WorldWideScience

Sample records for investigators collaborative network

  1. Managing collaborative innovation networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Vidar; Agger, Annika

    2017-01-01

    . Empirical research on the management of collaborative policy innovation processes is, however, scarce. Therefore, we review in this article a case to add new insights to the causal link between collaboration, management, and innovation. Specifically, we examine the management strategies which helped......Collaborative innovation networks are increasingly used as vehicles for fostering innovative policy solutions. However, scholars have noted that the extent to which collaborative networks can actually contribute to the development of innovative policy solutions depends on how they are managed...... a Flemish administrative network to develop a radical new Spatial Planning Policy Plan. This study shows that the best way to manage collaborative innovation networks is not to press directly for results, but take the time to invest in relationship-building and together agree on a planning and clear process...

  2. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...

  3. Sensemaking in collaborative networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to advance research on open business models as activity systems (Zott and Amit, 2010) in collaborative networks. We utilize Bradley’s (1995) theory of exchange behavior to discuss how new joint activities can be explored as well as how existing activities can...... be redesigned to strengthen the collaboration between companies. To enable this discussion we delve into the sensemaking literature and theory from loosely coupled systems. Our discussion leads to the development of the Balanced Activity System (BAS) model. The paper’s key contribution is the prescriptive BAS...

  4. Investigating the Influence of Special On–Off Attacks on Challenge-Based Collaborative Intrusion Detection Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrusions are becoming more complicated with the recent development of adversarial techniques. To boost the detection accuracy of a separate intrusion detector, the collaborative intrusion detection network (CIDN has thus been developed by allowing intrusion detection system (IDS nodes to exchange data with each other. Insider attacks are a great threat for such types of collaborative networks, where an attacker has the authorized access within the network. In literature, a challenge-based trust mechanism is effective at identifying malicious nodes by sending challenges. However, such mechanisms are heavily dependent on two assumptions, which would cause CIDNs to be vulnerable to advanced insider attacks in practice. In this work, we investigate the influence of advanced on–off attacks on challenge-based CIDNs, which can respond truthfully to one IDS node but behave maliciously to another IDS node. To evaluate the attack performance, we have conducted two experiments under a simulated and a real CIDN environment. The obtained results demonstrate that our designed attack is able to compromise the robustness of challenge-based CIDNs in practice; that is, some malicious nodes can behave untruthfully without a timely detection.

  5. Investigating the influence of special on-off attacks on challenge-based collaborative intrusion detection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Wenjuan; Meng, Weizhi; Kwok, Lam For

    2018-01-01

    to exchange data with each other. Insider attacks are a great threat for such types of collaborative networks, where an attacker has the authorized access within the network. In literature, a challenge-based trust mechanism is effective at identifying malicious nodes by sending challenges. However...

  6. Collaborative Trust Networks in Engineering Design Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Simon Reay; Maier, Anja; Caldwell, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Within organisations, decision makers have to rely on collaboration with other actors from different disciplines working within highly dynamic and distributed associated networks of varying size and scales. This paper develops control and influence networks within Design Structure Matrices (DSM...... hinder effective communication and collaboration. Different combinations of trust may therefore improve or impair the likelihood of information flow, transfer and subsequent action (cause and effect). This paper investigates how analysing different types of network-structures-in-being can support...... collaboration and decision-making by using the change prediction method as a way of scoping information propagation between actors within a network....

  7. Student Collaborative Networks and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, David; Bridgeman, Ariel; Kohl, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Undergraduate physics students commonly collaborate with one another on homework assignments, especially in more challenging courses. However, there currently exists a dearth of empirical research directly comparing the structure of students' collaborative networks to their academic performances in lower and upper division physics courses. We investigate such networks and associated performances through a mandated collaboration reporting system in two sophomore level and three junior level physics courses during the Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters. We employ social network analysis to quantify the structure and time evolution of networks involving approximately 140 students. Analysis includes analytical and numerical assignments in addition to homework and exam scores. Preliminary results are discussed.

  8. Persistent Homology of Collaboration Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carstens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, network science has introduced several statistical measures to determine the topological structure of large networks. Initially, the focus was on binary networks, where edges are either present or not. Thus, many of the earlier measures can only be applied to binary networks and not to weighted networks. More recently, it has been shown that weighted networks have a rich structure, and several generalized measures have been introduced. We use persistent homology, a recent technique from computational topology, to analyse four weighted collaboration networks. We include the first and second Betti numbers for the first time for this type of analysis. We show that persistent homology corresponds to tangible features of the networks. Furthermore, we use it to distinguish the collaboration networks from similar random networks.

  9. Network effects on scientific collaborations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahadat Uddin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of co-authorship network aims at exploring the impact of network structure on the outcome of scientific collaborations and research publications. However, little is known about what network properties are associated with authors who have increased number of joint publications and are being cited highly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Measures of social network analysis, for example network centrality and tie strength, have been utilized extensively in current co-authorship literature to explore different behavioural patterns of co-authorship networks. Using three SNA measures (i.e., degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality, we explore scientific collaboration networks to understand factors influencing performance (i.e., citation count and formation (tie strength between authors of such networks. A citation count is the number of times an article is cited by other articles. We use co-authorship dataset of the research field of 'steel structure' for the year 2005 to 2009. To measure the strength of scientific collaboration between two authors, we consider the number of articles co-authored by them. In this study, we examine how citation count of a scientific publication is influenced by different centrality measures of its co-author(s in a co-authorship network. We further analyze the impact of the network positions of authors on the strength of their scientific collaborations. We use both correlation and regression methods for data analysis leading to statistical validation. We identify that citation count of a research article is positively correlated with the degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of its co-author(s. Also, we reveal that degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of authors in a co-authorship network are positively correlated with the strength of their scientific collaborations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Authors' network positions in co

  10. Networked Leadership in Educational Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gibson, Jordi; Zaragoza, Mireia Civís; Daly, Alan J.; Mayayo, Jordi Longás; Romaní, Jordi Riera

    2017-01-01

    Educational Collaborative Networks (ECNs) aim to achieve educational goals at the community level and base their actions on collaborative partnering between schools and community organizations. These approaches are an emergent and innovative leadership and policy strategy being used increasingly across the globe, given the interconnected and…

  11. Collaboration and Networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, O.; Manten-Horst, E.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the need for collaboration across pediatric and adult cancer to care for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) arose from the recognition of the unique characteristics of AYAs with cancer. Neither pediatric nor adult oncology hospital departments are able to provide age-appropriate care

  12. Theorizing benefits and constraints in collaborative environmental governance: a transdisciplinary social-ecological network approach for empirical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Örjan Bodin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available When environmental processes cut across socioeconomic boundaries, traditional top-down government approaches struggle to effectively manage and conserve ecosystems. In such cases, governance arrangements that foster multiactor collaboration are needed. The effectiveness of such arrangements, however, depends on how well any ecological interdependencies across governed ecosystems are aligned with patterns of collaboration. This inherent interdisciplinary and complex problem has impeded progress in developing a better understanding of how to govern ecosystems for conservation in an increasingly interconnected world. We argue for the development of empirically informed theories, which are not only able to transcend disciplinary boundaries, but are also explicit in taking these complex social-ecological interdependences into account. We show how this emerging research frontier can be significantly improved by incorporating recent advances in stochastic modeling of multilevel social networks. An empirical case study from an agricultural landscape in Madagascar is reanalyzed to demonstrate these improvements.

  13. Understanding collaborative business networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Koendjbiharie (Sarita)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Ever wondered how Apple gets its latest shiny new phone into your hand, how Nike has you working out in their latest products or how Ryanair safely gets you and your luggage from one destination to another? In these cases and many more, a whole network of firms is

  14. Endurability and profitability analysis of collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatemi, Hassan; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Razo-Zapata, Ivan S.

    A collaborative network is a network consisting of a variety of autonomous actors (e.g. enterprises, organizations and people) that collaborate to better achieve common or compatible goals. A collaborative network starts with a contract and then the collaboration partners conduct business as

  15. Endurability and profitability analysis of collaborative networks

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemi, Hassan; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Razo-Zapata, Ivan S.

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative network is a network consisting of a variety of autonomous actors (e.g. enterprises, organizations and people) that collaborate to better achieve common or compatible goals. A collaborative network starts with a contract and then the collaboration partners conduct business as described in the contract. Before engaging in such a collaboration, partners need to reach an agreement regarding their responsibilities in the collaboration and develop a shared understanding regarding t...

  16. Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative

  17. Attack resilience of the evolving scientific collaboration network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fan Liu

    Full Text Available Stationary complex networks have been extensively studied in the last ten years. However, many natural systems are known to be continuously evolving at the local ("microscopic" level. Understanding the response to targeted attacks of an evolving network may shed light on both how to design robust systems and finding effective attack strategies. In this paper we study empirically the response to targeted attacks of the scientific collaboration networks. First we show that scientific collaboration network is a complex system which evolves intensively at the local level--fewer than 20% of scientific collaborations last more than one year. Then, we investigate the impact of the sudden death of eminent scientists on the evolution of the collaboration networks of their former collaborators. We observe in particular that the sudden death, which is equivalent to the removal of the center of the egocentric network of the eminent scientist, does not affect the topological evolution of the residual network. Nonetheless, removal of the eminent hub node is exactly the strategy one would adopt for an effective targeted attack on a stationary network. Hence, we use this evolving collaboration network as an experimental model for attack on an evolving complex network. We find that such attacks are ineffectual, and infer that the scientific collaboration network is the trace of knowledge propagation on a larger underlying social network. The redundancy of the underlying structure in fact acts as a protection mechanism against such network attacks.

  18. Social networks as ICT collaborative and supportive learning media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated the social networks as ICT collaborative and supportive learning media utilisation within the Nigerian educational system. The concept of ICT was concisely explained vis-à-vis the social network concept, theory and collaborative and supportive learning media utilisation. Different types of social ...

  19. Behavioral aspects in collaborative enterprise networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    The collaborative networks paradigm can empower enterprises with the needed agility and survival capability to face market turbulence. However, the success and sustainability of collaboration requires proper understanding and modeling of the involved behavioral aspects, a basis for sound development

  20. Collaborative Trust Networks in Engineering Design Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Simon Reay; Maier, Anja; Caldwell, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Within organisations, decision makers have to rely on collaboration with other actors from different disciplines working within highly dynamic and distributed associated networks of varying size and scales. This paper develops control and influence networks within Design Structure Matrices (DSM...

  1. Exploiting Publication Contents and Collaboration Networks for Collaborator Recommendation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjie Kong

    Full Text Available Thanks to the proliferation of online social networks, it has become conventional for researchers to communicate and collaborate with each other. Meanwhile, one critical challenge arises, that is, how to find the most relevant and potential collaborators for each researcher? In this work, we propose a novel collaborator recommendation model called CCRec, which combines the information on researchers' publications and collaboration network to generate better recommendation. In order to effectively identify the most potential collaborators for researchers, we adopt a topic clustering model to identify the academic domains, as well as a random walk model to compute researchers' feature vectors. Using DBLP datasets, we conduct benchmarking experiments to examine the performance of CCRec. The experimental results show that CCRec outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and F1 score.

  2. Metagoverning Collaborative Innovation in Governance Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    , the current wave of New Public Governance reforms perceives collaboration between relevant and affected actors from the public and private sector as the primary vehicle of public innovation, and tends to see governance networks as potential arenas for collaborative innovation. The new focus on collaborative...... innovation in networks poses a fundamental challenge for public managers, elected politicians, and others aiming to metagovern governance networks. Hence, we claim that a specific metagovernance strategy is needed when the purpose of governance networks is to stimulate efficiency, effectiveness...

  3. Collaboration networks and research productivity at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the IPEN's scientific collaboration network. Based on publications registered in IPEN's technical and scientific database was extracted a set of authors that developed technical and scientific work on the 2001 to 2010 period, using coauthorship to define the relationship between authors. From the data collected, we used degree centrality indicator in conjunction with two approaches to assess the relationship between collaboration and productivity: normal count, where for each publication that the author appears is added one for the author’s productivity indicator, and fractional count which is added a fractional value according to the total number of publication's authors. We concluded that collaboration for the development of a technical and scientific work has a positive correlation with the researchers productivity, that is, the greater the collaboration greater the productivity. We presented, also, a statistical summary to reveal the total number of publications and the number of IPEN's authors by publication, the average number of IPEN's authors per publication and the average number of publications by IPEN's author, the number of IPEN's authors that not published with no other author of the IPEN and, finally, the number of active and inactive (ex. retirees) researchers of the IPEN, as well as, the number of authors who do not have employment contract with the IPEN. (author)

  4. Network Structure, Collaborative Context, and Individual Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soda, Giuseppe; Stea, Diego; Pedersen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    . Individuals embedded in closed networks acquire more knowledge and become more creative when the level of collaboration in their network is high. Brokers who arbitrage information across disconnected contacts acquire more knowledge and become more creative when collaboration is low. An analysis of employee......The debate on whether bonding or bridging ties are more beneficial for acquiring knowledge that is conducive to individual creativity has mostly overlooked the context in which such ties are formed. We challenge the widespread assumption that closed, heavily bonded networks imply a collaborative...... attitude on the part of the embedded actors and propose that the level of collaboration in a network can be independent from that network’s structural characteristics, such that it moderates the effects of closed and brokering network positions on the acquisition of knowledge that supports creativity...

  5. Leadership Networking Connect, Collaborate, Create

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Baldwin, David

    2011-01-01

    Networking is essential to effective leadership in today's organizations. Leaders who are skilled networkers have access to people, information, and resources to help solve problems and create opportunities. Leaders who neglect their networks are missing out on a critical component of their role as leaders. This book will help leaders take a new view of networking and provide insight into how to enhance their networks and become effective at leadership networking.

  6. Discovering Collaborative Cyber Attack Patterns Using Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haitao; Yang, Shanchieh Jay

    This paper investigates collaborative cyber attacks based on social network analysis. An Attack Social Graph (ASG) is defined to represent cyber attacks on the Internet. Features are extracted from ASGs to analyze collaborative patterns. We use principle component analysis to reduce the feature space, and hierarchical clustering to group attack sources that exhibit similar behavior. Experiments with real world data illustrate that our framework can effectively reduce from large dataset to clusters of attack sources exhibiting critical collaborative patterns.

  7. Collaborative work and social networks: assessment of university students from Alicante about collaborative work through social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Ramos Marcillas; Antonio Rodríguez Ruibal

    2017-01-01

    The information and communication technologies (ICT) has revolutionized education, promoting the development of collaborative work through the use of Web 2.0 tools. In this vein, social networking services gain a special importance. However, the establishment of a collaborative methodology in the university through the use of ICT tools cannot be effective without a good predisposition of students. So, the present investigation aims to know students’ perceptions about collaborative work and so...

  8. CollaborationViz: interactive visual exploration of biomedical research collaboration networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Bian

    Full Text Available Social network analysis (SNA helps us understand patterns of interaction between social entities. A number of SNA studies have shed light on the characteristics of research collaboration networks (RCNs. Especially, in the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA community, SNA provides us a set of effective tools to quantitatively assess research collaborations and the impact of CTSA. However, descriptive network statistics are difficult for non-experts to understand. In this article, we present our experiences of building meaningful network visualizations to facilitate a series of visual analysis tasks. The basis of our design is multidimensional, visual aggregation of network dynamics. The resulting visualizations can help uncover hidden structures in the networks, elicit new observations of the network dynamics, compare different investigators and investigator groups, determine critical factors to the network evolution, and help direct further analyses. We applied our visualization techniques to explore the biomedical RCNs at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences--a CTSA institution. And, we created CollaborationViz, an open-source visual analytical tool to help network researchers and administration apprehend the network dynamics of research collaborations through interactive visualization.

  9. Collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to improve the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge of catchment systems through networks of researchers, policy makers and practitioners. This requires greater levels of systems based integrative research. In parallel to the growing realization that greater levels of collaborative knowledge in scientific research networks are required, a digital revolution has been taking place. This has been driven primarily by the emergence of distributed networks of computers and standards-based interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present the status and research needs for greater levels of systems based integrative research for the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. To enable increased levels of integrative research depends on development and application of digital technologies to improve collection, use and sharing of data and devise new knowledge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the requirements for catchment observatories that integrate existing and novel physical, social and digital networks of knowledge infrastructures. To support this focus, I present three leading international examples of collaborative networks of catchment researchers and their development of catchment observatories. In particular, the digital infrastructures they have developed to support collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. These examples are from North America (NSF funded CUAHSI HIS) and from Europe (UK NERC funded EVOp and the German Helmholtz Association Centers funded TERENO/TEODOOR). These exemplars all supported advancing collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks through the development of catchment observatories. I will conclude by discussing the future research directions required for greater levels of production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks based on catchment systems science.

  10. Networked Collaboration Canvas : How can Service Design facilitate Networked Collaboration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Henze; I.J. Mulder

    2014-01-01

    Whereas products and services are growing in complexity, industry needs to expand their networks to include expertise from other fields than their own. Consequently, innovation activities more and more take place in highly dynamic network environments, mixing people and parties, models, interests,

  11. Computer Networking Strategies for Building Collaboration among Science Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Ronald

    The development and dissemination of science materials can be associated with technical delivery systems such as the Unified Network for Informatics in Teacher Education (UNITE). The UNITE project was designed to investigate ways for using computer networking to improve communications and collaboration among university schools of education and…

  12. Collaborative communication protocols for wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulman, S.O.; van Hoesel, L.F.W.; Nieberg, T.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    In this document, the design of communication within a wireless sensor network is discussed. The resource limitations of such a network, especially in terms of energy, require an integrated approach for all (traditional) layers of communication. We present such an integrated, collaborative approach

  13. Collaborative tagging as a tripartite network

    OpenAIRE

    Lambiotte, R.; Ausloos, M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe online collaborative communities by tripartite networks, the nodes being persons, items and tags. We introduce projection methods in order to uncover the structures of the networks, i.e. communities of users, genre families... To do so, we focus on the correlations between the nodes, depending on their profiles, and use percolation techniques that consist in removing less correlated links and observing the shaping of disconnected islands. The structuring of the network is visualis...

  14. Capacity of Wireless Ad Hoc Networks with Opportunistic Collaborative Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeone O

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal multihop routing in ad hoc networks requires the exchange of control messages at the MAC and network layer in order to set up the (centralized optimization problem. Distributed opportunistic space-time collaboration (OST is a valid alternative that avoids this drawback by enabling opportunistic cooperation with the source at the physical layer. In this paper, the performance of OST is investigated. It is shown analytically that opportunistic collaboration outperforms (centralized optimal multihop in case spatial reuse (i.e., the simultaneous transmission of more than one data stream is not allowed by the transmission protocol. Conversely, in case spatial reuse is possible, the relative performance between the two protocols has to be studied case by case in terms of the corresponding capacity regions, given the topology and the physical parameters of network at hand. Simulation results confirm that opportunistic collaborative communication is a promising paradigm for wireless ad hoc networks that deserves further investigation.

  15. Fragmented Romanian Sociology: Growth and Structure of the Collaboration Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hâncean, Marian-Gabriel; Perc, Matjaž; Vlăsceanu, Lazăr

    2014-01-01

    Structural patterns in collaboration networks are essential for understanding how new ideas, research practices, innovation or cooperation circulate and develop within academic communities and between and within university departments. In our research, we explore and investigate the structure of the collaboration network formed by the academics working full-time within all the 17 sociology departments across Romania. We show that the collaboration network is sparse and fragmented, and that it constitutes an environment that does not promote the circulation of new ideas and innovation within the field. Although recent years have witnessed an increase in the productivity of Romanian sociologists, there is still ample room for improvement in terms of the interaction infrastructure that ought to link individuals together so that they could maximize their potentials. We also fail to discern evidence in favor of the Matthew effect governing the growth of the network, which suggests scientific success and productivity are not rewarded. Instead, the structural properties of the collaboration network are partly those of a core-periphery network, where the spread of innovation and change can be explained by structural equivalence rather than by interpersonal influence models. We also provide support for the idea that, within the observed network, collaboration is the product of homophily rather than prestige effects. Further research on the subject based on data from other countries in the region is needed to place our results in a comparative framework, in particular to discern whether the behavior of the Romanian sociologist community is unique or rather common. PMID:25409180

  16. Fragmented Romanian sociology: growth and structure of the collaboration network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hâncean, Marian-Gabriel; Perc, Matjaž; Vlăsceanu, Lazăr

    2014-01-01

    Structural patterns in collaboration networks are essential for understanding how new ideas, research practices, innovation or cooperation circulate and develop within academic communities and between and within university departments. In our research, we explore and investigate the structure of the collaboration network formed by the academics working full-time within all the 17 sociology departments across Romania. We show that the collaboration network is sparse and fragmented, and that it constitutes an environment that does not promote the circulation of new ideas and innovation within the field. Although recent years have witnessed an increase in the productivity of Romanian sociologists, there is still ample room for improvement in terms of the interaction infrastructure that ought to link individuals together so that they could maximize their potentials. We also fail to discern evidence in favor of the Matthew effect governing the growth of the network, which suggests scientific success and productivity are not rewarded. Instead, the structural properties of the collaboration network are partly those of a core-periphery network, where the spread of innovation and change can be explained by structural equivalence rather than by interpersonal influence models. We also provide support for the idea that, within the observed network, collaboration is the product of homophily rather than prestige effects. Further research on the subject based on data from other countries in the region is needed to place our results in a comparative framework, in particular to discern whether the behavior of the Romanian sociologist community is unique or rather common.

  17. Collaboration and communication in a networked economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christian Pfohl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The networked economy is a result of the increasing specialization and productivity. The blurring of company boundaries enables potential for new competitive advantages. However, along with the growing networked economy, the complexity also increases. Methods: With their current study the German logistics association sheds a light on the most important trends of the networked and complex economy and the strategies of logistics and supply chain management (SCM coping with them. Results and conclusions: This paper focuses on the collaboration of actors in logistics and supply chain management and the communication required for being successful. Furthermore, going beyond the study, the role of collaboration for innovation in logistics and SCM is considered, that has been neglected in literature so far. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion reflecting the current state of collaboration in the context of its potential.

  18. Collaborative work and social networks: assessment of university students from Alicante about collaborative work through social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ramos Marcillas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The information and communication technologies (ICT has revolutionized education, promoting the development of collaborative work through the use of Web 2.0 tools. In this vein, social networking services gain a special importance. However, the establishment of a collaborative methodology in the university through the use of ICT tools cannot be effective without a good predisposition of students. So, the present investigation aims to know students’ perceptions about collaborative work and social networks. Specifically, the learners are studying Pre-School Education degree at Alicante's University. The goals are focused on knowing students’ attitudes about collaborative work and social networks, knowing their level of experience about these tools, and also analyzing their interest in introducing these tools in the academic world. The instrument for data gathering is a questionnaire. It concludes that the students show a positive attitude towards team work and they are interested in learning to handle some social media.

  19. Creatiing a Collaborative Research Network for Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, W.

    2012-12-01

    This abstract proposes a discussion of how professional science communication and scientific cooperation can become more efficient through the use of modern social network technology, using the example of Mendeley. Mendeley is a research workflow and collaboration tool which crowdsources real-time research trend information and semantic annotations of research papers in a central data store, thereby creating a "social research network" that is emergent from the research data added to the platform. We describe how Mendeley's model can overcome barriers for collaboration by turning research papers into social objects, making academic data publicly available via an open API, and promoting more efficient collaboration. Central to the success of Mendeley has been the creation of a tool that works for the researcher without the requirement of being part of an explicit social network. Mendeley automatically extracts metadata from research papers, and allows a researcher to annotate, tag and organize their research collection. The tool integrates with the paper writing workflow and provides advanced collaboration options, thus significantly improving researchers' productivity. By anonymously aggregating usage data, Mendeley enables the emergence of social metrics and real-time usage stats on top of the articles' abstract metadata. In this way a social network of collaborators, and people genuinely interested in content, emerges. By building this research network around the article as the social object, a social layer of direct relevance to academia emerges. As science, particularly Earth sciences with their large shared resources, become more and more global, the management and coordination of research is more and more dependent on technology to support these distributed collaborations.

  20. Organizational emergence in networked collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Hameri, Ari Pekka; Syrjalahti, Mikko

    2002-01-01

    Research on complex adaptive systems has generated several conceptual parables to explain systems with emergent behaviour. One prominent use for terms such as self-organization, evolutionary trajectories, co-evolution and punctuated equilibrium has been in understanding human organizations. In such systems, emergent behaviour is demonstrated in novel structures, processes and spin-offs that cannot be explained just by studying single components of the organization and the intelligence embedded in them. Instead of solely exploiting the qualitative explanatory power of the evolutionary concepts, this paper focuses also on quantitative methods to track emergent behaviour in a globally distributed, constantly fluctuating and highly networked project organization. The underlying case is that of CERN and its decade long accelerator project, which strongly relies on electronic communication and networking to achieve its major objectives due to be accomplished by the year 2007. By using time series and self-organizin...

  1. Collaborative Networks as a Mechanism for Strengthening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collaborative Networks as a Mechanism for Strengthening Competitiveness: Small and Medium Enterprises and Non-state Actors in Tanzania as Cases. ... Coping with these challenges requires continuous restructuring and managing changes in organizations. However, only large organizations can afford to institute these ...

  2. Business Process Modeling Languages Supporting Collaborative Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleimani Malekan, H.; Afsarmanesh, H.; Hammoudi, S.; Maciaszek, L.A.; Cordeiro, J.; Dietz, J.L.G.

    2013-01-01

    Formalizing the definition of Business Processes (BPs) performed within each enterprise is fundamental for effective deployment of their competencies and capabilities within Collaborative Networks (CN). In our approach, every enterprise in the CN is represented by its set of BPs, so that other

  3. Negotiation and Contracting in Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Inês; Camarinha-Matos, Luis M.

    Due to the increasing market turbulence, companies, organizations and individuals need to tune their actuation forms so that they can prevail. It is particularly essential to create alliances and partnerships for collaborative problem solving when responding to new businesses or collaborative opportunities. In all types of alliances it is necessary to establish agreements that represent the rights and duties of all involved parts in a given collaboration opportunity. Therefore, it is important to deeply understand the structures and requirements of these alliances, i.e. what kind of members does the alliance have, what kind of protocols may be implied, how conflicts may possibly be resolved, etc. Moreover to these requirements, also the required support tools and mechanisms have to be identified. For that, this paper presents a research work that is being carried in the negotiation and contracting field, in order to promote agility in collaborative networks.

  4. The Danish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Arpi, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The Danish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN) research database includes microbiological data obtained from positive blood cultures from a geographically and demographically well-defined population serviced by three clinical microbiology departments (1.7 million residents, 32% of the Dan......The Danish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN) research database includes microbiological data obtained from positive blood cultures from a geographically and demographically well-defined population serviced by three clinical microbiology departments (1.7 million residents, 32...... enables linkage to additional registries for specific research projects. The DACOBAN database is continuously updated, and it currently comprises 39,292 patients with 49,951 bacteremic episodes from 2000 through 2011. The database is part of an international network of population-based bacteremia...

  5. Collaborative neighbour monitoring in TV white space networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Takyi, A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative sensing among secondary users in television white space (cognitive radio) networks can considerably increase the probability of detecting primary or secondary users. In current collaborative sensing schemes, all collaborative secondary...

  6. The degree distribution of fixed act-size collaboration networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we investigate a special evolving model of collaboration net-works, where the act-size is fixed. Based on the first-passage probability of Markov chain theory, this paper provides a rigorous proof for the existence of a limiting degree distribution of this model and proves that the degree distribution obeys the ...

  7. Discussion Tool Effects on Collaborative Learning and Social Network Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Astrid; Suthers, Daniel D.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the social network structure of booking officers at the Honolulu Police Department and how the introduction of an online discussion tool affected knowledge about operation of a booking module. Baseline data provided evidence for collaboration among officers in the same district using e-mail, telephone and face-to-face media…

  8. Mapping and modeling of physician collaboration network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Shahadat; Hamra, Jafar; Hossain, Liaquat

    2013-09-10

    Effective provisioning of healthcare services during patient hospitalization requires collaboration involving a set of interdependent complex tasks, which needs to be carried out in a synergistic manner. Improved patients' outcome during and after hospitalization has been attributed to how effective different health services provisioning groups carry out their tasks in a coordinated manner. Previous studies have documented the underlying relationships between collaboration among physicians on the effective outcome in delivering health services for improved patient outcomes. However, there are very few systematic empirical studies with a focus on the effect of collaboration networks among healthcare professionals and patients' medical condition. On the basis of the fact that collaboration evolves among physicians when they visit a common hospitalized patient, in this study, we first propose an approach to map collaboration network among physicians from their visiting information to patients. We termed this network as physician collaboration network (PCN). Then, we use exponential random graph (ERG) models to explore the microlevel network structures of PCNs and their impact on hospitalization cost and hospital readmission rate. ERG models are probabilistic models that are presented by locally determined explanatory variables and can effectively identify structural properties of networks such as PCN. It simplifies a complex structure down to a combination of basic parameters such as 2-star, 3-star, and triangle. By applying our proposed mapping approach and ERG modeling technique to the electronic health insurance claims dataset of a very large Australian health insurance organization, we construct and model PCNs. We notice that the 2-star (subset of 3 nodes in which 1 node is connected to each of the other 2 nodes) parameter of ERG has significant impact on hospitalization cost. Further, we identify that triangle (subset of 3 nodes in which each node is connected to

  9. Obtaining informedness in collaborative networks through automated information provisioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thimm, Heiko; Rasmussen, Karsten Boye

    2013-01-01

    Successful collaboration in business networks calls for well-informed network participants. Members who know about the many aspects of the network are an effective vehicle to successfully resolve conflicts, build a prospering collaboration climate and promote trust within the network. The importa......Successful collaboration in business networks calls for well-informed network participants. Members who know about the many aspects of the network are an effective vehicle to successfully resolve conflicts, build a prospering collaboration climate and promote trust within the network...

  10. Social Networking Adapted for Distributed Scientific Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, Homa

    2012-01-01

    Share is a social networking site with novel, specially designed feature sets to enable simultaneous remote collaboration and sharing of large data sets among scientists. The site will include not only the standard features found on popular consumer-oriented social networking sites such as Facebook and Myspace, but also a number of powerful tools to extend its functionality to a science collaboration site. A Virtual Observatory is a promising technology for making data accessible from various missions and instruments through a Web browser. Sci-Share augments services provided by Virtual Observatories by enabling distributed collaboration and sharing of downloaded and/or processed data among scientists. This will, in turn, increase science returns from NASA missions. Sci-Share also enables better utilization of NASA s high-performance computing resources by providing an easy and central mechanism to access and share large files on users space or those saved on mass storage. The most common means of remote scientific collaboration today remains the trio of e-mail for electronic communication, FTP for file sharing, and personalized Web sites for dissemination of papers and research results. Each of these tools has well-known limitations. Sci-Share transforms the social networking paradigm into a scientific collaboration environment by offering powerful tools for cooperative discourse and digital content sharing. Sci-Share differentiates itself by serving as an online repository for users digital content with the following unique features: a) Sharing of any file type, any size, from anywhere; b) Creation of projects and groups for controlled sharing; c) Module for sharing files on HPC (High Performance Computing) sites; d) Universal accessibility of staged files as embedded links on other sites (e.g. Facebook) and tools (e.g. e-mail); e) Drag-and-drop transfer of large files, replacing awkward e-mail attachments (and file size limitations); f) Enterprise-level data and

  11. Services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Kim; Uoti, Mikko; Karvonen, Iris

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale facilities such as power plants, process factories, ships and communication infrastructures are often engineered and delivered through geographically distributed operations. The competencies required are usually distributed across several contributing organisations. In these complicated projects, it is of key importance that all partners work coherently towards a common goal. VTT and a number of industrial organisations in the marine sector have participated in a national collaborative research programme addressing these needs. The main output of this programme was development of the Innovation and Engineering Maturity Model for Marine-Industry Networks. The recently completed European Union Framework Programme 7 project COIN developed innovative solutions and software services for enterprise collaboration and enterprise interoperability. One area of focus in that work was services for collaborative project management. This article first addresses a number of central underlying research themes and previous research results that have influenced the development work mentioned above. This article presents two approaches for the development of services that support distributed engineering work. Experience from use of the services is analysed, and potential for development is identified. This article concludes with a proposal for consolidation of the two above-mentioned methodologies. This article outlines the characteristics and requirements of future services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks.

  12. [Coauthorship networks and institutional collaboration in Revista de Neurología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alcaide, G; Alonso-Arroyo, A; González de Dios, J; Sempere, A P; Valderrama-Zurián, J C; Aleixandre-Benavent, R

    Scientific cooperation is essential for the advance of science. Bibliometrics and social network analysis offer evaluation indicators to analyse collaboration in scientific papers. The aim of this study is to characterize scientific collaboration patterns in Revista de Neurología between 2002 and 2006. Coauthorships and institutional relationships of papers published in Revista de Neurología have been identified. Collaboration Index, the most productive authors' and institutional collaboration patterns and the types of institutional collaborations have been quantified. Also, it has been constructed the coauthorship networks and the institutional collaboration network. Networks have been identified and represented using Access and Pajek software tools. The Collaboration Index was 4.01. 56.54% of papers involved institutional collaboration. The collaboration between institutions of the same country prevails (52.7%), followed by collaborations between departments, services or units of the same institution (40.47%) and international collaboration (6.83%). 45 coauthorship networks involving 149 investigators with a high intensity of collaboration and a large institutional network involved 80 centres were observed. Revista de Neurología covers scientific production of a high number of research groups. It has been observed a positive evolution in the collaboration patterns over the time. Nevertheless, it is essential to encourage inter-regional and international collaboration.

  13. Collaborative Supervised Learning for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration methods for distributed machine-learning algorithms involve the specification of communication protocols for the learners, which can query other learners and/or broadcast their findings preemptively. Each learner incorporates information from its neighbors into its own training set, and they are thereby able to bootstrap each other to higher performance. Each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. After being seeded with an initial labeled training set, each learner proceeds to learn in an iterative fashion. New data is collected and classified. The learner can then either broadcast its most confident classifications for use by other learners, or can query neighbors for their classifications of its least confident items. As such, collaborative learning combines elements of both passive (broadcast) and active (query) learning. It also uses ideas from ensemble learning to combine the multiple responses to a given query into a single useful label. This approach has been evaluated against current non-collaborative alternatives, including training a single classifier and deploying it at all nodes with no further learning possible, and permitting learners to learn from their own most confident judgments, absent interaction with their neighbors. On several data sets, it has been consistently found that active collaboration is the best strategy for a distributed learner network. The main advantages include the ability for learning to take place autonomously by collaboration rather than by requiring intervention from an oracle (usually human), and also the ability to learn in a distributed environment, permitting decisions to be made in situ and to yield faster response time.

  14. Ontological View-Driven Semantic Integration in Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yunjiao; Ghenniwa, Hamada H.; Shen, Weiming

    In collaborative enterprise networks, semantic heterogeneity is an important factor that hinders collaboration of various information systems. Ontology-driven semantic integration is an important category of solutions for the semantic integration problem. However, in many domains, there are no explicit and formal ontologies available. This paper proposes to adopt ontological views to address such challenges. It investigates the theoretical foundation of ontologies and ontological views. It presents a framework as a solution, based on the theoretical foundation, including the architecture of a semantic integration enabled environment, the modeling and representation of ontological views, and the semantic equivalence relationship discovered from the ontological views.

  15. Interdisciplinary contributions to theory for collaborative networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dekkers, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Scientific progress on a field is mostly discussed within disciplines. Far less attention is paid to outside or between disciplines' work. To speed up research progresses for Collaborative Networks in Manufacturing, a base for further grounded theory establishment is propagated recalling some of the most relevant chapters of philosophy of science. The focus is put onto the roles of disciplines and their scholars involved in interdisciplinary contexts in order to further motivate as well as to hint at a number of catalysing forces and fruitful impacts of outside disciplines' work.

  16. Value Systems Alignment Analysis in Collaborative Networked Organizations Management

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Macedo; Luis Camarinha-Matos

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of value systems alignment can play an important role in the formation and evolution of collaborative networks, contributing to reduce potential risks of collaboration. For this purpose, an assessment tool is proposed as part of a collaborative networks information system, supporting both the formation and evolution of long-term strategic alliances and goal-oriented networks. An implementation approach for value system alignment analysis is described, which is intended to assis...

  17. Guest editorial - Networked collaboration, sharing and response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Skundberg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available  This issue of Seminar.net contains three articles that were written in connection with a Norwegian e-learning conference titled “Networked collaboration, sharing and response”. The conference was held in Mars 2008 in Trondheim, and the presentations from the conference is available (in norwegian language at http://www.nvu.no. Networked collaboration was chosen as a theme because collaboration is important to achieve learning, according to the social-constructivistic pedagogy that has a strong standing in Norway, but how should this occur on the net? Sharing of content, as in digital learning resources, is a phenomenon with increasing popularity as described in the OECD-report “Giving Knowledge for Free”. But to achieve reuse of content, not only publishing it, it is important with a networked community where the plethora of information can be sorted with relevance to specific topics. Response is about guiding, coaching and tutoring. In what ways may resources and tools be used to move in the direction of solving Bloom’s two sigma problem/challenge? The first article, by Morten Flate Paulsen, shows how cooperative learning can be implemented successfully so that students have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. The second article, by Carl F. Dons, shows how student teachers can be prepared to deal with pupils who have a wide range of experiences of the digital world. The third and last article, by Kristin Dale, is sharing experiences with multiple choice-tests to give midterm responses to students. In addition, this issue has a commentary article by Rune Krumsvik discussing the need to develop new practices for teachers and students on the background of the digital developments. The conference and articles covers three big themes. It may be difficult to find more important issues, apart from finding money and time to support its development. Olav Skundberg, guest editorAssociate professor

  18. Co-reading: investigating collaborative group reading.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, J.; Owen, T.; Thimbleby, H. W.; Buchanan, G.

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative reading, or co-reading as we call it, is ubiquitous—it occurs, for instance, in classrooms, book-clubs, and in less coordinated ways through mass media. While individual digital reading has been the subject of much investigation, research into co-reading is scarce. We report a two-phase field study of group reading to identify an initial set of user requirements. A co-reading interface is then designed that facilitates the coordination of group reading by providing temporary ‘Po...

  19. A Cloud Platform to support Collaboration in Supply Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Andres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration is a trend in supply networks management, based on the jointly planning, coordination and integration of processes, participating all network entities. Due to the current characteristics of uncertainty in the markets and economic crisis, there is a need to encourage collaboration tools to reduce costs and increase trust and accountability to market requirements. This study presents an overview of the research carried out in the H2020 European Project: Cloud Collaborative Manufacturing Networks (C2NET, which is directed towards the development a cloud platform that consist of, optimization tools, collaboration tools to support and agile management of the network. The collaborative cloud platform allows to collect real time information coming from real-world resources and considering all the actors involved in the process. The collaborative cloud provides real time data gathered from the entire network partners in order to improve their decision-making processes.

  20. Management of Information Supporting Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Camarinha-Matos, Luis M.

    Dynamic creation of opportunity-based goal-oriented Collaborative Networks (CNs), among organizations or individuals, requires the availability of a variety of up-to-date information. In order to effectively address the complexity, dynamism, and scalability of actors, domains, and operations in opportunity-based CNs, pre-establishment of properly administrated strategic CNs is required. Namely, to effectively support creation/operation of opportunity-based VOs (Virtual Organizations) operating in certain domain, the pre-establishment of a VBE (Virtual organizations Breeding Environment) for that domain plays a crucial role and increases their chances of success. Administration of strategic CN environments however is challenging and requires an advanced set of inter-related functionalities, developed on top of strong management of their information. With the emphasis on information management aspects, a number of generic challenges for the CNs and especially for the administration of VBEs are introduced in the paper.

  1. Collaborative Manufacturing Management in Networked Supply Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouly, Michel; Naciri, Souleiman; Berthold, Sébastien

    ERP systems provide information management and analysis to industrial companies and support their planning activities. They are currently mostly based on theoretical values (averages) of parameters and not on the actual, real shop floor data, leading to disturbance of the planning algorithms. On the other hand, sharing data between manufacturers, suppliers and customers becomes very important to ensure reactivity towards markets variability. This paper proposes software solutions to address these requirements and methods to automatically capture the necessary corresponding shop floor information. In order to share data produced by different legacy systems along the collaborative networked supply chain, we propose to use the Generic Product Model developed by Hitachi to extract, translate and store heterogeneous ERP data.

  2. Multiuser Collaboration with Networked Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Kam S.; Tai, Ann T.; Deng, Yong M.; Becks, Paul G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe a multiuser collaboration infrastructure that enables multiple mission scientists to remotely and collaboratively interact with visualization and planning software, using wireless networked personal digital assistants(PDAs) and other mobile devices. During ground operations of planetary rover and lander missions, scientists need to meet daily to review downlinked data and plan science activities. For example, scientists use the Science Activity Planner (SAP) in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission to visualize downlinked data and plan rover activities during the science meetings [1]. Computer displays are projected onto large screens in the meeting room to enable the scientists to view and discuss downlinked images and data displayed by SAP and other software applications. However, only one person can interact with the software applications because input to the computer is limited to a single mouse and keyboard. As a result, the scientists have to verbally express their intentions, such as selecting a target at a particular location on the Mars terrain image, to that person in order to interact with the applications. This constrains communication and limits the returns of science planning. Furthermore, ground operations for Mars missions are fundamentally constrained by the short turnaround time for science and engineering teams to process and analyze data, plan the next uplink, generate command sequences, and transmit the uplink to the vehicle [2]. Therefore, improving ground operations is crucial to the success of Mars missions. The multiuser collaboration infrastructure enables users to control software applications remotely and collaboratively using mobile devices. The infrastructure includes (1) human-computer interaction techniques to provide natural, fast, and accurate inputs, (2) a communications protocol to ensure reliable and efficient coordination of the input devices and host computers, (3) an application

  3. Process and data fragmentation-oriented enterprise network integration with collaboration modelling and collaboration agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Ze-yuan; Cao, Zhi-chao; Du, Rui-yang; Luo, Hao

    2015-08-01

    With the process of globalisation and the development of management models and information technology, enterprise cooperation and collaboration has developed from intra-enterprise integration, outsourcing and inter-enterprise integration, and supply chain management, to virtual enterprises and enterprise networks. Some midfielder enterprises begin to serve for different supply chains. Therefore, they combine related supply chains into a complex enterprise network. The main challenges for enterprise network's integration and collaboration are business process and data fragmentation beyond organisational boundaries. This paper reviews the requirements of enterprise network's integration and collaboration, as well as the development of new information technologies. Based on service-oriented architecture (SOA), collaboration modelling and collaboration agents are introduced to solve problems of collaborative management for service convergence under the condition of process and data fragmentation. A model-driven methodology is developed to design and deploy the integrating framework. An industrial experiment is designed and implemented to illustrate the usage of developed technologies in this paper.

  4. Involvement, Collaboration and Engagement: Social Networks through a Pedagogical Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tami

    2016-01-01

    Social networks facilitate activities that promote involvement, collaboration and engagement. Modelling of best practices using social networks enhances its usage by participants, increases participants confidence as to its implementation and creates a paradigm shift to a more personalized, participatory and collaborative learning and a more…

  5. Collaborative Network Management for Enhancing Quality Education of Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikoed, Wisithsak; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Numnaphol, Kochaporn

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to study the network and collaborative factors that enhance quality education of primary schools. Different methods were used in this research work: (1) Related approaches, theories, and research literatures and (2) Scholars were interviewed on 871 issues in the form of questionnaire, and the collaborative network factors were…

  6. RCNF: Real-time Collaborative Network Forensic Scheme for Evidence Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Moustafa, Nour; Slay, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Network forensic techniques help in tracking different types of cyber attack by monitoring and inspecting network traffic. However, with the high speed and large sizes of current networks, and the sophisticated philosophy of attackers, in particular mimicking normal behaviour and/or erasing traces to avoid detection, investigating such crimes demands intelligent network forensic techniques. This paper suggests a real-time collaborative network Forensic scheme (RCNF) that can monitor and inves...

  7. Collaborative Networks for biodiversity domain organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermilova, E.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2010-01-01

    European scientific research and development organizations, operating in the domains of biology, ecology, and biodiversity, strongly need to cooperate/collaborate with other centers. Unavailability of interoperation infrastructure as well as the needed collaboration environment among research

  8. Collaboration tools for the global accelerator network Workshop Report

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, D; Olson, J

    2002-01-01

    The concept of a ''Global Accelerator Network'' (GAN) has been put forward as a means for inter-regional collaboration in the operation of internationally constructed and operated frontier accelerator facilities. A workshop was held to allow representatives of the accelerator community and of the collaboratory development community to meet and discuss collaboration tools for the GAN environment. This workshop, called the Collaboration Tools for the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) Workshop, was held on August 26, 2002 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to provide input about collaboration tools in general and to provide a strawman for the GAN collaborative tools environment. The participants at the workshop represented accelerator physicists, high-energy physicists, operations, technology tool developers, and social scientists that study scientific collaboration.

  9. Collaboration tools for the global accelerator network: Workshop Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Deborah; Olson, Gary; Olson, Judy

    2002-01-01

    The concept of a ''Global Accelerator Network'' (GAN) has been put forward as a means for inter-regional collaboration in the operation of internationally constructed and operated frontier accelerator facilities. A workshop was held to allow representatives of the accelerator community and of the collaboratory development community to meet and discuss collaboration tools for the GAN environment. This workshop, called the Collaboration Tools for the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) Workshop, was held on August 26, 2002 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to provide input about collaboration tools in general and to provide a strawman for the GAN collaborative tools environment. The participants at the workshop represented accelerator physicists, high-energy physicists, operations, technology tool developers, and social scientists that study scientific collaboration

  10. Collaboration tools for the global accelerator network: Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Olson, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Olson, Judy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2002-09-15

    The concept of a ''Global Accelerator Network'' (GAN) has been put forward as a means for inter-regional collaboration in the operation of internationally constructed and operated frontier accelerator facilities. A workshop was held to allow representatives of the accelerator community and of the collaboratory development community to meet and discuss collaboration tools for the GAN environment. This workshop, called the Collaboration Tools for the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) Workshop, was held on August 26, 2002 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to provide input about collaboration tools in general and to provide a strawman for the GAN collaborative tools environment. The participants at the workshop represented accelerator physicists, high-energy physicists, operations, technology tool developers, and social scientists that study scientific collaboration.

  11. Collaboration using roles. [in computer network security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-01-01

    Segregation of roles into alternative accounts is a model which provides not only the ability to collaborate but also enables accurate accounting of resources consumed by collaborative projects, protects the resources and objects of such a project, and does not introduce new security vulnerabilities. The implementation presented here does not require users to remember additional passwords and provides a very simple consistent interface.

  12. Networked Cultures in the Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2017-01-01

    This chapter charts diverse approaches to conceptualizing the cultures of connection characterizing the collaborative economy. To decode the “we-conomy”, we revisit classic notions of coexistence, collaboration and bonding in communities. Informed by a multidisciplinary review (touching upon human...

  13. Global research collaboration: Networks and partners in South East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Woolley, Richard; Robinson-Garcia, Nicolas; Costas, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    This is an empirical paper that addresses the role of bilateral and multilateral international co-authorships in the six leading science systems among the ASEAN group of countries (ASEAN6). The paper highlights the different ways that bilateral and multilateral co-authorships structure global networks and the collaborations of the ASEAN6. The paper looks at the influence of the collaboration styles of major collaborating countries of the ASEAN6, particularly the USA and Japan. It also highlig...

  14. Related work on reference modeling for collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Several international research and development initiatives have led to development of models for organizations and organization interactions. These models and their approaches constitute a background for development of reference models for collaborative networks. A brief survey of work on modeling

  15. A framework for automated service composition in collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Sargolzaei, M.; Shadi, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel framework for automated software service composition that can significantly support and enhance collaboration among enterprises in service provision industry, such as in tourism insurance and e-commerce collaborative networks (CNs). Our proposed framework is founded on

  16. A Collaborative Learning Network Approach to Improvement: The CUSP Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sallie J; Lofthus, Jennifer; Sawyer, Melinda; Greer, Lee; Opett, Kristin; Reynolds, Catherine; Wyskiel, Rhonda; Peditto, Stephanie; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-04-01

    Collaborative improvement networks draw on the science of collaborative organizational learning and communities of practice to facilitate peer-to-peer learning, coaching, and local adaption. Although significant improvements in patient safety and quality have been achieved through collaborative methods, insight regarding how collaborative networks are used by members is needed. Improvement Strategy: The Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) Learning Network is a multi-institutional collaborative network that is designed to facilitate peer-to-peer learning and coaching specifically related to CUSP. Member organizations implement all or part of the CUSP methodology to improve organizational safety culture, patient safety, and care quality. Qualitative case studies developed by participating members examine the impact of network participation across three levels of analysis (unit, hospital, health system). In addition, results of a satisfaction survey designed to evaluate member experiences were collected to inform network development. Common themes across case studies suggest that members found value in collaborative learning and sharing strategies across organizational boundaries related to a specific improvement strategy. The CUSP Learning Network is an example of network-based collaborative learning in action. Although this learning network focuses on a particular improvement methodology-CUSP-there is clear potential for member-driven learning networks to grow around other methods or topic areas. Such collaborative learning networks may offer a way to develop an infrastructure for longer-term support of improvement efforts and to more quickly diffuse creative sustainment strategies.

  17. Value Systems Alignment Analysis in Collaborative Networked Organizations Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Macedo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of value systems alignment can play an important role in the formation and evolution of collaborative networks, contributing to reduce potential risks of collaboration. For this purpose, an assessment tool is proposed as part of a collaborative networks information system, supporting both the formation and evolution of long-term strategic alliances and goal-oriented networks. An implementation approach for value system alignment analysis is described, which is intended to assist managers in virtual and networked organizations management. The implementation of the assessment and analysis methods is supported by a set of software services integrated in the information system that supports the management of the networked organizations. A case study in the solar energy sector was conducted, and the data collected through this study allow us to confirm the practical applicability of the proposed methods and the software services.

  18. Cooperation in health: mapping collaborative networks on the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pamela Barreto; Gouveia, Fábio Castro; Leta, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    To map and investigate the relationships established on the web between leading health-research institutions around the world. Sample selection was based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres (CCs). Data on the 768 active CCs in 89 countries were retrieved from the WHO's database. The final sample consisted of 190 institutions devoted to health sciences in 42 countries. Data on each institution's website were retrieved using webometric techniques (interlinking), and an asymmetric matrix was generated for social network analysis. The results showed that American and European institutions, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), are the most highly connected on the web and have a higher capacity to attract hyperlinks. The Karolinska Institute (KI-SE) in Sweden is well placed as an articulation point between several integrants of the network and the component's core but lacks general recognition on the web by hyperlinks. Regarding the north-south divide, Mexico and Brazil appear to be key southern players on the web. The results showed that the hyperlinks exchanged between northern and southern countries present an abysmal gap: 99.49% of the hyperlinks provided by the North are directed toward the North itself, in contrast to 0.51% that are directed toward the South. Regarding the South, its institutions are more connected to its northern partners, with 98.46% of its hyperlinks directed toward the North, and mainly toward the United States, compared with 1.54% toward southern neighbors. It is advisable to strengthen integration policies on the web and to increase web networking through hyperlink exchange. In this way, the web could actually reflect international cooperation in health and help to legitimize and enhance the visibility of the many existing south-south collaboration networks.

  19. Cooperation in health: mapping collaborative networks on the web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Barreto Lang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To map and investigate the relationships established on the web between leading health-research institutions around the world. METHODS: Sample selection was based on the World Health Organization (WHO Collaborating Centres (CCs. Data on the 768 active CCs in 89 countries were retrieved from the WHO's database. The final sample consisted of 190 institutions devoted to health sciences in 42 countries. Data on each institution's website were retrieved using webometric techniques (interlinking, and an asymmetric matrix was generated for social network analysis. FINDINGS: The results showed that American and European institutions, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, the National Institutes of Health (NIH and the National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM, are the most highly connected on the web and have a higher capacity to attract hyperlinks. The Karolinska Institute (KI-SE in Sweden is well placed as an articulation point between several integrants of the network and the component's core but lacks general recognition on the web by hyperlinks. Regarding the north-south divide, Mexico and Brazil appear to be key southern players on the web. The results showed that the hyperlinks exchanged between northern and southern countries present an abysmal gap: 99.49% of the hyperlinks provided by the North are directed toward the North itself, in contrast to 0.51% that are directed toward the South. Regarding the South, its institutions are more connected to its northern partners, with 98.46% of its hyperlinks directed toward the North, and mainly toward the United States, compared with 1.54% toward southern neighbors. CONCLUSION: It is advisable to strengthen integration policies on the web and to increase web networking through hyperlink exchange. In this way, the web could actually reflect international cooperation in health and help to legitimize and enhance the visibility of the many existing south

  20. Australasian Diabetes Data Network: Building a Collaborative Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapin, Helen; Phelan, Helen; Bruns, Loren; Sinnott, Richard; Colman, Peter; Craig, Maria; Jones, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Australasia is a region with a high incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D). There are approximately 140 000 individuals with T1D, and of these 10 000 are children. Although the region covers a huge geographical area, most children with T1D are managed by tertiary academic centers in the major capital cities. Local longitudinal data collection has been in place for several decades in most of these centers, however ongoing national data collection had not been attempted. In 2012, with funding from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Australian Type 1 Clinical Research Network, a national collaboration was formed to provide ongoing longitudinal collection of T1D patient characteristics and outcomes. The initial phase of this collaboration, known as the Australasian Diabetes Data Network or ADDN, was led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG) and thus included only children and adolescents. The next phase, commenced in 2016, will see adult sites added through collaboration with the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS). As most of the initial centers had longitudinal data collection in place the model employed was to establish the transfer and collation of data already collected into a central database. This required the definition of a common data dictionary, ethics and governance procedures and the employment of technology to enable efficient and accurate information transfer and accessibility. The ADDN project received widespread support from the diabetes research community with study investigators representing 20 pediatric centers across the region. The first phase focused on the 5 largest centers and at the end of 2015 these centers were uploading patient data to the ADDN database on a quarterly basis resulting in 5271 patients with 83 506 diabetes visits. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Collaboration Nation: The Building of the Welsh Repository Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to disseminate information about the Welsh Repository Network (WRN), innovative work being undertaken to build an integrated network of institutional digital repositories. A collaborative approach, in particular through the provision of centralised technical and organisational support, has demonstrated…

  2. Collaborative Algorithms for Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieberg, T.; Dulman, S.O.; Havinga, Paul J.M.; van Hoesel, L.F.W.; Wu Jian, W.J.; Basten, Twan; Geilen, Marc; de Groot, Harmke

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of the communication in a wireless sensor network. The resource limitations of a wireless sensor network, especially in terms of energy, require an integrated, and collaborative approach for the different layers of communication. In particular, energy-efficient

  3. Collaborative Algortihms for Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieberg, T.; Dulman, S.O.; Havinga, Paul J.M.; van Hoesel, L.F.W.; Wu Jian, W.J.

