nondirective ethos. Hence, to understand the practice of genetic counselors in two late-modern societies, one must understand the unique relationship between the individual bodies of pregnant women and the body politics of their nations, a relationship mediated by the counselors, who are the bearers of knowledge and expertise in this field.

  12. Chromosomal Anomalies in Individuals with Autism: A Strategy Towards the Identification of Genes Involved in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castermans, Dries; Wilquet, Valerie; Steyaert, Jean; van de Ven, Wim; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Devriendt, Koen

    2004-01-01

    We review the different strategies currently used to try to identify susceptibility genes for idiopathic autism. Although identification of genes is usually straightforward in Mendelian disorders, it has proved to be much more difficult to establish in polygenic disorders like autism. Neither genome screens of affected siblings nor the large…

  13. Chromosomal locations and modes of action of genes of the retinoid (vitamin A) system support their involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, A.B. [Columbia Univ. School of Public Health, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-08-14

    Vitamin A (retinoid), an essential nutrient for fetal and subsequent mammalian development, is involved in gene expression, cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, and death. Retinoic acid (RA) the morphogenic derivative of vitamin A is highly teratogenic. In humans retinoid excess or deficit can result in brain anomalies and psychosis. This review discusses chromosomal loci of genes that control the retinoid cascade in relation to some candidate genes in schizophrenia. The paper relates the knowledge about the transport, delivery, and action of retinoids to what is presently known about the pathology of schizophrenia, with particular reference to the dopamine hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, retinitis pigmentosa, dermatologic disorders, and craniofacial anomalies. 201 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Mosaic trisomy 1q: a recurring chromosome anomaly that is a diagnostic challenge and is associated with a Fryns-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Kathleen M; Chernos, Judy E; Perrier, Renee; Innes, A Micheil; Bernier, Francois P; McLeod, Ross; Thomas, Mary Ann

    2017-06-01

    Trisomy of the long arm of chromosome 1 is a very rare cytogenetic anomaly that is difficult to diagnose because of tissue-limited mosaicism. This study aimed to further characterize the prenatal and post-natal findings associated with this anomaly, including the first reported chromosomal microarray finding. This is a retrospective study of six cases of mos 46,X,der(Y)t(Y;1)(q12;q21)/46,XY, diagnosed both prenatally and post-natally. Detailed clinical features and pregnancy outcome were documented. Recurrent prenatal and post-natal features of our case series, as well as the previously reported cases, were described, suggesting a Fryns-like phenotype. A diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 1q is difficult to confirm post-natally in some cases because of the tissue provided for analysis, emphasizing the need to study multiple tissue types in cases of fetal loss with a suspected underlying chromosomal imbalance. The overlap of clinical features between mosaic trisomy 1q and Fryns syndrome emphasizes the need to obtain appropriate samples for genetic analysis. The present cases and a review of the literature suggest that partial trisomy of the long arm of chromosome 1 is a distinct de novo clinical entity with low recurrence risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Low grade mosaic for a complex supernumerary ring chromosome 18 in an adult patient with multiple congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. van der Veken (Lars); M.M.J. Dieleman (Marianne); H. Douben (Hannie); J.C. van de Brug (Judith); R. van de Graaf (Raoul); A.J.M. Hoogeboom; P.J. Poddighe (Pino); J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Several cases have been reported of patients with a ring chromosome 18 replacing one of the normal chromosomes 18. Less common are patients with a supernumerary ring chromosomes 18. High resolution whole genome examination in patients with multiple congenital abnormalities mi

  16. Pattern of chromosome involvement in childhood hyperdiploid pre-B-cell acute lymhoblastic leukemia cases from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily S. Kerketta

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, the pattern of chromosome involvement in hyperdiploid karyotype of ALL patients is same as other studies except some chromosomes like 1, 6, 11, 12, 19 and 22 have some more frequent involvement than other studies. This study also showed the occurrence of TEL/AML1 fusion is more (19.8% than other reports from India.

  17. Identification of two quantitative trait loci involved in antibody production on mouse chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puel, A; Mevel, J C; Bouthillier, Y; Decreusefond, C; Fridman, W H; Feingold, N; Mouton, D

    1998-03-01

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to the extreme phenotypes of the selected high (H) and low (L) antibody-responder lines of mice were mapped on distinct chromosomes. Successive backcrosses were bred to reduce the length of the QTL-bearing segment detected on chromosome 8 and to produce congenic lines to test gene effect independently of the other QTLs. An increase in antibody responses was repeatedly found to be associated with inheritance of the H-line allele at two markers separated by 30 cM on that chromosome. In the successive backcrosses, background and unlinked involved genes of H-line origin were progressively eliminated; however, unexpected within-progeny variations persisted in the third and even fourth backcross. Nevertheless, the presence of two QTLs within the considered interval was definitely demonstrated in distinct progenies of the fourth backcross which separately inherited one of the two gene-marker H-line alleles. The previously identified chromosome 8 segment therefore contains at least two QTLs involved in antibody responsiveness.

  18. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Dickson

    2016-04-01

    staining was used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3.

  19. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Laura B; Sharakhova, Maria V; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Fleming, Karen L; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C

    2016-04-01

    used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3.

  20. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Laura B.; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A.; Fleming, Karen L.; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C.

    2016-01-01

    was used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3. PMID:27105225

  1. Interchanges in popcorn (Zea mays L. involving the nucleolus organizer chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suely Pagliarini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of microsporogenesis in endogamous plants of popcorn (S5 to S7 showed several and distinctinterchanges which involve the nucleolus organizer (chromosome 6. The detection of cells with interchanges was facilitatedby the presence of two nucleoli of different sizes in contrast to normal ones with a single big nucleolus. Interchange points donot always seem to be at the same place. Whereas in several situations the interchange point clearly involved more than twochromosome pairs, a simple terminal translocation seemed to occur in others. During diplotene, a cross-shaped configurationconnected with the nucleoli was observed in some meiocytes. Some heteromorphic bivalents were found during diakinesis,after which meiosis progressed normally to the end and gave rise to apparently normal tetrads with one normal nucleolus ineach microspore. Tests of pollen viability in fixed pollen grains showed 100% stainability in normal and in affected plants.This is the first report on chromosome interchanges in popcorn.

  2. Equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies maps to a 4.9 megabase interval on horse chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewart Susan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies (MCOA syndrome consists of a diverse set of abnormalities predominantly localized to the frontal part of the eye. The disease is in agreement with a codominant mode of inheritance in our horse material. Animals presumed to be heterozygous for the mutant allele have cysts originating from the temporal ciliary body, peripheral retina and/or iris. In contrast, animals predicted to be homozygous for the disease-causing allele possess a wide range of multiple abnormalities, including iridociliary and/or peripheral retinal cysts, iridocorneal angle abnormalities, cornea globosa, iris hypoplasia and congenital cataracts. MCOA is most common in the Rocky Mountain horse breed where it occurs at a high frequency among Silver colored horses. The Silver coat color is associated with mutations in PMEL17 that resides on ECA6q23. To map the MCOA locus we analyzed 11 genetic markers on ECA6q and herein describe a chromosome interval for the MCOA locus. Results We performed linkage analysis within 17 paternal half-sib families of the Rocky Mountain horse breed. More than half of the 131 offspring had the Cyst phenotype and about one third had MCOA. Segregation data were obtained by genotyping 10 microsatellite markers most of which are positioned on ECA6q22-23, as well as the missense mutation for the Silver phenotype in PMEL17. Significant linkage was found between the MCOA locus and eight of the genetic markers, where marker UPP5 (Theta = 0, z = 12.3, PMEL17ex11 (Theta = 0, z = 19.0 and UPP6 (Theta = 0, z = 17.5 showed complete linkage with the MCOA locus. DNA sequencing of PMEL17 in affected and healthy control individuals did not reveal any additional mutations than the two mutations associated with the Silver coat color. Conclusion The MCOA locus can with high confidence be positioned within a 4.9 megabase (Mb interval on ECA6q. The genotype data on UPP5, PMEL17ex11 and UPP6 strongly support

  3. A unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17)(q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Contiguous gene or microdeletion syndromes occurring on chromosome 17p include the Smith-Magenis and Miller-Dieker syndromes associated with interstitial deletions of 17p11.2 and 17p13.3, respectively. Other cytogenetically visible interstitial deletions on chromosome 17 are quite rare or unique. We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 [del(17)(q23.2q24.3)] who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. We have compared our patient`s phenotype and karyotype to two reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap. The most striking clinical features of this patient were severe intrauterine growth retardation, widespread skeletal malformations (split sutures, hypoplastic acetabulae and scapulae, vertebral anomalies, and digital hypoplasia), cutis verticis gyrata, dysmorphic facial features, and oropharyngeal malformations (absent uvula and submucous cleft palate). Mild congenital heart disease and anomalous optic nerves were also present. Parental karyotyps were normal. DNA from parents and patient has been collected and cell lines established on both parents. Genes which have been previously mapped to the region that is apparently deleted in this patient include: chorionic somatomammotropin A, growth hormone (normal), acid alpha-glucosidase, apolipoprotein H, and the alpha peptide of type 4 voltage gated sodium channel. As in other clinical cytogenetic syndromes, further descriptions of patients with similar or overlapping rearrangements in this region will be necessary to delineate genotype/phenotype correlations for chromosome 17.

  4. 35-Year Follow-Up of a Case of Ring Chromosome 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarri, Catherine; Douzgou, Sofia; Kontos, Haris;

    2015-01-01

    Côté et al. [1981] suggested that ring chromosomes with or without deletions share a common pattern of phenotypic anomalies, regardless of which chromosome is involved. The phenotype of this 'general ring syndrome' consists of growth failure without malformations, few or no minor anomalies, and m...

  5. Syndromal frontonasal dysostosis in a child with a complex translocation involving chromosomes 3, 7, and 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, C A; Qumsiyeh, M B

    1995-02-13

    We report on a 4-year-old boy with typical frontonasal dysostosis and an apparently balanced de novo translocation involving chromosomes 3, 7, and 11, and four breakpoints. The karyotype was 46,XY,t(7;3)(3;11) (7pter-->7q21.3::3q27-->3qter;3pter-->3 q23::11q21-->11qter; 11pter-->11q21::3q23-->3q27::7q21.3-->7 qter). In situ hybridization with a chromosome 3 painting probe confirmed the interpretation from GTG banding. The child had a widow's peak, marked hypertelorism, absence of the nasal tip, and widely separated nares. He also had an atrial septal defect, micropenis, small testes, clubfeet, scoliosis, block C2-4, and structural brain abnormalities on MRI. In review we found two other cases of frontonasal dysostosis with chromosome abnormalities, neither of which was similar to our case. The presence of a de novo (apparently) balanced translocation in our patient may help to locate the gene(s) for frontonasal dysplasia and perhaps other midline craniofacial malformations.

  6. Left ventricular noncompaction: a rare disorder in adults and its association with 1p36 chromosomal anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dod, Harvinder S; Bhardwaj, Ravindra; Hummel, Marybeth; Morise, Anthony P; Batish, Satdev; Warden, Bradford E; Beto, Robert J; Jain, Abnash C

    2010-01-01

    We report on a case of a 25-year-old male with 1p36 deletion syndrome, who was diagnosed with left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). The association of this rare chromosomal abnormality with LVNC is reported in the pediatric literature, but it has not previously been specifically reported in adults. It is important to diagnose this unclassified cardiomyopathy in the adult population with this chromosomal abnormality for appropriate management and treatment as highlighted in our case.

  7. Cryptic mosaicism involving a second chromosome X in patients with Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Araújo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The high abortion rate of 45,X embryos indicates that patients with Turner syndrome and 45,X karyotype could be mosaics, in at least one phase of embryo development or cellular lineage, due to the need for the other sex chromosome presence for conceptus to be compatible with life. In cases of structural chromosomal aberrations or hidden mosaicism, conventional cytogenetic techniques can be ineffective and molecular investigation is indicated. Two hundred and fifty patients with Turner syndrome stigmata were studied and 36 who had female genitalia and had been cytogenetically diagnosed as having "pure" 45,X karyotype were selected after 100 metaphases were analyzed in order to exclude mosaicism and the presence of genomic Y-specific sequences (SRY, TSPY, and DAZ was excluded by PCR. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and screened by the human androgen receptor (HUMARA assay. The HUMARA gene has a polymorphic CAG repeat and, in the presence of a second chromosome with a different HUMARA allele, a second band will be amplified by PCR. Additionally, the CAG repeats contain two methylation-sensitive HpaII enzyme restriction sites, which can be used to verify skewed inactivation. Twenty-five percent (9/36 of the cases showed a cryptic mosaicism involving a second X and approximately 14% (5/36, or 55% (5/9 of the patients with cryptic mosaicism, also presented skewed inactivation. The laboratory identification of the second X chromosome and its inactivation pattern are important for the clinical management (hormone replacement therapy, and inclusion in an oocyte donation program and prognostic counseling of patients with Turner syndrome.

  8. Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly and Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome: clinical, molecular-cytogenetic, and DNA array analyses of three patients with chromosomal defects at 6p25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonoki, Hidefumi; Harada, Naoki; Shimokawa, Osamu; Yosozumi, Ayako; Monzaki, Kadomi; Satoh, Kohei; Kosaki, Rika; Sato, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Iizuka, Susumu

    2011-12-01

    Clinical phenotypes of and genetic aberrations in three unrelated Japanese patients with Axenfeld-Rieger anomalies and various accompanying malformations of systemic organs are described. GTG-banded chromosome analysis showed terminal deletions of the short arm of chromosome 6 in two patients and an inversion, inv(6)(p25q14), in the other. FISH and DNA array analyses revealed that the two patients with deletions had 5.0-5.7 Mb and 6.6 Mb 6p terminal deletions, respectively, and FOXC1 was apparently deleted in both patients. In the other patient, the inversion breakpoint at 6p25 was estimated to be in or very close to the FOXC1 locus, but DNA array analysis did not reveal a deletion around the breakpoint. Common extraocular findings in these patients included broad forehead, brachycephaly, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, small anteverted nose, and cardiac defects. Two patients also exhibited autistic characteristics. The two patients with deletions exhibited poor muscle tone and developmental delays. Most of these extraocular findings were similar to those found in previous patients with FOXC1 mutations and distinct from those found in patients with PITX2 mutations, who frequently develop umbilical and dental anomalies. We suggest that the psychomotor retardation is a clinical manifestation associated with a deletion of multiple contiguous genes in the 6p terminus and that this phenomenon is similar to the 6p25 deletion syndrome. Understanding the relationship between genetic lesions and the spectrum of extraocular findings in patients with Axenfeld-Rieger anomalies may lead to better clinical management. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The nucleoporin Mlp2 is involved in chromosomal distribution during mitosis in trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelle, Christelle; Sterkers, Yvon; Crobu, Lucien; MBang-Benet, Diane-Ethna; Kuk, Nada; Portalès, Pierre; Bastien, Patrick; Pagès, Michel; Lachaud, Laurence

    2015-04-30

    Nucleoporins are evolutionary conserved proteins mainly involved in the constitution of the nuclear pores and trafficking between the nucleus and cytoplasm, but are also increasingly viewed as main actors in chromatin dynamics and intra-nuclear mitotic events. Here, we determined the cellular localization of the nucleoporin Mlp2 in the 'divergent' eukaryotes Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei. In both protozoa, Mlp2 displayed an atypical localization for a nucleoporin, essentially intranuclear, and preferentially in the periphery of the nucleolus during interphase; moreover, it relocated at the mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. In T. brucei, where most centromeres have been identified, TbMlp2 was found adjacent to the centromeric sequences, as well as to a recently described unconventional kinetochore protein, in the periphery of the nucleolus, during interphase and from the end of anaphase onwards. TbMlp2 and the centromeres/kinetochores exhibited a differential migration towards the poles during mitosis. RNAi knockdown of TbMlp2 disrupted the mitotic distribution of chromosomes, leading to a surprisingly well-tolerated aneuploidy. In addition, diploidy was restored in a complementation assay where LmMlp2, the orthologue of TbMlp2 in Leishmania, was expressed in TbMlp2-RNAi-knockdown parasites. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Mlp2 is involved in the distribution of chromosomes during mitosis in trypanosomatids.

  10. Activation of Holliday junction recognizing protein involved in the chromosomal stability and immortality of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tatsuya; Sato, Nagato; Hayama, Satoshi; Yamabuki, Takumi; Ito, Tomoo; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Daigo, Yataro

    2007-09-15

    We identified a novel gene HJURP (Holliday junction-recognizing protein) whose activation seemed to play a pivotal role in the immortality of cancer cells. HJURP was considered a possible downstream target for ataxia telangiectasia mutated signaling, and its expression was increased by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). HJURP was involved in the homologous recombination pathway in the DSB repair process through interaction with hMSH5 and NBS1, which is a part of the MRN protein complex. HJURP formed nuclear foci in cells at S phase and those subjected to DNA damage. In vitro assays implied that HJURP bound directly to the Holliday junction and rDNA arrays. Treatment of cancer cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against HJURP caused abnormal chromosomal fusions and led to genomic instability and senescence. In addition, HJURP overexpression was observed in a majority of lung cancers and was associated with poor prognosis as well. We suggest that HJURP is an indispensable factor for chromosomal stability in immortalized cancer cells and is a potential novel therapeutic target for the development of anticancer drugs.

  11. Tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism of the SRY gene in patients with sex chromosome anomalies and males exposed to natural background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premi, Sanjay; Srivastava, Jyoti; Chandy, Sebastian Padinjarel; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2006-02-01

    Mutations in the SRY gene encompassing the HMG box have been well characterized in gonadal dysgenesis, male infertility and other types of sex chromosome related anomalies (SCRA). However, no information is available on copy number status of this gene under such abnormal conditions. Employing 'Taqman Probe Assay' specific to the SRY gene, we screened 16 DNA samples from patients with SCRA and 36 samples from males exposed to high levels of natural background radiation (HNBR). Patients with SCRA showed 2-16 copies of the SRY gene of which, one, Oxen (49, XYYYY) had eight copies with sequences different from one another. Of the 36 HNBR samples, 12 had one copy whereas 24 harboured 2-8 copies of the SRY gene. A HNBR male 33F had one normal and one mutated copy of this gene. Analysis of 25 DNA samples from blood and semen of normal males showed only one copy of this gene. Despite multiple copies in affected males, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with SRY probe detected a single signal on the Y chromosome in HNBR males suggesting its possible localized tandem duplication. Copy number status of the other Y-linked loci is envisaged to augment DNA diagnostics facilitating genetic counselling to affected patients.

  12. The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization in the diagnosis of hidden mosaicism: apropos of three cases of sex chromosome anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel-Guerra, Andréa Trevas; Paulo, Juliana De; Santos, Ana Paula; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme; Andrade, Juliana Gabriel Ribeiro; Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Guerra-Júnior, Gil

    2012-11-01

    FISH has been used as a complement to classical cytogenetics in the detection of mosaicism in sex chromosome anomalies. The aim of this study is to describe three cases in which the final diagnosis could only be achieved by FISH. Case 1 was an 8-year-old 46,XY girl with normal female genitalia referred to our service because of short stature. FISH analysis of lymphocytes with probes for the X and Y centromeres identified a 45,X/46,X,idic(Y) constitution, and established the diagnosis of Turner syndrome. Case 2 was a 21-month-old 46,XY boy with genital ambiguity (penile hypospadias, right testis, and left streak gonad). FISH analysis of lymphocytes and buccal smear identified a 45,X/46,XY karyotype, leading to diagnosis of mixed gonadal dysgenesis. Case 3 was a 47,XYY 19-year-old boy with delayed neuromotor development, learning disabilities, psychological problems, tall stature, small testes, elevated gonadotropins, and azoospermia. FISH analysis of lymphocytes and buccal smear identified a 47,XYY/48,XXYY constitution. Cases 1 and 2 illustrate the phenotypic variability of the 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, and the importance of detection of the 45,X cell line for proper management and follow-up. In case 3, abnormal gonadal function could be explained by the 48,XXYY cell line. The use of FISH in clinical practice is particularly relevant when classical cytogenetic analysis yields normal or uncertain results in patients with features of sex chromosome aneuploidy.

  13. Chromosome alterations in breast carcinomas: frequent involvement of DNA losses including chromosomes 4q and 21q.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendel, A.; Richard, F.; Langreck, H.; Kaufmann, O.; Lage, H.; Winzer, K.J.; Petersen, I; Dietel, M

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to map DNA gains and losses in 39 invasive ductal breast carcinomas. Frequent abnormalities included gains on chromosomal regions 1q, 8q, 11q12-13, 16p, 19, 20q and X as well as frequent losses on 1p, 5q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 13q and 16q. Furthermore, frequent losses on 4q (20 cases) and 21q (14 cases) were found for the first time in this tumour type. High copy number amplifications were observed at 8q12-24, 11q11-13 and 20q13-ter. Highly differentiated ...

  14. Involvement of regions of the 4th and 7th chromosomes in the open-field activity of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Y; Martin, B; Venault, P; Chapouthier, G

    1995-09-01

    Reactivity to a new environment was studied in mice, using an open-field procedure in two strains, C57BL/6By and ABP/Le, the F1 populations and the intercrosses F2 and backcross segregating populations. The analysis of the behavioral traits: peripheral and central activities, leaning, rearing and defecation in the parental strains made it possible to show that the ABP/Le strain was more reactive than C57BL/6By. In addition, the study of segregating, for four phenotypic markers, in F2 and backcross populations strongly suggested that two autosomal regions were involved in the control of open-field behavior: one in chromosomal region comprising the b locus on chromosome 4 and one in chromosomal region comprising the p locus on chromosome 7.

  15. Chromosome segregation analysis in human embryos obtained from couples involving male carriers of reciprocal or Robertsonian translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yilmaz

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of chromosome segregation patterns in cleavage stage embryos obtained from male carriers of Robertsonian (ROB and reciprocal (REC translocations undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD at our reproductive center. We used FISH to analyze chromosome segregation in 308 day 3 cleavage stage embryos obtained from 26 patients. The percentage of embryos consistent with normal or balanced segregation (55.1% vs. 27.1% and clinical pregnancy (62.5% vs. 19.2% rates were higher in ROB than the REC translocation carriers. Involvement of non-acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s in reciprocal translocations was associated with an increase in the percent of embryos consistent with adjacent 1 but with a decrease in 3∶1 segregation. Similar results were obtained in the analysis of nontransferred embryos donated for research. 3∶1 segregation was the most frequent segregation type in both day 3 (31% and spare (35% embryos obtained from carriers of t(11;22(q23;q11, the only non-random REC with the same breakpoint reported in a large number of unrelated families mainly identified by the birth of a child with derivative chromosome 22. These results suggest that chromosome segregation patterns in day 3 and nontransferred embryos obtained from male translocation carriers vary with the type of translocation and involvement of acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s. These results should be helpful in estimating reproductive success in translocation carriers undergoing PGD.

  16. Fragile X syndrome and an isodicentric X chromosome in a woman with multiple anomalies, developmental delay, and normal pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, D L; Gane, L W; Richards, C S; Lampe, M; Hills, J; O'Connor, R; Manchester, D; Taylor, A; Tassone, F; Hulseberg, D; Hagerman, R J; Patil, S R

    1999-07-30

    We report on an individual with developmental delays, short stature, skeletal abnormalities, normal pubertal development, expansion of the fragile X triplet repeat, as well as an isodicentric X chromosome. S is a 19-year-old woman who presented for evaluation of developmental delay. Pregnancy was complicated by a threatened miscarriage. She was a healthy child with intellectual impairment noted in infancy. Although she had global delays, speech was noted to be disproportionately delayed with few words until age 3.5 years. Facial appearance was consistent with fragile X syndrome. Age of onset of menses was 11 years with normal breast development. A maternal male second cousin had been identified with fragile X syndrome based on DNA studies. The mother of this child (S's maternal first cousin) and the grandfather (S's maternal uncle) were both intellectually normal but were identified as carrying triplet expansions in the premutation range. S's mother had some school difficulties but was not identified as having global delays. Molecular analysis of S's fragile X alleles noted an expansion of more than 400 CGG repeats in one allele. Routine cytogenetic studies of peripheral blood noted the presence of an isodicentric X in 81of 86 cells scored. Five of 86 cells were noted to be 45,X. Cytogenetic fra(X) studies from peripheral blood showed that the structurally normal chromosome had the fragile site in approximately 16% of the cells. Analysis of maternal fragile X alleles identified an allele with an expansion to approximately 110 repeats. FMRP studies detected the expression of the protein in 24% of cells studied. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with an isodicentric X and fragile X syndrome. Whereas her clinical phenotype is suggestive of fragile X syndrome, her skeletal abnormalities may represent the presence of the isodicentric X. Treatment of S with 20 mg/day of Prozac improved her behavior. In the climate of cost con trol, this individual

  17. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular outcomes in a series of 66 patients with Pierre Robin sequence and literature review: 22q11.2 deletion is less common than other chromosomal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-04-01

    Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is an important craniofacial anomaly that can be seen as an isolated finding or manifestation of multiple syndromes. 22q11.2 deletion and Stickler syndrome are cited as the two most common conditions associated with PRS, but their frequencies are debated. We performed a retrospective study of 66 patients with PRS and reviewed their genetic testing, diagnoses, and clinical findings. The case series is complemented by a comprehensive literature review of the nature and frequency of genetic diagnosis in PRS. In our cohort 65% of patients had associated anomalies; of these, a genetic diagnosis was established in 56%. Stickler syndrome was the most common diagnosis, comprising approximately 11% of all cases, followed by Treacher Collins syndrome (9%). The frequency of 22q11.2 deletion was 1.5%. Chromosome arrays, performed for 72% of idiopathic PRS with associated anomalies, revealed two cases of 18q22→qter deletion, a region not previously reported in association with PRS. A review of the cytogenetic anomalies identified in this population supports an association between the 4q33-qter, 17q24.3, 2q33.1, and 11q23 chromosomal loci and PRS. We found a low frequency of 22q11.2 deletion in PRS, suggesting it is less commonly implicated in this malformation. Our data also indicate a higher frequency of cytogenetic anomalies in PRS patients with associated anomalies, and a potential new link with the 18q22→qter locus. The present findings underscore the utility of chromosomal microarrays in cases of PRS with associated anomalies and suggest that delaying testing for apparently isolated cases should be considered.

  18. Robertsonian rearrangements in the reef fish Chromis (Perciformes, Pomacentridae involving chromosomes bearing 5s rRNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner F. Molina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic studies were done on three Pomacentridae species of the genus Chromis. The karyotype of C. multilineata consisted of 48 acrocentric chromosomes (FN = 48, C. insolata had 2n = 46-47 (3-4M+6SM+36-38A; FN = 56 and C. flavicauda had 2n = 39 (9M+6SM+24A; FN = 54. Robertsonian polymorphisms were detected in C. insolata and C. flavicauda. All three species had small heterochromatic blocks restricted to centromeric regions. Nucleolar organizer regions (NORs were detected in the telomeric position of a medium acrocentric chromosome pair in C. multilineata and in non-homologous chromosomes in both C. flavicauda and C. insolata. FISH with a telomeric probe detected no internal telomeric sequences in C. flavicauda and C. insolata. 5S rRNA genes were observed in a pericentromeric region of two large metacentric chromosome pairs in C. flavicauda and two large acrocentric pairs in C. insolata. The karyotype structure and the number and location of the 5S rDNA loci in these two species indicated that the 5S rRNA-bearing acrocentric chromosomes were directly involved in the origin of the polymorphisms observed. These data reinforce the idea that Robertsonian rearrangements have been involved in molding the karyotype in the subfamily Chrominae.

  19. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J. [INSERM, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  1. The human chromosomal fragile sites more often involved in constitutional deletions and duplications - A genetic and statistical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dora Prata; Sequeira, Inês J.; Figueiredo, Carlos; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2016-12-01

    Human chromosomal fragile sites (CFSs) are heritable loci or regions of the human chromosomes prone to exhibit gaps, breaks and rearrangements. Determining the frequency of deletions and duplications in CFSs may contribute to explain the occurrence of human disease due to those rearrangements. In this study we analyzed the frequency of deletions and duplications in each human CFS. Statistical methods, namely data display, descriptive statistics and linear regression analysis were applied to analyze this dataset. We found that FRA15C, FRA16A and FRAXB are the most frequently involved CFSs in deletions and duplications occurring in the human genome.

  2. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the male-specific lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Philge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. Results We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Conclusions Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  3. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the Male-Specific Lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philge; Pettersson, Fredrik; Stenberg, Per

    2012-03-19

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s) and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL) complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs) and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  4. Preferential response of acute myeloid leukemias with translocation involving chromosome 17 to human recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pébusque, M J; Lafage, M; Lopez, M; Mannoni, P

    1988-07-01

    Induction of proliferation and differentiation in response to the addition of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was studied by both suspension and semisolid cultures in a series of acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Induction of proliferation by G-CSF alone was observed in six of 27 cases of AML. All acute promyelocytic leukemias with the specific chromosomal translocation t(15;17) and one case of myelomonocytic leukemia with balanced chromosomal translocation involving chromosome 17 at band q12q21 were induced to proliferate strongly by the G-CSF. However, contrary to the long-term proliferative effect observed with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), G-CSF activity can be characterized by its capability to initiate and promote the growth of responding AML cells but not to sustain long-term proliferation. Finally, no terminal differentiation was found, as assessed by morphology, cytochemistry, and cell surface marker analysis. These results indicate that G-CSF may be sufficient to provide a specific signal for induction of a transient proliferation in AML without induction of terminal differentiation. The cells with the highest response are clonal leukemia cells, all bearing a translocation involving the chromosome region 17q12q21 in which the G-CSF gene has been recently located.

  5. Correlation between missed abortion and insertional translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Husseiny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Missed abortion (Silent miscarriage is defined as intrauterine fetal death before twenty weeks gestation. One of the most common causes of early missed abortions (before 10 weeks gestation is cytogenetic abnormalities. Objective: To asses if there is a correlation between chromosomal aberrations (especially in chromosome 7 and missed abortion among at least two generations.Materials and Methods: After exclusion of direct causes of missed abortion, this study included 60 women (the study group who had first trimestric missed abortion and 30 healthy women who did not suffer from any diseases during their pregnancy and had apparently normal outcome (the control group. All cases were diagnosed; the blood and tissue samples were collected from the mothers and abortuses from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternity Hospital, Ain Shams University. Cytogenetic analyses were performed by using conventional technique and G/T banding techniques and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH analysis with a whole chromosome 7 painting probe (WCP7 and a 7q subterminal probe (7q36, qter, prepared by chromosome micro dissection technique was used for confirming the specific chromosomal abnormality.

  6. A new function of microtubule-associated protein tau: involvement in chromosome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giacomina; Dalprà, Leda; Crosti, Francesca; Lissoni, Sara; Sciacca, Francesca L; Catania, Marcella; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Mangieri, Michela; Giaccone, Giorgio; Croci, Danilo; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2008-06-15

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that promotes assembly and stabilization of cytoskeleton microtubules. It is mostly expressed in neuronal and glial cells but it is also present in non-neural cells such as fibroblasts and lymphocytes. An altered tau produces cytoskeleton pathology resulting in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies. Tau has been suggested to be a multifunctional protein, due to its localization in different cellular compartments. However its further functions are still unclear. We analyzed the distribution of tau in human skin fibroblasts showing its localization in the nucleus and along mitotic chromosomes. Then, we investigated if an altered tau, such as the P301L mutated protein associated with frontotemporal dementia, could produce nuclear pathology. We found that patients carrying the mutation consistently had several chromosome aberrations in their fibroblasts and lymphocytes: chromosome and chromatid breakages or gaps, aneuploidies, translocations, in addition to chromatin bridges and decondensed chromosomes. Our findings argue for a role of tau in chromosome stability by means of its interaction with both microtubules and chromatin.

  7. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Daza Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R. One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species.

  8. A novel cell line derived from pleomorphic adenoma expresses MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1, TIMP2, and shows numeric chromosomal anomalies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Semblano Carreira Falcão

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common salivary gland neoplasm, and it can be locally invasive, despite its slow growth. This study aimed to establish a novel cell line (AP-1 derived from a human pleomorphic adenoma sample to better understand local invasiveness of this tumor. AP-1 cell line was characterized by cell growth analysis, expression of epithelial and myoepithelial markers by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, 3D cell culture assays, cytogenetic features and transcriptomic study. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs was also analyzed by immunofluorescence and zymography. Furthermore, epithelial and myoepithelial markers, MMPs and TIMPs were studied in the tumor that originated the cell line. AP-1 cells showed neoplastic epithelial and myoepithelial markers, such as cytokeratins, vimentin, S100 protein and smooth-muscle actin. These molecules were also found in vivo, in the tumor that originated the cell line. MMPs and TIMPs were observed in vivo and in AP-1 cells. Growth curve showed that AP-1 exhibited a doubling time of 3.342 days. AP-1 cells grown inside Matrigel recapitulated tumor architecture. Different numerical and structural chromosomal anomalies were visualized in cytogenetic analysis. Transcriptomic analysis addressed expression of 7 target genes (VIM, TIMP2, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1, ACTA2 e PLAG1. Results were compared to transcriptomic profile of non-neoplastic salivary gland cells (HSG. Only MMP9 was not expressed in both libraries, and VIM was expressed solely in AP-1 library. The major difference regarding gene expression level between AP-1 and HSG samples occurred for MMP2. This gene was 184 times more expressed in AP-1 cells. Our findings suggest that AP-1 cell line could be a useful model for further studies on pleomorphic adenoma biology.

  9. A novel cell line derived from pleomorphic adenoma expresses MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1, TIMP2, and shows numeric chromosomal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Aline Semblano Carreira; Kataoka, Maria Sueli da Silva; Ribeiro, Nélson Antonio Bailão; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Alves, Sérgio Melo; Ribeiro, André L Ribeiro; de Siqueira, Adriane Sousa; da Silva, Artur Luiz; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Freitas, Vanessa M; Jaeger, Ruy G; Pinheiro, João J V

    2014-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common salivary gland neoplasm, and it can be locally invasive, despite its slow growth. This study aimed to establish a novel cell line (AP-1) derived from a human pleomorphic adenoma sample to better understand local invasiveness of this tumor. AP-1 cell line was characterized by cell growth analysis, expression of epithelial and myoepithelial markers by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, 3D cell culture assays, cytogenetic features and transcriptomic study. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) was also analyzed by immunofluorescence and zymography. Furthermore, epithelial and myoepithelial markers, MMPs and TIMPs were studied in the tumor that originated the cell line. AP-1 cells showed neoplastic epithelial and myoepithelial markers, such as cytokeratins, vimentin, S100 protein and smooth-muscle actin. These molecules were also found in vivo, in the tumor that originated the cell line. MMPs and TIMPs were observed in vivo and in AP-1 cells. Growth curve showed that AP-1 exhibited a doubling time of 3.342 days. AP-1 cells grown inside Matrigel recapitulated tumor architecture. Different numerical and structural chromosomal anomalies were visualized in cytogenetic analysis. Transcriptomic analysis addressed expression of 7 target genes (VIM, TIMP2, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1, ACTA2 e PLAG1). Results were compared to transcriptomic profile of non-neoplastic salivary gland cells (HSG). Only MMP9 was not expressed in both libraries, and VIM was expressed solely in AP-1 library. The major difference regarding gene expression level between AP-1 and HSG samples occurred for MMP2. This gene was 184 times more expressed in AP-1 cells. Our findings suggest that AP-1 cell line could be a useful model for further studies on pleomorphic adenoma biology.

  10. Microdeletions involving chromosomes 12 and 22 associated with syndromic Duane retraction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Kondkar, Altaf A; Oystreck, Darren T; Khan, Arif O; Bosley, Thomas M

    2014-09-01

    Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) is the most common of the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs). CCDDs can be monogenic or chromosomal in origin. Identification of the genetic cause(s) in patients and families with DRS facilitates definitive diagnosis and provides insights into these developmental errors. This study described a young girl with DRS on the left and several additional developmental abnormalities. Clinical examination including neuroimaging, sequencing of candidate genes associated with DRS, and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) were performed. The proband had unilateral DRS type 3 on the left with somewhat low-set ears, mild motor delay with normal intelligence, and an asymmetric neck without a palpable right sternocleidomastoid muscle. Spine X-rays revealed a Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) and an MRI showed a webbed neck. She also had spina bifida at C8-T1 and a submucosal cleft palate. The parents of the proband were related with no other family member affected similarly. Sequencing of SALL4, CHN1, HOXA1, and TUBB3 did not show any mutation. Array CGH revealed de novo deletions of 21 Kb on chromosome 12q24.31 and 11 Kb on chromosome 22q13.31, each encompassing only one gene, ring finger protein 34, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (RNF34) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA) respectively. This patient presents an unusual phenotype associated with a unique combination of two chromosomal microdeletions.

  11. Characterization of a Complex Chromosomal Rearrangement Involving a de novo Duplication of 9p and 9q and a Deletion of 9q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-De Saro, Mónica D; Valdés-Miranda, Juan M; Plaza-Benhumea, Lautaro; Pérez-Cabrera, Adrián; Gonzalez-Huerta, Luz M; Guevara-Yañez, Roberto; Cuevas-Covarrubias, Sergio A

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangements of the distal region of 9p are important chromosome imbalances in human beings. Trisomy 9p is the fourth most frequent chromosome anomaly and is a clinically recognizable syndrome. Kleefstra syndrome, previously named 9q subtelomeric deletion syndrome, is either caused by a submicroscopic deletion in 9q34.3 or an intragenic mutation of EHMT1. We report a Mexican male patient with abnormal development, dysmorphism, systemic anomalies and a complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR). GTG-banding revealed a 46,XY,add(9)(q34.3) karyotype, whereas array analysis resulted in arr[hg19] 9p24.3p23(203,861-11,842,172)×3, 9q34.3(138,959,881-139,753,294)×3, 9q34.3(139,784,913-141,020,389)×1. Array and karyotype analyses were normal in both parents. Partial duplication of 9p is one of the most commonly detected autosomal structural abnormalities in liveborn infants. A microdeletion in 9q34.3 corresponds to Kleefstra syndrome, whereas a microduplication in 9q34.3 shows a great clinical variability. Here, we present a CCR in a patient with multiple congenital anomalies who represents the first case with partial 9p trisomy, partial 9q trisomy and partial 9q monosomy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Genomic hallmarks of genes involved in chromosomal translocations in hematological cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Shugay

    Full Text Available Reciprocal chromosomal translocations (RCTs leading to the formation of fusion genes are important drivers of hematological cancers. Although the general requirements for breakage and fusion are fairly well understood, quantitative support for a general mechanism of RCT formation is still lacking. The aim of this paper is to analyze available high-throughput datasets with computational and robust statistical methods, in order to identify genomic hallmarks of translocation partner genes (TPGs. Our results show that fusion genes are generally overexpressed due to increased promoter activity of 5' TPGs and to more stable 3'-UTR regions of 3' TPGs. Furthermore, expression profiling of 5' TPGs and of interaction partners of 3' TPGs indicates that these features can help to explain tissue specificity of hematological translocations. Analysis of protein domains retained in fusion proteins shows that the co-occurrence of specific domain combinations is non-random and that distinct functional classes of fusion proteins tend to be associated with different components of the gene fusion network. This indicates that the configuration of fusion proteins plays an important role in determining which 5' and 3' TPGs will combine in specific fusion genes. It is generally accepted that chromosomal proximity in the nucleus can explain the specific pairing of 5' and 3' TPGS and the recurrence of hematological translocations. Using recently available data for chromosomal contact probabilities (Hi-C we show that TPGs are preferentially located in early replicated regions and occupy distinct clusters in the nucleus. However, our data suggest that, in general, nuclear position of TPGs in hematological cancers explains neither TPG pairing nor clinical frequency. Taken together, our results support a model in which genomic features related to regulation of expression and replication timing determine the set of candidate genes more likely to be translocated in

  13. Nonreciprocal chromosomal translocations in renal cancer involve multiple DSBs and NHEJ associated with breakpoint inversion but not necessarily with transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hanif; Daser, Angelika; Dear, Paul; Wood, Henry; Rabbitts, Pamela; Rabbitts, Terence

    2013-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations and other abnormalities are central to the initiation of cancer in all cell types. Understanding the mechanism is therefore important to evaluate the evolution of cancer from the cancer initiating events to overt disease. Recent work has concentrated on model systems to develop an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of translocations but naturally occurring events are more ideal case studies since biological selection is absent from model systems. In solid tumours, nonreciprocal translocations are most commonly found, and accordingly we have investigated the recurrent nonreciprocal t(3;5) chromosomal translocations in renal carcinoma to better understand the mechanism of these naturally occurring translocations in cancer. Unexpectedly, the junctions of these translocations can be associated with site-specific, intrachromosomal inversion involving at least two double strand breaks (DSB) in cis and rejoining by nonhomologous end joining or micro-homology end joining. However, these translocations are not necessarily associated with transcribed regions questioning accessibility per se in controlling these events. In addition, intrachromosomal deletions also occur. We conclude these naturally occurring, nonreciprocal t(3;5) chromosomal translocations occur after complex and multiple unresolved intrachromosomal DSBs leading to aberrant joining with concurrent interstitial inversion and that clonal selection of cells is the critical element in cancer development emerging from a plethora of DSBs that may not always be pathogenic.

