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Sample records for inverse band structure

  1. Topological Nonsymmorphic Metals from Band Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muechler, Lukas; Alexandradinata, A.; Neupert, Titus; Car, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    We expand the phase diagram of two-dimensional, nonsymmorphic crystals at integer fillings that do not guarantee gaplessness. In addition to the trivial, gapped phase that is expected, we find that band inversion leads to a class of topological, gapless phases. These topological phases are exemplified by the monolayers of M Te2 (M =W ,Mo ) if spin-orbit coupling is neglected. We characterize the Dirac band touching of these topological metals by the Wilson loop of the non-Abelian Berry gauge field. Furthermore, we develop a criterion for the proximity of these topological metals to 2D and 3D Z2 topological insulators when spin-orbit coupling is included; our criterion is based on nonsymmorphic symmetry eigenvalues, and may be used to identify topological materials without inversion symmetry. An additional feature of the Dirac cone in monolayer M Te2 is that it tilts over in a Lifshitz transition to produce electron and hole pockets—a type-II Dirac cone. These pockets, together with the pseudospin structure of the Dirac electrons, suggest a unified, topological explanation for the recently reported, nonsaturating magnetoresistance in WTe2 , as well as its circular dichroism in photoemission. We complement our analysis and first-principles band structure calculations with an ab-initio-derived tight-binding model for the WTe2 monolayer.

  2. Topological Nonsymmorphic Metals from Band Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Muechler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We expand the phase diagram of two-dimensional, nonsymmorphic crystals at integer fillings that do not guarantee gaplessness. In addition to the trivial, gapped phase that is expected, we find that band inversion leads to a class of topological, gapless phases. These topological phases are exemplified by the monolayers of MTe_{2} (M=W,Mo if spin-orbit coupling is neglected. We characterize the Dirac band touching of these topological metals by the Wilson loop of the non-Abelian Berry gauge field. Furthermore, we develop a criterion for the proximity of these topological metals to 2D and 3D Z_{2} topological insulators when spin-orbit coupling is included; our criterion is based on nonsymmorphic symmetry eigenvalues, and may be used to identify topological materials without inversion symmetry. An additional feature of the Dirac cone in monolayer MTe_{2} is that it tilts over in a Lifshitz transition to produce electron and hole pockets—a type-II Dirac cone. These pockets, together with the pseudospin structure of the Dirac electrons, suggest a unified, topological explanation for the recently reported, nonsaturating magnetoresistance in WTe_{2}, as well as its circular dichroism in photoemission. We complement our analysis and first-principles band structure calculations with an ab-initio-derived tight-binding model for the WTe_{2} monolayer.

  3. The Inverse of Banded Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    of Br,n. For these sequences to be well-defined, we assume that none of the denominators kis are zero (which is equivalent to the below-defined U...numbers of summed or subtracted terms in computing the inverse of a term of an upper (lower) triangular matrix are the generalized order-k Fibonacci ... Fibonacci numbers are the usual Fibonacci numbers, that is, f 2m = Fm (mth Fibonacci number). When also k = 3, c1 = c2 = c3 = 1, then the generalized order-3

  4. Regularizing Inverse Preconditioners for Symmetric Band Toeplitz Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Menchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Image restoration is a widely studied discrete ill-posed problem. Among the many regularization methods used for treating the problem, iterative methods have been shown to be effective. In this paper, we consider the case of a blurring function defined by space invariant and band-limited PSF, modeled by a linear system that has a band block Toeplitz structure with band Toeplitz blocks. In order to reduce the number of iterations required to obtain acceptable reconstructions, in 13 an inverse Toeplitz preconditioner for problems with a Toeplitz structure was proposed. The cost per iteration is of O(n2logn operations, where n2 is the pixel number of the 2D image. In this paper, we propose inverse preconditioners with a band Toeplitz structure, which lower the cost to O(n2 and in experiments showed the same speed of convergence and reconstruction efficiency as the inverse Toeplitz preconditioner.

  5. Regularizing Inverse Preconditioners for Symmetric Band Toeplitz Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotti G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Image restoration is a widely studied discrete ill-posed problem. Among the many regularization methods used for treating the problem, iterative methods have been shown to be effective. In this paper, we consider the case of a blurring function defined by space invariant and band-limited PSF, modeled by a linear system that has a band block Toeplitz structure with band Toeplitz blocks. In order to reduce the number of iterations required to obtain acceptable reconstructions, in 13 an inverse Toeplitz preconditioner for problems with a Toeplitz structure was proposed. The cost per iteration is of operations, where is the pixel number of the 2D image. In this paper, we propose inverse preconditioners with a band Toeplitz structure, which lower the cost to and in experiments showed the same speed of convergence and reconstruction efficiency as the inverse Toeplitz preconditioner.

  6. Free orthodox semigroups and free bands with inverse transversals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the subclass of inverse semigroups and the subclass of completely regular semigroups of the class of regular semigroups form the so called e-varieties of semigroups. However, the class of regular semigroups with inverse transversals does not belong to this variety. We now call this class of semigroups the ist-variety of semigroups, and denote it by IST . In this paper, we consider the class of orthodox semigroups with inverse transversals, which is a special ist-variety and is denoted by OIST . Some previous results given by Tang and Wang on this topic are extended. In particular, the structure of free bands with inverse transversals is investigated. Results of McAlister, McFadden, Blyth and Saito on semigroups with inverse transversals are hence generalized and enriched.

  7. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  8. Inversion of band patterns in spherical tumblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengfei; Lochman, Bryan J; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2009-04-10

    Bidisperse granular mixtures in spherical tumblers segregate into three bands: one at each pole and one at the equator. For low fill levels, large particles are at the equator; for high fill levels, the opposite occurs. Segregation is robust, though the transition depends on fill level, particle size, and rotational speed. Discrete element method simulations reproduce surface patterns and reveal internal structures. Particle trajectories show that small particles flow farther toward the poles than large particles in the upstream portion of the flowing layer for low fill levels leading to a band of small particles at each pole. The opposite occurs for high fill levels, though more slowly.

  9. The structure of (L)*-inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueming; SHUM Karping

    2006-01-01

    The concepts of (L)*-inverse semigroups and left wreath products of semigroups are introduced. It is shown that the (L)*-inverse semigroup can be described as the left wreath product of a type A semigroup Γ and a left regular band B together with a mapping which maps the semigroup Γ into the endomorphism semigroup End(B). This result generalizes the structure theorem of Yamada for the left inverse semigroups in the class of regular semigroups.We shall also provide a constructed example for the (L)*-inverse semigroups by using the left wreath products.

  10. Approximating the inverse of banded matrices by banded matrices with applications to probability and statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Bickel, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we give an elementary proof of the fact that if an infinite matrix $A$, which is invertible as a bounded operator on $\\ell^2$, can be uniformly approximated by banded matrices then so can the inverse of $A$. We give explicit formulas for the banded approximations of $A^{-1}$ as well as bounds on their accuracy and speed of convergence in terms of their band-width. In the second part we apply these results to covariance matrices $\\Sigma$ of Gaussian processes and study mixing and beta mixing of processes in terms of properties of $\\Sigma$. Finally, we note some applications of our results to statistics.