    In this paper, we present the design of the communication in a wireless sensor network. The resource limitations of a wireless sensor network, especially in terms of energy, require an integrated, and collaborative approach for the different layers of communication. In particular, energy-efficient

  4. Electronic collaboration in dermatology resident training through social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Natalie M; McGuire, April L; Carroll, Bryan T

    2017-04-01

    The use of online educational resources and professional social networking sites is increasing. The field of dermatology is currently under-utilizing online social networking as a means of professional collaboration and sharing of training materials. In this study, we sought to assess the current structure of and satisfaction with dermatology resident education and gauge interest for a professional social networking site for educational collaboration. Two surveys-one for residents and one for faculty-were electronically distributed via the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery and Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserves. The surveys confirmed that there is interest among dermatology residents and faculty in a dermatology professional networking site with the goal to enhance educational collaboration.

  5. Comparing Notes: Collaborative Networks, Breeding Environments, and Organized Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Alejandro

    Collaborative network theory can be useful in refining current understanding of criminal networks and aid in understanding their evolution. Drug trafficking organizations that operate in the region directly north of Colombia’s Valle del Cauca department and the “collection agencies” that operate in the Colombian city of Cali have abandoned hierarchical organizational structures and have become networked-based entities. Through the exposition of Camarinha-Matos and Afsarmanesh’s business networking ideas, this chapter examines the similarities and differences between the application of collaborative networks in licit enterprises, such as small and medium enterprises in Europe, and how the networks might be used by illicit criminal enterprises in Colombia.

  6. Supply chain collaboration in industrial symbiosis networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herczeg, Gabor; Akkerman, Renzo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2018-01-01

    A strategy supporting the development towards a circular economy is industrial symbiosis (IS). It is a form of collaborative supply chain management aiming to make industry more sustainable and achieve collective benefits based on utilization of waste, by-products, and excess utilities between...

  7. Experiment in Collaborative Learning Network for Enhanced ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Since 1961, CUSO has sent approximately 11 000 Canadians abroad to work at the local level on various development issues. CUSO is now in the process of merging with Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO) Canada, and is seeking to validate the importance of knowledge sharing and collaborative learning in ...

  8. Supply chain collaboration in industrial symbiosis networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herczeg, Gábor; Akkerman, Renzo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2018-01-01

    A strategy supporting the development towards a circular economy is industrial symbiosis (IS). It is a form of collaborative supply chain management aiming to make industry more sustainable and achieve collective benefits based on utilization of waste, by-products, and excess utilities between

  9. Gender differences in collaborative learning over online social networks: Epistemological beliefs and behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Y.-Y. Chan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks are popular venues for computer-supported collaborative work and computer-supported collaborative learning. Professionals within the same discipline, such as software developers, often interact over various social network sites for knowledge updates and collective understandings. The current study aims at gathering empirical evidences concerning gender differences in online social network beliefs and behaviors. A total of 53 engineering postgraduate students were engaged in a blogging community for collaborative learning. Participants’ beliefs about collaboration and nature of knowledge and knowing (i.e. epistemological beliefs are investigated. More specifically, social network analysis metrics including in-degree, out-degree, closeness centrality, and betweenness centrality are obtained from an 8-interval longitudinal SNA. Methodologically speaking, the current work puts forward mixed methods of longitudinal SNA and quantitative beliefs survey to explore online social network participants’ beliefs and behaviors. The study’s findings demonstrate significant gender differences in collaborative learning through online social networks, including (1 female engineering postgraduate students engage significantly more actively in online communications, (2 male engineering postgraduate students are more likely to be the potential controllers of information flows, and (3 gender differences exist in belief gains related to social aspects, but not individual's epistemic aspects. Overall, participants in both genders demonstrated enhanced beliefs in collaboration as well as the nature of knowledge and knowing.

  10. Network Measures of Collaborative Support for Young Adults With Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee Hassrick, Elizabeth; Shattuck, Paul; Carley, Kathleen

    2018-04-01

    The treatment of autism requires complex, multimodal interventions, provided by parents and providers across settings. As young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) transition into adulthood, new stakeholders are added to support planning for postsecondary employment. In this article, we investigate the use of dynamic social network measures that describe the resources of young adults throughout transition. A longitudinal, dynamic social network survey (Social Dynamics of Intervention [SoDI]) was conceptualized, designed, and conducted as a feasibility test, measuring changes in collaboration among parents and school staff members who provided interventions for children with ASD in 2 urban public schools. Using the SoDI, we tracked the following over time: the team who provided interventions, their locations, the interventions they provided, the autism trainings they attended, and the density of the team's problem-solving network for the child. Using the SoDI, we successfully identified stakeholders across settings who provided interventions for each child. Results indicated variation in the density of problem-solving and trust related to ASD intervention across teams as well as variation in intervention and autism knowledge networks during the school year. Adaptations of the SoDI for mapping pre- and posttransition resources and social connectivity across stakeholders for young adults with ASD are proposed in the Discussion section. Dynamic social network approaches can be used to capture changes in intervention, autism knowledge, and social connectivity, providing informative descriptive data about how vocational rehabilitation policies might increase employment supports during the transition process for young adults with ASD. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Structural Conditions for Collaboration and Learning in Innovation Networks: Using an Innovation System Performance Lens to Analyse Agricultural Knowledge Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, F.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Roep, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate how the structural conditions of eight different European agricultural innovation systems can facilitate or hinder collaboration and social learning in multidisciplinary innovation networks. Methodology: We have adapted the Innovation System Failure Matrix to investigate the

  12. Collaborative Approach to Network Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehak, Martin; Pechoucek, Michal; Grill, Martin; Bartos, Karel; Celeda, Pavel; Krmicek, Vojtech

    Network Behavior Analysis techniques are designed to detect intrusions and other undesirable behavior in computer networks by analyzing the traffic statistics. We present an efficient framework for integration of anomaly detection algorithms working on the identical input data. This framework is based on high-speed network traffic acquisition subsystem and on trust modeling, a well-established set of techniques from the multi-agent system field. Trust-based integration of algorithms results in classification with lower error rate, especially in terms of false positives. The presented framework is suitable for both online and offline processing, and introduces a relatively low computational overhead compared to deployment of isolated anomaly detection algorithms.

  13. Collaboration in sensor network research: an in-depth longitudinal analysis of assortative mixing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alberto; Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-09-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on statistical analyses of large networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustrate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a relatively small network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research centerin the development and application of wireless and sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortative mixing of selected node characteristics, unveiling the researchers' propensity to collaborate preferentially with others with a similar academic profile. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  14. Social network analysis of international scientific collaboration on psychiatry research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorder is harmful to human health, effects social life seriously and still brings a heavy burden for countries all over the world. Scientific collaboration has become the indispensable choice for progress in the field of biomedicine. However, there have been few scientific publications on scientific collaboration in psychiatry research so far. The aim of this study was to measure the activities of scientific collaboration in psychiatry research at the level of authors, institutions and countries. We retrieved 36557 papers about psychiatry from Science Ciation Index Expanded (SCI-Expanded) in web of science. Additionally, some methods such as social network analysis (SNA), K-plex analysis and Core-Periphery were used in this study. Collaboration has been increasing at the level of authors, institutions and countries in psychiatry in the last ten years. We selected the top 100 prolific authors, institutions and 30 countries to construct collaborative map respectively. Freedman, R and Seidman, LJ were the central authors, Harvard university was the central institution and the USA was the central country of the whole network. Notably, the rate of economic development of countries affected collaborative behavior. The results show that we should encourage multiple collaboration types in psychiatry research as they not only help researchers to master the current research hotspots but also provide scientific basis for clinical research on psychiatry and suggest policies to promote the development of this area.

  15. Multi-operator collaboration for green cellular networks under roaming price consideration

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2014-09-01

    This paper investigates the collaboration between multiple mobile operators to optimize the energy efficiency of cellular networks. Our framework studies the case of LTE-Advanced networks deployed in the same area and owning renewable energy generators. The objective is to reduce the CO2 emissions of cellular networks via collaborative techniques and using base station sleeping strategy while respecting the network quality of service. Low complexity and practical algorithm is employed to achieve green goals during low traffic periods. Cooperation decision criteria are also established basing on derived roaming prices and profit gains of competitive mobile operators. Our numerical results show a significant save in terms of CO2 compared to the non-collaboration case and that cooperative mobile operator exploiting renewables are more awarded than traditional operators.

  16. Social Networking: A Collaborative Open Educational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toetenel, Lisette

    2014-01-01

    Studies undertaken since the introduction of Web 2.0 have focussed mainly on open educational resources (OERs) such as email, blogging and virtual learning environments. No consistent efforts have been undertaken to study the use of social networking sites as a tool for learning in the second language classroom. This study examined the use of…

  17. Collaborative Estimation in Distributed Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Swarnendu

    2013-01-01

    Networks of smart ultra-portable devices are already indispensable in our lives, augmenting our senses and connecting our lives through real time processing and communication of sensory (e.g., audio, video, location) inputs. Though usually hidden from the user's sight, the engineering of these devices involves fierce tradeoffs between energy…

  18. Global networking: Meeting the challenges, facilitating collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, M; Oancea, R; Thomas, H F; Paganelli, C; Ferrillo, P J

    2018-03-01

    The constant change of information and technology advancement as well as the impact of social media has radically changed the world and education and, in particular, the needs of students, organisations and disadvantaged communities who share the aim of training and providing quality healthcare services. Dental organisations and education centres around the world have recognised the importance of networking in delivering effective education to students, healthcare professionals and communities. Networking is one way to meet the challenges of delivering healthcare education and services. This can be achieved by sharing of resources, expertise, knowledge and experience to benefit all the stakeholders in healthcare delivery. The joint ADEE/ADEA Meeting in London on 8-9 May 2017 has facilitated discussions amongst dental educators from all over the world during a workshop on "Global Networking: the how and why for dental educators." The aim of this workshop was to determine how can dental educators worldwide network to share ideas, experience, expertise and resources to improve both the curricula and the teaching and learning environment. A pre-conference survey was designed and implemented to identify the domains of interest and needs of participants. A structured questionnaire was administered, and this information was used to guide discussions on three main themes: curricula, faculty development and mobility of faculty and students. Four questions were then defined to help group leaders to frame discussions in the four working groups. The four groups engaged in parallel discussions, with the ideas recorded and collated by group leaders, which later served for the thematic analysis across the groups to draw the key points discussed. Overall, a great desire and potential to create a global networking to share and gain support and expertise at individual and organisational level was apparent and the working group has proposed an action plan, acknowledging that it

  19. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  20. Collaborative Rural Healthcare Network: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Raja

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare is a critical issue in rural communities throughout the world. Provision of timely and cost effective health care in these communities is a challenge since it is coupled with a lack of adequate infrastructure and manpower support. Twenty percent of the United States of America‘s population resides in rural communities, i.e., 59 million people; however, only nine percent of the nation’s physicians practice in rural communities. Shortage of health care personnel and the lack of equipment and facilities often force rural residents to travel long distances to receive needed medical treatment. Researchers and practitioners are in search of solutions to address these unique challenges. In this research, we present a proposed collaborative model of a health information system for rural communities and the challenges and opportunities of this global issue.

  1. The network of collaboration among rappers and its community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Reginald D.

    2006-02-01

    The social network formed by the collaboration between rappers is studied using standard statistical techniques for analysing complex networks. In addition, the community structure of the rap music community is analysed using a new method that uses weighted edges to determine which connections are most important and revealing among all the communities. The results of this method as well as possible reasons for the structure of the rap music community are discussed.

  2. Co-authorship and scientific collaboration networks in Medwave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Reyes, Ibraín Enrique

    2017-12-15

    Scientific collaboration between researchers is one of the most important aspects in the evolution of science helping promote the quality of the studies that are carried out. In turn, it determines an increase in citations when research results are published in scholarly journals. It is interesting to explore the dynamics of scientific collaboration networks regarding co-authorship of scientific articles published in Medwave from January 2014 to September of 2017 and indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE. The largest collaboration networks occurred among authors Rada G, Corsi O and Peña J; and, at universities and healthcare centers level, in the Faculty of Medicine belonging to the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile located in Santiago, Chile.

  3. Collaborative networked organizations - Concepts and practice in manufacturing enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.; Galeano, N.; Molina, A.

    2009-01-01

    Participation in networks has nowadays become very important for any organization that strives to achieve a differentiated competitive advantage, especially if the company is small or medium sized. Collaboration is a key issue to rapidly answer market demands in a manufacturing company, through

  4. The degree distribution of fixed act-size collaboration networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There are a large number of fixed act-size collaboration networks [11]. For ex- ample, each football team has eleven players. In athletic sports or other items, the number of players is fixed, etc. In this paper, we propose a new approach to provide a rigorous proof for the existence of the degree distribution of this model, and ...

  5. Social Networking Tools to Facilitate Cross-Program Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Paul; Howard, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Students working on a highly collaborative project used social networking technology for community building activities as well as basic project-related communication. Requiring students to work on cross-program projects gives them real-world experience working in diverse, geographically dispersed groups. An application used at Appalachian State…

  6. Collaboration Layer for Robots in Mobile Ad-hoc Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Madsen, Per Printz; Broberg, Jacob Honor´e

    2009-01-01

    networks to solve tasks collaboratively. In this proposal the Collaboration Layer is modelled to handle service and position discovery, group management, and synchronisation among robots, but the layer is also designed to be extendable. Based on this model of the Collaboration Layer, generic services...... are provided to the application running on the robot. The services are generic because they can be used by many different applications, independent of the task to be solved. Likewise, specific services are requested from the underlying Virtual Machine, such as broadcast, multicast, and reliable unicast....... A prototype of the Collaboration Layer has been developed to run in a simulated environment and tested in an evaluation scenario. In the scenario five robots solve the tasks of vacuum cleaning and entrance guarding, which involves the ability to discover potential co-workers, form groups, shift from one group...

  7. Collaboration Networks in Applied Conservation Projects across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Andreea; Rozylowicz, Laurentiu; Manolache, Steluta; Ciocănea, Cristiana Maria; Miu, Iulia Viorica; Popescu, Viorel Dan

    2016-01-01

    The main funding instrument for implementing EU policies on nature conservation and supporting environmental and climate action is the LIFE Nature programme, established by the European Commission in 1992. LIFE Nature projects (>1400 awarded) are applied conservation projects in which partnerships between institutions are critical for successful conservation outcomes, yet little is known about the structure of collaborative networks within and between EU countries. The aim of our study is to understand the nature of collaboration in LIFE Nature projects using a novel application of social network theory at two levels: (1) collaboration between countries, and (2) collaboration within countries using six case studies: Western Europe (United Kingdom and Netherlands), Eastern Europe (Romania and Latvia) and Southern Europe (Greece and Portugal). Using data on 1261 projects financed between 1996 and 2013, we found that Italy was the most successful country not only in terms of awarded number of projects, but also in terms of overall influence being by far the most influent country in the European LIFE Nature network, having the highest eigenvector (0.989) and degree centrality (0.177). Another key player in the network is Netherlands, which ensures a fast communication flow with other network members (closeness-0.318) by staying connected with the most active countries. Although Western European countries have higher centrality scores than most of the Eastern European countries, our results showed that overall there is a lower tendency to create partnerships between different organization categories. Also, the comparisons of the six case studies indicates significant differences in regards to the pattern of creating partnerships, providing valuable information on collaboration on EU nature conservation. This study represents a starting point in predicting the formation of future partnerships within LIFE Nature programme, suggesting ways to improve transnational

  8. Collaborative multi-layer network coding for cellular cognitive radio networks

    KAUST Repository

    Sorour, Sameh

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a prioritized multi-layer network coding scheme for collaborative packet recovery in underlay cellular cognitive radio networks. This scheme allows the collocated primary and cognitive radio base-stations to collaborate with each other, in order to minimize their own and each other\\'s packet recovery overheads, and thus improve their throughput, without any coordination between them. This non-coordinated collaboration is done using a novel multi-layer instantly decodable network coding scheme, which guarantees that each network\\'s help to the other network does not result in any degradation in its own performance. It also does not cause any violation to the primary networks interference thresholds in the same and adjacent cells. Yet, our proposed scheme both guarantees the reduction of the recovery overhead in collocated primary and cognitive radio networks, and allows early recovery of their packets compared to non-collaborative schemes. Simulation results show that a recovery overhead reduction of 15% and 40% can be achieved by our proposed scheme in the primary and cognitive radio networks, respectively, compared to the corresponding non-collaborative scheme. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Network-based stochastic competitive learning approach to disambiguation in collaborative networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiano Silva, Thiago; Raphael Amancio, Diego

    2013-03-01

    Many patterns have been uncovered in complex systems through the application of concepts and methodologies of complex networks. Unfortunately, the validity and accuracy of the unveiled patterns are strongly dependent on the amount of unavoidable noise pervading the data, such as the presence of homonymous individuals in social networks. In the current paper, we investigate the problem of name disambiguation in collaborative networks, a task that plays a fundamental role on a myriad of scientific contexts. In special, we use an unsupervised technique which relies on a particle competition mechanism in a networked environment to detect the clusters. It has been shown that, in this kind of environment, the learning process can be improved because the network representation of data can capture topological features of the input data set. Specifically, in the proposed disambiguating model, a set of particles is randomly spawned into the nodes constituting the network. As time progresses, the particles employ a movement strategy composed of a probabilistic convex mixture of random and preferential walking policies. In the former, the walking rule exclusively depends on the topology of the network and is responsible for the exploratory behavior of the particles. In the latter, the walking rule depends both on the topology and the domination levels that the particles impose on the neighboring nodes. This type of behavior compels the particles to perform a defensive strategy, because it will force them to revisit nodes that are already dominated by them, rather than exploring rival territories. Computer simulations conducted on the networks extracted from the arXiv repository of preprint papers and also from other databases reveal the effectiveness of the model, which turned out to be more accurate than traditional clustering methods.

  10. Investigating User Collaboration in Music Based Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2011-01-01

    detected by the system and b) video analysis used to describe and interpret the interaction situation and the context in which the social interplay takes place. This combined method is used in an iterative process, where the design of interactive games with musical-sonic feedback is improved according...... to newly discovered understandings and interpretations of joint user action. For example: How do two people play together if they play music with a pen tablet interface? Can a sound based computer game encourage two players to co-perform and co-create music? This study investigated two players’ joint...

  11. Link prediction in author collaboration network based on BP neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chaoqun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, more and more authors have been encouraged for collaboration because it often produces good results. However, the author collaboration network contains experts in various research directions within various fields, and it is difficult for individual authors to decide which authors are best suited to their expertise. This paper uses the relationships among authors to predict new relationships that may arise, recommending each author with the collaborators they may be interested in. The data source comes from 4-year data in DBLP from 2001 to 2004. After data cleaning, the training set and test set are constructed and then used BP neural network to build model. At the same time, this article compares the performance with Logistic Regression, SVM and Random Forest. The experiment shows that the BP neural network can get better result, and it is feasible to predict links in the author collaboration network.

  12. COLLABORATIVE NETWORK SECURITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BASED ON ASSOCIATION MINING RULE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Mariam Varughese

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Security is one of the major challenges in open network. There are so many types of attacks which follow fixed patterns or frequently change their patterns. It is difficult to find the malicious attack which does not have any fixed patterns. The Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS attacks like Botnets are used to slow down the system performance. To address such problems Collaborative Network Security Management System (CNSMS is proposed along with the association mining rule. CNSMS system is consists of collaborative Unified Threat Management (UTM, cloud based security centre and traffic prober. The traffic prober captures the internet traffic and given to the collaborative UTM. Traffic is analysed by the Collaborative UTM, to determine whether it contains any malicious attack or not. If any security event occurs, it will reports to the cloud based security centre. The security centre generates security rules based on association mining rule and distributes to the network. The cloud based security centre is used to store the huge amount of tragic, their logs and the security rule generated. The feedback is evaluated and the invalid rules are eliminated to improve the system efficiency.

  13. Assessing Collaboration Networks in Educational Research: A Co-Authorship-Based Social Network Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, David Andres; Queupil, Juan Pablo; Fraser, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze collaboration networks and their patterns among higher education institutions (HEIs) in Chile and the Latin American region. This will provide evidence to educational managements in order to properly allocate their efforts to improve collaboration. Design/methodology/approach: This quantitative…

  14. Usability Analysis within The DataONE Network of Collaborators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, A. E.; Frame, M. T.; Tenopir, C.; Volentine, R.

    2014-12-01

    DataONE was conceived as a 10-year project to enable new science and knowledge creation through universal access to data about life on Earth and the environment that sustains it. In Phase I (2009-2014) more than 300 DataONE participants designed, developed and deployed a robust cyberinfrastructure (CI) with innovative services, and directly engaged and educated a broad stakeholder community. DataONE provides a resilient, scalable infrastructure using Member Nodes (data repositories), Coordinating Nodes, and an Investigator Toolkit to support the data access and data management needs of biological, Earth, and environmental science researchers in the U.S. and across the globe. DataONE collaborators, such as the U.S. Geological Survey, University of New Mexico, and the University of Tennessee, perform research to measure both the current data practices and opinions of DataONE stakeholders and the usability of DataONE for these stakeholders. Stakeholders include scientists, data managers, librarians, and educators among others. The DataONE Usability and Assessment Working Group, which includes members from multiple sectors, does research, development, and implementation projects on DataONE processes, systems, and methods. These projects are essential to insure that DataONE products and services meet network goals, include appropriate community involvement, and demonstrate progress and achievements of DataONE. This poster will provide an overview of DataONE's usability analysis and assessment methodologies, benefits to DataONE and its collaborators, and current tools/techniques being utilized by the participants.

  15. Achieving social-ecological fit through bottom-up collaborative governance: an empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Guerrero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant benefits can arise from collaborative forms of governance that foster self-organization and flexibility. Likewise, governance systems that fit with the extent and complexity of the system under management are considered essential to our ability to solve environmental problems. However, from an empirical perspective the fundamental question of whether self-organized (bottom-up collaborative forms of governance are able to accomplish adequate fit is unresolved. We used new theory and methodological approaches underpinned by interdisciplinary network analysis to address this gap by investigating three governance challenges that relate to the problem of fit: shared management of ecological resources, management of interconnected ecological resources, and cross-scale management. We first identified a set of social-ecological network configurations that represent the hypothesized ways in which collaborative arrangements can contribute to addressing these challenges. Using social and ecological data from a large-scale biodiversity conservation initiative in Australia, we empirically determined how well the observed patterns of stakeholder interactions reflect these network configurations. We found that stakeholders collaborate to manage individual parcels of native vegetation, but not for the management of interconnected parcels. In addition, our data show that the collaborative arrangements enable management across different scales (local, regional, supraregional. Our study provides empirical support for the ability of collaborative forms of governance to address the problem of fit, but also suggests that in some cases the establishment of bottom-up collaborative arrangements would likely benefit from specific guidance to facilitate the establishment of collaborations that better align with the ways ecological resources are interconnected across the landscape. In our case study region, this would improve the capacity of stakeholders to

  16. Supporting tactical intelligence using collaborative environments and social networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollocko, Arthur B.; Farry, Michael P.; Stark, Robert F.

    2013-05-01

    Modern military environments place an increased emphasis on the collection and analysis of intelligence at the tactical level. The deployment of analytical tools at the tactical level helps support the Warfighter's need for rapid collection, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence. However, given the lack of experience and staffing at the tactical level, most of the available intelligence is not exploited. Tactical environments are staffed by a new generation of intelligence analysts who are well-versed in modern collaboration environments and social networking. An opportunity exists to enhance tactical intelligence analysis by exploiting these personnel strengths, but is dependent on appropriately designed information sharing technologies. Existing social information sharing technologies enable users to publish information quickly, but do not unite or organize information in a manner that effectively supports intelligence analysis. In this paper, we present an alternative approach to structuring and supporting tactical intelligence analysis that combines the benefits of existing concepts, and provide detail on a prototype system embodying that approach. Since this approach employs familiar collaboration support concepts from social media, it enables new-generation analysts to identify the decision-relevant data scattered among databases and the mental models of other personnel, increasing the timeliness of collaborative analysis. Also, the approach enables analysts to collaborate visually to associate heterogeneous and uncertain data within the intelligence analysis process, increasing the robustness of collaborative analyses. Utilizing this familiar dynamic collaboration environment, we hope to achieve a significant reduction of time and skill required to glean actionable intelligence in these challenging operational environments.

  17. Collaborative Multi-Layer Network Coding in Hybrid Cellular Cognitive Radio Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Moubayed, Abdallah J.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, as an extension to [1], we propose a prioritized multi-layer network coding scheme for collaborative packet recovery in hybrid (interweave and underlay) cellular cognitive radio networks. This scheme allows the uncoordinated collaboration between the collocated primary and cognitive radio base-stations in order to minimize their own as well as each other\\'s packet recovery overheads, thus by improving their throughput. The proposed scheme ensures that each network\\'s performance is not degraded by its help to the other network. Moreover, it guarantees that the primary network\\'s interference threshold is not violated in the same and adjacent cells. Yet, the scheme allows the reduction of the recovery overhead in the collocated primary and cognitive radio networks. The reduction in the cognitive radio network is further amplified due to the perfect detection of spectrum holes which allows the cognitive radio base station to transmit at higher power without fear of violating the interference threshold of the primary network. For the secondary network, simulation results show reductions of 20% and 34% in the packet recovery overhead, compared to the non-collaborative scheme, for low and high probabilities of primary packet arrivals, respectively. For the primary network, this reduction was found to be 12%. © 2015 IEEE.

  18. Collaborative Beamforming Techniques for Data Transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Berbakov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative beamforming is a technique for improving energy efficiency of uplink communications in wireless sensor networks. It is done by synchronizing carrier phases of individual sensor nodes precisely enough, so that they jointly form a beampattern with a stable mainlobe. In this paper, we analyze the impact of additive noise in the received signal on the behavior of an iterative phase synchronization scheme. Besides, we analyze the bit error rate performance of such collaborative transmission. In particular, we consider a decentralized antenna array where sensors are allowed to perform distributed carrier synchronization and collaborative data transmission simultaneously. We evaluate the system performance by using numerical simulations and provide a semi-analytical solution for the algorithm convergence characteristics and the overall bit error rate as a function of the algorithm’s iteration index.

  19. Coarse cluster enhancing collaborative recommendation for social network systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao-Dong; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Shang, Min-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Traditional collaborative filtering based recommender systems for social network systems bring very high demands on time complexity due to computing similarities of all pairs of users via resource usages and annotation actions, which thus strongly suppresses recommending speed. In this paper, to overcome this drawback, we propose a novel approach, namely coarse cluster that partitions similar users and associated items at a high speed to enhance user-based collaborative filtering, and then develop a fast collaborative user model for the social tagging systems. The experimental results based on Delicious dataset show that the proposed model is able to dramatically reduce the processing time cost greater than 90 % and relatively improve the accuracy in comparison with the ordinary user-based collaborative filtering, and is robust for the initial parameter. Most importantly, the proposed model can be conveniently extended by introducing more users' information (e.g., profiles) and practically applied for the large-scale social network systems to enhance the recommending speed without accuracy loss.

  20. Can Learning Collaboratives Support Implementation by Rewiring Professional Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C; Hanson, Rochelle F; Doogan, Nathan J; Powell, Byron J; Cao, Yiwen; Dunn, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how a learning collaborative focusing on trauma-focused CBT (TF-CBT) impacted advice-seeking patterns between clinicians and three key learning sources: (1) training experts who share technical knowledge about TF-CBT, (2) peers from other participating organizations who share their implementation experiences, and (3) colleagues from their own agency who provide social and professional support. Based on surveys administered to 132 clinicians from 32 agencies, participants' professional networks changed slightly over time by forming new advice-seeking relationships with training experts. While small, these changes at the clinician-level yielded substantial changes in the structure of the regional advice network.

  1. Can Learning Collaboratives Support Implementation By Rewiring Professional Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Rochelle F.; Doogan, Nathan J.; Powell, Byron J.; Cao, Yiwen; Dunn, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how a learning collaborative focusing on Trauma-Focused CBT (TF-CBT) impacted advice-seeking patterns between clinicians and three key learning sources: (1) training experts who share technical knowledge about TF-CBT, (2) peers from other participating organizations who share their implementation experiences, and (3) colleagues from their own agency who provide social and professional support. Based on surveys administered to 132 clinicians from 32 agencies, participants’ professional networks changed slightly over time by forming new advice-seeking relationships with training experts. While small, these changes at the clinician-level yielded substantial changes in the structure of the regional advice network. PMID:25542237

  2. Rethinking learning networks collaborative possibilities for a Deleuzian century

    CERN Document Server

    Kamp, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    In the face of today's complex policy challenges, various forms of 'joining-up' - networking, collaborating, partnering - have become key responses. However, institutions often fail to take advantage of the full benefits that joining-up offers. In this book, the author draws on ethnographic research into learning networks in post compulsory education and training in the state of Victoria, Australia, to explore why this might be the case and presents an argument for rethinking how joining-up works in practice. Throughout the book, Deleuzian concepts are engaged to forge a 'little complicating m

  3. Diversity of social ties in scientific collaboration networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Quan; Xu, Bo; Xu, Xiaomin; Xiao, Yanghua; Wang, Wei; Wang, Hengshan

    2011-11-01

    Diversity is one of the important perspectives to characterize behaviors of individuals in social networks. It is intuitively believed that diversity of social ties accounts for competition advantage and idea innovation. However, quantitative evidences in a real large social network can be rarely found in the previous research. Thanks to the availability of scientific publication records on WWW; now we can construct a large scientific collaboration network, which provides us a chance to gain insight into the diversity of relationships in a real social network through statistical analysis. In this article, we dedicate our efforts to perform empirical analysis on a scientific collaboration network extracted from DBLP, an online bibliographic database in computer science, in a systematical way, finding the following: distributions of diversity indices tend to decay in an exponential or Gaussian way; diversity indices are not trivially correlated to existing vertex importance measures; authors of diverse social ties tend to connect to each other and these authors are generally more competitive than others.

  4. Computer networks promote caregiving collaboration: the ComputerLink Project.

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    ComputerLink is a specialized computer network designed to support caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's Disease. ComputerLink delivers information, communication, and decision support, accessed through home terminals. It stands as a unique demonstration of how information technologies support collaboration among family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's Disease, and between caregivers and professionals. In a randomized field experiment involving 102 AD caregivers, 47 caregivers had acce...

  5. Long-Term Collaboration Network Based on ClinicalTrials.gov Database in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyoung Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing costs, risks, and productivity problems in the pharmaceutical industry are important recent issues in the biomedical field. Open innovation is proposed as a solution to these issues. However, little statistical analysis related to collaboration in the pharmaceutical industry has been conducted so far. Meanwhile, not many cases have analyzed the clinical trials database, even though it is the information source with the widest coverage for the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to test the clinical trials information as a probe for observing the status of the collaboration network and open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry. This study applied the social network analysis method to clinical trials data from 1980 to 2016 in ClinicalTrials.gov. Data were divided into four time periods—1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s—and the collaboration network was constructed for each time period. The characteristic of each network was investigated. The types of agencies participating in the clinical trials were classified as a university, national institute, company, or other, and the major players in the collaboration networks were identified. This study showed some phenomena related to the pharmaceutical industry that could provide clues to policymakers about open innovation. If follow-up studies were conducted, the utilization of the clinical trial database could be further expanded, which is expected to help open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Collaborative Multi-Layer Network Coding For Hybrid Cellular Cognitive Radio Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Moubayed, Abdallah J.

    2014-05-01

    In this thesis, as an extension to [1], we propose a prioritized multi-layer network coding scheme for collaborative packet recovery in hybrid (interweave and underlay) cellular cognitive radio networks. This scheme allows the uncoordinated collaboration between the collocated primary and cognitive radio base-stations in order to minimize their own as well as each other’s packet recovery overheads, thus by improving their throughput. The proposed scheme ensures that each network’s performance is not degraded by its help to the other network. Moreover, it guarantees that the primary network’s interference threshold is not violated in the same and adjacent cells. Yet, the scheme allows the reduction of the recovery overhead in the collocated primary and cognitive radio networks. The reduction in the cognitive radio network is further amplified due to the perfect detection of spectrum holes which allows the cognitive radio base station to transmit at higher power without fear of violating the interference threshold of the primary network. For the secondary network, simulation results show reductions of 20% and 34% in the packet recovery overhead, compared to the non-collaborative scheme, for low and high probabilities of primary packet arrivals, respectively. For the primary network, this reduction was found to be 12%. Furthermore, with the use of fractional cooperation, the average recovery overhead is further reduced by around 5% for the primary network and around 10% for the secondary network when a high fractional cooperation probability is used.

  7. Revolutions in Global Networking and Collaborations, and the Digital Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Harvey

    2007-04-01

    The major physics experiments of the next twenty five years, such as those at the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider, will break new ground in our understanding of the fundamental interactions, structures and symmetries that govern the nature of matter and spacetime. In order to realize the scientific wealth of these experimental programs, physicists have formed global-scale collaborations and built grid systems where the data is processed, distributed and collaboratively analyzed using networked computing facilities at more than 100 sites around the world. Effective use of these emerging ensembles of facilities and networks presents new challenges in Petabyte-scale data access, processing and distribution, and collaboration across national and international networks on a scale unprecedented in the history of science. The key to meeting these challenges is the effective use of data networks. The bandwidth use by high energy physicists, paralleled by scientists in other fields of data intensive science, continues to grow at several hundred times per decade, and there are indications that this growth is accelerating. This is helping to drive the growth of the major networks serving research and education, as well as mission-oriented networks in the US, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America and across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Physicists and computer scientists have together made striking technological advances in recent years, and have developed tools that allow full use of long range 10 gigabit/sec links on a routine basis for the first time. As the science community continues to advance in its development of networks and grid systems, a key concern is the rising Digital Divide between the favored and less-favored regions of the world. Closing the Divide is vital for the health of our global collaborations and our field. In this talk I will review these trends, and focus on the means to reduce the Digital Divide, from the perspective of

  8. Collaborative research networks in health: a pragmatic scoping study for the development of an imaging network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tracy Elizabeth; Rankin, Nicole; Janssen, Anna; Mcgregor, Deborah; Grieve, Stuart; Shaw, Timothy

    2015-12-09

    Collaborative research networks are often touted as a solution for enhancing the translation of knowledge, but questions remain about how to evaluate their impact on health service delivery. This pragmatic scoping study explored the enabling factors for developing and supporting a collaborative imaging network in a metropolitan university in Australia. An advisory group was established to provide governance and to identify key informants and participants. Focus group discussions (n = 2) and semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were facilitated with representatives from a broad range of disciplines. In addition, a survey, a review of relevant websites (n = 15) and a broad review of the literature were undertaken to elicit information on collaborative research networks and perceived needs and factors that would support their involvement in a multi-disciplinary collaborative research network. Findings were de-identified and broad themes were identified. Participants identified human factors as having priority for developing and sustaining a collaborative research network. In particular, leadership, a shared vision and a communication plan that includes social media were identified as crucial for sustaining an imaging network in health research. It is important to develop metrics that map relationships between network members and the role that communication tools can contribute to this process. This study confirms that human factors remain significant across a range of collaborative endeavours. The use of focus group discussions, interviews, and literature and website reviews means we can now strongly recommend the primacy of human factors. More work is needed to identify how the network operates and what specific indicators or metrics help build the capacity of clinicians and scientists to participate in translational research.

  9. The Multi-Scale Network Landscape of Collaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arram Bae

    Full Text Available Propelled by the increasing availability of large-scale high-quality data, advanced data modeling and analysis techniques are enabling many novel and significant scientific understanding of a wide range of complex social, natural, and technological systems. These developments also provide opportunities for studying cultural systems and phenomena--which can be said to refer to all products of human creativity and way of life. An important characteristic of a cultural product is that it does not exist in isolation from others, but forms an intricate web of connections on many levels. In the creation and dissemination of cultural products and artworks in particular, collaboration and communication of ideas play an essential role, which can be captured in the heterogeneous network of the creators and practitioners of art. In this paper we propose novel methods to analyze and uncover meaningful patterns from such a network using the network of western classical musicians constructed from a large-scale comprehensive Compact Disc recordings data. We characterize the complex patterns in the network landscape of collaboration between musicians across multiple scales ranging from the macroscopic to the mesoscopic and microscopic that represent the diversity of cultural styles and the individuality of the artists.

  10. The Multi-Scale Network Landscape of Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Arram; Park, Doheum; Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Park, Juyong

    2016-01-01

    Propelled by the increasing availability of large-scale high-quality data, advanced data modeling and analysis techniques are enabling many novel and significant scientific understanding of a wide range of complex social, natural, and technological systems. These developments also provide opportunities for studying cultural systems and phenomena--which can be said to refer to all products of human creativity and way of life. An important characteristic of a cultural product is that it does not exist in isolation from others, but forms an intricate web of connections on many levels. In the creation and dissemination of cultural products and artworks in particular, collaboration and communication of ideas play an essential role, which can be captured in the heterogeneous network of the creators and practitioners of art. In this paper we propose novel methods to analyze and uncover meaningful patterns from such a network using the network of western classical musicians constructed from a large-scale comprehensive Compact Disc recordings data. We characterize the complex patterns in the network landscape of collaboration between musicians across multiple scales ranging from the macroscopic to the mesoscopic and microscopic that represent the diversity of cultural styles and the individuality of the artists.

  11. Developing A Large-Scale, Collaborative, Productive Geoscience Education Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Egger, A. E.; Fox, S.; Ledley, T. S.; Macdonald, H.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, the geoscience education community has grown substantially and developed broad and deep capacity for collaboration and dissemination of ideas. While this community is best viewed as emergent from complex interactions among changing educational needs and opportunities, we highlight the role of several large projects in the development of a network within this community. In the 1990s, three NSF projects came together to build a robust web infrastructure to support the production and dissemination of on-line resources: On The Cutting Edge (OTCE), Earth Exploration Toolbook, and Starting Point: Teaching Introductory Geoscience. Along with the contemporaneous Digital Library for Earth System Education, these projects engaged geoscience educators nationwide in exploring professional development experiences that produced lasting on-line resources, collaborative authoring of resources, and models for web-based support for geoscience teaching. As a result, a culture developed in the 2000s in which geoscience educators anticipated that resources for geoscience teaching would be shared broadly and that collaborative authoring would be productive and engaging. By this time, a diverse set of examples demonstrated the power of the web infrastructure in supporting collaboration, dissemination and professional development . Building on this foundation, more recent work has expanded both the size of the network and the scope of its work. Many large research projects initiated collaborations to disseminate resources supporting educational use of their data. Research results from the rapidly expanding geoscience education research community were integrated into the Pedagogies in Action website and OTCE. Projects engaged faculty across the nation in large-scale data collection and educational research. The Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network and OTCE engaged community members in reviewing the expanding body of on-line resources. Building Strong

  12. Collaborative Distributed Scheduling Approaches for Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidong Deng

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy constraints restrict the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs with battery-powered nodes, which poses great challenges for their large scale application. In this paper, we propose a family of collaborative distributed scheduling approaches (CDSAs based on the Markov process to reduce the energy consumption of a WSN. The family of CDSAs comprises of two approaches: a one-step collaborative distributed approach and a two-step collaborative distributed approach. The approaches enable nodes to learn the behavior information of its environment collaboratively and integrate sleep scheduling with transmission scheduling to reduce the energy consumption. We analyze the adaptability and practicality features of the CDSAs. The simulation results show that the two proposed approaches can effectively reduce nodes’ energy consumption. Some other characteristics of the CDSAs like buffer occupation and packet delay are also analyzed in this paper. We evaluate CDSAs extensively on a 15-node WSN testbed. The test results show that the CDSAs conserve the energy effectively and are feasible for real WSNs.

  13. Investigating biofuels through network analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curci, Ylenia; Mongeau Ospina, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Biofuel policies are motivated by a plethora of political concerns related to energy security, environmental damages, and support of the agricultural sector. In response to this, much scientific work has chiefly focussed on analysing the biofuel domain and on giving policy advice and recommendations. Although innovation has been acknowledged as one of the key factors in sustainable and cost-effective biofuel development, there is an urgent need to investigate technological trajectories in the biofuel sector by starting from consistent data and appropriate methodological tools. To do so, this work proposes a procedure to select patent data unequivocally related to the investigated sector, it uses co-occurrence of technological terms to compute patent similarity and highlights content and interdependencies of biofuels technological trajectories by revealing hidden topics from unstructured patent text fields. The analysis suggests that there is a breaking trend towards modern generation biofuels and that innovators seem to focus increasingly on the ability of alternative energy sources to adapt to the transport/industrial sector. - Highlights: • Innovative effort is devoted to biofuels additives and modern biofuels technologies. • A breaking trend can be observed from the second half of the last decade. • A patent network is identified via text mining techniques that extract latent topics.

  14. Three is a crowd? On the benefits of involving contract manufacturers in collaborative planning for Three-Echelon Supply Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, H.A.; van Oorschot, K.E.; Peeters, W.; Choi, T-M.; Cheng, T.C.E.

    2011-01-01

    In today’s network economy, multi-echelon supply networks have become the dominant life form. The question of how to coordinate goods flows in such multi-echelon settings has become paramount. This study investigates the effectiveness of collaboration and information sharing in a three-echelon

  15. Hybrid Collaborative Learning for Classification and Clustering in Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Sosnowski, Scott; Lane, Terran

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events as well as faster responses, such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if learners at individual nodes can communicate with their neighbors. In previous work, methods were developed by which classification algorithms deployed at sensor nodes can communicate information about event labels to each other, building on prior work with co-training, self-training, and active learning. The idea of collaborative learning was extended to function for clustering algorithms as well, similar to ideas from penta-training and consensus clustering. However, collaboration between these learner types had not been explored. A new protocol was developed by which classifiers and clusterers can share key information about their observations and conclusions as they learn. This is an active collaboration in which learners of either type can query their neighbors for information that they then use to re-train or re-learn the concept they are studying. The protocol also supports broadcasts from the classifiers and clusterers to the rest of the network to announce new discoveries. Classifiers observe an event and assign it a label (type). Clusterers instead group observations into clusters without assigning them a label, and they collaborate in terms of pairwise constraints between two events [same-cluster (mustlink) or different-cluster (cannot-link)]. Fundamentally, these two learner types speak different languages. To bridge this gap, the new communication protocol provides four types of exchanges: hybrid queries for information, hybrid "broadcasts" of learned information, each specified for classifiers-to-clusterers, and clusterers

  16. Building Research Collaboration Networks--An Interpersonal Perspective for Research Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun Song

    2014-01-01

    While collaboration is increasingly recognized to be important for research, researchers' collaboration networks are still not adequately recognized as a form of research capacity in the literature. Research is a knowledge creation activity and interpersonal research collaboration networks are important for knowledge cross-fertilization and…

  17. A Collaborative Network Model for Agrifood Transactions on Regional Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpentesta, Antonio P.; Ammirato, Salvatore

    The paper deals with a collaborative agrifood network in a regional scenario where producers of high typical and quality goods and consumer groups are involved in agrifood transactions as well as information and knowledge exchanges through an e-business platform. While producers are engaged in providing consumers with useful and timely information about healthiness, environmentally friendliness and most importantly, food quality of their products, consumers are engaged in giving prompt and understandable feedbacks to the producers. In this sense, the network is a form of proactive learning community. Starting from some basic socio-economic assumptions on a reference territory, we present an organizational model that can be adopted to foster the development of the regional area where it is applied. An instantiation of the model for a selected territory (the District of High Quality Productions in Sibari, Calabria, Italy) and first results, coming from two pilot tests, have been summarized as well.

  18. Resource Allocation Optimization Model of Collaborative Logistics Network Based on Bilevel Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-feng Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative logistics network resource allocation can effectively meet the needs of customers. It can realize the overall benefit maximization of the logistics network and ensure that collaborative logistics network runs orderly at the time of creating value. Therefore, this article is based on the relationship of collaborative logistics network supplier, the transit warehouse, and sellers, and we consider the uncertainty of time to establish a bilevel programming model with random constraints and propose a genetic simulated annealing hybrid intelligent algorithm to solve it. Numerical example shows that the method has stronger robustness and convergence; it can achieve collaborative logistics network resource allocation rationalization and optimization.

  19. Securing Collaborative Spectrum Sensing against Untrustworthy Secondary Users in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenkai; Li, Husheng; Sun, Yan(Lindsay); Han, Zhu

    2009-12-01

    Cognitive radio is a revolutionary paradigm to migrate the spectrum scarcity problem in wireless networks. In cognitive radio networks, collaborative spectrum sensing is considered as an effective method to improve the performance of primary user detection. For current collaborative spectrum sensing schemes, secondary users are usually assumed to report their sensing information honestly. However, compromised nodes can send false sensing information to mislead the system. In this paper, we study the detection of untrustworthy secondary users in cognitive radio networks. We first analyze the case when there is only one compromised node in collaborative spectrum sensing schemes. Then we investigate the scenario that there are multiple compromised nodes. Defense schemes are proposed to detect malicious nodes according to their reporting histories. We calculate the suspicious level of all nodes based on their reports. The reports from nodes with high suspicious levels will be excluded in decision-making. Compared with existing defense methods, the proposed scheme can effectively differentiate malicious nodes and honest nodes. As a result, it can significantly improve the performance of collaborative sensing. For example, when there are 10 secondary users, with the primary user detection rate being equal to 0.99, one malicious user can make the false alarm rate [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] increase to 72%. The proposed scheme can reduce it to 5%. Two malicious users can make [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] increase to 85% and the proposed scheme reduces it to 8%.

  20. Business Collaboration in Food Networks: Incremental Solution Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Sundmaeker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper will present an approach for an incremental solution development that is based on the usage of the currently developed Internet based FIspace business collaboration platform. Key element is the clear segmentation of infrastructures that are either internal or external to the collaborating business entity in the food network. On the one hand, the approach enables to differentiate between specific centralised as well as decentralised ways for data storage and hosting of IT based functionalities. The selection of specific dataexchange protocols and data models is facilitated. On the other hand, the supported solution design and subsequent development is focusing on reusable “software Apps” that can be used on their own and are incorporating a clear added value for the business actors. It will be outlined on how to push the development and introduction of Apps that do not require basic changes of the existing infrastructure. The paper will present an example that is based on the development of a set of Apps for the exchange of product quality related information in food networks, specifically addressing fresh fruits and vegetables. It combines workflow support for data exchange from farm to retail as well as to provide quality feedback information to facilitate the business process improvement. Finally, the latest status of theFIspace platform development will be outlined. Key features and potential ways for real users and software developers in using the FIspace platform that is initiated by science and industry will be outlined.

  1. Social Learning Networks: Build Mobile Learning Networks Based on Collaborative Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeff J. S.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Huang, Yueh-Min; Hsiao, Indy Y. T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the rising of Web 2.0 has made online community gradually become popular, like Facebook, blog, etc. As a result, the online knowledge sharing network formed by interpersonal interaction is now a major character of Web 2.0, and therefore, by this trend, we try to build up a collaborative service mechanism and further set up an analysis…

  2. Networking: a study in planning and developing cross-cultural collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Singh

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a collaboration between the authors at the University of Brighton (UK and the University of Delhi, South Campus. The collaboration came about as a result of the EU-India Cross-Cultural Innovation Network collaboration programme, a project involving several universities and organizations across Europe and India. The authors of this paper both lecture in the area of computer networking. Following meetings in Delhi, they agreed to work together to produce a Web-based networking resource to be generated by the students of both institutions. The first phase of development involved the mounting of Web-based tutorials and documents produced by the students. The second phase will centre on the development of a knowledge base generated by the interaction of the students within an asynchronous forum. Running alongside these phases will be a collaborative bookmarking system, a database in which the students will post URLs of Web-based resources that they find useful in their studies. This system incorporates a form of collaborative filtering, an evolutionary mechanism which seeks to embody the qualities that students value in resources to provide a dynamic set of ratings to assist in the selection of those of most use. The planning of such a system raises some unusual issues, not least in the process of collaboration itself, with concerns as diverse as technical compatibility, institutional and cultural differences, timezones and the reliability of email. Limited bandwidth between our institutions causes special problems with the interactive elements of the resource. We present the methods we are investigating to reduce the impact of this. The fact that the students share an intellectual discipline but are otherwise separated by a cultural and geographical divide is expected to lead to fruitful diversity in thinking and approaches to problem-solving.

  3. Scientific collaboration and endorsement: Network analysis of coauthorship and citation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Scientific collaboration and endorsement are well-established research topics which utilize three kinds of methods: survey/questionnaire, bibliometrics, and complex network analysis. This paper combines topic modeling and path-finding algorithms to determine whether productive authors tend to collaborate with or cite researchers with the same or different interests, and whether highly cited authors tend to collaborate with or cite each other. Taking information retrieval as a test field, the results show that productive authors tend to directly coauthor with and closely cite colleagues sharing the same research interests; they do not generally collaborate directly with colleagues having different research topics, but instead directly or indirectly cite them; and highly cited authors do not generally coauthor with each other, but closely cite each other. PMID:21344057

  4. Bridging the Gap in Port Security; Network Centric Theory Applied to Public/Private Collaboration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wright, Candice L

    2007-01-01

    ...." Admiral Thad Allen, 2007 The application of Network Centric Warfare theory enables all port stakeholders to better prepare for a disaster through increased information sharing and collaboration...

  5. Open Dialogues in social networks: professional identity and transdisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmesland, Anne-Lise; Seikkula, Jaakko; Nilsen, Oystein; Hopfenbeck, Mark; Erik Arnkil, Tom

    2010-09-16

    The aim of this article is to explore the challenges connected to the transformation and emergence of professional identity in transdisciplinary multi-agency network meetings and the use of Open Dialogue. The empirical findings have been taken from a clinical project in southern Norway concerning multi-agency network meetings with persons between 14 and 25 years of age. The project explores how these meetings are perceived by professionals working in various sectors. Data was collected through three interviews conducted with two focus groups, the first comprising health care professionals and the second professionals from the social and educational sectors. Content analysis was used to create categories through condensation and interpretation. The two main categories that emerged were 'professional role' and 'teamwork'. These were analysed and compared according to the two first meeting in the two focus groups. The results indicate different levels of motivation and understanding regarding role transformation processes. The realization of transdisciplinary collaboration is dependent upon the professionals' mutual reliance. The professionals' participation is affected by stereotypes and differences in their sense of belonging to a certain network, and thus their identity transformation seems to be strongly affected. To encourage the use of integrated solutions in mental health care, the professionals' preference for teamwork, the importance of familiarity with each other and knowledge of cultural barriers should be addressed.

  6. Open Dialogues in social networks: professional identity and transdisciplinary collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise Holmesland

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this article is to explore the challenges connected to the transformation and emergence of professional identity in transdisciplinary multi-agency network meetings and the use of Open Dialogue.Introduction: The empirical findings have been taken from a clinical project in southern Norway concerning multi-agency network meetings with persons between 14 and 25 years of age. The project explores how these meetings are perceived by professionals working in various sectors.Methodology: Data was collected through three interviews conducted with two focus groups, the first comprising health care professionals and the second professionals from the social and educational sectors. Content analysis was used to create categories through condensation and interpretation. The two main categories that emerged were 'professional role' and 'teamwork'. These were analysed and compared according to the two first meeting in the two focus groups.Results and discussion: The results indicate different levels of motivation and understanding regarding role transformation processes. The realization of transdisciplinary collaboration is dependent upon the professionals' mutual reliance. The professionals' participation is affected by stereotypes and differences in their sense of belonging to a certain network, and thus their identity transformation seems to be strongly affected. To encourage the use of integrated solutions in mental health care, the professionals' preference for teamwork, the importance of familiarity with each other and knowledge of cultural barriers should be addressed.

  7. Open Dialogues in social networks: professional identity and transdisciplinary collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise Holmesland

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this article is to explore the challenges connected to the transformation and emergence of professional identity in transdisciplinary multi-agency network meetings and the use of Open Dialogue. Introduction: The empirical findings have been taken from a clinical project in southern Norway concerning multi-agency network meetings with persons between 14 and 25 years of age. The project explores how these meetings are perceived by professionals working in various sectors. Methodology: Data was collected through three interviews conducted with two focus groups, the first comprising health care professionals and the second professionals from the social and educational sectors. Content analysis was used to create categories through condensation and interpretation. The two main categories that emerged were 'professional role' and 'teamwork'. These were analysed and compared according to the two first meeting in the two focus groups. Results and discussion: The results indicate different levels of motivation and understanding regarding role transformation processes. The realization of transdisciplinary collaboration is dependent upon the professionals' mutual reliance. The professionals' participation is affected by stereotypes and differences in their sense of belonging to a certain network, and thus their identity transformation seems to be strongly affected. To encourage the use of integrated solutions in mental health care, the professionals' preference for teamwork, the importance of familiarity with each other and knowledge of cultural barriers should be addressed.