  14. Aneugenic potential of the anticancer drugs melphalan and chlorambucil. The involvement of apoptosis and chromosome segregation regulating proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, Maria; Stephanou, Georgia; Demopoulos, Nikos A; Nikolaropoulos, Sotiris S

    2013-07-01

    Previous findings showed that the anticancer drugs p-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl) amino-l-phenylalanine (melphalan, MEL) and p-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)aminophenylbutyric acid (chlorambucil, CAB) belonging to the nitrogen mustard group, in addition to their clastogenic activity, also exert aneugenic potential, nondisjunction and chromosome delay. Their aneugenic potential is mainly mediated through centrosome defects. To further investigate their aneugenicity we (a) studied whether apoptosis is a mechanism responsible for the elimination of damaged cells generated by MEL and CAB and (b) investigated if proteins that regulate chromosome segregation are involved in the modulation of their aneugenic potential. Apoptosis was studied by Annexin-V/Propidium Iodide staining and fluorescence microscopy. The involvement of apoptosis on the exclusion of cells with genetic damage and centrosome disturbances was analyzed by DAPI staining and immunofluorescence of β- and γ-tubulin in the presence of pan-caspase inhibitor. The expressions of Aurora-A, Aurora-B, survivin and γ-tubulin were studied by western blot. We found that (a) apoptosis is not the mechanism of choice for selectively eliminating cells with supernumerary centrosomes, and (b) the proteins Aurora-A, Aurora-B and survivin are involved in the modulation of MEL and CAB aneugenicity. These findings are important for the understanding of the mechanism responsible for the aneugenic activity of the anticancer drugs melphalan and chlorambucil. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Systematic Triple-Mutant Analysis Uncovers Functional Connectivity between Pathways Involved in Chromosome Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Haber

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions reveal the functional relationships between pairs of genes. In this study, we describe a method for the systematic generation and quantitation of triple mutants, termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA. We have used this approach to interrogate partially redundant pairs of genes in S. cerevisiae, including ASF1 and CAC1, two histone chaperones. After subjecting asf1Δ cac1Δ to TMA, we found that the Swi/Snf Rdh54 protein compensates for the absence of Asf1 and Cac1. Rdh54 more strongly associates with the chromatin apparatus and the pericentromeric region in the double mutant. Moreover, Asf1 is responsible for the synthetic lethality observed in cac1Δ strains lacking the HIRA-like proteins. A similar TMA was carried out after deleting both CLB5 and CLB6, cyclins that regulate DNA replication, revealing a strong functional connection to chromosome segregation. This approach can reveal functional redundancies that cannot be uncovered through traditional double-mutant analyses.

  16. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Pan

    Full Text Available Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs, which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques.

  17. Involvement of condensin-directed gene associations in the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Osamu; Corcoran, Christopher J.; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes are not randomly disposed in the nucleus but instead occupy discrete sub-nuclear domains, referred to as chromosome territories. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of chromosome territories and how they are regulated during the cell cycle remain largely unknown. Here, we have developed two different chromosome-painting approaches to address how chromosome territories are organized in the fission yeast model organism. We show that condensin frequently associates RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (tRNA and 5S rRNA) that are present on the same chromosomes, and that the disruption of these associations by condensin mutations significantly compromises the chromosome territory arrangement. We also find that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal gene associations and chromosome territories are co-regulated during the cell cycle. For example, condensin-directed gene associations occur to the least degree during S phase, with the chromosomal overlap becoming largest. In clear contrast, condensin-directed gene associations become tighter in other cell-cycle phases, especially during mitosis, with the overlap between the different chromosomes being smaller. This study suggests that condensin-driven intra-chromosomal gene associations contribute to the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle. PMID:26704981

  18. A rare extramedullary involvement in myeloma: lung parenchyma and association with unfavorable chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Şahin Balçık

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although pulmonary complications developing secondary to lung infections and involvement in ribs occur frequently in multiple myeloma (MM, involvement of the lung parenchyma is quite rare. In clinical studies, the involvement of lung parenchyma has been found to be associated with unfavorable prognosis. Here, a MM case in whom involvement of lung parenchyma was accompanied by unfavorable prognostic cytogenetic markers is presented. A 62-year-old male presented with complaint of cough, and heterogeneous hypodense mass was detected in thorax computerized tomography. The patient underwent bronchoscopic biopsy. Pathological examination revealed diffuse plasma cell infiltration staining with kappa immunohistochemically. In bone marrow biopsy, plasma cell infiltration was observed. In conventional cytogenetic examination, hypodiploidy was established. In cytogenetic examination carried out with fluorescence in situ hybridization, deletion (13q was determined. In conclusion, in patients diagnosed with MM and presenting with pulmonary mass lesion, lung involvement associated with plasma cell infiltration should also be considered in the differential diagnosis. As overall survival is low in these cases, more aggressive treatment approaches such as high-dose treatment should be immediately considered.

  19. Aneuploidy involving chromosome 1 may be an early predictive marker of intestinal type gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L. [Royal Glamorgan Hospital, Ynysmaerdy, Llantrisant CF72 8XR (United Kingdom); Somasekar, A. [Institute of Life Science, Swansea School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea SA28PP (United Kingdom); Neath Port Talbot Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University NHS Trust, Baglan Way, Port Talbot SA12 7BX (United Kingdom); Davies, D.J.; Cronin, J.; Doak, S.H. [Institute of Life Science, Swansea School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea SA28PP (United Kingdom); Alcolado, R. [Royal Glamorgan Hospital, Ynysmaerdy, Llantrisant CF72 8XR (United Kingdom); Williams, J.G. [Neath Port Talbot Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University NHS Trust, Baglan Way, Port Talbot SA12 7BX (United Kingdom); Griffiths, A.P. [Department of Histopathology, Morriston Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University NHS Trust, Morriston, SA66NL (United Kingdom); Baxter, J.N. [Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University NHS Trust, Morriston, SA66NL (United Kingdom); Jenkins, G.J.S., E-mail: g.j.jenkins@swansea.ac.uk [Institute of Life Science, Swansea School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea SA28PP (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-02

    Intestinal type gastric cancer is a significant cause of mortality, therefore a better understanding of its molecular basis is required. We assessed if either aneuploidy or activity of the oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), increased incrementally during pre-malignant gastric histological progression and also if they correlated with each other in patient samples, as they are both induced by oxygen free radicals. In a prospective study of 54 (aneuploidy) and 59 (NF-{kappa}B) consecutive patients, aneuploidy was assessed by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for chromosome 1. NF-{kappa}B was assessed by expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), and in a subset, by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for active p65. Aneuploidy levels increased incrementally across the histological series. 2.76% of cells with normal histology (95% CI, 2.14-3.38%) showed background levels of aneuploidy, this increased to averages of 3.78% (95% CI, 3.21-4.35%), 5.89% (95% CI, 3.72-8.06%) and 7.29% (95% CI, 4.73-9.85%) of cells from patients with gastritis, Helicobacter pylori positive gastritis and atrophy/intestinal metaplasia (IM) respectively. IL-8 expression was only increased in patients with current H. pylori infection. NF-{kappa}B analysis showed some increased p65 activity in inflamed tissues. IL-8 expression and aneuploidy level were not linked in individual patients. Aneuploidy levels increased incrementally during histological progression; were significantly elevated at very early stages of neoplastic progression and could well be linked to cancer development and used to assess cancer risk. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced in early gastric cancer are presumably responsible for the stepwise accumulation of this particular mutation, i.e. aneuploidy. Hence, aneuploidy measured by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) coupled to brush cytology, would be worthy of consideration as a predictive marker in gastric cancer and could be

  20. Clinical correlation between premature ovarian failure and a chromosomal anomaly in a 22-year-old Caucasian woman: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'edera, Domenico; Tinelli, Andrea; Capozzi, Oronzo; Epifania, Annunziata Anna; Malvasi, Antonio; Lofrese, Dominga; Pacella, Elena; Milazzo, Giusi Natalia; Mazzone, Eleonora; Leo, Manuela; Rocchi, Mariano

    2012-10-29

    Premature ovarian failure is defined as the cessation of ovarian activity before the age of 40 years. It is biochemically characterized by low levels of gonadal hormones (estrogens and inhibins) and high levels of gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone). Our patient, a 22-year-old Caucasian woman under evaluation for infertility, had experienced secondary amenorrhea from the age of 18. No positive family history was noted regarding premature menopause. An examination of our patient's karyotype showed the presence of a reciprocal translocation, apparently balanced, which had the X chromosome long arm (q13) and the 14 chromosome short arm (p12) with consequent karyotype: 46, X, t(X; 14)(q13;p12). Our study has underlined that karyotyping is one of the fundamental investigations in the evaluation of amenorrhea. It highlighted a genetic etiology, in the form of a chromosomal abnormality, as the causal factor in amenorrhea.

  1. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Levi CT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer-specific recurrent translocations, we have examined 444 unique pairs of genes involved in these translocations to determine the correlation of translocation breakpoints and fragile sites in the gene pairs. We found that over half (52% of translocation breakpoints in at least one gene of these gene pairs are mapped to fragile sites. Among these, we examined the DNA sequences within and flanking three randomly selected pairs of translocation-prone genes, and found that they exhibit characteristic features of fragile DNA, with frequent AT-rich flexibility islands and the potential of forming highly stable secondary structures. Conclusion Our study is the first to examine gene pairs involved in all recurrent chromosomal translocations observed in tumor cells, and to correlate the location of more than half of breakpoints to positions of known fragile sites. These results provide strong evidence to support a causative role for fragile sites in the generation of cancer-specific chromosomal rearrangements.

  2. Prevalence of chromosomal rearrangements involving non-ETS genes in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Martina; Galal, Rami; Krohn, Antje; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Tsourlakis, Christina; Paustian, Lisa; Ahrary, Ramin; Ahmed, Malik; Scherzai, Sekander; Meyer, Anne; Sirma, Hüseyin; Korbel, Jan; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Simon, Ronald; Minner, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is characterized by structural rearrangements, most frequently including translocations between androgen-dependent genes and members of the ETS family of transcription factor like TMPRSS2:ERG. In a recent whole genome sequencing study we identified 140 gene fusions that were unrelated to ETS genes in 11 prostate cancers. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of non-ETS gene fusions. We randomly selected 27 of these rearrangements and analyzed them by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a tissue microarray format containing 500 prostate cancers. Using break-apart FISH probes for one fusion partner each, we found rearrangements of 13 (48%) of the 27 analyzed genes in 300-400 analyzable cancers per gene. Recurrent breakage, often accompanied by partial deletion of the genes, was found for NCKAP5, SH3BGR and TTC3 in 3 (0.8%) tumors each, as well as for ARNTL2 and ENOX1 in 2 (0.5%) cancers each. One rearranged tumor sample was observed for each of VCL, ZNF578, IMMP2L, SLC16A12, PANK1, GPHN, LRP1 and ZHX2. Balanced rearrangements, indicating possible gene fusion, were found for ZNF578, SH3BGR, LPR12 and ZHX2 in individual cancers only. The results of the present study confirm that rearrangements involving non-ETS genes occur in prostate cancer, but demonstrate that they are highly individual and typically non-recurrent.

  3. The Involvement of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome Ten (PTEN in the Regulation of Inflammation Following Coronary Microembolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyou Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Growing evidence shows that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN is involved in regulating inflammation in different pathological conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that the upregulation of PTEN correlates with the impairment of cardiac function in swine following coronary microembolization (CME. Methods: To possibly disclose an anti-inflammatory effect of PTEN, we induced swine CME by injecting inertia plastic microspheres (42 μm in diameter into the left anterior descending coronary artery and analyzed the myocardial tissue by immunochemistry, qRT-PCR and western blot analyses. In addition, we downregulated PTEN using siRNA. Results: Following CME, PTEN mRNA and protein levels were elevated as early as 3 h, peaked at 12 h, and then continuously decreased at 24 h and 48 h but remained elevated. Through linear correlation analysis, the PTEN protein level positively correlated with cTnI and TNF-α but was negatively correlated with LVEF. Furthermore, PTEN siRNA reduced the microinfarct volume, improved cardiac function (LVEF, reduced the release of cTnI, and suppressed PTEN and TNF-α protein expression. Conclusion: This study demonstrated, for the first time, that PTEN is involved in CME-induced inflammatory injury. The data generated from this study provide a rationale for the development of PTEN-based anti-inflammatory strategies.

  4. Adaptive response to chronic mild ethanol stress involves ROS, sirtuins and changes in chromosome dosage in wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Potocki, Leszek; Rawska, Ewa; Pabian, Sylwia; Kaplan, Jakub; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-24

    Industrial yeast strains of economic importance used in winemaking and beer production are genomically diverse and subjected to harsh environmental conditions during fermentation. In the present study, we investigated wine yeast adaptation to chronic mild alcohol stress when cells were cultured for 100 generations in the presence of non-cytotoxic ethanol concentration. Ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide signals promoted growth rate during passages that was accompanied by increased expression of sirtuin proteins, Sir1, Sir2 and Sir3, and DNA-binding transcription regulator Rap1. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis revealed that yeast genome was shaped during passages. The gains of chromosomes I, III and VI and significant changes in the gene copy number in nine functional gene categories involved in metabolic processes and stress responses were observed. Ethanol-mediated gains of YRF1 and CUP1 genes were the most accented. Ethanol also induced nucleolus fragmentation that confirms that nucleolus is a stress sensor in yeasts. Taken together, we postulate that wine yeasts of different origin may adapt to mild alcohol stress by shifts in intracellular redox state promoting growth capacity, upregulation of key regulators of longevity, namely sirtuins and changes in the dosage of genes involved in the telomere maintenance and ion detoxification.

  5. Survey of prenatal screening policies in Europe for structural malformations and chromosome anomalies, and their impact on detection and termination rates for neural tube defects and Down's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, P A; Devigan, C; Khoshnood, B

    2008-01-01

    screening policies in 18 countries and 1.13 million births in 12 countries in 2002-04. METHODS: (i) Questionnaire on national screening policies and termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFA) laws in 2004. (ii) Analysis of data on prenatal detection and termination for Down's syndrome and neural...... tube defects (NTDs) using the EUROCAT database. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Existence of national prenatal screening policies, legal gestation limit for TOPFA, prenatal detection and termination rates for Down's syndrome and NTD. RESULTS: Ten of the 18 countries had a national country-wide policy for Down...

  6. Relationship between fetal congenital heart defects and chromosomal anomalies detected by prenatal ultrasound%产前超声诊断胎儿先天性心脏畸形与染色体异常的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎新艳; 田晓先; 晁桂华; 韦波

    2012-01-01

    目的 应用超声探讨胎儿先天性心脏畸形与染色体异常的关系.方法 回顾分析我院产前超声检查发现先天性心脏畸形,并行染色体检查的胎儿58例.结果 58例先天性心脏畸形胎儿中复杂畸形39例(67.2%),心内畸形合并心外畸形26例(44.8% );染色体异常16例(27.6%),其中18 -三体综合征9例,21 -三体综合征4例,13 -三体综合征2例,47,XX,+8[16]\\46,XX[44] 1例.结论 不同类型的胎儿先天性心脏畸形与染色体异常的关系不同;当产前超声发现胎儿先天性心脏畸形时,应仔细观察胎儿全身有无畸形及超声软标志,必要时行染色体检查以明确核型.%Objective To explore the relationship between fetal congenital heart defects (CHD)and chromosomal anomalies by ultrasound. Methods Fifty-eight fetuses with CHD and underwent chromosome examination were enrolled in this study, their data were analyzed retrospectively. Results In 58 cases, there were 39 fetuses (67.2% ) of cardiac complicated deformity and 26 fetuses (44.8%) of extra cardiac malformations, 16 fetuses (27.6%) had chromosomal abnormalities including 9 cases of trisomy 18, 4 cases of trisomy 21, 2 cases of trisomy 13, and 1 case of 47, XX,+8 [ 16 ]\\46, XX [ 44 ]. Conclusion Different fetal CHD has different correlation with chromosomal abnormalities. When prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of heart malformations is made, we should check the fetus carefully and perform amniocentesis or umbilical cord blood puncture to confirm the chromosome karyotype when it is necessary.

  7. Array based characterization of a terminal deletion involving chromosome subband 15q26.2: an emerging syndrome associated with growth retardation, cardiac defects and developmental delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkhem Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtelomeric regions are gene rich and deletions in these chromosomal segments have been demonstrated to account for approximately 2.5% of patients displaying mental retardation with or without association of dysmorphic features. However, cases that report de novo terminal deletions on chromosome arm 15q are rare. Methods In this study we present the first example of a detailed molecular genetic mapping of a de novo deletion in involving 15q26.2-qter, caused by the formation of a dicentric chromosome 15, using metaphase FISH and tiling resolution (32 k genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Results After an initial characterization of the dicentric chromosome by metaphase FISH, array CGH analysis mapped the terminal deletion to encompass a 6.48 megabase (Mb region, ranging from 93.86–100.34 Mb on chromosome 15. Conclusion In conclusion, we present an additional case to the growing family of reported cases with 15q26-deletion, thoroughly characterized at the molecular cytogenetic level. In the deleted regions, four candidate genes responsible for the phenotype of the patient could be delineated: IGFR1, MEF2A, CHSY1, and TM2D3. Further characterization of additional patients harboring similar 15q-aberrations might hopefully in the future lead to the description of a clear cut clinically recognizable syndrome.

  8. Genetic Mapping of the Rhodopseudomonas capsulata Chromosome Shows Non-clustering of Genes Involved in Nitrogen Fixation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    WILLISON, JOHN C; AHOMBO, GABRIEL; CHABERT, JACQUELINE; MAGNIN, JEAN-PIERRE; VIGNAIS, PAULETTE M

    1985-01-01

    ... Nucléaires de Grenoble, 85 X, 38041 Grenoble Cedex, France ABSTRACT Summary: The mutant R plasmid pTH10 was used to construct a circular linkage map of the Rhodopseudomonas capsulata B10 chromosome...

  9. Assessment of aneuploidy in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos by chromosome painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougier, N.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Plachot, M. [Hospital Necker, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The poor quality of chromosome preparations often observed after fixation of oocytes and embryos did not usually allow accurate identification of chromosomes involved in non-disjunctions. We, therefore, used chromosome painting to determine the incidence of abnormalities for chromosomes 1 and 7. A total of 50 oocytes inseminated for IVF and showing no signs of fertilization as well as 37 diploid embryos donated for research were fixed according to the Dyban`s technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was carried out using whole chromosome painting DNA probes specific for human chromosome 1 and 7. The incidence of aneuploidy was 28%, 10% and 60% for metaphase II, polar body and sperm chromosomes, respectively. The high incidence of aneuploidy observed in sperm prematurely condensed sperm chromosomes is due to the fact that usually far less than 23 sperm chromatids are observed, maybe as a consequence of incomplete chromosome condensation. Thirty seven embryos were analyzed with the same probes. 48% of early embryos were either monosomic 1 or 7 or mosaics comprising blastomeres with 1, 2 or 3 signals. Thus, 8 among the 11 abnormal embryos had hypodiploid cells (25 to 37 chromosomes) indicating either an artefactual loss of chromosomes or a complex anomaly of nuclear division (maltinucleated blastomeres, abnormal migration of chromosomes at anaphase). We therefore calculated a {open_quotes}corrected{close_quotes} incidence of aneuploidy for chromosomes 1 or 7 in early embryos: 18%. 86% of the blastocysts showed mosaicism 2n/3 or 4n as a consequence of the formation of the syncitiotrophoblast. To conclude, chromosome painting is an efficient method to accurately identify chromosomes involved in aneuploidy. This technique should allow us to evaluate the incidence of non-disjunction for all chromosome pairs. Our results confirm the high incidence of chromosome abnormalities occurring as a consequence of meiotic or mitotic non-disjunctions in human oocytes and embryos.

  10. Three-way complex variant translocation involving short arm chromosome (1;9;22)(p36;q34;q11) in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASIF, MUHAMMAD; HUSSAIN, ABRAR; MALIK, ARIF; RASOOL, MAHMOOD

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a disease of the clonal hematopoietic stem cells caused by a balanced translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22. Overall, 90–95% of CML patients present with a Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation and in addition, variant complex translocations, involving a third chromosome, are observed in 5–8% of CML patients. Cytogenic testing using bone marrow sample was performed and the FISH test was used for the detection of BCR-ABL fusion gene and complete blood analysis of CML patient was also performed. Results of hematological analysis showed the induced values of white blood cells (168,5000/mm3) and platelets (300,000/mm3) and FISH analysis test showed that 98% cells were positive for BCR/ABL gene translocation. The present study describes a three-way (1;9;22)(p36;q34;q11) Ph chromosome translocation in a 24-year-old female with CML. The patient, who was in the chronic phase of the disease, was treated with daily dose of 400 mg/dl with imatinib mesylateand was monitored constantly at various intervals over a 6-month period. Many studies reported that certain CML patents with variant translocation responded poorly to imatinib. In the current case report, the CML patient exhibited a suboptimal response to imatinib, denoting a poor prognosis. PMID:26622740

  11. An apparently de novo translocation in a neonate involving chromosomes 3 and 19 [t(3:19)(p21;q13.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, H.O.; Buttice, L.S.; Chester, M. [Nassau County Medical Center, East Meadow, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A 7 1/2-week-old infant female was referred for cytogenetic evaluation after she developed a left inguinal hernia containing a gonadal mass. She had been born to a 25-year-old mother after approximately 31 weeks gestation. This was the couple`s first pregnancy. She was small for gestational age. Her weight was 835 g, length was 32 cm, head circumference was 26 cm at birth. She developed hypothyroidism requiring synthroid. There were no other obvious dysmorphisms. The cytogenetic findings with G-banding revealed an apparently-balanced translocation involving chromosomes 3 and 19. The patient`s karyotype revealed 46,XX,t(3;19)(q21;q13.1). Parental chromosomes were found to be normal. Because of the increased risk for developmental and other congenital problems in an individual with a {open_quotes}de novo translocation{close_quotes} (even when the rearrangement appears balanced), this infant is being followed regularly. Evaluation at 5 months of age revealed a small but thriving female infant who is alert and developmentally appropriate. She is still receiving synthroid. We are in the process of analyzing this case further using chromosome paint probes for chromosomes 3 and 19 to identify the break points more precisely. This would allow us to assess with greater accuracy if this is a {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} translocation.

  12. Postzygotic isolation involves strong mitochondrial and sex-specific effects in Tigriopus californicus, a species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, B R; Rose, C G; Rundle, D E; Leong, W; Edmands, S

    2013-11-01

    Detailed studies of the genetics of speciation have focused on a few model systems, particularly Drosophila. The copepod Tigriopus californicus offers an alternative that differs from standard animal models in that it lacks heteromorphic chromosomes (instead, sex determination is polygenic) and has reduced opportunities for sexual conflict, because females mate only once. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was conducted on reciprocal F2 hybrids between two strongly differentiated populations, using a saturated linkage map spanning all 12 autosomes and the mitochondrion. By comparing sexes, a possible sex ratio distorter was found but no sex chromosomes. Although studies of standard models often find an excess of hybrid male sterility factors, we found no QTL for sterility and multiple QTL for hybrid viability (indicated by non-Mendelian adult ratios) and other characters. Viability problems were found to be stronger in males, but the usual explanations for weaker hybrid males (sex chromosomes, sensitivity of spermatogenesis, sexual selection) cannot fully account for these male viability problems. Instead, higher metabolic rates may amplify deleterious effects in males. Although many studies of standard speciation models find the strongest genetic incompatibilities to be nuclear-nuclear (specifically X chromosome-autosome), we found the strongest deleterious interaction in this system was mito-nuclear. Consistent with the snowball theory of incompatibility accumulation, we found that trigenic interactions in this highly divergent cross were substantially more frequent (>6×) than digenic interactions. This alternative system thus allows important comparisons to studies of the genetics of reproductive isolation in more standard model systems.

  13. Miscarriage after a normal scan at 12-14 gestational weeks in women at low risk of carrying a fetus with chromosomal anomaly according to nuchal translucency screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, M; Källén, K; Saltvedt, S; Almström, H; Grunewald, C; Valentin, L

    2007-10-01

    To estimate the risk of second-trimester miscarriage in women with low risk of carrying a fetus with chromosomal abnormality, according to nuchal translucency (NT) screening, and to determine whether NT thickness or other factors affect the risk. The study population comprised 14 278 singleton pregnancies with a risk of Down syndrome < 1:250 at NT scan, and where no fetal karyotyping was performed < 25 weeks. Risk factors for miscarriage were investigated by logistic regression. The median risk of Down syndrome was 1 : 3138 (range 1 : 9651-1 : 251) and median NT was 1.7 (range 0.4-3.0) mm. The miscarriage rate was 0.5% (77/14 278; 95% CI 0.4-0.6). After having controlled for maternal age, we found the number of previous deliveries and miscarriages to independently predict miscarriage: odds ratio (OR) for each previous delivery 1.48, 95% CI 1.22-1.94, P < 0.0001; OR for each previous miscarriage 1.34, 95% CI 1.07-1.68, P = 0.01. Excluding women with any previous miscarriage and adjusting for parity, we found a U-shaped relationship between maternal age and miscarriage (P = 0.04). In singleton pregnancies with estimated risk of Down syndrome < 1:250 according to NT screening at 12-14 weeks, the spontaneous fetal loss rate before 25 weeks is likely to be around 0.5%. NT thickness up to 3 mm does not seem to affect the risk of miscarriage in such pregnancies. Instead, the risk seems to increase with number of previous miscarriages and deliveries, and possibly the risk is highest in the youngest and oldest women. Copyright (c) 2007 ISUOG

  14. Detection of Numerical Chromosomal Anomalies in Spontaneous Abortion by Fluorescent in situ Hybridization%FISH技术在检测自然流产绒毛组织非整倍体异常中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周佳; 蔡彩萍; 姚红霞; 骆敏; 郭茗; 杨颖俊; 孙路明

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To study the clinical value of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) detection method for numerical chromosomal anomalies in spontaneous abortion and to evaluate its efficiency compared with the classic method of karyotyping.Methods:A total of 157 patients who suffered from spontaneous abortion were observed.All of these cases were detected chromosome 16,22,13,21,18,X and Y by FISH.The chorionic villi samples (CVS) were cultured for chromosome analysis at the same time.Results:Seventy-six samples were successfully karyotyped,while the success rate of FISH was 100%.For the two methods,64 cases matched perfectly,and the corresponding rate of FISH to karyotyping was 84.2%.Conclusion:FISH provides a diagnosis for spontaneous abortion because of rapid,easy to carry out and higher successful rate.Although FISH can not substitute the traditional karyotping,it can be a supplementary method to traditional kayotyping.%目的:探讨运用荧光原位杂交(FISH)检测自然流产绒毛组织的临床价值,评价它与传统经典的核型分析方法的关系.方法:对157例孕早期自然流产的绒毛组织进行FISH检测,均采用16、22、13、21、18、X、Y号染色体荧光探针检测,判断染色体非整倍体异常情况.同时进行绒毛细胞培养染色体核型分析,作为对照诊断标准.结果:核型分析成功率为48.4%,FISH检测成功率为100%.核型分析成功的76例样本中,64例结果与核型分析结果相一致,以细胞遗传学作为诊断标准,诊断的符合率为84.2%.结论:FISH技术与传统的绒毛细胞培养染色体核型分析相比,过程迅速,方法简单,提高了诊断的成功率,但无法完全取代传统的染色体核型分析,应两者结合应用于临床.

  15. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  16. Anomaly holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripaios, Ben [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: b.gripaios1@physics.ox.ac.uk; West, Stephen M. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.west1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2008-01-21

    We consider, in the effective field theory context, anomalies of gauge field theories on a slice of a five-dimensional, anti-de Sitter geometry and their four-dimensional, holographic duals. A consistent effective field theory description can always be found, notwithstanding the presence of the anomalies and without modifying the degrees of freedom of the theory. If anomalies do not vanish, the d=4 theory contains additional pseudoscalar states, which are either present in the low-energy theory as physical, light states, or are eaten by (would-be massless) gauge bosons. We show that the pseudoscalars ensure that global anomalies of the four-dimensional dual satisfy the 't Hooft matching condition and comment on the relevance for warped models of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  17. Epilepsy phenotype associated with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A: Migrating partial seizures of infancy or atypical Dravet syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Hunmin; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The deletion of a sodium channel gene cluster located on chromosome 2q24.3 is associated with variable epilepsy phenotypes, including Dravet syndrome and migrating partial seizures of infancy. Although SCN1A is considered as the major contributor to the epilepsy phenotype, the role of other sodium channel genes that map within this cluster has not been delineated. We presented five new cases with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A and investigated their epilepsy phenotype in relation to the extent of the deletion. Three cases with deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster (SCN3A, SCN2A, SCN1A, SCN9A, and SCN7A) exhibited a complex epilepsy phenotype that was atypical for Dravet syndrome and suggestive of migrating partial seizures of infancy: early seizure onset (before 2 months of age), severe developmental delay from seizure onset, multifocal interictal spikes, polymorphous focal seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Two cases with partial deletion of SCN1A and SCN9A and whole SCN1A deletion had an epilepsy phenotype of Dravet syndrome. A literature review of cases with chromosome 2q24.3 deletion revealed that, in most Dravet syndrome cases, it does not involve SCN2A and SCN3A, whereas a complex epilepsy phenotype that is shared with migrating partial seizures of infancy was associated with cases of deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster.

  18. Detailed comparison between the wheat chromosome group 7 short arms and the rice chromosome arms 6S and 8L with special reference to genes involved in starch biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhongyi; Huang, Bingyan; Rampling, Lynette

    2004-01-01

    on wheat chromosome 7AS and the virtual rice contig covering wheat chromosome 7AS. A preliminary comparison between the short arms of chromosome 7A and 7D in wheat showed that both chromosomes had a similar level of sequence synteny with rice. Therefore, there appears to be considerable variation in gene...

  19. Cytogenetic findings in patients with intellectual disability and/or multiple congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Derakhshan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chromosomal abnormalities are a major etiology of intellectual disability (ID and multiple congenital anomalies (MCAs. Screening for chromosomal aberrations by clinical diagnostic techniques has been primarily performed through standard karyotyping. Methods: A cytogenetic study involving 1730 individuals with ID and/or MCA was conducted using lymphocyte culture and high-resolution G-banding method. Results: Various types of chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 440 patients (25.5%. Numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, respectively, were observed in 63.3% (278 out of 440 and 36.7% (162 out of 440 patients. Among the chromosomal abnormalities, sexual chromosomal abnormalities were found in some cases, and Klinefelter syndrome with 2.5% frequency was the most frequent sex chromosomal abnormality. Autosomal abnormalities were found in cases, and Down syndrome was the most frequent autosomal chromosomal abnormality occurring in 41.0% of detected abnormalities. Conclusion: The higher contribution of chromosome aberrations in the northwest of Iran indicates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in the etiology of MCA and/or ID patients. Genetic counseling was provided to the family members to explain the recurrence risk as well as the need for prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancies and management of patients by collected data bank.

  20. A balanced chromosomal translocation involving chromosomes 3 and 16 in a patient with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome reveals new candidate genes at 3p22.3 and 16p13.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lacey S; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Tuck, J Matthew; Chorich, Lynn P; Sullivan, Megan E; Falkenstrom, Allison; Reindollar, Richard H; Layman, Lawrence C

    2016-01-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, or the congenital absence of uterus and vagina, is the most severe anomaly of the female reproductive tract. It affects 1 in 5,000 females, and is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhea. The etiology remains unknown in most patients, although four single gene defects and some repetitive copy number variants (CNVs) have been identified. Translocations in MRKH patients are very rare, and reported only in three patients previously without breakpoint mapping. We have identified the fourth MRKH translocation patient and are the first to characterize the breakpoints mapped by molecular methods. The proband is a 17- year old white female with agenesis of the uterus and vagina who had a peripheral blood karyotype revealing a de novo balanced translocation 46,XX,t(3;16)(p22.3;p13.3)dn. There were no known related anomalies present in the proband or her family. No CNVs were found by chromosomal microarray analysis, and no genes were directly disrupted by the translocation. DNA sequencing of six nearby candidate genes-TRIM71, CNOT10, ZNF200, OR1F1, ZNF205, and ZNF213-did not reveal any mutations. RT-qPCR of proband lymphoblast RNA for 20 genes near the breakpoints of 3p22.3 and 16p13.3 showed significantly altered expression levels for four genes in the proband compared to three white female controls, after correction for multiple comparisons. Reduced expression was seen for CMTM7 and CCR4 on 3p22.3, while increased expression was observed for IL32 and MEFV on 16p13.3. We have mapped the breakpoints of our t(3;16)(p22.3;p13.3) translocation patient using molecular methods to within 13.6 kb at 3p22.3 and within 1.9 kb for 16p13.3 and have suggested 10 nearby genes that become plausible candidate genes for future study.

  1. The distal end of porcine chromosome 6p is involved in the regulation of skatole levels in boars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooijmans Richard PMA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boar taint is an unpleasant condition of pork, mainly due to the accumulation of androstenone and skatole in male pigs at onset of puberty. This condition is the cause of considerable economic losses in the pig industry and the most common practice to control it is to castrate male piglets. Because of the economic and animal welfare concerns there is interest in developing genetic markers that could be used in selection schemes to decrease the incidence of boar taint. The Porcine 60 K SNP Beadchip was used to genotype 891 pigs from a composite Duroc sire line, for which skatole levels in fat had been collected. Results The genome-wide association study revealed that 16 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms located on the proximal region of chromosome 6 were significantly associated with skatole levels. These SNPs are grouped in three separate clusters located in the initial 6 Mb region of chromosome 6. The differences observed between the homozygote genotypes for SNPs in the three clusters were substantial, including a difference of 102.8 ng/g skatole in melted fat between the homozygotes for the ALGA0107039 marker. Single SNPs explain up to 22% of the phenotypic variance. No obvious candidate genes could be pinpointed in the region, which may be due to the need of further annotation of the pig genome. Conclusions This study demonstrated new SNP markers significantly associated with skatole levels in the distal region of chromosome 6p. These markers defined three independent clusters in the region, which contain a low number of protein-coding genes. The considerable differences observed between the homozygous genotypes for several SNPs may be used in future selection schemes to reduce skatole levels in pigs

  2. Comparison of reproductive outcome, including the pattern of loss, between couples with chromosomal abnormalities and those with unexplained repeated miscarriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Helen; Yan, Junhao; Saravelos, Sotirios H; Li, Tin-Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are an important cause of repeated miscarriage. Several studies have discussed the association between chromosomal abnormalities and repeated miscarriage. This study attempts to describe the pattern of miscarriage in this group of women and the eventual pregnancy outcome of couples with chromosomal abnormalities compared with couples with unexplained repeated pregnancy loss. This was a retrospective study involving 795 couples with repeated miscarriages. Out of 795 couples, 28 (3.52%) were found to have a chromosomal abnormality (carrier group). Over half (65.5%) of the chromosomal abnormalities were balanced reciprocal translocations. After referral, this carrier group had a total of 159 pregnancies, leading to 36 live births (22.6%) among 18 couples. The after referral miscarriage rate in the chromosomal anomaly group (55.6%) was significantly (P chromosomal anomaly, the miscarriages were more likely to occur between 6 and 12 weeks' gestation. The encouraging cumulative live birth rate of 64.3% for couples with chromosomal anomaly and repeated miscarriage suggests that further attempts at natural conception are a viable option. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Major congenital anomalies in a Danish region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Birkelund, Anne Sofie

    2014-01-01

    congenital anomaly, 13.9% had a chromosomal anomaly and 7.7% were multiple congenital anomalies. The combined foetal and infant mortality in the study area was 11.6 per 1,000 births. 19% (2.2 per 1,000) of these deaths were foetuses and infants with major congenital anomalies. Combined foetal and infant......INTRODUCTION: This study describes the prevalence of congenital anomalies and changes over time in birth outcome, mortality and chronic maternal diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on population data from the EUROCAT registry covering the Funen County, Denmark, 1995......-2008. The registry covers live births, foetal deaths with a gestational age (GA) of 20 weeks or more, and terminations of pregnancy due to congenital anomalies (TOPFA). RESULTS: The overall prevalence of congenital anomalies was 2.70% (95% confidence interval: 2.58-2.80). The majority of cases had an isolated...

  4. The prevalence of congenital anomalies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester

    2010-01-01

    anomalies overwhelmingly concern children surviving the early neonatal period, who have important medical, social or educational needs. The prevalence of chromosomal anomalies was 3.6 per 1,000 births, contributing 28% of stillbirths/fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation with congenital anomaly, and 48...... of 23.9 per 1,000 births for 2003-2007. 80% were livebirths. 2.5% of livebirths with congenital anomaly died in the first week of life. 2.0% were stillbirths or fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation. 17.6% of all cases were terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis (TOPFA). Thus, congenital...

  5. The gene for calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAMLG) is located on human Chromosome 5q23 and a syntenic region of mouse chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bram, R.J.; Valentine, V.; Shapiro, D.N. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-15

    The CAMLG gene encodes a novel cyclophilin B-binding protein called calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, which appears to be involved in the regulation of calcium signaling in T lymphocytes and other cells. The murine homolog, Caml, was localized by interspecific backcross analysis in the middle of chromosome 13. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, this gene was localized to human chromosome 5 in a region (q23) known to be syntenic to mouse chromosome 13. These results provide further evidence supporting the extensive homology between human chromosome 5q and mouse chromosome 13. In addition, the results will provide a basis for further evaluation of cytogenetic anomalies that may contribute to inherited defects in calcium signaling or immune system function. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Accurate Chromosome Segregation at First Meiotic Division Requires AGO4, a Protein Involved in RNA-Dependent DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Cecilia; Santos, Juan Luis; Pradillo, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway is important for the transcriptional repression of transposable elements and for heterochromatin formation. Small RNAs are key players in this process by regulating both DNA and histone methylation. Taking into account that methylation underlies gene silencing and that there are genes with meiosis-specific expression profiles, we have wondered whether genes involved in RdDM could play a role during this specialized cell division. To address this issue, we have characterized meiosis progression in pollen mother cells from Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants defective for several proteins related to RdDM. The most relevant results were obtained for ago4-1 In this mutant, meiocytes display a slight reduction in chiasma frequency, alterations in chromatin conformation around centromeric regions, lagging chromosomes at anaphase I, and defects in spindle organization. These abnormalities lead to the formation of polyads instead of tetrads at the end of meiosis, and might be responsible for the fertility defects observed in this mutant. Findings reported here highlight an involvement of AGO4 during meiosis by ensuring accurate chromosome segregation at anaphase I.

  7. Computer aided analysis of additional chromosome aberrations in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia using a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of complex cytogenetic databases of distinct leukaemia entities may help to detect rare recurring chromosome aberrations, minimal common regions of gains and losses, and also hot spots of genomic rearrangements. The patterns of the karyotype alterations may provide insights into the genetic pathways of disease progression. Results We developed a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation (SCCN by which chromosome findings are normalised at a resolution of 400 bands. Lost or gained chromosomes or chromosome segments are specified in detail, and ranges of chromosome breakpoint assignments are recorded. Software modules were written to summarise the recorded chromosome changes with regard to the respective chromosome involvement. To assess the degree of karyotype alterations the ploidy levels and numbers of numerical and structural changes were recorded separately, and summarised in a complex karyotype aberration score (CKAS. The SCCN and CKAS were used to analyse the extend and the spectrum of additional chromosome aberrations in 94 patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and secondary chromosome anomalies. Dosage changes of chromosomal material represented 92.1% of all additional events. Recurring regions of chromosome losses were identified. Structural rearrangements affecting (pericentromeric chromosome regions were recorded in 24.6% of the cases. Conclusions SCCN and CKAS provide unifying elements between karyotypes and computer processable data formats. They proved to be useful in the investigation of additional chromosome aberrations in Ph-positive ALL, and may represent a step towards full automation of the analysis of large and complex karyotype databases.

  8. t(X;17) as the sole karyotypic anomaly in a case of M(3r) subtype of acute promyelocytic leukemia without RARalpha rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan-Ping; Xu, Huan; Chen, Zhi-Mei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Qian, Wen-Bin; Jin, Jie

    2010-02-01

    We describe here a unique chromosomal abnormality found in a patient with M(3r) subtype of APL. Neither t(15;17) nor rearrangement of RARalpha was detected by routine R-banded chromosome as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using PML/RARalpha dual-color dual-fusion translocation probe and RARalpha dual-color break apart rearrangement probe. Instead of the typical rearrangement between chromosomes 15 and 17, all cells analyzed had a translocation between X and 17 as the sole karyotypic anomaly. The translocation was conformed by whole chromosome painting (WCP) with painting probes of chromosomes X and 17. To our knowledge, this is the first documented APL with a novel translocation involving chromosomes X and 17 without RARalpha gene rearrangement. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Studies of X inactivation and isodisomy in twins provide further evidence that the X chromosomes is not involved in Rett syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migeon, B.R.; Dunn, M.A.; Schmeckpeper, B.J.; Naidu, S. [Johns Hophins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomas, G. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Kennedy-Kreiger Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RS), a progressive encephalopathy with onset in infancy, has been attributed to an X-linked mutation, mainly on the basis of its occurrence almost exclusively in females and its concordance in female MZ twins. The underlying mechanisms proposed are an X-linked dominant mutation with male lethality, uniparental disomy of the X chromosome, and/or some disturbance in the process of X inactivation leading to unequal distribution of cells expressing maternal or paternal alleles (referred to as a {open_quotes}nonrandom{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}skewed {close_quotes} inactivation). To determine if the X chromosome is in fact involved in RS, we studied a group of affected females including three pairs of MZ twins, two concordant for RS and one uniquely discordant for RS. Analysis of X-inactivation patterns confirms the frequent nonrandom X inactivation previously observed in MZ twins but indicates that this is independent of RS. Analysis of 29 RS females reveals not one instance of uniparental X disomy, extending the observations previously reported. Therefore, our findings contribute no support for the hypothesis that RS is an X-linked disorder. Furthermore, the concordant phenotype in most MZ females twins with RS, which has not been observed in female twins with known X-linked mutations, argues against an X mutation. 41 refs., 2 figs.