  11. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Subramanian

    2008-04-01

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are formed by removing the substrate material in a periodic manner. This paper also demonstrates that these structures can serve as a non-destructive characterization tool for materials, a duplexor and frequency selective coupler. The paper presents both experimental results and theoretical simulation based on a commercially available finite element methodology for comparison.

  12. The structure of *-inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN; Xueming

    2006-01-01

    [1]Hall T E.Orthodox semigroups.Pacific J Math,1971,39:677-686[2]Howie J M.An Introduction to Semigroup Theory.Now York:Academic Press,1976[3]Fountain J B.Abundant semigroups.Proc Lond Math Soc,1982,44 (3):103-129[4]El-Qallali A,Fountain J B.Idempotent-connected abundant semigroups.Proc Roy Soc Edinburgh,1981,Sec.A:79-90[5]El-Qallali A,Fountain J B.Quasi-adequate semigroups.Proc Roy Soc Edinburgh,1981,Sec.A:91-99[6]Fountain J B.Adequate semigroups.Proc Edinburgh Math Soc,1979,22:113-125[7]Guo X J.Abundant C-lpp proper semigroups.Southeast Asian Bull Math,2000,24 (1):41-50[8]Guo X J,Shum K P,Guo Y Q.Perfect rpp semigroups.Communications in Algebra,2001,29(6):2447-2459[9]Ren X M,Shum K P.Structure theorems for right pp-semigroups with left central idempotents.Discussions Math General Algebra and Applications,2000,20:63-75[10]Ren X M,Shum K P.The structure of superabundant semigroups.Sci China Ser A-Math,2004,47(5):756-771[11]Shum K P,Ren X M.Abundant semigroups with left central idempotents.Pure Math Appl,1999,10(1):109-113[12]Armstrong S.The structure of type A semigroups.Semigroup Forum,1984,29:319-336[13]Lawson M V.The structure of type A semigroups.Quart J Math Oxford,1986,37(2):279-298[14]Bailes G L.Right inverse semigroups.J Algebra,1973,26:492-507[15]Venkatesan P S.Right (left) inverse semigroups.J Algebra,1974,31:209-217[16]Yamada M.Orthodox semigroups whose idempotents satisfy a certain identity.Semigroup Forum,1973,6:113-128[17]Preston G B.Semiproducts of semigroups.Proc Roy Soc Edinburgh,1986,102A:91-102[18]Preston G B:Products of semigroups.In:Shum K P,Yuen P C,eds.Proc.of the conference"Ordered structures and algebra of computer languages",1991 (Hong Kong).Singapore:World Scientific Inc,1993.161-169[19]Lawson M V.The natural partial order on an abundant semigroup.Proc Edinburgh Math Soc,1987,30:169-186[20]El-Qallali A.(L)*-unipotent semigroups.J Pure and Applied Algebra,1989,62:19-23

  13. The d-p band-inversion topological insulator in bismuth-based skutterudites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-05-30

    Skutterudites, a class of materials with cage-like crystal structure which have received considerable research interest in recent years, are the breeding ground of several unusual phenomena such as heavy fermion superconductivity, exciton-mediated superconducting state and Weyl fermions. Here, we predict a new topological insulator in bismuth-based skutterudites, in which the bands involved in the topological band-inversion process are d- and p-orbitals, which is distinctive with usual topological insulators, for instance in Bi2Se3 and BiTeI the bands involved in the topological band-inversion process are only p-orbitals. Due to the present of large d-electronic states, the electronic interaction in this topological insulator is much stronger than that in other conventional topological insulators. The stability of the new material is verified by binding energy calculation, phonon modes analysis, and the finite temperature molecular dynamics simulations. This new material can provide nearly zero-resistivity signal current for devices and is expected to be applied in spintronics devices.

  14. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  15. Direct band gap silicon crystals predicted by an inverse design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Jun; Lee, In-Ho; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Sunghyun; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    Cubic diamond silicon has an indirect band gap and does not absorb or emit light as efficiently as other semiconductors with direct band gaps. Thus, searching for Si crystals with direct band gaps around 1.3 eV is important to realize efficient thin-film solar cells. In this work, we report various crystalline silicon allotropes with direct and quasi-direct band gaps, which are predicted by the inverse design method which combines a conformation space annealing algorithm for global optimization and first-principles density functional calculations. The predicted allotropes exhibit energies less than 0.3 eV per atom and good lattice matches, compared with the diamond structure. The structural stability is examined by performing finite-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and calculating the phonon spectra. The absorption spectra are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation together with the quasiparticle G0W0 approximation. For several allotropes with the band gaps around 1 eV, photovoltaic efficiencies are comparable to those of best-known photovoltaic absorbers such as CuInSe2. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (2005-0093845 and 2008-0061987), Samsung Science and Technology Foundation (SSTF-BA1401-08), KIAS Center for Advanced Computation, and KISTI (KSC-2013-C2-040).

  16. Inverse Folding of RNA Pseudoknot Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, James Z M; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Background: RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and \\pairGU-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, {\\tt RNAinverse}, {\\tt RNA-SSD} as well as {\\tt INFO-RNA} are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv} which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results: In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv}. We give a detailed analysis of {\\tt Inv}, including pseudocodes. We show that {\\tt Inv} allows to...

  17. Assessing the influence of spectral band configuration on automated radiative transfer model inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo, W.A.; Richter, R.; Schneider, T.; Schaepman, M.E.; Müller, A.; Wagner, W.

    2009-01-01

    The success of radiative transfer model (RTM) inversion strongly depends on various factors, including the choice of a suited radiative transfer model, the followed inversion strategy, and the band configuration of the remote sensing system. Current study aims at addressing the latter, by

  18. Inverse folding of RNA pseudoknot structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Linda YM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and G-U-base pairings (secondary structure and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, RNAinverse, RNA-SSD as well as INFO-RNA are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm Inv which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm Inv. We give a detailed analysis of Inv, including pseudocodes. We show that Inv allows to design in particular 3-noncrossing nonplanar RNA pseudoknot 3-noncrossing RNA structures-a class which is difficult to construct via dynamic programming routines. Inv is freely available at http://www.combinatorics.cn/cbpc/inv.html. Conclusions The algorithm Inv extends inverse folding capabilities to RNA pseudoknot structures. In comparison with RNAinverse it uses new ideas, for instance by considering sets of competing structures. As a result, Inv is not only able to find novel sequences even for RNA secondary structures, it does so in the context of competing structures that potentially exhibit cross-serial interactions.

  19. Band inversion mechanism in topological insulators: A guideline for materials design

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-01

    Alteration of the topological order by band inversion is a key ingredient of a topologically nontrivial material. Using first-principles calculations for HgTe, PtScBi, and Bi2Se3, we argue that it is not accurate to ascribe the band inversion to the spin-orbit coupling. Instead, scalar relativistic effects and/or lattice distortions are found to be essential. Therefore, the search for topologically nontrivial materials should focus on band shifts due to these mechanisms rather than spin-orbit coupling. We propose an effective scheme to search for new topological insulators.