  8. Structural Conditions for Collaboration and Learning in Innovation Networks: Using an Innovation System Performance Lens to Analyse Agricultural Knowledge Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Frans; Klerkx, Laurens; Roep, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate how the structural conditions of eight different European agricultural innovation systems can facilitate or hinder collaboration and social learning in multidisciplinary innovation networks. Methodology: We have adapted the Innovation System Failure Matrix to investigate the main barriers and enablers eight countries…

  9. Criminal Network Investigation: Processes, Tools, and Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenqvist

    important challenge for criminal network investigation, despite the massive attention it receives from research and media. Challenges such as the investigation process, the context of the investigation, human factors such as thinking and creativity, and political decisions and legal laws are all challenges......Criminal network investigations such as police investigations, intelligence analysis, and investigative journalism involve a range of complex knowledge management processes and tasks. Criminal network investigators collect, process, and analyze information related to a specific target to create...... that could mean the success or failure of criminal network investigations. % include commission reports as indications of process related problems .. to "play a little politics" !! Information, process, and human factors, are challenges we find to be addressable by software system support. Based on those...

  10. Collaborative Image Coding and Transmission over Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The imaging sensors are able to provide intuitive visual information for quick recognition and decision. However, imaging sensors usually generate vast amount of data. Therefore, processing and coding of image data collected in a sensor network for the purpose of energy efficient transmission poses a significant technical challenge. In particular, multiple sensors may be collecting similar visual information simultaneously. We propose in this paper a novel collaborative image coding and transmission scheme to minimize the energy for data transmission. First, we apply a shape matching method to coarsely register images to find out maximal overlap to exploit the spatial correlation between images acquired from neighboring sensors. For a given image sequence, we transmit background image only once. A lightweight and efficient background subtraction method is employed to detect targets. Only the regions of target and their spatial locations are transmitted to the monitoring center. The whole image can then be reconstructed by fusing the background and the target images as well as their spatial locations. Experimental results show that the energy for image transmission can indeed be greatly reduced with collaborative image coding and transmission.

  11. Managing the Collaborative Networks Lifecycle: A Meta-Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noran, Ovidiu

    The benefits of using various forms of Collaborative Networks (CNs) to create agile virtual organisations (Va), shop floors and laboratories, or to bring together professionals worldwide in virtual communities are commonly acknowledged in both academia and industry. Currently however, the existing CN knowledge is scattered and overlapping; this is a transitional phase in the maturing of the CN domain and its evolution towards a proper discipline. The.progress of the CN research domain (and its practical applications) relies upon the structuring of relevant knowledge into a consistent framework that conveys an unambiguous and agreed-upon collaborative paradigm. The methodological aspect of this integration effort can be significantly supported by the creation of a high-level artefact, able to express and manage existing and emerging knowledge related to the creation and operation of various CN types and their concrete manifestations. The proposed artefact could take the form of a 'to-do list on how to create methods' (thus, a meta-methodology) for specific enterprise architecture (EA) tasks or task types, which typically include the information system (IS) supporting the business.

  12. The US Fire Learning Network: Springing a Rigidity Trap through Multiscalar Collaborative Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hale. Butler

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Wildland fire management in the United States is caught in a rigidity trap, an inability to apply novelty and innovation in the midst of crisis. Despite wide recognition that public agencies should engage in ecological fire restoration, fire suppression still dominates planning and management, and restoration has failed to gain traction. The U.S. Fire Learning Network (FLN, a multiscalar collaborative endeavor established in 2002 by federal land management agencies and The Nature Conservancy, offers the potential to overcome barriers that inhibit restoration planning and management. By circulating people, planning products, and information among landscape- and regional-scale collaboratives, this network has facilitated the development and dissemination of innovative approaches to ecological fire restoration. Through experimentation and innovation generated in the network, the FLN has fostered change by influencing fire and land management plans as well as federal policy. We suggest that multiscalar collaborative planning networks such as the FLN can facilitate overcoming the rigidity traps that prevent resource management agencies from responding to complex cross-scalar problems.

  13. Beyond the Relational View: Network Resources and Leadership in Multi-Stakeholder Collaborations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reypens, C.; Blazevic, V.; Lievens, A.

    2016-01-01

    The growing prominence of networks as organizational forms for innovation raises questions concerning how to organize and manage effective collaboration between multiple, diverse stakeholders. Building on the relational view, we study the determinants underlying superior network performance in a

  14. Information technology as a facilitator of suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Chinomona

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness about the paramount importance of information technology within business in the context of large businesses. However, research about the investigation of the role of information technology resources in fostering collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in the small and medium enterprise sector has remained scant. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of information technology on collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in Zimbabwe’s SME sector. Five research hypotheses were posited and sample data from 162 small and medium enterprise suppliers were collected and used to empirically test the hypotheses. The results of this study showed that information technology resources positively influenced small and medium enterprise suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and consequential relationship longevity with their buyers in a significant way. Overall, the current study findings provided tentative support to the proposition that information technology resources, collaborative communication and network governance should be recognised as significant antecedents for improved relationship longevity between suppliers and their buyers in the SME setting. Therefore, managers in the small and medium enterprise sector and small and medium enterprise owners need to pay attention to both collaborative communication and network governance in order to optimise information technology resource impact on their relationship longevity with their business counterparts. Limitations and future research directions were also indicated.

  15. Research and Collaboration Overview of Institut Pasteur International Network: A Bibliometric Approach toward Research Funding Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mostafavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Institut Pasteur International Network (IPIN, which includes 32 research institutes around the world, is a network of research and expertise to fight against infectious diseases. A scientometric approach was applied to describe research and collaboration activities of IPIN. Methods Publications were identified using a manual search of IPIN member addresses in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE between 2006 and 2011. Total publications were then subcategorized by geographic regions. Several scientometric indicators and the H-index were employed to estimate the scientific production of each IPIN member. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the IPIN members. Results A total number of 12667 publications originated from IPIN members. Each author produced an average number of 2.18 papers and each publication received an average of 13.40 citations. European Pasteur Institutes had the largest amount of publications, authored papers, and H-index values. Biochemistry and molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases were the most important research topics, respectively. Geographic mapping of IPIN publications showed wide international collaboration among IPIN members around the world. Conclusion IPIN has strong ties with national and international authorities and organizations to investigate the current and future health issues. It is recommended to use scientometric and collaboration indicators as measures of research performance in IPIN future policies and investment decisions.

  16. Integrated care: the impact of governmental behaviour on collaborative networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur-Veeman, I; van Raak, A; Paulus, A

    1999-11-01

    Integration of care is necessary to secure the most appropriate match of the individual demands and the organisational and professional supply. Although this is a basic assumption of all the people involved in health and social care, the magnitude and persistence of obstacles to integration is a common problem in most European countries. In this article, we will explore the role of the Dutch government in the complex interplay of forces around the development of integrated care, within networks of collaborating health and social care agencies. By analysing the behaviour of the Dutch government, we will argue that, in principle, the authorities can play a facilitating role here. For several reasons, however, the government appears not to be able to adequately stimulate the establishment of integrated care arrangements. Examples of such ineffective governmental behaviour are measures with contradictory effects and the adoption of a traditional public finance perspective of comprehensive planning. Our conclusion is that, where local networks play a dominant role in integrated care delivery, the most effective governmental steering should be tailored steering, including a mix of specific steering measures suitable to specific local circumstances, combined with more general steering measures, like financial stimuli, based on legislation.

  17. Framework of collaboration investigation on neutron effect on superconducting magnet materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Arata; Takeuchi, Takao; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Henmi, Tsutomu; Nishijima, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuo; Sato, Isamu; Kurisita, Hiroaki; Narui, Minoru; Shikama, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    A fusion reactor will generate D-T neutron and the kinetic energy of the neutron will be converted to the thermal energy and electrical energy. The neutron has huge energy and will be able to penetrate a shielding blanket and stream out of ports for neutral beam injections. The penetrated and streamed out neutrons will reach superconducting magnets and make some damages on the magnet system. To investigate the neutron irradiation effects on the superconducting magnet materials, a collaborative network must be organized and the irradiation researches must be performed. This report will describe the framework of the collaboration investigation which has been established among neutronics, superconducting magnet and fusion system. After showing the collaboration scheme, some new results on 14 MeV neutron irradiation effect are presented. Then, a three years new project which was adopted as one of 'Nuclear basic infrastructure strategy study initiatives' by MEXT will be introduced as an example of collaborative program among superconducting materials, fission reactor and high magnetic field technology. (author)

  18. Facilitative Components of Collaborative Learning: A Review of Nine Health Research Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Lisa; Rittner, Jessica Levin; Johnson, Karin E; Gerteis, Jessie; Miller, Therese

    2017-02-01

    Collaborative research networks are increasingly used as an effective mechanism for accelerating knowledge transfer into policy and practice. This paper explored the characteristics and collaborative learning approaches of nine health research networks. Semi-structured interviews with representatives from eight diverse US health services research networks conducted between November 2012 and January 2013 and program evaluation data from a ninth. The qualitative analysis assessed each network's purpose, duration, funding sources, governance structure, methods used to foster collaboration, and barriers and facilitators to collaborative learning. The authors reviewed detailed notes from the interviews to distill salient themes. Face-to-face meetings, intentional facilitation and communication, shared vision, trust among members and willingness to work together were key facilitators of collaborative learning. Competing priorities for members, limited funding and lack of long-term support and geographic dispersion were the main barriers to coordination and collaboration across research network members. The findings illustrate the importance of collaborative learning in research networks and the challenges to evaluating the success of research network functionality. Conducting readiness assessments and developing process and outcome evaluation metrics will advance the design and show the impact of collaborative research networks. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  19. Networking support for collaborative virtual reality projects in national, european and international context

    OpenAIRE

    Hommes, F.; Pless, E.

    2004-01-01

    The report describes experiences from networking support for two three years virtual reality projects. Networking requirements depending on the virtual reality environment and the planned distributed scenarios are specified and verified in the real network. Networking problems especially due to the collaborative, distributed character of interaction via the Internet are presented.

  20. A collaboration investigating endocannabinoid signalling in brain and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the psychoactive effects of cannabis preparations have led to the discovery of the endocannabinoid system. Interest in the central nervous system effects was initially the main focus of the research, but it soon became evident that the endocannabinoid system affects virtually every organ. The research field has therefore experienced a tremendous growth over the last decade and is now truly interdisciplinary. This short review provides a personal account of an interdisciplinary collaboration between Itai Bab from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the author. It describes the discovery of the endocannabinoid system in bone and the analysis of its functions. I am summarising the role of CB1 signalling as a modulator of sympathetic inhibition of bone formation. Thus, activation of CB1 receptors on sympathetic nerve terminals in bone, presumably from endocannabinoids released from apposing osteoblasts, reduces the inhibition of bone formation of sympathetic norepinephrine. CB2 receptors on osteoblasts and osteoclasts also modulate the proliferation and functions of these cells. Thus, activation of CB2 stimulates bone formation and represses bone resorption, whereas the genetic disruption of CB2 results in an osteoporosis-like phenotype. This signalling mechanism is clinically relevant, as shown by the association of polymorphisms in the CB2 receptor gene, CNR2, with bone density and osteoporosis. Finally, the review provides a summary of the recently discovered role of endocannabinoid signalling in one elongation. This review will also discuss the benefits of interdisciplinary and international collaborations.

  1. Green collaboration in cognitive radio cellular networks with roaming and spectrum trading

    KAUST Repository

    Sboui, Lokman

    2015-08-30

    In this paper, we propose a new cognitive cellular network architecture based on the coexistence of primary and secondary networks, (PN) and (SN), respectively. The PN aims to minimize its energy consumption by switching off the maximum number of its BSs and offloading its users to the SN\\'s infrastructure to maintain its QoS. In return, the PN pays a roaming price and permits the SN to share or lease the spectrum at a certain price. We propose a low-complexity algorithm allowing the PN to minimize its energy consumption by selecting a suboptimal combination of active base stations. Our algorithm also optimizes the resource allocation of the SN to maximize its total sum-rate while respecting the minimal profit constraints for both networks. In the numerical results, we show that our proposed algorithm achieves close performances to the optimal exhaustive search algorithm. In addition, we investigate the impact of various system parameters in the collaboration decision.

  2. How social network analysis can be used to monitor online collaborative learning and guide an informed intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqr, Mohammed; Fors, Uno; Tedre, Matti; Nouri, Jalal

    2018-01-01

    To ensure online collaborative learning meets the intended pedagogical goals (is actually collaborative and stimulates learning), mechanisms are needed for monitoring the efficiency of online collaboration. Various studies have indicated that social network analysis can be particularly effective in studying students' interactions in online collaboration. However, research in education has only focused on the theoretical potential of using SNA, not on the actual benefits they achieved. This study investigated how social network analysis can be used to monitor online collaborative learning, find aspects in need of improvement, guide an informed intervention, and assess the efficacy of intervention using an experimental, observational repeated-measurement design in three courses over a full-term duration. Using a combination of SNA-based visual and quantitative analysis, we monitored three SNA constructs for each participant: the level of interactivity, the role, and position in information exchange, and the role played by each participant in the collaboration. On the group level, we monitored interactivity and group cohesion indicators. Our monitoring uncovered a non-collaborative teacher-centered pattern of interactions in the three studied courses as well as very few interactions among students, limited information exchange or negotiation, and very limited student networks dominated by the teacher. An intervention based on SNA-generated insights was designed. The intervention was structured into five actions: increasing awareness, promoting collaboration, improving the content, preparing teachers, and finally practicing with feedback. Evaluation of the intervention revealed that it has significantly enhanced student-student interactions and teacher-student interactions, as well as produced a collaborative pattern of interactions among most students and teachers. Since efficient and communicative activities are essential prerequisites for successful content

  3. Spectrum-Based and Collaborative Network Topology Analysis and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianlin

    2013-01-01

    Networks are of significant importance in many application domains, such as World Wide Web and social networks, which often embed rich topological information. Since network topology captures the organization of network nodes and links, studying network topology is very important to network analysis. In this dissertation, we study networks by…

  4. CosmoQuest Collaborative: Galvanizing a Dynamic Professional Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Whitney; Bracey, Georgia; Buxner, Sanlyn; Gay, Pamela L.; Noel-Storr, Jacob; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-10-01

    The CosmoQuest Collaboration offers in-depth experiences to diverse audiences around the nation and the world through pioneering citizen science in a virtual research facility. An endeavor between universities, research institutes, and NASA centers, CosmoQuest brings together scientists, educators, researchers, programmers—and citizens of all ages—to explore and make sense of our solar system and beyond. Leveraging human networks to expand NASA science, scaffolded by an educational framework that inspires lifelong learners, CosmoQuest engages citizens in analyzing and interpreting real NASA data, inspiring questions and defining problems.The QuestionLinda Darling-Hammond calls for professional development to be: "focused on the learning and teaching of specific curriculum content [i.e. NGSS disciplinary core ideas]; organized around real problems of practice [i.e. NGSS science and engineering practices] … [and] connected to teachers' collaborative work in professional learning community...." (2012) In light of that, what is the unique role CosmoQuest's virtual research facility can offer NASA STEM education?A Few AnswersThe CosmoQuest Collaboration actively engages scientists in education, and educators (and learners) in science. CosmoQuest uses social channels to empower and expand NASA's learning community through a variety of media, including science and education-focused hangouts, virtual star parties, and social media. In addition to creating its own supportive, standards-aligned materials, CosmoQuest offers a hub for excellent resources and materials throughout NASA and the larger astronomy community.In support of CosmoQuest citizen science opportunities, CQ initiatives (Learning Space, S-ROSES, IDEASS, Educator Zone) will be leveraged and shared through the CQPLN. CosmoQuest can be present and alive in the awareness its growing learning community.Finally, to make the CosmoQuest PLN truly relevant, it aims to encourage partnerships between scientists

  5. Investigating the Effects of Peer to Peer Prompts on Collaborative Argumentation, Consensus and Perceived Efficacy in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, Owen M.; Hogan, Michael J.; Quinn, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    In a society which is calling for more productive modes of collaboration to address increasingly complex scientific and social issues, greater involvement of students in dialogue, and increased emphasis on collaborative discourse and argumentation, become essential modes of engagement and learning. This paper investigates the effects of…

  6. Hybrid E-Learning Tool TransLearning: Video Storytelling to Foster Vicarious Learning within Multi-Stakeholder Collaboration Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Marjoleine G.; Kupper, Frank; Beers, Pieter J.; Broerse, Jacqueline E. W.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning and storytelling approaches can support informal vicarious learning within geographically widely distributed multi-stakeholder collaboration networks. This case study evaluates hybrid e-learning and video-storytelling approach "TransLearning" by investigation into how its storytelling e-tool supported informal vicarious…

  7. Understanding the parents of children with special needs: collaboration between health, social and education networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, S; Freeman, A; Carrière, M; Beaupré, P; Gascon, H; Marier Deschênes, P

    2014-11-01

    In 2003, Quebec's Ministry of Health and Social Services (MSSS) and the Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports (MELS) concluded the Agreement for the complementarity of services between the health and social services network and the education network. The objectives of the current investigation were to evaluate the implementation of this Agreement and its impact upon renewal of practices and services, and to investigate the consequences for children with special needs and their families. The specific focus of this article is to describe parents' perspectives regarding the impact of this Agreement upon them and their children. Interviews were conducted with 56 parents of children with disabilities, social maladjustment or learning difficulties across the province of Quebec. Data were analysed using content analysis. Most parents were not directly aware of any contact between school staff and health or social professionals, although discussions might have been held without their knowledge. The intervention plans seemed to be the main vehicle through which some parents perceived collaboration to be occurring. For parents, the impact upon actual practices or collaborative work is either minimal or non-existent. School inclusion of children with special needs is a challenge for all societies. The Agreement illustrates the Quebec government's intent to promote an alliance between two complex networks and has the potential to greatly benefit children and their families. However, more concrete action is required in order to realize specific changes regarding work cohesion and service organization for these groups. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Enhancing Sensor Network Data Quality via Collaborated Circuit and Network Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Vespa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In many applications, the quality of data gathered by sensor networks is directly related to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the sensor data being transmitted in the networks. Different from the SNR that is often used in measuring the quality of communication links, the SNR used in this work measures how accurately the data in the network packets represent the physical parameters being sensed. Hence, the signal here refers to the physical parameters that are being monitored by sensor networks; the noise is due to environmental interference and circuit noises at sensor nodes, and packet loss during network transmission. While issues affecting SNR at sensor nodes have been intensively investigated, the impact of network packet loss on data SNR has not attracted significant attention in sensor network design. This paper investigates the impact of packet loss on sensor network data SNR and shows that data SNR is dramatically affected by network packet loss. A data quality metric, based on data SNR, is developed and a cross-layer adaptive scheme is presented to minimize data quality degradation in congested sensor networks. The proposed scheme consists of adaptive downsampling and bit truncation at sensor nodes and intelligent traffic management techniques at the network level. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  9. The Influence of Ethnic Diversity on Social Network Structure in a Common-Pool Resource System: Implications for Collaborative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Barnes-Mauthe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Social networks have recently been identified as key features in facilitating or constraining collaborative arrangements that can enhance resource governance and adaptability in complex social-ecological systems. Nonetheless, the effect of ethnicity on social network structure in an ethnically diverse common-pool resource system is virtually unknown. We characterize the entire social network of Hawaii's longline fishery, an ethnically diverse competitive pelagic fishery, and investigate network homophily, network structure, and cross-scale linkages. Results show that ethnicity significantly influences social network structure and is responsible for a homophily effect, which can create challenges for stakeholder collaboration across groups. Our analysis also suggests that ethnicity influences the formation of diverse network structures, and can affect the level of linkages to outside industry leaders, government or management officials, and members of the scientific community. This study provides the first empirical examination of the impact of ethnic diversity on resource user's social networks in the common-pool resource literature, having important implications for collaborative resource management.

  10. THE INFORMATIONAL SYSTEM FOR THE COLLABORATIVE LOGISTICS NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAIANA ŢARCĂ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an informatic system designed for collaborative logistic networks. The informational system is composed of structured informational modules that can easily be modified in order to facilitate the testing of the different algorithms that are being used. The informational system has two components, in the form of web application modules, which are connected to the user-specific modules (THE CLIENT WEB APPLICATION and to the server-specific modules (THE SERVER WEB APPLICATION, respectively. These two modules operate the transmission of information, the demands of the client and the offers generated by the server. The designed informational system has been tested in actual operating conditions, by co-optating ten EMSs from the Bihor county area. Some of the elements considered positive by the users, in the testing period, were: usability, the automatic assignment of a motor vehicle according to the characteristics of the product, the automatic route generation, the selection of goods according to the cluster “route” of the system.

  11. [Scientific production in clinical medicine and international collaboration networks in South American countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamaní, Charles; González A, Gregorio; Curioso, Walter H; Pacheco-Romero, José

    2012-04-01

    International collaboration is increasingly used in biomedical research. To describe the characteristics of scientific production in Latin America and the main international collaboration networks for the period 2000 to 2009. Search for papers generated in Latin American countries in the Clinical Medicine database of ISI Web of Knowledge v.4.10 - Current Contents Connect. The country of origin of the corresponding author was considered the producing country of the paper. International collaboration was analyzed calculating the number of countries that contributed to the generation of a particular paper. Collaboration networks were graphed to determine the centrality of each network. Twelve Latin American countries participated in the production of 253,362 papers. The corresponding author was South American in 79% of these papers. Sixteen percent of papers were on clinical medicine and 36% of these were carried out in collaboration. Brazil had the highest production (22,442 papers) and the lower percentage of international collaboration (31%). North America accounts for 63% of collaborating countries. Only 8% of collaboration is between South American countries. Brazil has the highest tendency to collaborate with other South American countries. Brazil is the South American country with the highest scientific production and indicators of centrality in South America. The most common collaboration networks are with North American countries.

  12. Investigating collaborative learning success with physiological coupling indices based on electrodermal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijeira-díaz, Hector; Drachsler, Hendrik; Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative learning is considered a critical 21st century skill. Much is known about its contribution to learning, but still investigating a process of collaboration remains a challenge. This paper approaches the investigation on collaborative learning from a psychophysiological perspective. An

  13. Change in science teaching behaviors: Evaluating the impact of a collaborative learning network at the level of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Teresa Mae

    This study reports the results of research designed to explore the impact of a science and technology collaborative network called the Kansas Collaborative Research Network (KanCRN) on the teaching practices of Kansas City, Kansas elementary and middle school science teachers. Research questions were developed around the theory that collaborative networks provide teachers the kind of support they need to create contexts conducive to change. Hence, research questions first dealt with determining whether teachers, who had participated in the network for two years, reported changes in their teaching practices. Subsequent questions asked teachers to describe these changes and to describe the role KanCRN played in the change process. Analysis, during the first phase of the investigation, was based on the KanCRN Teacher Practice Survey Data. Data analysis revealed that change in teacher practice had occurred. The second phase of the investigation sought to build a descriptive picture of the role KanCRN played in the change process. Interview data revealed that teachers described changes in their teaching practices concurrent with those specified by science education reform documents. KanCRN teachers also noted personal changes in pedagogical skill, and science content knowledge. These changes served as a catalyst for the behavioral changes cited. Moreover, teachers expressed changes in their views of the nature of science that also transferred to the types of classroom teaching behaviors now employed. Teachers credited network participation as the force behind the change. Teachers cited (a) challenging pedagogical and technological training, (b) interactive real world experiences with science content, (c) progressive technological tools and materials, and (d) personal guidance from mentors who respected and valued teachers as knowledgeable professionals critical for promoting change. One conclusion drawn from this study is that collaborative networks are capable on

  14. An Examination of Research Collaboration in Psychometrics Utilizing Social Network Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCrecchio, Nicole C.

    2016-01-01

    Co-authorship networks have been studied in many fields as a way to understand collaboration patterns. However, a comprehensive exploration of the psychometrics field has not been conducted. Also, few studies on co-author networks have included longitudinal analyses as well as data on the characteristics of authors in the network. Including both…

  15. A Social Network Analysis of Teaching and Research Collaboration in a Teachers' Virtual Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaofan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Qintai; Liu, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Analysing the structure of a social network can help us understand the key factors influencing interaction and collaboration in a virtual learning community (VLC). Here, we describe the mechanisms used in social network analysis (SNA) to analyse the social network structure of a VLC for teachers and discuss the relationship between face-to-face…

  16. Social network and decision-making in primates: a report on Franco-Japanese research collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Pelé, Marie

    2016-07-01

    Sociality is suggested to evolve as a strategy for animals to cope with challenges in their environment. Within a population, each individual can be seen as part of a network of social interactions that vary in strength, type and dynamics (Sueur et al. 2011a). The structure of this social network can strongly impact upon not only on the fitness of individuals and their decision-making, but also on the ecology of populations and the evolution of a species. Our Franco-Japanese collaboration allowed us to study social networks in several species (Japanese macaques, chimpanzees, colobines, etc.) and on different topics (social epidemiology, social evolution, information transmission). Individual attributes such as stress, rank or age can affect how individuals take decisions and the structure of the social network. This heterogeneity is linked to the assortativity of individuals and to the efficiency of the flow within a network. It is important, therefore, that this heterogeneity is integrated in the process or pattern under study in order to provide a better resolution of investigation and, ultimately, a better understanding of behavioural strategies, social dynamics and social evolution. How social information affects decision-making could be important to understand how social groups make collective decisions and how information may spread throughout the social group. In human beings, road-crossing behaviours in the presence of other individuals is a good way to study the influence of social information on individual behaviour and decision-making, for instance. Culture directly affects which information - personal vs social - individuals prefer to follow. Our collaboration contributed to the understanding of the relative influence of different factors, cultural and ecological, on primate, including human, sociality.

  17. Collaborative Networks Development Based on the Convergence of Strategic Axes for Increasing Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian NĂSTASE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and development of collaborative networks can be analyzed from different perspectives and different levels of complexity. Collaborative networks are formed and developed as a result of the strategic axes for increasing competitiveness. The dynamics and complexity of the business environment led to the innovation of business models and to the identification of new ways to capitalize the organizational potential. The main objective behind the emergence of collaborative networks is to capitalize on the organizational potential through collaboration. Organizational progress and economic development can be achieved through innovation, knowledge and transfer of knowledge and by making the best use of the organizations’ distinctive potentials in a collaborative and synergistic manner.

  18. Teacher Collaboration Network in Higher Education: Reflective Visions from Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu, Teresa; Guitert, Montse; Sangrà, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Online collaboration is a relevant teaching method and has become a priority in education and research. In addition, it is becoming an essential skill for teachers. Taking this fact into consideration, this study focuses on online collaboration from the teachers' perspective. The participants of our research develop their training activity in a…

  19. Robust collaborative services interactions under system crashes and network failures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Electronic collaboration has grown significantly in the last decade, with applications in many different areas such as shopping, trading, and logistics. Often electronic collaboration is based on automated business processes managed by different companies and connected through the Internet. Such a

  20. A Net Centric Collaborative Support System Concept: A Preliminary Investigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eggleston, Robert

    2004-01-01

    ... layer added to the information technology (IT) infrastructure. Design requirements for this layer of the collaborative interface are derived from principles of Cognitive Systems Engineering and characteristics of human expertise...

  1. Assessing the value of collaboration in tourism networks: A case study of Elkhart County, Indiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zach, Florian; Racherla, Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the determinants of perceived value derived from interorganizational collaborations in a tourism destination. The authors propose a theoretical model of perceived value drawing upon the rich stream of literature related to strategic collaborations and interorganizational...... networks. The model was tested using a cross section of tourism organizations operating within Elkhart County, Indiana. The results indicate that a significant positive value of collaboration is achieved from dyadic relationships. Importantly, the results suggest that the positive effect achieved from one...

  2. ePAL roadmap for active ageing: a collaborative networks approach to extending professional life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.; del Cura, A.; Playfoot, J.

    2010-01-01

    Active ageing, through a balanced combination of leisure and social interaction with continued work involvement, is central to meeting older citizens expectations, and maintaining their mental and physical health. Application of the collaborative networks paradigm, and the new generation of

  3. Fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model of interuniversity collaborative learning based on network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenhui, Ma; Yu, Wang

    2017-06-01

    Learning evaluation is an effective method, which plays an important role in the network education evaluation system. But most of the current network learning evaluation methods still use traditional university education evaluation system, which do not take into account of web-based learning characteristics, and they are difficult to fit the rapid development of interuniversity collaborative learning based on network. Fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method is used to evaluate interuniversity collaborative learning based on the combination of fuzzy theory and analytic hierarchy process. Analytic hierarchy process is used to determine the weight of evaluation factors of each layer and to carry out the consistency check. According to the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method, we establish interuniversity collaborative learning evaluation mathematical model. The proposed scheme provides a new thought for interuniversity collaborative learning evaluation based on network.

  4. Sci-Share: Social Networking Adapted for Distributed Scientific Collaboration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our goal is to develop a social networking site with novel, specially designed feature sets to enable simultaneous remote collaboration and sharing of large data...

  5. Network Patterns of Inventor Collaboration and Their Effects on Innovation Outputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonchang Hur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine how the collaboration structure among inventors in an R and D organization affects its capability to create impactful innovations. Specifically, this study is focused on examining whether a certain type of network mechanism found in collaboration among inventors contributes more to enhancing the future impacts of collaboration outputs, which is represented by the forward citations of their patents. To this end, co-invention networks for R and D organizations are constructed from an inventor-patent database, and the three structural patterns are measured by using network analytic constructs, namely, structural holes, strength of ties, and centralization. The results show that the presence of structural holes and strong ties are positively associated with the increasing forward citations, and that decentralized collaboration has also a positive impact. The findings offer support for both structural hole and network closure perspectives on social capital, which have been considered contradictive in the literature.

  6. Integrated production-distribution planning optimization models: A review in collaborative networks context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Andres

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in the area of collaborative networks are more and more aware of proposing collaborative approaches to address planning processes, due to the advantages associated when enterprises perform integrated planning models. Collaborative production-distribution planning, among the supply network actors, is considered a proper mechanism to support enterprises on dealing with uncertainties and dynamicity associated to the current markets. Enterprises, and especially SMEs, should be able to overcome the continuous changes of the market by increasing their agility. Carrying out collaborative planning allows enterprises to enhance their readiness and agility for facing the market turbulences. However, SMEs have limited access when incorporating optimization tools to deal with collaborative planning, reducing their ability to respond to the competition. The problem to solve is to provide SMEs affordable solutions to support collaborative planning. In this regard, new optimisation algorithms are required in order to improve the collaboration within the supply network partners. As part of the H2020 Cloud Collaborative Manufacturing Networks (C2NET research project, this paper presents a study on integrated production and distribution plans. The main objective of the research is to identify gaps in current optimization models, proposed to address integrated planning, taking into account the requirements and needs of the industry. Thus, the needs of the companies belonging to the industrial pilots, defined in the C2NET project, are identified; analysing how these needs are covered by the optimization models proposed in the literature, to deal with the integrated production-distribution planning.

  7. Optimizing Supply Chain Collaboration Based on Agreement Buyer-Supplier Relationship with Network Design Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Wahyudi Sutopo; Ayu Erliza; Arien Heryansyah

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the rising competitive environment with shorter product life cycles and high customization forces industries to increase their flexibility, speed up their response, and enhance concurrent engineering designs. To integrate these prospects, supply chain collaboration becomes a pertinent strategy for industries to strengthen their competitiveness. The network design problem is used to implement supply chain collaboration. In the buying and...

  8. HRM implications for network collaboration of small and medium sized companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    Collaboration in innovation networks is particularly important for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to remain competitive in a rapidly changing environment. Collaboration may however be particularly challenging for SMEs, due to their size and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper...

  9. Cognitive and Social Structure of the Elite Collaboration Network of Astrophysics: A Case Study on Shifting Network Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidler, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Scientific collaboration can only be understood along the epistemic and cognitive grounding of scientific disciplines. New scientific discoveries in astrophysics led to a major restructuring of the elite network of astrophysics. To study the interplay of the epistemic grounding and the social network structure of a discipline, a mixed-methods…

  10. Science collaboration networks in sociology and their general characteristics in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazar Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Science collaboration networks occupy an important place in the analysis of social networks. There are several directions of concern in this kind of research: one attempts to explain the structure of science collaboration networks, the second one analyses the invisible scientific communities and the third one is dealing with the problems of different citation forms which function as a base from which many of the conclusions concerning these networks are being derived. However, the results of recent research in science collaboration networks indicate that there are a number of idiosyncratic characteristics of collaboration networks in sociology. In the first part of the paper the author analyzes the results of previous research of sociological social networks, published in scientific papers available in the following databases: JSTOR, ScienceDirect and SpringerLink. The authors then proceeds with the analysis of social networks of sociologists in Serbia and gives guidelines of the first research project dedicated to the analysis of social networks in Serbia.

  11. Relevant problems in collaborative processes of non-hierarchical manufacturing networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Andrés

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify some of existing problems associated with collaboration among SMEs of the same network. Concretely, the problems are focused. The research objective is to identify the most relevant problems existing when SMEs have to deal with decentralized decisions (DDM. Design/methodology/approach: Through the literature review there have been collected collaborative problems caused by inter-organizational barriers. The approach taken is a qualitative study and analysis that classifies collaborative problems from less important to very important. In light of this, we are able to identify what are the most relevant problems to study in the NHN collaborative context. Findings and Originality/value: The developed methodology allows researchers to indentify amongst the collaborative problems those that are most relevant to solve in the NHN context, with the main aim of providing solutions in the future. The research aim is to provide the expert in the collaborative field a starting point to address the collaborative problems SMEs can find when belonging to collaborative networks. Research limitations/implications: Not all the problems that appear when an SME establish collaborative relationships, in a NHN, are considered. The identified problems have been arisen because there are discussed in the literature for addressing collaborative problems among networked partners. Identified problems are also considered because there are relevant to achieve collaboration among SMEs. Originality/value: The degree of coverage and the degree of significance is the taxonomy criteria used to identify the importance of solution degree of the encountered collaborative problems, in NHN context, in order to provide a future research of solutions to overcome them.

  12. Building collaboration through shared actions: The experience of the Global Network for Disaster Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Gibson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article asks how the emergent Global Network for Disaster Reduction has built collaboration and impact. Observation of the network’s journey nuanced the researcher’s initial hypothesis in marked ways. A ‘reflective practitioner’ perspective is adopted, locating action within two relevant theoretical frameworks to aid understanding and define future progress. Development showed an early emphasis on a ‘community of practice’ model. However, this appeared ineffective in creating the intended collaboration and led to the recognition of the power of shared action. This observation is framed within the thinking of Freire (1996 on action and reflection as a means of empowerment. The political dimension of the network’s activity is recognised, and is related to Gaventa’s (1980 thinking on the creation of political space. The article attempts to show that combining cycles of action and reflection in the network’s activity (i.e. creating a practitioner focus with a wider investigation of relevant literature and thinking can be helpful in framing understanding and determining future strategy. It concludes by suggesting that a proposed framework of ‘communities of praxis’ may have a broader application in the development of networks.

  13. Building collaboration through shared actions: The experience of the Global Network for Disaster Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Gibson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article asks how the emergent Global Network for Disaster Reduction has built collaboration and impact. Observation of the network’s journey nuanced the researcher’s initial hypothesis in marked ways. A ‘reflective practitioner’ perspective is adopted, locating action within two relevant theoretical frameworks to aid understanding and define future progress. Development showed an early emphasis on a ‘community of practice’ model. However, this appeared ineffective in creating the intended collaboration and led to the recognition of the power of shared action. This observation is framed within the thinking of Freire (1996 on action and reflection as a means of empowerment. The political dimension of the network’s activity is recognised, and is related to Gaventa’s (1980 thinking on the creation of political space. The article attempts to show that combining cycles of action and reflection in the network’s activity (i.e. creating a practitioner focus with a wider investigation of relevant literature and thinking can be helpful in framing understanding and determining future strategy. It concludes by suggesting that a proposed framework of ‘communities of praxis’ may have a broader application in the development of networks.

  14. International collaboration in science: The global map and the network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Wagner, C.S.; Park, H.W.; Adams, J.

    2013-01-01

    The network of international co-authorship relations has been dominated by certain European nations and the USA, but this network is rapidly expanding at the global level. Between 40 and 50 countries appear in the center of the international network in 2011, and almost all (201) nations are nowadays

  15. Cluster-based Dynamic Energy Management for Collaborative Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao-Wei Bi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A primary criterion of wireless sensor network is energy efficiency. Focused onthe energy problem of target tracking in wireless sensor networks, this paper proposes acluster-based dynamic energy management mechanism. Target tracking problem isformulated by the multi-sensor detection model as well as energy consumption model. Adistributed adaptive clustering approach is investigated to form a reasonable routingframework which has uniform cluster head distribution. Dijkstra’s algorithm is utilized toobtain optimal intra-cluster routing. Target position is predicted by particle filter. Thepredicted target position is adopted to estimate the idle interval of sensor nodes. Hence,dynamic awakening approach is exploited to prolong sleep time of sensor nodes so that theoperation energy consumption of wireless sensor network can be reduced. The sensornodes around the target wake up on time and act as sensing candidates. With the candidatesensor nodes and predicted target position, the optimal sensor node selection is considered.Binary particle swarm optimization is proposed to minimize the total energy consumptionduring collaborative sensing and data reporting. Experimental results verify that theproposed clustering approach establishes a low-energy communication structure while theenergy efficiency of wireless sensor networks is enhanced by cluster-based dynamic energymanagement.

  16. Interest in Collaborative, Practice-Based Research Networks in Pediatric Refugee Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sural; Yun, Katherine

    2018-02-01

    Over the last decade, approximately 200,000 refugee children have resettled across the United States. This population is dispersed, resulting in limited data. Collaborative research networks, where clinicians across distinct practice sites work together to answer research questions, can improve the evidence base regarding clinical care. We distributed a web-based survey to pediatric refugee providers around North America to assess priorities, perceived barriers and benefits to collaborative research. We recruited 57 participants. Of respondents, 89 % were interested in collaborative research, prioritizing: (1) access to health care (33 %), (2) mental health (24 %) and (3) nutrition/growth (24 %). Perceived benefits were "improving clinical practice" (98 %) and "raising awareness about the needs of pediatric refugees" (94 %). Perceived barriers were "too many other priorities" (89 %) and "lack of funding for data entry" (78 %). There is widespread interest in collaborative networks around pediatric refugee healthcare. A successful network will address barriers and emphasize priorities.

  17. The development of a network for community-based obesity prevention: the CO-OPS Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Community-based interventions are a promising approach and an important component of a comprehensive response to obesity. In this paper we describe the Collaboration of COmmunity-based Obesity Prevention Sites (CO-OPS Collaboration) in Australia as an example of a collaborative network to enhance the quality and quantity of obesity prevention action at the community level. The core aims of the CO-OPS Collaboration are to: identify and analyse the lessons learned from a range of community-based initiatives aimed at tackling obesity, and; to identify the elements that make community-based obesity prevention initiatives successful and share the knowledge gained with other communities. Methods Key activities of the collaboration to date have included the development of a set of Best Practice Principles and knowledge translation and exchange activities to promote the application (or use) of evidence, evaluation and analysis in practice. Results The establishment of the CO-OPS Collaboration is a significant step toward strengthening action in this area, by bringing together research, practice and policy expertise to promote best practice, high quality evaluation and knowledge translation and exchange. Future development of the network should include facilitation of further evidence generation and translation drawing from process, impact and outcome evaluation of existing community-based interventions. Conclusions The lessons presented in this paper may help other networks like CO-OPS as they emerge around the globe. It is important that networks integrate with each other and share the experience of creating these networks. PMID:21349185

  18. A New Collaborative Knowledge-Based Approach for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Canada-Bago

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new approach for collaboration among sensors in Wireless Sensor Networks. These networks are composed of a large number of sensor nodes with constrained resources: limited computational capability, memory, power sources, etc. Nowadays, there is a growing interest in the integration of Soft Computing technologies into Wireless Sensor Networks. However, little attention has been paid to integrating Fuzzy Rule-Based Systems into collaborative Wireless Sensor Networks. The objective of this work is to design a collaborative knowledge-based network, in which each sensor executes an adapted Fuzzy Rule-Based System, which presents significant advantages such as: experts can define interpretable knowledge with uncertainty and imprecision, collaborative knowledge can be separated from control or modeling knowledge and the collaborative approach may support neighbor sensor failures and communication errors. As a real-world application of this approach, we demonstrate a collaborative modeling system for pests, in which an alarm about the development of olive tree fly is inferred. The results show that knowledge-based sensors are suitable for a wide range of applications and that the behavior of a knowledge-based sensor may be modified by inferences and knowledge of neighbor sensors in order to obtain a more accurate and reliable output.

  19. Implementation of a Framework for Collaborative Social Networks in E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglajlic, Seid

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a framework for the construction and utilization of social networks in ELearning. These social networks aim to enhance collaboration between all E-Learning participants (i.e. both traineeto-trainee and trainee-to-tutor communication are targeted). E-Learning systems that include a so-called "social…

  20. Self-synchronization in networked teams : Initializing and monitoring interteam collaborations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezooijen, B.J.A. van; Essens, P.J.M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Networked teams do not only have to make decisions that are in line with the overall goal, but face additional problems because teams have to synchronize decisions and actions with other teams in the network, Experiments have demonstrated that training teams for collaborating with other teams

  1. [Co-authorship and collaboration networks in Spanish research into multiple sclerosis (1996-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Alonso-Arroyo, A; Gonzalez de Dios, J; Sempere, A P; Castello-Cogollos, L; Bolanos-Pizarro, M; Valderrama-Zurian, J C

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Scientific collaboration is vital for to the advance of knowledge and is especially important in health sciences. The aim of this study is to identify scientific collaboration indicators and co-authorship networks of researchers and Spanish institutions that publish on multiple sclerosis (MS) during the period 1996-2010. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The analyzed papers were obtained from Web of Science and Scopus international databases, and IBECS and IME national databases, applying specific search profiles in each one of them. In order to identify collaboration networks all signed papers were quantified and co-authored measures were obtained, as the different indexes, degree, intermediation and closeness. RESULTS. 1,613 articles were published in the period 1996-2010, 92% of them in collaboration. With 10 or more works signed in collaboration, 20 Spanish research groups in MS were identified. 64.23% of the papers were published in collaboration between Spanish institutions, and 33.85% were in collaboration with foreign institutions. The institutional participation analysis has identified a large network of institutional partnerships that integrates 27 institutions, with the Hospital Vall d'Hebron in a central position. International collaboration is headed by the U.S. and European countries, most notably the UK and Italy. CONCLUSION. The most collaborative authors, institutions, and work groups in Spanish research in MS have been identified. Despite these indicators that characterize the collaboration in this area, it is necessary to enhance cooperation between them, since this collaboration is positively related to the quality and impact of research and publications.

  2. The world network of scientific collaborations between cities: domestic or international dynamics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisonobe, M.; Eckert, D.; Grossetti, M.; Jégou, L.; Milard, B.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier publication (Grossetti et al., 2014) has established that we are attending a decreasing concentration of scientific activities within “world-cities”. Given that more and more cities and countries are contributing to the world production of knowledge, this article analyzes the evolution of the world network of collaborations both at the domestic and international levels during the 2000s. Using data from the Science Citation Index Expanded, scientific authors’ addresses are geo-localized and grouped by urban areas. Our data suggests that interurban collaborations within countries have increased together with international linkages. In most countries, domestic collaborations have increased faster than international collaborations. Even among the top collaborating cities, sometimes referred to as “world cities”, the share of domestic collaborations is gaining momentum. Our results suggest that, contrary to common beliefs about the globalization process, national systems of research have been strengthening during the 2000s. (Author)

  3. Dynamic robustness of knowledge collaboration network of open source product development community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2018-01-01

    As an emergent innovative design style, open source product development communities are characterized by a self-organizing, mass collaborative, networked structure. The robustness of the community is critical to its performance. Using the complex network modeling method, the knowledge collaboration network of the community is formulated, and the robustness of the network is systematically and dynamically studied. The characteristics of the network along the development period determine that its robustness should be studied from three time stages: the start-up, development and mature stages of the network. Five kinds of user-loss pattern are designed, to assess the network's robustness under different situations in each of these three time stages. Two indexes - the largest connected component and the network efficiency - are used to evaluate the robustness of the community. The proposed approach is applied in an existing open source car design community. The results indicate that the knowledge collaboration networks show different levels of robustness in different stages and different user loss patterns. Such analysis can be applied to provide protection strategies for the key users involved in knowledge dissemination and knowledge contribution at different stages of the network, thereby promoting the sustainable and stable development of the open source community.

  4. Network-based collaborative research environment LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, B.R.; McDonald, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Virtual Collaborative Environment (VCE) and Distributed Collaborative Workbench (DCW) are new technologies that make it possible for diverse users to synthesize and share mechatronic, sensor, and information resources. Using these technologies, university researchers, manufacturers, design firms, and others can directly access and reconfigure systems located throughout the world. The architecture for implementing VCE and DCW has been developed based on the proposed National Information Infrastructure or Information Highway and a tool kit of Sandia-developed software. Further enhancements to the VCE and DCW technologies will facilitate access to other mechatronic resources. This report describes characteristics of VCE and DCW and also includes background information about the evolution of these technologies.

  5. Collaborating on Facebook: Teachers Exchanging Experiences Through Social Networking Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Cunha Júnior F.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the use of Facebook for educational purposes, as a collaborative online space for enabling communication among teachers from different schools. The article describes how a group of 43 teachers on Facebook, from various schools in the southeast region of Brazil used a group on Facebook as a collaborative space for communicating among each other. On the group, these teachers shared experiences about the use of digital technologies in their secondary education classes. This study is based on Cultural Historical Activity Theory, considering the group on Facebook as a tool for mediating communication . The objective of this study is to explore why and how teachers collaborated with each other on Facebook, and to study how communication among them evolved in the process. We examined the posts on that group from 2012 to 2014, and two questionnaires responded online by the teachers in June 2012 and in December 2013. Our findings suggest that teachers tend to critically collaborate in smaller groups and that further online communication evolved outside the group of teachers, with the creation of smaller groups on Facebook inside their schools.

  6. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Research Productivity and Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Akers, Kathryn S.; Lybarger, Melanie A.; Zakrajsek, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity and collaborations are essential aspects of advancing academia. Publishing is a critical mechanism in higher education to allow faculty members to share new information in all disciplinary fields. Due to its importance, scholarly work is often heavily considered for promotion, tenure, compensation, and other merit decisions.…

  7. Collaborative Caregiving: Parlerai Connects the Network of Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Kristin and Jon Erickson know that communication and collaboration are key to success. As the parents of Karly, a child with special needs, the Ericksons experienced first-hand the trials and tribulations that go along with managing the care of a person with disabilities. They found themselves frustrated by a lack of available tools for parents…

  8. Collaborative Wireless Sensor Networks in Industrial and Business Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Perianu, Mihai

    2008-01-01

    Personal computers, mobile telephony and the Internet made the vision of everyone being networked real, at such a level of quality and speed that people could only dream of, one hundred years ago. Nowadays, another dream starts to become reality: the dream of networking everything. The limits of

  9. Nurturing Global Collaboration and Networked Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Catherine; Cochrane, Thomas; Gordon, Averill

    2016-01-01

    We consider the principles of communities of practice (CoP) and networked learning in higher education, illustrated with a case study. iCollab has grown from an international community of practice connecting students and lecturers in seven modules across seven higher education institutions in six countries, to a global network supporting the…

  10. How social network analysis can be used to monitor online collaborative learning and guide an informed intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Uno; Tedre, Matti; Nouri, Jalal

    2018-01-01

    To ensure online collaborative learning meets the intended pedagogical goals (is actually collaborative and stimulates learning), mechanisms are needed for monitoring the efficiency of online collaboration. Various studies have indicated that social network analysis can be particularly effective in studying students’ interactions in online collaboration. However, research in education has only focused on the theoretical potential of using SNA, not on the actual benefits they achieved. This study investigated how social network analysis can be used to monitor online collaborative learning, find aspects in need of improvement, guide an informed intervention, and assess the efficacy of intervention using an experimental, observational repeated-measurement design in three courses over a full-term duration. Using a combination of SNA-based visual and quantitative analysis, we monitored three SNA constructs for each participant: the level of interactivity, the role, and position in information exchange, and the role played by each participant in the collaboration. On the group level, we monitored interactivity and group cohesion indicators. Our monitoring uncovered a non-collaborative teacher-centered pattern of interactions in the three studied courses as well as very few interactions among students, limited information exchange or negotiation, and very limited student networks dominated by the teacher. An intervention based on SNA-generated insights was designed. The intervention was structured into five actions: increasing awareness, promoting collaboration, improving the content, preparing teachers, and finally practicing with feedback. Evaluation of the intervention revealed that it has significantly enhanced student-student interactions and teacher-student interactions, as well as produced a collaborative pattern of interactions among most students and teachers. Since efficient and communicative activities are essential prerequisites for successful content

  11. Network collaboration of organizations for homeless individuals in the Montreal region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Fleury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We know little about the intensity and determinants of interorganisational collaboration within the homeless network. This study describes the characteristics and relationships (along with the variables predicting their degree of interorganisational collaboration of 68 organisations of such a network in Montreal (Quebec, Canada. Theory and methods: Data were collected primarily through a self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive analyses were conducted followed by social network and multivariate analyses. Results: The Montreal homeless network has a high density (50.5% and a decentralised structure and maintains a mostly informal collaboration with the public and cross-sectorial sectors. The network density showed more frequent contacts among four types of organisations which could point to the existence of cliques. Four variables predicted interorganisational collaboration: organisation type, number of services offered, volume of referrals and satisfaction with the relationships with public organisations. Conclusions and discussion: The Montreal homeless network seems adequate to address non-complex homelessness problems. Considering, however, that most homeless individuals present chronic and complex profiles, it appears necessary to have a more formal and better integrated network of homeless organisations, particularly in the health and social service sectors, in order to improve services.

  12. A small world of citations? The influence of collaboration networks on citation practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Wallace

    Full Text Available This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of references and the social sciences (20%, the same cannot be said for citations to authors who are members of the co-author network. Differences between fields and trends over time lie not only in the degree of co-authorship which defines the large-scale topology of the collaboration network, but also in the referencing practices within a given discipline, computed by defining a propensity to cite at a given distance within the collaboration network. Overall, there is little tendency to cite those nearby in the collaboration network, excluding direct self-citations. These results are interpreted in terms of small-scale structure, field-specific citation practices, and the value of local co-author networks for the production of knowledge and for the accumulation of symbolic capital. Given the various levels of integration between co-authors, our findings shed light on the question of the availability of 'arm's length' expert reviewers of grant applications and manuscripts.

  13. A small world of citations? The influence of collaboration networks on citation practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Matthew L; Larivière, Vincent; Gingras, Yves

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers) is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of references) and the social sciences (20%), the same cannot be said for citations to authors who are members of the co-author network. Differences between fields and trends over time lie not only in the degree of co-authorship which defines the large-scale topology of the collaboration network, but also in the referencing practices within a given discipline, computed by defining a propensity to cite at a given distance within the collaboration network. Overall, there is little tendency to cite those nearby in the collaboration network, excluding direct self-citations. These results are interpreted in terms of small-scale structure, field-specific citation practices, and the value of local co-author networks for the production of knowledge and for the accumulation of symbolic capital. Given the various levels of integration between co-authors, our findings shed light on the question of the availability of 'arm's length' expert reviewers of grant applications and manuscripts.

  14. Do learning collaboratives strengthen communication? A comparison of organizational team communication networks over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C; Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca

    Collaborative learning models were designed to support quality improvements, such as innovation implementation by promoting communication within organizational teams. Yet the effect of collaborative learning approaches on organizational team communication during implementation is untested. The aim of this study was to explore change in communication patterns within teams from children's mental health organizations during a year-long learning collaborative focused on implementing a new treatment. We adopt a social network perspective to examine intraorganizational communication within each team and assess change in (a) the frequency of communication among team members, (b) communication across organizational hierarchies, and (c) the overall structure of team communication networks. A pretest-posttest design compared communication among 135 participants from 21 organizational teams at the start and end of a learning collaborative. At both time points, participants were asked to list the members of their team and rate the frequency of communication with each along a 7-point Likert scale. Several individual, pair-wise, and team level communication network metrics were calculated and compared over time. At the individual level, participants reported communicating with more team members by the end of the learning collaborative. Cross-hierarchical communication did not change. At the team level, these changes manifested differently depending on team size. In large teams, communication frequency increased, and networks grew denser and slightly less centralized. In small teams, communication frequency declined, growing more sparse and centralized. Results suggest that team communication patterns change minimally but evolve differently depending on size. Learning collaboratives may be more helpful for enhancing communication among larger teams; thus, managers might consider selecting and sending larger staff teams to learning collaboratives. This study highlights key future

  15. Multidisciplinary Collaboration in Professional Networks for PD A Mixed-Method Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Eijk, Martijn; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Nijhuis, Frouke A P; Koetsenruijter, Jan; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Munneke, Marten; Wensing, Michel; Faber, Marjan J

    2015-01-01

    ParkinsonNet, a nationwide organization with regionally oriented professional health networks in TheNetherlands, aims to improve the quality of Parkinson care. Facilitation of multidisciplinary collaboration is a key objective of ParkinsonNet. This study examined whether the concept enhances multidisciplinary collaboration between healthcare professionals involved in Parkinson care. A regional network involving 101 healthcare professionals was newly established. Participants received two questionnaires. One aimed at documenting direct working relationships ('connections') between professionals and the other aimed at evaluating multidisciplinary team performance. Additionally, thirteen healthcare professionals were interviewed to identify barriers and facilitators for multidisciplinary collaboration. 'Social network analysis' focused on sub-networks around three community hospitals at baseline and one year after the implementation. The number of 'knowing each other' connections increased from 1431 to 2175 (52% , p professional contact' connections increased from 664 to 891 (34% , p networks were found, positive changes being associated with a central role of neurologists and nurse specialists committed to multidisciplinary care. The perceived team performance did not change. Participants experienced problems with information exchange and interdisciplinary communication. Generally, participants were unaware of other healthcare professionals involved in individual patients and what treatments they provide simultaneously. ParkinsonNet partially enhanced multidisciplinary collaboration between healthcare professionals involved in Parkinson care. Crucial facilitators of this were a central role of nurse specialists and the commitment to collaborate with and refer to expert therapists among neurologists. Additional measures are needed to further improve multidisciplinary care across different institutions and around individual patients.