  10. LOH at chromosome 9q34.3 and the Notch1 gene methylation are less involved in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shan; Krogdahl, Annelise; Eiberg, Hans;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of oral carcinomas have shown that both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and hypermethylation at chromosome 9q33 to 9q34.2 are frequent. The present study investigates the frequency of Notch1 gene methylation and LOH at 9q34.3 region. METHODS: Gene promoter hypermethylation...... of the Notch1 gene was analysed by methylation-specific PCR and LOH was analysed using microsatellite markers. RESULTS: We found LOH at 9q34.3 in three patients and methylation of the Notch1 gene only in two patients with oral carcinoma. CONCLUSION: Comparing with the alterations at 9q33 to 34.2 regions, LOH...... at 9q34.3 and methylation of the Notch1 gene was less involved in oral squamous cell carcinomas....

  11. Childhood pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with translocation t(1;19)(q21.1;p13.3) and two additional chromosomal aberrations involving chromosomes 1, 6, and 13: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafa, Abdulsamad; As'sad, Manar; Liehr, Thomas; Aljapawe, Abdulmunim; Al Achkar, Walid

    2017-04-07

    The translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13), which results in the TCF3-PBX1 chimeric gene, is one of the most frequent rearrangements observed in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It appears in both adult and pediatric patients with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia at an overall frequency of 3 to 5%. Most cases of pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the translocation t(1;19) have a typical immunophenotype with homogeneous expression of CD19, CD10, CD9, complete absence of CD34, and at least diminished CD20. Moreover, the translocation t(1;19) correlates with known clinical high risk factors, such as elevated white blood cell count, high serum lactate dehydrogenase levels, and central nervous system involvement; early reports indicated that patients with translocation t(1;19) had a poor outcome under standard treatment. We report the case of a 15-year-old Syrian boy with pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal karyotype with a der(19)t(1;19)(q21.1;p13.3) and two yet unreported chromosomal aberrations: an interstitial deletion 6q12 to 6q26 and a der(13)t(1;13)(q21.1;p13). According to the literature, cases who are translocation t(1;19)-positive have a significantly higher incidence of central nervous system relapse than patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia without the translocation. Of interest, central nervous system involvement was also seen in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of childhood pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an unbalanced translocation t(1;19) with two additional chromosomal aberrations, del(6)(q12q26) and t(1;13)(q21.3;p13), which seem to be recurrent and could influence clinical outcome. Also the present case confirms the impact of the translocation t(1;19) on central nervous system relapse, which should be studied for underlying mechanisms in future.

  12. Mechanisms for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Jean-Yves; Stouf, Mathieu; Lebailly, Elise; Cornet, François

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria face the problem of segregating their gigantic chromosomes without a segregation period restricted in time and space, as Eukaryotes do. Segregation thus involves multiple activities, general or specific of a chromosome region and differentially controlled. Recent advances show that these various mechanisms conform to a “pair and release” rule, which appears as a general rule in DNA segregation. We describe the latest advances in segregation of bacterial chromosomes with emphasis on the different pair and release mechanisms.

  13. Seismic data fusion anomaly detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David

    2014-06-01

    Detecting anomalies in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of anomaly detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to anomaly detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect anomalies in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for anomalies. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find anomalies in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which anomaly detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for anomaly detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.

  14. Chromosomal differences between acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in patients with prior solid tumors and prior hematologic malignancies. A study of 14 cases with prior breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamuris, Z.; Dumont, J.; Dutrillaux, B.; Aurias, A. (Institut Curie, Paris (France))

    1989-10-01

    A cytogenetic study of 14 patients with secondary acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (S-ANLL) with prior treatment for breast cancer is reported. The chromosomes recurrently involved in numerical or structural anomalies are chromosomes 7, 5, 17, and 11, in decreasing order of frequency. The distribution of the anomalies detected in this sample of patients is similar to that observed in published cases with prior breast or other solid tumors, though anomalies of chromosome 11 were not pointed out, but it significantly differs from that of the S-ANLL with prior hematologic malignancies. This difference is principally due to a higher involvement of chromosome 7 in patients with prior hematologic malignancies and of chromosomes 11 and 17 in patients with prior solid tumors. A genetic determinism involving abnormal recessive alleles located on chromosomes 5, 7, 11, and 17 uncovered by deletions of the normal homologs may be a cause of S-ANLL. The difference between patients with prior hematologic malignancies or solid tumors may be explained by different constitutional mutations of recessive genes in the two groups of patients.

  15. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Chromosomal abnormalities in couples with repeated fetal loss: An Indian retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenny J Sheth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss is a common occurrence and a matter of concern for couples planning the pregnancy. Chromosomal abnormalities, mainly balanced rearrangements, are common in couples with repeated miscarriages. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contribution of chromosomal anomalies causing repeated spontaneous miscarriages and provide detailed characterization of a few structurally altered chromosomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cytogenetic study was carried out on 4859 individuals having a history of recurrent miscarriages. The cases were analyzed using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization wherever necessary. Results: Chromosomal rearrangements were found in 170 individuals (3.5%. Translocations were seen in 72 (42.35% cases. Of these, reciprocal translocations constituted 42 (24.70% cases while Robertsonian translocations were detected in 30 (17.64% cases. 7 (4.11% cases were mosaic, 8 (4.70% had small supernumerary marker chromosomes and 1 (0.6% had an interstitial microdeletion. Nearly, 78 (1.61% cases with heteromorphic variants were seen of which inversion of Y chromosome (57.70% and chromosome 9 pericentromeric variants (32.05% were predominantly involved. Conclusions: Chromosomal analysis is an important etiological investigation in couples with repeated miscarriages. Characterization of variants/marker chromosome enable calculation of a more precise recurrent risk in a subsequent pregnancy thereby facilitating genetic counseling and deciding further reproductive options.

  17. Partitioning of the Linear Chromosome during Sporulation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) Involves an oriC-Linked parAB Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Calcutt, Michael J.; Schmidt, Francis J.; Chater, Keith F.

    2000-01-01

    Candidate partitioning genes (parA and parB) for the linear chromosome of Streptomyces coelicolor were identified by DNA sequencing in a series of seven genes located between rnpA and trxA near the chromosomal replication origin. The most likely translation start point of parB overlapped the parA stop codon, suggestive of coregulation, and transcription analysis suggested that the two genes formed an operon. Deletion of part of parB had no effect on the growth or appearance of colonies but caused a deficiency in DNA partitioning during the multiple septation events involved in converting aerial hyphae into long chains of spores. At least 13% of spore compartments failed to inherit the normal DNA allocation. The same phenotype was obtained with a deletion removing a segment of DNA from both parA and parB. Reinforcing the idea of a special role for the par locus during sporulation, the stronger of two parAB promoters was greatly upregulated at about the time when sporulation septation was maximal in colonies. Three copies of a 14-bp inverted repeat (GTTTCACGTGAAAC) were found in or near the parAB genes, and at least 12 more identical copies were identified within 100 kb of oriC from the growing genome sequence database. Only one perfect copy of the 14-bp sequence was present in approximately 5 Mb of sequence available from the rest of the genome. The 14-bp sequence was similar to sequences identified as binding sites for Spo0J, a ParB homologue from Bacillus subtilis believed to be important for DNA partitioning (D. C.-H. Lin and A. D. Grossman, Cell 92:675–685, 1998). One of these sites encompassed the transcription start point of the stronger parA promoter. PMID:10671452

  18. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  19. Seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Dolk, Helen; Addor, Marie-Claude;

    2014-01-01

    with influenza. RESULTS: We detected statistically significant seasonality in prevalence of anomalies previously associated with influenza, but the conception peak was in June (2.4% excess). We also detected seasonality in congenital cataract (April conceptions, 27%), hip dislocation and/or dysplasia (April, 12......%), congenital hydronephrosis (July, 12%), urinary defects (July, 5%), and situs inversus (December, 36%), but not for nonchromosomal anomalies combined, chromosomal anomalies combined, or other anomalies analyzed. CONCLUSION: We have confirmed previously described seasonality for congenital cataract and hip......BACKGROUND: This study describes seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe to provide a baseline against which to assess the impact of specific time varying exposures such as the H1N1 pandemic influenza, and to provide a comprehensive and recent picture of seasonality and its possible relation...

  20. Psychotic disorder and its characteristics in sex chromosome aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapia Verri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex chromosome anomalies have been associated with psychoses. We report a patient with XYY chromosome anomaly who developed a paranoid psychosis. The second case deal with a 51-year-old woman affected by Turner Syndrome and Psychotic Disorder, with a prevalent somatic and sexual focus.

  1. Identification and characterization of a new type of asymmetrical dicentric chromosome derived from a single maternal chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C C; Li, Y-C; Liu, P-P; Hsieh, L-J; Cheng, Y-M; Teng, R-H; Shi, S-L; Tsai, F-J

    2007-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetic analysis identified a new type of dicentric chromosome involving different breakpoints at 18q in a female fetus. The chromosome anomaly was designated as an asymmetrical pseudoisodicentric chromosome 18, 46,XX,psu dic(18)(pter-->q11.2::q21.3-->pter)mat. A series of BAC clones for 18q11.2 and q21.3 regions were used to identify one breakpoint within the region q11.2 between 19.8 and 21.6 Mb from the telomere of 18p and another breakpoint within q21.3 between 55.4 and 56.9 Mb from the telomere of 18p by FISH analysis. Real-time quantitative PCR and microsatellite analysis further verified that the dicentric chromosome was maternal in origin and resulted from a break-reunion between sister chromatids of a single maternal chromosome. We propose that a loop-type configuration of sister chromatids took place and that the break-reunion occurred at cross sites of the loop to form an asymmetrical isodicentric chromosome during either mitosis or meiosis. In this case, the asymmetrical pseudoisodicentric resulted in an 18pter--> q11.2 duplication and an 18q21.3-->qter deletion, which could have led to certain dysmorphic features of 18q- syndrome in this fetus.

  2. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  3. Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma occurring during pregnancy with a novel translocation involving chromosome 19: a case report with review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surti Urvashi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recently recognized renal cell carcinomas (RCCs associated with Xp11.2 translocations (TFE3 transcription factor gene fusions are rare tumors predominantly reported in children. They comprise at least one-third of pediatric RCCs and only few adult cases have been reported. Here, we present a case of Xp11.2 translocation RCC in 26-year-old pregnant female. Her routine antenatal ultrasonography accidentally found a complex cystic right renal mass. Further radiologic studies revealed unilocular cyst with multiple mural nodules at inferior pole of right kidney, which was suspicious for RCC. She underwent right radical nephrectomy at 15 weeks gestation. Macroscopically, the cystic tumor was well encapsulated with multiple friable mural nodules on its inner surface. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of clear and eosinophilic/oncocytic voluminous cells arranged in papillary, trabecular, and nested/alveolar patterns. Occasional hyaline nodules and numerous psammoma bodies were present. Immunohistochemically, the tumor showed strong nuclear positivity for TFE3. Epithelial membrane antigen, CD10, and E-cadherin were strongly positive. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cytokeratin CAM-5.2, calveolin, and parvalbumin were moderately positive. Cytokeratin 7, renal cell carcinoma antigen, and colloidal iron were focally weakly positive. BerEP4 and carbonic anhydrase IX were negative. Cytogenetically, the tumor harbored a novel variant translocation involving chromosomes X and 19, t(X;19(p11.2;q13.1. Interphase FISH analysis performed on cultured and uncultured tumor cells using a dual-color break-apart DNA probe within the BCL3 gene on 19q13.3 was negative for the BCL3 gene rearrangement. She received no adjuvant therapy, delivered a normal term baby five months later, and is alive without evidence of disease 27 months after diagnosis and surgery. Unlike most recently reported Xp11.2 translocation RCCs in adult patients with aggressive clinical course

  4. Anomaly Structure of Supergravity and Anomaly Cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Butter, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We display the full anomaly structure of supergravity, including new D-term contributions to the conformal anomaly. This expression has the super-Weyl and chiral U(1)_K transformation properties that are required for implementation of the Green-Schwarz mechanism for anomaly cancellation. We outline the procedure for full anomaly cancellation. Our results have implications for effective supergravity theories from the weakly coupled heterotic string theory.

  5. Peters anomaly: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Ramanath; Ferri, Sara; Whittaker, Beatrice; Liu, Margaret; Lazzaro, Douglas R

    2011-08-01

    Peters anomaly is a rare dramatic finding at birth and can be associated with other systemic malformations. We performed a literature review of multiple case reports and case series to better define the common characteristics and unusual findings associated with Peters anomaly. A representative case is discussed followed by a literature review of multiple case reports and case series. The literature search was conducted for the years 1969 to 2009. Cases and case series were included in the review of published English ophthalmic literature. Cases were excluded if no information was reported on ocular and systemic malformations or if no information was reported on surgical interventions or outcomes. In addition, if cases did not report laterality of the lesion, they were excluded from the review. Fifty-eight cases were found that fit the above criteria, and the relevant cases were reviewed to better characterize the systemic malformations, interventions, and outcomes associated with Peters anomaly reported in the literature. Fifty-eight cases of Peters anomaly were reviewed. Of those cases reporting sex, 56% were men and 44% of cases were women. In terms of laterality, 67.2% of cases were bilateral versus 32.8% of cases that were unilateral. Moreover, bilateral cases of Peters anomaly were associated with a higher rate of systemic malformations (71.8%) versus unilateral Peters anomaly (36.8%). This difference was significant (P anomaly type I (87.5%), as opposed to those patients with Peters anomaly type II (14.2%) (P anomaly are presented. Cornea specialists who care for pediatric patients should be aware of the common and uncommon associations with Peters anomaly. Although bilateral Peters anomaly is much more commonly associated with systemic malformations, we believe that all patients with Peters anomaly should be screened for systemic malformations by both pediatricians and geneticists and undergo chromosomal analysis and molecular genetic testing.

  6. Familial complex chromosomal rearrangement resulting in a recombinant chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berend, Sue Ann; Bodamer, Olaf A F; Shapira, Stuart K; Shaffer, Lisa G; Bacino, Carlos A

    2002-05-15

    Familial complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are rare and tend to involve fewer breakpoints and fewer chromosomes than CCRs that are de novo in origin. We report on a CCR identified in a child with congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Initially, the child's karyotype was thought to involve a straightforward three-way translocation between chromosomes 3, 8, and 16. However, after analyzing the mother's chromosomes, the mother was found to have a more complex rearrangement that resulted in a recombinant chromosome in the child. The mother's karyotype included an inverted chromosome 2 and multiple translocations involving chromosomes 3, 5, 8, and 16. No evidence of deletion or duplication that could account for the clinical findings in the child was identified.

  7. Increased chromosomal breakage in Tourette syndrome predicts the possibility of variable multiple gene involvement in spectrum phenotypes: Preliminary findings and hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Buckle, C. [Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    Increased chromosomal breakage was found in 12 patients with DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) as compared with 10 non-TS control individuals with respect to untreated, modified RPM1-, and BrdU treated lymphocyte cultures (P < 0.001 in each category). A hypothesis is proposed that a major TS gene is probably connected to genetic instability, and associated chromosomal marker sites may be indicative of the localization of secondary genes whose altered expression could be responsible for associated comorbid conditions. This concept implies that genes influencing higher brain functions may be situated at or near highly recombigenic areas allowing enhanced amplification, duplication and recombination following chromosomal strand breakage. Further studies on a larger sample size are required to confirm the findings relating to chromosomal breakage and to analyze the possible implications for a paradigmatic shift in linkage strategy for complex disorders by focusing on areas at or near unstable chromosomal marker sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Genetic analyses involving microsatellite ETH10 genotypes on bovine chromosome 5 and performance trait measures in Angus- and Brahman-influenced cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAtley, K L; Rincon, G; Farber, C R; Medrano, J F; Luna-Nevarez, P; Enns, R M; VanLeeuwen, D M; Silver, G A; Thomas, M G

    2011-07-01

    ETH10 is a dinucleotide microsatellite within the promoter of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) gene on bovine chromosome 5. ETH10 is included in the panel of genetic markers used in parentage testing procedures of cattle breed associations. Allelic sizes of ETH10 PCR amplicons range from 199 to 225 bp. Objectives of this study were to use microsatellite data from beef cattle breed associations to investigate genetic distance and population stratification among Angus- and Brahman-influenced cattle and to use ETH10 genotypes and growth and ultrasound carcass data to investigate their statistical relationships. Three series of genotype to phenotype association analyses were conducted with 1) Angus data (n=5,094), 2) Brangus data (3/8 Brahman × 5/8 Angus; n=2,296), and 3) multibreed data (n=4,426) of Angus and Brangus cattle. Thirteen alleles and 38 genotypes were observed, but frequencies varied among breed groups. Tests of genetic identity and distance among 6 breed composition groups increasing in Brahman influence from 0 to 75% revealed that as Brahman-influence increased to ≥50%, genetic distance from Angus ranged from 18.3 to 43.5%. This was accomplished with 10 microsatellite loci. A mixed effects model involving genotype as a fixed effect and sire as a random source of variation suggested that Angus cattle with the 217/219 genotype tended to have 2.1% heavier (P=0.07) 205-d BW than other genotypes. In Brangus cattle, allele combinations were classified as small (≤215 bp) or large (≥217 bp). Brangus cattle with the small/large genotype had 2.0% heavier (P<0.05) birth weight, yet cattle with the large/large genotype had approximately 5.1% greater (P<0.05) percentage of fat within LM and more LM per BW than cattle with small/large or small/small genotypes. Genotype-to-phenotype relationships were not detected in multibreed analyses. The ETH10 locus appears to be associated with growth and carcass traits in Angus and Brangus cattle

  9. Evidence for involvement of TRE-2 (USP6) oncogene, low-copy repeat and acrocentric heterochromatin in two families with chromosomal translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Zhishuo; Jarmuz, Małgorzata; Sparagana, Steven P; Michaud, Jacques; Décarie, Jean-Claude; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Nowakowska, Beata; Furman, Patti; Shaw, Chad A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Lupski, James R; Chinault, A Craig; Cheung, Sau W; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2006-09-01

    We report clinical findings and molecular cytogenetic analyses for two patients with translocations [t(14;17)(p12;p12) and t(15;17)(p12;p13.2)], in which the chromosome 17 breakpoints map at a large low-copy repeat (LCR) and a breakage-prone TRE-2 (USP6) oncogene, respectively. In family 1, a 6-year-old girl and her 5-year-old brother were diagnosed with mental retardation, short stature, dysmorphic features, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). G-banding chromosome analysis showed a der(14)t(14;17)(p12;p12) in both siblings, inherited from their father, a carrier of the balanced translocation. Chromosome microarray and FISH analyses revealed that the PMP22 gene was duplicated. The chromosome 17 breakpoint was mapped within an approximately 383 kb LCR17pA that is known to also be the site of several breakpoints of different chromosome aberrations including the evolutionary translocation t(4;19) in Gorilla gorilla. In family two, a patient with developmental delay, subtle dysmorphic features, ventricular enlargement with decreased periventricular white matter, mild findings of bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria and a very small anterior commissure, a cryptic duplication including the Miller-Dieker syndrome region was identified by chromosome microarray analysis. The chromosome 17 breakpoint was mapped by FISH at the TRE-2 oncogene. Both partner chromosome breakpoints were mapped on the short arm acrocentric heterochromatin within or distal to the rRNA cluster, distal to the region commonly rearranged in Robertsonian translocations. We propose that TRE-2 together with LCR17pA, located approximately 10 Mb apart, also generated the evolutionary gorilla translocation t(4;19). Our results support previous observations that the USP6 oncogene, LCRs, and repetitive DNA sequences play a significant role in the origin of constitutional chromosome aberrations and primate genome evolution.

  10. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  11. A Novel four-way complex variant translocation involving chromosome 46, XY, t(4;9; 19;22(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2 in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad eAsif

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Philadelphia (Ph chromosome (9; 22(q34;q11 is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and the remaining 5-8% CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth or fifth chromosome other then 9;22. However, in very rare cases the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we find a novel case of four way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY, t(4;9;19;22(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2 with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin and platelets. Fluorescence In situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR-ABL fusion gene and cryptogenic test for the confirmation of Ph (9; 22(q34;q11 and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec with 400mg/day dose. We observed a significant decrease in WBC count after 48 months follow up 11.7 x109/L. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue and anxiety.

  12. A Novel Four-Way Complex Variant Translocation Involving Chromosome 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Abrar; Choudhry, Hani; Malik, Arif; Khan, Shahida Aziz; Mahmoud, Maged Mostafa; Ali, Ashraf; Iram, Saima; Kamran, Kashif; Iqbal, Asim; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome (9;22)(q34;q11) is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, and the remaining 5–8% of CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth, or fifth chromosome other than 9;22. However, in very rare cases, the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we found a novel case of four-way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of the CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin, and platelets. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR–ABL fusion gene, and cytogenetic test for the confirmation of Ph (9;22)(q34;q11) and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with a dose of 400 mg/day imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We observed a significant decrease in white blood cell count of 11.7 × 109/L after 48-month follow-up. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue, and anxiety. PMID:27303656

  13. Supernumerary ring chromosome 17 identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, K. [Hunter Area Pathology Service, New South Wales (Australia); Edwards, M. [Western Suburbs Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)

    1997-04-14

    We present a patient with multiple anomalies and severe developmental delay. A small supernumerary ring chromosome was found in 40% of her lymphocyte cells at birth. The origin of the marker chromosome could not be determined by GTG banding, but fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) later identified the marker as deriving from chromosome 17. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 中孕期非整倍体染色体异常血清学筛查不同方案比较%Comparison of different serological screening scheme on aneuploid chro-mosome anomalies in second trimester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐坤强

    2015-01-01

    目的:对中孕期非整倍体染色体异常血清学筛查不同方案的检出率进行探讨。方法选取513名2009年9月~2013年3月在攀枝花市妇幼保健院产科进行常规产前筛查的孕妇血清样本,分别采用化学发光法和时间分辨荧光免疫法对孕妇血清进行二联、三联、四联检查,比较阳性率及假阳性率。结果二联化学发光法检测唐氏综合征(DS)高危假阳性率为9.10豫,三联为7.36豫,四联为6.28豫,假阳性率呈递减趋势(字2=5.119,P约0.05);二联化学发光法筛查18-三体高危假阳性率(0.63豫)低于三联(0.82豫),差异有统计学意义(字2=4.776,P约0.05)。三联时间分辨荧光免疫法筛查DS、18-三体假阳性率(4.01豫、0.34豫)较二联(8.93豫、0.61豫)均明显降低(字2=6.992、4.776,P约0.05)。二联化学发光法检测DS、18-三体假阳性率分别为9.10豫、0.63豫,时间分辨荧光免疫法则分别为8.93豫、0.61豫,两种检测方法比较,差异无统计学意义(字2=1.787、0.000,P跃0.05);而三联时间荧光分辨法检测DS、18-三体假阳性率(4.01豫、0.34豫)均低于三联化学发光法(7.36豫、0.82豫),差异有统计学意义(字2=5.382、4.783,P约0.05)。结论化学发光法的检测系统发现筛查效率二联、三联及四联方案呈递增趋势。时间分辨荧光免疫法检测系统发现筛查效率三联高于二联方案,时间荧光分辨法三联筛查优于化学发光法。%Objective To explore the detectable rate of different serological screening scheme on aneuploid chromo-some anomalies in second trimester. Methods 513 serum samples of pregnant woman in Obstetrical Department of Panzhihua Maternal and Child Health Hospital from September 2009 to March 2013 were collected for routine prenatal screening. The serum samples were respectively used chemiluminescence and time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay to two, triple, quadruple check and the positive rate and the false positive rate were

  15. 8q21.11 microdeletion in two patients with syndromic peters anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happ, Hannah; Schilter, Kala F; Weh, Eric; Reis, Linda M; Semina, Elena V

    2016-09-01

    Peters anomaly is a form of anterior segment dysgenesis characterized by central ocular opacity and corneo-lenticular adhesions. Isolated and syndromic Peters anomaly can be observed and demonstrate significant genetic heterogeneity. We report the identification of overlapping 8q21.11 deletions in two patients with syndromic Peters anomaly via whole exome sequencing and chromosomal microarray analyses. Microdeletions of 8q21.11 were recently reported in 10 patients with highly variable phenotypes involving craniofacial features, ptosis, intellectual disability, abnormalities of the hands/feet and other defects; sclerocornea and/or microphthalmia were reported in three cases. The two additional cases presented in this report expand the phenotypic spectrum of 8q21.11 microdeletions to include Peters anomaly (seen in both patients) and persistent primary dentition (seen in one patient with a larger deletion). The two novel deletions include the ZFHX4 and PEX2 genes, which were also affected in all three previous cases involving ocular anomalies. Screening of the remaining alleles of ZFHX4 and PEX2 did not identify any additional likely pathogenic variants in either patient, suggesting a dominant mechanism (haploinsufficiency) for the identified deletion. This report provides further insight into the phenotypes associated with 8q21.11 deletions and, for the first time, reports Peters anomaly as an additional ocular feature; screening for copy number variations of the 8q21.11 region should be considered in patients with Peters anomaly and related syndromic features. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  17. Epidemiology of Congenital Anomalies in a Population-based Birth Registry in Taiwan, 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Yu Chen

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: The occurrence rates for individual congenital anomalies in Taiwan were reported. Older maternal age was a risk factor for the occurrence of chromosomal and orofacial anomalies. More active prenatal screening and further investigation of causal factors of congenital anomalies are of major importance.

  18. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  19. Limb anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurrieri, Fiorella; Kjær, Klaus Wilbrandt; Sangiorgi, Eugenio

    2002-01-01

    In this review we describe the developmental mechanisms involved in the making of a limb, by focusing on the nature and types of interactions of the molecules that play a part in the regulation of limb patterning and characterizing clinical conditions that are known to result from the abnormal...... function of these molecules. The latter subject is divided into sections dealing with syndromal and nonsyndromal deficiencies, polydactylies, and brachydactylies. Conditions caused by mutations in homeobox genes and fibroblast growth factors and their receptor genes are listed separately. Since the process...... of limb development has been conserved for more than 300 millions years, with all the necessary adaptive modifications occurring throughout evolution, we also take into consideration the evolutionary aspects of limb development in terms of genetic repertoire, molecular pathways, and morphogenetic events....

  20. Subtelomeric study of 132 patients with mental retardation reveals 9 chromosomal anomalies and contributes to the delineation of submicroscopic deletions of 1pter, 2qter, 4pter, 5qter and 9qter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommerup Niels

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptic chromosome imbalances are increasingly acknowledged as a cause for mental retardation and learning disability. New phenotypes associated with specific rearrangements are also being recognized. Techniques for screening for subtelomeric rearrangements are commercially available, allowing the implementation in a diagnostic service laboratory. We report the diagnostic yield in a series of 132 subjects with mental retardation, and the associated clinical phenotypes. Methods We applied commercially available subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. All patients referred for subtelomeric screening in a 5-year period were reviewed and abnormal cases were further characterized clinically and if possible molecularly. Results We identified nine chromosomal rearrangements (two of which were in sisters corresponding to a diagnostic yield of approx. 7%. All had dysmorphic features. Five had imbalances leading to recognizable phenotypes. Conclusion Subtelomeric screening is a useful adjunct to conventional cytogenetic analyses, and should be considered in mentally retarded subjects with dysmorphic features and unknown cause.

  1. Deletion of 14q24.1 approximately q24.3 in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a hidden chromosomal anomaly detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Lu, Xianglan; Kim, YoungMi; Luo, Ying; Martin, Mallory; Mulvihill, John J; Li, Shibo

    2008-08-01

    A 4-year-old patient, who was newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was referred to us for cytogenetic evaluation. He had a normal karyotype by G-banded chromosome analysis, and a deletion of the ETV6 (alias TEL) gene was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using DNA probes specific for t(12;21), which leads to ETV6/RUNX1 (alias TEL/AML1) gene fusion, but no translocation was found between the two genes. To find out if there were possibly additional subtle chromosomal changes undetectable by routine cytogenetics, high-density 385K oligo array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) assay was performed. Besides the confirmation of the 12p deletion, a deletion of a 12-megabase (Mb) chromosomal segment on 14q24.1 approximately q24.3 was also detected. Within the deleted 12-Mb region, there were a total of 155 genes and at least 28 of these were cancer-related genes. A similar approach by array CGH in patients with ALL, especially in those patients with 12p deletion, could help to determine the significance of this rare event.

  2. The "Parity" Anomaly On An Unorientable Manifold

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The "parity" anomaly -- more accurately described as an anomaly in time-reversal or reflection symmetry -- arises in certain theories of fermions coupled to gauge fields and/or gravity in a spacetime of odd dimension. The "parity" anomaly has traditionally been studied on orientable manifolds only, but recent developments involving topological superconductors have made it clear that one can get more information by asking what happens on an unorientable manifold. In this paper, we analyze the "parity" anomaly for fermions coupled to gauge fields and gravity in $2+1$ dimensions. We consider applications to gapped boundary states of a topological superconductor and to M2-branes in string/M-theory.

  3. Chromosome territories, X;Y translocation and Premature Ovarian Failure: is there a relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betri Enrico

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Premature ovarian failure (POF is a secondary hypergonadotrophic amenorrhea occurring before the age of 40 and affecting 1-3% of females. Chromosome anomalies account for 6-8% of POF cases, but only few cases are associated with translocations involving X and Y chromosomes. This study shows the cytogenetic and molecular analysis of a POF patient came to our attention as she developed a left ovary choriocarcinoma at the age of 10 and at 14 years of age she presented secondary amenorrhea with elevated levels of gonadotropins. Results Breakpoint position on X and Y chromosomes was investigated using Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation (FISH with a panel of specific BAC probes, microsatellite analysis and evaluation of copy number changes and loss of heterozigosity by Affymetrix® GeneChip platform (Santa Clara, CA, USA. Patient's karyotype resulted 46, X, der(Yt(X;Y(q13.1;q11.223. X inactivation study was assessed by RBA banding and showed preferential inactivation of derivative chromosome. The reciprocal spatial disposition of sexual chromosome territories was investigated using whole chromosome painting and centromeres probes: patient's results didn't show a significant difference in comparison to normal controls. Conclusion The peculiar clinical case come to our attention highlighted the complexity of POF aetiology and of the translocation event, even if our results seem to exclude any effect on nuclear organisation. POF phenotype could be partially explained by skewed X chromosome inactivation that influences gene expression.

  4. [Sex chromosomes and meiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichaoua, M-R; Geoffroy-Siraudin, C; Tassistro, V; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, R; Perrin, J; Metzler-Guillemain, C

    2009-01-01

    Sex chromosome behaviour fundamentally differs between male and female meiosis. In oocyte, X chromosomes synapse giving a XX bivalent which is not recognizable in their morphology and behaviour from autosomal bivalents. In human male, X and Y chromosomes differ from one another in their morphology and their genetic content, leading to a limited pairing and preventing genetic recombination, excepted in homologous region PAR1. During pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase, X and Y chromosomes undergo a progressive condensation and form a transcriptionally silenced peripheral XY body. The condensation of the XY bivalent during pachytene stage led us to describe four pachytene substages and to localize the pachytene checkpoint between substages 2 and 3. We also defined the pachytene index (PI=P1+P2/P1+P2+P3+P4) which is always less than 0.50 in normal meiosis. XY body undergoes decondensation at diplotene stage, but transcriptional inactivation of the two sex chromosomes or Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) persists through to the end of spermatogenesis. Sex chromosome inactivation involves several proteins, some of them were now identified. Two isoforms of the HP1 protein, HP1beta and HP1gamma, are involved in the facultative heterochromatinization of the XY body, but the initiation of this process involves the phosphorylation of the protein H2AX by the kinase ATR whose recruitment depends on BRCA1. Extensive researches on the inactivation of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis will allow to a better understanding of some male infertilities.

  5. Chromosomal mosaicism goes global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular differences of chromosomal content in the same individual are defined as chromosomal mosaicism (alias intercellular or somatic genomic variations or, in a number of publications, mosaic aneuploidy. It has long been suggested that this phenomenon poorly contributes both to intercellular (interindividual diversity and to human disease. However, our views have recently become to change due to a series of communications demonstrated a higher incidence of chromosomal mosaicism in diseased individuals (major psychiatric disorders and autoimmune diseases as well as depicted chromosomal mosaicism contribution to genetic diversity, the central nervous system development, and aging. The later has been produced by significant achievements in the field of molecular cytogenetics. Recently, Molecular Cytogenetics has published an article by Maj Hulten and colleagues that has provided evidences for chromosomal mosaicism to underlie formation of germline aneuploidy in human female gametes using trisomy 21 (Down syndrome as a model. Since meiotic aneuploidy is suggested to be the leading genetic cause of human prenatal mortality and postnatal morbidity, these data together with previous findings define chromosomal mosaicism not as a casual finding during cytogenetic analyses but as a more significant biological phenomenon than previously recognized. Finally, the significance of chromosomal mosaicism can be drawn from the fact, that this phenomenon is involved in genetic diversity, normal and abnormal prenatal development, human diseases, aging, and meiotic aneuploidy, the intrinsic cause of which remains, as yet, unknown.

  6. Subtelomeric study of 132 patients with mental retardation reveals 9 chromosomal anomalies and contributes to the delineation of submicroscopic deletions of 1pter, 2qter, 4pter, 5qter and 9qter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogaard, Marie; Tümer, Zeynep; Hjalgrim, Helle

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryptic chromosome imbalances are increasingly acknowledged as a cause for mental retardation and learning disability. New phenotypes associated with specific rearrangements are also being recognized. Techniques for screening for subtelomeric rearrangements are commercially available......, allowing the implementation in a diagnostic service laboratory. We report the diagnostic yield in a series of 132 subjects with mental retardation, and the associated clinical phenotypes. METHODS: We applied commercially available subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). All patients...... dysmorphic features. Five had imbalances leading to recognizable phenotypes. CONCLUSION: Subtelomeric screening is a useful adjunct to conventional cytogenetic analyses, and should be considered in mentally retarded subjects with dysmorphic features and unknown cause....

  7. Tracheobronchial Branching Anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Min Ji; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, A Young [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    There are various congenital anomalies with respect to the number, length, diameter, and location of tracheobronchial branching patterns. The tracheobronchial anomalies are classified into two groups. The first one, anomalies of division, includes tracheal bronchus, cardiac bronchus, tracheal diverticulum, pulmonary isomerism, and minor variations. The second one, dysmorphic lung, includes lung agenesis-hypoplasia complex and lobar agenesis-aplasia complex

  8. Molecular karyotyping by array CGH in a Russian cohort of children with intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy and congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iourov Ivan Y

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH has been repeatedly shown to be a successful tool for the identification of genomic variations in a clinical population. During the last decade, the implementation of array CGH has resulted in the identification of new causative submicroscopic chromosome imbalances and copy number variations (CNVs in neuropsychiatric (neurobehavioral diseases. Currently, array-CGH-based technologies have become an integral part of molecular diagnosis and research in individuals with neuropsychiatric disorders and children with intellectual disability (mental retardation and congenital anomalies. Here, we introduce the Russian cohort of children with intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy and congenital anomalies analyzed by BAC array CGH and a novel bioinformatic strategy. Results Among 54 individuals highly selected according to clinical criteria and molecular and cytogenetic data (from 2426 patients evaluated cytogenetically and molecularly between November 2007 and May 2012, chromosomal imbalances were detected in 26 individuals (48%. In two patients (4%, a previously undescribed condition was observed. The latter has been designated as meiotic (constitutional genomic instability resulted in multiple submicroscopic rearrangements (including CNVs. Using bioinformatic strategy, we were able to identify clinically relevant CNVs in 15 individuals (28%. Selected cases were confirmed by molecular cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods. Eight out of 26 chromosomal imbalances (31% have not been previously reported. Among them, three cases were co-occurrence of subtle chromosome 9 and 21 deletions. Conclusions We conducted an array CGH study of Russian patients suffering from intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy and congenital anomalies. In total, phenotypic manifestations of clinically relevant genomic variations were found to result from genomic rearrangements affecting 1247 disease

  9. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  10. Microdeletion del(22)(q12.1) excluding the MN1 gene in a patient with craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Caroline; Devillard, Françoise; Satre, Véronique; Dieterich, Klaus; Ray, Pierre F; Morand, Béatrice; Dubois-Teklali, Fanny; Vieville, Gaëlle; Andrieux, Joris; Brouillet, Sophie; Amblard, Florence; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Coutton, Charles

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have recently reported that 22q12.1 deletions encompassing the MN1 gene are associated with craniofacial anomalies. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that MN1 haploinsufficiency may be solely responsible for craniofacial anomalies and/or cleft palate. We report here the case of a 4-year-old boy presenting with global developmental delay and craniofacial anomalies including severe maxillary protrusion and retromicrognathia. Array-CGH detected a 2.4 Mb de novo deletion of chromosome 22q12.1 which did not encompass the MN1 gene thought to be the main pathological candidate in 22q12.1 deletions. This observation, combined with data from other patients from the Database of Chromosomal Imbalance and Phenotype in Humans Using Ensemble Resources (DECIPHER), suggests that other gene(s) in the 22q12.1 region are likely involved in craniofacial anomalies and/or may contribute to the phenotypic variability observed in patients with MN1 deletion.

  11. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Servant, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation that are

  12. Chromosomal localization of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), and endonuclease G (ENDOG), three human housekeeping genes involving in mitochondrial biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiranti, V.; Rossi, G.; DiDonato, S. [Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Carlo Besta (Italy)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    By using a PCR-based screening of a somatic cell hybrid panel and FISH, we have assigned the loci of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), and mitochondrial endonuclease G (ENDOG) genes to human chromosomes 7q34, 10q21, and 9q34.1, respectively. The products of these three genes are involved in fundamental aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as replication and transcription of the mitochondrial genome. The chromosomal localization of these genes is important to testing whether the corresponding proteins may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of human disorders associated with qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of mitochondrial DNA. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD.

  14. Mosaic Double Aneuploidy of X and G Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Singh, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    Reported are case histories of three severely retarded adolescents with typical Down's Syndrome features but whose cytogenetic analysis revealed a rare chromosomal anomaly of mosaicism of Down's and Turner's syndromes. (CL)

  15. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  16. Abnormal Chromosome Segregation May Trigger Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Cancer is a primary threat to human health as it kills millions of people each year.Scientists have shown that 75% of human cancers have an abnormal number of chromosomes in cells,and the proportion of the cells with an abnormal chromosome number is tightly and positively related to malignance progression and metastasis of cancers. But the pathological mechanism behind the anomaly still remains unknown.

  17. 一例发育落后合并多发先天畸形患儿9q和22q亚端粒不平衡重组%Unbalanced subtelomic rearrangement involving 9q and 22q in a child with mental retardation and multiple congenital anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖冰; 邢娅; 季星; 徐燕; 倪琳; 祝悦; 陶炯

    2013-01-01

    unbalanced subtelomeric translocation 46,XY,der(9)t(9 ; 22) (q34.3 ; q13.2q13.33) mat,which has resulted in partial trisomy 22q and partial monosomy 9q.Clinical features of the patient included developmental delay,facial dysmorphism and multiple congenital anomalies.Upon subsequent pregnancy,FISH analysis revealed that the fetus has inherited the normal chromosomes 9 and 22 from his mother.Postnatal follow-up confirmed normal development milestone and physiques in the child.Conclusion An unbalanced translocation involving 9q and 22q has been found in a child featuring multiple congenital anomalies,which is due to a balanced translocation 9; 22 in his mother.Array CGH and FISH have also helped with discovery of subtelomeric rearrangement.Prenatal diagnosis of this aberration in subsequent pregnancies with FISH can prevent the recurrence of this disease.

  18. Associated anomalies in cases with anotia and microtia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Alembik, Yves; Dott, Beatrice; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2016-12-01

    Infants with anotia and microtia (AM) often have other non-AM associated congenital anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of these associated anomalies in a defined population. The associated anomalies in infants with AM were collected in all livebirths, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 29 years in 387,067 consecutive births in the area covered by our population-based registry of congenital malformations. Of the 146 cases with AM registered during this period, representing a prevalence of 3.77 per 10,000, 49.3% had associated anomalies. There were 14 (9.6%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 5 trisomies 18, and 18 (12.3%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions including 6 cases with oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum. However, numerous other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered. Forty (27.4%) of the cases had multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies especially in the cardiovascular, the musculoskeletal, the urogenital, the central nervous, and the digestive systems, and facial clefts were the most common other anomalies. This study included special strengths: each affected child was examined by a geneticist, all elective terminations were ascertained, and the surveillance for anomalies was continued until 2 years of age. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in every two cases, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with AM. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with AM.