  20. Inverse scattering of dispersive stratified structures

    CERN Document Server

    Skaar, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    We consider the inverse scattering problem of retrieving the structural parameters of a stratified medium consisting of dispersive materials, given knowledge of the complex reflection coefficient in a finite frequency range. It is shown that the inverse scattering problem does not have a unique solution in general. When the dispersion is sufficiently small, such that the time-domain Fresnel reflections have durations less than the round-trip time in the layers, the solution is unique and can be found by layer peeling. Numerical examples with dispersive and lossy media are given, demonstrating the usefulness of the method for e.g. THz technology.

  1. High-energy band structure of gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede

    1976-01-01

    The band structure of gold for energies far above the Fermi level has been calculated using the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The calculated f-band edge (Γ6-) lies 15.6 eV above the Fermi level is agreement with recent photoemission work. The band model is applied to interpret...

  2. X-band inverse class-F GaN internally-matched power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo-Chao; Lu, Yang; Han, Wen-Zhe; Zheng, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Heng-Shuang; Ma, Pei-jun; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Hao, Yue

    2016-09-01

    An X-band inverse class-F power amplifier is realized by a 1-mm AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). The intrinsic and parasitic components inside the transistor, especially output capacitor Cds, influence the harmonic impedance heavily at the X-band, so compensation design is used for meeting the harmonic condition of inverse class-F on the current source plane. Experiment results show that, in the continuous-wave mode, the power amplifier achieves 61.7% power added efficiency (PAE), which is 16.3% higher than the class-AB power amplifier realized by the same kind of HEMT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first inverse class-F GaN internally-matched power amplifier, and the PAE is quite high at the X-band. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA016801).

  3. Effective band structure of random alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2010-06-11

    Random substitutional A(x)B(1-x) alloys lack formal translational symmetry and thus cannot be described by the language of band-structure dispersion E(k(→)). Yet, many alloy experiments are interpreted phenomenologically precisely by constructs derived from wave vector k(→), e.g., effective masses or van Hove singularities. Here we use large supercells with randomly distributed A and B atoms, whereby many different local environments are allowed to coexist, and transform the eigenstates into an effective band structure (EBS) in the primitive cell using a spectral decomposition. The resulting EBS reveals the extent to which band characteristics are preserved or lost at different compositions, band indices, and k(→) points, showing in (In,Ga)N the rapid disintegration of the valence band Bloch character and in Ga(N,P) the appearance of a pinned impurity band.

  4. Solar structure inversion with LOWL data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sarbani; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Schou, Jesper; Thompson, Michael J.; Tomczyk, Steven

    1995-01-01

    Inversion results for the radial hydrostatic structure of the Sun, using six months of oscillation data obtained with the LOWL instrument, are presented. Both low and intermediate degree modes are used, thus avoiding the systematic errors that might have occurred in previous inversions by merging more than one data set. Using modes of between 0 deg and 90 deg and frequencies of between 1.5 mHz and 3.5 mHz, the variations with depth of the speed of sound, the density and the pressure were inferred for radii of between 0.05 and 0.85 stellar radius. It was found that in this region, the sound speed was within 0.15% of that of a model constructed using an equation of state that incorporated helium diffusion. The density difference between the Sun and the model was less than 0.8%. Given the small error bars on the inversion results, these differences are considered as being significant.

  5. Design of a three-dimensional photonic band gap cavity in a diamondlike inverse woodpile photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldering, Léon A.; Mosk, Allard P.; Vos, Willem L.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the design of cavities in a three-dimensional (3D) inverse woodpile photonic crystal. This class of cubic diamondlike crystals has a very broad photonic band gap and consists of two perpendicular arrays of pores with a rectangular structure. The point defect that acts as a cavity is centered on the intersection of two intersecting perpendicular pores with a radius that differs from the ones in the bulk of the crystal. We have performed supercell band structure calculations with up to 5×5×5 unit cells. We find that up to five isolated and dispersionless bands appear within the 3D photonic band gap. For each isolated band, the electric-field energy is localized in a volume centered on the point defect, hence the point defect acts as a 3D photonic band gap cavity. The mode volume of the cavities resonances is as small as 0.8 λ3 (resonance wavelength cubed), indicating a strong confinement of the light. By varying the radius of the defect pores we found that only donorlike resonances appear for smaller defect radius, whereas no acceptorlike resonances appear for greater defect radius. From a 3D plot of the distribution of the electric-field energy density we conclude that peaks of energy are found in sharp edges situated at the point defect, similar to how electrons collect at such features. This is different from what is observed for cavities in noninverted woodpile structures. Since inverse woodpile crystals can be fabricated from silicon by CMOS-compatible means, we project that single cavities and even cavity arrays can be realized, for wavelength ranges compatible with telecommunication windows in the near infrared.

  6. Inverse Eigenvalue Problem in Structural Dynamics Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Hua Dai

    2006-01-01

    A kind of inverse eigenvalue problem in structural dynamics design is considered. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The properties of this problem are analyzed, and the existence of the optimum solution is proved. The directional derivative of the objective function is obtained and a necessary condition for a point to be a local minimum point is given. Then a numerical algorithm for solving the problem is presented and a plane-truss problem is discussed to show the applications of the theories and the algorithm.

  7. One-Dimensional Anisotropic Band Gap Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The band gap structure of one-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal has been studied by means of the transfer matrix formalism. From the analytic expressions and numeric calculations we see some general characteristics of the band gap structure of anisotropic photonic crystals, each band separates into two branches and the two branches react to polarization sensitively. In the practical case of oblique incidence, gaps move towards high frequency when the angle of incidence increases. Under some special conditions, the two branches become degenerate again.

  8. Complex band structure and superlattice electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J. N.; McGill, T. C.

    1981-04-01

    The complex band structures of the bulk materials which constitute the alternating layer (001) semiconductor-semiconductor superlattice are investigated. The complex bands near the center of the Brillouin zone in the [001] direction are studied in detail. The decay lengths of superlattice states whose energies lie in the bulk band gaps of one of the semiconductors are determined from the dispersion curves of these bands for imaginary k-->. This method is applied using a tight-binding band-structure calculation to two superlattices: the AlAs-GaAs superlattice and the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. The decay lengths of AlAs-GaAs superlattice conduction-band minimum states are found to be substantially shorter than those for the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. These differences in the decay of the states in the two superlattices result in differences in the variation of the conduction-band effective masses with the thickness of the AlAs and CdTe layers. The conduction-band effective masses increase more rapidly with AlAs thickness in the AlAs-GaAs superlattice than with CdTe thickness in the CdTe-HgTe superlattice.