  16. International R&D collaboration networks and free trade agreements

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hua Sheng

    2006-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the analysis of optimal industrial and strategic trade policy in the presence of oligopoly and other forms of imperfect competition, so as to make contact with important empirical regularities and policy concerns, such as international R&D collaboration, unionization and free trade. First, in the context of international competition in which R&D plays an important role, we study the consequences of allowing governments to subsidize R&D and coalition devi...

  17. Digital network of writers helps to foster spirit of collaboration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Klimas, J

    2015-07-29

    Nurse Liz Charalambous has shown how a Facebook group can help boost writing (careers, June 3). We would like to take this idea one step further and argue that, contrary to a commonly held notion, \\'too many cooks do not spoil the broth\\' when it comes to group writing. Instead, this approach fosters collaboration between writers, as Ms Charalambous suggests, and which has also been our experience.

  18. Feedback Models for Collaboration and Trust in Crisis Response Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hudgens, Bryan J; Bordetsky, Alex

    2008-01-01

    .... Coordination within disaster response networks is difficult for several reasons, including the chaotic nature of the crisis, a need for the various organizations to balance shared goals (crisis amelioration...

  19. Collaboration Networks in the Brazilian Scientific Output in Evolutionary Biology: 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Dirce M; Vanz, Samile A S; Stumpf, Ida R C

    2016-03-01

    This article analyzes the existing collaboration networks in the Brazilian scientific output in Evolutionary Biology, considering articles published during the period from 2000 to 2012 in journals indexed by Web of Science. The methodology integrates bibliometric techniques and Social Network Analysis resources to describe the growth of Brazilian scientific output and understand the levels, dynamics and structure of collaboration between authors, institutions and countries. The results unveil an enhancement and consolidation of collaborative relationships over time and suggest the existence of key institutions and authors, whose influence on research is expressed by the variety and intensity of the relationships established in the co-authorship of articles. International collaboration, present in more than half of the publications, is highly significant and unusual in Brazilian science. The situation indicates the internationalization of scientific output and the ability of the field to take part in the science produced by the international scientific community.

  20. Collaboration Networks in the Brazilian Scientific Output in Evolutionary Biology: 2000-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce M. Santin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the existing collaboration networks in the Brazilian scientific output in Evolutionary Biology, considering articles published during the period from 2000 to 2012 in journals indexed by Web of Science. The methodology integrates bibliometric techniques and Social Network Analysis resources to describe the growth of Brazilian scientific output and understand the levels, dynamics and structure of collaboration between authors, institutions and countries. The results unveil an enhancement and consolidation of collaborative relationships over time and suggest the existence of key institutions and authors, whose influence on research is expressed by the variety and intensity of the relationships established in the co-authorship of articles. International collaboration, present in more than half of the publications, is highly significant and unusual in Brazilian science. The situation indicates the internationalization of scientific output and the ability of the field to take part in the science produced by the international scientific community.

  1. E-Center: A Collaborative Platform for Wide Area Network Users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, M; DeMar, P; Tierney, B; Lake, A; Metzger, J; Frey, M; Calyam, P

    2012-01-01

    The E-Center is a social collaborative web-based platform for assisting network users in understanding network conditions across network paths of interest to them. It is designed to give a user the necessary tools to isolate, identify, and resolve network performance-related problems. E-Center provides network path information on a link-by-link level, as well as from an end-to-end perspective. In addition to providing current and recent network path data, E-Center is intended to provide a social media environment for them to share issues, ideas, concerns, and problems. The product has a modular design that accommodates integration of other network services that make use of the same network path and performance data.

  2. PeerShield: determining control and resilience criticality of collaborative cyber assets in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Hasan

    2012-06-01

    As attackers get more coordinated and advanced in cyber attacks, cyber assets are required to have much more resilience, control effectiveness, and collaboration in networks. Such a requirement makes it essential to take a comprehensive and objective approach for measuring the individual and relative performances of cyber security assets in network nodes. To this end, this paper presents four techniques as to how the relative importance of cyber assets can be measured more comprehensively and objectively by considering together the main variables of risk assessment (e.g., threats, vulnerabilities), multiple attributes (e.g., resilience, control, and influence), network connectivity and controllability among collaborative cyber assets in networks. In the first technique, a Bayesian network is used to include the random variables for control, recovery, and resilience attributes of nodes, in addition to the random variables of threats, vulnerabilities, and risk. The second technique shows how graph matching and coloring can be utilized to form collaborative pairs of nodes to shield together against threats and vulnerabilities. The third technique ranks the security assets of nodes by incorporating multiple weights and thresholds of attributes into a decision-making algorithm. In the fourth technique, the hierarchically well-separated tree is enhanced to first identify critical nodes of a network with respect to their attributes and network connectivity, and then selecting some nodes as driver nodes for network controllability.

  3. Managing cancer care through service delivery networks: The role of professional collaboration in two European cancer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, Joan; Morando, Verdiana; Tozzi, Valeria D; Verhoeven, Didier; Germà, Jose R; Borras, Josep M

    2017-01-01

    Background The study examines two meso-strategic cancer networks, exploring to what extent collaboration can strengthen or hamper network effectiveness. Unlike macro-strategic networks, meso-strategic networks have no hierarchical governance structures nor are they institutionalised within healthcare services' delivery systems. This study aims to analyse the models of professional cooperation and the tools developed for managing clinical practice within two meso-strategic, European cancer networks. Methods Multiple case study design based on the comparative analysis of two cancer networks: Iridium, in Antwerp, Belgium and the Institut Català d'Oncologia in Catalonia, Spain. The case studies applied mixed methods, with qualitative research based on semi-structured interviews ( n = 35) together with case-site observation and material collection. Results The analysis identified four levels of collaborative intensity within medical specialties as well as in multidisciplinary settings, which became both platforms for crosscutting clinical work between hubs' experts and local care teams and the levers for network-based tools development. The organisation of clinical practice relied on professional-based cooperative processes and tiers, lacking vertical integration mechanisms. Conclusions The intensity of professional linkages largely shaped the potential of meso-strategic cancer networks to influence clinical practice organisation. Conversely, the introduction of managerial techniques or network governance structures, without introducing vertical hierarchies, was found to be critical solutions.

  4. Herbivory Network: An international, collaborative effort to study herbivory in Arctic and alpine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, I. C.; Hik, D. S.; Jónsdóttir, I. S.; Bueno, C. G.; Mörsdorf, M. A.; Ravolainen, V. T.

    2016-09-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are central to the functioning of tundra ecosystems, but their outcomes vary over space and time. Accurate forecasting of ecosystem responses to ongoing environmental changes requires a better understanding of the processes responsible for this heterogeneity. To effectively address this complexity at a global scale, coordinated research efforts, including multi-site comparisons within and across disciplines, are needed. The Herbivory Network was established as a forum for researchers from Arctic and alpine regions to collaboratively investigate the multifunctional role of herbivores in these changing ecosystems. One of the priorities is to integrate sites, methodologies, and metrics used in previous work, to develop a set of common protocols and design long-term geographically-balanced, coordinated experiments. The implementation of these collaborative research efforts will also improve our understanding of traditional human-managed systems that encompass significant portions of the sub-Arctic and alpine areas worldwide. A deeper understanding of the role of herbivory in these systems under ongoing environmental changes will guide appropriate adaptive strategies to preserve their natural values and related ecosystem services.

  5. From continuous improvement to collaborative improvement: scope, scale, skill and social networking in collaborative improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, H.G.A.; Groen, Arend J.; Fisscher, O.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    More than ever, companies are challenged to improve their performance and respond quickly and accurately to changes within the market. As competitive battlefield is moving towards the level of networks of organisations, the individual firm is an inadequate entity for identifying improvements.

  6. Learning through Online Collaboration by SME Staff: A Scoping Investigation into Likely Team-Role Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, John; Lawless, Naomi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to research the stress caused to small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) staff by online collaboration. It aims to investigate online team roles as possible stressors. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper is based on research carried out on online collaborative teams by the authors in the Open University…

  7. The Communications and Networks Collaborative Technology Alliance Publication Network: A Case Study on Graph and Simplicial Complex Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Sethi 19 Yingbo Hua 0.2249 Kyriakos Manousakis 0.0891 19 Errol L Lloyd 18 Zhengyuan Xu 0.2249 Youngchul Sung 0.0869 20 Latha Kant 17 M Ghogho 0.2243...an innate feature of small world networks. 48 5. References and Notes 1. ARL: Collaborative Alliances: Completed CTAs. Adelphi (MD): United States Army

  8. A cloud collaborative medical image platform oriented by social network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Frederico B.; Araújo, Luciano V.; Nunes, Fátima L. S.

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis systems using medical images and three-dimensional models as input data have greatly expanded and developed, but in terms of building suitable image databases to assess them, the challenge remains. Although there are some image databases available for this purpose, they are generally limited to certain types of exams or contain a limited number of medical cases. The objective of this work is to present the concepts and the development of a collaborative platform for sharing medical images and three-dimensional models, providing a resource to share and increase the number of images available for researchers. The collaborative cloud platform, called CATALYZER, aims to increase the availability and sharing of graphic objects, including 3D images, and their reports that are essential for research related to medical images. A survey conducted with researchers and health professionals indicated that this could be an innovative approach in the creation of medical image databases, providing a wider variety of cases together with a considerable amount of shared information among its users.

  9. City networks collaboration and planning for health and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Migdalas, Athanasios; Rassia, Stamatina; Pardalos, Panos

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable development within urban and rural areas, transportation systems, logistics, supply chain management, urban health, social services, and architectural design are taken into consideration in the cohesive network models provided in this book. The ideas, methods, and models presented consider city landscapes and quality of life conditions based on mathematical network models and optimization. Interdisciplinary Works from prominent researchers in mathematical modeling, optimization, architecture, engineering, and physics are featured in this volume to promote health and well-being through design.   Specific topics include: -          Current technology that form the basis of future living in smart cities -          Interdisciplinary design and networking of large-scale urban systems  -          Network communication and route traffic optimization -          Carbon dioxide emission reduction -          Closed-loop logistics chain management and operation ...

  10. Ciência & Saúde Coletiva: scientific production analysis and collaborative research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Norma; Provedel, Attilio; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this metric and descriptive study was to identify the most productive authors and their collaborative research networks from articles published in Ciência & Saúde Coletiva between, 2005, and 2014. Authors meeting the cutoff criteria of at least 10 articles were considered the most productive authors. VOSviewer and Network Workbench technologies were applied for visual representations of collaborative research networks involving the most productive authors in the period. Initial analysis recovered 2511 distinct articles, with 8920 total authors with an average of 3.55 authors per article. Author analysis revealed 6288 distinct authors, 24 of these authors were identified as the most productive. These 24 authors generated 287 articles with an average of 4.31 authors per article, and represented 8 separate collaborative partnerships, the largest of which had 14 authors, indicating a significant degree of collaboration among these authors. This analysis provides a visual representation of networks of knowledge development in public health and demonstrates the usefulness of VOSviewer and Network Workbench technologies in future research.

  11. [Co-authorship and Spanish pediatric scientific collaboration networks (2006-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre Benavent, R; González de Dios, J; Alonso Arroyo, A; Bolaños Pizarro, M; Castelló Cogollos, L; González Alcaide, G; Vidal Infer, A; Navarro Molina, C; Coronado Ferrer, S; González Muñoz, M; Málaga Guerrero, S

    2013-06-01

    Scientific collaboration is very important, as it is the basis of the scientific development of every discipline. The aim of this paper is to identify the indicators of scientific collaboration and co-authorship networks of Spanish researchers and institutions publishing in national and international paediatric, multidisciplinary or other knowledge areas journals during the period 2006-2010. The papers studied were obtained from the databases including, Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus, Índice Médico Español and Índice Bibliográfico Español en Ciencias de la Salud, by means of applying different search profiles. All the papers signed by co-authors were quantified in order to identify the authorship and institutional collaboration networks. Furthermore the degree, betweenness index, and closeness index were obtained as a measurement of the structural analysis. Co-authorships were represented graphically by the network analysis and display software Pajek. A total of 7971 articles were published during the period 2006-2010, with 90.55% completed in collaboration. Using a threshold of 10 or more co-authorships, 77 research groups in Pediatrics were identified. Most papers were published in collaboration between institutions of the same Autonomous Community (42.28%), and 14.84% with international collaboration. The analysis of institutional participation enabled a large nucleus or institutional collaboration network to be identified, with 52 linked institutions. International collaboration was led by the USA and European countries, such as United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. Authors, institutions and the most active working groups in Spanish pediatrics were identified, which is very interesting information to establish contacts to increase the existing networks, to prevent redundancies, and to take advantage of the new emerging groups. It is necessary to promote the collaboration of Spanish researchers, especially with their international colleagues, since a

  12. A Collaboration-Oriented M2M Messaging Mechanism for the Collaborative Automation between Machines in Future Industrial Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaozong; Wu, Zhipeng; Gray, John

    2017-11-22

    Machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is a key enabling technology for industrial internet of things (IIoT)-empowered industrial networks, where machines communicate with one another for collaborative automation and intelligent optimisation. This new industrial computing paradigm features high-quality connectivity, ubiquitous messaging, and interoperable interactions between machines. However, manufacturing IIoT applications have specificities that distinguish them from many other internet of things (IoT) scenarios in machine communications. By highlighting the key requirements and the major technical gaps of M2M in industrial applications, this article describes a collaboration-oriented M2M (CoM2M) messaging mechanism focusing on flexible connectivity and discovery, ubiquitous messaging, and semantic interoperability that are well suited for the production line-scale interoperability of manufacturing applications. The designs toward machine collaboration and data interoperability at both the communication and semantic level are presented. Then, the application scenarios of the presented methods are illustrated with a proof-of-concept implementation in the PicknPack food packaging line. Eventually, the advantages and some potential issues are discussed based on the PicknPack practice.

  13. A Collaboration-Oriented M2M Messaging Mechanism for the Collaborative Automation between Machines in Future Industrial Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaozong Meng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Machine-to-machine (M2M communication is a key enabling technology for industrial internet of things (IIoT-empowered industrial networks, where machines communicate with one another for collaborative automation and intelligent optimisation. This new industrial computing paradigm features high-quality connectivity, ubiquitous messaging, and interoperable interactions between machines. However, manufacturing IIoT applications have specificities that distinguish them from many other internet of things (IoT scenarios in machine communications. By highlighting the key requirements and the major technical gaps of M2M in industrial applications, this article describes a collaboration-oriented M2M (CoM2M messaging mechanism focusing on flexible connectivity and discovery, ubiquitous messaging, and semantic interoperability that are well suited for the production line-scale interoperability of manufacturing applications. The designs toward machine collaboration and data interoperability at both the communication and semantic level are presented. Then, the application scenarios of the presented methods are illustrated with a proof-of-concept implementation in the PicknPack food packaging line. Eventually, the advantages and some potential issues are discussed based on the PicknPack practice.

  14. The North Texas aerospace manufacturing and aviation industries: An explanatory case study of school-to-work collaborative networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia Ann

    The purpose of this study is to explore how educators, business partners and facilitators developed ties or networks to initiate a school-to-work collaboration to prepare students for jobs and careers in the aerospace manufacturing and aviation industries. There is growing concern about preparing a future workforce supply in these industries in North Texas. Workforce projections call for 8000 additional jobs between 2010 and 2020 (North Central Texas Council of Governments, 2013). Collaboration is recognized as a valuable asset to connect disjointed segments within the K-16 trajectory. This study explores the contradiction between the stated need for collaborative strategies and the inability of stakeholders attempting to collaborate across organizational and institutional boundaries to sustain these connections. Through the lens of networking theory, the roles of facilitators and the operation of networks and ties between and among partners are investigated. Ten participants in a high school curriculum development project were interviewed, representing a business, community college, and K-12 education. Data analysis revealed findings associated with three major themes: facilitation, project activity and relationships. Nine individuals were identified as facilitators, and facilitators were perceived as helping the project move forward. Project activity benefited from the structured curriculum development process. Although relationships characterized by strong ties helped start the project, weak ties predominated among project participants. Implications for theory include the need for more knowledge about facilitator roles and group dynamics. Further research about the functioning of weak and strong ties and facilitator skill sets relating to collaborative leadership would be valuable. Implications for practice include capturing lessons learned to apply to other industries, and overtly acknowledging the existence and importance of facilitators.

  15. Advanced wireless mobile collaborative sensing network for tactical and strategic missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, an advanced wireless mobile collaborative sensing network will be developed. Through properly combining wireless sensor network, emerging mobile robots and multi-antenna sensing/communication techniques, we could demonstrate superiority of developed sensing network. To be concrete, heterogeneous mobile robots including unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) are equipped with multi-model sensors and wireless transceiver antennas. Through real-time collaborative formation control, multiple mobile robots can team the best formation that can provide most accurate sensing results. Also, formatting multiple mobile robots can also construct a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication system that can provide a reliable and high performance communication network.

  16. Cross-Dependency Inference in Multi-Layered Networks: A Collaborative Filtering Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Tong, Hanghang; Xie, Lei; Ying, Lei; He, Qing

    2017-08-01

    The increasingly connected world has catalyzed the fusion of networks from different domains, which facilitates the emergence of a new network model-multi-layered networks. Examples of such kind of network systems include critical infrastructure networks, biological systems, organization-level collaborations, cross-platform e-commerce, and so forth. One crucial structure that distances multi-layered network from other network models is its cross-layer dependency, which describes the associations between the nodes from different layers. Needless to say, the cross-layer dependency in the network plays an essential role in many data mining applications like system robustness analysis and complex network control. However, it remains a daunting task to know the exact dependency relationships due to noise, limited accessibility, and so forth. In this article, we tackle the cross-layer dependency inference problem by modeling it as a collective collaborative filtering problem. Based on this idea, we propose an effective algorithm Fascinate that can reveal unobserved dependencies with linear complexity. Moreover, we derive Fascinate-ZERO, an online variant of Fascinate that can respond to a newly added node timely by checking its neighborhood dependencies. We perform extensive evaluations on real datasets to substantiate the superiority of our proposed approaches.

  17. LHCNet: Wide Area Networking and Collaborative Systems for HEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, H.B,

    2007-08-20

    This proposal presents the status and progress in 2006-7, and the technical and financial plans for 2008-2010 for the US LHCNet transatlantic network supporting U.S. participation in the LHC physics program. US LHCNet provides transatlantic connections of the Tier1 computing facilities at Fermilab and Brookhaven with the Tier0 and Tier1 facilities at CERN as well as Tier1s elsewhere in Europe and Asia. Together with ESnet, Internet2, the GEANT pan-European network, and NSF’s UltraLight project, US LHCNet also supports connections between the Tier2 centers (where most of the analysis of the data will take place, starting this year) and the Tier1s as needed.See report

  18. Managerial Perspective on Open Source Collaboration and Networked Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henttonen Maaret Katja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the managerial perspectives towards open source software and networked innovation. We analysed six software companies who use open source software as a significant part of their product or service offering. The study found notable differences in managerial attitudes, expected benefits and key challenges related to open source software and its role in innovative activities. While all companies were using same pieces of software with open source communities, there were different levels of engagement in the development of the software and information flows between companies and communities. A deeper level of involvement enables the exchange of more than just the code: like ideas, influences, opinions and even innovations or parts of them. The differences in managerial views on open source and networked innovation may be explained by industry domains, value chain position and leadership style

  19. LHCNet: Wide Area Networking and Collaborative Systems for HEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, H.B.

    2007-01-01

    This proposal presents the status and progress in 2006-7, and the technical and financial plans for 2008-2010 for the US LHCNet transatlantic network supporting U.S. participation in the LHC physics program. US LHCNet provides transatlantic connections of the Tier1 computing facilities at Fermilab and Brookhaven with the Tier0 and Tier1 facilities at CERN as well as Tier1s elsewhere in Europe and Asia. Together with ESnet, Internet2, the GEANT pan-European network, and NSF's UltraLight project, US LHCNet also supports connections between the Tier2 centers (where most of the analysis of the data will take place, starting this year) and the Tier1s as needed.See report

  20. An analysis of collaborative technological advancements achieved through the Center for Network Innovation and Experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Quarles, Eric L.

    2008-01-01

    The primary focus of this thesis is to produce an analysis of collaborative technology advancements experienced through the experimental cycles which the members of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Network Innovation and Experimentation (CENETIX) participate. These experiments, which include Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO) and Tactical Network Topology (TNT) scenarios, have advanced a great deal since their inception and there is a need for a detailed study into which c...

  1. Secure Collaborative Key Management for Dynamic Groups in Mobile Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukin Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile networks are composed of heterogeneous mobile devices with peer-to-peer wireless communication. Their dynamic and self-organizing natures pose security challenge. We consider secure group key management for peer dynamic groups in mobile wireless networks. Many group based applications have achieved remarkable growth along with increasing use of multicast based services. The key sharing among the group members is an important issue for secure group communication because the communication for many participants implies that the likelihood of illegal overhearing increases. We propose a group key sharing scheme and efficient rekeying methods for frequent membership changes from network dynamics. The proposed method enables the group members to simply establish a group key and provide high flexibility for dynamic group changes such as member join or leave and group merging or partition. We conduct mathematical evaluation with other group key management protocols and finally prove its security by demonstrating group key secrecy, backward and forward secrecy, key independence, and implicit key authentication under the decisional Diffie-Hellman (DDH assumption.

  2. An Evolutionary Algorithm of the Regional Collaborative Innovation Based on Complex Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a new perspective to study the evolution of regional collaborative innovation based on complex network theory. The two main conceptions of evolution, “graph with dynamic features” and “network evolution,” have been provided in advance. Afterwards, we illustrate the overall architecture and capability model of the regional collaborative innovation system, which contains several elements and participants. Therefore, we can definitely assume that the regional collaborative innovation system could be regarded as a complex network model. In the proposed evolutionary algorithm, we consider that each node in the network could only connect to less than a certain amount of neighbors, and the extreme value is determined by its importance. Through the derivation, we have created a probability density function as the most important constraint and supporting condition of our simulation experiments. Then, a case study was performed to explore the network topology and validate the effectiveness of our algorithm. All the raw datasets were obtained from the official website of the National Bureau of Statistic of China and some other open sources. Finally, some meaningful recommendations were presented to policy makers, especially based on the experimental results and some common conclusions of complex networks.

  3. Tle and Heet Research in South America in the Framework of Leona Collaborative Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sao Sabbas, F.

    2013-12-01

    South America is one of the most active thunderstorm regions of the world. About 20 years ago, it was discovered that thunderstorm electrical activity, in the form of lightning discharges, can excite Transient Luminous Events - TLEs in the upper atmosphere directly above it. More recently, measurements of High Energy Emissions from Thunderstorms - HEET from space revealed that they also produce high energy emissions. Up to date, six different field campaigns, between 2002 and 2012 have been successfully performed in Brazil to make TLE observations. More than 700 events, mainly sprites, have been recorded over thunderstorms in different places in South America during these campaigns. Given the high thunderstorm electrical activity in our region, it is expected to have an extremely high TLE occurrence rate as well as intense emission of TGFs, high energy electron beams, neutron beam, X-Rays, i.e. HEET in general. This paper will review the main results of the different TLE observations performed from Brazil up to date and the research on TLEs and HEET performed by the Atmospheric and Space Electrodynamical Coupling - ACATMOS group at INPE. It will introduce the LEONA: Transient Luminous Event and Thunderstorm High Energy Emission Collaborative Network in Latin America. The team unites scientists of research institutions from several countries to investigate TLEs, HEET and related phenomena. It will present the collaborative network of cameras that are already been installed in Brazil, Peru and Argentina for continuous remote observation of TLE, and the prospective installation of 21 optical observation sites in other locations in South America, as well as a neutron detector in southern Brazil. The LEONA project has been recently approved by the Brazilian research funding agency FAPESP. The Argentina sites will allow for combined collaborative studies of TLEs and HEET produced by thunderstorms in the Pampas region, where the most several thunderstorms in South America

  4. A Framework for Collaborative Networked Learning in Higher Education: Design & Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan F. Issa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive framework for building collaborative learning networks within higher educational institutions. This framework focuses on systems design and implementation issues in addition to a complete set of evaluation, and analysis tools. The objective of this project is to improve the standards of higher education in Jordan through the implementation of transparent, collaborative, innovative, and modern quality educational programs. The framework highlights the major steps required to plan, design, and implement collaborative learning systems. Several issues are discussed such as unification of courses and program of studies, using appropriate learning management system, software design development using Agile methodology, infrastructure design, access issues, proprietary data storage, and social network analysis (SNA techniques.

  5. Opening the black box of quality improvement collaboratives: An Actor-Network theory approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Broer (Tineke); A.P. Nieboer (Anna); R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Quality improvement collaboratives are often labeled as black boxes because effect studies usually do not describe exactly how the results were obtained. In this article we propose a way of opening such a black box, by taking up a dynamic perspective based on Actor-Network

  6. Analysis and Evaluation of Business Process Modeling Adoption in Collaborative Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Soleimani Malekan, H.; Shishkov, B.

    2013-01-01

    Besides, knowledge and information enterprises can share Business Processes (BPs) within Collaborative Networks (CNs). Each enterprise has a set of BPs that it can perform, and through developing integrated BPs in the CN they deploy their capacities and capabilities. Selecting and adopting the

  7. CLAM - CoLlAborative eMbedded networks for submarine surveillance: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Casari, Paolo; Petrioli, Chiara; Grythe, Knut; Husoy, Thor; Zorzi, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the CLAM project, which aims at developing a collaborative embedded monitoring and control platform for submarine surveillance by combining cutting edge acoustic vector sensor technology and 1D, 2D, 3D sensor arrays, underwater wireless sensor networks protocol

  8. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim A.; Hausman, Angela; Washington, Melvin C.

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication increases students' learning outcomes in higher education. Web 2.0 technologies encourages students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities, facilitates group work, and encourages information sharing among students. Familiarity with organizational use and sharing in social networks aids…

  9. Promoting Cognitive Health: A Formative Research Collaboration of the Healthy Aging Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laditka, James N.; Beard, Renee L.; Bryant, Lucinda L.; Fetterman, David; Hunter, Rebecca; Ivey, Susan; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Sharkey, Joseph R.; Wu, Bei

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests that healthy lifestyles may help maintain cognitive health. The Prevention Research Centers Healthy Aging Research Network, 9 universities collaborating with their communities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is conducting a multiyear research project, begun in 2005, to understand how to translate this…

  10. Developing advanced fingerprint attacks on challenge-based collaborative intrusion detection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Wenjuan; Meng, Weizhi; Kwok, Lam-For

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, an isolated intrusion detection system (IDS) is vulnerable to various types of attacks. In order to enhance IDS performance, collaborative intrusion detection networks (CIDNs) are developed through enabling a set of IDS nodes to communicate with each other. Due to the distributed...

  11. Towards collaborative, intermodal hub networks. A case study in the fast moving consumer goods market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothedde, B.; Ruijgrok, C.; Tavasszy, L.

    2005-01-01

    Collaborative hub networks can provide an answer to the need to decrease logistics cost and maintain logistics service levels by shifting consolidated flows to modes that are better suited for handling large volumes (rail, barge, coastal shipping), so economies of scale can be obtained. This

  12. Innovation as a distributed, collaborative process of knowledge generation: open, networked innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Sloep, P. B. (2009). Innovation as a distributed, collaborative process of knowledge generation: open, networked innovation. In V. Hornung-Prähauser & M. Luckmann (Eds.), Kreativität und Innovationskompetenz im digitalen Netz - Creativity and Innovation Competencies in the Web, Sammlung von

  13. Enhancing collaborative intrusion detection networks against insider attacks using supervised intrusion sensitivity-based trust management model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Wenjuan; Meng, Weizhi; Kwok, Lam-For

    2017-01-01

    To defend against complex attacks, collaborative intrusion detection networks (CIDNs) have been developed to enhance the detection accuracy, which enable an IDS to collect information and learn experience from others. However, this kind of networks is vulnerable to malicious nodes which...... are utilized by insider attacks (e.g., betrayal attacks). In our previous research, we developed a notion of intrusion sensitivity and identified that it can help improve the detection of insider attacks, whereas it is still a challenge for these nodes to automatically assign the values. In this article, we...... of intrusion sensitivity based on expert knowledge. In the evaluation, we compare the performance of three different supervised classifiers in assigning sensitivity values and investigate our trust model under different attack scenarios and in a real wireless sensor network. Experimental results indicate...

  14. Collaboration: the Key to Establishing Community Networks in Regional Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wal Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the promise of community involvement, cohesion and empowerment offered by local community networks (CN using Internet Technologies, few communities in regional Australia have been able to demonstrate sustainable and vibrant CN which demonstrate increased social, cultural or self-reliance capital. The Faculty of Informatics and Communication at Central Queensland University (CQU and a local council have established a formal alliance to establish the COIN (Community Informatics projects to research issues around this topic. This paper presents the initial findings from this work and draws conclusions for possible comparison with other international experience. The research focuses attention on community understanding and cohesion, local government priorities in a community with relatively low diffusion of the Internet and the competing demands in a regional university between traditional service provision in an increasingly competitive market and the needs of establishing outreach research for altruistic, industry establishment and commercial rationale.

  15. AN EVALUATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF COLLABORATIVE AND SOCIAL NETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES FOR COMPUTER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie Cheung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a collaborative and social networking environment that integrates the knowledge and skills in communication and computing studies with a multimedia development project. The outcomes of the students’ projects show that computer literacy can be enhanced through a cluster of communication, social, and digital skills. Experience in implementing a web-based social networking environment shows that the new media is an effective means of enriching knowledge by sharing in computer literacy projects. The completed assignments, projects, and self-reflection reports demonstrate that the students were able to achieve the learning outcomes of a computer literacy course in multimedia development. The students were able to assess the effectiveness of a variety of media through the development of media presentations in a web-based, social-networking environment. In the collaborative and social-networking environment, students were able to collaborate and communicate with their team members to solve problems, resolve conflicts, make decisions, and work as a team to complete tasks. Our experience has shown that social networking environments are effective for computer literacy education, and the development of the new media is emerging as the core knowledge for computer literacy education.

  16. VIOLIN: vaccine investigation and online information network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zuoshuang; Todd, Thomas; Ku, Kim P; Kovacic, Bethany L; Larson, Charles B; Chen, Fang; Hodges, Andrew P; Tian, Yuying; Olenzek, Elizabeth A; Zhao, Boyang; Colby, Lesley A; Rush, Howard G; Gilsdorf, Janet R; Jourdian, George W; He, Yongqun

    2008-01-01

    Vaccines are among the most efficacious and cost-effective tools for reducing morbidity and mortality caused by infectious diseases. The vaccine investigation and online information network (VIOLIN) is a web-based central resource, allowing easy curation, comparison and analysis of vaccine-related research data across various human pathogens (e.g. Haemophilus influenzae, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Plasmodium falciparum) of medical importance and across humans, other natural hosts and laboratory animals. Vaccine-related peer-reviewed literature data have been downloaded into the database from PubMed and are searchable through various literature search programs. Vaccine data are also annotated, edited and submitted to the database through a web-based interactive system that integrates efficient computational literature mining and accurate manual curation. Curated information includes general microbial pathogenesis and host protective immunity, vaccine preparation and characteristics, stimulated host responses after vaccination and protection efficacy after challenge. Vaccine-related pathogen and host genes are also annotated and available for searching through customized BLAST programs. All VIOLIN data are available for download in an eXtensible Markup Language (XML)-based data exchange format. VIOLIN is expected to become a centralized source of vaccine information and to provide investigators in basic and clinical sciences with curated data and bioinformatics tools for vaccine research and development. VIOLIN is publicly available at http://www.violinet.org.

  17. Investigating accident causation through information network modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, T G C; Young, M S; Stanton, N A

    2010-02-01

    Management of risk in complex domains such as aviation relies heavily on post-event investigations, requiring complex approaches to fully understand the integration of multi-causal, multi-agent and multi-linear accident sequences. The Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork methodology (EAST; Stanton et al. 2008) offers such an approach based on network models. In this paper, we apply EAST to a well-known aviation accident case study, highlighting communication between agents as a central theme and investigating the potential for finding agents who were key to the accident. Ultimately, this work aims to develop a new model based on distributed situation awareness (DSA) to demonstrate that the risk inherent in a complex system is dependent on the information flowing within it. By identifying key agents and information elements, we can propose proactive design strategies to optimize the flow of information and help work towards avoiding aviation accidents. Statement of Relevance: This paper introduces a novel application of an holistic methodology for understanding aviation accidents. Furthermore, it introduces an ongoing project developing a nonlinear and prospective method that centralises distributed situation awareness and communication as themes. The relevance of findings are discussed in the context of current ergonomic and aviation issues of design, training and human-system interaction.

  18. Mapping industrial networks as an approach to identify inter-organisational collaborative potential in new product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parraguez, Pedro; Maier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Increased industrial complexity and specialization is pushing organizations to participate more proactively in collaborative networks. These networks enable them to create new products and services requiring a pool of knowledge and capabilities going beyond the traditional organizational boundari....... The analysis is contextualized mapping the Danish Cleantech industry and depict the uses of the visualization and analysis of industrial networks in the selection of co-developing partners........ Consequently, identifying and selecting potential partners to establish collaboration agreements can be a key activity in the new product development process. This paper explores the implications of mapping industrial networks with the purpose of identifying inter-organisational collaborative potential...

  19. Expectations and satisfaction of academic investigators in nonclinical collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Marjan; Michel, Martin C

    2015-06-01

    In light of a growing role of research collaborations between academia and the pharmaceutical industry, we have explored expectations and experience of academic investigators with preclinical collaborations. Researchers from Western Europe, North America, and Japan with preclinical publications in the obstructed airways or diabetes fields were invited to anonymously participate in a web-based survey. A total of 134 investigators (28 % of invitees) participated in the two sequentially performed surveys with similar responses in both therapeutic areas. A secondary but prespecified subgroup analysis was based on region of residence, gender, and career level of the investigator. Across all groups, responders considered freedom to publish, obtaining funding and obtaining compounds to be the most important objectives of nonclinical collaborations with the pharmaceutical industry, whereas cultivating professional relationships, getting external scientific input, direct relationship to disease treatment, and involvement with drug development were less important. Among eight attributes of the primary contact person in the company, trustworthiness ranked highest, followed by a collaborative spirit and transparent information sharing; supportiveness, scientific qualification, accessibility, and timeliness of responses ranked lower, and friendliness, lowest. Related to their most recent collaboration, investigators also expressed the highest level of satisfaction with the trustworthiness attribute. On the other hand, the process of reaching a contract was often considered too long and difficult, for which both university and company legal departments were reported as culprits. We conclude that academic researchers are generally satisfied with their preclinical collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry but look for improved contracting procedures.

  20. Communication, collaboration and identity: factor analysis of academics’ perceptions of online networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Jordan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of online social networking sites, much has been written about their potential for transforming academia, as communication and collaboration underpin many scholarly activities. However, the extent to which these benefits are being realised in practice is unclear. As the uptake of tools by academics continues to grow, there is a question as to whether differences exist in their use and if any patterns or underlying factors are at play. This article presents the results of an online survey addressing this gap. A disciplinary divide was evident in terms of preferred academic social networking platforms, while perceptions about how academics use online networking for different purposes are linked to job position. Exploratory factor analysis identified four components representing different strategies used by academics in their approaches to online networking, including maintaining a personal learning network, promoting the professional self, seeking and promoting publications, and advancing careers.

  1. Investigating the Relationship between Learning Style Preferences and Teaching Collaboration Skills and Technology: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, S.; Sonnenwald, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study that investigates the relationship between participants' learning style preferences and their perceptions of a professional workshop on collaboration and technology to support collaboration. The Learning Preference Scale-Students (LPSS) (Owens & Barnes, 1992) was administered to identify participants' learning style preferences as cooperative, competitive and/or individualized. Using cluster analysis two groups, or categories, of learning style prefe...

  2. Enforcement of Privacy Policies over Multiple Online Social Networks for Collaborative Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengping; Wang, Lifeng

    Our goal is to tend to develop an enforcement architecture of privacy policies over multiple online social networks. It is used to solve the problem of privacy protection when several social networks build permanent or temporary collaboration. Theoretically, this idea is practical, especially due to more and more social network tend to support open source framework “OpenSocial”. But as we known different social network websites may have the same privacy policy settings based on different enforcement mechanisms, this would cause problems. In this case, we have to manually write code for both sides to make the privacy policy settings enforceable. We can imagine that, this is a huge workload based on the huge number of current social networks. So we focus on proposing a middleware which is used to automatically generate privacy protection component for permanent integration or temporary interaction of social networks. This middleware provide functions, such as collecting of privacy policy of each participant in the new collaboration, generating a standard policy model for each participant and mapping all those standard policy to different enforcement mechanisms of those participants.

  3. Heterogeneous Collaborative Sensor Network for Electrical Management of an Automated House with PV Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Jiménez-Leube

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a heterogeneous collaborative sensor network for electrical management in the residential sector. Improving demand-side management is very important in distributed energy generation applications. Sensing and control are the foundations of the “Smart Grid” which is the future of large-scale energy management. The system presented in this paper has been developed on a self-sufficient solar house called “MagicBox” equipped with grid connection, PV generation, lead-acid batteries, controllable appliances and smart metering. Therefore, there is a large number of energy variables to be monitored that allow us to precisely manage the energy performance of the house by means of collaborative sensors. The experimental results, performed on a real house, demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed collaborative system to reduce the consumption of electrical power and to increase energy efficiency.

  4. Investigating Inter-Organizational Collaboration during the Haiti Relief Effort from a Macrocognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    16th ICCRTS: Collective C2 in Multinational Civil -Military Operations Investigating Inter-Organizational Collaboration during the Haiti...Making Alternate Topics: Topic 10: C2, Management, and Governance in Civil -Military Operations Topic 4...Relief. Presentation for Naval Postgraduate School, Decision Information Systems Experimentation ( DISE ) Research Group. Monterey, CA. Investigating

  5. Coauthorship and institutional collaborations on cost-effectiveness analyses: a systematic network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrán Catalá-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA has been promoted as an important research methodology for determining the efficiency of healthcare technology and guiding medical decision-making. Our aim was to characterize the collaborative patterns of CEA conducted over the past two decades in Spain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A systematic analysis was carried out with the information obtained through an updated comprehensive literature review and from reports of health technology assessment agencies. We identified CEAs with outcomes expressed as a time-based summary measure of population health (e.g. quality-adjusted life-years or disability-adjusted life-years, conducted in Spain and published between 1989 and 2011. Networks of coauthorship and institutional collaboration were produced using PAJEK software. One-hundred and thirty-one papers were analyzed, in which 526 authors and 230 institutions participated. The overall signatures per paper index was 5.4. Six major groups (one with 14 members, three with 7 members and two with 6 members were identified. The most prolific authors were generally affiliated with the private-for-profit sector (e.g. consulting firms and the pharmaceutical industry. The private-for-profit sector maintains profuse collaborative networks including public hospitals and academia. Collaboration within the public sector (e.g. healthcare administration and primary care was weak and fragmented. CONCLUSIONS: This empirical analysis reflects critical practices among collaborative networks that contributed substantially to the production of CEA, raises challenges for redesigning future policies and provides a framework for similar analyses in other regions.

  6. Implications of Scientific Collaboration Networks on Studies of Aquatic Vertebrates in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero, María Celeste; Michalski, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of wildlife extracted from the Amazon has increased in the past decades as a consequence of an increase in human population density and income growth. To evaluate the spatial distribution of studies on subsistence and/or commercial hunting conducted in the Brazilian Amazon, we selected eight mid-sized and large-bodied aquatic vertebrate species with a history of human exploitation in the region. We used a combination of searches in the gray and scientific literature from the past 24 years to provide an updated distributional map of studies on the target species. We calculated the distances between the study sites and the locations of the research institutes/universities that the first and last authors of the same study were affiliated to. For the period of 1990 to 2014, we found 105 studies on the subsistence and/or commercial hunting of aquatic vertebrates in the Brazilian Amazon in 271 locations that involved 43 institutions (37 Brazilian and 6 international). The spatial distribution of the studies across the Brazilian Amazon varied, but over 80% took place in the northeast and central Amazon, encompassing three States of the Legal Brazilian Amazon (Amazonas, 51.42%; Pará, 19.05%; and Amapá, 16.19%). Over half of the research study sites (52.91%) were within 500 km of the research institute/university of the first or last authors. Some research institutes/universities did not have any inter-institutional collaborations, while others collaborated with eight or more institutes. Some research institutes/universities conducted many studies, had an extensive collaboration network, and contributed greatly to the network of studies on Amazonian aquatic vertebrates. Our research contributes to the knowledge of studies on the subsistence and/or commercial hunting of the most exploited aquatic vertebrates of the Brazilian Amazon, illustrates the impact that collaboration networks have on research, and highlights potential areas for improvement and the

  7. Framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis to investigate the perturbed metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic network models have contributed to elucidating biological phenomena, and predicting gene targets to engineer for biotechnological applications. With their increasing importance, their precise network characterization has also been crucial for better understanding of the cellular physiology. We herein introduce a framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis (FMB) to investigate organism's metabolism under perturbation. FMB reveals direction of influences among metabolic modules, in which reactions with similar or positively correlated flux variation patterns are clustered, in response to specific perturbation using metabolic flux data. With metabolic flux data calculated by constraints-based flux analysis under both control and perturbation conditions, FMB, in essence, reveals the effects of specific perturbations on the biological system through network modularization and Bayesian network analysis at metabolic modular level. As a demonstration, this framework was applied to the genetically perturbed Escherichia coli metabolism, which is a lpdA gene knockout mutant, using its genome-scale metabolic network model. After all, it provides alternative scenarios of metabolic flux distributions in response to the perturbation, which are complementary to the data obtained from conventionally available genome-wide high-throughput techniques or metabolic flux analysis.

  8. Modeling and Management of Information Supporting Functional Dimension of Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Ermilova, Ekaterina; Msanjila, Simon S.; Camarinha-Matos, Luis M.

    Fluent creation of opportunity-based short-term Collaborative Networks (CNs) among organizations or individuals requires the availability of a variety of up-to-date information. A pre-established properly administrated strategic-alliance Collaborative Network (CN) can act as the breeding environment for creation/operation of opportunity-based CNs, and effectively addressing the complexity, dynamism, and scalability of their actors and domains. Administration of these environments however requires effective set of functionalities, founded on top of strong information management. The paper introduces main challenges of CNs and their management of information, and focuses on the Virtual organizations Breeding Environment (VBE), which represents a specific form of strategic-alliances. It then focuses on the needed functionalities for effective administration/management of VBEs, and exemplifies information management challenges for three of their subsystems handling the Ontology, the profiles and competencies, and the rational trust.

  9. An optimization model for the costs allocation in spare parts collaborative networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzoni, Chiara; Ferrara, Andrea; Grassi, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The paper focuses on the aftermarket spare parts in the automotive industry. In particular, only products with infrequent and low quantity demand are considered. This work is an extention of a previuos work by the same authors in which a stochastic model for the optimal inventory policy of spare parts has been presented. In this paper the authors improved what has been called "the second layer" in the previous model, that is the products allocation among a collaborative network of distributors. The improvement is related to the basic model and to the introducion of new products in the network.

  10. New Zealand Emergency Medicine Network: a collaboration for acute care research in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The specialty of emergency medicine in Australasia is coming of age. As part of this maturation there is a need for high-quality evidence to inform practice. This article describes the development of the New Zealand Emergency Medicine Network, a collaboration of committed emergency care researchers who share the vision that New Zealand/Aotearoa will have a world-leading, patient-centred emergency care research network, which will improve emergency care for all, so that people coming to any ED in the country will have access to the same world-class emergency care. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Towards Effective Trust-Based Packet Filtering in Collaborative Network Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Weizhi; Li, Wenjuan; Kwok, Lam-For

    2017-01-01

    Overhead network packets are a big challenge for intrusion detection systems (IDSs), which may increase system burden, degrade system performance, and even cause the whole system collapse, when the number of incoming packets exceeds the maximum handling capability. To address this issue, packet...... filtration is considered as a promising solution, and our previous research efforts have proven that designing a trust-based packet filter was able to refine unwanted network packets and reduce the workload of a local IDS. With the development of Internet cooperation, collaborative intrusion detection...

  12. PMFA: Toward Passive Message Fingerprint Attacks on Challenge-Based Collaborative Intrusion Detection Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Wenjuan; Meng, Weizhi; Kwok, Lam-For

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the performance of single intrusion detection systems (IDSs), collaborative intrusion detection networks (CIDNs) have been developed, which enable a set of IDS nodes to communicate with each other. In such a distributed network, insider attacks like collusion attacks are the main threat....... In the literature, challenge-based trust mechanisms have been established to identify malicious nodes by evaluating the satisfaction between challenges and responses. However, we find that such mechanisms rely on two major assumptions, which may result in a weak threat model and make CIDNs still vulnerable...

  13. Collaborative Networks - Premises for Exploitation of Inter-Organizational Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela MIRCEA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inter-organization knowledge management in the context of collaborative networks is a critical activity for business success. During the evolution of collaborative network specific technologies, increasingly performant instruments were created to exploit this knowledge. As a development cycle, inter-organizational knowledge is built on the foundation of information and data owned by the participants in the collaborative networks. One of the most widely used instruments to exploit this data and knowledge, with the purpose of creating new knowledge, is Data Mining. In the context of this paper, data mining is the process of discovering patterns and hidden relations in very large data collections, stored in data banks or data bases. Because only in extremely rare cases reading data tables record by record leads to the discovery of useful patterns, the information must be processed automatically, process known as Knowledge Discovery. Knowledge Discovery is a component that combines the power of computers with a human operator that has the ability to find the visual patterns revealed by the system. Using an automated data mining system, the computer finds the existing informational patterns and the human factor (the analyst evaluates those patterns and picks the ones that are really relevant for the current analysis. Considering the current technological context, where storage devices are more and more accessible and performant, the storage capacity is no longer a barrier preventing storage of all required data. Exploitation of inter-organizational knowledge in collaborative networks leads the research to the field of business intelligence applied even on social environment. This approach belongs in literature to the general branch of social business intelligence.

  14. Integrated microfluidic platforms for investigating neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joon

    This dissertation describes the development and application of integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms to study neuronal activities in the nervous system in-vitro. The assay platforms were fabricated using soft lithography and micro/nano fabrication including microfluidics, surface patterning, and nanomaterial synthesis. The use of integrated microfluidics-based assay platform allows culturing and manipulating many types of neuronal tissues in precisely controlled microenvironment. Furthermore, they provide organized multi-cellular in-vitro model, long-term monitoring with live cell imaging, and compatibility with molecular biology techniques and electrophysiology experiment. In this dissertation, the integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms are developed for investigation of neuronal activities such as local protein synthesis, impairment of axonal transport by chemical/physical variants, growth cone path finding under chemical/physical cues, and synaptic transmission in neuronal circuit. Chapter 1 describes the motivation, objectives, and scope for developing in-vitro platform to study various neuronal activities. Chapter 2 introduces microfluidic culture platform for biochemical assay with large-scale neuronal tissues that are utilized as model system in neuroscience research. Chapter 3 focuses on the investigation of impaired axonal transport by beta-Amyloid and oxidative stress. The platform allows to control neuronal processes and to quantify mitochondrial movement in various regions of axons away from applied drugs. Chapter 4 demonstrates the development of microfluidics-based growth cone turning assay to elucidate the mechanism underlying axon guidance under soluble factors and shear flow. Using this platform, the behaviors of growth cone of mammalian neurons are verified under the gradient of inhibitory molecules and also shear flow in well-controlled manner. In Chapter 5, I combine in-vitro multicellular model with microfabricated MEA

  15. An automatic method to generate domain-specific investigator networks using PubMed abstracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwinn Marta

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration among investigators has become critical to scientific research. This includes ad hoc collaboration established through personal contacts as well as formal consortia established by funding agencies. Continued growth in online resources for scientific research and communication has promoted the development of highly networked research communities. Extending these networks globally requires identifying additional investigators in a given domain, profiling their research interests, and collecting current contact information. We present a novel strategy for building investigator networks dynamically and producing detailed investigator profiles using data available in PubMed abstracts. Results We developed a novel strategy to obtain detailed investigator information by automatically parsing the affiliation string in PubMed records. We illustrated the results by using a published literature database in human genome epidemiology (HuGE Pub Lit as a test case. Our parsing strategy extracted country information from 92.1% of the affiliation strings in a random sample of PubMed records and in 97.0% of HuGE records, with accuracies of 94.0% and 91.0%, respectively. Institution information was parsed from 91.3% of the general PubMed records (accuracy 86.8% and from 94.2% of HuGE PubMed records (accuracy 87.0. We demonstrated the application of our approach to dynamic creation of investigator networks by creating a prototype information system containing a large database of PubMed abstracts relevant to human genome epidemiology (HuGE Pub Lit, indexed using PubMed medical subject headings converted to Unified Medical Language System concepts. Our method was able to identify 70–90% of the investigators/collaborators in three different human genetics fields; it also successfully identified 9 of 10 genetics investigators within the PREBIC network, an existing preterm birth research network. Conclusion We successfully created a

  16. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD for brain cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area – nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD. NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1 international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2 highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3 research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.

  17. Opening the black box of quality improvement collaboratives: an Actor-Network theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broer Tineke

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality improvement collaboratives are often labeled as black boxes because effect studies usually do not describe exactly how the results were obtained. In this article we propose a way of opening such a black box, by taking up a dynamic perspective based on Actor-Network Theory. We thereby analyze how the problematisation process and the measurement practices are constructed. Findings from this analysis may have consequences for future evaluation studies of collaboratives. Methods In an ethnographic design we probed two projects within a larger quality improvement collaborative on long term mental health care and care for the intellectually disabled. Ethnographic observations were made at nine national conferences. Furthermore we conducted six case studies involving participating teams. Additionally, we interviewed the two program leaders of the overall projects. Results In one project the problematisation seemed to undergo a shift of focus away from the one suggested by the project leaders. In the other we observed multiple roles of the measurement instrument used. The instrument did not only measure effects of the improvement actions but also changed these actions and affected the actors involved. Conclusions Effectiveness statistics ideally should be complemented with an analysis of the construction of the collaborative and the improvement practices. Effect studies of collaboratives could benefit from a mixed methods research design that combines quantitative and qualitative methods.

  18. Final report for the network authentication investigation and pilot.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldridge, John M.; Dautenhahn, Nathan; Miller, Marc M.; Wiener, Dallas J; Witzke, Edward L.

    2006-11-01

    New network based authentication mechanisms are beginning to be implemented in industry. This project investigated different authentication technologies to see if and how Sandia might benefit from them. It also investigated how these mechanisms can integrate with the Sandia Two-Factor Authentication Project. The results of these investigations and a network authentication path forward strategy are documented in this report.

  19. Investigation of the properties of fully reacted unstoichiometric polydimethylsiloxane networks and their extracted network fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Sarah Maria Grundahl; Jensen, Mette Krog; Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the linear dynamic response of a series of fully reacted unstoichiometric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) networks and of the two corresponding network fractions namely the sol and the washed network. The sol and the washed network were separated by a simple extraction process. This way...

  20. Collaboration networks and intersectoriality in public daycares of São Paulo state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maria Simões Martinez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The literature indicates positive impacts on child development for those children attending day care centers, when this context includes good practices. It is believed that a set of actions, networking, coordinated by managers can positively to impact the children development. Objective: Although the literature indicate the fields of knowledge “health, education and social” as the daycare collaborative networks, this study evaluated are the points that allow connections in these networks today, and the possible existence of other networks describing their characteristics. Method: The methodology included ethical procedures and definition of the sampling plan, which resulted in 32 daycare schools in the municipalities of São Paulo. Data were collected through interviews with the daycares directors seeking to identify the network points, from situations present in their daily practice. Results: The results showed the presence of 75 points of the cooperation network in 32 municipalities with different service partnerships, sometimes with more extensive networks, or shorter. We highlight the strong presence of intersectorality arising from the fields of education, health and social. Municipal equipment for infrastructure actions were identified, as well as the presence of various government programs from the federal level. Conclusion: The scale of child development is present in an intense way in the sphere of education and health. The data are discussed from the perspective of supporting leaders for solving the problems considering the potential of preventive action in early childhood.