  19. Auditory function in the Tc1 mouse model of down syndrome suggests a limited region of human chromosome 21 involved in otitis media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kuhn

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is one of the most common congenital disorders leading to a wide range of health problems in humans, including frequent otitis media. The Tc1 mouse carries a significant part of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21 in addition to the full set of mouse chromosomes and shares many phenotypes observed in humans affected by Down syndrome with trisomy of chromosome 21. However, it is unknown whether Tc1 mice exhibit a hearing phenotype and might thus represent a good model for understanding the hearing loss that is common in Down syndrome. In this study we carried out a structural and functional assessment of hearing in Tc1 mice. Auditory brainstem response (ABR measurements in Tc1 mice showed normal thresholds compared to littermate controls and ABR waveform latencies and amplitudes were equivalent to controls. The gross anatomy of the middle and inner ears was also similar between Tc1 and control mice. The physiological properties of cochlear sensory receptors (inner and outer hair cells: IHCs and OHCs were investigated using single-cell patch clamp recordings from the acutely dissected cochleae. Adult Tc1 IHCs exhibited normal resting membrane potentials and expressed all K(+ currents characteristic of control hair cells. However, the size of the large conductance (BK Ca(2+ activated K(+ current (I(K,f, which enables rapid voltage responses essential for accurate sound encoding, was increased in Tc1 IHCs. All physiological properties investigated in OHCs were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. The normal functional hearing and the gross structural anatomy of the middle and inner ears in the Tc1 mouse contrast to that observed in the Ts65Dn model of Down syndrome which shows otitis media. Genes that are trisomic in Ts65Dn but disomic in Tc1 may predispose to otitis media when an additional copy is active.

  20. Detecting anomalies in a deliberately biased tomotherapy plan: Comparison of two patient-specific quality assurance processes involving ArcCHECK(®) and Gafchromic(®) EBT3 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlé, F; Dehaynin, N; Niederst, C; Jarnet, D; Gantier, M; Karamanoukian, D; Meyer, P

    2017-08-02

    This work proposes a comparative evaluation of two of our patient-specific quality assurance processes involving ArcCHECK(®) (Sun Nuclear) and Gafchromic(®) EBT3 films (Ashland) in order to determine which detector is able to most effectively detect an anomaly in a deliberately biased tomotherapy plan. A complex clinical head and neck tomotherapy plan was deliberately biased by introducing six errors: multileaf collimator leaf positional errors by leaving one and two central leafs closed during the whole treatment, initial radiation angle errors (+0.5° and +1.0°) and multileaf collimator leafs opening time errors (+0.5% and +1.0%). For each error-induced plan, comparison of ArcCHECK(®) with Gafchromic(®) EBT3 films (20.3×25.4cm(2)) was performed through two methods: a dose matrices subtraction study and a gamma index analysis. The dose matrices subtraction study shows that our ArcCHECK(®) processing is able to detect all the six induced errors contrary to the one using films, which are only able to detect the two biases involving multileaf collimator leaf positional errors. The gamma index analysis confirms the previous method, since it shows all six errors induced in the reference plan seem to be widely detected with ArcCHECK(®) with the more restrictive 1%/1mm gamma criterion, whereas films may only be able to detect biases in relation to multileaf collimator leaf positional errors. It also shows the common 3%/3mm gamma criterion does not allow deciding between both detectors in the detection of the six induced biases. Both comparative methods showed ArcCHECK(®) processing is more suitable to detect the six errors introduced in the reference treatment plan. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromosomes in the genesis and progression of ependymomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogatto, S R; Casartelli, C; Rainho, C A;

    1993-01-01

    chromosomes in three cases. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 2 were a finding for all cases and involved loss of material at 2q32-34. Other structural chromosome abnormalities detected involved chromosomes 4, 6, 10, 11, 12, and X. We also reviewed data on 22 cases previously reported....

  2. A large scale survey reveals that chromosomal copy-number alterations significantly affect gene modules involved in cancer initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigudosa Juan C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent observations point towards the existence of a large number of neighborhoods composed of functionally-related gene modules that lie together in the genome. This local component in the distribution of the functionality across chromosomes is probably affecting the own chromosomal architecture by limiting the possibilities in which genes can be arranged and distributed across the genome. As a direct consequence of this fact it is therefore presumable that diseases such as cancer, harboring DNA copy number alterations (CNAs, will have a symptomatology strongly dependent on modules of functionally-related genes rather than on a unique "important" gene. Methods We carried out a systematic analysis of more than 140,000 observations of CNAs in cancers and searched by enrichments in gene functional modules associated to high frequencies of loss or gains. Results The analysis of CNAs in cancers clearly demonstrates the existence of a significant pattern of loss of gene modules functionally related to cancer initiation and progression along with the amplification of modules of genes related to unspecific defense against xenobiotics (probably chemotherapeutical agents. With the extension of this analysis to an Array-CGH dataset (glioblastomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas we demonstrate the validity of this approach to investigate the functional impact of CNAs. Conclusions The presented results indicate promising clinical and therapeutic implications. Our findings also directly point out to the necessity of adopting a function-centric, rather a gene-centric, view in the understanding of phenotypes or diseases harboring CNAs.

  3. The most common genetic syndromes and associated anomalies in Latvian patients with cleft lip with or without palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lace, Baiba; Barkane, Biruta; Akota, Ilze

    2006-01-01

    1 over 700 newborns every year is born with cleft lip with/or without palate, in 30% of cases there is a certain genetic mechanism underlying development of disease: chromosomal anomalies, monogenic diseases, exposure to teratogens or in utero disruptive mechanisms. The objective of our study is to describe the most common genetic syndromes and associated anomalies in patients with CL/CP in Latvia. Study material was medical records obtained from Riga Cleft Lip and Palate Centre Registry in a time period of 1980 till 2005. There was analyzed information about patients with identified genetic syndromes and associated anomalies. In a time period from 1980 till 2005, the following genetic syndromes were identified: Van der Woude, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Holzgreve syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Myotonic dystrophy, Klippel-Feil syndrome, Patau syndrome, Potter sequence and Pierre Robin sequence. 16% of CL/CP patients have recognized genetic syndromes or associated anomalies, including profound, severe and moderate mental retardation. Number is lower than expected, but still correlates with date presented in other populations. Long term follow-up of multidisciplinary specialists which includes cardiologists, clinical-geneticists and paediatricians, is needed for CL/CP patients with associated anomalies in order to identify timely side diseases and complications. Grant: Baltic-Taiwan joint research project "Identification of genes involved in craniofacial morphogenesis and susceptibility to orofacial clefting in a human genome scan 2004-2006".

  4. Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm Rupture: An Unusual Presentation of Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda-Cristina Abuchaibe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA is defined as a weakness in the aortic valve wall, immediately above the attachments of each of the aortic cusps. This weakness can rupture and create an aortocardiac fistula. There are many congenital heart defects associated with chromosome 22q11 deletion, especially involving the aortic arch and its branches. SVA is not an anomaly usually associated with chromosome 22 deletion. We report the case of a 19-year-old female who presented to our institution with SVA rupture. She was subsequently diagnosed with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome. Despite dysmorphic facial features and a learning disability, our patient had not been diagnosed with the chromosome abnormality. SVA is a rare congenital heart defect and has only once previously been reported in a child with a chromosome 22q11 deletion. We report the first case where aneurysm rupture preceded the chromosomal findings. Chromosome 22q11 deletion could be missed due to either the unfamiliarity of physicians with the syndrome or the variability and subtlety of the phenotype. This was demonstrated by our patient who, at age 19 after presenting with an SVA rupture, prompted physicians to find an explanation for her coexisting dysmorphic features and her learning disability.

  5. Simple recipe for holographic Weyl anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Bugini, F

    2016-01-01

    We propose a recipe - arguably the simplest - to compute the holographic type-B Weyl anomaly for general higher-derivative gravity in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. In 5 and 7 dimensions we identify a suitable basis of curvature invariants that allows to read off easily, without any further computation, the Weyl anomaly coefficients of the dual CFT. We tabulate the contributions from quadratic, cubic and quartic purely algebraic curvature invariants and also from terms involving derivatives of the curvature. We provide few examples, where the anomaly coefficients have been obtained by other means, to illustrate the effectiveness of our prescription.

  6. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Brilstra, Eva H; Brown, Chester W; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B A; Earl, Dawn L; Ferguson, Heather L; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W; Gropman, Andrea L; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J; Hayden, Mark A; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D; Hopkin, Robert J; Hubshman, Monika W; Innes, A Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Kahler, Stephen G; Koolen, David A; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W; Mendoza, Cinthya J Zepeda; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Aguilar, Raul E Piña; Poddighe, Pino J; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L P; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V; van Bon, Bregje W; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M L; Warburton, Dorothy P; Waterman, Matthew J; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A; Zori, Roberto T; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Thorland, Erik C; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing

  7. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  8. Anomaly-induced baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kobakhidze, A

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for dynamical generation of the observed baryon asymmetry within the minimal Standard model extended by massive Majorana neutrinos and non-vanishing electroweak Chern-Simons term. We show that electroweak Chern-Simons number is produced in the expanding universe due to the conformal anomaly and subsequently converted into baryon number through the triangle anomaly.

  9. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-08

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  10. On the topological interpretation of gravitational anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Denis

    2001-07-01

    We consider the mixed gravitational Yang-Mills anomaly as the coupling between the K-theory and K-homology of a C ∗-algebra crossed product. The index theorem of Connes-Moscovici allows to compute the Chern character of the K-cycle by local formulae involving connections and curvatures. It gives a topological interpretation to the anomaly, in the sense of noncommutative algebras.

  11. Common chromosomal fragile sites (CFS) may be involved in normal and traumatic cognitive stress memory consolidation and altered nervous system immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, G S

    2010-05-01

    Previous reports of specific patterns of increased fragility at common chromosomal fragile sites (CFS) found in association with certain neurobehavioural disorders did not attract attention at the time due to a shift towards molecular approaches to delineate neuropsychiatric disorder candidate genes. Links with miRNA, altered methylation and the origin of copy number variation indicate that CFS region characteristics may be part of chromatinomic mechanisms that are increasingly linked with neuroplasticity and memory. Current reports of large-scale double-stranded DNA breaks in differentiating neurons and evidence of ongoing DNA demethylation of specific gene promoters in adult hippocampus may shed new light on the dynamic epigenetic changes that are increasingly appreciated as contributing to long-term memory consolidation. The expression of immune recombination activating genes in key stress-induced memory regions suggests the adoption by the brain of this ancient pattern recognition and memory system to establish a structural basis for long-term memory through controlled chromosomal breakage at highly specific genomic regions. It is furthermore considered that these mechanisms for management of epigenetic information related to stress memory could be linked, in some instances, with the transfer of the somatically acquired information to the germline. Here, rearranged sequences can be subjected to further selection and possible eventual retrotranscription to become part of the more stable coding machinery if proven to be crucial for survival and reproduction. While linkage of cognitive memory with stress and fear circuitry and memory establishment through structural DNA modification is proposed as a normal process, inappropriate activation of immune-like genomic rearrangement processes through traumatic stress memory may have the potential to lead to undesirable activation of neuro-inflammatory processes. These theories could have a significant impact on the

  12. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of gonosomal anomalies: limitations of the FISH method and genetic counseling difficulties in 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, Elena; Martiniuc, Violeta; Panzaru, Monica; Caba, Lavinia; Butnariu, Lăcrămioara; Onofriescu, M; Socolov, Demetra; Grigore, Mihaela; Nemescu, D; Mihălceanu, Elena; Iliev, G; Gorduza, E V

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis (PD) by FISH or cell culture is today an important tool for the prevention of chromosomal anomalies. A difficult issue is prenatal detection of gonosomal anomalies. Most gonosomal anomalies neither affect life expectancy nor cause psychomotor retardation, but sexualization disorders and the lack of reproductive potential are a constant finding. This study aimed at identifying the medical problems the specialists and the parental couple are faced with at the time of the diagnosis of fetal gonosomal anomalies. This retrospective study (2004-2012) was conducted in the Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis Department of "CuzaVoda" Maternity by FISH technique in 1685 pregnancies. The AneuVysion probes were used for identifying and enumerating chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in interphase nuclei obtained from amniotic fluid. Fifteen fetuses were selected in which we were faced with difficulties interpreting the number of gonosomes: monosomy X (5 cases), pseudomosaicism XX/XY (3), trisomy XXY (3 cases), trisomy XYY (1 case), 45,X/46.XX mosaicism (1 case) and triploidy XXX (2 cases). Later, by repeating the analysis, 2 cases with pseudomosaicism XX/XY were excluded. A case highlighting the limitations of the FISH test was that of a fetus in which the FISH test revealed trisomy XXY, while postnatal karyotyping showed a six cell line mosaicism (marker and ring X chromosomes). All parental couples received nondirective genetic counseling, respecting the individuals' dignity and rights of self-determination. Parents received information on the natural course of the disease, treatment options, and psychological support and were involved in their child's recovery.

  14. Craniosynostosis and syndactyly: expanding the 11q-- chromosomal deletion phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Lippe, B M; Sparkes, R. S.; Fass, B; Neidengard, L

    1980-01-01

    A patient with a partial deletion (q23 leads to qter) of the long arm of chromosome 11 presented with craniosynostosis and syndactyly. These characteristics, which have not been previously reported with 11q--, expand the phenotype of this syndrome and emphasise the need for chromosome analysis with banding techniques in multiple congenital anomaly syndromes, even if the patient could be classified as having a non-chromosomal syndrome.

  15. Survey of Anomaly Detection Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, B

    2006-10-12

    This survey defines the problem of anomaly detection and provides an overview of existing methods. The methods are categorized into two general classes: generative and discriminative. A generative approach involves building a model that represents the joint distribution of the input features and the output labels of system behavior (e.g., normal or anomalous) then applies the model to formulate a decision rule for detecting anomalies. On the other hand, a discriminative approach aims directly to find the decision rule, with the smallest error rate, that distinguishes between normal and anomalous behavior. For each approach, we will give an overview of popular techniques and provide references to state-of-the-art applications.

  16. Understanding Chromosome Disorders and their Implications for Special Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Gilmore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available More children are now being diagnosed with chromosome abnormalities. Some chromosome disorder syndromes are relatively well known; while others are so rare that there is only limited evidence about their likely impact on learning and development. For educators, a basic level of knowledge about chromosome abnormalities is important for understanding the literature and communicating with families and professionals. This paper describes chromosomes, and the numerical and structural anomalies that can occur, usually spontaneously during early cell division. Distinctive features of various chromosome syndromes are summarised before a discussion of the rare chromosome disorders that are labelled, not with a syndrome name, but simply by a description of the chromosome number, size and shape. Because of the potential within-group variability that characterises syndromes, and the scarcity of literature about the rare chromosome disorders, expectations for learning and development of individual students need to be based on the range of possible outcomes that may be achievable.

  17. Similar frequency of paternal uniparental disomy involving chromosome 20q (patUPD20q) in Japanese and Caucasian patients affected by sporadic pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (sporPHP1B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Rieko; Minagawa, Masanori; Molinaro, Angelo; Reyes, Monica; Kinoshita, Kaori; Takatani, Tomozumi; Kazukawa, Itsuro; Nagatsuma, Misako; Kashimada, Kenichi; Sato, Kenichi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Nomura, Fumio; Shimojo, Naoki; Jüppner, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B) is caused by proximal tubular resistance to parathyroid hormone that occurs in most cases in the absence of Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO). Familial forms of PHP1B are caused by maternally inherited microdeletions within STX16, the gene encoding syntaxin 16, or within GNAS, a complex genetic locus on chromosome 20q13.3 encoding Gsα and several splice variants thereof. These deletions lead either to a loss-of-methylation affecting GNAS exon A/B alone or to epigenetic changes involving multiple differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within GNAS. Broad GNAS methylation abnormalities are also observed in most sporadic PHP1B (sporPHP1B) cases. However, with the exception of paternal uniparental disomy involving chromosome 20q (patUPD20q), the molecular mechanism leading to this disease variant remains unknown. We now investigated 23 Japanese sporPHP1B cases, who presented with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, elevated PTH levels, and occasionally with TSH elevations and mild AHO features. Age at diagnosis was 10.6 ± 1.45 years. Calcium, phosphate, and PTH were 6.3 ± 0.23 mg/dL, 7.7 ± 0.33 mg/dL, and 305 ± 34.5 pg/mL, respectively, i.e. laboratory findings that are indistinguishable from those previously observed for Caucasian sporPHP1B cases. All investigated patients showed broad GNAS methylation changes. Eleven individuals were homozygous for SNPs within exon NESP and a pentanucleotide repeat in exon A/B. Two of these patients furthermore revealed homozygosity for numerous microsatellite markers on chromosome 20q raising the possibility of patUPD20q, which was confirmed through the analysis of parental DNA. Based on this and our previous reports, paternal duplication of the chromosomal region comprising the GNAS locus appears to be a fairly common cause of sporPHP1B that is likely to occur with equal frequency in Caucasians and Asians.

  18. Chromosome breakage in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome deletions may involve recombination between a repeat at the proximal and distal breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos-Landgraf J.; Nicholls, R.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Gottlieb, W. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi (PWS) and Angelman (AS) syndromes most commonly arise from large deletions of 15q11-q13. Deletions in PWS are paternal in origin, while those in AS are maternal in origin, clearly demonstrating genomic imprinting in these clinically distinct neurobehavioural disorders. In at least 90% of PWS and AS deletion patients, the same 4 Mb region within 15q11-q13 is deleted with breakpoints clustering in single YAC clones at the proximal and distal ends. To study the mechanism of chromosome breakage in PWS and AS, we have previously isolated 25 independent clones from these three YACs using Alu-vector PCR. Four clones were selected that appear to detect a low copy repeat that is located in the proximal and distal breakpoint regions of chromosome 15q11-q13. Three clones detect the same 4 HindIII bands in genomic DNA, all from 15q11-q13, with differing intensities for the probes located at the proximal or distal breakpoints region, respectively. This suggests that these probes detect related members of a low-copy repeat at either location. Moreover, the 254RL2 probe detects a novel HindIII band in two unrelated PWS deletion patients, suggesting that this may represent a breakpoint fragment, with recombination occurring within a similar interval in both patients. A fourth clone, 318RL3 detects 5 bands in HindIII-digested genomic DNA, all from 15q11-q13. This YAC endclone itself is not deleted in PWS and AS deletion patients, as seen by an invariant strong band. Two other strong bands are variably intact or deleted in different PWS or AS deletion patients, suggesting a relationship of this sequence to the breakpoints. Moreover, PCR using 318RL3 primers from the distal 93C9 YAC led to the isolation of a related clone with 96% identity, demonstrating the existence of a low-copy repeat with members close to the proximal and distal breakpoints. Taken together, our data suggest a complex, low-copy repeat with members at both the proximal and distal boundaries.

  19. Single chromosomal abnormalities in Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panani, Anna D

    2007-01-01

    In Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD), increased proliferation with effective maturation of the myeloid lineage is present, while peripheral leukocytosis, thrombocytosis or elevated red blood cell mass are found. This group of disorders includes polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF). Furthermore, cases that cannot be clearly defined are regarded as unclassified CMPD. In Philadelphia-negative CMPD, recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities occur, but no specific abnormality has been defined to date. Chromosomal abnormalities detected in a neoplastic disease as a sole anomaly are of major importance, possibly constituting primary changes implicated in the initiation or progression of the neoplastic process. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and the type of single chromosomal changes in Philadelphia-negative CMPD patients. By conventional cytogenetics, 245 Philadelphia-negative CMPD cases at diagnosis were investigated for the frequency and the type of single chromosomal aberrations. Seventeen patients presented single chromosomal changes. These aberrations were, according to frequency, +8 (in 3 PV cases, 2 IMF and 2 unclassified myeloproliferative diseases), +13 in 3 cases (IMF, ET and unclassified myeloproliferative disease), monosomy 10 in 2 PV cases, monosomy 14 in one ET patient, +3, -4 and del(11)(q13) in 1 unclassified myeloproliferative disease each and monosomy 7 in 1 IMF case. It is unclear whether these abnormalities found at the time of diagnosis play a role in CMPD. However, since an isolated chromosomal abnormality may be implicated in the initiation of the neoplastic process, the documentation of more cases of CMPD with single abnormalities at the time of diagnosis would facilitate the identification of candidate genes involved in the neoplastic process.

  20. Anomalies on orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew G.; Georgi, Howard

    2001-03-16

    We discuss the form of the chiral anomaly on an S1/Z2 orbifold with chiral boundary conditions. We find that the 4-divergence of the higher-dimensional current evaluated at a given point in the extra dimension is proportional to the probability of finding the chiral zero mode there. Nevertheless the anomaly, appropriately defined as the five dimensional divergence of the current, lives entirely on the orbifold fixed planes and is independent of the shape of the zero mode. Therefore long distance four dimensional anomaly cancellation ensures the consistency of the higher dimensional orbifold theory.

  1. Pattern of chromosomal aberrations in patients from north East iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaey, Saeedeh; Mirzaei, Farzaneh; Ahadian, Mitra; Keifi, Fatemeh; Semiramis, Tootian; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques. In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities. The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS) was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%). Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner's syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter's syndrome. According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  2. Pulmonary agenesis and pulmonary sling anomaly in an infant with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takci, S; Yigit, S; Haliloglu, M; Boduroglu, K; Kiper, N

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly presenting with normal karyotype in most of the cases. Rarely pulmonary agenesis is associated with chromosomal abnormalities and other genetic disorders such as Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum, VACTERL association and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. This report presents a patient with pulmonary agenesis, pulmonary sling anomaly and Down syndrome.

  3. Children with Anatomical Congenital Anomalies; a Portrait Follow-up over five years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Mazer (Petra); S.J. Gischler (Saskia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAnnually some 5.000 newborns (2 - 3% of all births) in the Netherlands present with major anatomical congenital anomalies.140,395 The causes of most of these are still unknown. So far, genetic or chromosomal causes have been implicated in 13 - 14% of all anomalies,17,120,214,249,337 and

  4. Theoretically Optimal Distributed Anomaly Detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel general framework for distributed anomaly detection with theoretical performance guarantees is proposed. Our algorithmic approach combines existing anomaly...

  5. Anomaly Detection in Sequences

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a set of novel algorithms which we call sequenceMiner, that detect and characterize anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences that...

  6. Neutrino anomalies without oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandip Pakvasa

    2000-01-01

    I review explanations for the three neutrino anomalies (solar, atmospheric and LSND) which go beyond the `conventional' neutrino oscillations induced by mass-mixing. Several of these require non-zero neutrino masses as well.

  7. Scattering anomaly in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    In time-reversal invariant electronic systems the scattering matrix is anti-symmetric. This property enables an effect, designated here as "scattering anomaly", such that the electron transport does not suffer from back reflections, independent of the specific geometry of the propagation path or the presence of time-reversal invariant defects. In contrast, for a generic time-reversal invariant photonic system the scattering matrix is symmetric and there is no similar anomaly. Here, it is theoretically proven that despite these fundamental differences there is a wide class of photonic platforms - in some cases formed only by time-reversal invariant media - in which the scattering anomaly can occur. It is shown that an optical system invariant under the action of the composition of the time-reversal, parity and duality operators is characterized by an anti-symmetric scattering matrix. Specific examples of photonic platforms wherein the scattering anomaly occurs are given, and it is demonstrated with full wave n...

  8. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  9. Sex chromosome rearrangements in Polyphaga beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrillaux, A M; Dutrillaux, B

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a parachute sex chromosome bivalent (Xyp) at metaphase I of male meiosis is a well-known characteristic of Coleoptera, present in almost all families of this order and assumed to represent their ancestral sex chromosome formula. Sex chromosomes appear to be manifold more frequently involved in inter-chromosomal rearrangements than the average of the nine autosomal pairs usually forming their karyotype. This leads to various formulae such as neo-sex, multiple sex and perhaps unique sex chromosomes. These rearrangements alter the intimate association between sex chromosomes and nucleolar proteins, which are usual components of the Xyp. Different situations, selected in a series of 125 mitotic and meiotic cytogenetic studies of Polyphaga beetle species, are reported and discussed, with the aim to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms of sex chromosome rearrangements, the relationships with nucleoli and the consequences on dosage compensation and chromosome segregation.

  10. The Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    de Diego, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the radio-metric data from Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts has indicated the presence of an unmodeled acceleration starting at 20 AU, which has become known as the Pioneer anomaly. The nature of this acceleration is uncertain. In this paper we give a description of the effect and review some relevant mechanisms proposed to explain the observed anomaly. We also discuss on some future projects to investigate this phenomenon.

  11. DREDed Anomaly Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Boyda, E; Pierce, A T; Boyda, Ed; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierce, Aaron

    2002-01-01

    We offer a guide to dimensional reduction (DRED) in theories with anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking. Evanescent operators proportional to epsilon arise in the bare Lagrangian when it is reduced from d=4 to d= (4-2 epsilon) dimensions. In the course of a detailed diagrammatic calculation, we show that inclusion of these operators is crucial. The evanescent operators conspire to drive the supersymmetry-breaking parameters along anomaly-mediation trajectories across heavy particle thresholds, guaranteeing the ultraviolet insensitivity.

  12. Anomalies and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W

    2006-01-01

    Anomalies in Yang-Mills type gauge theories of gravity are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the relation between the Dirac spin, the axial current j_5 and the non-covariant gauge spin C. Using diagrammatic techniques, we show that only generalizations of the U(1)- Pontrjagin four--form F^ F= dC arise in the chiral anomaly, even when coupled to gravity. Implications for Ashtekar's canonical approach to quantum gravity are discussed.

  13. SADM potentiometer anomaly investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian; Mussett, David; Cattaldo, Olivier; Rohr, Thomas

    2005-07-01

    During the last 3 years Contraves Space have been developing a Low Power (1-2kW) Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) aimed at small series production. The mechanism was subjected to two test programmes in order to qualify the SADM to acceptable levels. During the two test programmes, anomalies were experienced with the Potentiometers provided by Eurofarad SA and joint investigations were undertaken to resolve why these anomalies had occurred. This paper deals with the lessons learnt from the failure investigation on the two Eurofarad (rotary) Potentiometer anomaly. The Rotary Potentiometers that were used were fully redundant; using two back to back mounted "plastic tracks". It is a pancake configuration mounted directly to the shaft of the Slip Ring Assembly at the extreme in-board end of the SADM. It has no internal bearings. The anomaly initially manifested itself as a loss of performance in terms of linearity, which was first detected during Thermal Vacuum testing. A subsequent anomaly manifested itself by the complete failure of the redundant potentiometer again during thermal vacuum testing. This paper will follow and detail the chain of events following this anomaly and identifies corrective measures to be applied to the potentiometer design and assembly process.

  14. Label Free Chromosome Translocation Detection with Silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Frøhling, Kasper Bayer;

    is a Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which is laborious and involves use of expensive reagents [1]. Here we present a label free technique for detection of chromosome translocations. As a proof of concept detection of chromosome translocation between chromosome 3 (Chr3) and chromosome 9 (Chr9) was chosen....

  15. Chromosomal instability in Streptomyces avermitilis: major deletion in the central region and stable circularized chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ying

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome of Streptomyces has been shown to be unstable, frequently undergoing gross chromosomal rearrangements. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear, with previous studies focused on two chromosomal ends as targets for rearrangements. Here we investigated chromosomal instability of Streptomyces avermitilis, an important producer of avermectins, and characterized four gross chromosomal rearrangement events, including a major deletion in the central region. The present findings provide a valuable contribution to the mechanistic study of genetic instability in Streptomyces. Results Thirty randomly-selected "bald" mutants derived from the wild-type strain all contained gross chromosomal rearrangements of various types. One of the bald mutants, SA1-8, had the same linear chromosomal structure as the high avermectin-producing mutant 76-9. Chromosomes of both strains displayed at least three independent chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement to form new 88-kb terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and two major deletions. One of the deletions eliminated the 36-kb central region of the chromosome, but surprisingly did not affect viability of the cells. The other deletion (74-kb was internal to the right chromosomal arm. The chromosome of another bald mutant, SA1-6, was circularized with deletions at both ends. No obvious homology was found in all fusion sequences. Generational stability analysis showed that the chromosomal structure of SA1-8 and SA1-6 was stable. Conclusions Various chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement, interstitial deletions and chromosomal circularization, occurred in S. avermitilis by non-homologous recombination. The finding of an inner deletion involving in the central region of S. avermitilis chromosome suggests that the entire Streptomyces chromosome may be the target for rearrangements, which are not limited, as previously

  16. Chromosome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  17. A rare case of a three way complex variant positive Philadelphia translocation involving chromosome (9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11) in chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation is present in 90–95% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Variant complex translocations have been observed in 5–8% of CML patients, in which a third chromosome other than (9;22) is involved. Imatinib mesylate is the first line breakpoint cluster region-Abelson gene (BCR/ABL)-targeted oral therapy for CML, and may produce a complete response in 70–80% of CML patients in the chronic phase. In the present study, a bone marrow sample was used for conventional cytogenetic analysis, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test was used for BCR/ABL gene detection. A hematological analysis was also performed to determine the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin levels, packed and mean cell volumes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and platelet values of the patient. The hematological analysis of the patient indicated the increased WBC of 186.5×103 cells/µl, and decreased hemoglobin levels of 11.1 g/dl. The FISH test revealed that 67% cells demonstrated BCR/ABL gene translocation. The patient was treated with 400 mg imatinib mesylate daily, and was monitored at various intervals over a 6-month period. The present study reports the rare case of a patient that demonstrates a three-way Philadelphia chromosome-positive translocation involving 46XY,t(9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11)[10], alongside CML in the chronic phase. The translocation was analyzed using cytogenetic and FISH tests. PMID:27602125

  18. Geoid anomalies over Gorringe Ridge, North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriau, A.

    1984-04-01

    The geoid anomalies over Gorringe Ridge, a very prominent high in the topography north of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary, have been deduced from Seasat alimetric data, and an interpretation of these anomalies together with the gravity anomalies is attempted. The geoid anomalies generated by the topographic high alone with the serpentinite density nearly fit the observed geoid anomalies, so that the structure must be either out of isostatic equilibrium or compensated at great depth. It is shown that a model in isostatic equilibrium with a small negative density contrast extending to 60 km depth or more explains both the gravity and geoid anomalies and is compatible with the deep seismicity north of Gorringe Ridge. Previous nonisostatic models, one involving an uplift of the upper mantle beneath the ridge, one describing a nascent subduction zone, and another involving flexure of the elastic part of the lithosphere due to the ridge loading, are discussed.

  19. Sexual maldevelopment and sex reversal, chromosomal causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenis, R Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The SRY gene on the Y chromosome is the testis determining factor (TDF). It is therefore the initial male determining factor. However, phenotypic sex determination includes a cascade of genes located on autosomes as well as sex chromosomes. Aberrations of these genes may cause sexual maldevelopment or sex reversal. Abnormalities may include single gene mutations and gene loss or gain-changes may involve only sex organs or may be part of syndromes. These changes may also arise as chromosome abnormalities involving contiguous genes. Eight cases with chromosomal abnormalities involving different causative mechanisms are described herein. The most common cause is nondisjunction, including loss or gain of sex chromosomes. Less common causes are mispairing and crossing over in meiosis, chromosome breaks with repair, nonhomologous pairing due to low copy repeats and crossing over, and translocation (familial or de novo) with segregation. Cases include: [see: text].

  20. Stable X chromosome inactivation involves the PRC1 Polycomb complex and requires histone MACROH2A1 and the CULLIN3/SPOP ubiquitin E3 ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Lund, Anders H; van der Stoop, Petra

    2005-01-01

    . This recruitment results in an inactive state that is initially labile but is further locked in by epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation, histone hypoacetylation, and MACROH2A deposition. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase consisting of SPOP and CULLIN3 is able to ubiquitinate the Polycomb group...... inactivation in somatic cells. We further demonstrate that MACROH2A1 deposition is regulated by the CULLIN3/SPOP ligase complex and is actively involved in stable X inactivation, likely through the formation of an additional layer of epigenetic silencing....

  1. Chromosomal translocation in a mongoloid male child and his normal mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Beçak

    1963-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a translocation 21/13-15 is related in 46 chromosomes, karyotypes of a mongoloid male child (Down's syndrome. The abnormal chromosome was transmitted by the mother of the patient. The possible deficiency of translocated chromosome 21 and the possible origin of the anomaly in the family was discussed and the presence of a markedly large Y chromosome in the karyotypes of the patient as in those of his father was also noted.

  2. The involvement of tetA and tetE tetracycline resistance genes in plasmid and chromosomal resistance of Aeromonas in Brazilian strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Teruszkin Balassiano

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the involvement of tetA and tetE genes in the tetracycline resistance of 16 strains of genus Aeromonas, isolated from clinical and food sources. Polymerase chain reactions revealed that 37.5% of the samples were positive for tetA, and also 37.5% were tetE positive. One isolate was positive for both genes. Only the isolate A. caviae 5.2 had its resistance associated to the presence of a plasmid, pSS2. The molecular characterization of pSS2 involved the construction of its restriction map and the determination of its size. The digestion of pSS2 with HindIII originated two fragments (A and B that were cloned separately into the pUC18 vector. The tetA gene was shown to be located on the HindIII-A fragment by PCR. After transforming a tetracycline-sensitive strain with pSS2, the transformants expressed the resistance phenotype and harbored a plasmid whose size was identical to that of pSS2. The results confirmed the association between pSS2 and the tetracycline resistance phenotype, and suggest a feasible dissemination of tetA and tetE among strains of Aeromonas. This study suggests the spreading tetA and tetE genes in Aeromonas in Brazil and describes a resistance plasmid that probably contributes to the dissemination of the resistance.

  3. Outcome of Fetal Omphalocele According to Omphalocele Content Combined with Associated Anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sung Il; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Ryu, Jung Kyu [SungKyunKwan University College of Medicine Samsung Cheil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To evaluate the risk of chromosomal abnormality and outcome of fetal omphalocele according to the omphalocele contents combined with associated anomalies. We retrospectively reviewed the sonograms and case records of 39 fetuses with an omphalocele prenatally detected by ultrasound between 1996 and 2004. We categorized them into two groups according to the omphalocele contents, and the two groups were further subdivided according to the presence or absence of associated anomalies on the prenatal ultrasound. We compared the risk of chromosomal abnormality and fetal outcome according to the omphalocele contents combined with associated anomalies. We categorized the 39 fetuses with an omphalocele into 20 cases with a liver- and bowel containing (group I) omphalocele and 19 cases with a bowel-only (group II) omphalocele. Seven of 20 (35%) fetuses with group I omphalocele and 17 of 19 (89%) with group II omphalocele had associated anomalies. Fetal karyotyping was performed in 31 of the 39 fetuses: in group II omphalocele, 13 of the 14 tested fetuses (93%) had chromosomal abnormalities, while in group I omphalocele, one of the 17 tested fetuses (6%) had chromosomal abnormalities. All 13 group II omphalocele with associated anomaly showed abnormal karyotype. Fourteen of 39 (36%) fetuses survived, including 13 fetuses with group I omphalocele (13/20, 65%) and one with group II omphalocele (1/19, 5%). Eleven of 13 (85%) fetuses with isolated group I omphalocele showed good outcome, while no group II omphalocele with associated anomaly survived. The bowel-only omphalocele with associated anomalies suggests a very high risk of chromosomal abnormality and a poor outcome. The isolated liver- and bowel-containing omphalocele has a good outcome with a low risk of chromosomal abnormality. Sonographic evaluation of the omphalocele contents and associated anomalies is essential to predict the prognosis of the fetal omphalocele

  4. Distal 5q trisomy resulting from an X;5 translocation detected by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D N; Ahsanuddin, A N; Mark, H F

    2000-10-23

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old girl with an apparently de novo unbalanced translocation resulting in the presence of additional chromosomal material on the short arm of one X chromosome, which was detected by conventional G-banding studies. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Chromoprobe Multiprobe-M protocol confirmed that the additional chromosomal material originated from chromosome 5. The karyotype of this patient is now established to be 46,X,der(X) t(X;5)(p22.3;q33), with a deletion of Xp22.3-pter and partial trisomy of 5q33-qter. The distal 5q trisomy genotype has been associated with clinical signs that include growth and mental retardation, eczema, craniofacial anomalies, and malformations of heart, lungs, abdomen, limbs, and genitalia. Our patient also has short stature, a prominent nasal bridge, a flat philtrum, a thin upper lip, dental caries, and limb and cardiac malformations, but she appears to be mildly affected compared with previously reported cases. This is the first case of distal 5q trisomy arising from a translocation with the X chromosome. Replication studies on this patient show that the derivative t(X;5) chromosome is late replicating in almost all cells examined, which indicates that this chromosome is preferentially inactivated. However, the translocated segment of chromosome 5 appears to be early replicating, which implies that the trisomic 5q segment is transcriptionally active. We cannot determine from these studies whether all or only some genes in this segment are expressed, but this patient's relatively mild clinical signs suggest that the critical region(s) that contribute to the distal 5q trisomy phenotype are at least partly suppressed. A review of other patients with X-chromosome translocations indicates that many but not all of them also have attenuated phenotypes. The mechanism of inactivation of autosomal material attached to the X chromosome is complex, with varying effects on the phenotype of the

  5. Anomalies without Massless Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Gurlanik, Z

    1994-01-01

    Baryon and lepton number in the standard model are violated by anomalies, even though the fermions are massive. This problem is studied in the context of a two dimensional model. In a uniform background field, fermion production arise from non-adiabatic behavior that compensates for the absence of massless modes. On the other hand, for localized instanton-like configurations, there is an adiabatic limit. In this case, the anomaly is produced by bound states which travel across the mass gap. The sphaleron corresponds to a bound state at the halfway point.

  6. Classical Trace Anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Farhoudi, M.

    1995-01-01

    We seek an analogy of the mathematical form of the alternative form of Einstein's field equations for Lovelock's field equations. We find that the price for this analogy is to accept the existence of the trace anomaly of the energy-momentum tensor even in classical treatments. As an example, we take this analogy to any generic second order Lagrangian and exactly derive the trace anomaly relation suggested by Duff. This indicates that an intrinsic reason for the existence of such a relation sh...

  7. Congenital laryngeal anomalies,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is essential for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to be cognizant of the fact that infants with congenital laryngeal anomalies are at particular risk for an unstable airway. Objectives: To familiarize clinicians with issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to present a succinct description of the diagnosis and management of an array of congenital laryngeal anomalies. Methods: Revision article, in which the main aspects concerning airway management of infants will be analyzed. Conclusions: It is critical for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants.

  8. Chromosomal study in newborn infants with congenital anomalies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yasir A. Mohammed

    c Pediatric Department, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt. Received 8 August ..... and placental infarction and modest elevations in temperature prior to implantation and .... A case of ectopia vesica with absent pelvic bone and herniated caecum.

  9. Chromosome X aneuploidy in Brazilian schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Leopoldo Silva; Khayat, André Salim; de Lima, Patrícia Danielle Lima; Lima, Eleonidas Moura; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    The identification of cytogenetic abnormalities in schizophrenic patients may provide clues to the genes involved in this disease. For this reason, a chromosomal analysis of samples from 62 schizophrenics and 70 controls was performed with trypsin-Giemsa banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization of the X chromosome. A clonal pericentric inversion on chromosome 9 was detected in one male patient, and we also discovered mosaicism associated with X chromosome aneuploidy in female patients, primarily detected in schizophrenic and normal female controls over 40 years old. When compared with age-matched female controls, the frequency of X chromosome loss was not significantly different between schizophrenics and controls, except for the 40- to 49-year-old age group. Our findings suggest that the X chromosome loss seen in schizophrenic patients is inherent to the normal cellular aging process. However, our data also suggest that X chromosome gain may be correlated with schizophrenia in this Brazilian population.

  10. Chromosomal patterns in human malignant astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J A; Bello, M J; de Campos, J M; Kusak, M E; Ramos, C; Benitez, J

    1987-12-01

    Cytogenetic analysis by direct and/or in vitro preparations was performed on 34 malignant astrocytomas. Thirty tumors showed near-diploid chromosome numbers, whereas, tritetraploid chromosome complements were present in four tumors. The most frequent chromosomal changes implied numerical deviations by a gain of chromosomes #7, #19, and #20, and by losses of #10, #22, and Y. Structural rearrangements were present in stem- or side lines of 24 tumors. Although no common chromosomal rearrangement seems to exist among those tumors, chromosomes #1, #6, #7, and #9 were predominantly involved. Polysomy and structural rearrangements of chromosome #7 could be related to the overexpression of epidermal growth factor gene, previously observed in some malignant gliomas.

  11. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  12. Characterization of a balanced complex chromosomal rearrangement carrier ascertained through a fetus with dup15q26.3 and del5p15.33: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lledo, Belen; Ortiz, Jose Antonio; Morales, Ruth; Manchon, Irene; Galan, Francisco; Bernabeu, Andrea; Bernabeu, Rafael

    2013-09-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are structural aberrations involving more than two chromosomes which rarely appear in individuals with normal phenotypes. These individuals report fertility problems, recurrent miscarriages, or congenital anomalies in newborn offspring as a consequence of either meiotic failure or imbalanced chromosome segregation. A CCR involving chromosomes 5, 15, and 18 was discovered in a phenotypically normal man through a fetus with congenital malformations and partial trisomy of chromosome 15 and monosomy of chromosome 5. Ultrasound examination at 20 weeks of gestation showed severe oligoamnios and hydrothorax. Prenatal cytogenetic analysis and array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) revealed a female fetus with dup15q26.3 and del5p15.33. We diagnosed the CCR using three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (three-color FISH), and a balanced CCR using array-CGH and FISH was diagnosed in the paternal karyotype. The father is a carrier of a balanced translocation 46,XY,t(5;15;18)(p15.31;q26.3;p11.2). Due to the complexity of these rearrangements the diagnosis is difficult and the reproductive outcome uncertain. Reporting such rare cases is important to enable such information to be used for genetic counseling in similar situations and help estimate the risk of miscarriage or of newborns with congenital abnormalities.