  9. Signature of a three-dimensional photonic band gap observed on silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Huisman, Simon R; Woldering, Léon A; Leistikow, Merel D; Mosk, Allard P; Vos, Willem L

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the reflectivity of CMOS-compatible three-dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals at near-infrared frequencies. Polarization-resolved reflectivity spectra were obtained from two orthogonal crystal surfaces corresponding to 1.88 pi sr solid angle. The spectra reveal broad peaks with high reflectivity up to 67 % that are independent of the spatial position on the crystals. The spectrally overlapping reflectivity peaks for all directions and polarizations form the signature of a broad photonic band gap with a relative bandwidth up to 16 %. This signature is supported with stopgaps in plane wave bandstructure calculations and with the frequency region of the expected band gap.

  10. Quasiparticle Band Structure of BaS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Tie-Yu; CHEN De-Yan; HUANG Mei-Chun

    2006-01-01

    @@ We calculate the band structure of BaS using the local density approximation and the GW approximation (GWA),i.e. in combination of the Green function G and the screened Coulomb interaction W. The Ba 4d states are treated as valence states. We find that BaS is a direct band-gap semiconductor. The result shows that the GWA band gap (Eg-Gw = 3.921 eV) agrees excellently with the experimental result (Eg-EXPT = 3.88 eV or 3.9eV).

  11. The relativistic inverse stellar structure problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindblom, Lee [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    The observable macroscopic properties of relativistic stars (whose equations of state are known) can be predicted by solving the stellar structure equations that follow from Einstein’s equation. For neutron stars, however, our knowledge of the equation of state is poor, so the direct stellar structure problem can not be solved without modeling the highest density part of the equation of state in some way. This talk will describe recent work on developing a model independent approach to determining the high-density neutron-star equation of state by solving an inverse stellar structure problem. This method uses the fact that Einstein’s equation provides a deterministic relationship between the equation of state and the macroscopic observables of the stars which are composed of that material. This talk illustrates how this method will be able to determine the high-density part of the neutron-star equation of state with few percent accuracy when high quality measurements of the masses and radii of just two or three neutron stars become available. This talk will also show that this method can be used with measurements of other macroscopic observables, like the masses and tidal deformabilities, which can (in principle) be measured by gravitational wave observations of binary neutron-star mergers.

  12. The Relativistic Inverse Stellar Structure Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Lindblom, Lee

    2014-01-01

    The observable macroscopic properties of relativistic stars (whose equations of state are known) can be predicted by solving the stellar structure equations that follow from Einstein's equation. For neutron stars, however, our knowledge of the equation of state is poor, so the direct stellar structure problem can not be solved without modeling the highest density part of the equation of state in some way. This talk will describe recent work on developing a model independent approach to determining the high-density neutron-star equation of state by solving an inverse stellar structure problem. This method uses the fact that Einstein's equation provides a deterministic relationship between the equation of state and the macroscopic observables of the stars which are composed of that material. This talk illustrates how this method will be able to determine the high-density part of the neutron-star equation of state with few percent accuracy when high quality measurements of the masses and radii of just two or thr...

  13. Design of a 3D photonic band gap cavity in a diamond-like inverse woodpile photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Woldering, Léon A; Vos, Willem L

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the design of cavities in a three-dimensional (3D) inverse woodpile photonic crystal. This class of cubic diamond-like crystals has a very broad photonic band gap and consists of two perpendicular arrays of pores with a rectangular structure. The point defect that acts as a cavity is centred on the intersection of two intersecting perpendicular pores with a radius that differs from the ones in the bulk of the crystal. We have performed supercell bandstructure calculations with up to $5 \\times 5 \\times 5$ unit cells. We find that up to five isolated and dispersionless bands appear within the 3D photonic band gap. For each isolated band, the electric-field energy is localized in a volume centred on the point defect, hence the point defect acts as a 3D photonic band gap cavity. The mode volume of the cavities resonances is as small as 0.8 $\\lambda^{3}$ (resonance wavelength cubed), indicating a strong confinement of the light. By varying the radius of the defect pores we found that o...

  14. Working memory performance inversely predicts spontaneous delta and theta-band scaling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Matthew J; Wiltshire, Travis J; Niermeyer, Madison A; Butner, Jonathan E

    2016-04-15

    Electrophysiological studies have strongly implicated theta-band activity in human working memory processes. Concurrently, work on spontaneous, non-task-related oscillations has revealed the presence of long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs) within sub-bands of the ongoing EEG, and has begun to demonstrate their functional significance. However, few studies have yet assessed the relation of LRTCs (also called scaling relations) to individual differences in cognitive abilities. The present study addressed the intersection of these two literatures by investigating the relation of narrow-band EEG scaling relations to individual differences in working memory ability, with a particular focus on the theta band. Fifty-four healthy adults completed standardized assessments of working memory and separate recordings of their spontaneous, non-task-related EEG. Scaling relations were quantified in each of the five classical EEG frequency bands via the estimation of the Hurst exponent obtained from detrended fluctuation analysis. A multilevel modeling framework was used to characterize the relation of working memory performance to scaling relations as a function of general scalp location in Cartesian space. Overall, results indicated an inverse relationship between both delta and theta scaling relations and working memory ability, which was most prominent at posterior sensors, and was independent of either spatial or individual variability in band-specific power. These findings add to the growing literature demonstrating the relevance of neural LRTCs for understanding brain functioning, and support a construct- and state-dependent view of their functional implications.

  15. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...... periodic plate using Bloch theory, which conveniently reduces the maximization problem to that of a single base cell. Secondly, we construct a finite periodic plate using a number of the optimized base cells in a postprocessed version. The dynamic properties of the finite plate are investigated...

  16. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A.; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-01

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors.

  17. Numerical simulation and inversion of offshore area depth based on x-band microwave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; WU Xiongbin; PI Xiaoshan; MA Ketao; LIU Jianfei; TIAN Yun

    2015-01-01

    A detection method of offshore area depth utilizing the x-band microwave radar is proposed. The method is based on the sea clutter imaging mechanism of microwave radar, and combined with dispersion equation of the liner wave theorem and least square method (LSM), consequently get the inversion results of water depth in the detected region. The wave monitoring system OSMAR-X exploited by the Ocean State Laborato-ry, Wuhan University, based on a microwave radar has proven to be a powerful tool to monitor ocean waves in time and space. Numerical simulation and inversion of offshore area depth are carried out here; since JONSWAP model can give description of stormy waves in different growth phase, it is suitable for simulation. Besides, some results from measured data detected by OSMAR-X x-band radar located at Longhai of Fujian Province, China, validates this method. The tendency of the average water depths inferred from the radar images is in good agreement with the tide level detected by Xiamen tide station. These promising results suggest the possibility of using OSMAR-X to monitor operationally morphodynamics in coastal zones. This method can be applied to both shore-based and shipborne x-band microwave radar.

  18. Production of S-band Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, C; Vogel, H; Vom Stein, P

    2004-01-01

    ACCEL currently produces accelerating structures for several scientific laboratories. Multi-cell cavities at S-band frequencies are required for the projects CLIC-driver-linac, DLS and ASP pre-injector linac and the MAMI-C microtron. Based on those projects differences and similarities in design, production technologies and requirements will be addressed.