  1. An architecture for performance optimization in a collaborative knowledge-based approach for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadeo-Martos, Manuel Angel; Fernandez-Prieto, Jose Angel; Canada-Bago, Joaquin; Velasco, Juan Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, Intelligent Spaces (ISs) have received the attention of many Wireless Sensor Network researchers. Recently, several studies have been devoted to identify their common capacities and to set up ISs over these networks. However, little attention has been paid to integrating Fuzzy Rule-Based Systems into collaborative Wireless Sensor Networks for the purpose of implementing ISs. This work presents a distributed architecture proposal for collaborative Fuzzy Rule-Based Systems embedded in Wireless Sensor Networks, which has been designed to optimize the implementation of ISs. This architecture includes the following: (a) an optimized design for the inference engine; (b) a visual interface; (c) a module to reduce the redundancy and complexity of the knowledge bases; (d) a module to evaluate the accuracy of the new knowledge base; (e) a module to adapt the format of the rules to the structure used by the inference engine; and (f) a communications protocol. As a real-world application of this architecture and the proposed methodologies, we show an application to the problem of modeling two plagues of the olive tree: prays (olive moth, Prays oleae Bern.) and repilo (caused by the fungus Spilocaea oleagina). The results show that the architecture presented in this paper significantly decreases the consumption of resources (memory, CPU and battery) without a substantial decrease in the accuracy of the inferred values.

  2. TNT Maritime Interdiction Operation Experiments: Enabling Radiation Awareness and Geographically Distributed Collaboration for Network-Centric Maritime Interdiction Operations [Preprint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bordetsky, Alex; Dougan, Arden; Chiann, Foo Y; Kilberg, Andres

    2007-01-01

    ...) comprised of long-haul OFDM networks combined with self-forming wireless mesh links to radiation detection sensors, and real-time radiation awareness collaboration with geographically distributed partners...

  3. The Motus Wildlife Tracking System: a collaborative research network to enhance the understanding of wildlife movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Taylor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new collaborative network, the Motus Wildlife Tracking System (Motus; https://motus.org, which is an international network of researchers using coordinated automated radio-telemetry arrays to study movements of small flying organisms including birds, bats, and insects, at local, regional, and hemispheric scales. Radio-telemetry has been a cornerstone of tracking studies for over 50 years, and because of current limitations of geographic positioning systems (GPS and satellite transmitters, has remained the primary means to track movements of small animals with high temporal and spatial precision. Automated receivers, along with recent miniaturization and digital coding of tags, have further improved the utility of radio-telemetry by allowing many individuals to be tracked continuously and simultaneously across broad landscapes. Motus is novel among automated arrays in that collaborators employ a single radio frequency across receiving stations over a broad geographic scale, allowing individuals to be detected at sites maintained by others. Motus also coordinates, disseminates, and archives detections and associated metadata in a central repository. Combined with the ability to track many individuals simultaneously, Motus has expanded the scope and spatial scale of research questions that can be addressed using radio-telemetry from local to regional and even hemispheric scales. Since its inception in 2012, more than 9000 individuals of over 87 species of birds, bats, and insects have been tracked, resulting in more than 250 million detections. This rich and comprehensive dataset includes detections of individuals during all phases of the annual cycle (breeding, migration, and nonbreeding, and at a variety of spatial scales, resulting in novel insights into the movement behavior of small flying animals. The value of the Motus network will grow as spatial coverage of stations and number of partners and collaborators increases. With

  4. Burning through organizational boundaries? Examining inter-organizational communication networks in policy-mandated collaborative bushfire planning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel F. Brummel; Kristen C. Nelson; Pamela J. Jakes

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration can enhance cooperation across geographic and organizational scales, effectively "burning through" those boundaries. Using structured social network analysis (SNA) and qualitative in-depth interviews, this study examined three collaborative bushfire planning groups in New South Wales, Australia and asked: How does participation in policy-...

  5. Investigating Uses and Perceptions of an Online Collaborative Workspace for the Dissertation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this study was to investigate 93 doctoral candidates' perceptions and use of an online collaboration workspace and content management server, Microsoft Office SharePoint, for dissertation process. All candidates were enrolled in an Ed.D. programme in the United States. Descriptive statistics demonstrate that candidates frequently use…

  6. Investigating the Effects of Prompts on Argumentation Style, Consensus and Perceived Efficacy in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, Owen M.; Hogan, Michael J.; Broome, Benjamin; Hall, Tony; Ryan, Cormac

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of task-level versus process-level prompts on levels of perceived and objective consensus, perceived efficacy, and argumentation style in the context of a computer-supported collaborative learning session using Interactive Management (IM), a computer facilitated thought and action mapping methodology. Four…

  7. A Privacy-Preserving Framework for Collaborative Intrusion Detection Networks Through Fog Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yu; Xie, Lin; Li, Wenjuan

    2017-01-01

    of dispersed IDS nodes to exchange required information. With the advent of fog computing, in this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving framework for collaborative networks based on fog devices. Our study shows that the proposed framework can help reduce the workload on cloud’s side.......Nowadays, cyber threats (e.g., intrusions) are distributed across various networks with the dispersed networking resources. Intrusion detection systems (IDSs) have already become an essential solution to defend against a large amount of attacks. With the development of cloud computing, a modern IDS...... is able to implement more complicated detection algorithms by offloading the expensive operations such as the process of signature matching to the cloud (i.e., utilizing computing resources from the cloud). However, during the detection process, no party wants to disclose their own data especially...

  8. Congestion Control and Traffic Scheduling for Collaborative Crowdsourcing in SDN Enabled Mobile Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Shen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a number of crowdsourcing-based mobile applications have been implemented in mobile networks and Internet of Things (IoT, targeted at real-time services and recommendation. The frequent information exchanges and data transmissions in collaborative crowdsourcing are heavily injected into the current communication networks, which poses great challenges for Mobile Wireless Networks (MWN. This paper focuses on the traffic scheduling and load balancing problem in software-defined MWN and designs a hybrid routing forwarding scheme as well as a congestion control algorithm to achieve the feasible solution. The traffic scheduling algorithm first sorts the tasks in an ascending order depending on the amount of tasks and then solves it using a greedy scheme. In the proposed congestion control scheme, the traffic assignment is first transformed into a multiknapsack problem, and then the Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm (AFSA is utilized to solve this problem. Numerical results on practical network topology reveal that, compared with the traditional schemes, the proposed congestion control and traffic scheduling schemes can achieve load balancing, reduce the probability of network congestion, and improve the network throughput.

  9. Globalization of stem cell science: an examination of current and past collaborative research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyuan; Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2013-01-01

    Science and engineering research has becoming an increasingly international phenomenon. Traditional bibliometric studies have not captured the evolution of collaborative partnerships between countries, particularly in emerging technologies such as stem cell science, in which an immense amount of investment has been made in the past decade. Analyzing over 2,800 articles from the top journals that include stem cell research in their publications, this study demonstrates the globalization of stem cell science. From 2000 to 2010, international collaborations increased from 20.9% to 36% of all stem cell publications analyzed. The United States remains the most prolific and the most dominant country in the field in terms of publications in high impact journals. But Asian countries, particularly China are steadily gaining ground. Exhibiting the largest relative growth, the percent of Chinese-authored stem cell papers grew more than ten-fold, while the percent of Chinese-authored international papers increased over seven times from 2000 to 2010. And while the percent of total stem cell publications exhibited modest growth for European countries, the percent of international publications increased more substantially, particularly in the United Kingdom. Overall, the data indicated that traditional networks of collaboration extant in 2000 still predominate in stem cell science. Although more nations are becoming involved in international collaborations and undertaking stem cell research, many of these efforts, with the exception of those in certain Asian countries, have yet to translate into publications in high impact journals.

  10. [Research on collaborative innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China based on patent cooperation network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Chen, Xiang-dong

    2015-03-01

    In the situation of global completion, collaborative innovation is becoming increasingly important because its advantage in risk avoiding and innovation efficiency. In order to explore the model of collaborative innovation and its evolution in traditional Chinese medicine of China, the cooperation in traditional Chinese medicine patents of China from 1985 to 2013 has been analyzed by using the method of scientometrics and social network analysis. It is proved that, though the number of grated cooperative patents has increased sharply during the last thirty years, the degree of cooperation innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China is still not high. Moreover, in spite of the individual subject' s leading role in the past domestic collaborative innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China, the institutions have been more and more powerful and achieved great improvement. At last, core institutions, represented by universities have played an important role in the collaborative innovation of domestic institutions, because they are key links between many institutions and promote the transferring and diffusion of knowledge.

  11. Globalization of Stem Cell Science: An Examination of Current and Past Collaborative Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyuan; Matthews, Kirstin R. W.

    2013-01-01

    Science and engineering research has becoming an increasingly international phenomenon. Traditional bibliometric studies have not captured the evolution of collaborative partnerships between countries, particularly in emerging technologies such as stem cell science, in which an immense amount of investment has been made in the past decade. Analyzing over 2,800 articles from the top journals that include stem cell research in their publications, this study demonstrates the globalization of stem cell science. From 2000 to 2010, international collaborations increased from 20.9% to 36% of all stem cell publications analyzed. The United States remains the most prolific and the most dominant country in the field in terms of publications in high impact journals. But Asian countries, particularly China are steadily gaining ground. Exhibiting the largest relative growth, the percent of Chinese-authored stem cell papers grew more than ten-fold, while the percent of Chinese-authored international papers increased over seven times from 2000 to 2010. And while the percent of total stem cell publications exhibited modest growth for European countries, the percent of international publications increased more substantially, particularly in the United Kingdom. Overall, the data indicated that traditional networks of collaboration extant in 2000 still predominate in stem cell science. Although more nations are becoming involved in international collaborations and undertaking stem cell research, many of these efforts, with the exception of those in certain Asian countries, have yet to translate into publications in high impact journals. PMID:24069210

  12. A collaborative project using narratives: What happens when pupils work on mathematical investigations?

    OpenAIRE

    Ponte, João Pedro da; Segurado, Maria Irene; Oliveira, Hélia

    2003-01-01

    Mathematical investigations involve searching for patterns, formulating, testing, and justifying conjectures, reflecting, and generalising. Doing investigations in the classroom is a powerful activity for students’ learning but poses many challenges to the teacher. To study the professional knowledge involved in this kind of work was the aim of a collaborative action-research project that involved one classroom teacher and two university teacher educators. We used narratives to depict relevan...

  13. Two small linear marks on a mandible: collaborative networking between forensic experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanetake, Jun; Sakaue, Kazuhiro; Sakai, Jun; Takahashi, Shirushi; Kanawaku, Yoshimasa; Hashiyada, Masaki; Funayama, Masato

    2008-01-01

    A human male mandible was found under the eaves of a house. There were no associated items that allowed for personal identification. An anthropologist, who voluntarily joined our forensics team to give an expert opinion, found two small linear marks of 0.6 cm on the surface of the right condylar process. He thought these marks had been produced by a sharp object, and at the very least were not the result of bite marks by rodents or other animals. At first, the police did not appreciate the significance of the marks. One month later, however, other remains with similar marks were found near the scene, strongly suggesting that the case was a mutilation murder with a sharp weapon. After a vigorous search, the police obtained information that a young man in his twenties had gone missing in the area one year previously. After checking up on his relationships, a suspect was identified and arrested. The suspect subsequently confessed and was convicted as guilty of the crime. There are only a few forensic anthropologists in Japan. Consequently, almost all cases requiring bone examination have been handled by forensic pathologists, but it is hard for forensic pathologists to cover all fields comprehensively. The present case might have been solved without help from the anthropologist. However, we believe that forensic pathologists, especially less experienced ones, should seek advice from an expert in the field of forensic anthropology in order to carry a multidisciplinary forensic investigation. Given the current situation in, it is difficult in many institutes of forensics to obtain direct help from forensic anthropologists. The authors believe that collaborative networking via the Internet between forensic experts in each field cannot only obtain further information on complicated cases, but would also be helpful in training young forensic pathologists.

  14. Joint operational decision-making in collaborative transportation networks: The role of IT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, P.; Wortmann, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper addresses horizontal supply chain collaboration among autonomous freight carriers in the less-than-truckload industry. The main purpose of the paper is to identify and explain the challenges with joint operational decision-making in this context and investigate the precise role

  15. A network collaboration implementing technology to improve medication dispensing and administration in critical access hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Douglas S; Ward, Marcia M; Loes, Jean L; O'Brien, John

    2010-01-01

    We report how seven independent critical access hospitals collaborated with a rural referral hospital to standardize workflow policies and procedures while jointly implementing the same health information technologies (HITs) to enhance medication care processes. The study hospitals implemented the same electronic health record, computerized provider order entry, pharmacy information systems, automated dispensing cabinets (ADC), and barcode medication administration systems. We conducted interviews and examined project documents to explore factors underlying the successful implementation of ADC and barcode medication administration across the network hospitals. These included a shared culture of collaboration; strategic sequencing of HIT component implementation; interface among HIT components; strategic placement of ADCs; disciplined use and sharing of workflow analyses linked with HIT applications; planning for workflow efficiencies; acquisition of adequate supply of HIT-related devices; and establishing metrics to monitor HIT use and outcomes.

  16. Thirty years of European Collaboration in R&D: a Search for Key Network Indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caloghirou, Y.; Protogerou, A.; Siokas, E.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this session is to present a coherent set of papers offering useful insights on research priority setting processes/activities and indicators used to measure the impact of research and technology development programmes in Europe and Emerging Economies (Brazil, Chile, Peru and Russia). In particular, the first paper focuses on the research collaborative networks funded by the European Union during the past three decades and offers a comprehensive picture of science-industry collaboration in Europe by using network indicators and providing data on the characteristics and the innovative performance of young firms participating in these networks. The second paper presents three cases of non-traditional indicators for R&D funding agencies from emerging economies and aims at contributing to the discussions on the importance of employing suitable indicators that can complement classic STI indicators. The third paper seeks to provide a critical overview of the recent exercise in the evaluation of public research institutions in Russia. The session aims at bringing together researchers from both developed and emerging countries as well as policy makers and will be divided into two parts . The first part will be devoted in papers’ presentation and the second one in papers’ discussion by invited policy experts and officials. (Author)

  17. ATLAS: a traffic load aware sensor MAC design for collaborative body area sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Obaidur; Hong, Choong Seon; Lee, Sungwon; Bang, Young-Cheol

    2011-01-01

    In collaborative body sensor networks, namely wireless body area networks (WBANs), each of the physical sensor applications is used to collaboratively monitor the health status of the human body. The applications of WBANs comprise diverse and dynamic traffic loads such as very low-rate periodic monitoring (i.e., observation) data and high-rate traffic including event-triggered bursts. Therefore, in designing a medium access control (MAC) protocol for WBANs, energy conservation should be the primary concern during low-traffic periods, whereas a balance between satisfying high-throughput demand and efficient energy usage is necessary during high-traffic times. In this paper, we design a traffic load-aware innovative MAC solution for WBANs, called ATLAS. The design exploits the superframe structure of the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, and it adaptively uses the contention access period (CAP), contention free period (CFP) and inactive period (IP) of the superframe based on estimated traffic load, by applying a dynamic "wh" (whenever which is required) approach. Unlike earlier work, the proposed MAC design includes load estimation for network load-status awareness and a multi-hop communication pattern in order to prevent energy loss associated with long range transmission. Finally, ATLAS is evaluated through extensive simulations in ns-2 and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the protocol.

  18. Investigating physics learning with layered student interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Traxler, Adrienne

    Centrality in student interaction networks (SINs) can be linked to variables like grades [1], persistence [2], and participation [3]. Recent efforts in the field of network science have been done to investigate layered - or multiplex - networks as mathematical objects [4]. These networks can be e......, this study investigates how target entropy [5,1] and pagerank [6,7] are affected when we take time and modes of interaction into account. We present our preliminary models and results and outline our future work in this area....

  19. Social network analysis as a method for analyzing interaction in collaborative online learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rice Doran

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Social network analysis software such as NodeXL has been used to describe participation and interaction in numerous social networks, but it has not yet been widely used to examine dynamics in online classes, where participation is frequently required rather than optional and participation patterns may be impacted by the requirements of the class, the instructor’s activities, or participants’ intrinsic engagement with the subject matter. Such social network analysis, which examines the dynamics and interactions among groups of participants in a social network or learning group, can be valuable in programs focused on teaching collaborative and communicative skills, including teacher preparation programs. Applied to these programs, social network analysis can provide information about instructional practices likely to facilitate student interaction and collaboration across diverse student populations. This exploratory study used NodeXL to visualize students’ participation in an online course, with the goal of identifying (1 ways in which NodeXL could be used to describe patterns in participant interaction within an instructional setting and (2 identifying specific patterns in participant interaction among students in this particular course. In this sample, general education teachers demonstrated higher measures of connection and interaction with other participants than did those from specialist (ESOL or special education backgrounds, and tended to interact more frequently with all participants than the majority of participants from specialist backgrounds. We recommend further research to delineate specific applications of NodeXL within an instructional context, particularly to identify potential patterns in student participation based on variables such as gender, background, cultural and linguistic heritage, prior training and education, and prior experience so that instructors can ensure their practice helps to facilitate student interaction

  20. Network of educational investigation: Teaching innovatio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana de Pablo Redondo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The new educational reality, with the introduction of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA; and new requirements for education require a rethinking of the teaching process, which will use new technologies as key instruments. However, the concept of educational innovation goes beyond the widespread use of Information Technologies (IT. Structural changes are needed in educational institutions, which must be reorganized according to a new paradigm.This paper presents the strategic transformation developed by the National University of Distance Education (UNED; which involves the introduction of new instruments, new methodologies for current and prospective students and a new network organizational structure that facilitates global access to content and new methodologies. We emphasize Teaching Innovation Network, with special attention to the Educational Innovation in Finance. It shows a real example of combination of institutional change and educational initiatives. It combines efforts towards a better service and attention to students and the rest of the university community. And last, but not least, this new paradigm it is not only feasible but efficient because improvements outweigh organizational implications and economic costs

  1. Bootstrapping disaster: The challenge of growing and maintaining a cross-sector collaborative network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachhaus, Aaron

    This article examines the interaction of nonprofit and private actors with the traditional bureaucratic structures of government in central Pennsylvania&s recovery from hurricane Irene and tropical storm Lee. That effort relied heavily on private and nonprofit organizations as drivers of the response and recovery. The author maps the organizations involved in the recovery effort and explores the impact of the recovery effort on those organizations. A social network analysis was conducted and complemented with follow-up interviews with key actors. The network analysis reveals weak communication between sectors and a reliance on nonprofits to deliver services; interviews uncover the challenges of intersectoral collaboration. The author addresses the successes and limitations of the means by which a network of nonprofit efforts were coordinated with federal and state relief efforts and draw lessons for improving future practices. The author finds that this case deviates from theory in several ways that complicated community response and recovery. In particular, the challenges of developing and maintaining a recovery network while simultaneously delivering services placed great strain on several organizations, as well as on the fledgling network as a whole.

  2. Linked Heritage: a collaborative terminology management platform for a network of multilingual thesauri and controlled vocabularies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Veronique Leroi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminology and multilingualism have been one of the main focuses of the Athena Project. Linked Heritage as a legacy of this project also deals with terminology and bring theory to practice applying the recommendations given in the Athena Project. Linked Heritage as a direct follow-up of these recommendations on terminology and multilingualism is currently working on the development of a Terminology Management Platform (TMP. This platform will allow any cultural institution to register, SKOSify and manage its terminology in a collaborative way. This Terminology Management Platform will provide a network of multilingual and cross-domain terminologies.

  3. On investigating social dynamics in tactical opportunistic mobile networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Li, Yong

    2014-06-01

    The efficiency of military mobile network operations at the tactical edge is challenging due to the practical Disconnected, Intermittent, and Limited (DIL) environments at the tactical edge which make it hard to maintain persistent end-to-end wireless network connectivity. Opportunistic mobile networks are hence devised to depict such tactical networking scenarios. Social relations among warfighters in tactical opportunistic mobile networks are implicitly represented by their opportunistic contacts via short-range radios, but were inappropriately considered as stationary over time by the conventional wisdom. In this paper, we develop analytical models to probabilistically investigate the temporal dynamics of this social relationship, which is critical to efficient mobile communication in the battlespace. We propose to formulate such dynamics by developing various sociological metrics, including centrality and community, with respect to the opportunistic mobile network contexts. These metrics investigate social dynamics based on the experimentally validated skewness of users' transient contact distributions over time.

  4. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Wagner

    Full Text Available Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index, and year of first of publication, we compare bibliometric statistics and network measures. We find that the Laureates produce fewer papers but with higher average citations. The Laureates also produce more sole-authored papers both before and after winning the Prize. The Laureates have a lower number of coauthors across their entire careers than the matched group, but are equally collaborative on average. Further, we find no differences in international collaboration patterns. The Laureates coauthor network reveals significant differences from the non-Laureate network. Laureates are more likely to build bridges across a network when measuring by average degree, density, modularity, and communities. Both the Laureate and non-Laureate networks have "small world" properties, but the Laureates appear to exploit "structural holes" by reaching across the network in a brokerage style that may add social capital to the network. The dynamic may be making the network itself highly attractive and selective. These findings suggest new insights into the role "star scientists" in social networks and the production of scientific discoveries.

  5. XNsim: Internet-Enabled Collaborative Distributed Simulation via an Extensible Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, John; Karpov, Igor; Zhang, Chendi; Bedrossian, Nazareth S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the XNsim approach to achieve Internet-enabled, dynamically scalable collaborative distributed simulation capabilities is presented. With this approach, a complete simulation can be assembled from shared component subsystems written in different formats, that run on different computing platforms, with different sampling rates, in different geographic locations, and over singlelmultiple networks. The subsystems interact securely with each other via the Internet. Furthermore, the simulation topology can be dynamically modified. The distributed simulation uses a combination of hub-and-spoke and peer-topeer network topology. A proof-of-concept demonstrator is also presented. The XNsim demonstrator can be accessed at http://www.jsc.draver.corn/xn that hosts various examples of Internet enabled simulations.

  6. A Kohonen Network for Modeling Students' Learning Styles in Web 2.0 Collaborative Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatarain-Cabada, Ramón; Barrón-Estrada, M. Lucia; Zepeda-Sánchez, Leopoldo; Sandoval, Guillermo; Osorio-Velazquez, J. Moises; Urias-Barrientos, J. E.

    The identification of the best learning style in an Intelligent Tutoring System must be considered essential as part of the success in the teaching process. In many implementations of automatic classifiers finding the right student learning style represents the hardest assignment. The reason is that most of the techniques work using expert groups or a set of questionnaires which define how the learning styles are assigned to students. This paper presents a novel approach for automatic learning styles classification using a Kohonen network. The approach is used by an author tool for building Intelligent Tutoring Systems running under a Web 2.0 collaborative learning platform. The tutoring systems together with the neural network can also be exported to mobile devices. We present different results to the approach working under the author tool.

  7. LEONA: Transient Luminous Event and Thunderstorm High Energy Emission Collaborative Network in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sao Sabbas, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    This project has the goal of establishing the Collaborative Network LEONA, to study the electrodynamical coupling of the atmospheric layers signaled by Transient Luminous Events - TLEs and high energy emissions from thunderstorms. We will develop and install a remotely controlled network of cameras to perform TLE observations in different locations in South America and one neutron detector in southern Brazil. The camera network will allow building a continuous data set of the phenomena studied in this continent. The first two trial units of the camera network are already installed, in Brazil and Peru, and two more will be installed until December 2012, in Argentina and Brazil. We expect to determine the TLE geographic distribution, occurrence rate, morphology, and possible coupling with other geophysical phenomena in South America, such as the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly - SAMA. We also expect to study thunderstorm neutron emissions in a region of intense electrical activity, measuring neutron fluxes with high time resolution simultaneously with TLEs and lightning for the first time in South America. Using an intensified high-speed camera for TLE observation during 2 campaigns we expect to be able to determine the duration and spatial- temporal development of the TLEs observed, to study the structure and initiation of sprites and to measure the velocity of development of sprite structures and the sprite delay. The camera was acquired via the FAPESP project DEELUMINOS (2005-2010), which also nucleated our research group Atmospheric Electrodynamical Coupling - ACATMOS. LEONA will nucleate this research in other institutions in Brazil and other countries in South America, providing continuity for this important research in our region. The camera network will be an unique tool to perform consistent long term TLE observation, and in fact is the only way to accumulate a data set for a climatological study of South America, since satellite instrumentation turns off in

  8. Supporting interoperability of collaborative networks through engineering of a service-based Mediation Information System (MISE 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaben, Frederick; Mu, Wenxin; Boissel-Dallier, Nicolas; Barthe-Delanoe, Anne-Marie; Zribi, Sarah; Pingaud, Herve

    2015-08-01

    The Mediation Information System Engineering project is currently finishing its second iteration (MISE 2.0). The main objective of this scientific project is to provide any emerging collaborative situation with methods and tools to deploy a Mediation Information System (MIS). MISE 2.0 aims at defining and designing a service-based platform, dedicated to initiating and supporting the interoperability of collaborative situations among potential partners. This MISE 2.0 platform implements a model-driven engineering approach to the design of a service-oriented MIS dedicated to supporting the collaborative situation. This approach is structured in three layers, each providing their own key innovative points: (i) the gathering of individual and collaborative knowledge to provide appropriate collaborative business behaviour (key point: knowledge management, including semantics, exploitation and capitalisation), (ii) deployment of a mediation information system able to computerise the previously deduced collaborative processes (key point: the automatic generation of collaborative workflows, including connection with existing devices or services) (iii) the management of the agility of the obtained collaborative network of organisations (key point: supervision of collaborative situations and relevant exploitation of the gathered data). MISE covers business issues (through BPM), technical issues (through an SOA) and agility issues of collaborative situations (through EDA).

  9. Collaborative Area Monitoring Using Wireless Sensor Networks with Stationary and Mobile Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofanis P. Lambrou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring a large area with stationary sensor networks requires a very large number of nodes which with current technology implies a prohibitive cost. The motivation of this work is to develop an architecture where a set of mobile sensors will collaborate with the stationary sensors in order to reliably detect and locate an event. The main idea of this collaborative architecture is that the mobile sensors should sample the areas that are least covered (monitored by the stationary sensors. Furthermore, when stationary sensors have a “suspicion” that an event may have occurred, they report it to a mobile sensor that can move closer to the suspected area and can confirm whether the event has occurred or not. An important component of the proposed architecture is that the mobile nodes autonomously decide their path based on local information (their own beliefs and measurements as well as information collected from the stationary sensors in a neighborhood around them. We believe that this approach is appropriate in the context of wireless sensor networks since it is not feasible to have an accurate global view of the state of the environment.

  10. Optimizing Supply Chain Collaboration Based on Agreement Buyer-Supplier Relationship with Network Design Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi Sutopo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the rising competitive environment with shorter product life cycles and high customization forces industries to increase their flexibility, speed up their response, and enhance concurrent engineering designs. To integrate these prospects, supply chain collaboration becomes a pertinent strategy for industries to strengthen their competitiveness. The network design problem is used to implement supply chain collaboration. In the buying and selling process, sharing information between buyer and supplier are important to obtain a transaction decision. The optimimum supply chain profit can be identified by mathematical model of network design problem. The Mathematical Model takes into consideration the uncertainity in negotiation of supply chain, transportation problems, and locationallocation of products from supplier to buyer in the planning based on the time value of money. The results show that the model can be used to optimize the supply chain profit. The supplier gets a profit because income were received in the initial contract, while the buyer profit comes from lower pay.

  11. ATLAS: A Traffic Load Aware Sensor MAC Design for Collaborative Body Area Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Cheol Bang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In collaborative body sensor networks, namely wireless body area networks(WBANs, each of the physical sensor applications is used to collaboratively monitor thehealth status of the human body. The applications of WBANs comprise diverse and dynamictraffic loads such as very low-rate periodic monitoring (i.e., observation data and high-ratetraffic including event-triggered bursts. Therefore, in designing a medium access control(MAC protocol for WBANs, energy conservation should be the primary concern duringlow-traffic periods, whereas a balance between satisfying high-throughput demand andefficient energy usage is necessary during high-traffic times. In this paper, we design atraffic load-aware innovative MAC solution for WBANs, called ATLAS. The design exploitsthe superframe structure of the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, and it adaptively uses the contentionaccess period (CAP, contention free period (CFP and inactive period (IP of the superframebased on estimated traffic load, by applying a dynamic “wh” (whenever which is requiredapproach. Unlike earlier work, the proposed MAC design includes load estimation fornetwork load-status awareness and a multi-hop communication pattern in order to preventenergy loss associated with long range transmission. Finally, ATLAS is evaluated throughextensive simulations in ns-2 and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the protocol.

  12. LeaRN: A Collaborative Learning-Research Network for a WLCG Tier-3 Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calle, Elio Pérez

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Modern Physics of the University of Science and Technology of China is hosting a Tier-3 centre for the ATLAS experiment. A interdisciplinary team of researchers, engineers and students are devoted to the task of receiving, storing and analysing the scientific data produced by the LHC. In order to achieve the highest performance and to develop a knowledge base shared by all members of the team, the research activities and their coordination are being supported by an array of computing systems. These systems have been designed to foster communication, collaboration and coordination among the members of the team, both face-to-face and remotely, and both in synchronous and asynchronous ways. The result is a collaborative learning-research network whose main objectives are awareness (to get shared knowledge about other's activities and therefore obtain synergies), articulation (to allow a project to be divided, work units to be assigned and then reintegrated) and adaptation (to adapt information technologies to the needs of the group). The main technologies involved are Communication Tools such as web publishing, revision control and wikis, Conferencing Tools such as forums, instant messaging and video conferencing and Coordination Tools, such as time management, project management and social networks. The software toolkit has been deployed by the members of the team and it has been based on free and open source software.

  13. LeaRN: A Collaborative Learning-Research Network for a WLCG Tier-3 Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Calle, Elio

    2011-12-01

    The Department of Modern Physics of the University of Science and Technology of China is hosting a Tier-3 centre for the ATLAS experiment. A interdisciplinary team of researchers, engineers and students are devoted to the task of receiving, storing and analysing the scientific data produced by the LHC. In order to achieve the highest performance and to develop a knowledge base shared by all members of the team, the research activities and their coordination are being supported by an array of computing systems. These systems have been designed to foster communication, collaboration and coordination among the members of the team, both face-to-face and remotely, and both in synchronous and asynchronous ways. The result is a collaborative learning-research network whose main objectives are awareness (to get shared knowledge about other's activities and therefore obtain synergies), articulation (to allow a project to be divided, work units to be assigned and then reintegrated) and adaptation (to adapt information technologies to the needs of the group). The main technologies involved are Communication Tools such as web publishing, revision control and wikis, Conferencing Tools such as forums, instant messaging and video conferencing and Coordination Tools, such as time management, project management and social networks. The software toolkit has been deployed by the members of the team and it has been based on free and open source software.

  14. Practical Considerations in the Implementation of Collaborative Beamforming on Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Felici-Castell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are composed of spatially distributed autonomous sensor devices, named motes. These motes have their own power supply, processing unit, sensors and wireless communications However with many constraints, such as limited energy, bandwidth and computational capabilities. In these networks, at least one mote called a sink, acts as a gateway to connect with other networks. These sensor networks run monitoring applications and then the data gathered by these motes needs to be retrieved by the sink. When this sink is located in the far field, there have been many proposals in the literature based on Collaborative Beamforming (CB, also known as Distributed or Cooperative Beamforming, for these long range communications to reach the sink. In this paper, we conduct a thorough study of the related work and analyze the requirements to do CB. In order to implement these communications in real scenarios, we will consider if these requirements and the assumptions made are feasible from the point of view of commercial motes and their constraints. In addition, we will go a step further and will consider different alternatives, by relaxing these requirements, trying to find feasible assumptions to carry out these types of communications with commercial motes. This research considers the nonavailability of a central clock that synchronizes all motes in the WSN, and all motes have identical hardware. This is a feasibility study to do CB on WSN, using a simulated scenario with randomized delays obtained from experimental data from commercial motes.

  15. Rural Health Networks: How Network Analysis Can Inform Patient Care and Organizational Collaboration in a Rural Breast Cancer Screening Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusaczyk, Beth; Maki, Julia; Luke, Douglas A; Lobb, Rebecca

    2018-04-15

    Rural health networks have the potential to improve health care quality and access. Despite this, the use of network analysis to study rural health networks is limited. The purpose of this study was to use network analysis to understand how a network of rural breast cancer care providers deliver services and to demonstrate the value of this methodology in this research area. Leaders at 47 Federally Qualified Health Centers and Rural Health Clinics across 10 adjacent rural counties were asked where they refer patients for mammograms or breast biopsies. These clinics and the 22 referral providers that respondents named comprised the network. The network was analyzed graphically and statistically with exponential random graph modeling. Most (96%, n = 45) of the clinics and referral sites (95%, n = 21) are connected to each other. Two clinics of the same type were 62% less likely to refer patients to the same providers as 2 clinics of different types (OR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.29-0.50). Clinics in the same county have approximately 8 times higher odds of referring patients to the same providers compared to clinics in different counties (OR = 7.80, CI = 4.57-13.31). This study found that geographic location of resources is an important factor in rural health care providers' referral decisions and demonstrated the usefulness of network analysis for understanding rural health networks. These results can be used to guide delivery of patient care and strengthen the network by building resources that take location into account. © 2018 National Rural Health Association.

  16. Collaborative Catchment-Scale Water Quality Management using Integrated Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Huma; Harris, Nick; Merrett, Geoff

    2013-04-01

    Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, United Kingdom Summary The challenge of improving water quality (WQ) is a growing global concern [1]. Poor WQ is mainly attributed to poor water management and outdated agricultural activities. We propose that collaborative sensor networks spread across an entire catchment can allow cooperation among individual activities for integrated WQ monitoring and management. We show that sharing information on critical parameters among networks of water bodies and farms can enable identification and quantification of the contaminant sources, enabling better decision making for agricultural practices and thereby reducing contaminants fluxes. Motivation and results Nutrient losses from land to water have accelerated due to agricultural and urban pursuits [2]. In many cases, the application of fertiliser can be reduced by 30-50% without any loss of yield [3]. Thus information about nutrient levels and trends around the farm can improve agricultural practices and thereby reduce water contamination. The use of sensor networks for monitoring WQ in a catchment is in its infancy, but more applications are being tested [4]. However, these are focussed on local requirements and are mostly limited to water bodies. They have yet to explore the use of this technology for catchment-scale monitoring and management decisions, in an autonomous and dynamic manner. For effective and integrated WQ management, we propose a system that utilises local monitoring networks across a catchment, with provision for collaborative information sharing. This system of networks shares information about critical events, such as rain or flooding. Higher-level applications make use of this information to inform decisions about nutrient management, improving the quality of monitoring through the provision of richer datasets of catchment information to local networks. In the full paper, we present example scenarios and analyse how the benefits of

  17. Transforming public health education in India through networking and collaborations: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P

    2013-01-01

    A competent and motivated health workforce is indispensable to achieve the best health outcomes possible through given available resources and circumstances. However, apart from the shortages and unequal distribution, the workforce has fallen short of responding to the public health challenges of 21 st century also because of primarily the traditional training of health professionals. Although, health professionals have made enormous contributions to health and development over the past century, the 20 th century educational strategies are unfit to tackle 21 st century challenges. One of the key recommendations of the Lancet Commission on Education of Health Professionals is to improve health through reforms of professional education by establishing networks and partnerships which takes advantage of information and communication linkages. The primary goal of this manuscript is to highlight the potential of networks and partnerships in advancing the agenda of educational reforms to revitalize public health education in India. It outlines the current status and expanding scope of public health education in India, existing networks of public health professionals and public health education institutions in the country, and opportunities, advantages and challenges for such networks. Although, we have networks of individuals and institutions in the country, there potential to bring about change has still not being utilized fully and effectively. Immediate collaborative efforts could be directed towards designing and adaptation of competency driven curriculum frameworks suitable of addressing public health challenges of 21 st century, shifting the current focus of curriculum to multidisciplinary public health outlook, developing accreditation mechanisms for both the programs and institutions, engaging in creating job opportunities and designing career pathways for public health professionals in public and private sector. These efforts could certainly be facilitated

  18. Supply Chain Management Or Adaptive Business Network? – Coordination Versus Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilies Liviu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available You are not the only company capable to create value for your clients. For making valuable products, for performing high standard services, one company is no longer enough in this new informational era, in this new needs era. Better business performing means now to satisfy more complex needs quicker than ever. Could one company face this challenge alone? Is there another way? Collaboration may be the answer. Maybe the most well-known term when it comes to collaboration between companies is Supply Chain. Why Supply Chain, why Supply Chain Management (SCM? This article presents the answers to these questions, but also presents different approaches regarding SCM: the logistics approach regarding supply chain management, the strategic approach, the new entrepreneurial approach, supply chain as a win-win game. New paradigms regarding collaboration appeared regarding business collaboration: Adaptive Business Network (ABN. Do these new concepts imply the dead of SCM? Or are them only a new wave in SCM terminology and business orientation? Our conclusion is that these new approach is a normal change in business: businesses are made by people and people don’t like to be conducted (managed. The old-fashioned SCM was based on a coordinator versus several obedients relation. It is absolutely normal to dream at freedom and to be not very efficient while you have to play after somebody else rules. ABN is in the other side of human relations and also business relations – it insists on partnering. Everybody is a part of a chain which has as its main goal customer satisfaction, has the right to make proposals, to negotiate, and to be a winner. Of course, ABN appearance does not involve SCM disappearance, but change in how some chains are managed, in how some chains function. We shall see for the future if an organization with several brains is more successful.

  19. Delay-sensitive content distribution via peer-to-peer collaboration in public safety vehicular ad-hoc networks

    KAUST Repository

    Atat, Rachad

    2014-05-01

    Delay-sensitive content distribution with peer-to-peer (P2P) cooperation in public safety vehicular networks is investigated. Two cooperative schemes are presented and analyzed. The first scheme is based on unicasting from the base station, whereas the second is based on threshold based multicasting. Long Term Evolution (LTE) is used for long range (LR) communications with the base station (BS) and IEEE 802.11p is considered for inter-vehicle collaboration on the short range (SR). The first scheme is shown to outperform non-cooperative unicasting and multicasting, while the second scheme outperforms non-cooperative unicasting beyond a specific number of cooperating vehicles, when the appropriate 802.11p power class is used. The first scheme achieves the best performance among the compared methods, and a practical approximation of that scheme is shown to be close to optimal performance. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transnational science and collaborative networks. The case of Genetics and Radiobiology in Mexico, 1950-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The transnational approach of the science and technology studies (S&TS) abandons the nation as a unit of analysis in order to understand the development of science history. It also abandons Euro-US-centred narratives in order to explain the role of international collaborative networks and the circulation of knowledge, people, artefacts and scientific practices. It is precisely under this perspective that the development of genetics and radiobiology in Mexico shall be analyzed, together with the pioneering work of the Mexican physician-turned-geneticist Alfonso León de Garay who spent two years in the Galton Laboratory in London under the supervision of Lionel Penrose. Upon his return de Garay funded the Genetics and Radiobiology Program of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy based on local needs and the aim of working beyond geographical limitations to thus facilitate the circulation of knowledge, practices and people. The three main lines of research conducted in the years after its foundation that were in line with international projects while responding to the national context were, first, cytogenetic studies of certain abnormalities, and the cytogenetics and anthropological studies of the Olympic Games held in Mexico in 1968; second, the study of the effects of radiation on hereditary material; and third, the study of population genetics in Drosophila and in Mexican indigenous groups. The program played a key role in reshaping the scientific careers of Mexican geneticists, and in transferring locally sourced research into broader networks. This case shows the importance of international collaborative networks and circulation in the constitution of national scientific elites, and also shows the national and transnational concerns that shaped local practices.

  1. Collaborative Chronic Care Networks (C3Ns) to transform chronic illness care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Peter A; Peterson, Laura E; Seid, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Despite significant gains by pediatric collaborative improvement networks, the overall US system of chronic illness care does not work well. A new paradigm is needed: a Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N). A C3N is a network-based production system that harnesses the collective intelligence of patients, clinicians, and researchers and distributes the production of knowledge, information, and know-how over large groups of people, dramatically accelerating the discovery process. A C3N is a platform of "operating systems" on which interconnected processes and interventions are designed, tested, and implemented. The social operating system is facilitated by community building, engaging all stakeholders and their expertise, and providing multiple ways to participate. Standard progress measures and a robust information technology infrastructure enable the technical operating system to reduce unwanted variation and adopt advances more rapidly. A structured approach to innovation design provides a scientific operating system or "laboratory" for what works and how to make it work. Data support testing and research on multiple levels: comparative effectiveness research for populations, evaluating care delivery processes at the care center level, and N-of-1 trials and other methods to select the best treatment of individual patient circumstances. Methods to reduce transactional costs to participate include a Federated IRB Model in which centers rely on a protocol approved at 1 central institutional review board and a "commons framework" for organizational copyright and intellectual property concerns. A fully realized C3N represents a discontinuous leap to a self-developing learning health system capable of producing a qualitatively different approach to improving health.

  2. A Webometric Investigation of Visibility and Collaboration of Iranian Nanotechnology Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Sohili

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation intends to review the extent of visibility, impact and collaboration of Iranian nanotechnology websites using webometric method of link analysis. The sample consists of all websites dealing with nanotechnology in Iran. Findings showed that these sites have low visibility, web impact factor and page count. Iranian Nanotechnology Initiative, Nano Ideas and Iranian Nanotechnology Association had the highest number of inlinks and therefore highest visibility, while Nanotechnology Department Website had the lowest visibility. Findings also indicated that Amir Kabir Technical University Nanotechnology Committee website, Iran Nanotechnology initiative and Nano Ideas websites had the highest web impact factor, while Kashan University Institute for Nano Science and Technology had the lowest web impact factor. It was further established that Iranian Nanotech websites collaborate within two clusters. A Multi-dimensional scale was used.

  3. Investigating the Relationship between Learning Style Preferences and Teaching Collaboration Skills and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Seung L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study that investigates the relationship between participants' learning style preferences and their perceptions of a professional workshop on collaboration and technology to support collaboration. The Learning Preference Scale-Students (LPSS) (Owens & Barnes......, 1992) was administered to identify participants' learning style preferences as cooperative, competitive and/or individualized. Using cluster analysis two groups, or categories, of learning style preferences among the participants emerged. Group 1 showed a strong preference for the cooperative learning...... style, and Group 2 showed a strong preference for competitive and cooperative learning styles. Group 1 rated the workshop more positively than Group 2. However, Group 2 reported a larger increase in self-efficacy compared to those in Group 1 (18.9% vs. 6.0%). Both groups provided different suggestions...

  4. The Value of Social Network Analysis for Evaluating Academic-Community Partnerships and Collaborations for Social Determinants of Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Candace Forbes; Haynes, Eboni Edmonson; Patterson, Danny; Pisu, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Community-based participatory research processes build healthy communities, as well as promote trust and genuine collaborative partnerships between stakeholders. Fostering relationships is essential to promoting these partnerships, which are necessary for collaborative, coordinated, and integrated efforts toward improving health outcomes in the community. The objective of our research was to demonstrate social network analysis as an evaluative tool to assess movement toward positive health outcomes through promoting relationships. Using the example of the Gulf States Health Policy Center Coalition based at Bayou Clinic in Bayou La Batre, Alabama, we demonstrate the ability of social network analysis (SNA) methods to measure and map the formation of relationships, as well as the level and frequency of these relationships. Data were collected via email using a survey of Gulf States Health Policy Center Coalition members (N=80, 87%) and analyzed using UCInet software for social network analysis in April 2016. In this application of SNA to the community coalition of the Gulf States Health Policy Center, we find that, on average, coalition members doubled their own network within the coalition in a time period of network was accompanied by a higher level of collaboration among the coalition members as posited by social network and capital theories. As such, the community engagement fostered through the Coalition has increased and thus, to date, the Gulf States Health Policy Center has been effective in promoting partnerships and collaboration.

  5. China's landscape in oncology drug research: perspectives from research collaboration networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Han; Ni, Jingyun; Barber, Michael; Scherngell, Thomas; Hu, Yuanjia

    2015-04-01

    Better understanding of China's landscape in oncology drug research is of great significance for discovering anti-cancer drugs in future. This article differs from previous studies by focusing on Chinese oncology drug research communities in co-publication networks at the institutional level. Moreover, this research aims to explore structures and behaviors of relevant research units by thematic community analysis and to address policy recommendations. This research used social network analysis to define an institutions network and to identify a community network which is characterized by thematic content. A total of 675 sample articles from 2008 through 2012 were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) database of Web of Science, and top institutions and institutional pairs are highlighted for further discussion. Meanwhile, this study revealed that institutions based in the Chinese mainland are located in a relatively central position, Taiwan's institutions are closely assembled on the side, and Hong Kong's units located in the middle of the Chinese mainland's and Taiwan's. Spatial division and institutional hierarchy are still critical barriers to research collaboration in the field of anti-cancer drugs in China. In addition, the communities focusing on hot research areas show the higher nodal degree, whereas communities giving more attention to rare research subjects are relatively marginalized to the periphery of network. This paper offers policy recommendations to accelerate cross-regional cooperation, such as through developing information technology and increasing investment. The brokers should focus more on outreach to other institutions. Finally, participation in topics of common interest is conducive to improved efficiency in research and development (R&D) resource allocation.

  6. To Enhance Collaborative Learning and Practice Network Knowledge with a Virtualization Laboratory and Online Synchronous Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Yuin Hwang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various computer networking courses have included additional laboratory classes in order to enhance students’ learning achievement. However, these classes need to establish a suitable laboratory where each student can connect network devices to configure and test functions within different network topologies. In this case, the Linux operating system can be used to operate network devices and the virtualization technique can include multiple OSs for supporting a significant number of students. In previous research, the virtualization application was successfully applied in a laboratory, but focused only on individual assignments. The present study extends previous research by designing the Networking Virtualization-Based Laboratory (NVBLab, which requires collaborative learning among the experimental students. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group for the experiment. The experimental group performed their laboratory assignments using NVBLab, whereas the control group completed them on virtual machines (VMs that were installed on their personal computers. Moreover, students using NVBLab were provided with an online synchronous discussion (OSD feature that enabled them to communicate with others. The laboratory assignments were divided into two parts: Basic Labs and Advanced Labs. The results show that the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in two Advanced Labs and the post-test after Advanced Labs. Furthermore, the experimental group’s activities were better than those of the control group based on the total average of the command count per laboratory. Finally, the findings of the interviews and questionnaires with the experimental group reveal that NVBLab was helpful during and after laboratory class.

  7. O8.10A MODEL FOR RESEARCH INITIATIVES FOR RARE CANCERS: THE COLLABORATIVE EPENDYMOMA RESEARCH NETWORK (CERN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T.S.; Aldape, K.; Gajjar, A.; Haynes, C.; Hirakawa, D.; Gilbertson, R.; Gilbert, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Ependymoma represents less than 5% of adult central nervous system (CNS) tumors and a higher percentage of pediatric CNS tumors, but it remains an orphan disease. The majority of the laboratory-based research and clinical trials have been conducted in the pediatric setting, a reflection of the relative incidence and funding opportunities. CERN, created in 2006, was designed to establish a collaborative effort between laboratory and clinical research and pediatric and adult investigators. The organization of CERN is based on integration and collaboration among five projects. Project 1 contains the clinical trials network encompassing both adult and pediatric centers. This group has completed 2 clinical trials with more underway. Project 2 is focused on molecular classification of human ependymoma tumor tissues and also contains the tumor repository which has now collected over 600 fully clinically annotated CNS ependymomas from adults and children. Project 3 is focused on drug discovery utilizing robust laboratory models of ependymoma to perform high throughput screening of drug libraries, then taking promising agents through extensive preclinical testing including monitoring of drug delivery to tumor using state of the art microdialysis. Project 4 contains the basic research efforts evaluating the molecular pathogenesis of ependymoma and has successfully translated these findings by generating the first mouse models of ependymoma that are employed in preclinical drug development in Project 3. Project 5 studies patient outcomes, including the incorporation of these measures in the clinical trials. This project also contains an online Ependymoma Outcomes survey, collecting data on the consequences of the disease and its treatment. These projects have been highly successful and collaborative. For example, the serial measurement of symptom burden (Project 5) has greatly contributed to the evaluation of treatment efficacy of a clinical trial (Project 1) and

  8. Investigation of efficient features for image recognition by neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Alexander; Gritsenko, Vladimir

    2012-04-01

    In the paper, effective and simple features for image recognition (named LiRA-features) are investigated in the task of handwritten digit recognition. Two neural network classifiers are considered-a modified 3-layer perceptron LiRA and a modular assembly neural network. A method of feature selection is proposed that analyses connection weights formed in the preliminary learning process of a neural network classifier. In the experiments using the MNIST database of handwritten digits, the feature selection procedure allows reduction of feature number (from 60 000 to 7000) preserving comparable recognition capability while accelerating computations. Experimental comparison between the LiRA perceptron and the modular assembly neural network is accomplished, which shows that recognition capability of the modular assembly neural network is somewhat better. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of multimedia didactic courseware of network on image diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaochun; Gong Jianping; Shen Junkang; Lu Zhian; Chen Guangqiang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the methods of the design of multimedia didactic courseware of network on image diagnosis and its characteristic. Methods: Based on the teaching material of 'image diagnosis', the images were collected with computers and scanners, and processed with graphic software, and then the multimedia didactic courseware was designed with Frontpage. Results: The design of multimedia didactic courseware of network has been completed. Domain name has been applied. Part of the courseware has been passed to the website. Conclusion: Multimedia didactic courseware of network, with bright prospects, is superior in agility of didactic style, in abundance of content, and in timeliness of information

  10. Collaboration, learning and innovation across outsourced services value networks software services outsourcing in China

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Pamela; Du, Rong

    2015-01-01

    This book collects and reports on the results of a study conducted on the Chinese Software and Services Outsourcing (SSO) industry, focusing on one of its main players as a key case study. Two sets of research findings are presented: first, the knowledge management and communication processes inherent within a highly collaborative software development project between the case study company and one of its long-term UK clients are explored and distilled into specific practices; second, at the organizational level, the strategies used by the company to build and exploit capabilities and to dynamically configure resources to promote specific value positions along its outsourced services value networks are identified and discussed. The significance of these findings for similar China-based global high-tech firms and the value of this organizational form in moving closer to the goals of the 2020 enterprise vision are both discussed, along with the implications of the findings for EU/UK businesses operating in simil...

  11. Optimization and Simulation of Collaborative Networks for Sustainable Production and Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liotta, Giacomo; Kaihara, Toshiya; Stecca, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Complex and delocalized manufacturing industries require high levels of integration between production and transportation in order to effectively implement lean and agile operations. There are, however, limitations in research and applications simultaneously embodying further sustainability...... dimensions. This paper presents a methodological framework based on optimization and simulation to integrate aggregate optimized plans for production and multimodal transportation with detailed dynamic distribution plans affected by demand uncertainty. The objective function of the optimization model...... considers supply, production, transportation, and CO2 emission costs, as well as collaboration over the multimodal network. Bill-of-materials and capacity constraints are included. A feedback between simulation and optimization is used to plan requirements for materials and components. Computational...

  12. Hierarchical Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks for Collaborative Hybrid Semi-Supervised Classifier Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ding

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless multimedia sensor networks (WMSN have recently emerged as one ofthe most important technologies, driven by the powerful multimedia signal acquisition andprocessing abilities. Target classification is an important research issue addressed in WMSN,which has strict requirement in robustness, quickness and accuracy. This paper proposes acollaborative semi-supervised classifier learning algorithm to achieve durative onlinelearning for support vector machine (SVM based robust target classification. The proposedalgorithm incrementally carries out the semi-supervised classifier learning process inhierarchical WMSN, with the collaboration of multiple sensor nodes in a hybrid computingparadigm. For decreasing the energy consumption and improving the performance, somemetrics are introduced to evaluate the effectiveness of the samples in specific sensor nodes,and a sensor node selection strategy is also proposed to reduce the impact of inevitablemissing detection and false detection. With the ant optimization routing, the learningprocess is implemented with the selected sensor nodes, which can decrease the energyconsumption. Experimental results demonstrate that the collaborative hybrid semi-supervised classifier learning algorithm can effectively implement target classification inhierarchical WMSN. It has outstanding performance in terms of energy efficiency and timecost, which verifies the effectiveness of the sensor nodes selection and ant optimizationrouting.

  13. Scientific retreats with 'speed dating': networking to stimulate new interdisciplinary translational research collaborations and team science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranwala, Damayanthi; Alberg, Anthony J; Brady, Kathleen T; Obeid, Jihad S; Davis, Randal; Halushka, Perry V

    2017-02-01

    To stimulate the formation of new interdisciplinary translational research teams and innovative pilot projects, the South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute (South Carolina Clinical and Translational Science Award, CTSA) initiated biannual scientific retreats with 'speed dating' networking sessions. Retreat themes were prioritized based on the following criteria; cross-cutting topic, unmet medical need, generation of novel technologies and methodologies. Each retreat begins with an external keynote speaker followed by a series of brief research presentations by local researchers focused on the retreat theme, articulating potential areas for new collaborations. After each session of presentations, there is a 30 min scientific 'speed dating' period during which the presenters meet with interested attendees to exchange ideas and discuss collaborations. Retreat attendees are eligible to compete for pilot project funds on the topic of the retreat theme. The 10 retreats held have had a total of 1004 participants, resulted in 61 pilot projects with new interdisciplinary teams, and 14 funded projects. The retreat format has been a successful mechanism to stimulate novel interdisciplinary research teams and innovative translational research projects. Future retreats will continue to target topics of cross-cutting importance to biomedical and public health research. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  14. Towards a Global Hub and a Network for Collaborative Advancing of Space Weather Predictive Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Heynderickz, D.; Grande, M.; Opgenoorth, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    The COSPAR/ILWS roadmap on space weather published in 2015 (Advances in Space Research, 2015: DOI: 10.1016/j.asr.2015.03.023) prioritizes steps to be taken to advance understanding of space environment phenomena and to improve space weather forecasting capabilities. General recommendations include development of a comprehensive space environment specification, assessment of the state of the field on a 5-yr basis, standardization of meta-data and product metrics. To facilitate progress towards roadmap goals there is a need for a global hub for collaborative space weather capabilities assessment and development that brings together research, engineering, operational, educational, and end-user communities. The COSPAR Panel on Space Weather is aiming to build upon past progress and to facilitate coordination of established and new international space weather research and development initiatives. Keys to the success include creating flexible, collaborative, inclusive environment and engaging motivated groups and individuals committed to active participation in international multi-disciplinary teams focused on topics addressing emerging needs and challenges in the rapidly growing field of space weather. Near term focus includes comprehensive assessment of the state of the field and establishing an internationally recognized process to quantify and track progress over time, development of a global network of distributed web-based resources and interconnected interactive services required for space weather research, analysis, forecasting and education.