  13. The reactor antineutrino anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haser, Julia; Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Major discoveries were made in the past few years in the field of neutrino flavour oscillation. Nuclear reactors produce a clean and intense flux of electron antineutrinos and are thus an essential neutrino source for the determination of oscillation parameters. Most currently the reactor antineutrino experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO have accomplished to measure θ{sub 13}, the smallest of the three-flavour mixing angles. In the course of these experiments two anomalies emerged: (1) the reanalysis of the reactor predictions revealed a deficit in experimentally observed antineutrino flux, known as the ''reactor antineutrino anomaly''. (2) The high precision of the latest generation of neutrino experiments resolved a spectral shape distortion relative to the expected energy spectra. Both puzzles are yet to be solved and triggered new experimental as well as theoretical studies, with the search for light sterile neutrinos as most popular explanation for the flux anomaly. This talk outlines the two reactor antineutrino anomalies. Discussing possible explanations for their occurrence, recent and upcoming efforts to solve the reactor puzzles are highlighted.

  14. Bolivian Bouguer Anomaly Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Bouguer anomaly grid for the country of Bolivia.Number of columns is 550 and number of rows is 900. The order of the data is from the lower left to the...

  15. Minnesota Bouguer Anomaly Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1.5 kilometer Bouguer anomaly grid for the state of Minnesota. Number of columns is 404 and number of rows is 463. The order of the data is from the lower left to...

  16. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, Michael Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, John D [PROPULSION LABORATORY

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  17. The Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor T. Toth

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 × 10–9 Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of aP = (8.74 ± 1.33 × 10–10 m/s2. This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse square law has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the anomaly and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer anomaly, but it is critical for the new investigation.

  18. Chromosome abnormality incidence in fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezer, C; Ekin, A; Ozeren, M; Taner, C E; Ozer, O; Koc, A; Bilgin, M; Gezer, N S

    2014-07-01

    Ventriculomegaly (VM) is a marker of aneuploidy and warrants a detailed examination of fetal anatomy. Chromosomal abnormalities worsen the fetal and neonatal prognosis significantly and karyotyping of fetuses is critically important when accompanying anomalies are detected. Here, we report the genetic results of 140 fetuses with isolated and non-isolated VM detected during a second trimester ultrasound examination followed by invasive in utero diagnostic procedures for karyotyping. VM was diagnosed in seven (5%) fetuses with abnormal karyotype and the chromosomal abnormality incidence was higher in severe VM (6.8%) than mild (4.2%). Higher chromosomal abnormality rates were detected when VM was isolated (8.6%), rather than associated with any anomaly (3.8%). These results suggest that karyotype analysis should be offered to all patients with any degree of VM, regardless of its association with structural anomalies.

  19. Chromosomal phenotypes and submicroscopic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriendt Koen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The finding, during the last decade, that several common, clinically delineated syndromes are caused by submicroscopic deletions or, more rarely, by duplications, has provided a powerful tool in the annotation of the human genome. Since most microdeletion/microduplication syndromes are defined by a common deleted/duplicated region, abnormal dosage of genes located within these regions can explain the phenotypic similarities among individuals with a specific syndrome. As such, they provide a unique resource towards the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes such as congenital heart defects, mental and growth retardation and abnormal behaviour. In addition, the study of phenotypic differences in individuals with the same microdeletion syndrome may also become a treasury for the identification of modifying factors for complex phenotypes. The molecular analysis of these chromosomal anomalies has led to a growing understanding of their mechanisms of origin. Novel tools to uncover additional submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies at a higher resolution and higher speed, as well as the novel tools at hand for deciphering the modifying factors and epistatic interactors, are 'on the doorstep' and will, besides their obvious diagnostic role, play a pivotal role in the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes.

  20. Chromosome aberrations induced by zebularine in triticale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhi; Ma, Jieyun; Wu, Nan; Ni, Shuang; Luo, Tengxiao; Zhuang, Lifang; Chu, Chenggen; Cho, Seong-Woo; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Qi, Zengjun

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome engineering is an important approach for generating wheat germplasm. Efficient development of chromosome aberrations will facilitate the introgression and application of alien genes in wheat. In this study, zebularine, a DNA methylation transferase inhibitor, was successfully used to induce chromosome aberrations in the octoploid triticale cultivar Jinghui#1. Dry seeds were soaked in zebularine solutions (250, 500, and 750 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the 500 μmol/L treatment was tested in three additional treatment times, i.e., 12, 36, and 48 h. All treatments induced aberrations involving wheat and rye chromosomes. Of the 920 cells observed in 67 M1 plants, 340 (37.0%) carried 817 aberrations with an average of 0.89 aberrations per cell (range: 0-12). The aberrations included probable deletions, telosomes and acentric fragments (49.0%), large segmental translocations (28.9%), small segmental translocations (17.1%), intercalary translocations (2.6%), long chromosomes that could carry more than one centromere (2.0%), and ring chromosomes (0.5%). Of 510 M2 plants analyzed, 110 (21.6%) were found to carry stable aberrations. Such aberrations included 79 with varied rye chromosome numbers, 7 with wheat and rye chromosome translocations, 15 with possible rye telosomes/deletions, and 9 with complex aberrations involving variation in rye chromosome number and wheat-rye translocations. These indicated that aberrations induced by zebularine can be steadily transmitted, suggesting that zebularine is a new efficient agent for chromosome manipulation.

  1. Abdominal aortic surgery and renal anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Kidney anomalies present a challenge even for the most experienced vascular surgeon in the reconstruction of the aortoilliac segment. The most significant anomalies described in the surgery of the aortoilliac segment are a horse-shoe and ectopic kidney. Objective. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze experience on 40 patients with renal anomalies, who underwent surgery of the aortoilliac segment and to determine attitudes on conventional surgical treatment. Methods. In the period from 1992 to 2009, at the Clinic for Vascular Surgery of the Clinical Centre of Belgrade we operated on 40 patients with renal anomalies and aortic disease (aneurysmatic and obstructive. The retrospective analysis involved standard epidemiological data of each patient (gender, age, risk factors for atherosclerosis, type of anomaly, type of aortic disease, presurgical parameter values of renal function, type of surgical approach (laparatomy or retroperitoneal approach, classification of the renal isthmus, reimplantation of renal arteries and perioperative morbidity and mortality. Results. Twenty patients were males In 30 (70% patients we diagnosed a horse-shoe kidney and in 10 (30% ectopic kidney. In the cases of ruptured aneurysm of the abdominal aorta the diagnosis was made by ultrasound findings. Pre-surgically, renal anomalies were confirmed in all patients, except in those with a ruptured aneurysm who underwent urgent surgery. In all patients we applied medial laparatomy, except in those with a thoracoabdominal aneurysm type IV, when the retroperitonal approach was necessary. On average the patients were under follow-up for 6.2 years (from 6 months to 17 years. Conclusion. Under our conditions, the so-called double clamp technique with the preservation of the kidney gave best results in the patients with renal anomalies and aortic disease.

  2. A study of dental anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sook; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of dental anomalies in 600 normal persons (male:363, female:237) at age 14 to 39 years, through history taking, oral examination, and radiographic observations of subjects. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence of individual dental anomalies were as follows; Congenitally missing teeth 7%; supernumerary teeth 1.33%; ectopic eruption 8.50%; transposition 0.33%; rotation 23.67%; microdontia 11.16% (peg lateral is 5.33%; third molar 5.83%); prolonged retention of deciduous teeth 1.33%; crowding 49.83%; and spacing 15.17%. 2. Alterations in numbers of teeth : The most frequently missing teeth were mandibular lateral incisors, followed by mandibular second premolars and maxillary second premolars. In numbers of congenitally missing teeth per person, 52.38% had one missing tooth and 30.95% had two missing teeth. In supernumerary teeth, there was higher rate in male than in female. Most supernumerary teeth were mesiodens of median area in maxilla and the eruption pattern of that teeth generally was unerupted state. 3. In transposition, exchange of position of teeth involved the canine and first premolar. 4. Congenital missing rate of permanent successors in prolonged retention of deciduous teeth was 69.23%. 5. Crowding and spacing had respectively higher rate in mandible and in maxilla.

  3. DETECTION OF CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN TWELVE PRIMARY GASTRIC CANCERS BY DIRECT CHROMOSOME ANALYSIS AND FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Direct chromosome analysis and FISH were performed on twelve primary gastric carcinomas. Two of them had simple chromosome changes: 48,XX, +8, +20, and 49, XY, +2, +8, +9, and the others had complicated chromosome changes, which includes much more numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Frequent structural changes in the complicated types involved chromosome 7, 3, 1, 5 and 12 etc. The del 7q was noted in eight cases. The del (3p) and del (1p) were noted in six and five cases, respectively. The results provide some important clues for isolation of the genes related to gastric cancer.

  4. Low frequency of Y anomaly detected in Australian Brahman cow-herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Gregório M F; Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Fortes, Marina R S; Bunch, Rowan J; Tonhati, Humberto; Reverter, Antonio; Moore, Stephen S; Lehnert, Sigrid A

    2015-02-01

    Indicine cattle have lower reproductive performance in comparison to taurine. A chromosomal anomaly characterized by the presence Y markers in females was reported and associated with infertility in cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of the anomaly in Brahman cows. Brahman cows (n = 929) were genotyped for a Y chromosome specific region using real time-PCR. Only six out of 929 cows had the anomaly (0.6%). The anomaly frequency was much lower in Brahman cows than in the crossbred population, in which it was first detected. It also seems that the anomaly doesn't affect pregnancy in the population. Due to the low frequency, association analyses couldn't be executed. Further, SNP signal of the pseudoautosomal boundary region of the Y chromosome was investigated using HD SNP chip. Pooled DNA of "non-pregnant" and "pregnant" cows were compared and no difference in SNP allele frequency was observed. Results suggest that the anomaly had a very low frequency in this Australian Brahman population and had no effect on reproduction. Further studies comparing pregnant cows and cows that failed to conceive should be executed after better assembly and annotation of the Y chromosome in cattle.

  5. Neutrino anomalies and large extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Dighe, A S; Dighe, Amol S.; Joshipura, Anjan S.

    2001-01-01

    Theories with large extra dimensions can generate small neutrino masses when the standard model neutrinos are coupled to singlet fermions propagating in higher dimensions. The couplings can also generate mass splittings and mixings among the flavour neutrinos in the brane. We systematically study the minimal scenario involving only one singlet bulk fermion coupling weakly to the flavour neutrinos. We explore the neutrino mass structures in the brane that can potentially account for the atmospheric, solar and LSND anomalies simultaneously in a natural way. We demonstrate that in the absence of a priori mixings among the SM neutrinos, it is not possible to reconcile all these anomalies. The presence of some structure in the mass matrix of the SM neutrinos can solve this problem. This is exemplified by the Zee model, which when embedded in extra dimensions in a minimal way can account for all the neutrino anomalies.

  6. Discrete R Symmetries and Anomalies

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Dine(Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Santa Cruz CA 95064, U.S.A.); Angelo Monteux(Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, U.S.A.)

    2012-01-01

    We comment on aspects of discrete anomaly conditions focussing particularly on $R$ symmetries. We review the Green-Schwarz cancellation of discrete anomalies, providing a heuristic explanation why, in the heterotic string, only the "model-independent dilaton" transforms non-linearly under discrete symmetries; this argument suggests that, in other theories, multiple fields might play a role in anomaly cancellations, further weakening any anomaly constraints at low energies. We provide examples...

  7. Fetal phenotype of Prader-Willi syndrome due to maternal disomy for chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Herminé, A Coulomb; Aboura, A; Brisset, S; Cuisset, L; Castaigne, V; Labrune, P; Frydman, R; Tachdjian, G

    2003-11-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results from either paternal deletion of 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15 or imprinting center mutation. Prenatal diagnosis of PWS is currently indicated for chromosomal parental translocation involving chromosome 15 and for decreased fetal movements during the third trimester of gestation. Here we present the prenatal diagnosis of PWS during the first trimester of gestation and autopsy findings. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed for advanced maternal age at 13 weeks' gestation. CVS showed mosaicism including cells with a normal karyotype and cells with trisomy 15. Amniocentesis showed cells with a normal karyotype. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the fetus had a typical PWS abnormal methylation profile and maternal disomy for chromosome 15. Fetal ultrasound examination showed slightly enlarged lateral ventricles and hypoplasic male external genitalia without intra-uterine growth retardation. The autopsy showed a eutrophic male fetus with facial dysmorphy, hypoplasic genitalia, abnormal position of both feet and posterior hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. This report points out that in a karyotypically normal fetus with ambiguous male external genitalia and cerebral anomalies, extensive cytogenetic and molecular biology studies are strongly recommended because of risk of PWS. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important.

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities in 2 cases of testicular failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyan; Raca, Gordana; Laffin, Jennifer; Babaian, Kara N; Williams, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the underlying chromosomal abnormalities of testicular failure using molecular cytogenetic analysis. We report 2 cases of rare genetic anomalies that resulted in hypogonadism. The first patient presented with severe hypogonadism. Chromosome analysis revealed a mosaic 46,X,r(Y) (p11.3q11.23)/45,X karyotype, with a ring Y chromosome. A Y chromosome microdeletion assay showed a deletion in the azoospermia factor a region. The second patient presented with infertility and nonobstructive azoospermia. Cytogenetic and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis revealed a 47,XY,+mar.ish i(15) (D15Z1++,SNRPN2,PML2) karyotype, with a small supernumerary chromosome derived from chromosome 15. These results emphasize the need for molecular cytogenetic evaluation in patients with testicular failure before using advanced reproductive techniques.

  10. Anomaly-safe discrete groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mu-Chun, E-mail: muchunc@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Fallbacher, Maximilian, E-mail: m.fallbacher@tum.de [Physik–Department T30, Technische Universität München, James–Franck–Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ratz, Michael, E-mail: michael.ratz@tum.de [Physik–Department T30, Technische Universität München, James–Franck–Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Trautner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.trautner@tum.de [Physik–Department T30, Technische Universität München, James–Franck–Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S., E-mail: patrick.vaudrevange@tum.de [Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); TUM Institute for Advanced Study, Lichtenbergstraße 2a, 85748 Garching (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig–Maximilians–Universität München, Theresienstraße 37, 80333 München (Germany)

    2015-07-30

    We show that there is a class of finite groups, the so-called perfect groups, which cannot exhibit anomalies. This implies that all non-Abelian finite simple groups are anomaly-free. On the other hand, non-perfect groups generically suffer from anomalies. We present two different ways that allow one to understand these statements.

  11. Anomaly-safe discrete groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-Chun Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that there is a class of finite groups, the so-called perfect groups, which cannot exhibit anomalies. This implies that all non-Abelian finite simple groups are anomaly-free. On the other hand, non-perfect groups generically suffer from anomalies. We present two different ways that allow one to understand these statements.

  12. Craniofacial anomalies in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keusch, C F; Mulliken, J B; Kaplan, L C

    1991-01-01

    Studies of twins provide insight into the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the causality of structural anomalies. Thirty-five affected twin pairs were identified from a group of 1114 patients with congenital craniofacial deformities evaluated from 1972 to 1989. Forty-three of these 70 twins exhibited one or more craniofacial anomalies; these were analyzed for dysmorphic characteristics, zygosity, concordance, and family history. The anomalies were categorized into two groups: malformations and deformations. The malformations (n = 36) included hemifacial microsomia (n = 10), cleft lip and palate (n = 8), cleft palate (n = 4), rare facial cleft (n = 2), craniosynostosis (n = 2), Binder syndrome (n = 2), Treacher Collins syndrome (n = 2), craniopagus (n = 2), CHARGE association (n = 1), frontonasal dysplasia (n = 2), and constricted ears (n = 1). The deformations (n = 7) included plagiocephaly (n = 5), hemifacial hypoplasia (n = 1), and micrognathia (n = 1). Twenty-one monozygotic and 14 dizygotic twin pairs were identified. The concordance rate was 33 percent for monozygotic twins and 7 percent for dizygotic twins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Coarctation of the aorta and mild to moderate developmental delay in a child with a de novo deletion of chromosome 15(q21.1q22.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Sarika U

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of 15q21q22 is a rare chromosomal anomaly. To date, there have been nine reports describing ten individuals with different segmental losses involving 15q21 and 15q22. Many of these individuals have common features of growth retardation, hypotonia and moderate to severe mental retardation. Congenital heart disease has been described in three individuals with interstitial deletion involving this region of chromosome 15. Case presentation We report a child with coarctation of the aorta, partial agenesis of corpus callosum and mild to moderate developmental delay, with a de novo deletion of 15q21.1q22.2, detected by the array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH. We utilized chromosome 15-specific microarray-based CGH to define the chromosomal breakpoints in this patient. Conclusion This is the first description of mapping of an interstitial deletion involving the chromosome 15q21q22 segment using the chromosome 15-specific array-CGH. The report also expands the spectrum of clinical phenotype associated with 15q21q22 deletion.

  14. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with chromosomal abnormalities involving t(9;22(q34;q11 and t(3;21(q26;q22 during chemotherapy for follicular lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogasawara T

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of a patient who developed therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia five years after initiating chemotherapy for follicular lymphoma. The patient had been treated with multiple chemotherapeutic regimens, including anthracycline and etoposide (VP-16, as well as with radiation therapy for refractory follicular lymphoma over the preceding five years. The patient subsequently developed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS with karyotypic abnormalities of monosomy 7 and del (q11; q13.3 followed by acute myeloid leukemia (AML with an additional balanced translocation of t(9;22(q34;q11 and t(3;21(q26;q22. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification of the patient’s RNA showed a fusion transcript of minor BCR-ABL but not EVI1-RUNX1 (AML1 genes. Imatinib therapy resulted in regression of AML, but the patient soon became refractory to chemotherapy and died. Therapy-related acute leukemia develops mostly as non-lymphoid leukemia with unbalanced aberrations of monosomy 7 and 5 or balanced aberrations involving 11q23 and 21q22, but Philadelphia chromosome is uncommon. In addition, simultaneous occurrence of both t(9;22(q34;q11 and t(3;21(q26;q22 balanced aberrations in t-MDS/t-AML is a very rare event. The balanced translocations detected in this case suggest another mechanism by which t-AML can develop after chemotherapy and radiation therapy for follicular lymphoma.

  15. A three-generation family with terminal microdeletion involving 5p15.33-32 due to a whole-arm 5;15 chromosomal translocation with a steady phenotype of atypical cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmakky, Amira; Carli, Diana; Lugli, Licia; Torelli, Paola; Guidi, Battista; Falcinelli, Cristina; Fini, Sergio; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is characterized by cat-like cry, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, speech delay, intellectual disability and slow growth rate, which are present with variable frequency. The typical cri du chat syndrome, due to 5p15.2 deletion, includes severe intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypotonia and pre- and post-natal growth retardation, whereas more distal deletions in 5p15.3 lead to cat-like cry and speech delay and produce the clinical picture of the atypical cri du chat syndrome, with minimal or absent intellectual impairment. In this article we report a three-generation family with an unbalanced whole arm translocation between chromosome 5 and 15 and a microdeletion of 5.5 Mb involving 5p15.33-32. By reporting the smallest terminal deletion of 5p15.3 described so far and by reviewing the literature we discuss the genotype/phenotype correlations of the distal region of the cri du chat syndrome. The previously described critical region for the speech delay may be narrowed down and microcephaly, growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features can be included in the phenotypic expression of the atypical cri du chat syndrome due to 5p15.3 deletions.

  16. Peters anomaly in cri-du-chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, William C; Cordovez, Jose A; Capasso, Jenina E; Hammersmith, Kristin M; Eagle, Ralph C; Lall-Trail, Joel; Levin, Alex V

    2015-06-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5. It presents with a distinctive catlike high-pitched cry, psychomotor delays, microcephaly, craniofacial abnormalities, and, in many cases, ocular findings. We report the first child with cri-du-chat and the findings of unilateral corneal staphyloma due to Peters anomaly and retinal dysplasia. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiato, Helder; Gomes, Ana Margarida; Sousa, Filipe; Barisic, Marin

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E) that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle microtubule

  18. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Maiato

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle

  19. Termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly after 23 weeks of gestation: a European register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garne, E; Khoshnood, B; Loane, M; Boyd, Pa; Dolk, H

    2010-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFA) after 23 weeks of gestation in European countries, and describe the spectrum of anomalies for which late TOPFA is recorded. Population-based study. Twelve European countries. Nineteen registries of congenital anomaly in 12 European countries between 2000 and 2005. The number of total births covered was 2 695 832. TOPFAs in singleton pregnancies from the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies and Twins (EUROCAT) database. The prevalence of TOPFA and type of anomaly. There were 10 233 TOPFAs, 678 (6.6%) of which were performed at 24 weeks or more. The rate of TOPFA before 24 weeks was 3.4 per 1000 births, at 24-25 weeks 0.14 per 1000 births and at 26 weeks or more 0.11 per 1000 births. There was significant variation in the prevalence of TOPFA at >or=24 weeks between countries (P anomaly, with 4% of all TOPFAs for chromosomal anomalies and 9% of all TOPFAs for nonchromosomal anomalies resulting in late TOPFA (P anomalies, but longer (>or=5 weeks) for diaphragmatic hernia, omphalocoele, arthrogryposis multiplex and Turner's syndrome. Late TOPFA is rare in Europe, and varies in prevalence between countries. Compared with earlier TOPFA, late TOPFA is more often performed for a nonchromosomal isolated major structural anomaly and less often for a fetus with a chromosomal syndrome or multiple anomalies.

  20. CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES IN INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smogavec

    2009-08-01

    Conclusions Chromosomal analysis is an important method in diagnostic procedures of infertility, because chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions. Sex chromosome aneuploidies are highly correlated to infertility of females and males.

  1. Chromosome landmarks and autosome-sex chromosome translocations in Rumex hastatulus, a plant with XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska-Joachimiak, Aleksandra; Kula, Adam; Książczyk, Tomasz; Chojnicka, Joanna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Joachimiak, Andrzej J

    2015-06-01

    Rumex hastatulus is the North American endemic dioecious plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. It is differentiated into two chromosomal races: Texas (T) race characterised by a simple XX/XY sex chromosome system and North Carolina (NC) race with a polymorphic XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system. The gross karyotype morphology in NC race resembles the derived type, but chromosomal changes that occurred during its evolution are poorly understood. Our C-banding/DAPI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments demonstrated that Y chromosomes of both races are enriched in DAPI-positive sequences and that the emergence of polymorphic sex chromosome system was accompanied by the break of ancestral Y chromosome and switch in the localization of 5S rDNA, from autosomes to sex chromosomes (X and Y2). Two contrasting domains were detected within North Carolina Y chromosomes: the older, highly heterochromatinised, inherited from the original Y chromosome and the younger, euchromatic, representing translocated autosomal material. The flow-cytometric DNA estimation showed ∼3.5 % genome downsizing in the North Carolina race. Our results are in contradiction to earlier reports on the lack of heterochromatin within Y chromosomes of this species and enable unambiguous identification of autosomes involved in the autosome-heterosome translocation, providing useful chromosome landmarks for further studies on the karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in this species.

  2. Narrowing the genetic interval and yeast artificial chromosome map in the branchio-oto-renal region on chromosome 8q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shrawan; Kimberling, W.J.; Pinnt, J. [Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by branchial abnormality, hearing loss, and renal anomalies. Recently, the disease gene has been localized to chromosome 8q. Here, we report genetic studies that further refine the disease gene region to a smaller interval and identify several YACs from the critical region. We studied two large, clinically well-characterized BOR families with a set of 13 polymorphic markers spanning the D8S165-D8S275 interval from the chromosome 8q region. Based on multipoint analysis, the highest likelihood for the location of the BOR gene is between markers D8S543 and D8S530, a distance of about 2 cM. YACs that map in the BOR critical region have been identified and characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A YAC contig, based on the STS content map, that covers a minimum of 4 Mb of human DNA in the critical region of BOR is assembled. This lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in BOR syndrome. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Detecting Patterns of Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    detect anomalies in the dataset is used in [Leung and Leckie, 2005] and [Eskin et al., 2002]. One-class SVMs [Li et al., 2003, Heller et al., 2003] and...IEE Proceedings F, 140(2): 107–113, 1993. J.D.F. Habbema, J. Hermans , and K. Vandenbroek. A stepwise discriminant analysis pro- gram using density...Technometrics, 29(4):409–412, 1987. K.A. Heller , K.M. Svore, A. Keromytis, and S.J. Stolfo. One class support vector machines for detecting anomalous

  4. Chiral supergravity and anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W; Macias, Alfredo; Mielke, Eckehard W.

    1999-01-01

    Similarily as in the Ashtekar approach, the translational Chern-Simons term is, as a generating function, instrumental for a chiral reformulation of simple (N=1) supergravity. After applying the algebraic Cartan relation between spin and torsion, the resulting canonical transformation induces not only decomposition of the gravitational fields into selfdual and antiselfdual modes, but also a splitting of the Rarita-Schwinger fields into their chiral parts in a natural way. In some detail, we also analyze the consequences for axial and chiral anomalies.

  5. Low Risk Anomalies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Paul; Wagner, Christian; Zechner, Josef

    This paper shows theoretically and empirically that beta- and volatility-based low risk anomalies are driven by return skewness. The empirical patterns concisely match the predictions of our model that endogenizes the role of skewness for stock returns through default risk. With increasing downside...... of betting against beta/volatility among low skew firms compared to high skew firms is economically large. Our results suggest that the returns to betting against beta or volatility do not necessarily pose asset pricing puzzles but rather that such strategies collect premia that compensate for skew risk...

  6. Detecting Biosphere anomalies hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanche-Garcia, Yanira; Mahecha, Miguel; Flach, Milan; Denzler, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The current amount of satellite remote sensing measurements available allow for applying data-driven methods to investigate environmental processes. The detection of anomalies or abnormal events is crucial to monitor the Earth system and to analyze their impacts on ecosystems and society. By means of a combination of statistical methods, this study proposes an intuitive and efficient methodology to detect those areas that present hotspots of anomalies, i.e. higher levels of abnormal or extreme events or more severe phases during our historical records. Biosphere variables from a preliminary version of the Earth System Data Cube developed within the CAB-LAB project (http://earthsystemdatacube.net/) have been used in this study. This database comprises several atmosphere and biosphere variables expanding 11 years (2001-2011) with 8-day of temporal resolution and 0.25° of global spatial resolution. In this study, we have used 10 variables that measure the biosphere. The methodology applied to detect abnormal events follows the intuitive idea that anomalies are assumed to be time steps that are not well represented by a previously estimated statistical model [1].We combine the use of Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models with a distance metric like Mahalanobis distance to detect abnormal events in multiple biosphere variables. In a first step we pre-treat the variables by removing the seasonality and normalizing them locally (μ=0,σ=1). Additionally we have regionalized the area of study into subregions of similar climate conditions, by using the Köppen climate classification. For each climate region and variable we have selected the best ARMA parameters by means of a Bayesian Criteria. Then we have obtained the residuals by comparing the fitted models with the original data. To detect the extreme residuals from the 10 variables, we have computed the Mahalanobis distance to the data's mean (Hotelling's T^2), which considers the covariance matrix of the joint

  7. When do anomalies begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, Alan; Gingerich, Owen

    1992-02-01

    The present historical and methodological consideration of scientific anomalies notes that some of these are recognized as such, after long neglect, only after the emergence of compelling explanations for their presence in the given theory in view of an alternative conceptual framework. These cases of 'retrorecognition' are indicative not merely of a significant characteristic of the process of conceptual development and scientific discovery, but of the bases for such process in human psychology. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of the 'flatness problem' in big bang theory, the perigee-opposition problem in Ptolemaic astronomy, the continental-fit problem in geology, and the equality of inertial and gravitational mass.

  8. The diphoton anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardecchia, M.

    2017-07-01

    In December 2015, the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations presented results from data taken at the LHC with pp collisions at the center-of-mass energy of √{s} = 13{ TeV} . In the search for resonances decaying into two photons, both experiments observed a tantalising excess of events at an invariant mass of the photon pair of 750GeV. In this contribution, I will summarise some of the main phenomenological and theoretical aspects of this anomaly in terms of New Physics.

  9. Cytogenetic Analysis for Suspected Chromosomal Abnormalities; A Five Years Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, Vijay Kumar; Jindal, Ankur; Puppala, Madhavi; Singh, Pratiksha; Rawat, Kanchan; Kapoor, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chromosomal abnormalities are the results of alterations in the number or structure of chromosomes causing significant human morbidity and mortality. They are responsible for a large proportion of miscarriages, developmental delay, disorders of sexual development, congenital malformations and mental retardation. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of different chromosomal abnormalities in North Indian patients referred for cytogenetic analysis. Materials and Methods Total of 859 patients ranging from newborn to 37 years of age were referred to the division of genetics, Department of Paediatrics between 2010 and 2015, with a variety of clinical disorders; Down syndrome (DS), Turner’s syndrome (TS) and Klinefelter syndrome; amenorrhea; ambiguous sex and multiple congenital malformations. Chromosomal analysis was performed on lymphocyte culture according to standard methods. Results Of the 859 cases studied, 371 (43.1%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The most common autosomal abnormalities were DS 302 (81.4%) and sex chromosomal abnormalities were TS 51 (13.7%). Numerical abnormalities were accounted for 353 (41.0%) and structural abnormalities 18 (2.0%), respectively. Various other chromosomal anomalies were also reported. Conclusion We have reviewed the incidence and distribution of chromosomal abnormalities and found higher rate of chromosomal abnormalities 43.1% in the referred cases. Our data suggest that chromosomal analysis is important tool in the evaluation of genetic disorders and helps clinicians to provide accurate diagnosis and proper genetic counselling. PMID:27790464

  10. Urinary System anomalies at birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada B. Menasinkai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital anomalies of urinary system are common and are found in 3-4% of population, and lethal urinary anomalies account for 10% of termination of pregnancy. Methods: A study was done to know the incidence of congenital anomalies at birth for the period of 4 months from May 99 - Sept 99 at Cheluvamba hospital attached to Mysore medical college. Congenital anomalies in the still births, live births and aborted fetuses >20 weeks were studied along with the case history and ultrasound reports. Aborted fetuses and still born babies were collected for autopsy after the consent of parents. These babies were fixed in 10% formalin and autopsy was done after fixing, and anomalies were noted. Results: Total births during study period were 3000. There were 61 babies with congenital anomalies and 6 babies had anomalies of urinary system. Among the urinary system anomalies 1 baby had bilateral renal agenesis, 1 baby had unilateral renal agenesis with anophthalmia (Fraser syndrome, 2 babies had Multicystic dysplastic kidney disease (MCDK and 1 live baby had hydronephrosis due to obstruction at pelvi ureteric junction, and 1 live female baby had polycystic kidneys. Conclusion: Incidence of urinary system anomalies in the present study was 2 per 1000 births. U/S detection of urinary anomalies varies with period of gestation, amniotic fluid volume and visualisation of urinary bladder. Autopsy helps to detect renal agenesis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 743-748

  11. Pattern of Chromosomal Aberrations in Patients from North East Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ghazaey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities.Results: The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA. Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner’s syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter’s syndrome.Conclusion: According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  12. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  13. Chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidies of spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piomboni, Paola; Stendardi, Anita; Gambera, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are relevant causes of human infertility, affecting 2 -14 % of infertile males. Patients with seminal anomalies could be affected by improper meiotic recombination and increased sperm chromosome aneuploidy. Since the transmission of a haploid chromosomal asset is fundamental for embryo vitality and development, the study of sperm chromosomes has become fundamental because intracytoplasmic sperm injection allows fertilization in cases of severe male infertility.In this chapter we summarize the data on the incidence of sperm aneuploidy, detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in infertile men with normal or abnormal karyotype. The possibility of reducing sperm chromosomal imbalance is also reported.Among control males, the lowest aneuploidy rate was detected (range: 0.09 -0.14 % for autosomes; 0.04 -0.10 % for gonosomes). In infertile patients with normal karyotype, the severity of semen alteration is correlated with the frequency of aneuploidy, particularly for X and Y chromosomes. Among patients with abnormal karyotype, 47,XXY and 47,XYY carriers showed a high variability of sperm aneuploidy both for gonosomes and autosomes. In Robertsonian translocation carriers, the increase in aneuploidy rate was particularly evident for total sex disomy, and resulted mainly from interchromosomal effect (ICE). In reciprocal translocation carriers, a high percentage of unbalanced sperm (approximately 50 %) was detected, perhaps mostly related to ICE.Sperm chromosomal constitution could be analyzed to obtain more accurate information about the causes of male infertility. It would be worthwhile to evaluate the benefits of a therapy with recombinant Follicle Stimulating Hormone (rFSH) on sperm chromosome segregation in selected infertile males.

  14. Clinical Expression of an Inherited Unbalanced Translocation in Chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Bandana Ganguly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements are not common; however, they have a significant clinical expression. The parental balanced translocation produces unbalanced chromosome, which is transmitted to next generation through fertilization of gametes carrying the derivative chromosome. The carriers of balanced rearrangements mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression. We report a family comprising of healthy and non-consanguineous young parents and their preemie newborn severely affected with congenital anomalies and systemic disorders. Conventional Gbanding analysis of somatic chromosomes identified a balanced translocation, t(6;10(p23;q24, in mother and an unbalanced rearrangement, der(6t(6:10(p23;q24mat, in the child. The child has inherited a derivative chromosome 6 with partial deletion of 6(p23-pter and partial trisomy 10(q24-qter, which has resulted in fusion of genes of two different chromosomes. The prominent phenotypic features of del(6p, including high forehead, flat nasal bridge, agenesis of left ear, atrial septal defect (ASD, craniosynostosis, and growth retardation, are overlapping with specific Axenfeld-Reiger-, Larsen-, and Ritscher-Sinzel/3-C syndromes, however, lacking in ocular anomalies, skeletal laxity, or cerebellar malformation. Therefore, this paper rules out the isolated effect of del(6p23 or trisomy 10(q24 on distinct previously reported syndromes and proposes the combined effect of unbalanced chromosomal alteration.

  15. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamariola, Linda; Tiang, Choon Lin; De Storme, Nico; Pawlowski, Wojtek; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved. PMID:24987397

  16. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  17. Supernumerary ring chromosome: an etiology for Pallister-Killian syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloveras, E; Canellas, A; Cirigliano, V; Català, V; Cerdan, C; Plaja, A

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of marker chromosomes before the introduction of array CGH (aCGH) assays was only based on their banding patterns (G, C, and NOR staining) and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques. The use of aCGH greatly improves the identification of marker chromosomes in some cases. We describe an atypical case of Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) detected at prenatal diagnosis with a very unusual cytogenetic presentation: a supernumerary ring chromosome including two copies of 12p. A similar anomaly described in a postnatal patient suggests ring chromosome as a possible cause of PKS. Extra ring chromosomes might be a more common etiology for PKS than previously thought, given the difficulty in their characterization before the advent of aCGH.

  18. Quivers via anomaly chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casero, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: roberto.casero@mib.infn.it; Trincherini, Enrico [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milan (Italy)

    2003-09-01

    We study quivers in the context of matrix models. We introduce chains of generalized Konishi anomalies to write the quadratic and cubic equations that constrain the resolvents of general affine A-circumflex{sub n-1} and non-affine A{sub n} quiver gauge theories, and give a procedure to calculate all higher-order relations. For these theories we also evaluate, as functions of the resolvents, VEV's of chiral operators with two and four bi-fundamental insertions. As an example of the general procedure we explicitly consider the two simplest quivers A{sub 2} and A-circumflex{sub 1}, obtaining in the first case a cubic algebraic curve, and for the affine theory the same equation as that of U(N) theories with adjoint matter, successfully reproducing the RG cascade result. (author)

  19. Quivers via anomaly chains

    CERN Document Server

    Casero, R; Casero, Roberto; Trincherini, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    We study quivers in the context of matrix models. We introduce chains of generalized Konishi anomalies to write the quadratic and cubic equations that constrain the resolvents of general affine and non-affine quiver gauge theories, and give a procedure to calculate all higher-order relations. For these theories we also evaluate, as functions of the resolvents, VEV's of chiral operators with two and four bifundamental insertions. As an example of the general procedure we explicitly consider the two simplest quivers A2 and A1(affine), obtaining in the first case a cubic algebraic curve, and for the affine theory the same equation as that of U(N) theories with adjoint matter, successfully reproducing the RG cascade result.

  20. Low Risk Anomalies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Paul; Wagner, Christian; Zechner, Josef

    risk, the standard capital asset pricing model (CAPM) increasingly overestimates expected equity returns relative to firms' true (skew-adjusted) market risk. Empirically, the profitability of betting against beta/volatility increases with firms' downside risk, and the risk-adjusted return differential...... of betting against beta/volatility among low skew firms compared to high skew firms is economically large. Our results suggest that the returns to betting against beta or volatility do not necessarily pose asset pricing puzzles but rather that such strategies collect premia that compensate for skew risk......This paper shows theoretically and empirically that beta- and volatility-based low risk anomalies are driven by return skewness. The empirical patterns concisely match the predictions of our model that endogenizes the role of skewness for stock returns through default risk. With increasing downside...

  1. Cubic anomalies in WMAP

    CERN Document Server

    Land, K; Land, Kate; Magueijo, Joao

    2004-01-01

    We perform a frequentist analysis of the bispectrum of WMAP first year data. We find clear signal domination up to l=200, with overall consistency with Gaussianity except for the following features. There is a flat patch (i.e. a low chi-squared region) in the same-l components of the bispectrum spanning the range l=32-62; this may be interpreted as ruling out Gaussianity at the 99.6% confidence level. There is also an asymmetry between the North and South inter-l bispectrum components at the 99% confidence level. The preferred asymmetry axis correlates well with the (l,b)=(57,10) direction quoted in the literature for asymmetries in the power spectrum and three-point correlation function. However our analysis of the quadrupole (its bispectrum and principal axes) fail to make contact with previously claimed anomalies.

  2. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  3. A child with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and a bilobed gallbladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, James R.; Macken, Marian B. [Dalhousie University, Department of Radiology, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Schmidt, Matthias H. [Dalhousie University, Department of Radiology, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, 5850/5980 University Ave., P.O. Box 9700, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Morley, Charlotte; Cummings, Elizabeth A. [Dalhousie University, Department of Pediatrics, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2007-02-15

    We present an 11-year-old girl with a chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), and a bilobed gallbladder as an incidental finding on abdominal sonography. The finding was confirmed by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP).This is the first report of a gallbladder anomaly associated with a chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and the second report of a biliary tract anomaly associated with a mutation in the chromosome 22q11 region. We suggest that close attention be paid to the anatomy of the biliary tree in patients with mutations in the chromosome 22q11 region. Further study is warranted to determine the range and prevalence of biliary tract anomalies in this population. (orig.)

  4. Correlation of chromosome patterns in leukemic cells of patients with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1989-10-01

    We have identified two new recurring translocations involving chromosome 5; one is a 3;5 translocation and the other involves a rearrangement between chromosomes 5 and 7. The first is t(3;5)(q25.1;q35). We studied five patients with AML and a t(3;5) in their leukemic cells. At diagnosis, four of the patients had a t(3;5) as their sole karyotypic anomaly; the remaining patient had additional structural and numerical abnormalities. Careful cytogenetic analysis indicated that the breakpoints of this rearrangement were 3q25.1 and 5q34, in contrast to the various breakpoints reported in earlier studies (3q21 to 3q25 and 5q31 to 5q35). The karyotypic, morphologic, and clinical characteristics of this group, as well as those of 15 previously reported patients with the t(3;5), were compared to identify any features that might warrant consideration of this anomaly as a specific syndrome. The median age of the group, 37 years, as younger than that of all patients with AML, 49 years. A preceding myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in three patients. We have no information regarding the occupation of most of these patients. Except for acute promyelocytic leukemia, each morphologic subtype occurred in these patients; however, the frequency of erythroleukemia (M6) was much greater than expected. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Algebraic study of chiral anomalies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Juan Mañes; Raymond Stora; Bruno Zumino

    2012-06-01

    The algebraic structure of chiral anomalies is made globally valid on non-trivial bundles by the introduction of a fixed background connection. Some of the techniques used in the study of the anomaly are improved or generalized, including a systematic way of generating towers of ‘descent equations’.

  6. Anomaly mediation deformed by axion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Kazunori, E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Yanagida, Tsutomu T. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-05-13

    We show that in supersymmetric axion models the axion supermultiplet obtains a sizable F-term due to a non-supersymmetric dynamics and it generally gives the gaugino masses comparable to the anomaly mediation contribution. Thus the gaugino mass relation predicted by the anomaly mediation effect can be significantly modified in the presence of axion to solve the strong CP problem.

  7. What is a Timing Anomaly?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassez, Franck; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Olesen, Mads Chr.

    2012-01-01

    Timing anomalies make worst-case execution time analysis much harder, because the analysis will have to consider all local choices. It has been widely recognised that certain hardware features are timing anomalous, while others are not. However, defining formally what a timing anomaly is, has bee...