  19. New strategy of modeling inversion layer characteristics in MOS structure for ULSI applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马玉涛; 李志坚; 刘理天

    2001-01-01

    With the development of ULSI silicon technology, metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices are scaling down to nanometer regime. Energy of carriers in inversion layer in MOS structure is quantized and consequently, the physics and then the transport characteristics of inversion layer carriers are different from those in semi-classical theory. One essential matter is that the widely used concept of conduction band (valence band as well) effective density-of-states is no longer valid in quantized inversion layer. In this paper, an alternative concept, called surface layer effective density-of-states, is used to model the characteristics of MOS structure including threshold voltage, carrier sheet density, surface potential as well as capacitance.

  20. Flame structure of methane inverse diffusion flame

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents high speed images of OH-PLIF at 10. kHz simultaneously with 2D PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements collected along the entire length of an inverse diffusion flame with circumferentially arranged methane fuel jets. For a fixed fuel flow rate, the central air jet Re was varied, leading to four air to fuel velocity ratios, namely Vr = 20.7, 29, 37.4 and 49.8. A double flame structure could be observed composed of a lower fuel entrainment region and an upper mixing and intense combustion region. The entrainment region was enveloped by an early OH layer, and then merged through a very thin OH neck to an annular OH layer located at the shear layer of the air jet. The two branches of this annular OH layer broaden as they moved downstream and eventfully merged together. Three types of events were observed common to all flames: breaks, closures and growing kernels. In upstream regions of the flames, the breaks were counterbalanced by flame closures. These breaks in OH signal were found to occur at locations where locally high velocity flows were impinging on the flame. As the Vr increased to 37.4, the OH layers became discontinuous over the downstream region of the flame, and these regions of low or no OH moved upstream. With further increases in Vr, these OH pockets act as flame kernels, growing as they moved downstream, and became the main mechanism for flame re-ignition. Along the flame length, the direction of the two dimensional principle compressive strain rate axis exhibited a preferred orientation of approximately 45° with respect to the flow direction. Moreover, the OH zones were associated with elongated regions of high vorticity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  1. Quasiparticle band structure of antiferromagnetic Eu Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathi Jaya, S.; Nolting, W. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Lehrstuhl Festkoerpertheorie, Invalidenstrasse 110, D-10115 Berlin (Germany)

    1997-11-24

    The temperature-dependent electronic quasiparticle spectrum of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Eu Te is derived by use of a combination of a many-body model procedure with a tight-binding-'linear muffin tin orbital' (TB - LMTO) band structure calculation. The central part is the d-f model for a single band electron ('test electron') being exchange coupled to the anti ferromagnetically ordered localized moments of the Eu ions. The single-electron Bloch energies of the d-f model are taken from a TB-LMTO calculation for paramagnetic Eu Te. The d-f model is evaluated by a recently proposed moment conserving Green function technique to get the temperature-dependent sublattice-quasiparticle band structure (S-QBS) and sublattice-quasiparticle density of states (S-QDOS) of the unoccupied 5 d-6 s energy bands. Unconventional correlation effects and the appearance of characteristic quasiparticles ('magnetic polarons') are worked out in detail. The temperature dependence of the S-QDOS and S-QBS is mainly provoked by the spectral weights of the energy dispersions. Minority- and majority-spin spectra coincide for all temperatures but with different densities of states. Upon cooling from T{sub N} to T = 0 K the lower conduction band edge exhibits a small blue shift of -0.025 eV in accordance with the experiment. Quasiparticle damping manifesting itself in a temperature-dependent broadening of the spectral density peaks arises from spin exchange processes between (5 d-6 s) conduction band electrons and localized 4 f moments. (author)

  2. Midfrequency band dynamics of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Robert N.; Adams, Douglas S.; Levine, Marie B.

    2004-09-01

    High and low intensity dynamic environments experienced by a spacecraft during launch and on-orbit operations, respectively, induce structural loads and motions, which are difficult to reliably predict. Structural dynamics in low- and mid-frequency bands are sensitive to component interface uncertainty and non-linearity as evidenced in laboratory testing and flight operations. Analytical tools for prediction of linear system response are not necessarily adequate for reliable prediction of mid-frequency band dynamics and analysis of measured laboratory and flight data. A new MATLAB toolbox, designed to address the key challenges of mid-frequency band dynamics, is introduced in this paper. Finite-element models of major subassemblies are defined following rational frequency-wavelength guidelines. For computational efficiency, these subassemblies are described as linear, component mode models. The complete structural system model is composed of component mode subassemblies and linear or non-linear joint descriptions. Computation and display of structural dynamic responses are accomplished employing well-established, stable numerical methods, modern signal processing procedures and descriptive graphical tools. Parametric sensitivity and Monte-Carlo based system identification tools are used to reconcile models with experimental data and investigate the effects of uncertainties. Models and dynamic responses are exported for employment in applications, such as detailed structural integrity and mechanical-optical-control performance analyses.

  3. Reflection Band Control of Inverse Opal Film with Photoresponse Properties of Push-Pull Type Azobenzene LC Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunnam Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available DcAz2Mc and DR1Mc molecules having push-pull type of azobenzene groups are synthesized, and their photo-orientational behaviors are investigated in the polymer system. In order to understand the relationship between a molecular structure and its physical properties, electronic structure calculation is computationally carried out. Regarding to their photo response properties, the copolymers of poly(DcAz2Mc-co-M6PBMe and poly(DR1Mc-co-M6PBMe are infiltrated into inverse opal films, and Bragg reflection shifts are observed under photostimuli. When the linearly polarized light is irradiated, Bragg reflection bands are shifted to the longer wavelength region as reflective index increases.

  4. Complex banded structures in directional solidification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhenevskii, A L; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J

    2016-01-27

    A combination of theory and numerical simulation is used to investigate impurity superstructures that form in rapid directional solidification (RDS) processes in the presence of a temperature gradient and a pulling velocity with an oscillatory component. Based on a capillary wave model, we show that the RDS processes are associated with a rich morphology of banded structures, including frequency locking and the transition to chaos.

  5. Banded electron structures in the plasmasphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, W.J.; Rubin, A.G.; Hardy, D.A.; Holeman, E.G.

    1995-05-01

    The low-energy plasma analyzer on CRRES has detected significant fluxes of 10-eV to 30-keV electrons trapped on plasmaspheric field lines. On energy versus time spectrograms these electrons appear as banded structures that can span the 2 < L < 6 range of magnetic shells. The authors present an example of banded electron structures, encountered in the nightside plasmasphere during the magnetically quiet January 30, 1991. Empirical analysis suggests that two clouds of low energy electrons were injected from the plasma sheet to L < 4 on January 26 and 27 while the convective electric field was elevated. The energies of electrons in the first cloud were greater than those in the second. DMSP F8 measurements show that after the second injection, the polar cap potential rapidly decreased from >50 to <20 kY. Subsequent encounters with the lower energy cloud on alternating CRRES orbits over the next 2 days showed a progressive, earthward movement of the electrons, inner boundary. Whistler and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions accompanied the most intense manifestations of cloud electrons. The simplest explanation of these measurements is that after initial injection, the AIfven boundary moved Outward, leaving the cloud electrons on closed drift paths. Subsequent fluctuations of the convective electric field penetrated the plasmasphere, transporting cloud elements inward. The magnetic shell distribution of electron temperatures in one of the banded structures suggests that radiative energy losses may be comparable in magnitude to gains due to adiabatic compression.