  15. Spanning Boundaries in an Arizona Watershed Partnership: Information Networks as Tools for Entrenchment or Ties for Collaboration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tischa A. Muñoz-Erickson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The need to develop successful collaborative strategies is an enduring problem in sustainable resource management. Our goal is to evaluate the relationship between information networks and conflict in the context of collaborative groundwater management in the rapidly growing central highland region of Arizona. In this region, water-management conflicts have emerged because of stakeholders' differing geographic perspectives and competing scientific claims. Using social network analyses, we explored the extent to which the Verde River Basin Partnership (VRBP, which was charged with developing and sharing scientific information, has contributed to collaboration in the region. To accomplish this, we examined the role that this stakeholder partnership plays in reinforcing or overcoming the geographic, ideological, expert, and power conflicts among its members. Focusing on information sharing, we tested the extent to which several theoretically important elements of successful collaboration were evidenced by data from the VRBP. The structure of information sharing provides insight into ways in which barriers between diverse perspectives might be retained and elucidates weaknesses in the partnership. To characterize information sharing, we examined interaction ties among individuals with different geographic concerns, hierarchical scales of interest, belief systems (about science, the environment, and the role of the partnership, and self-identified expertise types. Results showed that the partnership's information-sharing network spans most of these boundaries. Based on current theories of collaboration, we would expect the partnership network to be conducive to collaboration. We found that information exchanges are limited by differences in connection patterns across actor expertise and environmental-belief systems. Actors who view scientists as advocates are significantly more likely to occupy boundary-spanning positions, that appear to impede the

  16. CEEPRA - Collaboration Network on EuroArctic Environmental Radiation Protection and Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solatie, D.; Leppaenen, A.P. [STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland); Kasatkina, N. [Murmansk Marine Biological Institute (Russian Federation); Nalbandyan, A. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Paatero, J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland); Reinikainen, K.; Nissi, M. [Poeyry Finland Oy (Finland); Vaaramaa, K. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    CEEPRA (Collaboration Network on EuroArctic Environmental Radiation Protection and Research) is an EU-funded project acting under the Kolarctic ENPI CBC programme. The CEEPRA project's main aim is to develop a collaboration network between key radiation research institutions in the EuroArctic region, which will lead to improved emergency preparedness capabilities in the event of any nuclear accidents. The project is studying the current state of radioactive contamination in the terrestrial and marine ecosystems in the EuroArctic region by examining environmental samples collected from Lapland in Finland, Finnmark and Troms in Norway, the Kola Peninsula in Russia and in the Barents Sea. The results provide updated information on the present levels, occurrence and the fate of radioactive substances in the Arctic environments and food chains. Special attention is given to collection and analyses of natural products widely used by general public in Finland, Russia and Norway, such as berries, mushrooms, fish and reindeer meat. The region-specific risk assessments are carried out through modelling and studying of long-term effects of potential nuclear accidents in the EuroArctic region and possible impacts on the region's indigenous population, terrestrial and marine environments, reindeer husbandry, the natural product sector, tourism and industries. The project partners are Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) from Finland, the Murmansk Marine Biological Institute (MMBI) from Russia, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), Finnish Meteorological Institute and Poeyry Finland Oy. The Southern Scientific Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SSC RAS) and Norwegian Meteorological Institute (MET) are taking part in the project as well. The main results of the project are presented in this study. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  17. Analysing collaboration among HIV agencies through combining network theory and relational coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Nidhi; Marsteller, Jill Ann; Hsu, Yea Jen; Elliott, David L

    2016-02-01

    Agencies with different foci (e.g. nutrition, social, medical, housing) serve people living with HIV (PLHIV). Serving needs of PLHIV comprehensively requires a high degree of coordination among agencies which often benefits from more frequent communication. We combined Social Network theory and Relational Coordination theory to study coordination among HIV agencies in Baltimore. Social Network theory implies that actors (e.g., HIV agencies) establish linkages amongst themselves in order to access resources (e.g., information). Relational Coordination theory suggests that high quality coordination among agencies or teams relies on the seven dimensions of frequency, timeliness and accuracy of communication, problem-solving communication, knowledge of agencies' work, mutual respect and shared goals. We collected data on frequency of contact from 57 agencies using a roster method. Response options were ordinal ranging from 'not at all' to 'daily'. We analyzed data using social network measures. Next, we selected agencies with which at least one-third of the sample reported monthly or more frequent interaction. This yielded 11 agencies whom we surveyed on seven relational coordination dimensions with questions scored on a Likert scale of 1-5. Network density, defined as the proportion of existing connections to all possible connections, was 20% when considering monthly or higher interaction. Relational coordination scores from individual agencies to others ranged between 1.17 and 5.00 (maximum possible score 5). The average scores for different dimensions across all agencies ranged between 3.30 and 4.00. Shared goals (4.00) and mutual respect (3.91) scores were highest, while scores such as knowledge of each other's work and problem-solving communication were relatively lower. Combining theoretically driven analyses in this manner offers an innovative way to provide a comprehensive picture of inter-agency coordination and the quality of exchange that underlies

  18. A collaborative epidemiological investigation into the criminal fake artesunate trade in South East Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul N Newton

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998 the serious public health problem in South East Asia of counterfeit artesunate, containing no or subtherapeutic amounts of the active antimalarial ingredient, has led to deaths from untreated malaria, reduced confidence in this vital drug, large economic losses for the legitimate manufacturers, and concerns that artemisinin resistance might be engendered.With evidence of a deteriorating situation, a group of police, criminal analysts, chemists, palynologists, and health workers collaborated to determine the source of these counterfeits under the auspices of the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL and the Western Pacific World Health Organization Regional Office. A total of 391 samples of genuine and counterfeit artesunate collected in Vietnam (75, Cambodia (48, Lao PDR (115, Myanmar (Burma (137 and the Thai/Myanmar border (16, were available for analysis. Sixteen different fake hologram types were identified. High-performance liquid chromatography and/or mass spectrometry confirmed that all specimens thought to be counterfeit (195/391, 49.9% on the basis of packaging contained no or small quantities of artesunate (up to 12 mg per tablet as opposed to approximately 50 mg per genuine tablet. Chemical analysis demonstrated a wide diversity of wrong active ingredients, including banned pharmaceuticals, such as metamizole, and safrole, a carcinogen, and raw material for manufacture of methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy'. Evidence from chemical, mineralogical, biological, and packaging analysis suggested that at least some of the counterfeits were manufactured in southeast People's Republic of China. This evidence prompted the Chinese Government to act quickly against the criminal traders with arrests and seizures.An international multi-disciplinary group obtained evidence that some of the counterfeit artesunate was manufactured in China, and this prompted a criminal investigation. International cross

  19. A collaborative epidemiological investigation into the criminal fake artesunate trade in South East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul N; Fernández, Facundo M; Plançon, Aline; Mildenhall, Dallas C; Green, Michael D; Ziyong, Li; Christophel, Eva Maria; Phanouvong, Souly; Howells, Stephen; McIntosh, Eric; Laurin, Paul; Blum, Nancy; Hampton, Christina Y; Faure, Kevin; Nyadong, Leonard; Soong, C W Ray; Santoso, Budiono; Zhiguang, Wang; Newton, John; Palmer, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Since 1998 the serious public health problem in South East Asia of counterfeit artesunate, containing no or subtherapeutic amounts of the active antimalarial ingredient, has led to deaths from untreated malaria, reduced confidence in this vital drug, large economic losses for the legitimate manufacturers, and concerns that artemisinin resistance might be engendered. With evidence of a deteriorating situation, a group of police, criminal analysts, chemists, palynologists, and health workers collaborated to determine the source of these counterfeits under the auspices of the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the Western Pacific World Health Organization Regional Office. A total of 391 samples of genuine and counterfeit artesunate collected in Vietnam (75), Cambodia (48), Lao PDR (115), Myanmar (Burma) (137) and the Thai/Myanmar border (16), were available for analysis. Sixteen different fake hologram types were identified. High-performance liquid chromatography and/or mass spectrometry confirmed that all specimens thought to be counterfeit (195/391, 49.9%) on the basis of packaging contained no or small quantities of artesunate (up to 12 mg per tablet as opposed to approximately 50 mg per genuine tablet). Chemical analysis demonstrated a wide diversity of wrong active ingredients, including banned pharmaceuticals, such as metamizole, and safrole, a carcinogen, and raw material for manufacture of methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy'). Evidence from chemical, mineralogical, biological, and packaging analysis suggested that at least some of the counterfeits were manufactured in southeast People's Republic of China. This evidence prompted the Chinese Government to act quickly against the criminal traders with arrests and seizures. An international multi-disciplinary group obtained evidence that some of the counterfeit artesunate was manufactured in China, and this prompted a criminal investigation. International cross

  20. A Collaborative Epidemiological Investigation into the Criminal Fake Artesunate Trade in South East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul N; Fernández, Facundo M; Plançon, Aline; Mildenhall, Dallas C; Green, Michael D; Ziyong, Li; Christophel, Eva Maria; Phanouvong, Souly; Howells, Stephen; McIntosh, Eric; Laurin, Paul; Blum, Nancy; Hampton, Christina Y; Faure, Kevin; Nyadong, Leonard; Soong, C. W. Ray; Santoso, Budiono; Zhiguang, Wang; Newton, John; Palmer, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Background Since 1998 the serious public health problem in South East Asia of counterfeit artesunate, containing no or subtherapeutic amounts of the active antimalarial ingredient, has led to deaths from untreated malaria, reduced confidence in this vital drug, large economic losses for the legitimate manufacturers, and concerns that artemisinin resistance might be engendered. Methods and Findings With evidence of a deteriorating situation, a group of police, criminal analysts, chemists, palynologists, and health workers collaborated to determine the source of these counterfeits under the auspices of the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the Western Pacific World Health Organization Regional Office. A total of 391 samples of genuine and counterfeit artesunate collected in Vietnam (75), Cambodia (48), Lao PDR (115), Myanmar (Burma) (137) and the Thai/Myanmar border (16), were available for analysis. Sixteen different fake hologram types were identified. High-performance liquid chromatography and/or mass spectrometry confirmed that all specimens thought to be counterfeit (195/391, 49.9%) on the basis of packaging contained no or small quantities of artesunate (up to 12 mg per tablet as opposed to ∼ 50 mg per genuine tablet). Chemical analysis demonstrated a wide diversity of wrong active ingredients, including banned pharmaceuticals, such as metamizole, and safrole, a carcinogen, and raw material for manufacture of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (‘ecstasy'). Evidence from chemical, mineralogical, biological, and packaging analysis suggested that at least some of the counterfeits were manufactured in southeast People's Republic of China. This evidence prompted the Chinese Government to act quickly against the criminal traders with arrests and seizures. Conclusions An international multi-disciplinary group obtained evidence that some of the counterfeit artesunate was manufactured in China, and this prompted a criminal investigation

  1. Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) of networked systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, David P.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; McDonald, Michael James; Onunkwo, Uzoma A.; Tarman, Thomas David; Urias, Vincent E.

    2009-09-01

    This report describes recent progress made in developing and utilizing hybrid Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) environments. Many organizations require advanced tools to analyze their information system's security, reliability, and resilience against cyber attack. Today's security analysis utilize real systems such as computers, network routers and other network equipment, computer emulations (e.g., virtual machines) and simulation models separately to analyze interplay between threats and safeguards. In contrast, this work developed new methods to combine these three approaches to provide integrated hybrid SEPIA environments. Our SEPIA environments enable an analyst to rapidly configure hybrid environments to pass network traffic and perform, from the outside, like real networks. This provides higher fidelity representations of key network nodes while still leveraging the scalability and cost advantages of simulation tools. The result is to rapidly produce large yet relatively low-cost multi-fidelity SEPIA networks of computers and routers that let analysts quickly investigate threats and test protection approaches.

  2. New perspectives on the "silo effect": initial comparisons of network structures across public health collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevc, Christine A; Retrum, Jessica H; Varda, Danielle M

    2015-04-01

    We explored to what extent "silos" (preferential partnering) persist in interorganizational boundaries despite advances in working across boundaries. We focused on organizational homophily and resulting silo effects within networks that might both facilitate and impede success in public health collaboratives (PHCs). We analyzed data from 162 PHCs with a series of exponential random graph models to determine the influence of uniform and differential homophily among organizations and to identify the propensity for partnerships with similar organizations. The results demonstrated a low presence (8%) of uniform homophily among networks, whereas a greater number (30%) of PHCs contained varying levels of differential homophily by 1 or more types of organization. We noted that the higher frequency among law enforcement, nonprofits, and public health organizations demonstrated a partner preference with similar organizations. Although we identified only a modest occurrence of partner preference in PHCs, overall success in efforts to work across boundaries might be problematic when public health members (often leaders of PHCs) exhibit the tendency to form silos.

  3. Collaboration patterns in the German political science co-authorship network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifeld, Philip; Wankmüller, Sandra; Berger, Valentin T Z; Ingold, Karin; Steiner, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Research on social processes in the production of scientific output suggests that the collective research agenda of a discipline is influenced by its structural features, such as "invisible colleges" or "groups of collaborators" as well as academic "stars" that are embedded in, or connect, these research groups. Based on an encompassing dataset that takes into account multiple publication types including journals and chapters in edited volumes, we analyze the complete co-authorship network of all 1,339 researchers in German political science. Through the use of consensus graph clustering techniques and descriptive centrality measures, we identify the ten largest research clusters, their research topics, and the most central researchers who act as bridges and connect these clusters. We also aggregate the findings at the level of research organizations and consider the inter-university co-authorship network. The findings indicate that German political science is structured by multiple overlapping research clusters with a dominance of the subfields of international relations, comparative politics and political sociology. A small set of well-connected universities takes leading roles in these informal research groups.

  4. An Information-Theoretic Approach for Energy-Efficient Collaborative Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arienzo Loredana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of collaborative tracking of mobile nodes in wireless sensor networks is addressed. By using a novel metric derived from the energy model in LEACH (W.B. Heinzelman, A.P. Chandrakasan and H. Balakrishnan, Energy-Efficient Communication Protocol for Wireless Microsensor Networks, in: Proceedings of the 33rd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS '00, 2000 and aiming at an efficient resource solution, the approach adopts a strategy of combining target tracking with node selection procedures in order to select informative sensors to minimize the energy consumption of the tracking task. We layout a cluster-based architecture to address the limitations in computational power, battery capacity and communication capacities of the sensor devices. The computation of the posterior Cramer-Rao bound (PCRB based on received signal strength measurements has been considered. To track mobile nodes two particle filters are used: the bootstrap particle filter and the unscented particle filter, both in the centralized and in the distributed manner. Their performances are compared with the theoretical lower bound PCRB. To save energy, a node selection procedure based on greedy algorithms is proposed. The node selection problem is formulated as a cross-layer optimization problem and it is solved using greedy algorithms.

  5. Temporal motifs reveal collaboration patterns in online task-oriented networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Qi; Fang, Huiting; Fu, Chenbo; Filkov, Vladimir

    2015-05-01

    Real networks feature layers of interactions and complexity. In them, different types of nodes can interact with each other via a variety of events. Examples of this complexity are task-oriented social networks (TOSNs), where teams of people share tasks towards creating a quality artifact, such as academic research papers or software development in commercial or open source environments. Accomplishing those tasks involves both work, e.g., writing the papers or code, and communication, to discuss and coordinate. Taking into account the different types of activities and how they alternate over time can result in much more precise understanding of the TOSNs behaviors and outcomes. That calls for modeling techniques that can accommodate both node and link heterogeneity as well as temporal change. In this paper, we report on methodology for finding temporal motifs in TOSNs, limited to a system of two people and an artifact. We apply the methods to publicly available data of TOSNs from 31 Open Source Software projects. We find that these temporal motifs are enriched in the observed data. When applied to software development outcome, temporal motifs reveal a distinct dependency between collaboration and communication in the code writing process. Moreover, we show that models based on temporal motifs can be used to more precisely relate both individual developer centrality and team cohesion to programmer productivity than models based on aggregated TOSNs.

  6. Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Burgos, D., Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Brouns, F., & Koper, R. (2009). Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design). In L. Lockyer, S. Bennett, S. Agostinho & B. Harper (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Learning Design

  7. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A.; Mattson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index,

  8. The collaborative African genomics network training program: A trainee perspective on training the next generation of African scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collaborative African Genomics Network (CAfGEN) aims to establish sustainable genomics research programs in Botswana and Uganda through long-term training of PhD students from these countries at Baylor College of Medicine. Here, we present an overview of the CAfGEN PhD training program alongside...

  9. Australia's TERN: Building, Sustaining and Advancing Collaborative Long Term Ecosystem Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEld, A. A.; Phinn, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    TERN is Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (www.tern.org.au) is one of several environmental data collection, storage and sharing projects developed through the government's research infrastructure programs 2008-2014. This includes terrestrial and coastal ecosystem data collection infrastructure across multiple disciplines, hardware, software and processes used to store, analyse and integrate data sets. TERN's overall objective is to build the collaborations, infrastructure and programs to meet the needs of ecosystem science communities in Australia in the long term, through institutional frameworks necessary to establish a national terrestrial ecosystem site and observational network, coordinated networks enabling cooperation and operational experience; public access to quality assured and appropriately licensed data; and allowing the terrestrial ecosystem research community to define and sustain the terrestrial observing paradigm into the longer term. This paper explains how TERN was originally established, and now operates, along with plans to sustain itself in the future. TERN is implemented through discipline/technical groups referred to as "TERN Facilities". Combined, the facilities provide observations of surface mass and energy fluxes over key ecosystems, biophysical remote sensing data, ecological survey plots, soils information, and coastal ecosystems and associated water quality variables across Australia. Additional integrative facilities cover elements of ecoinformatics, data-scaling and modelling, and linking science to management. A central coordination and portal facility provides meta-data storage, data identification, legal and licensing support. Data access, uploading, meta-data generation, DOI attachment and licensing is completed at each facility's own portal level. TERN also acts as the open-data repository of choice for Australian scientists required to publish their data. Several key lessons we have learnt, will be presented

  10. The ESWN network as a platform to increase international collaboration between women in the Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Gesche; Wang, Yiming; Glessmer, Mirjam; Kirchgaessner, Amelie

    2014-05-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN; ESWNonline.org) is an international peer-mentoring network of women in the Earth Sciences, many in the early stages of their careers. ESWN's mission is to promote career development, build community, provide opportunities for informal mentoring and support, and facilitate professional collaborations. This has been accomplished via email and a listserv, on Facebook, at in-person networking events, and at professional development workshops. In an effort to facilitate international connections among women in the Earth Sciences, ESWN has developed a password protected community webpage supported by AGU and a National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant where members can create an online presence and interact with each other. For example, groups help women to connect with co-workers or center around a vast array of topics ranging from research interests, funding opportunities, work-life balance, teaching, scientific methods, and searching for a job to specific challenges faced by women in the earth sciences. Members can search past discussions and share documents like examples of research statements, useful interview materials, or model recommendation letters. Over the last 10 years, ESWN has grown by word of mouth to include more than 1600 members working on all 7 continents. ESWN also offers professional development workshops at major geologic conferences around the world and at ESWN-hosted workshops mostly exclusively throughout the United States. In 2014, ESWN offers a two day international workshop on communication and networking skills and career development. Women working in all disciplines of Earth Sciences from later PhD level up to junior professors in Europe are invited to the workshop that will be held in Kiel, Germany. The workshop offers participants an individual personality assessment and aims at providing participants with improved communication and networking skills. The second focus will be to teach them how to

  11. The Kansas Collaborative Research Network, KanCRN: Teaching science content through process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Steven B.

    The Kansas Collaborative Research Network, KanCRN is an Internet-based research community, in which citizens, teachers and students can engage in authentic, meaningful scientific inquiry. Recent efforts to reform science education in the United States have strongly emphasized that understanding of the nature of science is an essential component of general scientific literacy. The National Science Education Standards suggest that engaging students in scientific inquiry is one opportunity to develop an understanding of the nature of science. Extending the philosophical understanding of science to specific science classroom organization, KanCRN is large-scale, systemic project that attempts to achieve the vision of scientific inquiry in the National Science Education Standards. The underlying question of standards-based reform still remains; does participation in scientific inquiry provide compelling evidence of an increase in the understanding of the process of science and the ability to apply these skills in novel situations? This study took advantage of the Kansas City Kansas Public Schools involvement in districtwide systemic reform, First Things First. Each year the students in grades 3--12 complete a district First Things First questionnaire. Since longitudinal measures of student attitudes are generally difficult to obtain, this study tapped into this wealth of attitude measures gained from these questionnaires. These data sets include general demographics of the students, attitudinal data toward school and learning, and general achievement data. Running a factor analysis on these data sets allowed factoring out the influence of non-critical variables. In running this initial factor analysis of the First Things First data sets, several factors emerged as related to student's academic success on the Science Performance Assessment; Academic Effort, Teacher Quality, Project-based Learning, General Academic Ability (Self-Attitude Data), and Parental Support. Using

  12. GDTN: Genome-Based Delay Tolerant Network Formation in Heterogeneous 5G Using Inter-UA Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ilsun; Sharma, Vishal; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2016-01-01

    With a more Internet-savvy and sophisticated user base, there are more demands for interactive applications and services. However, it is a challenge for existing radio access networks (e.g. 3G and 4G) to cope with the increasingly demanding requirements such as higher data rates and wider coverage area. One potential solution is the inter-collaborative deployment of multiple radio devices in a 5G setting designed to meet exacting user demands, and facilitate the high data rate requirements in the underlying networks. These heterogeneous 5G networks can readily resolve the data rate and coverage challenges. Networks established using the hybridization of existing networks have diverse military and civilian applications. However, there are inherent limitations in such networks such as irregular breakdown, node failures, and halts during speed transmissions. In recent years, there have been attempts to integrate heterogeneous 5G networks with existing ad hoc networks to provide a robust solution for delay-tolerant transmissions in the form of packet switched networks. However, continuous connectivity is still required in these networks, in order to efficiently regulate the flow to allow the formation of a robust network. Therefore, in this paper, we present a novel network formation consisting of nodes from different network maneuvered by Unmanned Aircraft (UA). The proposed model utilizes the features of a biological aspect of genomes and forms a delay tolerant network with existing network models. This allows us to provide continuous and robust connectivity. We then demonstrate that the proposed network model has an efficient data delivery, lower overheads and lesser delays with high convergence rate in comparison to existing approaches, based on evaluations in both real-time testbed and simulation environment.

  13. Using Action Research to Investigate Social Networking Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Lisa; Harris, Katy

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the first cycle of an Action Research (AR) investigation into why professional learners are not using the Social Networking Technologies (SNTs) of their bespoke website. It presents the rationale of how this study came about, the ontological and epistemological stance of the authors and how this led to the particular choice…

  14. The LTER Network Information System: Improving Data Quality and Synthesis through Community Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servilla, M.; Brunt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Emerging in the 1980's as a U.S. National Science Foundation funded research network, the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network began with six sites and with the goal of performing comparative data collection and analysis of major biotic regions of North America. Today, the LTER Network includes 26 sites located in North America, Antarctica, Puerto Rico, and French Polynesia and has contributed a corpus of over 7,000 data sets to the public domain. The diversity of LTER research has led to a wealth of scientific data derived from atmospheric to terrestrial to oceanographic to anthropogenic studies. Such diversity, however, is a contributing factor to data being published with poor or inconsistent quality or to data lacking descriptive documentation sufficient for understanding their origin or performing derivative studies. It is for these reasons that the LTER community, in collaboration with the LTER Network Office, have embarked on the development of the LTER Network Information System (NIS) - an integrative data management approach to improve the process by which quality LTER data and metadata are assembled into a central archive, thereby enabling better discovery, analysis, and synthesis of derived data products. The mission of the LTER NIS is to promote advances in collaborative and synthetic ecological science at multiple temporal and spatial scales by providing the information management and technology infrastructure to increase: ? availability and quality of data from LTER sites - by the use and support of standardized approaches to metadata management and access to data; ? timeliness and number of LTER derived data products - by creating a suite of middleware programs and workflows that make it easy to create and maintain integrated data sets derived from LTER data; and ? knowledge generated from the synthesis of LTER data - by creating standardized access and easy to use applications to discover, access, and use LTER data. The LTER NIS will utilize

  15. Investigating uses and perceptions of an online collaborative workspace for the dissertation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The intent of this study was to investigate 93 doctoral candidates’ perceptions and use of an online collaboration workspace and content management server, Microsoft Office SharePoint, for dissertation process. All candidates were enrolled in an Ed.D. programme in the United States. Descriptive statistics demonstrate that candidates frequently use SharePoint for a variety of reasons, including assisting them in sharing and gaining information, improving the flow and organisation of the dissertation process and collaborating with their advisors mentors, in the dissertation process. Results of the multivariate analysis of variance demonstrated that doctoral students’ who extensively use SharePoint have significantly higher student-to-student connectedness and student-to-advisors connectedness than doctoral students who use it moderately and on a limited basis. Additional results revealed that sense of connectedness and satisfaction are positively associated with the different features of SharePoint. Since using SharePoint to facilitate the mentorship during the dissertation process is positively associated with connectedness and satisfaction, it may positively influence completion and time to completion of a doctoral programme.

  16. The impact of electronic health records on collaborative work routines: A narrative network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chia-An

    2016-10-01

    This study examined collaborative work routines and changes after the implementation of a perinatal EHR. The change process and underlying drivers were analyzed to offer insight into why changes - intended or unintended - did or did not occur and their implications for EHR design and implementation. This mixed-method case study included both qualitative and quantitative information. Pre- and post-implementation observations took place over an 18-month period totaling 90h. Formal and informal interviews with administrative and clinical staff, pre- and post-implementation surveys, project meeting observations, and artifact review supplemented data gathered from the observations. Workflow and narrative network analyses of work routines were used to identify changes pre- and post-EHR and to represent different perspectives of work routines. EHR improved documentation efficiency and in- and out-patient information exchange, but increased variability in documentation. Some variabilities were institutionally sanctioned or tolerated, but other variabilities - while ingenious and emblematic of the generative nature of routines enabled by the EHR - were problematic. EHR's support for clinician communication and coordination was limited and its cognitive support insufficient. In some cases, EHR increased cognitive load as the unlocalized EHR scattered information, and the lengthy printouts contributed to information fragmentation and made information retrieval more difficult. The process of the EHR implementation and the changes observed was the confluence of three factors: resource constraint - in particular EHR expertise and experience - not uncommon in many community hospitals; the functional properties of the EHR focusing on information aggregation, storage, and retrieval; and the extant culture and practice of healthcare emphasizing autonomy and flexibility. While collaborative and communication changes were prompted by EHR implementation, the system played a minimal

  17. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore, it tr...

  18. Investigating Technical and Pedagogical Usability Issues of Collaborative Learning with Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjerrouit, Said

    2012-01-01

    Wikis have been recently promoted as tools that foster collaborative learning. However, there has been little research devoted to the criteria that are suitable to address issues pertinent to collaborative learning. This paper proposes a set of criteria to explore technical and pedagogical usability issues of collaborative learning with wikis. The…

  19. The Indigenous Observation Network: Collaborative, Community-Based Monitoring in the Yukon River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Mercer, N. M.; Mutter, E. A.; Wilson, N. J.; Toohey, R.; Schuster, P. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Indigenous Observation Network (ION) is a collaborative Community-Based Monitoring (CBM) program with both permafrost and water-quality monitoring components operating in the Yukon River Basin (YRB) of Alaska and Canada. ION is jointly facilitated by the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC), an indigenous non-profit organization, and the US Geological Survey (USGS), a federal agency. The YRB is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America encompassing 855,000 square kilometers in northwestern Canada and central Alaska and is essential to the ecosystems of the Bering and Chuckchi Seas. Water is also fundamental to the subsistence and culture of the 76 Tribes and First Nations that live in the YRB providing sustenance in the form of drinking water, fish, wildlife, and vegetation. Despite the ecological and cultural significance of the YRB, the remote geography of sub-Arctic and Arctic Alaska and Canada make it difficult to collect scientific data in these locations and led to a lack of baseline data characterizing this system until recently. In response to community concerns about the quality of the YR and a desire by USGS scientists to create a long term water-quality database, the USGS and YRITWC collaborated to create ION in 2005. Surface water samples are collected by trained community technicians from Tribal Environmental Programs or First Nation Lands and Resources staff from over 35 Alaska Native Tribes and First Nations that reside along the YR and/or one of the major tributaries. Samples are analyzed at USGS laboratories in Boulder, CO and results are disseminated to participating YRB communities and the general public. This presentation will focus on the factors that have enabled the longevity and success of this program over the last decade, as well as the strategies ION uses to ensure the credibility of the data collected by community members and best practices that have facilitated the collection of surface water data in remote

  20. Building a Foundation for Knowledge Co-Creation in Collaborative Water Governance: Dimensions of Stakeholder Networks Facilitated through Bridging Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietske Medema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable governance of water resources relies on processes of multi-stakeholder collaborations and interactions that facilitate the sharing and integration of diverse sources and types of knowledge. In this context, it is essential to fully recognize the importance of fostering and enhancing critical connections within and between networks of relationships between different government and non-government agencies, as well as the dynamics that are in support of the development of new knowledge and practices. In Quebec, a network of watershed organizations (WOs has been put in place to serve as bridging organizations (BOs for stakeholder groups in their watershed territories. Using the WOs as a case study, this research aims to contribute to a greater understanding of how stakeholder groups can be effectively connected to support knowledge co-creation through networked relationships facilitated by BOs. In line with this overall research aim, the following research objectives are proposed: (1 to assess the quality of the knowledge that is developed and shared through the WOs and their stakeholder networks; (2 to determine the characteristics of stakeholders participating in the WOs’ networks that either hinder or support collaborations and knowledge co-creation; (3 to describe the collaborative processes and mechanisms through which the WOs facilitate stakeholder interactions and knowledge co-creation; and (4 to assess the quality of the relationships and interactions between stakeholders participating in the WOs’ collaborative networks. A comprehensive literature review is provided of collaborative network dimensions that are in support of knowledge co-creation that forms the foundation of a research framework to assess knowledge co-creation processes that are facilitated through BOs and their collaborative networks. Documented experiences have been gathered through face-to-face semi-structured interviews, as well as a Quebec-wide survey

  1. Using theory to predict implementation of a physician–pharmacist collaborative intervention within a practice-based research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMik, David E.; Vander Weg, Mark W.; Lundt, Emily S.; Coffey, Christopher S.; Ardery, Gail; Carter, Barry L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated that physician/pharmacist collaboration can improve management of chronic conditions. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether a correlation exists between existing clinical pharmacy services within a practice-based research network (PBRN) and provider attitudes and beliefs regarding implementing a new pharmacy intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Methods A validated survey was completed by one clinical pharmacist from each office. This instrument evaluated the current clinical pharmacy services provided in the medical office. TPB instruments were developed that measured beliefs concerning implementation of a clinical pharmacy intervention for either blood pressure or asthma. The pharmacy services and TPB surveys were then administered to physicians and pharmacists in 32 primary care offices throughout the United States. Results Physicians returned 321 (35.9%) surveys, while pharmacists returned 40 (75.5%). The Cronbach’s alpha coefficients generally ranged from 0.65 to 0.98. TPB subscale scores were lower in offices rated with lower pharmacy service scores, but these differences were not statistically significant. There was no correlation between clinical pharmacy service score and providers’ TPB subscale scores. In both the hypertension and asthma groups, pharmacists scores were significantly higher than physicians’ scores on the attitudes subscale in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusions Pharmacists consistently scored higher than physicians on the TPB, indicating that they felt the hypertension or asthma intervention would be more straightforward for them to implement than did physicians. There was no significant correlation between clinical pharmacy service scores and attitudes toward implementing a future physician/pharmacist collaborative intervention using the TPB. Future studies should investigate the ability of the TPB instrument

  2. Promoting scientific collaboration and research through integrated social networking capabilities within the OpenTopography Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandigam, V.; Crosby, C. J.; Baru, C.

    2009-04-01

    LiDAR (Light Distance And Ranging) topography data offer earth scientists the opportunity to study the earth's surface at very high resolutions. As a result, the popularity of these data is growing dramatically. However, the management, distribution, and analysis of community LiDAR data sets is a challenge due to their massive size (multi-billion point, mutli-terabyte). We have also found that many earth science users of these data sets lack the computing resources and expertise required to process these data. We have developed the OpenTopography Portal to democratize access to these large and computationally challenging data sets. The OpenTopography Portal uses cyberinfrastructure technology developed by the GEON project to provide access to LiDAR data in a variety of formats. LiDAR data products available range from simple Google Earth visualizations of LiDAR-derived hillshades to 1 km2 tiles of standard digital elevation model (DEM) products as well as LiDAR point cloud data and user generated custom-DEMs. We have found that the wide spectrum of LiDAR users have variable scientific applications, computing resources and technical experience and thus require a data system with multiple distribution mechanisms and platforms to serve a broader range of user communities. Because the volume of LiDAR topography data available is rapidly expanding, and data analysis techniques are evolving, there is a need for the user community to be able to communicate and interact to share knowledge and experiences. To address this need, the OpenTopography Portal enables social networking capabilities through a variety of collaboration tools, web 2.0 technologies and customized usage pattern tracking. Fundamentally, these tools offer users the ability to communicate, to access and share documents, participate in discussions, and to keep up to date on upcoming events and emerging technologies. The OpenTopography portal achieves the social networking capabilities by integrating various

  3. Managing collaborative innovation in public bureaucracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Public planners are increasingly recruited to manage collaborative innovation processes, but there is hardly any research on how they deal with the tensions they encounter in managing collaborative innovation in the institutional context of a public bureaucracy. Drawing on emerging theories...... of collaborative planning, network management and public innovation, the article develops a taxonomy of tasks related to managing collaborative innovation, identifies potential tensions between these tasks and the institutional logic of public bureaucracies and investigates how these tensions are experienced...

  4. [Development of the theoretical orientation of psychotherapists. SPR Collaborative Research Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambühl, H; Orlinsky, D; Cierpka, M; Buchheim, P; Meyerberg, J; Willutzki, U

    1995-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which, and ways in which, German speaking psychotherapists modify their theoretical orientations as a function of increasing clinical experience. The data for this come from the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core Questionnaire (CCQ), an instrument designed by the SPR Collaborative Research Network to collect a broad range of information about the therapist's background, training, practice etc. Two sections ask directly about the theoretical framework used by therapists to guide their therapeutic work, using a set of scales to assess the degree to which practitioners rely on various general models (analytic/psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, systems theory, other). This permits the construction of profiles of formal and content based theoretical orientation patterns. By asking the question separately about the therapist's current practice, and about their practices as beginners, it also permits an evaluation of self-assessed change. In order to amplify the meaning of the theoretical background we ask therapists to indicate the relative importance of their patients realizing each of a series of therapeutic goals. The findings show very clearly that psychotherapists are very diverse both in the formal patterns and specific contents of their therapeutic orientations, and that they tend, as a role, to integrate two or more distinct theoretical approaches in guiding their clinical work with patients. The adherence to theoretical orientations has a strong impact on the goals that therapists typically work toward with their patients. Our findings show that therapists do pursue different goals depending on which conceptual framework they rely on.

  5. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  6. Network Experiences from a Cross-Sector Biosafety Level-3 Laboratory Collaboration: A Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelaus, Johanna; Lindberg, Anna; Thisted Lambertz, Susanne; Byström, Mona; Forsman, Mats; Lindmark, Hans; Knutsson, Rickard; Båverud, Viveca; Bråve, Andreas; Jureen, Pontus; Lundin Zumpe, Annelie; Melefors, Öjar

    The Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics (FBD) is a network that fosters collaboration among the 4 agencies with responsibility for the laboratory diagnostics of high-consequence pathogens, covering animal health and feed safety, food safety, public health and biodefense, and security. The aim of the network is to strengthen capabilities and capacities for diagnostics at the national biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) laboratories to improve Sweden's biopreparedness, in line with recommendations from the EU and WHO. Since forming in 2007, the FBD network has contributed to the harmonization of diagnostic methods, equipment, quality assurance protocols, and biosafety practices among the national BSL-3 laboratories. Lessons learned from the network include: (1) conducting joint projects with activities such as method development and validation, ring trials, exercises, and audits has helped to build trust and improve communication among participating agencies; (2) rotating the presidency of the network steering committee has fostered trust and commitment from all agencies involved; and (3) planning for the implementation of project outcomes is important to maintain gained competencies in the agencies over time. Contacts have now been established with national agencies of the other Nordic countries, with an aim to expanding the collaboration, broadening the network, finding synergies in new areas, strengthening the ability to share resources, and consolidating long-term financing in the context of harmonized European biopreparedness.

  7. Network Experiences from a Cross-Sector Biosafety Level-3 Laboratory Collaboration: A Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Anna; Thisted Lambertz, Susanne; Byström, Mona; Forsman, Mats; Lindmark, Hans; Knutsson, Rickard; Båverud, Viveca; Bråve, Andreas; Jureen, Pontus; Lundin Zumpe, Annelie; Melefors, Öjar

    2017-01-01

    The Swedish Forum for Biopreparedness Diagnostics (FBD) is a network that fosters collaboration among the 4 agencies with responsibility for the laboratory diagnostics of high-consequence pathogens, covering animal health and feed safety, food safety, public health and biodefense, and security. The aim of the network is to strengthen capabilities and capacities for diagnostics at the national biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) laboratories to improve Sweden's biopreparedness, in line with recommendations from the EU and WHO. Since forming in 2007, the FBD network has contributed to the harmonization of diagnostic methods, equipment, quality assurance protocols, and biosafety practices among the national BSL-3 laboratories. Lessons learned from the network include: (1) conducting joint projects with activities such as method development and validation, ring trials, exercises, and audits has helped to build trust and improve communication among participating agencies; (2) rotating the presidency of the network steering committee has fostered trust and commitment from all agencies involved; and (3) planning for the implementation of project outcomes is important to maintain gained competencies in the agencies over time. Contacts have now been established with national agencies of the other Nordic countries, with an aim to expanding the collaboration, broadening the network, finding synergies in new areas, strengthening the ability to share resources, and consolidating long-term financing in the context of harmonized European biopreparedness. PMID:28805472

  8. An investigative laboratory course in human physiology using computer technology and collaborative writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A

    2004-12-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65 second-year students in sports medicine and biology at a small private comprehensive college. The course builds on skills and abilities first introduced in an introductory investigations course and introduces additional higher-level skills and more complex human experimental models. In four multiweek experimental modules, involving neuromuscular, reflex, and cardiovascular physiology, by use of computerized hardware/software with a variety of transducers, students carry out self-designed experiments with human subjects and perform data collection and analysis, collaborative writing, and peer editing. In assessments, including standard course evaluations and the Salgains Web-based evaluation, student responses to this approach are enthusiastic, and gains in their skills and abilities are evident in their comments and in improved performance.

  9. Applying Collaborative Learning and Quality Improvement to Public Health: Lessons from the Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Reem M; Flaherty, Katherine; Hirai, Ashley; Lee, Vanessa; Walker, Deborah Klein; Lu, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Infant mortality remains a significant public health problem in the U.S. The Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (CoIIN) model is an innovative approach, using the science of quality improvement and collaborative learning, which was applied across 13 Southern states in Public Health Regions IV and VI to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes. We provide an in-depth discussion of the history, development, implementation, and adaptation of the model based on the experience of the original CoIIN organizers and participants. In addition to the political genesis and functional components of the initiative, 8 key lessons related to staffing, planning, and implementing future CoIINs are described in detail. This paper reports the findings from a process evaluation of the model. Data on the states' progress toward reducing infant mortality and improving birth outcomes were collected through a survey in the final months of a 24-month implementation period, as well as through ongoing team communications. The peer-to-peer exchange and platform for collaborative learning, as well as the sharing of data across the states, were major strengths and form the foundation for future CoIIN efforts. A lasting legacy of the initiative is the unique application and sharing of provisional "real time" data to inform "real time" decision-making. The CoIIN model of collaborative learning, QI, and innovation offers a promising approach to strengthening partnerships within and across states, bolstering data systems to inform and track progress more rapidly, and ultimately accelerating improvement toward healthier communities, States, and the Nation as a whole.

  10. A Collaborative Diagonal Learning Network: The role of formal and informal professional development in elementary science reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke-Nieves, Natasha Anika

    professional development in elementary science reform are offered. It is suggested that researchers investigate collaborative coaching through the lenses of organizational learning network theory, and develop professional learning communities with formal and informal educators; and that professional developers in city school systems and informal science institutions work in concert to produce more effective elementary teachers who not only love science but love teaching it.

  11. Investigating the effects of virtual social networks on entrepreneurial marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Kambeiz Talebi; Mahnaz Behrad; Amir Ekhlassi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effects of virtual social networks on entrepreneurial marketing. The study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale based on a model originally developed by Morris et al. (2002) [Morris, M. H., Schindehutte, M., & LaForge, R. W. (2002). Entrepreneurial marketing: a construct for integrating emerging entrepreneurship and marketing perspectives. Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, 10(4), 1-19.]. The study considers the effects of ...

  12. Collaborative research: accomplishments & potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouyanni, Klea

    2008-01-21

    Although a substantial part of scientific research is collaborative and increasing globalization will probably lead to its increase, very few studies actually investigate the advantages, disadvantages, experiences and lessons learned from collaboration. In environmental epidemiology interdisciplinary collaboration is essential and the contrasting geographical patterns in exposure and disease make multi-location projects essential. This paper is based on a presentation given at the Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, Paris 2006, and is attempting to initiate a discussion on a framework for studying collaborative research. A review of the relevant literature showed that indeed collaborative research is rising, in some countries with impressive rates. However, there are substantial differences between countries in their outlook, need and respect for collaboration. In many situations collaborative publications receive more citations than those based on national authorship. The European Union is the most important host of collaborative research, mainly driven by the European Commission through the Framework Programmes. A critical assessment of the tools and trends of collaborative networks under FP6, showed that there was a need for a critical revision, which led to changes in FP7. In conclusion, it is useful to study the characteristics of collaborative research and set targets for the future. The added value for science and for the researchers involved may be assessed. The motivation for collaboration could be increased in the more developed countries. Particular ways to increase the efficiency and interaction in interdisciplinary and intercultural collaboration may be developed. We can work towards "the principles of collaborative research" in Environmental Epidemiology.

  13. Collaborative research: Accomplishments & potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouyanni, Klea

    2008-01-01

    Although a substantial part of scientific research is collaborative and increasing globalization will probably lead to its increase, very few studies actually investigate the advantages, disadvantages, experiences and lessons learned from collaboration. In environmental epidemiology interdisciplinary collaboration is essential and the contrasting geographical patterns in exposure and disease make multi-location projects essential. This paper is based on a presentation given at the Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, Paris 2006, and is attempting to initiate a discussion on a framework for studying collaborative research. A review of the relevant literature showed that indeed collaborative research is rising, in some countries with impressive rates. However, there are substantial differences between countries in their outlook, need and respect for collaboration. In many situations collaborative publications receive more citations than those based on national authorship. The European Union is the most important host of collaborative research, mainly driven by the European Commission through the Framework Programmes. A critical assessment of the tools and trends of collaborative networks under FP6, showed that there was a need for a critical revision, which led to changes in FP7. In conclusion, it is useful to study the characteristics of collaborative research and set targets for the future. The added value for science and for the researchers involved may be assessed. The motivation for collaboration could be increased in the more developed countries. Particular ways to increase the efficiency and interaction in interdisciplinary and intercultural collaboration may be developed. We can work towards "the principles of collaborative research" in Environmental Epidemiology. PMID:18208596

  14. Collaborative research: Accomplishments & potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsouyanni Klea

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although a substantial part of scientific research is collaborative and increasing globalization will probably lead to its increase, very few studies actually investigate the advantages, disadvantages, experiences and lessons learned from collaboration. In environmental epidemiology interdisciplinary collaboration is essential and the contrasting geographical patterns in exposure and disease make multi-location projects essential. This paper is based on a presentation given at the Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, Paris 2006, and is attempting to initiate a discussion on a framework for studying collaborative research. A review of the relevant literature showed that indeed collaborative research is rising, in some countries with impressive rates. However, there are substantial differences between countries in their outlook, need and respect for collaboration. In many situations collaborative publications receive more citations than those based on national authorship. The European Union is the most important host of collaborative research, mainly driven by the European Commission through the Framework Programmes. A critical assessment of the tools and trends of collaborative networks under FP6, showed that there was a need for a critical revision, which led to changes in FP7. In conclusion, it is useful to study the characteristics of collaborative research and set targets for the future. The added value for science and for the researchers involved may be assessed. The motivation for collaboration could be increased in the more developed countries. Particular ways to increase the efficiency and interaction in interdisciplinary and intercultural collaboration may be developed. We can work towards "the principles of collaborative research" in Environmental Epidemiology.

  15. A multidisciplinary monitoring network at Mayon volcano, Philippines: A collaborative effort between PHIVOLCS and EOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Hidayat, D.; Laguerta, E. P.; Baloloy, A. V.; Valerio, R.; Vaquilar, R.; Arpa, M. C.; Marcial, S. S.; Novianti, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    Mount Mayon in Albay province (Philippines) is an openly-degassing basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano, located on the northern edge of the northwest-trending OAS graben. Its latest eruptions were in Aug-Sept 2006 and Dec 2009. Mayon's current status is PHIVOLCS' level 1 with low seismicity dominated mostly local and regional tectonic earthquakes and continuous emission of SO2 from its summit crater. A research collaboration between the Earth Observatory of Singapore-NTU and the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) was initiated in 2009, aimed at developing a multi-disciplinary monitoring network around Mayon. The network design comprises a network of co-located geophysical, geochemical, hydrological and meteorological sensors, in both radial and circular arrangements. Radially arranged stations are intended to capture and distinguish vertical conduit processes, while the circular station design (including existing PHIVOLCS stations in cooperation with JICA, Japan) is meant to distinguish locations and sector activity of subsurface events. Geophysical instrumentation from EOS currently includes 4 broadband seismographs (in addition to 3 existing broadbands and 3 short period instruments from PHIVOLCS & JICA), and 5 tiltmeters. Four continuous cGPS stations will be installed in 2012, complementing 5 existing PHIVOLCS stations. Stations are also designed to house a multi-sensor package of static subsurface soil CO2 monitoring stations, the first of which was installed in early 2012, and which include subsoil sensors for heat flux, temperature, and moisture, as well as meteorological stations (with sonic anemometers and contact rain gages). These latter sensors are all controlled from one control box per station. Meteorological stations will help us to validate tilt, gas permeability, and also know lahar initiation potential. Since early 2011, separate stations downwind of the two prevailing wind directions from the summit continuously monitor

  16. Constructing "Authentic" Science: Results from a University/High School Collaboration Integrating Digital Storytelling and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olitsky, Stacy; Becker, Elizabeth A.; Jayo, Ignacio; Vinogradov, Philip; Montcalmo, Joseph

    2018-02-01

    This study explores the implications of a redesign of a college course that entailed a new partnership between a college neuroscience classroom and a high school. In this course, the college students engaged in original research projects which included conducting brain surgery and behavioural tests on rats. They used digital storytelling and social networking to communicate with high school students and were visited by the students during the semester. The aims of the redesign were to align the course with science conducted in the field and to provide opportunities to disseminate scientific knowledge through emerging technologies. This study investigates the impact of these innovations on the college and high school students' perceptions of authentic science, including their relationship with science-centred communities. We found that these collaborative tools increased college students' perceptions that authentic science entailed communication with the general public, in addition to supporting prior perceptions of the importance of conducting experiments and presenting results to experts. In addition, the view of science as high-status knowledge was attenuated as students integrated non-formal communication practices into presentations, showing the backstage process of learning, incorporating music and youth discourse styles, and displaying emotional engagement. An impact of these hybrid presentation approaches was an increase in the high school students' perceptions of the accessibility of laboratory science. We discuss how the use of technologies that are familiar to youth, such as iPads, social networking sites, and multimedia presentations, has the potential to prioritize students' voices and promote a more inclusive view of science.

  17. [Peruvian scientific production in medicine and collaboration networks, analysis of the Science Citation Index 2000-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamaní, Charles; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2010-09-01

    To describe the Peruvian scientific production in indexed journals in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and the characteristics of the institutional collaborative networks. All papers published in the ISI database (Clinical Medicine collection) were included during 2000 to 2009 with at least one author with a Peruvian affiliation. The publication trend, address of corresponding author, type of article, institution, city (only for Peru), and country were evaluated. The collaborative networks were analized using the Pajek® software. 1210 papers were found, increasing from 61 in 2000 to 200 in 2009 (average of 121 articles/year). 30.4% articles included a corresponding author from a Peruvian institution. The average of authors per article was 8.3. Original articles represented 82.1% of total articles. Infectious diseases-related journals concentrated most of the articles. The main countries that collaborate with Peru are: USA (60.4%), England (12.9%), and Brazil (8.0%). Lima concentrated 94.7% of the publications and three regions (Huancavelica, Moquegua and Tacna) did not register any publication. Only two universities published more than one article/year and four institutions published more than 10 articles/year. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia published 45% of the total number of articles, being the most productive institution and which concentrated the most number of collaborations with foreign institutions. The ministry of Health--including all dependencies--published 37.3% of the total number of publications. There is a higher level of collaboration with foreign institutions rather than local institutions. The Peruvian scientific production in medicine represented in the ISI database is very low but growing, and is concentrated in Lima and in a few institutions. The most productive Peruvian institutions collaborate more intensively with foreign journals rather than local institutions.

  18. Drawbacks and benefits associated with inter-organizational collaboration along the discovery-development-delivery continuum: a cancer research network case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jenine K; Provan, Keith G; Johnson, Kimberly J; Leischow, Scott J

    2012-07-25

    The scientific process around cancer research begins with scientific discovery, followed by development of interventions, and finally delivery of needed interventions to people with cancer. Numerous studies have identified substantial gaps between discovery and delivery in health research. Team science has been identified as a possible solution for closing the discovery to delivery gap; however, little is known about effective ways of collaborating within teams and across organizations. The purpose of this study was to determine benefits and drawbacks associated with organizational collaboration across the discovery-development-delivery research continuum. Representatives of organizations working on cancer research across a state answered a survey about how they collaborated with other cancer research organizations in the state and what benefits and drawbacks they experienced while collaborating. We used exponential random graph modeling to determine the association between these benefits and drawbacks and the presence of a collaboration tie between any two network members. Different drawbacks and benefits were associated with discovery, development, and delivery collaborations. The only consistent association across all three was with the drawback of difficulty due to geographic differences, which was negatively associated with collaboration, indicating that those organizations that had collaborated were less likely to perceive a barrier related to geography. The benefit, enhanced access to other knowledge, was positive and significant in the development and delivery networks, indicating that collaborating organizations viewed improved knowledge exchange as a benefit of collaboration. 'Acquisition of additional funding or other resources' and 'development of new tools and methods' were negatively significantly related to collaboration in these networks. So, although improved knowledge access was an outcome of collaboration, more tangible outcomes were not being

  19. PCORnet's Collaborative Research Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Mark J; Forrest, Christopher B; Carton, Thomas W

    2018-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) launched a multi-institutional "network of networks" in 2013 - Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet) - that is designed to conduct clinical research that is faster, less expensive, and more responsive to the information needs of patients and clinicians. To enhance cross-network and cross-institutional collaboration and catalyze the use of PCORnet, PCORI has supported formation of 11 Collaborative Research Groups focusing on specific disease types (e.g., cardiovascular health and cancer) or particular patient populations (e.g., pediatrics and health disparities). PCORnet's Collaborative Research Groups are establishing research priorities within these focus areas, establishing relationships with potential funders, and supporting development of specific research projects that will use PCORnet resources. PCORnet remains a complex, multilevel, and heterogeneous network that is still maturing and building a diverse portfolio of observational and interventional people-centered research; engaging with PCORnet can be daunting, particularly for outside investigators. We believe the Collaborative Research Groups are stimulating interest and helping investigators navigate the complexity, but only time will tell if these efforts will bear fruit in terms of funded multicenter PCORnet projects.

  20. The collaborative African genomics network training program: a trainee perspective on training the next generation of African scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlotshwa, Busisiwe C; Mwesigwa, Savannah; Mboowa, Gerald; Williams, Lesedi; Retshabile, Gaone; Kekitiinwa, Adeodata; Wayengera, Misaki; Kyobe, Samuel; Brown, Chester W; Hanchard, Neil A; Mardon, Graeme; Joloba, Moses; Anabwani, Gabriel; Mpoloka, Sununguko W

    2017-07-01

    The Collaborative African Genomics Network (CAfGEN) aims to establish sustainable genomics research programs in Botswana and Uganda through long-term training of PhD students from these countries at Baylor College of Medicine. Here, we present an overview of the CAfGEN PhD training program alongside trainees' perspectives on their involvement. Historically, collaborations between high-income countries (HICs) and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), or North-South collaborations, have been criticized for the lack of a mutually beneficial distribution of resources and research findings, often undermining LMICs. CAfGEN plans to address this imbalance in the genomics field through a program of technology and expertise transfer to the participating LMICs. An overview of the training program is presented. Trainees from the CAfGEN project summarized their experiences, looking specifically at the training model, benefits of the program, challenges encountered relating to the cultural transition, and program outcomes after the first 2 years. Collaborative training programs like CAfGEN will not only help establish sustainable long-term research initiatives in LMICs but also foster stronger North-South and South-South networks. The CAfGEN model offers a framework for the development of training programs aimed at genomics education for those for whom genomics is not their "first language." Genet Med advance online publication 06 April 2017.