  8. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  9. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  10. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  11. Use of chromosome microdissection in fish molecular cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Henning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome microdissection is a technique in which whole chromosomes or chromosomal segments are dissected under an inverted microscope yielding chromosome-specific sequences. Several protocol modifications introduced during the past 15 years reduced the number of chromosomes required for most applications. This is of particular interest to fish molecular cytogenetics, since most species present highly uniform karyotypes which make impossible the collection of multiple copies of the same chromosome. Probes developed in this manner can be used to investigate chromosome homologies in closely related species. Here we describe a protocol recently used in the gymnotiform species group Eigenmannia and review the major steps involved in the generation of these markers focusing on protocol modifications aiming to reduce the number of required chromosomes.

  12. LHCb anomalies from a natural perspective

    CERN Document Server

    García García, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Tension between the Standard Model (SM) and data concerning $b \\rightarrow s$ processes has become apparent. Most notoriously, concerning the $R_K$ ratio, which probes lepton non-universality in $b$ decays, and measurements involving the decays $B \\rightarrow K^* \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B_s \\rightarrow \\phi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. Careful analysis of a wide range of $b \\rightarrow s$ data shows that certain kinds of new physics can significantly ameliorate agreement with experiment. Here, we show that these $b \\rightarrow s$ anomalies can be naturally accommodated in the context of Natural Scherk-Schwarz Theories of the Weak Scale -- a class of models designed to address the hierarchy problem. No extra states need to be introduced in order to accommodate these anomalies, and the assumptions required regarding flavor violating couplings are very mild. Moreover, the structure of the theory makes sharp predictions regarding $B$ meson decays into final states including $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ pairs, which will provide a future test of t...

  13. Coronary artery anomalies in Turner Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, Mette H; Trolle, Christian; Wen, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Congenital heart disease, primarily involving the left-sided structures, is often seen in patients with Turner Syndrome. Moreover, a few case reports have indicated that coronary anomalies may be more prevalent in Turner Syndrome than in the normal population. We therefore set out...... to systematically investigate coronary arterial anatomy by computed tomographic coronary angiography (coronary CTA) in Turner Syndrome patients. METHODS: Fifty consecutive women with Turner Syndrome (mean age 47 years [17-71]) underwent coronary CTA. Patients were compared with 25 gender-matched controls. RESULTS......: Coronary anomaly was more frequent in patients with Turner Syndrome than in healthy controls [20% vs. 4% (p = 0.043)]. Nine out of ten abnormal cases had an anomalous left coronary artery anatomy (absent left main trunk, n = 7; circumflex artery originating from the right aortic sinus, n = 2). One case had...

  14. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  15. Acrocentric Chromosomes in Cultured Leukocytes from Mothers of Children Affected With the G1- Trisomy Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Cotton, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of venous blood samples from 24 mothers of G1-trisomy-affected (Down's Syndrome) children and 23 mothers of chromosomally normal children indicated that mothers of G1-trisomy-affected children had a greater than expected involvement of the G-chromosomes in associations of acrocentric satellited (chromosome configuration) chromosomes.…

  16. Anomaly Mediation and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Basboll, A; Jones, D R T

    2011-01-01

    We consider an extension of the MSSM wherein anomaly mediation is the source of supersymmetry-breaking, and the tachyonic slepton problem is solved by a Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) $D$-term associated with an additional $U(1)$ symmetry, which also facilitates the see-saw mechanism for neutrino masses and a natural source for the Higgs $\\mu$-term. We explore the cosmological consequences of the model, showing that the model naturally produces a period of hybrid inflation, terminating in the production of cosmic strings. In spite of the presence of a $U(1)$ with an FI term, inflation is effected by the $F$-term, with a $D$-flat tree potential (the FI term being cancelled by non-zero squark and slepton fields). Calculating the 1-loop corrections to the inflaton potential, we estimate the constraints on the parameters of the model from Cosmic Microwave Background data. We briefly discuss the mechanisms for baryogenesis via conventional leptogenesis, the out-of-equilibrium production of neutrinos from the cosmic strings...

  17. Chromosome morphometry in opisthorchiid species (Platyhelminthes, Trematoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Polyakov, Andrey V; Katokhin, Alexey V; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2017-08-01

    Few existing studies have dealt with cytogenetics in trematodes, largely due to the attendant technical difficulty of chromosome preparation. We performed a comparative analysis of chromosomes in five opistorchiid species, including Opisthorchis felineus Rivolta, 1884, Opisthorchis viverrini Poirier, 1886, Clonorchis sinensis Cobbold, 1875, Metorchis xanthosomus Creplin 1846, and Metorchis bilis (Braun, 1790) Odening, 1962. For some of these species, no detailed morphometric description of their karyotypes has yet been published; for the karyotype of Metorchis bilis this is the first-ever description. We found that opisthorchiids, like other trematodes, are characterized by karyotypic conservatism (N=6-7) and karyotype asymmetry, although comparison of chromosome morphometric traits did reveal differences between the karyotypes of the species. Moreover, to address certain a methodological issue in trematode chromosome preparation, we analyzed how the source of chromosomal material (partenitae or mature flukes) and the chromosome preparation techniques used (air-drying and cell suspension methods) affected chromosome spreading and size, concluding that the most reliable comparative method involves comparing relative parameters (relative length, arm ratio, centromeric index) of chromosomes prepared using the same technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Engineering of plant chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mette, Michael Florian; Houben, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minimal chromosomes with sufficient mitotic and meiotic stability have an enormous potential as vectors for stacking multiple genes required for complex traits in plant biotechnology. Proof of principle for essential steps in chromosome engineering such as truncation of chromosomes by T-DNA-mediated telomere seeding and de novo formation of centromeres by cenH3 fusion protein tethering has been recently obtained. In order to generate robust protocols for application in plant biotechnology, these steps need to be combined and supplemented with additional methods such as site-specific recombination for the directed transfer of multiple genes of interest on the minichromosomes. At the same time, the development of these methods allows new insight into basic aspects of plant chromosome functions such as how centromeres assure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells or how telomeres serve to cap the chromosome ends to prevent shortening of ends over DNA replication cycles and chromosome end fusion.

  19. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Brilstra, Eva H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/23639195X; Brown, Chester W; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183050487; Currall, Benjamin B; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B A; Earl, Dawn L; Ferguson, Heather L; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W; Gropman, Andrea L; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J; Hayden, Mark A; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/117339067; Hoffman, Jodi D; Hopkin, Robert J; Hubshman, Monika W; Innes, A Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Kahler, Stephen G; Koolen, David A; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W; Mendoza, Cinthya J Zepeda; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Aguilar, Raul E Piña; Poddighe, Pino J; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L P; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V; van Bon, Bregje W; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M L; Warburton, Dorothy P; Waterman, Matthew J; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A; Zori, Roberto T; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304076953; Thorland, Erik C; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing re

  20. Increased nuchal translucency with normal karyotype and anomaly scan : What next?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Merel; Pajkrt, Eva; Bilardo, Caterina M.

    Over the years, it has become clear that increased nuchal translucency is a marker for chromosomal abnormalities, and it is also associated with a wide spectrum of structural anomalies, genetic syndromes, a higher risk of miscarriage, and intrauterine fetal death. These risks are all proportionally

  1. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L.; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C.; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M.; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F.; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; Brilstra, Eva H.; Brown, Chester W.; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B.; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Earl, Dawn L.; Ferguson, Heather L.; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R.; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T.; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H.; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J.; Hayden, Mark A.; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Hubshman, Monika W.; Innes, A. Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C.; Kahler, Stephen G.; Koolen, David A.; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M.; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V.; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C.; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J.; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J.; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W.; Mendoza, Cinthya J. Zepeda; Menten, Bjorn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R.; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E.; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W.; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P.; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Pina Aguilar, Raul E.; Poddighe, Pino J.; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L. P.; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R.; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V.; van Bon, Bregje W.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M.; van Roosmalen, Markus J.; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M. L.; Warburton, Dorothy P.; Waterman, Matthew J.; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A.; Zori, Roberto T.; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G.; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Thorland, Erik C.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing re

  2. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Brilstra, Eva H; Brown, Chester W; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B A; Earl, Dawn L; Ferguson, Heather L; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W; Gropman, Andrea L; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J; Hayden, Mark A; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D; Hopkin, Robert J; Hubshman, Monika W; Innes, A Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Kahler, Stephen G; Koolen, David A; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W; Mendoza, Cinthya J Zepeda; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Aguilar, Raul E Piña; Poddighe, Pino J; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L P; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V; van Bon, Bregje W; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M L; Warburton, Dorothy P; Waterman, Matthew J; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A; Zori, Roberto T; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Thorland, Erik C; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing re

  3. THE PREVALENCE OF DENTAL ANOMALIES IN A TURKISH POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Aren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a Turkish population according to the gender and age. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was performed using panoramic radiographs of 2025 patients (885 males and 1140 females ranging in age from 9 to 35 (mean age 25.61±10.04 years attending Department of Oral Radiology, University of Istanbul, Faculty of Dentistry. These patients were examined to determine the presence of developmental dental anomalies involving hypodontia, hyperdontia, microdontia, taurodontism and other root anomalies. The incidence of these anomalies were assessed according to the gender and age. Results: Among the 2025 subjects, a total of 96 individuals (42 males and 54 females showed at least one of the selected dental anomalies (4.74%. Tooth agenesis was the most common dental abnormality (1.77% followed by taurodontism (1.18%, hyperdontia (0.79%, microdontia (0.54% and root anomalies (0.44%, respectively. Conclusion: Tooth agenesis is the most common developmental dental anomaly in the studied Turkish population followed by taurodontism.

  4. Impact of maternal body mass index on the antenatal detection of congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, K E; Tennant, P W G; Bell, R; Rankin, J

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the association between maternal body mass index (BMI) and antenatal ultrasound detection of congenital anomalies. Population-based register study. North of England (UK). All pregnancies (n = 3096) associated with a congenital anomaly notified to the Northern Congenital Abnormality Survey (NorCAS) during 2006-2009. Cases with chromosomal and teratogenic anomalies (n = 611) or without information on antenatal scanning (n = 4) were excluded. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for antenatal detection according to maternal BMI categories were estimated using logistic regression. For all anomalies combined, cases were defined as 'detected' if any congenital anomaly was suspected antenatally. Organ system-specific anomalies were defined as detected if an anomaly of the correct system was suspected. Antenatal detection of any anomaly occurred in 1146 of 2483 (46.2%) cases with normal karyotype. The odds of detection were significantly decreased in obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) women compared with women of recommended BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2); aOR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60-0.99; P = 0.046). Cardiovascular system anomalies were suspected antenatally in 109 of 945 (11.5%) cases. The odds of detecting a cardiovascular anomaly were significantly greater in underweight women (BMI BMI (aOR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.13-7.70; P = 0.027). There was no association between BMI and detection in any other organ system or between BMI and termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. Antenatal ultrasound detection of a congenital anomaly is decreased in obese pregnant women. This has implications for the scanning and counselling of obese women. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  5. Chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magoulas Pilar L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome is a recently described rare microdeletion syndrome that has been reported in 19 individuals. It is characterized by growth retardation, intellectual disability, and distinct facial features including long face with high anterior hairline, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, downslanting palpebral fissures, sparse and broad medial eyebrows, broad and/or depressed nasal bridge, small mouth, long smooth philtrum, and full lower lip. Other common findings include skeletal and digital abnormalities, genital abnormalities in males, hypotonia, behavior problems, recurrent infections, and eye problems. Other less frequent findings include hearing loss, growth hormone deficiency, hernias, and obesity. Congenital malformations, while rare, can be severe and include structural brain anomalies, cardiovascular malformations, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, intestinal atresia, imperforate anus, and myelomeningocele. Karyotypes are typically normal, and the deletions were detected in these individuals by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The deletions range in size from 1.7-6.1 Mb and usually result from nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between paralogous low-copy repeats (LCRs. The majority of 15q24 deletions have breakpoints that localize to one of five LCR clusters labeled LCR15q24A, -B, -C, -D, and -E. The smallest region of overlap (SRO spans a 1.2 Mb region between LCR15q24B to LCR15q24C. There are several candidate genes within the SRO, including CYP11A1, SEMA7A, CPLX3, ARID3B, STRA6, SIN3A and CSK, that may predispose to many of the clinical features observed in individuals with 15q24 deletion syndrome. The deletion occurred as a de novo event in all of the individuals when parents were available for testing. Parental aCGH and/or FISH studies are recommended to provide accurate genetic counseling and guidance regarding prognosis, recurrence risk, and reproductive options. Management

  6. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  7. Turner syndrome and schizophrenia: a further hint for the role of the X-chromosome in the pathogenesis of schizophrenic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, Patrik; Kawohl, Wolfram

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities of sex chromosomes are associated with various forms of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. Turner syndrome occurs approximately threefold more frequently in female schizophrenics compared to the general female population. A single case is reported. We report on a case of a 41-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, schizophrenia, mental retardation, and hypothyroidism. A polymorphism of the HOPA gene within Xq13 termed HOPA(12bp) is associated with schizophrenia, mental retardation, and hypothyroidism. Interestingly, Xq13 is the X-chromosome region that contains the X-inactivation center and a gene escaping X-inactivation whose gene product may be involved in the X-inactivation process as well as in the pathogenesis of sex chromosome anomalies such as Turner syndrome. These genes that escape X-inactivation may produce their gene products in excess, influencing normal brain growth and differentiation. Our case gives a further hint for an involvement of the X-chromosome in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  8. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  9. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. All grid cells within the rectangular data area (from 61 to 66 degrees North latitude and...

  10. ALP hints from cooling anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Giannotti, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We review the current status of the anomalies in stellar cooling and argue that, among the new physics candidates, an axion-like particle would represent the best option to account for the hinted additional cooling.

  11. Notes on Anomaly Induced Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Landsteiner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Chiral anomalies give rise to dissipationless transport phenomena such as the chiral magnetic and vortical effects. In these notes I review the theory from a quantum field theoretic, hydrodynamic and holographic perspective. A physical interpretation of the otherwise somewhat obscure concepts of consistent and covariant anomalies will be given. Vanishing of the CME in strict equilibrium will be connected to the boundary conditions in momentum space imposed by the regularization. The role of the gravitational anomaly will be explained. That it contributes to transport in an unexpectedly low order in the derivative expansion can be easiest understood via holography. Anomalous transport is supposed to play also a key role in understanding the electronics of advanced materials, the Dirac- and Weyl (semi)metals. Anomaly related phenomena such as negative magnetoresistivity, anomalous Hall effect, thermal anomalous Hall effect and Fermi arcs can be understood via anomalous transport. Finally I briefly review a holo...

  12. Renormalization group flows and anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Komargodski, Zohar

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews various aspects of renormalization group flows and anomalies. The chapter considers specific Euclidean two-dimensional theories. Namely, the theories are invariant under translations and rotations in the two space directions. Here the chapter studies theories where, if possible, certain equations hold in fact also at coincident points. In other words, the chapter looks at theories where there is no local gravitational anomaly.

  13. Situs anomalies on prenatal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Stefan F; Brugger, Peter C; Nemec, Ursula; Bettelheim, Dieter; Kasprian, Gregor; Amann, Gabriele; Rimoin, David L; Graham, John M; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-04-01

    Situs anomalies refer to an abnormal organ arrangement, which may be associated with severe errors of development. Due regard being given to prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US), this study sought to demonstrate the in utero visualization of situs anomalies on MRI, compared to US. This retrospective study included 12 fetuses with situs anomalies depicted on fetal MRI using prenatal US as a comparison modality. With an MRI standard protocol, the whole fetus was assessed for anomalies, with regard to the position and morphology of the following structures: heart; venous drainage and aorta; stomach and intestines; liver and gallbladder; and the presence and number of spleens. Situs inversus totalis was found in 3/12 fetuses; situs inversus with levocardia in 1/12 fetuses; situs inversus abdominis in 2/12 fetuses; situs ambiguous with polysplenia in 3/12 fetuses, and with asplenia in 2/12 fetuses; and isolated dextrocardia in 1/12 fetuses. Congenital heart defects (CHDs), vascular anomalies, and intestinal malrotations were the most frequent associated malformations. In 5/12 cases, the US and MRI diagnoses were concordant. Compared to US, in 7/12 cases, additional MRI findings specified the situs anomaly, but CHDs were only partially visualized in six cases. Our initial MRI results demonstrate the visualization of situs anomalies and associated malformations in utero, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Using a standard protocol, MRI may identify additional findings, compared to US, which confirm and specify the situs anomaly, but, with limited MRI visualization of fetal CHDs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anomaly detection on cup anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Enrique; Pindado, Santiago; Martínez, Alejandro; Meseguer, Encarnación; García, Luis

    2014-12-01

    The performances of two rotor-damaged commercial anemometers (Vector Instruments A100 LK) were studied. The calibration results (i.e. the transfer function) were very linear, the aerodynamic behavior being more efficient than the one shown by both anemometers equipped with undamaged rotors. No detection of the anomaly (the rotors’ damage) was possible based on the calibration results. However, the Fourier analysis clearly revealed this anomaly.

  15. Peters anomaly in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedmeyer, Wm Kirk; Pearce, Jacqueline; Persky, Meredith; Houck, Marlys L

    2014-09-01

    A 10-mo-old female red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented with a unilateral congenital corneal opacity OD. Complete ophthalmic examination revealed a shallow anterior chamber and a focal area of corneal edema with multiple persistent pupillary membranes extending from the iris colarette to the corneal endothelium adjacent to the edematous area of cornea. High-resolution B-scan ultrasound of the anterior segment showed an area consistent with thinning of Descemet's membrane in the area of corneal edema. Ophthalmic examination and ultrasound findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Peters anomaly, a form of anterior segment dysgenesis. An electroretinogram performed on the affected animal did not reveal any specific abnormalities. Karyotype analyses revealed a normal diploid number (2n = 20, -XX), with an abnormal pericentric inversion in the second largest chromosomal pair. The kangaroo exhibits mild compensated vision deficits in the affected eye. The maternal and paternal adult pairing has been discontinued in an effort to prevent future offspring anomalies.

  16. Chromosomal microarray versus karyotyping for prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapner, Ronald J; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C; Eng, Christine M; Zachary, Julia M; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N; Thom, Elizabeth A; Beaudet, Arthur L; Ledbetter, David H; Shaffer, Lisa G; Jackson, Laird

    2012-12-06

    Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down's syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.).

  17. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  18. Space weather and space anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dorman

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A large database of anomalies, registered by 220 satellites in different orbits over the period 1971-1994 has been compiled. For the first time, data from 49 Russian Kosmos satellites have been included in a statistical analysis. The database also contains a large set of daily and hourly space weather parameters. A series of statistical analyses made it possible to quantify, for different satellite orbits, space weather conditions on the days characterized by anomaly occurrences. In particular, very intense fluxes (>1000 pfu at energy >10 MeV of solar protons are linked to anomalies registered by satellites in high-altitude (>15000 km, near-polar (inclination >55° orbits typical for navigation satellites, such as those used in the GPS network, NAVSTAR, etc. (the rate of anomalies increases by a factor ~20, and to a much smaller extent to anomalies in geostationary orbits, (they increase by a factor ~4. Direct and indirect connections between anomaly occurrence and geomagnetic perturbations are also discussed.

  19. C1-2 vertebral anomalies in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Armstrong, Derek; Padfield, Nancy; Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Clarke, Howard [Hospital for Sick Children, Plastic Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Weksberg, Rosanna [Hospital for Sick Children, Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-07-15

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11DS) is characterized by cleft palate, cardiac anomalies, characteristic facies, high prevalence of skeletal anomalies and learning disability. To evaluate the prevalence of craniovertebral junction anomalies in children with 22q11DS and compare these findings to those in nonsyndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Sequential CT scans performed for presurgical carotid assessment in 76 children (45 children positive for chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and 31 negative for the deletion) with VPI were retrospectively evaluated for assessment of C1-2 anomalies. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, specifically midline C1 defects, uptilted or upswept posterior elements of C2 and fusions of C2-3, were nearly universal in our cohort of 22q11DS patients with VPI. They were strikingly absent in the majority of non-22q11DS patients with VPI. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, particularly those listed above, are important radiographic markers for 22q11DS. (orig.)

  20. Molecular cytogenetic studies in structural abnormalities of chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozzio, C.B.; Bamberger, E.; Anderson, I. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A partial trisomy 13 was detected prenatally in an amniocentesis performed due to the following ultrasound abnormalities: open sacral neural tube defect (NTD), a flattened cerebellum, and lumbar/thoracic hemivertebrae. Elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase in amniotic fluid confirmed the open NTD. Chromosome analysis showed an extra acrocentric chromosome marker. FISH analysis with the painting probe 13 showed that most of the marker was derived from this chromosome. Chromosomes on the parents revealed that the mother had a balanced reciprocal translocation t(2;13)(q23;q21). Dual labeling with painting chromosomes 2 and 13 on cells from the mother and from the amniotic fluid identified the marker as a der(13)t(2;13)(p23;q21). Thus, the fetus had a partial trisomy 13 and a small partial trisomy 2p. The maternal grandfather was found to be a carrier for this translocation. Fetal demise occurred a 29 weeks of gestation. The fetus had open lumbar NTD and showed dysmorphic features, overlapping fingers and imperforate anus. This woman had a subsequent pregnancy and chorionic villi sample showed that this fetus was normal. Another case with an abnormal chromosome 13 was a newborn with partial monosomy 13 due to the presence of a ring chromosome 13. This infant had severe intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital microphthalmia, congenital heart disease, absent thumbs and toes and cervical vertebral anomalies. Chromosome studies in blood and skin fibroblast cultures showed that one chromosome 3 was replaced by a ring chromosome of various sizes. This ring was confirmed to be derived from chromosome 13 using the centromeric 21/13 probe.

  1. Mosaic marker chromosome 16 resulting in 16q11.2-q12.1 gain in a child with intellectual disability, microcephaly, and cerebellar cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerem, Ayelet; Vinkler, Chana; Michelson, Marina; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Lev, Dorit

    2011-12-01

    Proximal duplications of the long arm of chromosome 16 are rare and only a few patients have been reported. Clinically, the patients do not have a distinctive syndromic appearance; however they all show some degree of intellectual disability and most have severely delayed speech development. We report on a child presenting with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, microcephaly, language dyspraxia, and mild dysmorphisms who was found to have a mosaic gain of chromosome 16q (16q11.2-16q12.1). Magnetic resonance imaging done at the age of 4 years demonstrated cerebellar cortical dysplasia involving the vermis and hemispheres. This is the first report of cerebellar anomalies in a patient with partial trisomy 16q. The genes ZNF423 and CBLN1 found in the duplicated region play a role in the development of the cerebellum and may be responsible for the cerebellar cortical dysplasia.

  2. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the t...

  3. Chromosome 10q tetrasomy: First reported case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackston, R.D.; May, K.M.; Jones, F.D. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While there are several reports of trisomy 10q (at least 35), we are not aware of previous cases of 10q tetrasomy. We present what we believe to be the initial report of such a case. R.J. is a 6 1/2 year old white male who presented with multiple dysmorphic features, marked articulation problems, hyperactivity, and developmental delays. He is the product of a term uncomplicated pregnancy. There was a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery with a birth weight of 6 lbs. 4oz. and length was 19 1/2 inch. Dysmorphic features include small size, an asymmetrically small head, low set ears with overfolded helixes, bilateral ptosis, downslanting eyes, right eye esotropia, prominent nose, asymmetric facies, high palate, mild pectus excavatum deformity of chest, and hyperextensible elbow joints. The patient is in special needs classes for mildly mentally handicapped students. Chromosome analysis at a resolution of 800 bands revealed a complex rearrangement of chromosomes 10 and 11. The segment 10q25.3 to q16.3 appears to be inverted and duplicated within the long arm of chromosome 10 at band q25.3 and the same segment of chromosome 10 is present on the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 11. There is no visible loss of material from chromosome 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed with a chromosome 10 specific {open_quotes}paint{close_quotes} to confirm that all of the material on the abnormal 10 and the material on the terminal short arm of 11 was from chromosome 10. Thus, it appears that the segment 10q25.3 to q26.3 is present in four copies. Parental chromosome studies are normal. We compared findings which differ in that the case of 10q tetrasomy did not have prenatal growth deficiency, microphthalmia, cleft palate, digital anomalies, heart, or renal defects. Whereas most cases of 10q trisomy are said to have severe mental deficiency, our case of 10q tetrasomy was only mildly delayed. We report this first apparent cited case of 10q tetrasomy.

  4. A review of non-strabismic accommodative-vergence anomalies in school-age children. Part 1: Vergence anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O. Wajuihian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Comfortable reading and the performance of near point activities involve efficient accommodative and vergence systems. However, accommodative and vergence anomalies are associated with various symptoms that impair efficient near point tasks. Although several studies investigated accommodative-vergence anomalies in school-age populations, their findings were diverse owing to differences in diagnostic techniques and the criteria used to define the variables. The aim of this paper is to derive prevalence and distribution estimates of vergence anomalies in school-age children and address variations in the study methods and findings. Despite variations in the study methods and findings, accommodativevergence anomalies were common in school-age populations. Variations and limitations of previous studies are discussed and recommendations for improving future studies are suggested.

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in azoospermic and non-azoospermic infertile men : numbers needed to be screened to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dul, E. C.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Groen, H.; Dijkhuizen, T.; Land, J. A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.

    2012-01-01

    How many infertile men who wish to conceive need to be screened for chromosomal abnormalities to prevent one miscarriage or the birth of one child with congenital anomalies (CAs)? In azoospermic men, the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities is 15.2 and the number needed to be screened (NNS; minim

  6. Chromosome oscillations in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campas, Otger

    2008-03-01

    Successful cell division necessitates a tight regulation of chromosome movement via the activity of molecular motors. Many of the key players at the origin of the forces generating the motion have been identified, but their spatial and temporal organization remains elusive. In animal cells, chromosomes periodically switch between phases of movement towards and away from the pole. This characteristic oscillatory behaviour cannot be explained by the current models of chromosome positioning and congression. We perform a self-contained theoretical analysis in which the motion of mono-oriented chromosomes results from the competition between the activity of the kinetochore and chromokinesin motors on the chromosome arms. Our analysis, consistent with the available experimental data, proposes that the interplay between the aster-like morphology of the spindle and the collective kinetics of molecular motors is at the origin of chromosome oscillations, positioning and congression. It provides a natural explanation for the so-called chromosome directional instability and for the mechanism by which chromosomes sense their position in space. In addition, we estimate the in vivo velocity of chromokinesins at vanishing load and propose new experiments to assess the mechanism at the origin of chromosome movement in cell division.

  7. Systematic yeast synthetic lethal and synthetic dosage lethal screens identify genes required for chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Measday, Vivien; Baetz, Kristin; Guzzo, Julie; Yuen, Karen; Kwok, Teresa; Sheikh, Bilal; Ding, Huiming; Ueta, Ryo; Hoac, Trinh; Cheng, Benjamin; Pot, Isabelle; Tong, Amy; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Boone, Charles; Hieter, Phil

    2005-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires the execution and coordination of many processes during mitosis, including DNA replication, sister chromatid cohesion, and attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules via the kinetochore complex. Additional pathways are likely involved because faithful chromosome segregation also requires proteins that are not physically associated with the chromosome. Using kinetochore mutants as a starting point, we have identified genes with roles in chromosom...

  8. Use of hierarchical models to analyze European trends in congenital anomaly prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadino, Alana; Prieto-Merino, David; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Draper, Elizabeth; Garne, Ester; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; Kurinczuk, Jenny; McDonnell, Bob; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahony, Mary; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; de Walle, Hermien; Wellesley, Diana; Morris, Joan K

    2016-06-01

    Surveillance of congenital anomalies is important to identify potential teratogens. Despite known associations between different anomalies, current surveillance methods examine trends within each subgroup separately. We aimed to evaluate whether hierarchical statistical methods that combine information from several subgroups simultaneously would enhance current surveillance methods using data collected by EUROCAT, a European network of population-based congenital anomaly registries. Ten-year trends (2003 to 2012) in 18 EUROCAT registries over 11 countries were analyzed for the following groups of anomalies: neural tube defects, congenital heart defects, digestive system, and chromosomal anomalies. Hierarchical Poisson regression models that combined related subgroups together according to EUROCAT's hierarchy of subgroup coding were applied. Results from hierarchical models were compared with those from Poisson models that consider each congenital anomaly separately. Hierarchical models gave similar results as those obtained when considering each anomaly subgroup in a separate analysis. Hierarchical models that included only around three subgroups showed poor convergence and were generally found to be over-parameterized. Larger sets of anomaly subgroups were found to be too heterogeneous to group together in this way. There were no substantial differences between independent analyses of each subgroup and hierarchical models when using the EUROCAT anomaly subgroups. Considering each anomaly separately, therefore, remains an appropriate method for the detection of potential changes in prevalence by surveillance systems. Hierarchical models do, however, remain an interesting alternative method of analysis when considering the risks of specific exposures in relation to the prevalence of congenital anomalies, which could be investigated in other studies. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:480-10, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Coronary Artery Anomalies in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Scansen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery anomalies represent a disease spectrum from incidental to life-threatening. Anomalies of coronary artery origin and course are well-recognized in human medicine, but have received limited attention in veterinary medicine. Coronary artery anomalies are best described in the dog, hamster, and cow though reports also exist in the horse and pig. The most well-known anomaly in veterinary medicine is anomalous coronary artery origin with a prepulmonary course in dogs, which limits treatment of pulmonary valve stenosis. A categorization scheme for coronary artery anomalies in animals is suggested, dividing these anomalies into those of major or minor clinical significance. A review of coronary artery development, anatomy, and reported anomalies in domesticated species is provided and four novel canine examples of anomalous coronary artery origin are described: an English bulldog with single left coronary ostium and a retroaortic right coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and transseptal left coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and absent left coronary artery with a prepulmonary paraconal interventricular branch and an interarterial circumflex branch; and a mixed-breed dog with tetralogy of Fallot and anomalous origin of all coronary branches from the brachiocephalic trunk. Coronary arterial fistulae are also described including a coronary cameral fistula in a llama cria and an English bulldog with coronary artery aneurysm and anomalous shunting vessels from the right coronary artery to the pulmonary trunk. These examples are provided with the intent to raise awareness and improve understanding of such defects.

  10. Female chromosome X mosaicism is age-related and preferentially affects the inactivated X chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Karlins, Eric

    2016-01-01

    To investigate large structural clonal mosaicism of chromosome X, we analysed the SNP microarray intensity data of 38,303 women from cancer genome-wide association studies (20,878 cases and 17,425 controls) and detected 124 mosaic X events >2 Mb in 97 (0.25%) women. Here we show rates for X......-chromosome mosaicism are four times higher than mean autosomal rates; X mosaic events more often include the entire chromosome and participants with X events more likely harbour autosomal mosaic events. X mosaicism frequency increases with age (0.11% in 50-year olds; 0.45% in 75-year olds), as reported for Y...... and autosomes. Methylation array analyses of 33 women with X mosaicism indicate events preferentially involve the inactive X chromosome. Our results provide further evidence that the sex chromosomes undergo mosaic events more frequently than autosomes, which could have implications for understanding...

  11. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...... with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...

  12. Congenital anomalies: 15 years of experience in a level III hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Félix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital anomalies (CAs are a leading cause of fetal and infant mortality and morbidity worldwide. They may be identified prenatally, at the moment of birth or later in life.Purpose: To describe the cases of CAs registered over the last 15 years at a level III hospital, comparing individuals who were detected through prenatal (preN diagnosis with those detected through postnatal (postN diagnosis.Methods: All records were collected from the Registo Nacional de Anomalias Congénitas (RENAC online platform between 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014, in a level III hospital, where cases of CAs were notified voluntarily (n = 1,222. We tested differences for selected variables between the years in study. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential factors associated to preN diagnosis.Results: We observed a total of 1,510 anomalies, being 493 (40.3% circulatory, 252 (20.6% chromosomal, 187 (15.3% musculoskeletal, 138 (11.3% digestive, 133 (10.9% urinary, 117 (9.6% nervous, 37 (3.0% respiratory, 35 (2.9% genital, 25 (2% anomalies of the eye, ear, face and neck, 20 (1.6% cleft lip/cleft palate and 73 (6.0% others. Time of diagnosis was known for all subjects: 770 (63.0% were diagnosed prenatally and 452 (37.0% were diagnosed at birth or during the first month of life. We found statistically significant differences between groups for several variables. Assisted reproduction techniques (p = 0.023, maternal medications during the first trimester of pregnancy (p = 0.004 and the number of anomalies per individual (p ≤ 0.001 had a statistically significant impact on receiving preN diagnosis.Conclusion: Our data confirm the importance of both RENAC national database and preN diagnosis in improving perinatal healthcare. However, in order to determine the national prevalence of CAs and understand any involved factors, it is desirable to enhance the notification in the whole country, facilitating the adjustment of national

  13. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    The main objectives of the PhD study are to identify and characterise chromosomal rearrangements within evolutionarily conserved regulatory landscapes around genes involved in the regulation of transcription and/or development (trans-dev genes). A frequent feature of trans-dev genes...... the complex spatio-temporal expression of the associated trans-dev gene. Rare chromosomal breakpoints that disrupt the integrity of these regulatory landscapes may be used as a tool, not only to make genotype-phenotype associations, but also to link the associated phenotype with the position and tissue...... specificity of the individual CNEs. In this PhD study I have studied several chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints in the vicinity of trans-dev genes. This included chromosomal rearrangements compatible with known phenotype-genotype associations (Rieger syndrome-PITX2, Mowat-Wilson syndrome-ZEB2...

  14. Involvement of interstitial telomeric sequences in two new cases of mosaicism for autosomal structural rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Jonathan; Receveur, Aline; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Renaldo, Florence; Gondry, Jean; Andrieux, Joris; Copin, Henri; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Portnoï, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    Mosaicism for an autosomal structural rearrangement that does not involve ring or marker chromosomes is rare. The mechanisms responsible for genome instability have not always been explained. Several studies have shown that interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs), involved in some mosaic constitutional anomalies, are potent sources of genomic instability. Here we describe two cases of mosaicism for uncommon constitutional autosomal rearrangements, involving ITSs, identified by karyotyping and characterized by FISH and SNP-array analysis. The first patient, a boy with global developmental delay, had a rare type of pure distal 1q inverted duplication (1q32-qter), attached to the end of the short arm of the same chromosome 1, in approximately 35% of his cells. The second patient, a phenotypically normal man, was diagnosed as having mosaic for a balanced non-reciprocal translocation of the distal segment of 7q (7q33qter), onto the terminal region of the short arm of a whole chromosome 12, in approximately 80% of his cells. The remaining 20% of the cells showed an unbalanced state of the translocation, with only the der(7) chromosome. He was ascertained through his malformed fetus carrying a non-mosaic partial monosomy 7q, identified at prenatal diagnosis. We show that pan-telomeric and subtelomeric sequences were observed at the interstitial junction point of the inv dup(1q) and of the der(12)t(7;12), respectively. The present cases and review of the literature suggest that the presence of ITSs at internal sites of the chromosomes may explain mechanisms of the patients's mosaic structural rearrangements.

  15. Ant colony optimization-based firewall anomaly mitigation engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmatsa, Ravi Kiran Varma; Vatsavayi, Valli Kumari; Samayamantula, Srinivas Kumar

    2016-01-01

    A firewall is the most essential component of network perimeter security. Due to human error and the involvement of multiple administrators in configuring firewall rules, there exist common anomalies in firewall rulesets such as Shadowing, Generalization, Correlation, and Redundancy. There is a need for research on efficient ways of resolving such anomalies. The challenge is also to see that the reordered or resolved ruleset conforms to the organization's framed security policy. This study proposes an ant colony optimization (ACO)-based anomaly resolution and reordering of firewall rules called ACO-based firewall anomaly mitigation engine. Modified strategies are also introduced to automatically detect these anomalies and to minimize manual intervention of the administrator. Furthermore, an adaptive reordering strategy is proposed to aid faster reordering when a new rule is appended. The proposed approach was tested with different firewall policy sets. The results were found to be promising in terms of the number of conflicts resolved, with minimal availability loss and marginal security risk. This work demonstrated the application of a metaheuristic search technique, ACO, in improving the performance of a packet-filter firewall with respect to mitigating anomalies in the rules, and at the same time demonstrated conformance to the security policy.

  16. The genetic basis of dental anomalies and its relation to orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Cakan, Derya Germec; Ulkur, Feyza; Taner, Tulin (Uğur)

    2013-01-01

    The interruption of odontogenesis by any etiological factor may result in dental anomalies. Apart from the environmental factors, the impact of genetics in dental anomalies was found to be a factor in different levels. Many authors had questioned a common genetic defect resulting in different phenotypic conditions such as absent, malformed, malposed or ectopic teeth. Because the multidisciplinary treatment of these dental anomalies such as hypodontia, impaction etc., involves orthodontic inte...

  17. Increased sex chromosome expression and epigenetic abnormalities in spermatids from male mice with Y chromosome deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynard, Louise N; Turner, James M A

    2009-11-15

    During male meiosis, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced, a process termed meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Recent studies have shown that the sex chromosomes remain substantially transcriptionally repressed after meiosis in round spermatids, but the mechanisms involved in this later repression are poorly understood. Mice with deletions of the Y chromosome long arm (MSYq-) have increased spermatid expression of multicopy X and Y genes, and so represent a model for studying post-meiotic sex chromosome repression. Here, we show that the increase in sex chromosome transcription in spermatids from MSYq- mice affects not only multicopy but also single-copy XY genes, as well as an X-linked reporter gene. This increase in transcription is accompanied by specific changes in the sex chromosome histone code, including almost complete loss of H4K8Ac and reduction of H3K9me3 and CBX1. Together, these data show that an MSYq gene regulates sex chromosome gene expression as well as chromatin remodelling in spermatids.

  18. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two chromoso...

  19. Prevalence of Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Couples in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mierla Dana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities. In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility.

  20. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile couples in romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierla, D; Malageanu, M; Tulin, R; Albu, D

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher's exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities). In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility.

  1. Epilepsy and ring chromosome 20: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Marleide da Mota

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical, electroencephalographic, neuroimaging (brain magnetic resonance image - MRI and spectroscopy by MRI and cytogenetic findings of a young male patient with a rare cytogenetic anomaly characterised by a de novo 46,XY,r(20(p13q13.3 karyotype. He presents with mental retardation, emotional liability, and strabismus, without any other significant dysmorphies. There are brain anomalies characterised by corpus callosum, uvula, nodule and cerebellum pyramid hypoplasias, besides arachnoid cysts in the occipital region. He had seizures refractory to pharmacotherapy and long period of confusional status with or without a motor component. The authors recognised that the EEG pattern was not fixed but changed over time, specially for bursts of slow waves with great amplitude accompanied or not by sharp components, and bursts of theta waves sharply contoured. Previously, epilepsy solely has been assigned to region 20q13. However, the important structural cerebral alterations present in our case has not been reported associated to such chromosomal abnormality and may indicate possible new chromosomal sites where such atypical neurological characteristics could be mapped.

  2. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  3. Uniparental disomy analysis in carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, K.M.; Pettay, D.; Muralidharan, K. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Although most individuals who carry a balanced familial chromosome rearrangement are phenotypically normal, those who are clinically abnormal raise the question of whether or not the rearrangement plays a causative role. One possible mechanism involves meiotic segregation of a normal homolog along with the rearranged chromosome(s) such that a trisomic conception occurs. Subsequent loss by mitotic nondisjunction of the structurally normal chromosome contributed by the non-carrier parent would then result in uniparental disomy (UPD) in a conceptus carrying a balanced rearrangement. UPD for chromosomes 14 and 15 has been demonstrated in several clinically abnormal individuals who carry a familial Robertsonian translocation. We have extended this type of analysis to include other forms of balanced chromosome rearrangements. We report the results of UPD analysis of 14 families who have a phenotypically abnormal child with an apparently balanced rearrangement. The series includes 4 reciprocal translocations, 4 Robertsonian translocations, 2 X;autosome translocations, and 4 inversions. High resolution chromosomes were used to compare breakpoints between parent and offspring to exclude the possibility of further rearrangements. Parental origin of the chromosome(s) involved was determined by DNA polymorphism analysis using PCR or Southern blotting techniques. We found no evidence of UPD in any of the 14 cases. Our data suggest that UPD is not a common explanation for phenotypically abnormal carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements.