  6. Search for Signature Inversion in the πi13/2 vi13/2 Band in Odd-Odd 178Ir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-Hu; H. Kusakari; M. Sugawara; T. Komatsubara; K. Furuno; T. Hayakawa; M. Oshima; Y. Toh; J. Katakura; Y. Hatsukawa; M. Matsuda; N. Shinohara; T. Ishii

    2001-01-01

    The search for the ri13/2 vi13/2 band in 178Ir has been conducted through the 152Sm(31 P, 5nγ) 178Ir reaction and the excitation functions, x-γ and γ-γ-t coincidence measurements. Five rotational bands have been newly identified. The low-spin signature inversion in the πi13/2 vi13/2 band has been confirmed by the observations of linking transitions and signature crossing at I = 25.5 h. The inversion phenomenon in rh11/2 vi13/2, rh9/2 vi13/2 and ri13/2 vi13/2 structures in 178Ir provides a unique testing ground for different theoretical interpretations.

  7. The band-gap enhanced photovoltaic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We critically examine the recently suggested structure that was postulated to potentially add 50% to the photo-conversion efficiency of organic solar cells. We find that the structure could be realized using stepwise increase in the gap as long as the steps are not above 0.1 eV. We also show that the charge extraction is not compromised due to an interplay between the contact's space charge and the energy level modification, which result in a flat energy band at the extracting contact.

  8. Range side lobe inversion for chirp-encoded dual-band tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Peng, Jun-Kai; Wu, Chi

    2014-02-01

    Dual-band (DB) harmonic imaging is performed by transmitting and receiving at both fundamental band (f0) and second-harmonic band (2f0). In our previous work, particular chirp excitation has been developed to increase the signal- to-noise ratio in DB harmonic imaging. However, spectral overlap between the second-order DB harmonic signals results in range side lobes in the pulse compression. In this study, a novel range side lobe inversion (RSI) method is developed to alleviate the level of range side lobes from spectral overlap. The method is implemented by firing an auxiliary chirp to change the polarity of the range side lobes so that the range side lobes can be suppressed in the combination of the original chirp and the auxiliary chirp. Hydrophone measurements show that the RSI method reduces the range side lobe level (RSLL) and thus increases the quality of pulse compression in DB harmonic imaging. With the signal bandwidth of 60%, the RSLL decreases from -23 dB to -36 dB and the corresponding compression quality improves from 78% to 94%. B-mode images also indicate that the magnitude of range side lobe is suppressed by 7 dB when the RSI method is applied.

  9. Polymer sol-gel composite inverse opal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Blanchard, G J

    2015-03-25

    We report on the formation of composite inverse opal structures where the matrix used to form the inverse opal contains both silica, formed using sol-gel chemistry, and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. We find that the morphology of the inverse opal structure depends on both the amount of PEG incorporated into the matrix and its molecular weight. The extent of organization in the inverse opal structure, which is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical reflectance data, is mediated by the chemical bonding interactions between the silica and PEG constituents in the hybrid matrix. Both polymer chain terminus Si-O-C bonding and hydrogen bonding between the polymer backbone oxygens and silanol functionalities can contribute, with the polymer mediating the extent to which Si-O-Si bonds can form within the silica regions of the matrix due to hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  10. Robust waveguide against surface perturbations due to band inversion in two kinds of single-negative metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohu; Li, Yuan; Miao, Xiangyang

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally study the guided wave along the interface between ε-negative (ENG) material and μ-negative (MNG) material when the interface is distorted. It is demonstrated that the guided mode is robust against various interface perturbations, owing to the band inversion between ENG and MNG materials. For comparison, the guided modes in double-positive material sandwiched by two MNG materials are also investigated under the same interface perturbations. Without band inversion, the guided modes in the sandwich waveguide are strongly affected by the interface distortions. Numerical simulations agree well with the experimental results.

  11. CUDA Parallel Algorithms for Forward and Inverse Structural Gravity Problems

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes usage of CUDA parallelization scheme for forward and inverse gravity problems for structural boundaries. Forward problem is calculated using the finite elements approach. This means that the whole calculation volume is split into parallelepipeds and then the gravity effect of each is calculated using known formula. Inverse problem solution is found using iteration local corrections method. This method requires only forward problem calculation on each iteration and does no...

  12. Band structure of superdeformed bands in odd-A Hg nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈星渠; 邢正

    1997-01-01

    Through particle-rotor model, band structure of superdeformed bands in odd-A Hg nuclei is analysed. An overall and excellent agreement between the calculated and observed kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia is obtained. The electromagnetic transition properties of SD bands can be used to identify the configuration with certainty.

  13. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Banaras [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saifullah [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali-Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan (UI), 81744 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khan, Imad [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan)

    2015-10-25

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX{sub 3} (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures.

  14. A Theoretical Structure of High School Concert Band Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergee, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to verify a theoretical structure for high school concert band performance and to test that structure for viability, generality, and invariance. A total of 101 university students enrolled in two different bands rated two high school band performances (a "first"…

  15. Chern insulators without band inversion in Mo S2 monolayers with 3 d adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinyuan; Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Jiayong; Xue, Yang; Li, Yun; Yang, Zhongqin

    2017-02-01

    Electronic and topological properties of Mo S2 monolayers endowed with 3 d transition metal (TM) adatoms (V-Fe) are explored by using ab initio methods and k .p models. Without the consideration of the Hubbard U interaction, the V, Cr, and Fe adatoms tend to locate on the top of the Mo atoms, while the most stable site for the Mn atom is at the hollow position of the Mo-S hexagon. After the Hubbard U is applied, the most stable sites of all the systems become the top of the Mo atoms. Chern insulators without band inversion are achieved in these systems. The V and Fe adsorption systems are the best candidates to produce the topological states. The k .p model calculations indicate that these topological states are determined by the TM magnetism, the C3 v crystal field from the Mo S2 substrate, and the TM atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The special two-meron pseudospin texture is found to contribute to the topology. The apparent difference between the Berry curvatures for the V and Fe adsorption systems is also explored. Our results widen the understanding of the Chern insulators and are helpful for the applications of the Mo S2 monolayers in the future electronics and spintronics.

  16. Opal shell structures: direct assembly versus inversion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Song; Sharifi, Parvin; Marlow, Frank

    2013-09-16

    Opal shell structures can be fabricated in two ways: By direct assembly from hollow spheres (hs-opal) or by infiltration of precursors into opal templates and inversion. The resulting lattice disturbances were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, and transmission spectra. The hs-opal system shows much lower disturbances, for example, a lower number of cracks and lattice deformations. The strong suppression of crack formation in one of these inverse opal structures can be considered as promising candidates for the fabrication of more perfect photonic crystals.