  1. The Role of Gender in Chagas Disease Prevention and Control in Honduras: An Analysis of Communication and Collaboration Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Diana Rocío Rodríguez; Mertens, Frédéric; Zúniga, Concepción Valeriano; Mendoza, Yolanda; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio; Monroy, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In Honduras, where Chagas disease is a serious health and environmental concern, prevention measures face the challenge of achieving widespread and long-term sustainable adoption by communities. The article integrates social network analysis and a gender-sensitive approach to understand the role of men and women in the implementation of a community-level intervention, based on the adoption of housing improvements to reduce the presence of the insect vector. A total of 108 people in the community of El Salitre were interviewed. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, participation in project activities, communication and collaboration networks related to Chagas disease prevention, knowledge of Chagas disease, and adoption of housing improvements techniques. Communication mostly occurred between the same gender individuals and was associated with knowledge of Chagas disease. Socioeconomic status, Chagas disease knowledge, and collaboration with men were associated with women adopting housing improvements. For men, however, participation in project activities, formal education, and collaboration with women were associated with adoption. These findings suggest that men and women were driven by distinct concerns, interests, and motivations when adopting new Chagas disease prevention strategies. Participatory community interventions that seek to generate health knowledge and foster collaborations to reduce health risk should address gender differences.

  2. The impact of downstream network subgroups on collaboration and performance. A survey of buyer-supplier relationships in the Dutch flower sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claro, D.P.; Hagelaar, J.L.F.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to identify those network subgroups that enhance the collaborative governance in a focal buyer-supplier relationship. We argue, that partners in a focal buyer-supplier relationship can be seen as embedded in a broader network of business relationships with network subgroups,

  3. TinCan: User-Defined P2P Virtual Network Overlays for Ad-hoc Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre St Juste

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual private networking (VPN has become an increasingly important component of a collaboration environment because it ensures private, authenticated communication among participants, using existing collaboration tools, where users are distributed across multiple institutions and can be mobile. The majority of current VPN solutions are based on a centralized VPN model, where all IP traffic is tunneled through a VPN gateway. Nonetheless, there are several use case scenarios that require a model where end-to-end VPN links are tunneled upon existing Internet infrastructure in a peer-to-peer (P2P fashion, removing the bottleneck of a centralized VPN gateway. We propose a novel virtual network — TinCan — based on peerto-peer private network tunnels. It reuses existing standards and implementations of services for discovery notification (XMPP, reflection (STUN and relaying (TURN, facilitating configuration. In this approach, trust relationships maintained by centralized (or federated services are automatically mapped to TinCan links. In one use scenario, TinCan allows unstructured P2P overlays connecting trusted end-user devices — while only requiring VPN software on user devices and leveraging online social network (OSN infrastructure already widely deployed. This paper describes the architecture and design of TinCan and presents an experimental evaluation of a prototype supporting Windows, Linux, and Android mobile devices. Results quantify the overhead introduced by the network virtualization layer, and the resource requirements imposed on services needed to bootstrap TinCan links.

  4. The Application of Human and Social Behavioral-Inspired Security Models for Self-aware Collaborative Cognitive Radio Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Jack L.; Kasch, William T. M.

    This paper discusses the introduction of anthropology and sociology-inspired approaches to providing security in collaborative self-aware cognitive radio networks. This includes the introduction of not only trust models, but also respect models and ‘intuition’ models. This paper discusses numerous potential benefits from this type of approach, including benefits to algorithm security, compromise recovery, protection from the Byzantine threat, and policy enforcement.

  5. Designing 3ERP to meet use and users - methods to handle cultural diversity and collaborative networking in SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Nielsen, Janni

    2007-01-01

    The purpose is to describe a project the aim of which is to develop and validate the scientific methodological foundation for design of user friendly and usable, flexible and configurable global Enterprise Resource Planning system for Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs) which are adoptable ...... to cultural diversity and support the collaborative networking tasks embedded in 3gERP. Focus is on Human Centered Design methods and tools which must be developed to handle cultural diversity....

  6. Analysis of the experience of providing radiation protection of population and environment within the international collaboration network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergei Aleksanin; Eugene Zheleznyakov; Regina Fedortseva

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The All-Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine (ARCERM) in St. Petersburg is a specialized radiation health institution and World Health Organization (WHO) collaborating center within the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network (REMPAN), which primary objectives are: - To promote medical preparedness for radiation accidents and radio-nuclear threats among WHO Member States; - To provide medical and public health advice, assistance and coordination of medical management at international and regional levels in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; - To assist in follow-up studies and rehabilitation. ARCERM serves as a national focal point for advice and possible medical care in cases of radiation injuries in humans as well as assists WHO to prepare relevant documents and guidelines, provides training in radiation medicine, distributes relevant information to the medical community and the public and carries out scientific investigations on radiation effects on humans. The Center is prepared to undertake actions on medical management of possible radiation emergencies both on national and international level as a member of REMPAN network. The assistance provided by ARCERM may also include providing radiation medicine and other appropriate specialists, scientific services and expertise, equipment and medical services for diagnosis, prognosis, medical treatment and medical follow-up of persons affected by radiation. In case of radiation accident the Center has standard operating procedures at country level. It includes the system of warning and data collection, setting up special wards for receiving radiation victims, radioactivity control station, primary deactivation and treatment as well as providing personal protection for staff. WHO, as well as other co-operating international organizations, are notified and provided with relevant information through the International Atomic

  7. Characteristics of HIV infected individuals traveling abroad. Results from the +REDIVI Collaborative Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Molina, Jose A; Martinez-Perez, Angela; Serre, Nuria; Treviño, Begoña; Ruiz-Giardín, José Manuel; Torrús, Diego; Goikoetxea, Josune; Echevarría, Esteban Martín; Malmierca, Eduardo; Rojo, Gerardo; Calabuig, Eva; Gutierrez, Belén; Norman, Francesca; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio

    2016-02-01

    The improvement in the prognosis of HIV infection, coupled with the increase in international travel and migration, has led to a rising number of HIV infected travelers. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological and clinical features of returning travelers, according to their HIV status. An observational prospective study was conducted including travelers and immigrants who traveled to visit friends and relatives (VFRs) registered in the +REDIVI collaborative network (January-2009; October-2014). +REDIVI is a national network that registers information regarding infections imported by travelers and immigrants at 21 different centers using a standardized protocol. A total of 3464 travellers were identified: 72 were HIV+ (2.1%) and 3.392 HIV- (98%). HIV+ vs. HIV- travelers were often older (40.5y vs. 34.2y P=.001), VFRs (79.1% vs. 44.4%; P<.001), and consulted less for pre-travel advice (27% vs. 37%; P=.078). The main destinations for both groups were sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. The most frequent reasons for consultation after travel were fever, request for a health examination, gastrointestinal complaints, and abnormal laboratory tests (mainly eosinophilia and anemia), which differed between groups. The most frequent diagnoses in HIV+ travelers were malaria (38.8%), newly diagnosed HIV infection (25%), and intestinal parasites (19.4%), while for HIV- travelers the main diagnoses were "healthy" (17.9%), malaria (14%), and intestinal parasites (17.3%). The typical profile of an HIV+ traveler in +REDIVI was that of a VFR traveler who did not seek pre-travel advice and made high-risk trips. This may increase the chance of acquiring travel-related infections which may pose a special risk for HIV-infected travelers. The post-travel visit was a good opportunity for HIV infection screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigating the effects of virtual social networks on entrepreneurial marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambeiz Talebi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effects of virtual social networks on entrepreneurial marketing. The study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale based on a model originally developed by Morris et al. (2002 [Morris, M. H., Schindehutte, M., & LaForge, R. W. (2002. Entrepreneurial marketing: a construct for integrating emerging entrepreneurship and marketing perspectives. Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, 10(4, 1-19.]. The study considers the effects of three components of virtual social network (VSN; namely structural VSN, interaction VSN and functional VSN on entrepreneurial marketing. Using structural equation modeling, the study has determined positive and meaningful effects of all three VSN components on entrepreneurial marketing.

  9. Investigation of Wireless Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are one of the most able technologies in the structural health monitoring (SHM field. Through intelligent, self-organising means, the contents of this paper will test a variety of different objects and different working principles of sensor nodes connected into a network and integrated with data processing functions. In this paper the key issues of WSN applied in SHM are discussed, including the integration of different types of sensors with different operational modalities, sampling frequencies, issues of transmission bandwidth, real-time ability, and wireless transmitter frequency. Furthermore, the topology, data fusion, integration, energy saving, and self-powering nature of different systems will be investigated. In the FP7 project “Health Monitoring of Offshore Wind Farms,” the above issues are explored.

  10. A game theoretic investigation of deception in network security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Grosu, Daniel

    2010-12-03

    We perform a game theoretic investigation of the effects of deception on the interactions between an attacker and a defender of a computer network. The defender can employ camouflage by either disguising a normal system as a honeypot or by disguising a honeypot as a normal system. We model the interactions between defender and attacker using a signaling game, a non-cooperative two player dynamic game of incomplete information. For this model, we determine which strategies admit perfect Bayesian equilibria. These equilibria are refined Nash equilibria in which neither the defender nor the attacker will unilaterally choose to deviate from their strategies. Finally, we discuss the benefits of employing deceptive equilibrium strategies in the defense of a computer network.

  11. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...... of Airbnb’s early legal issues Daniel Guttentag 8.Free walking tour enterprises in Europe: An evolutionary economic approach Maria del Pilar Leal and L. Xavier Medina, 9.Cultural capitalism: Manipulation and control in Airbnb’s intersection with tourism Michael O' Reganand Jaeyeon Choe 10.Sharing the new...

  12. Social Network Analysis of 50 Years of International Collaboration in the Research of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shesen; Zhang, Ganzhou; Guo, Yufei

    2016-01-01

    The definition of the field of educational technology has evolved over 50 years. New inventions and economic globalization increasingly facilitate people's communication for exchange of ideas and collaboration. This work attempts to describe international research collaboration in educational technology for the past 50 years. This article intends…

  13. Micro and Macro Spatial Networks in Two Contexts: Collaboration and Interpersonal Risk Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Ju-Sung; van Duinen, Rianne; Filatova, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Networks researchers have been learning the prominent role geographic/physical proximity plays in network dynamics. In this paper, we examine spatial distance in the context of two distinct social networks differing in size, geographic boundaries, and relation types. The first network comprises

  14. Investigating ultra high-enthalpy geothermal systems: a collaborative initiative to promote scientific opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Nielson, D.; Schiffman, P.; Schriener, A., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists, engineers, and policy makers gathered at a workshop in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California in October 2013 to discuss the science and technology involved in developing high-enthalpy geothermal fields. A typical high-enthalpy geothermal well between 2000 and 3000 m deep produces a mixture of hot water and steam at 200-300 °C that can be used to generate about 5-10 MWe of electric power. The theme of the workshop was to explore the feasibility and economic potential of increasing the power output of geothermal wells by an order of magnitude by drilling deeper to reach much higher pressures and temperatures. Development of higher enthalpy geothermal systems for power production has obvious advantages; specifically higher temperatures yield higher power outputs per well so that fewer wells are needed, leading to smaller environmental footprints for a given size of power plant. Plans for resource assessment and drilling in such higher enthalpy areas are already underway in Iceland, New Zealand, and Japan. There is considerable potential for similar developments in other countries that already have a large production of electricity from geothermal steam, such as Mexico, the Philippines, Indonesia, Italy, and the USA. However drilling deeper involves technical and economic challenges. One approach to mitigating the cost issue is to form a consortium of industry, government and academia to share the costs and broaden the scope of investigation. An excellent example of such collaboration is the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP), which is investigating the economic feasibility of producing electricity from supercritical geothermal reservoirs, and this approach could serve as model for future developments elsewhere. A planning committee was formed to explore creating a similar initiative in the USA.

  15. An Architecture for Performance Optimization in a Collaborative Knowledge-Based Approach for  Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ramon Velasco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, Intelligent Spaces (ISs have received the attention of many Wireless Sensor Network researchers. Recently, several studies have been devoted to identify their common capacities and to set up ISs over these networks. However, little attention has been paid to integrating Fuzzy Rule-Based Systems into collaborative Wireless Sensor Networks for the purpose of implementing ISs. This work presents a distributed architecture proposal for collaborative Fuzzy Rule-Based Systems embedded in Wireless Sensor Networks, which has been designed to optimize the implementation of ISs. This architecture includes the following: (a an optimized design for the inference engine; (b a visual interface; (c a module to reduce the redundancy and complexity of the knowledge bases; (d a module to evaluate the accuracy of the new knowledge base; (e a module to adapt the format of the rules to the structure used by the inference engine; and (f a communications protocol. As a real-world application of this architecture and the proposed methodologies, we show an application to the problem of modeling two plagues of the olive tree: prays (olive moth, Prays oleae Bern. and repilo (caused by the fungus Spilocaea oleagina. The results show that the architecture presented in this paper significantly decreases the consumption of resources (memory, CPU and battery without a substantial decrease in the accuracy of the inferred values.

  16. Maths Meets Myths: Network Investigations of Ancient Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Ralph; Mac Carron, Pádraig

    2016-02-01

    Three years ago, we initiated a programme of research in which ideas and tools from statistical physics and network theory were applied to the field of comparative mythology. The eclecticism of the work, together with the perspectives it delivered, led to widespread media coverage and academic discussion. Here we review some aspects of the project, contextualised with a brief history of the long relationship between science and the humanities. We focus in particular on an Irish epic, summarising some of the outcomes of our quantitative investigation. We also describe the emergence of a new sub-discipline and our hopes for its future.

  17. An Investigation of the Effects of Collaborative, Computer Assisted Writing Skills Practice on L2 Writing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Evelyn

    1998-01-01

    .... The subjects for this study were 42 students enrolled in French classes at the U.S. Air Force Academy. The CMC treatment consisted of 45 minutes of collaborative, simultaneous written "discussion" among student clusters of 3 or 4 students...

  18. Improving care and wellness in bipolar disorder: origins, evolution and future directions of a collaborative knowledge exchange network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Erin E; Hole, Rachelle; Livingston, James D; Murray, Greg; Parikh, Sagar V; Lapsley, Sara; McBride, Sally

    2012-09-10

    The Collaborative RESearch team to study psychosocial factors in bipolar disorder (CREST.BD) is a multidisciplinary, cross-sectoral network dedicated to both fundamental research and knowledge exchange on bipolar disorder (BD). The core mission of the network is to advance the science and understanding of psychological and social issues associated with BD, improve the care and wellness of people living with BD, and strengthen services and supports for these individuals. CREST.BD bridges traditional and newer research approaches, particularly embracing community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods. Membership of CREST is broad, including academic researchers, people with BD, their family members and supports, and a variety of health care providers. Here, we describe the origins, evolution, approach to planning and evaluation and future vision for our network within the landscape of CBPR and integrated knowledge translation (KT), and explore the keys and challenges to success we have encountered working within this framework.

  19. Improving care and wellness in bipolar disorder: origins, evolution and future directions of a collaborative knowledge exchange network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalak Erin E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Collaborative RESearch team to study psychosocial factors in bipolar disorder (CREST.BD is a multidisciplinary, cross-sectoral network dedicated to both fundamental research and knowledge exchange on bipolar disorder (BD. The core mission of the network is to advance the science and understanding of psychological and social issues associated with BD, improve the care and wellness of people living with BD, and strengthen services and supports for these individuals. CREST.BD bridges traditional and newer research approaches, particularly embracing community-based participatory research (CBPR methods. Membership of CREST is broad, including academic researchers, people with BD, their family members and supports, and a variety of health care providers. Here, we describe the origins, evolution, approach to planning and evaluation and future vision for our network within the landscape of CBPR and integrated knowledge translation (KT, and explore the keys and challenges to success we have encountered working within this framework.

  20. EPOS-WP16: A coherent and collaborative network of Solid Earth Multi-scale laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calignano, Elisa; Rosenau, Matthias; Lange, Otto; Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; van Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Funiciello, Francesca; Trippanera, Daniele; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory facilities are an integral part of Earth Science research. The diversity of methods employed in such infrastructures reflects the multi-scale nature of the Earth system and is essential for the understanding of its evolution, for the assessment of geo-hazards and for the sustainable exploitation of geo-resources. In the frame of EPOS (European Plate Observing System), the Working Package 16 represents a developing community of European Geoscience Multi-scale laboratories. The participant and collaborating institutions (Utrecht University, GFZ, RomaTre University, INGV, NERC, CSIC-ICTJA, CNRS, LMU, C4G-UBI, ETH, CNR*) embody several types of laboratory infrastructures, engaged in different fields of interest of Earth Science: from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue tectonic and geodynamic modelling and paleomagnetic laboratories. The length scales encompassed by these infrastructures range from the nano- and micrometre levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetres-sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. The aim of WP16 is to provide two services by the year 2019: first, providing virtual access to data from laboratories (data service) and, second, providing physical access to laboratories (transnational access, TNA). Regarding the development of a data service, the current status is such that most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are available only in limited "final form" in publications, many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. Within EPOS the TCS Multi-scale laboratories is collecting and harmonizing available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and process controlling rock system behaviour at all relevant scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting

  1. Networking 2.0: Expanding your collaboration circles through the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, J. A.; Bowden, S.; Stephenson, S. N.; Starkweather, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) envisions a prosperous, sustainable, and healthy Arctic understood through innovative and collaborative research coordinated among Federal agencies and domestic and international partners. IARPC's approach is to harnesses the talent of the scientific and stakeholder community through Federally-run but broadly open collaboration teams, and an innovative website that expands the frontiers of collaborative research. The Obama Administration released the five-year Arctic Research Plan: FY2013-2017 in February 2013. The Plan focuses on advancing knowledge and sustainability of the Arctic by improving collaboration in seven priority research areas: sea ice and marine ecosystems, terrestrial ice and ecosystems, atmospheric studies, observing systems, regional climate models, human health studies, and adaptation tools for communities. From these seven research areas, 12 collaboration teams were formed to respond to the 145 milestones laid out in the Plan. The collaboration teams are charged with enhancing inter-institutional and interdisciplinary implementation of scientific research on local, regional, and circumpolar environmental and societal issues in the Arctic. The collaboration teams are co-chaired by Federal program managers, and, in some cases, external partners and are open to research and stakeholder communities. They meet on a regular basis by web- or teleconference to inform one another about ongoing and planned programs and new research results, as well as to inventory existing programs, identify gaps in knowledge and research, and address and implement the Plan's milestones. In-between meetings, team members communicate via our innovative, user-driven, collaboration website. Members share information about their research activities by posting updates, uploading documents, and including events on our calendar, and entering into dialogue about their research activities. Conversations taking place on the

  2. "For Most of Us Africans, We Don't Just Speak": A Qualitative Investigation into Collaborative Heterogeneous PBL Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaram, Veena S.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Stevens, Fred; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) may provide the opportunity to bring together diverse students but their efficacy in practice and the complications that arise due to the mixed ethnicity needs further investigation. This study explores the key advantages and problems of heterogeneous PBL groups from the students' and…

  3. "For most of us Africans, we don't just speak": a qualitative investigation into collaborative heterogeneous PBL group learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singaram, V.S.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Stevens, F.; Dolmans, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) may provide the opportunity to bring together diverse students but their efficacy in practice and the complications that arise due to the mixed ethnicity needs further investigation. This study explores the key advantages and problems of

  4. Research on Biodiversity and Climate Change at a Distance: Collaboration Networks between Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangles, Olivier; Loirat, Jean; Freour, Claire; Serre, Sandrine; Vacher, Jean; Le Roux, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity loss and climate change are both globally significant issues that must be addressed through collaboration across countries and disciplines. With the December 2015 COP21 climate conference in Paris and the recent creation of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), it has become critical to evaluate the capacity for global research networks to develop at the interface between biodiversity and climate change. In the context of the European Union (EU) strategy to stand as a world leader in tackling global challenges, the European Commission has promoted ties between the EU and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) in science, technology and innovation. However, it is not clear how these significant interactions impact scientific cooperation at the interface of biodiversity and climate change. We looked at research collaborations between two major regions-the European Research Area (ERA) and LAC-that addressed both biodiversity and climate change. We analysed the temporal evolution of these collaborations, whether they were led by ERA or LAC teams, and which research domains they covered. We surveyed publications listed on the Web of Science that were authored by researchers from both the ERA and LAC and that were published between 2003 and 2013. We also run similar analyses on other topics and other continents to provide baseline comparisons. Our results revealed a steady increase in scientific co-authorships between ERA and LAC countries as a result of the increasingly complex web of relationships that has been weaved among scientists from the two regions. The ERA-LAC co-authorship increase for biodiversity and climate change was higher than those reported for other topics and for collaboration with other continents. We also found strong differences in international collaboration patterns within the LAC: co-publications were fewest from researchers in low- and lower-middle-income countries and most prevalent from

  5. Evaluation of the collaborative network of highly correlating skin proteins and its change following treatment with glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Nicolette

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids (GC represent the core treatment modality for many inflammatory diseases. Its mode of action is difficult to grasp, not least because it includes direct modulation of many components of the extracellular matrix as well as complex anti-inflammatory effects. Protein expression profile of skin proteins is being changed with topical application of GC, however, the knowledge about singular markers in this regard is only patchy and collaboration is ill defined. Material/Methods Scar formation was observed under different doses of GC, which were locally applied on the back skin of mice (1 to 3 weeks. After euthanasia we analyzed protein expression of collagen I and III (picrosirius in scar tissue together with 16 additional protein markers, which are involved in wound healing, with immunhistochemistry. For assessing GC's effect on co-expression we compared our results with a model of random figures to estimate how many significant correlations should be expected by chance. Results GC altered collagen and protein expression with distinct results in different areas of investigation. Most often we observed a reduced expression after application of low dose GC. In the scar infiltrate a multivariate analysis confirmed the significant impact of both GC concentrations. Calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficient similarly resulted in a significant impact of GC, and furthermore, offered the possibility to grasp the entire interactive profile in between all variables studied. The biological markers, which were connected by significant correlations could be arranged in a highly cross-linked network that involved most of the markers measured. A marker highly cross-linked with more than 3 significant correlations was indicated by a higher variation of all its correlations to the other variables, resulting in a standard deviation of > 0.2. Conclusion In addition to immunohistochemical analysis of single protein markers

  6. Scientific authorships and collaboration network analysis on Chagas disease: papers indexed in PubMed (1940-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Park, Jinseo; Huamaní, Charles; Gascón, Joaquín; Ramos, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic, tropical, parasitic disease, endemic throughout Latin America. The large-scale migration of populations has increased the geographic distribution of the disease and cases have been observed in many other countries around the world. To strengthen the critical mass of knowledge generated in different countries, it is essential to promote cooperative and translational research initiatives. We analyzed authorship of scientific documents on Chagas disease indexed in the Medline database from 1940 to 2009. Bibliometrics was used to analyze the evolution of collaboration patterns. A Social Network Analysis was carried out to identify the main research groups in the area by applying clustering methods. We then analyzed 13,989 papers produced by 21,350 authors. Collaboration among authors dramatically increased over the study period, reaching an average of 6.2 authors per paper in the last five-year period. Applying a threshold of collaboration of five or more papers signed in co-authorship, we identified 148 consolidated research groups made up of 1,750 authors. The Chagas disease network identified constitutes a "small world," characterized by a high degree of clustering and a notably high number of Brazilian researchers.

  7. Secure and Privacy-Preserving Data Sharing and Collaboration in Mobile Healthcare Social Networks of Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinlong Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile healthcare social networks (MHSN integrated with connected medical sensors and cloud-based health data storage provide preventive and curative health services in smart cities. The fusion of social data together with real-time health data facilitates a novel paradigm of healthcare big data analysis. However, the collaboration of healthcare and social network service providers may pose a series of security and privacy issues. In this paper, we propose a secure health and social data sharing and collaboration scheme in MHSN. To preserve the data privacy, we realize secure and fine-grained health data and social data sharing with attribute-based encryption and identity-based broadcast encryption techniques, respectively, which allows patients to share their private personal data securely. In order to achieve enhanced data collaboration, we allow the healthcare analyzers to access both the reencrypted health data and the social data with authorization from the data owner based on proxy reencryption. Specifically, most of the health data encryption and decryption computations are outsourced from resource-constrained mobile devices to a health cloud, and the decryption of the healthcare analyzer incurs a low cost. The security and performance analysis results show the security and efficiency of our scheme.

  8. Power Quality Investigation of Distribution Networks Embedded Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Elsherif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a multitude of events have created a new environment for the electric power infrastructure. The presence of small-scale generation near load spots is becoming common especially with the advent of renewable energy sources such as wind power energy. This type of generation is known as distributed generation (DG. The expansion of the distributed generators- (DGs- based wind energy raises constraints on the distribution networks operation and power quality issues: voltage sag, voltage swell, voltage interruption, harmonic contents, flickering, frequency deviation, unbalance, and so forth. Consequently, the public distribution network conception and connection studies evolve in order to keep the distribution system operating in optimal conditions. In this paper, a comprehensive power quality investigation of a distribution system with embedded wind turbines has been carried out. This investigation is carried out in a comparison aspect between the conventional synchronous generators, as DGs are widely in use at present, and the different wind turbines technologies, which represent the foresightedness of the DGs. The obtained results are discussed with the IEC 61400-21 standard for testing and assessing power quality characteristics of grid-connected wind energy and the IEEE 1547-2003 standard for interconnecting distributed resources with electric power systems.

  9. Fostering Collaboration Across the U.S. Critical Zone Observatories Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, S.; White, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) is defined as the permeable layer from the top of the vegetation canopy to the bottom of freely circulating groundwater where rock, soil, water, air and life meet. The study of the CZ is motivated by an overall lack of understanding of the coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in this zone at differing spatial and temporal scales. Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs), supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation's Geosciences Directorate, are natural laboratories that aim to provide infrastructure, data and models to gain understanding of the evolution and function of the CZ from grain-to-watershed scales. The nine U.S. observatories span a range of climatic, ecologic, geologic, and physiographic environments from California to Puerto Rico, working on site-specific hypotheses and network-scale goals. CZO research infrastructure allows for teams of cross-disciplinary scientists at each site to further CZ science using field and theoretical approaches, education and outreach, and cross-CZO science. Cross-CZO science emerges from a set of common CZ science questions and hypotheses focused on CZ structure and evolution, event-based and continuous fluxes across CZ interfaces, and changes in storage of major CZ reservoirs at the catchment scale. CZO research seeks to understand coupled processes across all timescales using quantitative models parameterized from observations of meteorological variables, streams, and groundwater, and sampling and analyzing landforms, bedrock, soils, and ecosystems. Each observatory strives to apply common infrastructure, protocols and measurements that help quantify the composition and fluxes of energy, water, solutes, sediments, energy, and mass across boundaries of the CZ system through both space and time. This type of approach enables researchers to access and integrate data in a way that allows for the isolation of environmental variables and comparison of processes and responses across

  10. SU-E-P-19: A National Collaborative Academic Medical Physics Network: Structure, Activity and Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A national Australian inter-university medical physics (MP) group was formed in 2011/12, supported by Department of Health Better Access to Radiation Oncology BARO) seed funding. Core membership includes the six universities providing postgraduate MP courses. Objectives include increasing capacity, development and efficiency of national academic MP structures/systems and hence supporting education, clinical training and research, for the MP workforce support. Although the BARO scheme focuses on Radiation Oncology, the group has wider MP interests. Methods: Two further BARO seed grants were achieved: 1) for networked academic activities, including shared-resource teaching, eg using virtual reality systems; MP outreach to schools and undergraduates; developing web-based student and registrar education/resources, etc.; and 2) for conjoint ‘translational research’ posts between universities and partner hospitals, to clinically progress advanced RT technologies and to support students and registrars. Each university received 0.5 FTE post from each grant over 2 years (total: $1.75M) and leveraged local additional partner funds. Results: Total funding: $4–5M. Overall there have been 35 (mainly overseas) postholders bringing specific expertise, beginning in early 2013. Periods in Australia have been from 0.25–2 years (median=1). As well as the education activities, research projects include lung/spine SBRT, 4D RT, FFF beams, technology assessment, complex treatment planning, imaging for radiation oncology, DIR, adaptive breast, datamining, radiomics,etc. Observed positive impacts include: increased interest in MP courses, training support, translational research infrastructure and/or clinical practice in the hospitals involved, plus increased collaboration and effectiveness between the universities. Posts are continuing beyond grant end using leveraged funds, providing the basis for sustainability of some posts. Conclusion: The BARO-funded projects have

  11. Information-computational platform for collaborative multidisciplinary investigations of regional climatic changes and their impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, Evgeny; Lykosov, Vasily; Krupchatnikov, Vladimir; Okladnikov, Igor; Titov, Alexander; Shulgina, Tamara

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of growing volume of related to climate change data from sensors and model outputs requires collaborative multidisciplinary efforts of researchers. To do it timely and in reliable way one needs in modern information-computational infrastructure supporting integrated studies in the field of environmental sciences. Recently developed experimental software and hardware platform Climate (http://climate.scert.ru/) provides required environment for regional climate change related investigations. The platform combines modern web 2.0 approach, GIS-functionality and capabilities to run climate and meteorological models, process large geophysical datasets and support relevant analysis. It also supports joint software development by distributed research groups, and organization of thematic education for students and post-graduate students. In particular, platform software developed includes dedicated modules for numerical processing of regional and global modeling results for consequent analysis and visualization. Also run of integrated into the platform WRF and «Planet Simulator» models, modeling results data preprocessing and visualization is provided. All functions of the platform are accessible by a user through a web-portal using common graphical web-browser in the form of an interactive graphical user interface which provides, particularly, capabilities of selection of geographical region of interest (pan and zoom), data layers manipulation (order, enable/disable, features extraction) and visualization of results. Platform developed provides users with capabilities of heterogeneous geophysical data analysis, including high-resolution data, and discovering of tendencies in climatic and ecosystem changes in the framework of different multidisciplinary researches. Using it even unskilled user without specific knowledge can perform reliable computational processing and visualization of large meteorological, climatic and satellite monitoring datasets through

  12. Automatic generation of investigator bibliographies for institutional research networking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B; Bales, Michael E; Dine, Daniel; Bakken, Suzanne; Albert, Paul J; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-10-01

    Publications are a key data source for investigator profiles and research networking systems. We developed ReCiter, an algorithm that automatically extracts bibliographies from PubMed using institutional information about the target investigators. ReCiter executes a broad query against PubMed, groups the results into clusters that appear to constitute distinct author identities and selects the cluster that best matches the target investigator. Using information about investigators from one of our institutions, we compared ReCiter results to queries based on author name and institution and to citations extracted manually from the Scopus database. Five judges created a gold standard using citations of a random sample of 200 investigators. About half of the 10,471 potential investigators had no matching citations in PubMed, and about 45% had fewer than 70 citations. Interrater agreement (Fleiss' kappa) for the gold standard was 0.81. Scopus achieved the best recall (sensitivity) of 0.81, while name-based queries had 0.78 and ReCiter had 0.69. ReCiter attained the best precision (positive predictive value) of 0.93 while Scopus had 0.85 and name-based queries had 0.31. ReCiter accesses the most current citation data, uses limited computational resources and minimizes manual entry by investigators. Generation of bibliographies using named-based queries will not yield high accuracy. Proprietary databases can perform well but requite manual effort. Automated generation with higher recall is possible but requires additional knowledge about investigators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Building the Child Safety Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network: How does it work and what is it achieving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, Jennifer B; Spicer, Rebecca S; Katradis, Maria; Allison, Jennifer; Thomas, Rebekah

    2018-02-16

    This study investigated whether the Child Safety Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network (CS CoIIN) framework could be applied in the field of injury and violence prevention to reduce fatalities, hospitalizations and emergency department visits among 0-19 year olds. Twenty-one states/jurisdictions were accepted into cohort 1 of the CS CoIIN, and 14 were engaged from March 2016 through April 2017. A quality improvement framework was used to test, implement and spread evidence-based change ideas (strategies and programs) in child passenger safety, falls prevention, interpersonal violence prevention, suicide and self-harm prevention and teen driver safety. Outcome and process measure data were analyzed using run chart rules. Descriptive data were analyzed for participation measures and descriptive statistics were produced. Qualitative data were analyzed to identify key themes. Seventy-six percent of CS CoIIN states/jurisdictions were engaged in activities and used data to inform decision making. Within a year, states/jurisdictions were able to test and implement evidence-based change ideas in pilot sites. A small group showed improvement in process measures and were ready to spread change ideas. Improvement in outcome measures was not achieved; however, 25% of states/jurisdictions identified data sources and reported on real-time outcome measures. Evidence indicates the CS CoIIN framework can be applied to make progress on process measures, but more time is needed to determine if this will result in progress on long-term outcome measures of fatalities, hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Seventeen states/jurisdictions will participate in cohort 2. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...

  15. Military Application of Networking by Touch in Collaborative Planning and Tactical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    extending broadband coverage to cities and towns wirelessly via a metro area network. Additionally, because of its far reaching capabilities and ease of...Telecommunications Network Architecture and Standards Transmission protocols ( Ethernet , Token Ring), message format standards (X.400, X12), network

  16. To Enhance Collaborative Learning and Practice Network Knowledge with a Virtualization Laboratory and Online Synchronous Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Kongcharoen, Chaknarin; Ghinea, Gheorghita

    2014-01-01

    Recently, various computer networking courses have included additional laboratory classes in order to enhance students' learning achievement. However, these classes need to establish a suitable laboratory where each student can connect network devices to configure and test functions within different network topologies. In this case, the Linux…

  17. A collaborative network middleware project by Lambda Station, TeraPaths, and Phoebus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobyshev, A.; /Fermilab; Bradley, S.; /Brookhaven; Crawford, M.; /Fermilab; DeMar, P.; /Fermilab; Katramatos, D.; /Brookhaven; Shroff, K.; /Brookhaven; Swany, M.; /Delaware U.; Yu, D.; /Brookhaven

    2010-01-01

    The TeraPaths, Lambda Station, and Phoebus projects, funded by the US Department of Energy, have successfully developed network middleware services that establish on-demand and manage true end-to-end, Quality-of-Service (QoS) aware, virtual network paths across multiple administrative network domains, select network paths and gracefully reroute traffic over these dynamic paths, and streamline traffic between packet and circuit networks using transparent gateways. These services improve network QoS and performance for applications, playing a critical role in the effective use of emerging dynamic circuit network services. They provide interfaces to applications, such as dCache SRM, translate network service requests into network device configurations, and coordinate with each other to setup up end-to-end network paths. The End Site Control Plane Subsystem (ESCPS) builds upon the success of the three projects by combining their individual capabilities into the next generation of network middleware. ESCPS addresses challenges such as cross-domain control plane signalling and interoperability, authentication and authorization in a Grid environment, topology discovery, and dynamic status tracking. The new network middleware will take full advantage of the perfSONAR monitoring infrastructure and the Inter-Domain Control plane efforts and will be deployed and fully vetted in the Large Hadron Collider data movement environment.

  18. Sustaining Broader Impacts through Researcher-Teacher Collaboration (A Model Based on Award Abstract #1334935: Collaborative Research: Investigating the Ecological Importance of Iron Storage in Diatoms.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, M.; Marchetti, A.

    2016-02-01

    Broader impacts have become a vital component of scientific research projects. A variety of outreach avenues are available to assist scientists in reaching larger audiences, however, the translation of cutting-edge scientific content and concepts can be challenging. Collaborating with educators is a viable option to assist researchers in fulfilling NSF's broader impact requirements. A broader impacts model based on collaborations between a teacher and 28 researchers from 14 institutions will demonstrate successful science outreach and engagement through interactions between teachers, researchers, students, and general audiences. Communication styles (i.e., blogs, social media) and outreach data incorporated by researchers and the teacher will be shared to illustrate the magnitude of the broader impacts achieved with this partnership. Inquiry-based investigations and activities developed to translate the science into the classroom will also be demonstrated, including the use of real scientific data collected during the research cruise. "Finding Microbe Needles in a Haystack of Oceans" provides an understanding of how remote sensing technology is used to locate specific ocean environments (e.g. High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll - HNLC) that support diverse microbial food webs. A board game ("Diatom Adventures©") designed to explore the physiology of microbial organisms and microscopic food webs will also be demonstrated. The tentative nature of science requires a constant vigil to stay abreast of the latest hypotheses and discoveries. Researcher/Teacher collaborations allow each professional to focus on his/her strengths while meeting broader impact requirements. These partnerships encourage lifelong learning as educators observe and work with scientists first-hand and then follow appropriate scope, sequence, and pedagogy to assist various audiences in understanding the innovative technologies being used to explore new scientific frontiers.

  19. Analysis of inter-country input-output table based on citation network: How to measure the competition and collaboration between industrial sectors on the global value chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Xing

    Full Text Available The input-output table is comprehensive and detailed in describing the national economic system with complex economic relationships, which embodies information of supply and demand among industrial sectors. This paper aims to scale the degree of competition/collaboration on the global value chain from the perspective of econophysics. Global Industrial Strongest Relevant Network models were established by extracting the strongest and most immediate industrial relevance in the global economic system with inter-country input-output tables and then transformed into Global Industrial Resource Competition Network/Global Industrial Production Collaboration Network models embodying the competitive/collaborative relationships based on bibliographic coupling/co-citation approach. Three indicators well suited for these two kinds of weighted and non-directed networks with self-loops were introduced, including unit weight for competitive/collaborative power, disparity in the weight for competitive/collaborative amplitude and weighted clustering coefficient for competitive/collaborative intensity. Finally, these models and indicators were further applied to empirically analyze the function of sectors in the latest World Input-Output Database, to reveal inter-sector competitive/collaborative status during the economic globalization.

  20. Analysis of inter-country input-output table based on citation network: How to measure the competition and collaboration between industrial sectors on the global value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lizhi

    2017-01-01

    The input-output table is comprehensive and detailed in describing the national economic system with complex economic relationships, which embodies information of supply and demand among industrial sectors. This paper aims to scale the degree of competition/collaboration on the global value chain from the perspective of econophysics. Global Industrial Strongest Relevant Network models were established by extracting the strongest and most immediate industrial relevance in the global economic system with inter-country input-output tables and then transformed into Global Industrial Resource Competition Network/Global Industrial Production Collaboration Network models embodying the competitive/collaborative relationships based on bibliographic coupling/co-citation approach. Three indicators well suited for these two kinds of weighted and non-directed networks with self-loops were introduced, including unit weight for competitive/collaborative power, disparity in the weight for competitive/collaborative amplitude and weighted clustering coefficient for competitive/collaborative intensity. Finally, these models and indicators were further applied to empirically analyze the function of sectors in the latest World Input-Output Database, to reveal inter-sector competitive/collaborative status during the economic globalization.

  1. Analysis of inter-country input-output table based on citation network: How to measure the competition and collaboration between industrial sectors on the global value chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The input-output table is comprehensive and detailed in describing the national economic system with complex economic relationships, which embodies information of supply and demand among industrial sectors. This paper aims to scale the degree of competition/collaboration on the global value chain from the perspective of econophysics. Global Industrial Strongest Relevant Network models were established by extracting the strongest and most immediate industrial relevance in the global economic system with inter-country input-output tables and then transformed into Global Industrial Resource Competition Network/Global Industrial Production Collaboration Network models embodying the competitive/collaborative relationships based on bibliographic coupling/co-citation approach. Three indicators well suited for these two kinds of weighted and non-directed networks with self-loops were introduced, including unit weight for competitive/collaborative power, disparity in the weight for competitive/collaborative amplitude and weighted clustering coefficient for competitive/collaborative intensity. Finally, these models and indicators were further applied to empirically analyze the function of sectors in the latest World Input-Output Database, to reveal inter-sector competitive/collaborative status during the economic globalization. PMID:28873432

  2. A Network Investigation on Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH is a rare condition in which puberty does not take place naturally. We aimed to develop and follow an internet-based cohort and to improve our understanding of the disease. We established an internet-based questionnaire survey. A total of 74 male IHH patients were recruited from the Chinese largest IHH network social group. The clinical symptoms before treatment mainly included small testis, underdeveloped secondary sexual characteristics, and sexual dysfunction. After treatment, the penis length, testicular volume, external genital organ development, pubic hair, beard, laryngeal prominence, erection, and spermatorrhea were improved significantly (P<0.001. 18.9% of the patients completed fertility; however, more than half of the patients still complained of poor happiness and low physical strength. In addition, improvements in penis and pubic hair development, testosterone normalization and the physical strength in IHH patients who received gonadotropin and androgen replacement therapy were better than in those who received single gonadotropin therapy (P<0.05 for all. In conclusion, disease-specific network investigation can be used as an alternative method of medical research for rare diseases. The results of our cross-sectional study showed the effectiveness of hormone replacement therapy for IHH and implied that gonadotropin and androgen replacement therapy may be superior to gonadotropin treatment alone.

  3. Investigating a Novel Measure of Brain Networking Following Sports Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglio, S P; Rettmann, A; Greer, J; Brimacombe, S; Moore, B; Narisetty, N; He, X; Eckner, J

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians managing sports-related concussions are left to their clinical judgment in making diagnoses and return-to-play decisions. This study was designed to evaluate the utility of a novel measure of functional brain networking for concussion management. 24 athletes with acutely diagnosed concussion and 21 control participants were evaluated in a research laboratory. At each of the 4 post-injury time points, participants completed the Axon assessment of neurocognitive function, a self-report symptom inventory, and the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks while electroencephalogram (EEG) readings were recorded. Brain Network Activation (BNA) scores were calculated from EEG data related to the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks. BNA scores were unable to differentiate between the concussed and control groups or by self-report symptom severity. These findings conflict with previous work implementing electrophysiological assessments in concussed athletes, suggesting that BNA requires additional investigation and refinement before clinical implementation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. An investigation of Pierre de Wet’s role in the Afrikaans film industry using social network analysis (SNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgert A. Senekal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the film industry – like the literary system – can be described as a cultural system or field, systems theory remains largely unexplored in South African film studies, as does the more recent network theory. Systems theory and network theory both emphasise the relationships of an entity within a larger context, arguing that an entity should be studied within the relationships in which it functions. Recently, researchers have suggested that network theory can be integrated with polysystem theory to study the interactions between entities in the literary system. This article illustrates the potential of using social network analysis (SNA as an investigative tool to identify and describe the role of an entity within the context of the film industry by focusing on one of the seminal Afrikaans film makers: Pierre de Wet. Pierre de Wet has been intricately involved with the beginnings of the Afrikaans film industry, collaborating with, amongst others, some of the most prolific film editors, producers,cinematographers and music composers. His major collaborators are highlighted as well as his central position in the Afrikaans film industry, taking into account the entire Afrikaans film industry from its origin to the contemporary period. The article also makes suggestions for further research.

  5. Investigating Factors That Influence Students' Management of Study Environment in Online Collaborative Groupwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianxia; Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines empirical models of students' management of the learning environment in the context of online collaborative groupwork. Such environment management is an important component of students' overall self-regulated learning strategy for effective learning. Student- and group-level predictors for study environment management in…

  6. MyLibrary@LANL: proximity and semi-metric networks for a collaborative and recommender web service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, L. M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Informatics and Cognitive Science Program; Simas, T. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Informatics and Cognitive Science Program; Rechtsteiner, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); DiGiacomo, M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Research Library; Luce, R. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Research Library

    2005-09-01

    We describe a network approach to building recommendation systems for a WWW service. We employ two different types of weighted graphs in our analysis and development: Proximity graphs, a type of Fuzzy Graphs based on a co-occurrence probability, and semi-metric distance graphs, which do not observe the triangle inequality of Euclidean distances. Both types of graphs are used to develop intelligent recommendation and collaboration systems for the MyLibrary@LANL web service, a user-centered front-end to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) digital library collections and WWW resources.

  7. Literacies for Surveillance: Social Network Sites and Background Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jackson Young

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In September 2013, civilian contractor Aaron Alexis entered the Washington Navy Yard and murdered twelve people before being fatally shot by police. This incident, together with an incident three months earlier involving Edward Snowden, caused the U.S. government to critically examine their background investigation (BI process; because both Snowden and Alexis had supposedly slipped through the cracks of their investigations, there must be some flaw in the BI procedure. The U.S. Committee on Oversight and Reform concluded that rules forbidding “background checkers from looking at the Internet or social media when performing checks” was one of the main factors contributing to defective BIs (Report, 2014. Since the report’s release, the Director of National Intelligence has been debating and trialing whether information from the Internet should be used to form a data double for BIs (Kopp, 2014; Rockwell, 2014. Using this conversation as a discussion catalyst, I argue that due to the nature of the data double, if the United States were to adopt the use of social networking sites (SNSs for security clearance purposes, neglecting to take into account basic principles of SNSs into the process of BIs may lead to misinformation and unfavorable adjudication. Ultimately, being literate about the social practices involved in SNSs and surveillance would benefit not only investigators, but anyone, including academics, looking at individuals in online spaces.

  8. Development of Network-type Archaeological Investigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, F.; Yokokoyama, S.; Kaneda, A.; Konno, K.

    2015-08-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 is said to be a once-in-1000-year catastrophic quake. The Tsunami triggered by the earthquake destroyed broad coastal areas in northeast Japan. As recovery from the earthquake proceeds, the demand for new road construction, housing hill development, and residential construction is rapidly increasing. Culture plays a critical role in the district's recovery. For that reason, before development, cultural properties in the corresponding districts must be urgently investigated. This is a must, although balancing cultural recovery with rapid economic recovery is no easy task. With this in mind, we have developed a new system focusing on speedy archaeological investigation and adequate documentation. The authors reexamined the existing investigation process to categorize tasks into two types: those that must be done only at archaeological sites (site A) and ones available at other places (site B). We then formulated a scheme where the tasks on both sites are performed simultaneously in parallel over the network. Experiments are ongoing. This presentation reports the process and issues of our research and development.

  9. Collaborative networks and patent production in Andean Community of Nations universities (UCANS, 2005-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Agüero Aguilar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The competitiveness and technological development of a region are measured by the degree of innovation supporting them. The quantity and quality of patents generated and applied in production dynamics serve as an element for evaluation. In this sense, universities play a role as generators and transmitters of knowledge. So it is important to identify the level of their collaboration and the trends in terms of technology application in order to establish future policies for development in this sector. This article identifies the degree of collaboration, types of patents, actors (primary and secondary and dynamics of patents produced at the Andean Community of Nations universities during the period 2005-2015 and present in the European Patent Office database. In conclusion, there is a great disparity between CAN universities regarding patent production, so it is necessary to strengthen the collaborative level among universities in this community. Nevertheless, an increase is seen in the production of patents.

  10. Primary health care service delivery networks for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: using social network methods to describe interorganisational collaboration in a rural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Julie; Jayasuriya, Rohan; Harris, Mark Fort

    2011-01-01

    Adults with type 2 diabetes or with behavioural risk factors require comprehensive and well coordinated responses from a range of health care providers who often work in different organisational settings. This study examines three types of collaborative links between organisations involved in a rural setting. Social network methods were employed using survey data on three types of links, and data was collected from a purposive sample of 17 organisations representing the major provider types. The analysis included a mix of unconfirmed and confirmed links, and network measures. General practices were the most influential provider group in initiating referrals, and they referred to the broadest range of organisations in the network. Team care arrangements formed a small part of the general practice referral network. They were used more for access to private sector allied health care providers and less for sharing care with public sector health services. Involvement in joint programs/activities was limited to public and non-government sector services, with no participation from the private sector. The patterns of interactions suggest that informal referral networks provide access to services and coordination of care for individual patients with diabetes. Two population subgroups would benefit from more proactive approaches to ensure equitable access to services and coordination of care across organisational boundaries: people with more complex health care needs and people at risk of developing diabetes.

  11. MetNet - In situ observational Network and Orbital platform to investigate the Martian environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Leinonen, Jussi; Merikallio, Sini; Paton, Mark; Haukka, Harri; Polkko, Jouni

    2007-09-01

    MetNet Mars Mission is an in situ observational network and orbital platform mission to investigate the Martian environment and it has been proposed to European Space Agency in response to Call for proposals for the first planning cycle of Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 D/SCI/DJS/SV/val/21851. The MetNet Mars Mission is to be implemented in collaboration with ESA, FMI, LA, IKI and the payload providing science teams. The scope of the MetNet Mission is to deploy 16 MetNet Landers (MNLs) on the Martian surface by using inflatable descent system structures accompanied by an atmospheric sounder and data relay onboard the MetNet Orbiter (MNO), which is based on ESA Mars Express satellite platform. The MNLs are attached on the three sides of the satellite and most of the MNLs are deployed to Mars separately a few weeks prior to the arrival to Mars. The MetNet Orbiter will perform continuous atmospheric soundings thus complementing the accurate in situ observations at the Martian ground produced by the MetNet observation network, as well as the orbiter will serve as the primary data relay between the MetNet Landers and the Earth. The MNLs are equipped with a versatile science payload focused on the atmospheric science of Mars. Detailed characterisation of the Martian atmospheric circulation patterns, boundary layer phenomena, and climatological cycles, as well as interior investigations, require simultaneous in situ meteorological, seismic and magnetic measurements from networks of stations on the Martian surface. MetNet Mars Mission will also provide a crucial support for the safety of large landing missions in general and manned Mars missions in particular. Accurate knowledge of atmospheric conditions and weather data is essential to guarantee safe landings of the forthcoming Mars mission elements.

  12. Improving social odometry robot networks with distributed reputation systems for collaborative purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, David; Gutiérrez, Alvaro; Vallejo, Juan Carlos; Campo, Alexandre; Bankovic, Zorana

    2011-01-01

    The improvement of odometry systems in collaborative robotics remains an important challenge for several applications. Social odometry is a social technique which confers the robots the possibility to learn from the others. This paper analyzes social odometry and proposes and follows a methodology to improve its behavior based on cooperative reputation systems. We also provide a reference implementation that allows us to compare the performance of the proposed solution in highly dynamic environments with the performance of standard social odometry techniques. Simulation results quantitatively show the benefits of this collaborative approach that allows us to achieve better performances than social odometry.

  13. Improving Social Odometry Robot Networks with Distributed Reputation Systems for Collaborative Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana Bankovic

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of odometry systems in collaborative robotics remains an important challenge for several applications. Social odometry is a social technique which confers the robots the possibility to learn from the others. This paper analyzes social odometry and proposes and follows a methodology to improve its behavior based on cooperative reputation systems. We also provide a reference implementation that allows us to compare the performance of the proposed solution in highly dynamic environments with the performance of standard social odometry techniques. Simulation results quantitatively show the benefits of this collaborative approach that allows us to achieve better performances than social odometry.

  14. Deployable Network Operations Center (DNOC): A Collaborative Technology Infostructure Designed to Support Tactical Sensor-Decision Maker Network Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Shawn E

    2005-01-01

    .... The increasing use of expeditionary and special operations forces operating in ad hoc, dynamic, and tactical environments poses a need for an adaptable, flexible, and responsive Deployable Network Operations Center (DNOC...

  15. Using multiple collaborative agents for adaptive Quality of Service management of C4ISR networks

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Raymond A.

    2001-01-01

    This research explores the potential of agent technology for adaptive Quality of Service (QoS) management of C4ISR networks. With the growing emphasis on information superiority, any time savings or additional utilization of resources enabled by effective network management becomes increasingly important. Intelligent agents are ideal for assessing information, adapting to dynamic conditions, and predicting future network conditions. In the kernel of the proposed multiple agent system (MAS) te...

  16. Invasive species information networks: Collaboration at multiple scales for prevention, early detection, and rapid response to invasive alien species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Annie; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Madsen, John; Westbrooks, Randy G.; Fournier, Christine; Mehrhoff, Les; Browne, Michael; Graham, Jim; Sellers, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate analysis of present distributions and effective modeling of future distributions of invasive alien species (IAS) are both highly dependent on the availability and accessibility of occurrence data and natural history information about the species. Invasive alien species monitoring and detection networks (such as the Invasive Plant Atlas of New England and the Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth) generate occurrence data at local and regional levels within the United States, which are shared through the US National Institute of Invasive Species Science. The Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network's Invasives Information Network (I3N), facilitates cooperation on sharing invasive species occurrence data throughout the Western Hemisphere. The I3N and other national and regional networks expose their data globally via the Global Invasive Species Information Network (GISIN). International and interdisciplinary cooperation on data sharing strengthens cooperation on strategies and responses to invasions. However, limitations to effective collaboration among invasive species networks leading to successful early detection and rapid response to invasive species include: lack of interoperability; data accessibility; funding; and technical expertise. This paper proposes various solutions to these obstacles at different geographic levels and briefly describes success stories from the invasive species information networks mentioned above. Using biological informatics to facilitate global information sharing is especially critical in invasive species science, as research has shown that one of the best indicators of the invasiveness of a species is whether it has been invasive elsewhere. Data must also be shared across disciplines because natural history information (e.g. diet, predators, habitat requirements, etc.) about a species in its native range is vital for effective prevention, detection, and rapid response to an invasion. Finally, it has been our

  17. HerzMobil Tirol network: rationale for and design of a collaborative heart failure disease management program in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von der Heidt, Andreas; Ammenwerth, Elske; Bauer, Karl; Fetz, Bettina; Fluckinger, Thomas; Gassner, Andrea; Grander, Willhelm; Gritsch, Walter; Haffner, Immaculata; Henle-Talirz, Gudrun; Hoschek, Stefan; Huter, Stephan; Kastner, Peter; Krestan, Susanne; Kufner, Peter; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Noebl, Josef; Radi, Momen; Raffeiner, Clemens; Welte, Stefan; Wiseman, Andreas; Poelzl, Gerhard

    2014-11-01

    Heart failure (HF) is approaching epidemic proportions worldwide and is the leading cause of hospitalization in the elderly population. High rates of readmission contribute substantially to excessive health care costs and highlight the fragmented nature of care available to HF patients. Disease management programs (DMPs) have been implemented to improve health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and quality of life, and to reduce health care costs. Telemonitoring systems appear to be effective in the vulnerable phase after discharge from hospital to prevent early readmissions. DMPs that emphasize comprehensive patient education and guideline-adjusted therapy have shown great promise to result in beneficial long-term effects. It can be speculated that combining core elements of the aforementioned programs may substantially improve long-term cost-effectiveness of patient management.We introduce a collaborative post-discharge HF disease management program (HerzMobil Tirol network) that incorporates physician-controlled telemonitoring and nurse-led care in a multidisciplinary network approach.