  4. A small (sSMC) chromosome 22 due to a maternal translocation between chromosomes 8 and 22: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhofir, F E P; Kooper, A J A; Winarni, T I; Smits, A P T; Faradz, S M H; Hamel, B C J

    2010-01-01

    We report on a boy with partial trisomies for chromosomes 8 and 22 caused by the presence of a small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC), a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21), inherited from a t(8;22)(p22;q11.21) translocation carrier mother. He has mild mental retardation, unability to speak distinct words and several minor anomalies i.e. high forehead and hairline, telecanthus, upslanting palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, nail hypoplasia, toe position anomaly and 5th finger clinodactyly. He has two maternal uncles and one maternal aunt with mental retardation. G-banding technique showed 47,XY,+mar whilst his mother's karyotype showed a balanced reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 8 and 22. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique with probes for centromere 22 and 8pter were used to detect the origin of marker chromosome and confirmed the marker chromosome in the proband showing to be extra chromosomal material originated from chromosome 8 and 22. Additional genome wide microarray analysis, using the Affymetrix Nspl 250K SNP array platform was performed to further characterize the marker chromosome and resulted in a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21). Furthermore, cytogenetic analysis of three affected family members showed the same unbalanced translocation, due to 3:1 meiotic segregation. This indicated the viability of this unbalanced pattern and combined with the recurrent miscarriages by the proband's mother, the mechanism of transmitting extrachromosomal material is probably not a random process. Since, there is no similar translocation (8p;22q) reported and the chromosomal translocation largely exists of additional 8p22-8pter we compare the clinical outcomes with reported cases of 8p22-8pter triplication, although there is a part of genetic material derived from chromosome 22 present. This unique familial chromosome translocation case from Indonesia will give insight in the underlying mechanism of this recurrent chromosomal abnormality

  5. Shortening Anomalies in Supersymmetric Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Gomis, Jaume; Ooguri, Hirosi; Seiberg, Nathan; Wang, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    We present new anomalies in two-dimensional ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$ superconformal theories. They obstruct the shortening conditions of chiral and twisted chiral multiplets at coincident points. This implies that marginal couplings cannot be promoted to background super-fields in short representations. Therefore, standard results that follow from ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$ spurion analysis are invalidated. These anomalies appear only if supersymmetry is enhanced beyond ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$. These anomalies explain why the conformal manifolds of the K3 and $T^4$ sigma models are not K\\"ahler and do not factorize into chiral and twisted chiral moduli spaces and why there are no ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$ gauged linear sigma models that cover these conformal manifolds. We also present these results from the point of view of the Riemann curvature of conformal manifolds.

  6. Boundary terms of conformal anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Solodukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal anomaly integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the anomalies of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons–Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal anomaly in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.

  7. Multiple Visceral and Peritoneal Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Prabhu S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Visceral and peritoneal anomalies are frequently encountered during cadaveric dissections and surgical procedures of abdomen. A thorough knowledge of the same is required for the success of diagnostic, surgical and radiological procedures of abdomen. We report multiple peritoneal and visceral anomalies noted during dissection classes for medical undergraduates. The anomalies were found in an adult male cadaver aged approximately 70 years. The right iliac fossa was empty due to the sub-hepatic position of caecum and appendix. The sigmoid colon formed an inverted “U” shaped loop above the sacral promontory in the median position. It entered the pelvis from the right side and descended along the lateral wall of the pelvis. The sigmoid mesocolon was attached obliquely to the posterior abdominal wall, just above the sacral promontory. Further there was a cysto-colic fold of peritoneum extending from the right colic flexure. We discuss the clinical significance of the variations.

  8. Electromagnetic Duality and Entanglement Anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Donnelly, William; Wall, Aron

    2016-01-01

    Duality is an indispensable tool for describing the strong-coupling dynamics of gauge theories. However, its actual realization is often quite subtle: quantities such as the partition function can transform covariantly, with degrees of freedom rearranged in a nonlocal fashion. We study this phenomenon in the context of the electromagnetic duality of abelian $p$-forms. A careful calculation of the duality anomaly on an arbitrary $D$-dimensional manifold shows that the effective actions agree exactly in odd $D$, while in even $D$ they differ by a term proportional to the Euler number. Despite this anomaly, the trace of the stress tensor agrees between the dual theories. We also compute the change in the vacuum entanglement entropy under duality, relating this entanglement anomaly to the duality of an "edge mode" theory in two fewer dimensions. Previous work on this subject has led to conflicting results; we explain and resolve these discrepancies.

  9. Conformal Anomalies and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Meissner, Krzysztof A

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the presence of conformal anomalies in gravitational theories can lead to observable modifications to Einstein's equations via the induced anomalous effective actions, whose non-localities can overwhelm the smallness of the Planck scale. The fact that no such effects have been seen in recent cosmological or gravitational wave observations therefore imposes strong restrictions on the field content of possible extensions of Einstein's theory: all viable theories should have vanishing conformal anomalies. We then show that, among presently known theories, a complete cancellation of conformal anomalies in $D=4$ for both the $C^2$ invariant and the Euler (Gauss-Bonnet) invariant $E_4$ can only be achieved for $N$-extended supergravities with $N\\geq 5$, as well as for M theory compactified to four dimensions.

  10. Boundary terms of conformal anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N., E-mail: Sergey.Solodukhin@lmpt.univ-tours.fr

    2016-01-10

    We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal anomaly integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the anomalies of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons–Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal anomaly in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.

  11. Case-control analysis of paternal age and trisomic anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, E; Morris, J K

    2010-11-01

    To determine whether older paternal age increases the risk of fathering a pregnancy with Patau (trisomy 13), Edwards (trisomy 18), Klinefelter (XXY) or XYY syndrome. Case-control: cases with each of these syndromes were matched to four controls with Down syndrome from within the same congenital anomaly register and with maternal age within 6 months. Data from 22 EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 12 European countries. Diagnoses with observed or (for terminations) predicted year of birth from 1980 to 2005, comprising live births, fetal deaths with gestational age ≥ 20 weeks and terminations after prenatal diagnosis of the anomaly. Data include 374 cases of Patau syndrome, 929 of Edwards syndrome, 295 of Klinefelter syndrome, 28 of XYY syndrome and 5627 controls with Down syndrome. Odds ratio (OR) associated with a 10-year increase in paternal age for each anomaly was estimated using conditional logistic regression. Results were adjusted to take account of the estimated association of paternal age with Down syndrome (1.11; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.23). The OR for Patau syndrome was 1.10 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.45); for Edwards syndrome, 1.15 (0.96 to 1.38); for Klinefelter syndrome, 1.35 (1.02 to 1.79); and for XYY syndrome, 1.99 (0.75 to 5.26). There was a statistically significant increase in the odds of Klinefelter syndrome with increasing paternal age. The larger positive associations of Klinefelter and XYY syndromes with paternal age compared with Patau and Edwards syndromes are consistent with the greater percentage of these sex chromosome anomalies being of paternal origin.

  12. Boundary Anomalies and Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that boundary terms of conformal anomalies recover the universal contribution to the entanglement entropy and also play an important role in the boundary monotonicity theorem of odd-dimensional quantum field theories. Motivated by these results, we investigate relationships between boundary anomalies and the stress tensor correlation functions in conformal field theories. In particular, we focus on how the conformal Ward identity and the renormalization group equation are modified by boundary central charges. Renormalized stress tensors induced by boundary Weyl invariants are also discussed, with examples in spherical and cylindrical geometries.

  13. Multiple vascular anomalies involving testicular, suprarenal arteries and lumbar veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Jyothsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular arteries arise from the abdominal aorta and the inferior suprarenal artery from the renal artery. There are reports about variant origin and course of these arteries. Accessory testicular artery is also a common finding but its providing origin to inferior suprarenal artery is an important observation. During a routine dissection of abdomen of approximately 55-year-old male cadaver, unique vascular abnormality was observed. On the left side, a common arterial trunk originating from abdominal aorta immediately branched to give rise to superior testicular and inferior suprarenal arteries, the former after a short course hooked by the left suprarenal vein. In addition, the left suprarenal vein, second left lumbar vein, and left testicular vein joined to form a common trunk which drained into the left renal vein. A sound knowledge of vascular variations in relation to the kidney and suprarenal gland is important to surgeons dissecting the abdominal cavity.

  14. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskeatnaf Mulugeta Achame

    Full Text Available Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY, representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals.

  15. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in Triportheus trifurcatus (Characidae, Characiformes): Insights into the Differentiation of the Z and W Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Poltronieri, Juliana; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Liehr, Thomas; de Bello Cioffi, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences play an important role in the structural and functional organization of chromosomes, especially in sex chromosome differentiation. The genus Triportheus represents an interesting model for such studies because all of its species analyzed so far contain a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. A close relationship has been found between the differentiation of the W chromosome and heterochromatinization, with the involvement of different types of repetitive DNA in this process. This study investigated several aspects of this association in the W chromosome of Triportheus trifurcatus (2n = 52 chromosomes), including the cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNAs such as telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n, microsatellites and retrotransposons. A remarkable heterochromatic segment on the W chromosome was observed with a preferential accumulation of (CAC)10, (CAG)10, (CGG)10, (GAA)10 and (TA)15. The retrotransposons Rex1 and Rex3 showed a general distribution pattern in the chromosomes, and Rex6 showed a different distribution on the W chromosome. The telomeric repeat (TTAGGG)n was highly evident in both telomeres of all chromosomes without the occurrence of ITS. Thus, the differentiation of the W chromosome of T. trifurcatus is clearly associated with the formation of heterochromatin and different types of repetitive DNA, suggesting that these elements had a prominent role in this evolutionary process. PMID:24632562

  16. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Baarends, Willy M; Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J Anton

    2010-12-14

    Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals.

  17. Genotoxic Effects of Tobacco on Buccal Epithelium: Cell Nuclear Anomalies as Biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohini Das Biswas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco use has toxic effects on different organs. This study was carried out to assess the effect of indigenous tobacco both in smoking (bidi and smokeless (gutkha, zarda and khaini forms on buccal cells at chromosomal level, through assessment of different nuclear anomalies as biomarker. Methods:This study was done on people living in Durgapur and its adjacent areas, West Bengal, India during January to July 2011. The samples were collected from 50 smokers (case group, 50 smokeless tobacco consumers or chewers (case group and 50 non-tobacco consumers (control group. Micronucleus assay was used to assess buccal cell nuclear changes. Buccal smears collected from study subjects were prepared on a grease free slide. Prepared slides were observed under light microscope and 2 to 5 fields were observed randomly for counting the different anomalies. In each field, the frequency of each anomaly was assessed in 100 cells and reported with percentage. Results:Chewers had significantly the highest frequency of all nuclear anomalies compared to smokers and healthy controls (HCs. Smokers also had significantly more anomalies compared to HCs. Condensed chromatin (CC, karyolysis (KL and bi-nucleation (BN in chewers and CC, pyknosis and BN in smokers were the most frequent anomalies. KL was significantly more frequent in chewers compared to smokers (59.8 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001, however, the frequency of other nuclear anomalies were not significantly different in these two study groups. Presence of each nuclear anomaly was significantly greater in older ages in all study groups. Conclusion:Tobacco can cause and increase the rate of nuclear anomalies in both smoking and smokeless forms compared to HCs. The genotoxic effects of tobacco on buccal cells are partly age-related. Cell nuclear anomalies in buccal tissue can be used as biomarker indicating the detrimental effects of tobacco.

  18. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  19. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  20. Constitutional chromoanasynthesis: description of a rare chromosomal event in a patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisancié, Julie; Kleinfinger, Pascale; Cances, Claude; Bazin, Anne; Julia, Sophie; Trost, Detlef; Lohmann, Laurence; Vigouroux, Adeline

    2014-10-01

    Structural alterations in chromosomes are a frequent cause of cancers and congenital diseases. Recently, the phenomenon of chromosome crisis, consisting of a set of tens to hundreds of clustered genomic rearrangements, localized in one or a few chromosomes, was described in cancer cells under the term chromothripsis. Better knowledge and recognition of this catastrophic chromosome event has brought to light two distinct entities, chromothripsis and chromoanasynthesis. The complexity of these rearrangements and the original descriptions in tumor cells initially led to the thought that it was an acquired anomaly. In fact, a few patients have been reported with constitutional chromothripsis or chromoanasynthesis. Using microarray we identified a very complex chromosomal rearrangement in a patient who had a cytogenetically visible rearrangement of chromosome 18. The rearrangement contained more than 15 breakpoints localized on a single chromosome. Our patient displayed intellectual disability, behavioral troubles and craniofacial dysmorphism. Interestingly, the succession of duplications and triplications identified in our patient was not clustered on a single chromosomal region but spread over the entire chromosome 18. In the light of this new spectrum of chromosomal rearrangements, this report outlines the main features of these catastrophic events and discusses the underlying mechanism of the complex chromosomal rearrangement identified in our patient, which is strongly evocative of a chromoanasynthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. CHROMOSOMES OF AMERICAN MARSUPIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIGGERS, J D; FRITZ, H I; HARE, W C; MCFEELY, R A

    1965-06-18

    Studies of the chromosomes of four American marsupials demonstrated that Caluromys derbianus and Marmosa mexicana have a diploid number of 14 chromosomes, and that Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis have a diploid number of 22. The karyotypes of C. derbianus and M. mexicana are similar, whereas those of P. opossum and D. marsupialis are dissimilar. If the 14-chromosome karyotype represents a reduction from a primitive number of 22, these observations suggest that the change has occurred independently in the American and Australasian forms.

  2. Global gravitational anomalies and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subham Dutta; David, Justin R.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the constraints imposed by global gravitational anomalies on parity odd induced transport coefficients in even dimensions for theories with chiral fermions, gravitinos and self dual tensors. The η-invariant for the large diffeomorphism corresponding to the T transformation on a torus constraints the coefficients in the thermal effective action up to mod 2. We show that the result obtained for the parity odd transport for gravitinos using global anomaly matching is consistent with the direct perturbative calculation. In d = 6 we see that the second Pontryagin class in the anomaly polynomial does not contribute to the η-invariant which provides a topological explanation of this observation in the `replacement rule'. We then perform a direct perturbative calculation for the contribution of the self dual tensor in d = 6 to the parity odd transport coefficient using the Feynman rules proposed by Gaumé and Witten. The result for the transport coefficient agrees with that obtained using matching of global anomalies.

  3. Anomalies and noncommutative index theory

    CERN Document Server

    Perrot, D

    2006-01-01

    These are the notes of a lecture given during the summer school "Geometric and Topological Methods for Quantum Field Theory", Villa de Leyva, Colombia, july 11 - 29, 2005. We review basic facts concerning gauge anomalies and discuss the link with the Connes-Moscovici index formula in noncommutative geometry.

  4. Bony anomaly of Meckel's cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the seemingly rare occurrence of bone formation within the proximal superior aspect of Meckel's cave thus forming a bony foramen for the proximal trigeminal nerve to traverse. The anatomy of Meckel's cave is reviewed and the clinical potential for nerve compression from this bony anomaly discussed.

  5. Conformal anomalies and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Krzysztof A.; Nicolai, Hermann

    2017-09-01

    We argue that the presence of conformal anomalies in gravitational theories can lead to observable modifications to Einstein's equations via the induced anomalous effective actions, whose non-localities can overwhelm the smallness of the Planck scale. The fact that no such effects have been seen in recent cosmological or gravitational wave observations therefore imposes strong restrictions on the field content of possible extensions of Einstein's theory: all viable theories should have vanishing conformal anomalies. We then show that a complete cancellation of conformal anomalies in D = 4 for both the C2 invariant and the Euler (Gauss-Bonnet) invariant E4 can only be achieved for N-extended supergravity multiplets with N ⩾ 5, as well as for M theory compactified to four dimensions. Although there remain open questions, in particular concerning the true significance of conformal anomalies in non-conformal theories, as well as their possible gauge dependence for spin s ⩾3/2, these cancellations suggest a hidden conformal structure of unknown type in these theories.

  6. Connecting Stratospheric and Ionospheric Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraggs, M. E.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.; Benkevitch, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates any relationship between lunar phases and ionospheric anomalies that appear at low latitudes concurrently with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). The study utilizes World-wide GPS Receiver Network Total Electron Content (TEC) data spanning 13 years (2001-2014) and focuses on the changes in the equatorial ionization anomaly the Western hemisphere. TEC is highly variable due to the influences of solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variation and these influences are removed by the use of model. This empirical TEC model is a combination of linear dependencies of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap3) with a third degree polynomial dependency for day-of-year (DOY). With such dependencies removed, the remaining TEC variation could be resolved and attributed to an appropriate mechanism. Lunar phase and apside was investigated in particular, especially the new and full moon phases during perigees when tidal forcing would be most powerful. Lunar tidal forcing on planetary waves is also examined as being physically responsible for setting up conditions that may give rise to SSWs and ionospheric anomalies. Preliminary results suggest that such anomalies may be enhanced in intensity during the full or new moon and even more so during perigee by different amounts depending on whether the SSW is a major (40-60%) or minor (20-45%) event.

  7. Thermal anomalies in stressed Teflon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Wulff, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) as a calorimetric gasketing material, serendipity revealed a thermal anomaly in stressed film that occurs concomitantly with the well-documented 25 C transition. The magnitude of the excess energy absorption - about 35 cal/g - is suggested to be related to the restricted thermal expansion of the film.

  8. Genome size, karyotype polymorphism and chromosomal evolution in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata T Souza

    provides evidence for the occurrence of fusion and split events involving T. brucei and T. cruzi chromosomes.

  9. Sex chromosome inactivation in the male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian females have two X chromosomes, while males have only one X plus a Y chromosome. In order to balance X-linked gene dosage between the sexes, one X chromosome undergoes inactivation during development of female embryos. This process has been termed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Inactivation of the single X chromosome also occurs in the male, but is transient and is confined to the late stages of first meiotic prophase during spermatogenesis. This phenomenon has been termed meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). A substantial portion ( approximately 15-25%) of X-linked mRNA-encoding genes escapes XCI in female somatic cells. While no mRNA genes are known to escape MSCI in males, approximately 80% of X-linked miRNA genes have been shown to escape this process. Recent results have led to the proposal that the RNA interference mechanism may be involved in regulating XCI in female cells. We suggest that some MSCI-escaping miRNAs may play a similar role in regulating MSCI in male germ cells.

  10. The genetic basis of dental anomalies and its relation to orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakan, Derya Germec; Ulkur, Feyza; Taner, Tulin

    2013-01-01

    The interruption of odontogenesis by any etiological factor may result in dental anomalies. Apart from the environmental factors, the impact of genetics in dental anomalies was found to be a factor in different levels. Many authors had questioned a common genetic defect resulting in different phenotypic conditions such as absent, malformed, malposed or ectopic teeth. Because the multidisciplinary treatment of these dental anomalies such as hypodontia, impaction etc., involves orthodontic intervention, orthodontists must be aware of the etiology and possible correlative conditions with dental anomalies. PMID:24966722

  11. RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CRANIOVERTEBRAL JUNCTION ANOMALIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Detailed discussions of the CVJ are conspicuously absent in many standard textbooks and chapters addressing the skull or cervical spine, since it lies in between these regions . CVJ anomalies are common in India subcontinent. OBJECTIVES : To outline the normal anatomy and various abnormalities of craniovertebral junction. To evaluate the most common developmental and acquired craniovertebral junction abnormalities . CRANIOMETRY AND DIAGNOSIS: Radiological evaluation of CVJ requir es identification of only a few anatomic structures. Over the years multiple lines , planes and angles have been described for assessment of CVJ relationship , initially with radiography and later with polytomography. Two lines have remained particularly use ful for evaluation of CVJ relationship with virtually any imaging modality: the chamberlain`s line and weckenheim ’ s clivus base line . Two angles also continue to be useful: the welcher basal angle and atlanto occipital joint axis angle. PATIENTS AND METHOD S: The prospective study of craniovertebral junction anomalies was carried out at Kurnool medical college , Governament general hospital Kurnool from NOV 2012 to AUG 2014. The patients are subjected to clinical evaluation and radiological evaluation. OBSERV ATIONS AND RESULTS : In our study there is male predominance with male to female ratio of 2:1 . Majority of patients are in the age group of 11 - 40 (73.26%. The commonest symptom seen is weakness of extremities ( 70% with associated numbness (50%. On clinica l examination pyramidal tract involvement noticed in 70% of cases. Basilar invagination is the most common followed by Atlantoocoipital assimilation (40% and AAD (30% . CONCLUSION : Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are invalvable adjuncts to the plain radiographs in the evaluation of the craniovertebral junction anomalies. Chamberlain’s line and McGregor line are the most commonly applied craniometric measurements

  12. Hirschsprung disease in an infant with a contiguous gene syndrome of chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanske, A; Ferreira, J C; Leonard, J C; Fuller, P; Marion, R W

    2001-08-15

    Hirschsprung disease is a developmental disorder resulting from the arrest of the craniocaudal migration of enteric neurons from the neural crest along gastrointestinal segments of variable length; see Behrman [Nelson textbook of pediatrics, 1992:954-956]. It is a heterogeneous disorder in which familial cases map to at least three loci whose function is necessary for normal neural crest-derived cell development. Homozygous mutations in the endothelin-B receptor gene (EDNRB) on 13q22 have been identified in humans and mice with Hirschsprung disease type 2 (HSCR2). The auditory pigmentary disorder, Waardenburg-Shah syndrome, comprises Waardenburg syndrome and Hirschsprung disease and has also been mapped to the EDNRB locus. Hirschsprung disease, malrotation, isochromia, a profound sensorineural hearing loss, and several other anomalies were found in an infant with an interstitial deletion of 13q, suggesting the existence of a contiguous gene syndrome involving developmental genes necessary for the normal growth of the neural crest derivatives of the eye, inner ear, and colon. We report on an additional patient with a deletion in 13q and Hirschsprung disease. Congenital anomalies associated with deletions of the distal long arm of chromosome 13 are sufficiently consistent to suggest a clinical syndrome.

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  14. PHACE syndrome: MRI of intracerebral vascular anomalies and clinical findings in a series of 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Jennifer; Robinson, Ian; Snow, Aisling; Rea, David; Phelan, Ethna [Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Watson, Rosemarie; Irvine, Alan D. [Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-09-15

    PHACE (posterior fossa defects, haemangioma, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, eye abnormalities) syndrome describes a constellation of abnormalities that can occur in association with segmental craniofacial infantile haemangioma. To report the spectrum of clinical and imaging abnormalities seen in a cohort of children. A retrospective review of the clinical and imaging records of all patients diagnosed with PHACE syndrome between 1998 and 2009 was performed. Information sought included patient demographics, craniofacial segments involved, imaging findings and other extracutaneous abnormalities. Twelve patients were diagnosed with PHACE syndrome over 11 years. All patients had a segmental craniofacial haemangioma. Involved facial segments, in order of frequency, were frontotemporal (12), maxillary (8), mandibular (5) and frontonasal (1). The most common extracutaneous abnormalities were neurovascular anomalies (10), with many patients having multiple anomalies. The spectrum of arterial anomalies ranged from hypoplasia (9) to ectasia (3), anomalous origin/course (2) and persistent fetal anastomosis (2). Other anomalies found included cardiac anomalies (3), coarctation of the aorta (2), posterior fossa malformations (1) and sternal region anomalies (1). Intracranial anomalies are the most common extracutaneous feature of PHACE syndrome. The contribution of the radiologist in the recognition of such anomalies is important for the diagnosis of PHACE syndrome. (orig.)

  15. PHACE syndrome: MRI of intracerebral vascular anomalies and clinical findings in a series of 12 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: PHACE (posterior fossa defects, haemangioma, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, eye abnormalities) syndrome describes a constellation of abnormalities that can occur in association with segmental craniofacial infantile haemangioma. OBJECTIVE: To report the spectrum of clinical and imaging abnormalities seen in a cohort of children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the clinical and imaging records of all patients diagnosed with PHACE syndrome between 1998 and 2009 was performed. Information sought included patient demographics, craniofacial segments involved, imaging findings and other extracutaneous abnormalities. RESULTS: Twelve patients were diagnosed with PHACE syndrome over 11 years. All patients had a segmental craniofacial haemangioma. Involved facial segments, in order of frequency, were frontotemporal (12), maxillary (8), mandibular (5) and frontonasal (1). The most common extracutaneous abnormalities were neurovascular anomalies (10), with many patients having multiple anomalies. The spectrum of arterial anomalies ranged from hypoplasia (9) to ectasia (3), anomalous origin\\/course (2) and persistent fetal anastomosis (2). Other anomalies found included cardiac anomalies (3), coarctation of the aorta (2), posterior fossa malformations (1) and sternal region anomalies (1). CONCLUSION: Intracranial anomalies are the most common extracutaneous feature of PHACE syndrome. The contribution of the radiologist in the recognition of such anomalies is important for the diagnosis of PHACE syndrome.

  16. Chromosome doubling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  17. Impact of parental ages and other characteristics at childbearing on congenital anomalies: Results for the Czech Republic, 2000-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Rychtarikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND If the impact of maternal age at childbearing on congenital anomalies is well-known for the occurrence of Down syndrome, less is known concerning its effects on other major anomalies. Information is even scarcer for the possible effects of other maternal characteristics and of age of the father. OBJECTIVE We present new results on the associations between parental ages and other maternal characteristics, on the one hand, and congenital anomalies, on the other hand, using data linkage between three Czech registries on mother, newborn, and malformations, for the period 2000-2007. METHODS As the variables are in categorical format, binary logistic regression is used in order to investigate the relationship between presence/absence of a congenital anomaly, for each of the eleven types of anomalies considered, and the set of predictors. RESULTS This research confirms the impact of a higher age of the mother on Down syndrome and on other chromosomal anomalies. Paternal age is not associated with chromosomal anomalies and, in this Czech population, has a rather slight effect on some of the congenital anomalies examined. Another finding of the present study is the possible role of various other maternal characteristics on congenital malformations. CONCLUSIONS Based on a large data set, this study concludes that both parental ages can be associated with congenital anomalies of the child, and that maternal characteristics other than age have also to be considered. COMMENTS Risk factors can be tentatively proposed if they are based on a plausible and suitably tested explanatory mechanism. Unfortunately, in the majority of individual cases of congenital anomaly, the cause of the condition is still unknown and suspected to be an interaction of multiple environmental and genetic factors.

  18. Ebstein anomaly: Genetic heterogeneity and association with microdeletions 1p36 and 8p23.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Laura; Lepri, Francesca; Giuffrida, Maria Grazia; Guida, Valentina; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Capolino, Rossella; Torres, Barbara; De Luca, Alessandro; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2011-09-01

    Ebstein anomaly is an uncommon congenital heart defect (CHD), characterized by downward displacement of the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle. To uncover the genetic associations with Ebstein anomaly, we have searched chromosomal imbalances using standard cytogenetic and array-CGH analysis, and single gene conditions associated with syndromic Ebstein anomaly (with extracardiac anomalies), and screened GATA4 and NKX2.5 mutations in nonsyndromic patients (without extracardiac anomalies). Between January 1997 and September 2009, 44 consecutive patients with Ebstein anomaly were evaluated in two centers of Pediatric Cardiology. Ebstein anomaly was syndromic in 12 (27%) patients, and nonsyndromic in 32 (73%). A recognizable syndrome or complex was diagnosed by clinical criteria in seven patients. In one syndromic patient an 18q deletion was diagnosed by standard cytogenetic analysis. Array-CGH analysis performed in 10 of the 12 syndromic patients detected an interstitial deletion of about 4 Mb at 8p23.1 in one patient, and a deletion 1pter > 1p36.32/dup Xpter- > Xp22.32 in another patient. In the 28 of 32 nonsyndromic patients who underwent molecular testing, no mutation in GATA4 and NKX2.5 genes were detected. We conclude that Ebstein anomaly is a genetically heterogeneous defect, and that deletion 1p36 and deletion 8p23.1 are the most frequent chromosomal imbalances associated with Ebstein anomaly. Candidate genes include the GATA4 gene (in patients with del 8p23.1), NKX2.5 (based on published patients with isolated Ebstein anomaly) and a hypothetical gene in patients with del 1p36). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  20. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  1. Absence of Y chromosome in human placental site trophoblastic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Pei; Wang, Hanlin L; Chu, Peiguo; Yang, Bin; Huang, Jiaoti; Baergen, Rebecca N; Sklar, Jeffrey; Yang, Ximing J; Soslow, Robert A

    2007-10-01

    Placental site trophoblastic tumor is a neoplasm of extravillous intermediate trophoblast at the implantation site, preceded in the majority of cases by a female gestational event. Our pilot investigation suggested that the development of this tumor might require a paternally derived X chromosome and the absence of a Y chromosome. Twenty cases of placental site trophoblastic tumor were included in this study. Genotyping at 15 polymorphic loci and one sex determination locus was performed by multiplex PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis. X chromosome polymorphisms were determined by PCR amplification of exon 1 of the human androgen receptor gene using primers flanking the polymorphic CAG repeats within this region. Genotyping at 15 polymorphic loci was informative and paternal alleles were present in all tumors, confirming the trophoblastic origin of the tumors. The presence of an X chromosome and the absence of a Y chromosome were observed in all tumors. Among 13 cases in which analysis of the X chromosome polymorphism was informative, all but one demonstrated at least two X alleles and seven cases showed one identifiable paternal X allele. These results confirm a unique pathogenetic mechanism in placental site trophoblastic tumor, involving an exclusion of the Y chromosome from the genome and, therefore, a tumor arising from the trophectoderm of a female conceptus. As epigenetic regulations of imprinting during X chromosome inactivation are of significant biological implications, placental site trophoblastic tumor may provide an important model for studying the sex chromosome biology and the proliferative advantage conferred by the paternal X chromosome.

  2. Mosaic tetrasomy 15q25{yields}qter in a newborn infant with multiple anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Enden, A.; Roy, N.V.; Speleman, F. [Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium)

    1996-06-14

    We describe a premature boy with metopic craniosynostosis, facial anomalies, atrial-septal defect, hydronephrosis and flexion contractures of lower limbs, and mosaic tetrasomy 15q25{r_arrow}qter. The extra chromosome material was present in the form of an acentric marker. A number of clinical manifestations observed in this child were also found in 3 previously reported patients who were trisomic for the same part of chromosome 15 and in 2 patients who were tetrasomic for a larger segment of 15q. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The influence of sex chromosome aneuploidy on brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Roozbeh; Daly, Eileen M; Cutter, William J; Murphy, Declan G M; Robertson, Dene M W; DeLisi, Lynn E; Mackay, Clare E; Barrick, Thomas R; Crow, Timothy J; Roberts, Neil

    2009-01-05

    The cognitive deficits present in individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies suggest that hemispheric differentiation of function is determined by an X-Y homologous gene [Crow (1993); Lancet 342:594-598]. In particular, females with Turner's syndrome (TS) who have only one X-chromosome exhibit deficits of spatial ability whereas males with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) who possess a supernumerary X-chromosome are delayed in acquiring words. Since spatial and verbal abilities are generally associated with right and left hemispheric function, such deficits may relate to anomalies of cerebral asymmetry. We therefore applied a novel image analysis technique to investigate the relationship between sex chromosome dosage and structural brain asymmetry. Specifically, we tested Crow's prediction that the magnitude of the brain torque (i.e., a combination of rightward frontal and leftward occipital asymmetry) would, as a function of sex chromosome dosage, be respectively decreased in TS women and increased in KS men, relative to genotypically normal controls. We found that brain torque was not significantly different in TS women and KS men, in comparison to controls. However, TS women exhibited significantly increased leftward brain asymmetry, restricted to the posterior of the brain and focused on the superior temporal and parietal-occipital association cortex, while KS men showed a trend for decreased brain asymmetry throughout the frontal lobes. The findings suggest that the number of sex chromosomes influences the development of brain asymmetry not simply to modify the torque but in a complex pattern along the antero-posterior axis.

  4. [Horseshoe kidney: not a simple fusion anomaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccetta, Francesco; Caroppo, Maurizio; Musio, Fernando; Mudoni, Anna; Accogli, Antonella; Zacheo, Maria Dolores; Burzo, Domenica; Bramato, Daniele; Carluccio, Giancamillo; Nuzzo, Vitale

    2015-01-01

    The horseshoe kidney is a congenital anatomical defect of the kidney that occurs in 0,25% of the population and is generally characterized by the fusion of the lower poles of the two kidneys through an isthmus and to which may be associated with urogenital and renal vascular anomalies. Asymptomatic in 1/3 of the cases and, most of time, accidentally discovered during a radiological examination, promotes nephrolithiasis, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux and pyelonephritis. We report two cases of patients with kidney horseshoe, characterized by the abrupt onset of a septic state with oligo-anuric acute renal failure, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities, rapid decay of the general conditions, with detection of nephrolithiasis, hydronephrosis and acute pyelonephritis and whose clinical management resulted in a significant and synergistic nefro-urology involvment. The kidney horseshoe not represent so only a simple fusion anomaly but rather an important anatomical condition that, once diagnosed, it would be worthy of a careful clinical, radiological and laboratory surveillance, in order to prevent the potential complications that may be also particularly severe.

  5. Anomaly detection in online social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, David; Yu, Xinghuo; Chou, Pauline; Wang, Qingmai

    2016-01-01

    Anomalies in online social networks can signify irregular, and often illegal behaviour. Anomalies in online social networks can signify irregular, and often illegal behaviour. Detection of such anomalies has been used to identify malicious individuals, including spammers, sexual predators, and online fraudsters. In this paper we survey existing computational techniques for detecting anomalies in online social networks. We characterise anomalies as being either static or dynamic, and as being labelled or unlabelled, and survey methods for detecting these different types of anomalies. We suggest that the detection of anomalies in online social networks is composed of two sub-processes; the selection and calculation of network features, and the classification of observations from this feature space. In addition, this paper provides an overview of the types of problems that anomaly detection can address and identifies key areas of future research.

  6. Focal skin defect, limb anomalies and microphthalmia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, K.E.; Andersson, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    We describe two unrelated female patients with congenital single focal skin defects, unilateral microphthalmia and limb anomalies. Growth and psychomotor development were normal and no brain malformation was detected. Although eye and limb anomalies are commonly associated, clinical anophthalmia and

  7. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  8. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  9. The Trace Anomaly and Dynamical Vacuum Energy in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Mottola, Emil

    2010-01-01

    The trace anomaly of conformal matter implies the existence of massless scalar poles in physical amplitudes involving the stress-energy tensor. These poles may be described by a local effective action with massless scalar fields, which couple to classical sources, contribute to gravitational scattering processes, and can have long range gravitational effects at macroscopic scales. In an effective field theory approach, the effective action of the anomaly is an infrared relevant term that should be added to the Einstein-Hilbert action of classical General Relativity to take account of macroscopic quantum effects. The additional scalar degrees of freedom contained in this effective action may be understood as responsible for both the Casimir effect in flat spacetime and large quantum backreaction effects at the horizon scale of cosmological spacetimes. These effects of the trace anomaly imply that the cosmological vacuum energy is dynamical, and its value depends on macroscopic boundary conditions at the cosmol...

  10. Multiple congenital ocular anomalies in Icelandic horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindgren Gabriella

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple congenital ocular anomalies (MCOA syndrome is a hereditary congenital eye defect that was first described in Silver colored Rocky Mountain horses. The mutation causing this disease is located within a defined chromosomal interval, which also contains the gene and mutation that is associated with the Silver coat color (PMEL17, exon 11. Horses that are homozygous for the disease-causing allele have multiple defects (MCOA-phenotype, whilst the heterozygous horses predominantly have cysts of the iris, ciliary body or retina (Cyst-phenotype. It has been argued that these ocular defects are caused by a recent mutation that is restricted to horses that are related to the Rocky Mountain Horse breed. For that reason we have examined another horse breed, the Icelandic horse, which is historically quite divergent from Rocky Mountain horses. Results We examined 24 Icelandic horses and established that the MCOA syndrome is present in this breed. Four of these horses were categorised as having the MCOA-phenotype and were genotyped as being homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation. The most common clinical signs included megaloglobus, iris stromal hypoplasia, abnormal pectinate ligaments, iridociliary cysts occasionally extending into the peripheral retina and cataracts. The cysts and pectinate ligament abnormalities were observed in the temporal quadrant of the eyes. Fourteen horses were heterozygous for the PMEL17 mutation and were characterized as having the Cyst-phenotype with cysts and occasionally curvilinear streaks in the peripheral retina. Three additional horses were genotyped as PMEL17 heterozygotes, but in these horses we were unable to detect cysts or other forms of anomalies. One eye of a severely vision-impaired 18 month-old stallion, homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation was examined by light microscopy. Redundant duplication of non-pigmented ciliary body epithelium, sometimes forming cysts bulging into the posterior chamber

  11. Education on, Exposure to, and Management of Vascular Anomalies During Otolaryngology Residency and Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Robert; Jabbour, Noel; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Bauman, Nancy; Darrow, David H; Elluru, Ravindhra; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Perkins, Jonathan; Richter, Gresham; Shin, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The field of vascular anomalies presents diverse challenges in diagnosis and management. Although many lesions involve the head and neck, training in vascular anomalies is not universally included in otolaryngology residencies and pediatric otolaryngology (POTO) fellowships. To explore the education in, exposure to, and comfort level of otolaryngology trainees with vascular anomalies. A survey was distributed to 39 POTO fellows and 44 residents in postgraduate year 5 who matched into POTO fellowships from April 22 through June 16, 2014. Survey responses from trainees on exposure to, education on, and comfort with vascular anomalies. Forty-four residents in postgraduate year 5 who applied to POTO fellowships and 39 POTO fellows were emailed the survey. Fourteen respondents were unable to be contacted owing to lack of a current email address. Thirty-six of 69 residents and fellows (18 fellows and 18 residents [52%]) responded to the survey. Twenty-seven trainees (75%) reported no participation in a vascular anomalies clinic during residency; 6 of these 27 individuals (22%) trained at institutions with a vascular anomalies clinic but did not participate in the clinic, and 28 of the 36 respondents (78%) reported that they had less than adequate or no exposure to vascular anomalies in residency. Among POTO fellows, 11 of 17 (65%) did not participate in a vascular anomalies clinic during fellowship, even though 8 of the 11 had a vascular anomalies clinic at their fellowship program. During fellowship training, 12 of 18 fellows (67%) reported that they had adequate exposure to vascular anomalies. Only 20 respondents (56%) felt comfortable distinguishing among diagnoses of vascular anomalies, and only 4 residents (22%) and 9 fellows (50%) felt comfortable treating patients with vascular anomalies. All fellows believed that training in vascular anomalies was important in fellowship, and 100% of respondents indicated that increased exposure to diagnosis and management of

  12. Prevalence of dental anomalies in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongudomporn, U; Freer, T J

    1998-12-01

    The prevalence of dental anomalies including agenesis, crown shape, tooth position, root shape, and invagination were examined in 111 orthodontic patients; 74.77 per cent of the patients exhibited at least one dental anomaly. Invagination was found to be the most prevalent anomaly, whereas supernumerary teeth and root dilaceration were the least frequent anomalies. Dental invagination and short or blunt roots were significantly more prevalent in females than in males. Implications for orthodontic treatment planning are discussed.

  13. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting chromos...... resistance but carboplatin sensitivity, indicating that CIN may determine MTS response in vivo. Thus, pretherapeutic assessment of CIN may optimize treatment stratification and clinical trial design using these agents....... chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor......-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...

  14. Identification of chromosome abnormalities in the horse using a panel of chromosome-specific painting probes generated by microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, Monika; Słota, Ewa; Pieńkowska-Schelling, Aldona; Schelling, Claude

    2009-09-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using a panel of molecular probes for all chromosome pairs obtained by chromosome microdissection of the domestic horse ( Equus caballus ) was used to diagnose karyotype abnormalities in 35 horses (32 mares, 2 stallions and 1 intersex), which were selected for the study due to infertility (23 horses), reduced fertility (10 horses) and developmental anomalies (2 horses). The use of the FISH technique with probes for each horse chromosome pair enabled the diagnosis of many different chromosome aberrations in this population. Among the horses analysed, 21 animals had normal karyotype - 64,XX (19 mares) and 64,XY (2 stallions). Fourteen animals, constituting 40% of the population studied, showed the following chromosome abnormalities: 63,X (1 mare); 63,X/64,XX (6 mares); 63,X/64,XX/65,XXX (3 mares); 63,X/65,XXX (1 mare); 64,XX/65,XX+Xp (1 mare); 63,X/64,XX/65,XX+Xq (1 mare), and 63,X/64,XX/65,XX+delY (1 intersex). When only the mares studied because of complete infertility were taken into consideration, this proportion exceeded 56%. Due to the increased frequency of the above-mentioned aberrations in the mosaic form of two or more lines, it was necessary to analyse a large number (100-300) of metaphase spreads. The use of specific molecular probes obtained by chromosome microdissection made these diagnoses much easier.

  15. [Ectopia cordis and cardiac anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Alberto; Rodrigo, David; Luis, María Teresa; Pastor, Esteban; Galdeano, José Miguel; Esteban, Susana

    2002-11-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare disease that occurs in 5.5 to 7.9 per million live births. Only 267 cases had been reported as of 2001, most (95%) associated with other cardiac anomalies. We studied the cardiac malformations associated in 6 patients with ectopia cordis. Depending on where the defect was located, the cases of ectopia were classified into four groups: cervical, thoracic, thoraco-abdominal, and abdominal. All 6 patients died before the third day of life, 4 during delivery. Three of the patients were included in the thoracic group, whereas the other 3 belonged to the thoraco-abdominal group. All the patients had associated ventricular septal defects, 3 double-outlet right ventricle (50%) and the rest (50%) tetralogy of Fallot-pulmonary atresia. Two patients with double-outlet right ventricle presented mitral-valve pathology, a parachute valve and an atresic mitral valve. None of these cardiac anomalies have been reported to date.

  16. On Anomaly Mediated SUSY Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    de Alwis, S P

    2008-01-01

    A discrepancy between the Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (AMSB) gaugino mass calculated from the work of Kaplunovsky and Louis (hep-th/9402005) (KL) and other calculations in the literature is explained, and it is argued that the KL expression is the correct one relevant to the Wilsonian action. Furthermore it is argued that the AMSB contribution to the squark and slepton masses should be replaced by the contribution pointed out by Dine and Seiberg (DS) which has nothing to do with Weyl anomalies. This is not in general equivalent to the AMSB expression, and it is shown that there are models in which the usual AMSB expression would vanish but the DS one is non-zero. In fact the latter has aspects of both AMSB and gauge mediated SUSY breaking. In particular like the latter, it gives positive squared masses for sleptons.