  17. Structured Sparsity Regularization Approach to the EEG Inverse Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montoya-Martinez, Jair; Artes-Rodriguez, Antonio; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2012-01-01

    Localization of brain activity involves solving the EEG inverse problem, which is an undetermined ill-posed problem. We propose a novel approach consisting in estimating, using structured sparsity regularization techniques, the Brain Electrical Sources (BES) matrix directly in the spatio-temporal......Localization of brain activity involves solving the EEG inverse problem, which is an undetermined ill-posed problem. We propose a novel approach consisting in estimating, using structured sparsity regularization techniques, the Brain Electrical Sources (BES) matrix directly in the spatio...

  18. Inverse Eigenvalue Problems for a Structure with Linear Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Liang-sheng; YANG Jia-hua; WEI Yuan-qian; MEN Hao; YANG Qing-kun; LIU Zhen-yu

    2005-01-01

    The inverse design method of a dynamic system with linear parameters has been studied. For some specified eigenvalues and eigenvectors, the design parameter vector which is often composed of whole or part of coefficients of spring and mass of the system can be obtained and the rigidity and mass matrices of an initially designed structure can be reconstructed through solving linear algebra equations. By using implicit function theorem, the conditions of existence and uniqueness of the solution are also deduced. The theory and method can be used for inverse vibration design of complex structure system.

  19. Three-quasiparticle rotational bands in sup 1 sup 0 sup 1 Rh IBFBPM description and signature inversion of the pi g sub 9 sub / sub 2 orbital

    CERN Document Server

    Timar, J; Gizon, A; Sohler, D; Nyakó, B M; Zolnai, L; Cata-Danil, G; Bucurescu, D; Boston, A J; Joss, D T; Paul, E S; Semple, A T; Parry, C M; Brant, S; Paar, V

    2001-01-01

    High- and intermediate-spin level structures of the sup 1 sup 0 sup 1 Rh nucleus have been studied using the reaction sup 7 sup 0 Zn+ sup 3 sup 6 S at 130 MeV bombarding energy. gamma-rays were detected with the EUROGAM II detector array. Three new DELTA I=1 rotational bands have been observed in this nucleus. The deduced level scheme is compared with results of calculations using Interacting Boson-Fermion plus Broken Pair Model. The model calculations give a consistent description of the one- and three-quasiparticle states providing fair agreement between the observed and calculated level energies and branching ratios. Experimental Routhians of the new high-spin bands and the pi g sub 9 sub / sub 2 nu h sub 1 sub 1 sub / sub 2 bands in the neighbouring Rh and Ag nuclei have been found to exhibit signature inversion. This signature inversion can be interpreted qualitatively as the inversion of the two signatures of the proton g sub 9 sub / sub 2 orbital caused by triaxial nuclear shape with large positive gam...

  20. High-quality photonic crystals with a nearly complete band gap obtained by direct inversion of woodpile templates with titanium dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Marichy, Catherine; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Scheffold, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Photonic crystal materials are based on a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant on length scales comparable to the wavelength of light. These materials can exhibit photonic band gaps; frequency regions for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden due to the depletion of the density of states. In order to exhibit a full band gap, 3D PCs must present a threshold refractive index contrast that depends on the crystal structure. In the case of the so-called woodpile photonic crystals this threshold is comparably low, approximately 1.9 for the direct structure. Therefore direct or inverted woodpiles made of high refractive index materials like silicon, germanium or titanium dioxide are sought after. Here we show that, by combining multiphoton lithography and atomic layer deposition, we can achieve a direct inversion of polymer templates into TiO$_{2}$ based photonic crystals. The obtained structures show remarkable optical properties in the near-infrared region with almost perfect sp...

  1. Band-Structure of Thallium by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtham, P. M.; Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The relativistic band structure of thallium has been calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method. The positions and extents of the bands were found to follow the Wigner-Seitz rule approximately, and the origin of the dispersion of the bands was established from the canonical s...

  2. Graphene Nanoribbon Conductance Model in Parabolic Band Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Ahmadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental measurements have been done on GNR conductance. In this paper, analytical model of GNR conductance is presented. Moreover, comparison with published data which illustrates good agreement between them is studied. Conductance of GNR as a one-dimensional device channel with parabolic band structures near the charge neutrality point is improved. Based on quantum confinement effect, the conductance of GNR in parabolic part of the band structure, also the temperature-dependent conductance which displays minimum conductance near the charge neutrality point are calculated. Graphene nanoribbon (GNR with parabolic band structure near the minimum band energy terminates Fermi-Dirac integral base method on band structure study. While band structure is parabola, semiconducting GNRs conductance is a function of Fermi-Dirac integral which is based on Maxwell approximation in nondegenerate limit especially for a long channel.

  3. Elucidating the stop bands of structurally colored systems through recursion

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Interference phenomena are the source of some of the spectacular colors of animals and plants in nature. In some of these systems, the physical structure consists of an ordered array of layers with alternating high and low refractive indices. This periodicity leads to an optical band structure that is analogous to the electronic band structure encountered in semiconductor physics; namely, specific bands of wavelengths (the stop bands) are perfectly reflected. Here, we present a minimal model for optical band structure in a periodic multilayer and solve it using recursion relations. We present experimental data for various beetles, whose optical structure resembles the proposed model. The stop bands emerge in the limit of an infinite number of layers by finding the fixed point of the recursive relations. In order for these to converge, an infinitesimal amount of absorption needs to be present, reminiscent of the regularization procedures commonly used in physics calculations. Thus, using only the phenomenon of...

  4. Experimental Studies of Band-Structure Properties in Bloch Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flees, Daniel J.

    1998-03-01

    One of the most striking features in small SIS tunnel junctions is the energy-band structure produced by Josephson coupling and charging effects. These energy bands are analogous to Bloch bands in crystalline solids. The superconducting single-electron (Bloch) transistor is the simplest system in which the energy bands can be readily studied. It consists of a superconducting island coupled to a source and drain through two small tunnel junctions. The elastic tunneling of Cooper-Pairs onto the island mixes the discrete charge states of the island. The shapes of the resulting energy bands can be modified by changing the electrostatic energies of these charge states with a voltage applied to a capacitively coupled gate. The maximum zero-voltage current (supercurrent) of each band depends upon the shape of the band and so the gate modulates the supercurrent. Each band has a different characteristic supercurrent modulation, with excited bands generally having lower currents. Thus! we can use the reduction in super current associated with a transition to an excited band to begin probing aip.org/journal_cgi/ getabs?KEY=PRLTAO&cvips=PRLTAO000078000025004817000001&gifs=No>band- structure properties such as the band-gap.(Daniel J. Flees, Siyuan Han, and J.E. Lukens, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 4817 (1997).