  18. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. May, Peter; Winter, Søren

    While much of prior research on collaboration addresses the service delivery network as a whole, we address collaborative relationships between one type of organization—municipal employment services—and a range of governmental and non-governmental partners for employment services in Denmark...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  19. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; J. May, Peter

    2007-01-01

    While much of prior research on collaboration addresses the service delivery network as a whole, we address collaborative relationships between one type of organization—municipal employment services—and a range of governmental and non-governmental partners for employment services in Denmark...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  20. An investigation of the efficacy of collaborative virtual reality systems for moderated remote usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalil Madathil, Kapil; Greenstein, Joel S

    2017-11-01

    Collaborative virtual reality-based systems have integrated high fidelity voice-based communication, immersive audio and screen-sharing tools into virtual environments. Such three-dimensional collaborative virtual environments can mirror the collaboration among usability test participants and facilitators when they are physically collocated, potentially enabling moderated usability tests to be conducted effectively when the facilitator and participant are located in different places. We developed a virtual collaborative three-dimensional remote moderated usability testing laboratory and employed it in a controlled study to evaluate the effectiveness of moderated usability testing in a collaborative virtual reality-based environment with two other moderated usability testing methods: the traditional lab approach and Cisco WebEx, a web-based conferencing and screen sharing approach. Using a mixed methods experimental design, 36 test participants and 12 test facilitators were asked to complete representative tasks on a simulated online shopping website. The dependent variables included the time taken to complete the tasks; the usability defects identified and their severity; and the subjective ratings on the workload index, presence and satisfaction questionnaires. Remote moderated usability testing methodology using a collaborative virtual reality system performed similarly in terms of the total number of defects identified, the number of high severity defects identified and the time taken to complete the tasks with the other two methodologies. The overall workload experienced by the test participants and facilitators was the least with the traditional lab condition. No significant differences were identified for the workload experienced with the virtual reality and the WebEx conditions. However, test participants experienced greater involvement and a more immersive experience in the virtual environment than in the WebEx condition. The ratings for the virtual

  1. Understanding Maturity of Collaborative Network Organizations by Using B-ITa Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhsh, Faiza Allah; Daneva, Maia; Weigand, Hans; Bajec, Marko; Eder, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Organization’s concerns as controlling costs, improving quality, increasing effectiveness, and managing risk increasingly impose strong requirements on Business-IT alignment (B-ITa). Several Maturity Models came into being for considering improvement actions in B-ITa. The IT-Enabled Collaborative

  2. "CityVille": Collaborative Game Play, Communication and Skill Development in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Moral, María-Esther; Guzmán-Duque, Alba-Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This paper has as its aim to analyze how CityVille, a videogame hosted on Facebook and oriented to the construction of a virtual city, can favor collaboration between gamers along with the exchange of strategies, equally contributing to learning transfer and skill acquisition. The first step consists in identifying the opportunities which the said…

  3. Science diplomacy: Investigating the perspective of scholars on politics-science collaboration in international affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähnrich, Birte

    2017-08-01

    Science diplomacy is a widely practiced area of international affairs, but academic research is rather sparse. The role of academia within this field of politics-science interaction has hardly been considered. This article analyzes this scholarly perspective: Based on a literature review, a case study of a German science diplomacy program is used to explore objectives, benefits, and constraints of science diplomacy for participating scholars. While political approaches suggest an ideal world where both sides profit from the collaboration, the findings of the case study point to another conclusion which shows that the interaction of scholars and officials in science diplomacy is far more complex. Thus, the contribution is regarded as both a useful starting point for further research and for a critical reflection of academics and politicians in science diplomacy practice to gauge what can be expected from the collaboration and what cannot.

  4. Investigating Team Collaboration of an Air Force Research Event October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    September 11, 2001. A third structural model of team collaboration thesis was conducted by Lieutenant Luis Socias . The thesis analyzed a second...Air Defense Sector and Federal Aviation Administration communications data from September 11, 2001 by Luis F. Socias also reflected similar low...16 May 2008, from Hhttp://www.onr.navy.mil/ media /FactSheets/science_technology_partnership_2008 /docs/FactSheets/Out-Thinking%20and%20Out-Adapting

  5. Investigating the interplay between fundamentals of national research systems: performance, investments and international collaborations

    OpenAIRE

    Cimini, Giulio; Zaccaria, Andrea; Gabrielli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We discuss, at the macro-level of nations, the contribution of research funding and rate of international collaboration to research performance, with important implications for the science of science policy. In particular, we cross-correlate suitable measures of these quantities with a scientometric-based assessment of scientific success, studying both the average performance of nations and their temporal dynamics in the space defined by these variables during the last decade. We find signifi...

  6. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Investigation of High-Speed-Shaft Bearing Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Guo, Yi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The loads and contact stresses in the bearings of the high speed shaft section of the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative gearbox are examined in this paper. The loads were measured though strain gauges installed on the bearing outer races during dynamometer testing of the gearbox. Loads and stresses were also predicted with a simple analytical model and higher-fidelity commercial models. The experimental data compared favorably to each model, and bearing stresses were below thresholds for contact fatigue and axial cracking.

  7. The Preparedness Web: Utilizing Regional Collaborative Networks for Homeland Security Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    April 1995): 59 48 Richard Beckhard and Reuben T. Harris, Organizational Transitions, Managing Complex Change (Reading, MA: Addison-Wessley...Networks New York: Perseus, 2002. Beckhard , Richard and Reuben T. Harris. Organizational Transitions, Managing Complex Change. Reading, MA: Addison...transformation to an open and decentralized network structure is possible, but not probable, without a well-constructed plan of action.47 Richard

  8. Peer Learning Network: Implementing and Sustaining Cooperative Learning by Teacher Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Ester; Duran, David

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an in-service teachers', staff-development model "Peer Learning Network" and presents results about its efficiency. "Peer Learning Network" promotes three levels of peer learning simultaneously (among pupils, teachers, and schools). It supports pairs of teachers from several schools, who are linked…

  9. The Meso-level Structure of F/OSS Collaboration Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conald, Guido; Rullani, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    F/OSS projects, but we focus on the less-studied meso-level structure emerging when applying to this network a community-detection technique. The network of ‘communities’ emerging from this analysis links sub-groups of densely connected developers, sub-groups that are smaller than the components...

  10. Investigating the Educational Value of Social Learning Networks: A Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafoulas, Georgios; Shokri, Azam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The emergence of Education 2.0 enabled technology-enhanced learning, necessitating new pedagogical approaches, while e-learning has evolved into an instrumental pedagogy of collaboration through affordances of social media. Social learning networks and ubiquitous learning enabled individual and group learning through social engagement and…

  11. Investigation of road network features and safety performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuesong; Wu, Xingwei; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Tremont, Paul J

    2013-07-01

    The analysis of road network designs can provide useful information to transportation planners as they seek to improve the safety of road networks. The objectives of this study were to compare and define the effective road network indices and to analyze the relationship between road network structure and traffic safety at the level of the Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ). One problem in comparing different road networks is establishing criteria that can be used to scale networks in terms of their structures. Based on data from Orange and Hillsborough Counties in Florida, road network structural properties within TAZs were scaled using 3 indices: Closeness Centrality, Betweenness Centrality, and Meshedness Coefficient. The Meshedness Coefficient performed best in capturing the structural features of the road network. Bayesian Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models were developed to assess the safety of various network configurations as measured by total crashes, crashes on state roads, and crashes on local roads. The models' results showed that crash frequencies on local roads were closely related to factors within the TAZs (e.g., zonal network structure, TAZ population), while crash frequencies on state roads were closely related to the road and traffic features of state roads. For the safety effects of different networks, the Grid type was associated with the highest frequency of crashes, followed by the Mixed type, the Loops & Lollipops type, and the Sparse type. This study shows that it is possible to develop a quantitative scale for structural properties of a road network, and to use that scale to calculate the relationships between network structural properties and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A new approach in development of data flow control and investigation system for computer networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, I.; Vaguine, A.; Silin, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach in development of data flow control and investigation system for computer networks. This approach was developed and applied in the Moscow Radiotechnical Institute for control and investigations of Institute computer network. It allowed us to solve our network current problems successfully. Description of our approach is represented below along with the most interesting results of our work. (author)

  13. Investigating scientific literacy documents with linguistic network analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry; Dolin, Jens

    2009-01-01

    International discussions of scientific literacy (SL) are extensive and numerous sizeable documents on SL exist. Thus, comparing different conceptions of SL is methodologically challenging. We developed an analytical tool which couples the theory of complex networks with text analysis in order...... on the network data. For example a minimal description length approach partitioned the network in to groups of words, which was then seen to represent different visions appearing in the discussion of SL. In short, the networks allow for quantitative analyses as well as a quick visual overview of SL documents....

  14. Feasibility Study of Network Operations Center Collaboration to Improve Application Layer Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    partners from various educational institutions, industry , foreign and coalition nations and military and government agencies to operate in a...Once the functional collaboration areas are identified they could be integrated into a NMS. The integration, user display and industry cooperation...the treatment Brian Med: 02/24/09 15:12:35 (PST)Treatment is to dress area and keep clean. Take two aspirin every 8 hrs. Chris%20ODA%20medic: 02

  15. Capacity Building in the IAI Collaborative Research Network Program- Experience from CRN03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, B. H.

    2007-05-01

    In addition to their scientific agendas, IAI CRNs have the explicit goal of capacity building in Global Change science. CRN03 examined climate variability in the Americas with particular emphasis on tree-rings, involving collaboration between 3 US, 2 Canadian plus Argentinean and Chilean laboratories. New pioneer laboratories were also established in Mexico, Bolivia and Peru. With limited funding we believed that capacity building is best achieved by involving students and junior researchers in project work directly (about 100 in total) but we also undertook educational activities that augment this role. The most visible was the initiation of dendroecological fieldweeks in Latin America. These brought together 20-30 international students and junior researchers from many disciplines to work in small research teams led by experienced scientists. Over a 7-10 day period projects go from conception via field sampling and measurement to final presentations (and sometimes publication). Major fieldweeks (the first in Latin America) were organized in Argentina (2000), Mexico (2001) Chile (2003) and Brazil (2005) with smaller groups in Chile (2000), Bolivia (2001) and Canada (2002). Over 100 students attended (mainly funded by the CRN) from11 Latin American and Caribbean countries and instructors from 6 countries. These field weeks develop important national and international contacts for participants and also provided promotional material (including a 20 minute bilingual video) for further recruiting. Several students were also supported for travel to short courses in the USA or elsewhere. Given the distances involved, most research collaborations were bilateral between individuals or institutions, the strongest ones generally involving a senior laboratory or scientists with junior partners elsewhere. This has particularly enhanced international collaboration for the established Latin American laboratories by attracting researchers from regions not previously involved in

  16. Collaboration on technological innovation in Danish fashion chains: A network perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben

    2014-01-01

    With brand owners struggling to compete with new products, physical production processes and sourcing logistics, innovation taking place in retail networks is often overlooked. Networks in retailing are comprised by the brand owner, the varieties of single- and multi-brand stores, chains...... and departments stores, technology and service providers, ownership structures and local level supply chain facilities. This paper analyses theoretical and empirical views of innovation in international retail networks using lead actors in the (Danish) fashion industry as a case to highlight how this industry...... of this work is based on four qualitative studies of medium/larger fashion brand owners and their respective retail and service provider networks. The study shows that innovation in retailing has a continuously emergent character with open-ended strategic design requirements and strong utilisation of relations...

  17. CityVille: collaborative game play, communication and skill development in social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Esther Del-Moral Pérez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has as its aim to analyze how CityVille, a videogame hosted on Facebook and oriented to the construction of a virtual city, can favor collaboration between gamers along with the exchange of strategies, equally contributing to learning transfer and skill acquisition. The first step consists in identifying the opportunities which the said game can offer in order to develop skills and promote learning formats linked with planning and resource management, after which a presentation is made of the opinions expressed by a sample of gamers (N=105 –belonging to the Fans-CityVille community– about the priorities established by them to communicate with their neighbors and the skills that they believe to have acquired playing this game. 85.7% of them state that they communicate with others to share strategies and expand their city. Unlike women, who value collaboration, men prioritize competition. Designing their city has enhanced a number of gamer skills in different proportions: creative skills (71.4%; organizational ones (68.0%; skills associated with decision-making and problem-solving (67.0%; and interpersonal skills through interaction with others (61.9%. The CityVille game mode favors skill development and helps to create a ludic atmosphere of collaboration and optimal strategy exchange through communication between neighbors by strengthening their mutual relationships. Its formula moves away from the often-criticized competitive practices of other games.  

  18. [Communication management of collaborative networks of science, technology and innovation in health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Wagner de Jesus; Artmann, Elizabeth; Rivera, Francisco Javier Uribe

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the article was to propose a model of communication management of networks for the Health Innovation System in Brazil. The health production complex and its relationship with the nation's development are addressed and some suggestions for operationalization of the proposed model are also presented. The discussion is based on Habermas' theory and similar cases from other countries. Communication strategies and approaches to commitment dialogue for concerted actions and consensus-building based on critical reasoning may help strengthen democratic networks.

  19. A collaborative approach for incorporating forensic case data into crime investigation using criminal intelligence analysis and visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossy, Quentin; Ribaux, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the articulation of forensic science and criminal investigation is critical to the resolution of crimes. However, models and methods to support an effective collaboration between the partners are still poorly expressed or even lacking. Three propositions are borrowed from crime intelligence methods in order to bridge this gap: (a) the general intelligence process, (b) the analyses of investigative problems along principal perspectives: entities and their relationships, time and space, quantitative aspects and (c) visualisation methods as a mode of expression of a problem in these dimensions. Indeed, in a collaborative framework, different kinds of visualisations integrating forensic case data can play a central role for supporting decisions. Among them, link-charts are scrutinised for their abilities to structure and ease the analysis of a case by describing how relevant entities are connected. However, designing an informative chart that does not bias the reasoning process is not straightforward. Using visualisation as a catalyser for a collaborative approach integrating forensic data thus calls for better specifications. © 2013.

  20. Scientific authorship and collaboration network analysis on malaria research in Benin: papers indexed in the web of science (1996-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azondekon, Roseric; Harper, Zachary James; Agossa, Fiacre Rodrigue; Welzig, Charles Michael; McRoy, Susan

    2018-01-01

    To sustain the critical progress made, prioritization and a multidisciplinary approach to malaria research remain important to the national malaria control program in Benin. To document the structure of the malaria collaborative research in Benin, we analyze authorship of the scientific documents published on malaria from Benin. We collected bibliographic data from the Web Of Science on malaria research in Benin from January 1996 to December 2016. From the collected data, a mulitigraph co-authorship network with authors representing vertices was generated. An edge was drawn between two authors when they co-author a paper. We computed vertex degree, betweenness, closeness, and eigenvectors among others to identify prolific authors. We further assess the weak points and how information flow in the network. Finally, we perform a hierarchical clustering analysis, and Monte-Carlo simulations. Overall, 427 publications were included in this study. The generated network contained 1792 authors and 116,388 parallel edges which converted in a weighted graph of 1792 vertices and 95,787 edges. Our results suggested that prolific authors with higher degrees tend to collaborate more. The hierarchical clustering revealed 23 clusters, seven of which form a giant component containing 94% of all the vertices in the network. This giant component has all the characteristics of a small-world network with a small shortest path distance between pairs of three, a diameter of 10 and a high clustering coefficient of 0.964. However, Monte-Carlo simulations suggested our observed network is an unusual type of small-world network. Sixteen vertices were identified as weak articulation points within the network. The malaria research collaboration network in Benin is a complex network that seems to display the characteristics of a small-world network. This research reveals the presence of closed research groups where collaborative research likely happens only between members. Interdisciplinary

  1. An Investigation into the Role of Mobile Technology in Collaborative Disease Management for Persons Living with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sultan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and other chronic non-communicable diseases represent a leading threat to health care and human development. The authors discusses how mobile technology can achieve collaborative disease management (CDM within a population living with Type 2 diabetes. We introduces a framework for CDM using mobile technologies. While it can be applied to the management of any disease, we describe a specific instance for diabetes peer-support. In this paper, we validate the framework through the development and testing of a Mobile Health initiative called Mobile Diabetes Self-Management Support (DSMS. It allows persons living with diabetes to learn from each others’ experiences through a virtual support group. The paper presents two user studies conducted. The first study captured the participants’ initial perceptions of the application in a controlled environment and the second study investigated system usage and collaboration when the application was used in their personal settings.

  2. Investigating the role of socially mediated metacognition during collaborative troubleshooting of electric circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L. Van De Bogart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing students’ ability to troubleshoot is an important learning outcome for many undergraduate physics lab courses, especially electronics courses. In other work, metacognition has been identified as an important feature of troubleshooting. However, that work has focused primarily on individual students’ metacognitive processes or troubleshooting abilities. In contrast, electronics courses often require students to work in pairs, and hence students’ in-class experiences likely have significant social dimensions that are not well understood. In this work, we use an existing framework for socially mediated metacognition to analyze audiovisual data from think-aloud activities in which eight pairs of students from two institutions attempted to diagnose and repair a malfunctioning electric circuit. In doing so, we provide insight into some of the social metacognitive dynamics that arise during collaborative troubleshooting. We find that students engaged in socially mediated metacognition at multiple key transitions during the troubleshooting process. Reciprocated metacognitive dialogue arose when students were collectively strategizing about which measurements to perform, or reaching a shared understanding of the circuit’s behavior. Our research demonstrates the value of the framework of socially mediated metacognition in providing insight into the nature of collaborative student troubleshooting in the context of electronics. As such, this framework may be a useful resource for future efforts to examine and support the development of student troubleshooting skills in other upper-division laboratory courses.

  3. Investigating the role of socially mediated metacognition during collaborative troubleshooting of electric circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Bogart, Kevin L.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.

    2017-12-01

    Developing students' ability to troubleshoot is an important learning outcome for many undergraduate physics lab courses, especially electronics courses. In other work, metacognition has been identified as an important feature of troubleshooting. However, that work has focused primarily on individual students' metacognitive processes or troubleshooting abilities. In contrast, electronics courses often require students to work in pairs, and hence students' in-class experiences likely have significant social dimensions that are not well understood. In this work, we use an existing framework for socially mediated metacognition to analyze audiovisual data from think-aloud activities in which eight pairs of students from two institutions attempted to diagnose and repair a malfunctioning electric circuit. In doing so, we provide insight into some of the social metacognitive dynamics that arise during collaborative troubleshooting. We find that students engaged in socially mediated metacognition at multiple key transitions during the troubleshooting process. Reciprocated metacognitive dialogue arose when students were collectively strategizing about which measurements to perform, or reaching a shared understanding of the circuit's behavior. Our research demonstrates the value of the framework of socially mediated metacognition in providing insight into the nature of collaborative student troubleshooting in the context of electronics. As such, this framework may be a useful resource for future efforts to examine and support the development of student troubleshooting skills in other upper-division laboratory courses.

  4. Collaboration with Customers in Network-Based Innovation Processes - Network and relations in the Fuzzy Front-End

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    Abstract There is a general tendency that product life cycles get shortened and there is an increased customer demand for individualized products. These trends put pressure on companies to continuously bring new products to the market (Cooper & Kleinschmidt 1987a)   Further it is a tendency...... that users of products are becoming more able to innovate by them selves rather than wait for the manufacturer to make the desired changes to products. This regards both fims and individual consumers (von Hippel 2005). Often these customers develop important product- and process innovations (Harhoff, Henkel......, & von Hippel 2003).   A possible response to the above described challenges of customization and faster innovation processes could be a closer collaboration with customers through strong and early linkages (Rothwell 1994).   This article extends the different concepts of "user-innovation" originated...

  5. Global collaborative networks on meta-analyses of randomized trials published in high impact factor medical journals: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Hutton, Brian; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Moher, David

    2014-01-29

    Research collaboration contributes to the advancement of knowledge by exploiting the results of scientific efforts more efficiently, but the global patterns of collaboration on meta-analysis are unknown. The purpose of this research was to describe and characterize the global collaborative patterns in meta-analyses of randomized trials published in high impact factor medical journals over the past three decades. This was a cross-sectional, social network analysis. We searched PubMed for relevant meta-analyses of randomized trials published up to December 2012. We selected meta-analyses (including at least randomized trials as primary evidence source) published in the top seven high impact factor general medical journals (according to Journal Citation Reports 2011): The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, the BMJ, JAMA, Annals of Internal Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine (now renamed JAMA Internal Medicine), and PLoS Medicine. Opinion articles, conceptual papers, narrative reviews, reviews without meta-analysis, reviews of reviews, and other study designs were excluded. Overall, we included 736 meta-analyses, in which 3,178 authors, 891 institutions, and 51 countries participated. The BMJ was the journal that published the greatest number of articles (39%), followed by The Lancet (18%), JAMA (15%) and the Archives of Internal Medicine (15%). The USA, the UK, and Canada headed the absolute global productivity ranking in number of papers. The 64 authors and the 39 institutions with the highest publication rates were identified. We also found 82 clusters of authors (one group with 55 members and one group with 54 members) and 19 clusters of institutions (one major group with 76 members). The most prolific authors were mainly affiliated with the University of Oxford (UK), McMaster University (Canada), and the University of Bern (Switzerland). Our analysis identified networks of authors, institutions and countries publishing meta-analyses of randomized

  6. Networked Learning as a Process of Identification in the Intersection of collaborative Knowledge Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Rina; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2011-01-01

    for negotiation of meaning in learning, and 3) a view of OER as potential resources and triggers of pedagogic/strategic awareness in educational design. The three phenomena are viewed and discussed in relation to societal and political reforms. The claim of the authors is that there is a strong need for a new...... concept of learning. A learning concept that unfolds in collaborative, intercultural and trans-disciplinary processes of identification through dialogue and negotiation and in relation to use and re-use of OER. In essence, these processes imply identification of values and unfold with participation...

  7. Collaborative 3D Target Tracking in Distributed Smart Camera Networks for Wide-Area Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenofon Koutsoukos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the evolution and fusion of wireless sensor network and embedded camera technologies, distributed smart camera networks have emerged as a new class of systems for wide-area surveillance applications. Wireless networks, however, introduce a number of constraints to the system that need to be considered, notably the communication bandwidth constraints. Existing approaches for target tracking using a camera network typically utilize target handover mechanisms between cameras, or combine results from 2D trackers in each camera into 3D target estimation. Such approaches suffer from scale selection, target rotation, and occlusion, drawbacks typically associated with 2D tracking. In this paper, we present an approach for tracking multiple targets directly in 3D space using a network of smart cameras. The approach employs multi-view histograms to characterize targets in 3D space using color and texture as the visual features. The visual features from each camera along with the target models are used in a probabilistic tracker to estimate the target state. We introduce four variations of our base tracker that incur different computational and communication costs on each node and result in different tracking accuracy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed trackers by comparing their performance to a 3D tracker that fuses the results of independent 2D trackers. We also present performance analysis of the base tracker along Quality-of-Service (QoS and Quality-of-Information (QoI metrics, and study QoS vs. QoI trade-offs between the proposed tracker variations. Finally, we demonstrate our tracker in a real-life scenario using a camera network deployed in a building.

  8. Collaborative-Hybrid Multi-Layer Network Control for Emerging Cyber-Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Tom [USC; Ghani, Nasir [UNM; Boyd, Eric [UCAID

    2010-08-31

    At a high level, there were four basic task areas identified for the Hybrid-MLN project. They are: o Multi-Layer, Multi-Domain, Control Plane Architecture and Implementation, including OSCARS layer2 and InterDomain Adaptation, Integration of LambdaStation and Terapaths with Layer2 dynamic provisioning, Control plane software release, Scheduling, AAA, security architecture, Network Virtualization architecture, Multi-Layer Network Architecture Framework Definition; o Heterogeneous DataPlane Testing; o Simulation; o Project Publications, Reports, and Presentations.

  9. Engaging Graduate-Level Distance Learners in Research: A Collaborative Investigation of Rural Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Melissa L; Fuller-Iglesias, Heather; Bishop, Alexander J; Doll, Gayle; Killian, Timothy; Margrett, Jennifer; Pearson-Scott, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Online educational programs pose challenges to nonresidential graduate students for whom research is a key professional development experience. In this article, the authors share their pedagogical approach to engaging graduate-level online distance learners in research. Five students enrolled in an online master's degree program participated in a directed research course designed to facilitate a semester-long, collaborative, hands-on research experience in gerontology. As such, students recruited participants and conducted phone interviews for a multisite study examining aging in place in rural areas. Several strategies were used to facilitate student engagement and learning, including: regular meetings with faculty mentors, creation of a research team across institutions, interactive training, and technological tools to aid in communication. The authors discuss the process of implementing the project, challenges that arose, strategies for dealing with these issues, and a pedagogical framework that could be used to guide future endeavors of this type.

  10. Book Review: Mastering Windows Network Forensics and Investigation, 2/e

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Ebert

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anson, S., Bunting, S., Johnson, R., & Pearson, S. (2012. Mastering Windows Network Forensics and Investigation, 2nd ed. Indianapolis: John Wiley & Sons. 674 pages, ISBN: 978-1-118-16382-5, $59.99 USA/$71.99 CAN.Reviewed by John C. Ebert, Metropolitan State University (eberjo@metrostate.eduThe book is available as a paperback and e-book. The e-book versions allow you to preview several chapters at any of a number of online vendors. The e-book prices vary from the same as the soft cover version ($59.99 to about $38.99. Some of the vendor's e-books retain the color illustrations found in the print version, but others produce them in grey scale, so you might want to look out for that. The book is divided into four parts (17 chapters plus two appendices.I am compelled to give the book illustrations a highly unfavorable assessment regarding their readability qualities. Their content is otherwise fine and meaningful. Time and again the illustrations are so miniscule that even those of us with the best of vision will be seriously challenged. I hold out the recommendation to review your e-book options over the hardcopy edition. At least in an e-book you have the hope of doing a page-zoom. Review your e-book providers carefully; some I reviewed had "fuzzy graphics." Notwithstanding the problem illustrations, I still recommend this book for its in-the-trenches information and the desktop reference it will become.(see PDF for full review

  11. The Challenge of Collaboration – ICT Implementation Networks in Courts in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian HENNING

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, public sector organisations are adopting Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in order to improve their operations, a tendency that is commonly referred to as “e-government”. However, e-government also comes with some major challenges for public administrators in introducing and managing those e-services, because they are usually located at the nexus of technological innovation and organisational and institutional change. In order to achieve the expected benefits from ICT in public organisations, work processes need to be re-engineered, whilst responsibilities and authority locations are shifting. A particular challenge in this respect is the trend towards e-services that cut across traditional organisational boundaries and integrate information flows between a number of different organisational actors with complex settings of strongly divergent backgrounds, practices and interests. Good examples of this, and the focus of this paper, are e-services in the judiciary (“e-justice”. In this paper, we address the issue of mediation required to motivate actors for collaboration in joint e-justice services. Our main research question therefore is: What is the role of legal frameworks for mediation and legitimization of collaborative implementation in inter-organisational e-justice projects? We will address this question by means of a case study analysis on judicial videoconferencing in the Netherlands, a project called “Telehoren en Telepleiten” (THTP.

  12. Graph methods for the investigation of metabolic networks in parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottret, Ludovic; Jourdan, Fabien

    2010-08-01

    Recently, a way was opened with the development of many mathematical methods to model and analyze genome-scale metabolic networks. Among them, methods based on graph models enable to us quickly perform large-scale analyses on large metabolic networks. However, it could be difficult for parasitologists to select the graph model and methods adapted to their biological questions. In this review, after briefly addressing the problem of the metabolic network reconstruction, we propose an overview of the graph-based approaches used in whole metabolic network analyses. Applications highlight the usefulness of this kind of approach in the field of parasitology, especially by suggesting metabolic targets for new drugs. Their development still represents a major challenge to fight against the numerous diseases caused by parasites.

  13. iTAG: Integrating a Cloud Based, Collaborative Animal Tracking Network into the GCOOS data portal in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, B. A.; Currier, R. D.; Simoniello, C.

    2016-02-01

    The tagging and tracking of aquatic animals using acoustic telemetry hardware has traditionally been the purview of individual researchers that specialize in single species. Concerns over data privacy and unauthorized use of receiver arrays have prevented the construction of large-scale, multi-species, multi-institution, multi-researcher collaborative acoustic arrays. We have developed a toolset to build the new portal using the Flask microframework, Python language, and Twitter bootstrap. Initial feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. The privacy policy has been praised for its granularity: principal investigators can choose between three levels of privacy for all data and hardware: Completely private - viewable only by the PI Visible to iTAG members Visible to the general public At the time of this writing iTAG is still in the beta stage, but the feedback received to date indicates that with the proper design and security features, and an iterative cycle of feedback from potential members, constructing a collaborative acoustic tracking network system is possible. Initial usage will be limited to the entry and searching for `orphan/mystery' tags, with the integration of historical array deployments and data following shortly thereafter. We have also been working with staff from the Ocean Tracking Network to allow for integration of the two systems. The database schema of iTAG is based on the marine metadata convention for acoustic telemetry. This should permit machine-to-machine data exchange between iTAG and OTN. The integration of animal telemetry data into the GCOOS portal will allow researchers to easily access the physiochemical oceanography data, thus allowing for a more in depth understanding of animal response and usage patterns.

  14. Using Social Network Analysis to Predict Early Collaboration within Health Advocacy Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Todd C.; Strong, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Within coalitions of consumer advocates formed to advance health insurance coverage expansions, engaging in united advocacy activities soon after formation might be an important precursor to attaining coalition effectiveness in shaping policy. In this article, the authors apply social network analysis (SNA) to examine how organizational…

  15. Innovation networks to stimulate public and private sector collaboration for advisory services innovation and coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, K.; Brazendale, R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: An innovation network, called the Pasture Improvement Leadership Group (PILG), was formed to improve the quality and consistency of advice provided to dairy farmers in New Zealand, after they expressed dissatisfaction with their pastures. The aim of this paper is to better understand the

  16. Task Allocation and Path Planning for Collaborative Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Operating through an Underwater Acoustic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and unstructured multiple cooperative autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV missions are highly complex operations, and task allocation and path planning are made significantly more challenging under realistic underwater acoustic communication constraints. This paper presents a solution for the task allocation and path planning for multiple AUVs under marginal acoustic communication conditions: a location-aided task allocation framework (LAAF algorithm for multitarget task assignment and the grid-based multiobjective optimal programming (GMOOP mathematical model for finding an optimal vehicle command decision given a set of objectives and constraints. Both the LAAF and GMOOP algorithms are well suited in poor acoustic network condition and dynamic environment. Our research is based on an existing mobile ad hoc network underwater acoustic simulator and blind flooding routing protocol. Simulation results demonstrate that the location-aided auction strategy performs significantly better than the well-accepted auction algorithm developed by Bertsekas in terms of task-allocation time and network bandwidth consumption. We also demonstrate that the GMOOP path-planning technique provides an efficient method for executing multiobjective tasks by cooperative agents with limited communication capabilities. This is in contrast to existing multiobjective action selection methods that are limited to networks where constant, reliable communication is assumed to be available.

  17. Evolution of collaboration within the US long term ecological research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey C. Johnson; Robert R. Christian; James W. Brunt; Caleb R. Hickman; Robert B. Waide

    2010-01-01

    The US Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program began in 1980 with the mission of addressing long-term ecological phenomena through research at individual sites, as well as comparative and synthetic activities among sites. We applied network science measures to assess how the LTER program has achieved its mission using intersite publications as the measure of...

  18. Improved UUV Positioning Using Acoustic Communications and a Potential for Real-Time Networking and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    12 III. ACOUSTIC WAVE TRAVEL TIME ESTIMATION...Centralized Multi- agent Network ..............................................................78 Figure 32. Ellipse Representing a Confidence Interval...Mission ...............................125 Table 8. Average Horizontal Distance from the UUV to the Reference Points when a Travel Time Measurement is

  19. Training the next generation of psychotraumatologists: COllaborative Network for Training and EXcellence in psychoTraumatology (CONTEXT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Frédérique; Hyland, Philip; Murphy, Jamie; Hansen, Maj; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask; Ceannt, Ruth; Armour, Cherie; Wiedemann, Nana; Munk, Mette; Dinesen, Cecilie; O'Hare, Geraldine; Cunningham, Twylla; Askerod, Ditte; Spitz, Pernille; Blackwell, Noeline; McCarthy, Angela; O'Dowd, Leonie; Scott, Shirley; Reid, Tracey; Mokake, Andreas; Halpin, Rory; Perera, Camila; Gleeson, Christina; Frost, Rachel; Flanagan, Natalie; Aldamman, Kinan; Tamrakar, Trina; Louison Vang, Maria; Sherwood, Larissa; Travers, Áine; Haahr-Pedersen, Ida; Walshe, Catherine; McDonagh, Tracey; Bramsen, Rikke Holm

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present a description of the Horizon2020, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action funded, research and training programme CONTEXT: COllaborative Network for Training and EXcellence in psychoTraumatology. The three objectives of the programme are put forward, each of which refers to a key component of the CONTEXT programme. First, we summarize the 12 individual research projects that will take place across three priority populations: (i) refugees and asylum seekers, (ii) first responders, and (iii) perpetrators and survivors of childhood and gender-based violence. Second, we detail the mentoring and training programme central to CONTEXT. Finally, we describe how the research, together with the training, will contribute towards better policy, guidelines, and practice within the field of psychotraumatology.

  20. The effect of a faith community nurse network and public health collaboration on hypertension prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Wendy

    2017-09-01

    As part of the Association of State and Territorial Health Official's Million Hearts State Learning Collaborative in 2014 and 2015, Washington County, Maryland formed a collaboration between the local health department, health system and faith community nurse network to address the undiagnosed and uncontrolled hypertension in the county. Data were analyzed to determine the effect of a faith community nursing intervention of teaching blood pressure self-monitoring and coaching blood pressure and lifestyle changes in the at-risk and hypertensive population. Thirty-nine faith community nurses offered a 3-month blood pressure self-monitoring and coaching intervention in 2014 and 2015 to 119 participants. A secondary data analysis using a repeated measure ANOVA to assess the differences in pre- and post-intervention systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings and a paired t-test to compare pre- and post-lifestyle scores was completed. A total of 109 participants completed the program and were included in the analysis and were showing decreased blood pressure readings and improved lifestyle satisfaction scores in six out of seven areas across the program period. Coaching by faith community nurses creates an environment of sustained support that can promote improved lifestyles and blood pressure changes over time. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Large-Scale Mutagenesis in p19ARF- and p53-Deficient Mice Identifies Cancer Genes and Their Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren, Anthony G.; Kool, Jaap; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; de Ridder, Jeroen; Mattison, Jenny; van Uitert, Miranda; Lagcher, Wendy; Sie, Daoud; Tanger, Ellen; Cox, Tony; Reinders, Marcel; Hubbard, Tim J.; Rogers, Jane; Jonkers, Jos; Wessels, Lodewyk; Adams, David J.; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Berns, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Summary p53 and p19ARF are tumor suppressors frequently mutated in human tumors. In a high-throughput screen in mice for mutations collaborating with either p53 or p19ARF deficiency, we identified 10,806 retroviral insertion sites, implicating over 300 loci in tumorigenesis. This dataset reveals 20 genes that are specifically mutated in either p19ARF-deficient, p53-deficient or wild-type mice (including Flt3, mmu-mir-106a-363, Smg6, and Ccnd3), as well as networks of significant collaborative and mutually exclusive interactions between cancer genes. Furthermore, we found candidate tumor suppressor genes, as well as distinct clusters of insertions within genes like Flt3 and Notch1 that induce mutants with different spectra of genetic interactions. Cross species comparative analysis with aCGH data of human cancer cell lines revealed known and candidate oncogenes (Mmp13, Slamf6, and Rreb1) and tumor suppressors (Wwox and Arfrp2). This dataset should prove to be a rich resource for the study of genetic interactions that underlie tumorigenesis. PMID:18485879

  2. Large-scale mutagenesis in p19(ARF)- and p53-deficient mice identifies cancer genes and their collaborative networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren, Anthony G; Kool, Jaap; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; de Ridder, Jeroen; Mattison, Jenny; van Uitert, Miranda; Lagcher, Wendy; Sie, Daoud; Tanger, Ellen; Cox, Tony; Reinders, Marcel; Hubbard, Tim J; Rogers, Jane; Jonkers, Jos; Wessels, Lodewyk; Adams, David J; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Berns, Anton

    2008-05-16

    p53 and p19(ARF) are tumor suppressors frequently mutated in human tumors. In a high-throughput screen in mice for mutations collaborating with either p53 or p19(ARF) deficiency, we identified 10,806 retroviral insertion sites, implicating over 300 loci in tumorigenesis. This dataset reveals 20 genes that are specifically mutated in either p19(ARF)-deficient, p53-deficient or wild-type mice (including Flt3, mmu-mir-106a-363, Smg6, and Ccnd3), as well as networks of significant collaborative and mutually exclusive interactions between cancer genes. Furthermore, we found candidate tumor suppressor genes, as well as distinct clusters of insertions within genes like Flt3 and Notch1 that induce mutants with different spectra of genetic interactions. Cross species comparative analysis with aCGH data of human cancer cell lines revealed known and candidate oncogenes (Mmp13, Slamf6, and Rreb1) and tumor suppressors (Wwox and Arfrp2). This dataset should prove to be a rich resource for the study of genetic interactions that underlie tumorigenesis.

  3. Beyond command and control: USSOUTHCOM's use of social networking to 'connect and collaborate' during Haiti relief operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    On 12 January 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake devastated Haiti killing over 230,000 unsuspecting victims, injuring tens of thousands more and displacing over 1.1 million people. The physical damage was so severe that over 50 percent of buildings in and near the affected areas were completely destroyed or damaged. After struggling for decades with adversity, and besieged by a myriad of social, economic and political challenges, Haiti, its government, and its people were by most accounts already in a state of crisis. The earthquake's devastation and its aftermath shocked the world and prompted a global response. Over 800 institutions and organizations representing the whole of society - governments and their militaries, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, public institutions, academia, corporations, and private citizens - mobilized to provide aid and relief. However, coordinating and managing their activities seemed a daunting, if not impossible, task. How could a global response achieve "unity of effort" when "unity of command" was not feasible? To provide a solution, US Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) looked beyond traditional Command and Control systems for collaboration with non-traditional partners and implemented the All Partners Access Network (APAN) in order to "Connect and Collaborate."

  4. Not more, but strategic collaboration needed to conserve Borneo's orangutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney L. Morgans

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In conservation, Collaboration is thought to improve returns from investment and is frequently encouraged, however not all collaborations are equal and may therefore lack characteristics important for addressing collective action problems. Furthermore, partnerships that are advantageous for a collective may not necessarily be advantageous for an individual. This study investigated collaboration within the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus conservation sector – a system with reported inefficiencies and for which there has been a renewed call for collaborative partnerships. Collaborative partnerships were conceptualised as a social network and analysed using exponential random graph modelling. The prevalence of structural attributes associated with social processes considered to be important for solving collective action problems such as trust and innovation were investigated. Qualitative surveying techniques were used to measure the perceptions of collaboration held by individual actors within the network and the impact of organizational attributes on network formation and perceptions was assessed. Collaboration was found to be occurring within the conservation network and was positively perceived at the individual organisational level. At the collective level, the current collaborative network contains some structural characteristics important for addressing the collective-action problem of orangutan conservation, particularly through innovation and knowledge sharing. However efforts to develop trust between organisations may be needed. To improve returns on investment, future collaborative partnerships must be strategically implemented with individual roles and desired overall outcomes explicitly articulated. Increased operational transparency and improved performance evaluation will be critical for achieving improved collaborative efficiency.

  5. Systemic aspects of innovation and design the perspective of collaborative networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mortati, Marzia

    2013-01-01

    The book provides a snapshot of a hot topic – the systemic nature of innovation and its relevance to design – with a trifold perspective: the academic level – the literature on innovation studies and design is often neglected and a clear connection between the two topics taken for granted; the research level – collaborative models are currently considered great opportunities for transforming consumption, production and distribution of goods, but a clear scholarly discourse is still forming; the political level – the European Commission and the OECD are devoting much effort to understanding and measuring the impact of design in innovation processes and firms and a clear contribution would greatly support this path. Thus the book provides an informed, historical and nuanced perspective to the relationship between design and innovation to contribute to all three levels and to propose a point of view that goes beyond aesthetics and meanings.

  6. Selective enhancement of attentional networks in college table tennis athletes: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biye; Guo, Wei; Zhou, Chenglin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of the attentional network in college table tennis athletes. A total of 65 college students categorized as table tennis athlete group or non-athlete group participated in the study. All participants completed the attentional network test (ANT) which measured the alerting, orienting and executive control networks. The results showed a significant difference between the athlete and non-athlete group for executive control network ( p   0.05) or orienting ( p  > 0.05) networks. These results combined suggest that college table tennis athletes exhibited selectively enhanced executive control of attentional networks.

  7. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  8. Intrinsic network activity in tinnitus investigated using functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver, Amber M.; Turesky, Ted K.; Seydell-Greenwald, Anna; Morgan, Susan; Kim, Hung J.; Rauschecker, Josef P.

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is an increasingly common disorder in which patients experience phantom auditory sensations, usually ringing or buzzing in the ear. Tinnitus pathophysiology has been repeatedly shown to involve both auditory and non-auditory brain structures, making network-level studies of tinnitus critical. In this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, we used two resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) approaches to better understand functional network disturbances in tinnitus. First, we demonstrated tinnitus-related reductions in RSFC between specific brain regions and resting-state networks (RSNs), defined by independent components analysis (ICA) and chosen for their overlap with structures known to be affected in tinnitus. Then, we restricted ICA to data from tinnitus patients, and identified one RSN not apparent in control data. This tinnitus RSN included auditory-sensory regions like inferior colliculus and medial Heschl’s gyrus, as well as classically non-auditory regions like the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus, striatum, lateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex. Notably, patients’ reported tinnitus loudness was positively correlated with RSFC between the mediodorsal nucleus and the tinnitus RSN, indicating that this network may underlie the auditory-sensory experience of tinnitus. These data support the idea that tinnitus involves network dysfunction, and further stress the importance of communication between auditory-sensory and fronto-striatal circuits in tinnitus pathophysiology. PMID:27091485

  9. Bridging the Gap in Port Security; Network Centric Theory Applied to Public/Private Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    trade each year. It is the fifth-largest port complex in the world after Hong Kong, Singapore, Shanghai, and Shenzhen .32 The twin ports’ combined import...units, each performing at its own rate but adjusting that performance to that of its near-neighbors in response to incoming information from the...Involving the Los Angeles/Long Beach Port Complex (2006). Ronfeldt, D., and J. Arquilla. “Networks, Netwars The Future of Terror, Crime and

  10. Chicago Ebola Response Network (CERN): A Citywide Cross-hospital Collaborative for Infectious Disease Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateef, Omar; Hota, Bala; Landon, Emily; Kociolek, Larry K; Morita, Julie; Black, Stephanie; Noskin, Gary; Kelleher, Michael; Curell, Krista; Galat, Amy; Ansell, David; Segreti, John; Weber, Stephen G

    2015-11-15

    The 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic and international public health emergency has been referred to as a "black swan" event, or an event that is unlikely, hard to predict, and highly impactful once it occurs. The Chicago Ebola Response Network (CERN) was formed in response to EVD and is capable of receiving and managing new cases of EVD, while also laying the foundation for a public health network that can anticipate, manage, and prevent the next black swan public health event. By sharing expertise, risk, and resources among 4 major academic centers, Chicago created a sustainable network to respond to the latest in a series of public health emergencies. In this respect, CERN is a roadmap for how a region can prepare to respond to public health emergencies, thereby preventing negative impacts through planning and implementation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. How does language change as a lexical network? An investigation based on written Chinese word co-occurrence networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng; Chen, Xinying

    2018-01-01

    Language is a complex adaptive system, but how does it change? For investigating this process, four diachronic Chinese word co-occurrence networks have been built based on texts that were written during the last 2,000 years. By comparing the network indicators that are associated with the hierarchical features in language networks, we learn that the hierarchy of Chinese lexical networks has indeed evolved over time at three different levels. The connections of words at the micro level are continually weakening; the number of words in the meso-level communities has increased significantly; and the network is expanding at the macro level. This means that more and more words tend to be connected to medium-central words and form different communities. Meanwhile, fewer high-central words link these communities into a highly efficient small-world network. Understanding this process may be crucial for understanding the increasing structural complexity of the language system. PMID:29489837

  12. User-Friendly Data-Sharing Practices for Fostering Collaboration within a Research Network: Roles of a Vanguard Center for a Community-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Eun; Sung, Jung Hye; Barnett, M Edwina; Norris, Keith

    2015-12-22

    Although various attempts have been made to build collaborative cultures for data sharing, their effectiveness is still questionable. The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) Vanguard Center (JHSVC) at the NIH-funded Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) Translational Research Network (RTRN) Data Coordinating Center (DCC) may be a new concept in that the data are being shared with a research network where a plethora of scientists/researchers are working together to achieve their common goal. This study describes the current practices to share the JHS data through the mechanism of JHSVC. The JHS is the largest single-site cohort study to prospectively investigate the determinants of cardiovascular disease among African-Americans. It has adopted a formal screened access method through a formalized JHSVC mechanism, in which only a qualified scientist(s) can access the data. The role of the DCC was to help RTRN researchers explore hypothesis-driven ideas to enhance the output and impact of JHS data through customized services, such as feasibility tests, data querying, manuscript proposal development and data analyses for publication. DCC has implemented these various programs to facilitate data utility. A total of 300 investigators attended workshops and/or received training booklets. DCC provided two online and five onsite workshops and developed/distributed more than 250 copies of the booklet to help potential data users understand the structure of and access to the data. Information on data use was also provided through the RTRN website. The DCC efforts led to the production of five active manuscript proposals, seven completed publications, 11 presentations and four NIH grant proposals. These outcomes resulted from activities during the first four years; over the last couple of years, there were few new requests. Our study suggested that DCC-customized services enhanced the accessibility of JHS data and their utility by RTRN researchers and helped to achieve the

  13. User-Friendly Data-Sharing Practices for Fostering Collaboration within a Research Network: Roles of a Vanguard Center for a Community-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Eun Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although various attempts have been made to build collaborative cultures for data sharing, their effectiveness is still questionable. The Jackson Heart Study (JHS Vanguard Center (JHSVC at the NIH-funded Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI Translational Research Network (RTRN Data Coordinating Center (DCC may be a new concept in that the data are being shared with a research network where a plethora of scientists/researchers are working together to achieve their common goal. This study describes the current practices to share the JHS data through the mechanism of JHSVC. The JHS is the largest single-site cohort study to prospectively investigate the determinants of cardiovascular disease among African-Americans. It has adopted a formal screened access method through a formalized JHSVC mechanism, in which only a qualified scientist(s can access the data. The role of the DCC was to help RTRN researchers explore hypothesis-driven ideas to enhance the output and impact of JHS data through customized services, such as feasibility tests, data querying, manuscript proposal development and data analyses for publication. DCC has implemented these various programs to facilitate data utility. A total of 300 investigators attended workshops and/or received training booklets. DCC provided two online and five onsite workshops and developed/distributed more than 250 copies of the booklet to help potential data users understand the structure of and access to the data. Information on data use was also provided through the RTRN website. The DCC efforts led to the production of five active manuscript proposals, seven completed publications, 11 presentations and four NIH grant proposals. These outcomes resulted from activities during the first four years; over the last couple of years, there were few new requests. Our study suggested that DCC-customized services enhanced the accessibility of JHS data and their utility by RTRN researchers and helped to

  14. Networks in biological systems: An investigation of the Gene Ontology as an evolving network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronnello, C; Tumminello, M; Micciche, S; Mantegna, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Many biological systems can be described as networks where different elements interact, in order to perform biological processes. We introduce a network associated with the Gene Ontology. Specifically, we construct a correlation-based network where the vertices are the terms of the Gene Ontology and the link between each two terms is weighted on the basis of the number of genes that they have in common. We analyze a filtered network obtained from the correlation-based network and we characterize its evolution over different releases of the Gene Ontology.

  15. Investigating scientific literacy documents with linguistic network analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry; Dolin, Jens

    2009-01-01

    in the one statement sentences. Using the program Pajek, we drew a map of the text showing the number of times a concept appeared in the one statement sentences, and the strength of links between words. Different SL texts was analysed in this way. The network description allowed for different calculations......International discussions of scientific literacy (SL) are extensive and numerous sizeable documents on SL exist. Thus, comparing different conceptions of SL is methodologically challenging. We developed an analytical tool which couples the theory of complex networks with text analysis in order...... to obtain clear visual images of what is meant by SL expressed in written text. The raw text was first parsed into one statement sentences. Then, a linguistic type network was created with nodes being the words used in SL texts, and a link between two words established if they were adjacent to each other...

  16. Tensions of network security and collaborative work practice: understanding a single sign-on deployment in a regional hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckle, Rosa R; Lutters, Wayne G

    2011-08-01

    Healthcare providers and their IT staff, working in an effort to balance appropriate accessibility with stricter security mandates, are considering the use of a single network sign-on approach for authentication and password management. Single sign-on (SSO) promises to improve usability of authentication for multiple-system users, increase compliance, and help curb system maintenance costs. However, complexities are introduced when SSO is placed within a collaborative environment. These complexities include unanticipated workflow implications that introduce greater security vulnerability for the individual user. OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY: In this work, we examine the challenges of implementing a single sign-on authentication technology in a hospital environment. The aim of the study was to document the factors that affected SSO adoption within the context of use. The ultimate goal is to better inform the design of usable authentication systems within collaborative healthcare work sites. The primary data collection techniques used are ethnographically informed - observation, contextual interviews, and document review. The study included a cross-section of individuals from various departments and varying rolls. These participants were a mix of both clinical and administrative staff, as well as the Information Technology group. The field work revealed fundamental mis-matches between the technology and routine work practices that will significantly impact its effective adoption. While single sign-on was effective in the administrative offices, SSO was not a good fit for collaborative areas. The collaborative needs of the clinical staff unearthed tensions in its implementation. An analysis of the findings revealed that the workflow, activities, and physical environment of the clinical areas create increased security vulnerabilities for the individual user. The clinical users were cognizant of these vulnerabilities and this created resistance to the implementation due

  17. Investigations on an environmental technology transfer information network; Kankyo gijutsu iten joho network chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    With developing countries (APEC countries) as the main objects, investigations were carried out to issue environmental technology transfer information that Japan has accumulated, and advance exchanges of technical information with persons related inside and outside Japan. As a result of the investigations, it was found that the environmental technology information that serves more effectively for the developing countries is the technical information that has been developed by repeating improvements, has provided actual results in work sites, and is actually used, rather than the state-of-art technologies. Based on this result, business entities having factories and operation centers located in Mie Prefecture and the city of Yokkaichi were asked to provide data for the actually used environmental technologies. Out of 51 items provided by 17 companies, nine items were selected to be used as prototype database materials for an information network. The objects of information sources will be expanded to a nationwide scale in the future to improve the contents of the database. Problems of handling information copyrights and technical know-hows were presented in the course of data collection, urging the necessity of due considerations on the matter. Necessity was indicated on maintenance and management of data base as well as its quantitative expansion. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  18. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  19. Paediatric Investigators Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada (PICNIC study of aseptic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Joan L

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The seasonality, clinical and radiographic features and outcome of aseptic meningitis have been described for regional outbreaks but data from a wider geographic area is necessary to delineate the epidemiology of this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was completed of children presenting with aseptic meningitis to eight Canadian pediatric hospitals over a two-year period. Results There were 233 cases of proven enteroviral (EV meningitis, 495 cases of clinical aseptic meningitis and 74 cases of possible aseptic meningitis with most cases occurring July to October. Headache, vomiting, meningismus and photophobia were more common in children ≥ 5 years of age, while rash, diarrhea and cough were more common in children Conclusion The clinical presentation of aseptic meningitis varies with the age of the child. Absence of CSF pleocytosis is common in infants

  20. Developing an Open Source, Reusable Platform for Distributed Collaborative Information Management in the Early Detection Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Andrew F.; Verma, Rishi; Mattmann, Chris A.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Kelly, Sean; Kincaid, Heather; Hughes, Steven; Ramirez, Paul; Goodale, Cameron; Anton, Kristen; hide

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in collaboration with Dartmouth University has served as the center for informatics for the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN). The EDRN is a multi-institution research effort funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) and tasked with identifying and validating biomarkers for the early detection of cancer. As the distributed network has grown, increasingly formal processes have been developed for the acquisition, curation, storage, and dissemination of heterogeneous research information assets, and an informatics infrastructure has emerged. In this paper we discuss the evolution of EDRN informatics, its success as a mechanism for distributed information integration, and the potential sustainability and reuse benefits of emerging efforts to make the platform components themselves open source. We describe our experience transitioning a large closed-source software system to a community driven, open source project at the Apache Software Foundation, and point to lessons learned that will guide our present efforts to promote the reuse of the EDRN informatics infrastructure by a broader community.