  17. Theory of Geological Anomaly in Remote Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Geological anomaly is geological body or complex body with obviously different compositions, structures or orders of genesis as compared with those in the surrounding areas. Geological anomaly, restrained by the geological factors closely associated with ore-forming process, is an important clue to ore deposits. The geological anomaly serves as a geological sign to locate ore deposits. Therefore, it is very important to study how to define the characteristics of geological anomaly and further to locate the changes in these characteristics. In this paper, the authors propose the geological anomaly based on the remote-sensing images and data, and expound systematically such image features as scale, size, boundary, morphology and genesis of geological anomalies. Then the authors introduce the categorization of the geological anomalies according to their geneses. The image characteristics of some types of geological anomalies, such as the underground geological anomaly, are also explained in detail. Based on the remote-sensing interpretation of these geological anomalies, the authors conclude that the forecasting and exploration of ore deposits should be focused on the following three aspects: (1) the analysis of geological setting and geological anomaly; (2) the analysis of circular geological anomaly, and (3) the comprehensive forecasting of ore deposits and the research into multi-source information.

  18. Fetal renal anomalies : diagnosis, management, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen-Elias, Henrica Antonia Maria

    2004-01-01

    In two to three percent of fetuses structural anomalies can be found with prenatal ultrasound investigation. Anomalies of the urinary tract account for 15 to 20% of these anomalies with a detection rate of approximately of 90%. In Chapter 2, 3 and 4 we present reference curves for size and growth of

  19. Fetal renal anomalies : diagnosis, management, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen-Elias, Henrica Antonia Maria

    2004-01-01

    In two to three percent of fetuses structural anomalies can be found with prenatal ultrasound investigation. Anomalies of the urinary tract account for 15 to 20% of these anomalies with a detection rate of approximately of 90%. In Chapter 2, 3 and 4 we present reference curves for size and growth

  20. The contribution of female meiotic drive to the evolution of neo-sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kohta; Kitano, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Sex chromosomes undergo rapid turnover in certain taxonomic groups. One of the mechanisms of sex chromosome turnover involves fusions between sex chromosomes and autosomes. Sexual antagonism, heterozygote advantage, and genetic drift have been proposed as the drivers for the fixation of this evolutionary event. However, all empirical patterns of the prevalence of multiple sex chromosome systems across different taxa cannot be simply explained by these three mechanisms. In this study, we propose that female meiotic drive may contribute to the evolution of neo-sex chromosomes. The results of this study showed that in mammals, the XY(1) Y(2) sex chromosome system is more prevalent in species with karyotypes of more biarmed chromosomes, whereas the X(1) X(2) Y sex chromosome system is more prevalent in species with predominantly acrocentric chromosomes. In species where biarmed chromosomes are favored by female meiotic drive, X-autosome fusions (XY(1) Y(2) sex chromosome system) will be also favored by female meiotic drive. In contrast, in species with more acrocentric chromosomes, Y-autosome fusions (X(1) X(2) Y sex chromosome system) will be favored just because of the biased mutation rate toward chromosomal fusions. Further consideration should be given to female meiotic drive as a mechanism in the fixation of neo-sex chromosomes.

  1. Bifid rib: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Krishnan Rathinasabapathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of the bifid rib was found during routine bone study. The distal part of the osseous rib bifurcated into two divisions with an angle of 60°. Both divisions had their own costal cartilage. Bifid rib is a congenital abnormality of the rib cage and usually asymptomatic, often discovered incidentally on chest X-ray. Effects of this neuroskeletal anomaly can include respiratory difficulties and neurological limitations.

  2. Sharing AIS Related Anomalies (SARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    misconfiguration and intentional misuse. These unintended behaviours generate an abundance of anomalies that the security community has an interest in monitoring...Lastly, the feedback loop formed with clients is essential to SARA’s advancement. The more SARA is exposed, the better and faster it can be adapted...to end-user needs and thus be adopted by them. This section is organised as follows : • Section 2.1 describes the strategy used to identify potential

  3. Anomaly mediation in superstring theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlon, J.P. [Rudolf Peierls Center for Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Balliol College, Oxford, OX1 3BJ (United Kingdom); Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-4030 (United States); Goodsell, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Palti, E. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2011-01-15

    We study anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking in type IIB string theory and use our results to test the supergravity formula for anomaly mediated gaugino masses. We compute 1-loop gaugino masses for models of D3-branes on orbifold singularities with 3-form fluxes by calculating the annulus correlator of 3-form flux and two gauginos in the zero momentum limit. Consistent with supergravity expectations we find both anomalous and running contributions to 1-loop gaugino masses. For background Neveu-Schwarz H-flux we find an exact match with the supergravity formula. For Ramond-Ramond flux there is an off-shell ambiguity that precludes a full matching. The anomaly mediated gaugino masses, while determined by the infrared spectrum, arise from an explicit sum over UV open string winding modes. We also calculate brane-to-brane tree-level gravity mediated gaugino masses and show that there are two contributions coming from the dilaton and from the twisted modes, which are suppressed by the full T{sup 6} volume and the untwisted T{sup 2} volume respectively. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Anomaly mediation in superstring theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlon, Joseph P. [Rudolf Peierls Center for Theoretical Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Balliol College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Palti, Eran [Centre de Physique Theoretique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2010-08-15

    We study anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking in type IIB string theory and use our results to test the supergravity formula for anomaly mediated gaugino masses. We compute 1-loop gaugino masses for models of D3-branes on orbifold singularities with 3-form fluxes by calculating the annulus correlator of 3-form flux and two gauginos in the zero momentum limit. Consistent with supergravity expectations we find both anomalous and running contributions to 1-loop gaugino masses. For background Neveu-Schwarz H-flux we find an exact match with the supergravity formula. For Ramond-Ramond flux there is an off-shell ambiguity that precludes a full matching. The anomaly mediated gaugino masses, while determined by the infrared spectrum, arise from an explicit sum over UV open string winding modes. We also calculate brane-to-brane tree-level gravity mediated gaugino masses and show that there are two contributions coming from the dilaton and from the twisted modes, which are suppressed by the full T{sup 6} volume and the untwisted T{sup 2} volume respectively. (orig.)

  5. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  6. Trace anomalies from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Bastianelli, F; Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Nieuwenhuizen, Peter van

    1993-01-01

    The 1-loop anomalies of a d-dimensional quantum field theory can be computed by evaluating the trace of the regulated path integral jacobian matrix, as shown by Fujikawa. In 1983, Alvarez-Gaum\\'e and Witten observed that one can simplify this evaluation by replacing the operators which appear in the regulator and in the jacobian by quantum mechanical operators with the same (anti)commutation relations. By rewriting this quantum mechanical trace as a path integral with periodic boundary conditions for a one-dimensional supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model, they obtained the chiral anomalies for spin 1/2 and 3/2 fields and selfdual antisymmetric tensors in d dimensions. In this article, we treat the case of trace anomalies for spin 0, 1/2 and 1 fields in a gravitational and Yang-Mills background. We do not introduce a supersymmetric sigma model, but keep the original Dirac matrices $\\g^\\m$ and internal symmetry generators $T^a$ in the path integral. As a result, we get a matrix-valued action. Gauge covariance o...

  7. Astrometric Solar-System Anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. Next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr$^{-1}$. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction ...

  8. The impact of national guidance for anomaly screening and invasive testing: unintended consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberry, M; Hassan, W A; Goodburn, S; Brockelsby, J; Wladimiroff, J; Nash, R; Lees, C

    2014-01-01

    Recent guidance from the UK National Screening Committee (NSC) and the Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme (FASP) has led to important changes in prenatal ultrasound diagnosis and invasive testing. These relate to prenatal ultrasound investigation of what were previously known as 'soft markers' for Down's syndrome at the time of the detailed anomaly scan and as to whether full karyotype or FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridisation)/QFPCR (quantitative fluorescence PCR) testing for trisomies should be carried out when an invasive test is performed. Neither recommendation is directly related to the other but both in combination could have profound implications for the detection of chromosomal abnormalities other than trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome). In the light of two cases recently managed in one regional fetal medicine unit, we retrospectively reviewed cases where, with correct application of the NSC and FASP recommendations, non-lethal and clinically important chromosomal abnormalities would most likely not have been detected.

  9. Prenatal Diagnosis of a Fetus with de novo Supernumerary Ring Chromosome 16 Characterized by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Cignini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A fetus with de novo ring chromosome 16 is presented. At 20 weeks' gestation, ultrasound examination demonstrated bilateral clubfoot, bilateral renal pyelectasis, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, and transposition of the great vessel. Amniocentesis was performed. Chromosome analysis identified a ring chromosome 16 [47,XY,r(16] and array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH demonstrated that the ring included the euchromatic portion 16p11.2. Postmortem examination confirmed prenatal findings. This is the first case of de novo ring chromosome 16 diagnosed prenatally with a new phenotypic pattern and also reinforces the importance of offering amniocentesis with a-CGH if fetal anomalies are detected.

  10. Studying physical chromatin interactions in plants using Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwers, M.; Splinter, E.; van Driel, R.; de Laat, W.; Stam, M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene regulation in higher eukaryotes frequently involves physical interactions between genomic sequence elements tens of kilobases apart on the same chromosome but can also entail interactions between different chromosomes. Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) is a powerful tool to identify such int

  11. Studying physical chromatin interactions in plants using Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwers, M.; Splinter, E.; van Driel, R.; de Laat, W.; Stam, M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene regulation in higher eukaryotes frequently involves physical interactions between genomic sequence elements tens of kilobases apart on the same chromosome but can also entail interactions between different chromosomes. Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) is a powerful tool to identify such int

  12. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Fransz; H. de Jong

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  13. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  14. From nucleosome to chromosome : a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.; de Jong, H.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  15. Genetics And Tooth Anomalies - An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswathy Brahmanandan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development like the development of all epithelial appendages is regulated by inductive tissue interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme. Numerous genes interact, either act in conjunction or antagonize each other in odontogenesis. A number of different mesenchymal molecules and their receptors act as mediators in epithelial mesenchymal interactions. Several genes linked with early tooth positioning and developments belong to signaling pathways and have morphogenesis regulatory functions in morphogenesis of other organs. Their mutations often show pleiotropic effects beyond dental morphogenesis. In contrast, certain genes involved in enamel and dentin structures are highly specific for tooth. Mutations in these genes have been identified as causes of Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI, Dentinogenesis Imperfecta (DI, Dentin Dysplasia (DD and anomalies in tooth number. This article focuses on genetic basis of inherited non-syndromic teeth disorders.

  16. "Chromosome": a knowledge-based system for the chromosome classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, G; Bernadet, M

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome, a knowledge-based analysis system has been designed for the classification of human chromosomes. Its aim is to perform an optimal classification by driving a tool box containing the procedures of image processing, pattern recognition and classification. This paper presents the general architecture of Chromosome, based on a multiagent system generator. The image processing tool box is described from the met aphasic enhancement to the fine classification. Emphasis is then put on the knowledge base intended for the chromosome recognition. The global classification process is also presented, showing how Chromosome proceeds to classify a given chromosome. Finally, we discuss further extensions of the system for the karyotype building.

  17. [Clinical features and molecular diagnosis of three patients with DiGeorge anomaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin-qiao; Wang, Lai-shuan; Qi, Chun-hua; Ying, Wen-jing; Guo, Xiao-hong; Liu, Dan-ru; Hui, Xiao-ying; Liu, Fang; Cao, Yun; Luo, Fei-hong; Wang, Xiao-chuan

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the clinical features and molecular diagnostic methods of three patients with DiGeorge anomaly. The clinical manifestations and immunological features of the three cases with DiGeorge anomaly were analyzed. We detected the chromosome 22q11.2 gene deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). (1) CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS: All three cases had varying degrees of infection, congenital heart disease and small thymus by imaging; two cases had significant hypocalcemia (1.11 mmol/L and 1.22 mmol/L, respectively), accompanied by convulsions; only 1 case had cleft palate and all had no significant facial deformity. (2) Immunological characteristics: All three cases had varying degrees of T-cell immune function defects (percentage of T lymphocytes was 24% - 43%, absolute count was 309 - 803/µl), and levels of immunoglobulin G, A, M, and percent of B lymphocytes and absolute count were normal. (3) Detection of the chromosome 22q11.2 gene deletion: 400 cells of each case were detected. All cells showed two green and one red hybridization signal, indicating the presence of gene deletions in chromosome 22q11.2. (4) OUTCOME: All three cases were treated with thymosin, and appropriate clinical intervention for cardiac malformations, hypocalcemia, and were followed-up for 4 - 18 months, the prognosis was good. DiGeorge anomaly showed diverse clinical manifestations. We should consider the disease if patients had congenital heart disease, thymic hypoplasia, hypocalcemia and/or impaired immune function. FISH for detecting chromosome 22q11.2 gene deletion can be used as accurate and rapid diagnostic method. Thymosin treatment and other clinical intervention may help to improve the prognosis of patients with partial DiGeorge anomaly.

  18. Development and Congenital Anomalies of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tadokoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the pancreas develops is essential to understand the pathogenesis of congenital pancreatic anomalies. Recent studies have shown the advantages of investigating the development of frogs, mice, and chickens for understanding early embryonic development of the pancreas and congenital anomalies, such as choledochal cysts, anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction, annular pancreas, and pancreas divisum. These anomalies arise from failure of complete rotation and fusion during embryogenesis. There are many theories in the etiology of congenital anomalies of the pancreas. We review pancreas development in humans and other vertebrates. In addition, we attempt to clarify how developmental failure is related to congenital pancreatic anomalies.

  19. Global Anomalies and Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Golkar, Siavash

    2015-01-01

    We show that matching anomalies under large gauge transformations and large diffeomorphisms can explain the appearance and non-renormalization of couplings in effective field theory. We focus on %thermal partition functions and thermal effective field theory where we argue that the appearance of certain unusual Chern-Simons couplings is a consequence of global anomalies. As an example, we show that a mixed global anomaly in four dimensions fixes the chiral vortical effect coefficient. This is an experimentally measurable prediction from a global anomaly. For certain situations, we propose a simpler method for calculating global anomalies which uses correlation functions rather than eta invariants.

  20. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  1. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  2. Recurrent X chromosome-linked deletions: discovery of new genetic factors in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giacco, D; Chianese, C; Ars, E; Ruiz-Castañé, E; Forti, G; Krausz, C

    2014-05-01

    The role of X-linked genes and copy-number variations (CNVs) in male infertility remains poorly explored. Our previous array-CGH analyses showed three recurrent deletions in Xq exclusively (CNV67) and prevalently (CNV64, CNV69) found in patients. Molecular and clinical characterisation of these CNVs was performed in this study. 627 idiopathic infertile patients and 628 controls were tested for each deletion with PCR+/-. We used PCR+/- to map deletion junctions and long-range PCR and direct sequencing to define breakpoints. CNV64 was found in 5.7% of patients and in 3.1% of controls (p=0.013; OR=1.89; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.3) and CNV69 was found in 3.5% of patients and 1.6% of controls (p=0.023; OR=2.204; 95% CI 1.05 to 4.62). For CNV69 we identified two breakpoints, types A and B, with the latter being significantly more frequent in patients than controls (p=0.011; OR=9.19; 95% CI 1.16 to 72.8). CNV67 was detected exclusively in patients (1.1%) and was maternally transmitted. The semen phenotype of one carrier (11-041) versus his normozoospermic non-carrier brother strongly indicates a pathogenic effect of the deletion on spermatogenesis. MAGEA9, an ampliconic gene reported as independently acquired on the human X chromosome with exclusive physiological expression in the testis, is likely to be involved in CNV67. We provide the first evidence for X chromosome-linked recurrent deletions associated with spermatogenic impairment. CNV67, specific to spermatogenic anomaly and with a frequency of 1.1% in oligo/azoospermic men, resembles the AZF regions on the Y chromosome with potential clinical implications.

  3. Congenital anomalies among live births in a polluted area. A ten-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianicolo Emilio Antonio Luca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital anomalies and their primary prevention are a crucial public health issue. This work aimed to estimate the prevalence of congenital anomalies in Brindisi, a city in southeastern Italy at high risk of environmental crisis. Methods This research concerned newborns up to 28 days of age, born between 2001 and 2010 to mothers resident in Brindisi and discharged with a diagnosis of congenital anomaly. We classified cases according to the coding system adopted by the European Network for the Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT. Prevalence rates of congenital anomalies in Brindisi were compared with those reported by EUROCAT. Logistic regression models were adapted to evaluate the association between congenital anomalies and municipality of residence of the mother during pregnancy. Results Out of 8,503 newborns we recorded 194 subjects with congenital anomalies (228.2/10,000 total births, 1.2 times higher than the one reported by the EUROCAT pool of registries. We observed 83 subjects with congenital heart diseases with an excess of 49.1%. Odds Ratios for congenital heart diseases significantly increased for newborns to mothers resident in Brindisi (OR 1.75 CI 95% 1.30-2.35. Conclusions Our findings indicated an increased prevalence of Congenital Anomalies (especially congenital heart diseases in the city of Brindisi. More research is needed in order to analyze the role of factors potentially involved in the causation of congenital anomalies.

  4. Algorithms for Anomaly Detection - Lecture 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The concept of statistical anomalies, or outliers, has fascinated experimentalists since the earliest attempts to interpret data. We want to know why some data points don’t seem to belong with the others: perhaps we want to eliminate spurious or unrepresentative data from our model. Or, the anomalies themselves may be what we are interested in: an outlier could represent the symptom of a disease, an attack on a computer network, a scientific discovery, or even an unfaithful partner. We start with some general considerations, such as the relationship between clustering and anomaly detection, the choice between supervised and unsupervised methods, and the difference between global and local anomalies. Then we will survey the most representative anomaly detection algorithms, highlighting what kind of data each approach is best suited to, and discussing their limitations. We will finish with a discussion of the difficulties of anomaly detection in high-dimensional data and some new directions for anomaly detec...

  5. Algorithms for Anomaly Detection - Lecture 1

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The concept of statistical anomalies, or outliers, has fascinated experimentalists since the earliest attempts to interpret data. We want to know why some data points don’t seem to belong with the others: perhaps we want to eliminate spurious or unrepresentative data from our model. Or, the anomalies themselves may be what we are interested in: an outlier could represent the symptom of a disease, an attack on a computer network, a scientific discovery, or even an unfaithful partner. We start with some general considerations, such as the relationship between clustering and anomaly detection, the choice between supervised and unsupervised methods, and the difference between global and local anomalies. Then we will survey the most representative anomaly detection algorithms, highlighting what kind of data each approach is best suited to, and discussing their limitations. We will finish with a discussion of the difficulties of anomaly detection in high-dimensional data and some new directions for anomaly detec...

  6. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  7. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  8. Chromosomal microarray analysis in a girl with mental retardation and spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdallah, Inesse; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal imbalances comprise a major cause of mental retardation, particularly in association with congenital malformations and dysmorphic features. Chromosomal analysis using banded karyotyping is limited by the low resolution of this technique, and cryptic chromosomal rearrangements cannot be detected. We describe a 6-year-old girl with mental retardation, mild growth, congenital malformation, and facial anomalies. Chromosomal analysis with karyotyping produced normal results. Because the phenotype suggested chromosomal abnormality, microarray comparative genomic hybridization was used to search for a possible cryptic anomaly. A subtelomeric chromosomal imbalance, consisting of partial trisomy 2q35 and partial monosomy 3p26, was detected and confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This rearrangement was inherited from an equilibrated maternal t(2;3) reciprocal translocation. Comparative genomic hybridization array in similar situations is useful in detecting cryptic chromosomal rearrangements, identifying genes contained in deleted or duplicated regions, establishing a precise phenotype-genotype correlation, and offering unambiguous genetic counseling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hominoid chromosomal rearrangements on 17q map to complex regions of segmental duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Jiang, Zhaoshi; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E.; Ventura, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Background Chromosomal rearrangements, such as translocations and inversions, are recurrent phenomena during evolution, and both of them are involved in reproductive isolation and speciation. To better understand the molecular basis of chromosome rearrangements and their part in karyotype evolution, we have investigated the history of human chromosome 17 by comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and sequence analysis. Results Human bacterial artificial chromosome/p1 artificial ...

  10. Assembly and disassembly of mammalian chromosome pellicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIZUMEI; JELITTLE; 等

    1992-01-01

    By means of indirect double immunofluorescent staining,the coordination of PI antigen and perichromonucleolin(PCN),the constituent of nuclear periphery and nucleolus respectively,in the assembly and disassembly of chromosome pellicle during mitosis was studied.It was found that in 3T3 cells,during mitosis PI antigen began to coat the condensing chromosome surface earlier than PCN did.However,both of them completed their coating on chromosome at approximately the same stage of mitosis,prometaphase metaphase,The dissociation of mitosis,Prometaphase metaphase.The dissociation of PI antigen from chromosome pellicle to participate the formation of nuclear periphery took place also ahead of that of PCN,At early telophase PI antigen had been extensively involved in the formation of nuclear periphery,while PCN remained in association with the surface of decondensing chromosomes.At late telophase,when PI antigen was localized in an fairly well formed nuclear periphery,PCN was in a stage of forming prenucleolar bodies.

  11. Chromosome 8p23.1 deletions as a cause of complex congenital heart defects and diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Margaret J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Holder, Ashley M; Breman, Amy M; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-08-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genomic hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm.

  12. Chromosome 8p23.1 Deletions as a Cause of Complex Congenital Heart Defects and Diaphragmatic Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Margaret J.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Holder, Ashley M.; Breman, Amy M.; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A.; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genome hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm. PMID:19606479

  13. The Consequences of Chromosome Segregation Errors in Mitosis and Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Potapova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mistakes during cell division frequently generate changes in chromosome content, producing aneuploid or polyploid progeny cells. Polyploid cells may then undergo abnormal division to generate aneuploid cells. Chromosome segregation errors may also involve fragments of whole chromosomes. A major consequence of segregation defects is change in the relative dosage of products from genes located on the missegregated chromosomes. Abnormal expression of transcriptional regulators can also impact genes on the properly segregated chromosomes. The consequences of these perturbations in gene expression depend on the specific chromosomes affected and on the interplay of the aneuploid phenotype with the environment. Most often, these novel chromosome distributions are detrimental to the health and survival of the organism. However, in a changed environment, alterations in gene copy number may generate a more highly adapted phenotype. Chromosome segregation errors also have important implications in human health. They may promote drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. In cancer cells, they are a source for genetic and phenotypic variability that may select for populations with increased malignance and resistance to therapy. Lastly, chromosome segregation errors during gamete formation in meiosis are a primary cause of human birth defects and infertility. This review describes the consequences of mitotic and meiotic errors focusing on novel concepts and human health.

  14. Association of MTHFR Polymorphisms and Chromosomal Abnormalities in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thivaratana Sinthuwiwat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in MTHFR gene might explain the interindividual differences in the reduction of DNA repaired and the increase of chromosome breakage and damage. Nowadays, chromosomal rearrangement is recognized as a major cause of lymphoid malignancies. In addition, the association of MTHFR polymorphisms with aneuploidy was found in several studies, making the MTHFR gene as a good candidate for leukemia etiology. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the common sequence variation, 677C>T and 1298A>C in the MTHFR gene of 350 fixed cell specimens archived after chromosome analysis. The distribution of the MTHFR polymorphisms frequency was compared in leukemic patients with structural chromosome abnormality and chromosome aneuploidy, as well as in those with no evidence of chromosome abnormalities. We observed a significant decrease in the distribution of T allele in 677C>T polymorphisms among patients with chromosomal abnormalities including both structural aberration and aneuploidy. The same significance result also found in patients with structural aberration when compare with the normal karyotype patients. Suggesting that polymorphism in the MTHFR gene was involved in chromosome abnormalities of leukemia. However, further investigation on the correlation with the specific types of chromosomal aberrations is needed.

  15. Caulobacter chromosome segregation is an ordered multistep process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebelut, Conrad W; Guberman, Jonathan M; van Teeffelen, Sven; Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2010-08-10

    Despite its fundamental nature, bacterial chromosome segregation remains poorly understood. Viewing segregation as a single process caused multiple proposed mechanisms to appear in conflict and failed to explain how asymmetrically dividing bacteria break symmetry to move only one of their chromosomes. Here, we demonstrate that the ParA ATPase extends from one cell pole and pulls the chromosome by retracting upon association with the ParB DNA-binding protein. Surprisingly, ParA disruption has a specific effect on chromosome segregation that only perturbs the latter stages of this process. Using quantitative high-resolution imaging, we demonstrate that this specificity results from the multistep nature of chromosome translocation. We propose that Caulobacter chromosome segregation follows an ordered pathway of events with distinct functions and mechanisms. Initiation releases polar tethering of the origin of replication, distinction spatially differentiates the two chromosomes, and commitment irreversibly translocates the distal centromeric locus. Thus, much as eukaryotic mitosis involves a sequence of distinct subprocesses, Caulobacter cells also segregate their chromosomes through an orchestrated series of steps. We discuss how the multistep view of bacterial chromosome segregation can help to explain and reconcile outstanding puzzles and frame future investigation.

  16. Trends in the prevalence, risk and pregnancy outcome of multiple births with congenital anomaly: a registry-based study in 14 European countries 1984-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, B; McConkey, R; Garne, E; Loane, M; Addor, M C; Bakker, M K; Boyd, P A; Gatt, M; Greenlees, R; Haeusler, M; Klungsøyr, K; Latos-Bielenska, A; Lelong, N; McDonnell, R; Métneki, J; Mullaney, C; Nelen, V; O'Mahony, M; Pierini, A; Rankin, J; Rissmann, A; Tucker, D; Wellesley, D; Dolk, H

    2013-05-01

    To assess the public health consequences of the rise in multiple births with respect to congenital anomalies. Descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from population-based congenital anomaly registries. Fourteen European countries. A total of 5.4 million births 1984-2007, of which 3% were multiple births. Cases of congenital anomaly included live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks of gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. Prevalence rates per 10,000 births and relative risk of congenital anomaly in multiple versus singleton births (1984-2007); proportion prenatally diagnosed, proportion by pregnancy outcome (2000-07). Proportion of pairs where both co-twins were cases. Prevalence of congenital anomalies from multiple births increased from 5.9 (1984-87) to 10.7 per 10,000 births (2004-07). Relative risk of nonchromosomal anomaly in multiple births was 1.35 (95% CI 1.31-1.39), increasing over time, and of chromosomal anomalies was 0.72 (95% CI 0.65-0.80), decreasing over time. In 11.4% of affected twin pairs both babies had congenital anomalies (2000-07). The prenatal diagnosis rate was similar for multiple and singleton pregnancies. Cases from multiple pregnancies were less likely to be terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly, odds ratio 0.41 (95% CI 0.35-0.48) and more likely to be stillbirths and neonatal deaths. The increase in babies who are both from a multiple pregnancy and affected by a congenital anomaly has implications for prenatal and postnatal service provision. The contribution of assisted reproductive technologies to the increase in risk needs further research. The deficit of chromosomal anomalies among multiple births has relevance for prenatal risk counselling. © 2013 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2013 RCOG.

  17. Increased nuchal translucency with normal karyotype and anomaly scan: what next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Merel; Pajkrt, Eva; Bilardo, Caterina M

    2014-04-01

    Over the years, it has become clear that increased nuchal translucency is a marker for chromosomal abnormalities, and it is also associated with a wide spectrum of structural anomalies, genetic syndromes, a higher risk of miscarriage, and intrauterine fetal death. These risks are all proportionally related to the degree of nuchal translucency enlargement. After the initial assessment of increased nuchal translucency, parents should be counselled by the fetal medicine specialist about the possible outcomes and the value of additional karyotyping and array comparative genomic hybridisation. A detailed late first-trimester and subsequent 20-week scan should aim at identifying structural anomalies, with special focus on the fetal heart and subtle dysmorphic features. In the absence of structural anomalies or markers, the chance of a favourable outcome is high. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The study of chromosomal abnormalities and heteromorphism in couples with 2 or 3 recurrent abortions in Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Hamedan

    OpenAIRE

    Atefeh Asgari; Safieh Ghahremani; Solmaz Saeedi; Ebrahim Kamrani

    2013-01-01

    Background: Different studies show that chromosomal balance translocation in the parents can cause recurrent spontaneous abortions. Incidence of chromosomal translocation abnormalities in couples with repeated abortions is from 0% to 31%. Objective: The purpose of this research was studying the presence or absence of chromosomal abnormalities and heteromorphism in couples with recurrent abortions and also the role of this anomaly in the abortions. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross ...

  19. Pallister-Killian syndrome caused by mosaicism for a supernumerary ring chromosome 12p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alison; Francis, David; Giouzeppos, Olivia; Amor, David J

    2009-03-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare but distinctive chromosomal syndrome distinguished by severe intellectual impairment, characteristic facial features, and variable structural anomalies. The characteristic cytogenetic abnormality in PKS is a supernumerary isochromosome 12p that confers mosaic tetrasomy. We describe a female child with PKS in whom tetrasomy 12p resulted from a supernumerary ring chromosome containing two copies of chromosome 12cen --> p13, a novel cytogenetic finding. The ring chromosome exhibited tissue-limited mosaicism, being absent in blood but detected in 38% of buccal mucosa cells and 41% of skin fibroblasts. Our patient demonstrated the typical dysmorphic characteristics of PKS, but her development was relatively advanced in comparison to children with isochromosome PKS. Her milder developmental phenotype may be attributable to differences in the mosaic distribution or the genomic content of the ring chromosome compared to mosaic isochromosome 12p.

  20. Buffering of segmental and chromosomal aneuploidies in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Stenberg

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal instability, which involves the deletion and duplication of chromosomes or chromosome parts, is a common feature of cancers, and deficiency screens are commonly used to detect genes involved in various biological pathways. However, despite their importance, the effects of deficiencies, duplications, and chromosome losses on the regulation of whole chromosomes and large chromosome domains are largely unknown. Therefore, to explore these effects, we examined expression patterns of genes in several Drosophila deficiency hemizygotes and a duplication hemizygote using microarrays. The results indicate that genes expressed in deficiency hemizygotes are significantly buffered, and that the buffering effect is general rather than being mainly mediated by feedback regulation of individual genes. In addition, differentially expressed genes in haploid condition appear to be generally more strongly buffered than ubiquitously expressed genes in haploid condition, but, among genes present in triploid condition, ubiquitously expressed genes are generally more strongly buffered than differentially expressed genes. Furthermore, we show that the 4th chromosome is compensated in response to dose differences. Our results suggest general mechanisms have evolved that stimulate or repress gene expression of aneuploid regions as appropriate, and on the 4th chromosome of Drosophila this compensation is mediated by Painting of Fourth (POF.

  1. Epidemiology and structure of congenital anomalies of the newborns in the region of Novi Sad (Vojvodina, Serbia in 1996 and 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristivojević Anđelka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. According to the World Health Organization (WHO definition, congenital anomalies are all disorders of the organs or tissues, regardless of whether they are visible at birth or manifest in life, and are registered in the International Classification of Diseases. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence and structure of prenatally detected and clinically manifested congenital anomalies in the newborns in the region of Novi Sad (Province of Vojvodina, Serbia in the two distant years (1996 and 2006. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included all the children born at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics (Clinical Center of Vojvodina in Novi Sad during 1996 and 2006. The incidence and the structure of congenital anomalies were analyzed. Results. During 1996 there were 6,099 births and major congenital anomalies were found in 215 infants, representing 3.5%. In 2006 there were 6,628 births and major congenital anomalies were noted in 201 newborns, which is 3%. During 1996 there were more children with anomalies of musculoskeletal system, urogenital tract, with anomalies of the central nervous system and chromosomal abnormalities. During the year 2006 there were more children with cardiovascular anomalies, followed by urogenital anomalies, with significant decline in musculoskeletal anomalies. The distribution of the newborns with major congenital anomalies, regarding perinatal outcome, showed the difference between the studied years. In 2006 the increasing number of children required further investigation and treatment. Conclusions. There is no national registry of congenital anomalies in Serbia so the aim of this study was to enlight this topic. In the span of ten years, covering the period of the NATO campaign in Novi Sad and Serbia, the frequency of major congenital anomalies in the newborns was not increased. The most frequent anomalies observed during both years implied the musculosketelal, cardiovascular

  2. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  3. Congenital anomalies in Primorsky region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, P; Voronin, S; Golokhvast, K

    2015-01-01

    According to WHO hereditary diseases and congenital malformations contribute significantly to the health of population. Thus, the problems of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of congenital abnormalities are of interest for many researchers [2]. In addition, the dynamic accounting for the incidence of congenital malformations and hereditary diseases allows the researchers to assess the ecological situation in the region [1]. The occurrence of congenital anomalies in the world varies; it depends heavily on how carefully the data is collected [4]. Multifactorial or polygenic diseases develop under the influence of environmental factors in the presence of defective genes. They can constitute up to 90% of all chronic pathology [2-5]. To determine the incidence of congenital anomalies under the influence of environmental factors. The study used the methodology of system evaluation of congenital anomalies incidence in Primorsky region, depending on bio-climatic and environmental conditions. The authors used health statistics for the period from 2000 to 2014, F.12 class for congenital abnormalities in adolescents and children that were compared in geographical and temporal aspects with environmental factors of 33 settlements in Primorsky region. The environment is represented by nature and climate (6 factor modules) and sanitation (7 factor modules) blocks of factors. When formalizing the information database of the environment a specially developed 10-point assessment scale was used. Statistical processing of the information was carried out using Pearson's chi-squared test and multiple regression method from SSPS application program package. The study found that over the 15-year period the level of congenital abnormalities in children increased by 27.5% and in adolescents - by 35.1%, and in 2014 it amounted to 1687.6 and 839.3 per 100 000 people, respectively. The predictive model shows a steady further growth of this pathology. The incidence

  4. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X–autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencin...

  5. Acentric chromosome ends are prone to fusion with functional chromosome ends through a homology-directed rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yuko; Ogiyama, Yuki; Kubota, Yoshino; Kubo, Takuya; Ishii, Kojiro

    2016-01-08

    The centromeres of many eukaryotic chromosomes are established epigenetically on potentially variable tandem repeats; hence, these chromosomes are at risk of being acentric. We reported previously that artificially created acentric chromosomes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe can be rescued by end-to-end fusion with functional chromosomes. Here, we show that most acentric/functional chromosome fusion events in S. pombe cells harbouring an acentric chromosome I differed from the non-homologous end-joining-mediated rearrangements that result in deleterious dicentric fusions in normal cells, and were elicited by a previously unidentified homologous recombination (HR) event between chromosome end-associated sequences. The subtelomere repeats associated with the non-fusogenic ends were also destabilized in the surviving cells, suggesting a causal link between general subtelomere destabilization and acentric/functional chromosome fusion. A mutational analysis indicated that a non-canonical HR pathway was involved in the rearrangement. These findings are indicative of a latent mechanism that conditionally induces general subtelomere instability, presumably in the face of accidental centromere loss events, resulting in rescue of the fatal acentric chromosomes by interchromosomal HR.

  6. Chiral Anomaly in Contorted Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W

    1999-01-01

    The Dirac equation in Riemann-Cartan spacetimes with torsion is reconsidered. As is well-known, only the axial covector torsion $A$, a one-form, couples to massive Dirac fields. Using diagrammatic techniques, we show that besides the familiar Riemannian term only the Pontrjagin type four-form $dA\\wedge dA$ does arise additionally in the chiral anomaly, but not the Nieh-Yan term $d ^* A$, as has been claimed recently. Implications for cosmic strings in Einstein-Cartan theory as well as for Ashtekar's canonical approach to quantum gravity are discussed.

  7. Endocrine disruptors and congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Rittler

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The specialized literature was reviewed concerning the suspected increasing secular trends in the frequency of female births, male genital congenital anomalies, abnormal sperm counts, and testicular cancer. Although no risk factors could be identified yet, the observed sex ratio decline during the last decades has been considered to be an effect of certain pollutants on normal hormone activity, and human reproductive development. Reported increasing trends in the frequencies of hypospadias and cryptorchidism are very difficult to be interpreted due to the large variability in the registered frequency of these malformations due to operational as well as biological reasons.

  8. Recognising serious umbilical cord anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrew S J; Jayapal, Sathiya S K; Whitburn, Jessica A S; Akinbiyi, Bolutito A; Willetts, Ian E

    2013-11-27

    Umbilical vessel catheterisation is a common intervention in neonatal care. Many complications are recognised, some of which are life-threatening. We report the case of a term neonate who was compromised at birth following antepartum haemorrhage with evidence of multiorgan ischaemic injury. Following resuscitation and umbilical vessel catheterisation, she developed pneumoperitoneum. At laparotomy, a patent vitellointestinal duct was identified and resected. Intestinal perforation was found in the duct wall, most plausibly explained by the unintentional catheterisation of the duct via the umbilicus. Learning to recognise umbilical cord anomalies, such as patent vitellointestinal duct, can be simple and could prevent potentially serious complications.

  9. Hot Flow Anomalies at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, David Gary; Boardsen, Scott A.; Moore, Tom; Barabash, S.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J.A.; Coates, A.J.; Zhang, T. L.; Sarantos, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow anomaly (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.

  10. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  11. Hereditary spherocytic anemia with deletion of the short arm of chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Yoich [Osaka Medical Center and Research Inst. for Maternal and Child Health, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-11

    We describe a 30-month-old boy with multiple anomalies and mental retardation with hereditary spherocytic anemia. His karyotype was 46,XYdel(8)(p11.23p21.1). Genes for ankyrin and glutathione reductase (GSR) were localized to chromosome areas 8p11.2 and 8p21.1, respectively. Six patients with spherocytic anemia and interstitial deletion of 8p- have been reported. In these patients, severe mental retardation and multiple anomalies are common findings. This is a new contiguous gene syndrome. Lux established that ankyrin deficiency and associated deficiencies of spectrin and protein 4.2 were responsible for spherocytosis in this syndrome. We reviewed the manifestations of this syndrome. Patients with spherocytic anemia and multiple congenital anomalies should be investigated by high-resolution chromosomal means to differentiate this syndrome. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  13. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B;

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  14. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  15. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Betrán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1 genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2 under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes.

  16. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  17. Recombination of an intrachromosomal paracentric insertion of chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, R.G.; Burnett, W.J.; Brock, J.K. [Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were initiated on a newborn female due to multiple congenital anomalies including microcephaly, clinodactyly, abnormal positioning of hands, left facial palsy, heart defect, sacral dimple, and facial dysmorphic features. Facial features were described as low set rotated ears, nystagmus, and a small, flattened nose. A structural rearrangement of the long arm of chromosome 3 was observed with a complex banding pattern. Study of parental chromosomes revealed a normal male pattern for the father, and an intrachromosomal insertion on the long arm of chromosome 3 for the mother described as 46,XX,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2). Further characterization of the proband`s structurally abnormal chromosome 3 revealed a karyotype best described as: 46,XX,rec(3),dupq23{r_arrow}q26.2::q21{r_arrow}q23,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2), which is a partial duplication of both the inserted segment as well as the intervening segment between the inserted segment and the insertion site. This would appear to be the result of a three-strand double cross-over within the insertion loop. Molecular cytogenetic studies are presently underway to further elucidate chromosome structure of the proband and her mother.

  18. A highly specific coding system for structural chromosomal alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Frías, M L; Martínez-Fernández, M L

    2013-04-01

    The Spanish Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECEMC, from the name in Spanish) has developed a very simple and highly specific coding system for structural chromosomal alterations. Such a coding system would be of value at present due to the dramatic increase in the diagnosis of submicroscopic chromosomal deletions and duplications through molecular techniques. In summary, our new coding system allows the characterization of: (a) the type of structural anomaly; (b) the chromosome affected; (c) if the alteration affects the short or/and the long arm, and (d) if it is a non-pure dicentric, a non-pure isochromosome, or if it affects several chromosomes. We show the distribution of 276 newborn patients with these types of chromosomal alterations using their corresponding codes according to our system. We consider that our approach may be useful not only for other registries, but also for laboratories performing these studies to store their results on case series. Therefore, the aim of this article is to describe this coding system and to offer the opportunity for this coding to be applied by others. Moreover, as this is a SYSTEM, rather than a fixed code, it can be implemented with the necessary modifications to include the specific objectives of each program. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  20. Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Seon; Kim, Gun-Ha; Byeon, Jung Hye; Eun, So-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome has been previously reported as either otodental syndrome or oculo-oto-dental syndrome. The otodental syndrome is characterized by dental abnormalities and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, and by ocular coloboma in some cases. The underlying genetic defect causing otodental syndrome is a hemizygous microdeletion involving the FGF3 gene on chromosome 11q13.3. Recently, a new form of severe deafness, microtia (small ear) and small teeth, without the appearance of eye abnormalities, was also reported. In this report, we describe a 1-year-old girl presenting with ptosis of the left upper eyelid, right auricular deformity, high-arched palate, delayed dentition, simian line on the right hand, microcephaly, and developmental delay. In this patient, we identified a deletion in the chromosome 11q13.2-q13.3 (2.75 Mb) region by using an array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis. The deletion in chromosome 11q13 results in a syndrome characterized by variable clinical manifestations. Some of these manifestations involve craniofacial dysmorphology and require a functional workup for hearing, ophthalmic examinations, and long-term dental care. PMID:28018436