  5. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fei [Centre for Innovative Structures and Materials, School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); School of Civil Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410075 (China); Huang, Xiaodong, E-mail: huang.xiaodong@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Innovative Structures and Materials, School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Vehicle Body Design & Manufacture, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Jia, Baohua [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Engineering & Industrial Science, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  6. STRUCTURAL IDENTIFICATION OF DISTINCT INVERSIONS OF PLANAR KINEMATIC CHAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Shubhashis Sanyal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 171 979 International Islamic University 8 2 1148 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} Inversions are various structural possibilities of a kinematic chain. The number of inversions depends on the number of links of a kinematic chain. At the stage of structural synthesis, identification of distinct structural inversions of a particular type of kinematic chain is necessary. Various researchers have proposed methods for identification of distinct inversions. Present method based on Link joint connectivity is proposed to identify the distinct inversions of a planar kinematic chain. Method is tested successfully on single degree and multiple degree of freedom planar kinematic chains. ABSTRAK: Penyonsangan merupakan kebarangkalian pelbagai struktur suatu rangkaian kinematik. Jumlah songsangan bergantung kepada jumlah hubungan suatu rangkaian kinematik. Pada peringkat sintesis struktur, pengenalan songsangan struktur yang berbeza untuk suatu jenis rangkaian kinematik adalah perlu. Ramai penyelidik telah mencadangkan pelbagai kaedah pengenalan songsangan yang berbeza. Kaedah terkini berdasarkan hubungan kesambungan bersama telah dicadangkan untuk mengenalpasti songsangan yang berbeza dalam suatu satah rangkaian kinematik.

  7. Band warping, band non-parabolicity, and Dirac points in electronic and lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resca, Lorenzo; Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-10-01

    We illustrate at a fundamental level the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. We point out a robust presence of pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a p-type tight-binding approximation. We analyze two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices with implications that are expected to generalize to more complex structures. Band warping is shown to arise at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, which allows the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions, hence band degeneracy, at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band warping is incompatible with a multi-dimensional Taylor series expansion, whereas band non-parabolicities are associated with multi-dimensional Taylor series expansions to all orders. Still band non-parabolicities may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Remarkably, while still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two p-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively to each other, until these conical intersections merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, even though our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more

  8. The complex band structure for armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Liu-Jun; Xia Tong-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Using a tight binding transfer matrix method, we calculate the complex band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbons. The real part of the complex band structure calculated by the transfer matrix method fits well with the bulk band structure calculated by a Hermitian matrix. The complex band structure gives extra information on carrier's decay behaviour. The imaginary loop connects the conduction and valence band, and can profoundly affect the characteristics of nanoscale electronic device made with graphene nanoribbons. In this work, the complex band structure calculation includes not only the first nearest neighbour interaction, but also the effects of edge bond relaxation and the third nearest neighbour interaction. The band gap is classified into three classes. Due to the edge bond relaxation and the third nearest neighbour interaction term, it opens a band gap for N= 3M-1. The band gap is almost unchanged for N = 3M + 1, but decreased for N = 3M. The maximum imaginary wave vector length provides additional information about the electrical characteristics of graphene nmaoribbons, and is also classified into three classes.

  9. Band structures in the nematic elastomers phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu

    2017-02-01

    As one kind of new intelligent materials, nematic elastomers (NEs) represent an exciting physical system that combines the local orientational symmetry breaking and the entropic rubber elasticity, producing a number of unique physical phenomena. In this paper, the potential application of NEs in the band tuning is explored. The band structures in two kinds of NE phononic crystals (PCs) are investigated. Through changing NE intrinsic parameters, the influence of the porosity, director rotation and relaxation on the band structures in NE PCs are analyzed. This work is a meaningful try for application of NEs in acoustic field and proposes a new intelligent strategy in band turning.

  10. Band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying, E-mail: yliu5@bjtu.edu.cn; Liang, Tianshu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals (FPPCs) are studied with the aim to clarify the effect of fractal hierarchy on the band structures. Firstly, one kind of FPPCs based on Sierpinski triangle routine is proposed. Then the influence of the porosity on the elastic wave dispersion in Sierpinski triangle FPPCs is investigated. The sensitivity of the band structures to the fractal hierarchy is discussed in detail. The results show that the increase of the hierarchy increases the sensitivity of ABG (Absolute band gap) central frequency to the porosity. But further increase of the fractal hierarchy weakens this sensitivity. On the same hierarchy, wider ABGs could be opened in Sierpinski equilateral triangle FPPC; whilst, a lower ABG could be opened at lower porosity in Sierpinski right-angled isosceles FPPCs. These results will provide a meaningful guidance in tuning band structures in porous phononic crystals by fractal design.

  11. Broadening of effective photonic band gaps in biological chiral structures: From intrinsic narrow band gaps to broad band reflection spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, W. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Azofeifa, D. E.; Solis, Á.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.

    2015-09-01

    Under normal illumination with non-polarized light, reflection spectra of the cuticle of golden-like and red Chrysina aurigans scarabs show a structured broad band of left-handed circularly polarized light. The polarization of the reflected light is attributed to a Bouligand-type left-handed chiral structure found through the scarab's cuticle. By considering these twisted structures as one-dimensional photonic crystals, a novel approach is developed from the dispersion relation of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves traveling through chiral media, to show how the broad band characterizing these spectra arises from an intrinsic narrow photonic band gap whose spectral position moves through visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  12. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  13. Band structure approach to the resonant x-ray scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Elfimov, I. S.; Skorikov, N. A.; Anisimov, V. I.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    We study the resonance behaviour of the forbidden 600 and 222 x-ray Bragg peaks in Ge using LDA band structure methods. These Bragg peaks remain forbidden in the resonant dipole scattering approximation even taking into account the non local nature of the band states. However they become allowed at resonance if the eigenstates of the unoccupied conduction band involve a hybridization of p like and d like atomic states. We show that the energy dependence of the resonant behaviour, including th...

  14. Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zheng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-27

    Sulfur is a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. The rapid capacity fading, however, presents a significant challenge for the practical application of sulfur cathodes. Two major approaches that have been developed to improve the sulfur cathode performance include (a) fabricating nanostructured conductive matrix to physically encapsulate sulfur and (b) engineering chemical modification to enhance binding with polysulfides and, thus, to reduce their dissolution. Here, we report a three-dimensional (3D) electrode structure to achieve both sulfur physical encapsulation and polysulfides binding simultaneously. The electrode is based on hydrogen reduced TiO2 with an inverse opal structure that is highly conductive and robust toward electrochemical cycling. The relatively enclosed 3D structure provides an ideal architecture for sulfur and polysulfides confinement. The openings at the top surface allow sulfur infusion into the inverse opal structure. In addition, chemical tuning of the TiO2 composition through hydrogen reduction was shown to enhance the specific capacity and cyclability of the cathode. With such TiO2 encapsulated sulfur structure, the sulfur cathode could deliver a high specific capacity of ∼1100 mAh/g in the beginning, with a reversible capacity of ∼890 mAh/g after 200 cycles of charge/discharge at a C/5 rate. The Coulombic efficiency was also maintained at around 99.5% during cycling. The results showed that inverse opal structure of hydrogen reduced TiO2 represents an effective strategy in improving lithium sulfur batteries performance.

  15. Electronic Band Structure and Sub-band-gap Absorption of Nitrogen Hyperdoped Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen; Shao, Hezhu; Dong, Xiao; Li, Ning; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhao, Li; Zhuang, Jun

    2015-05-27

    We investigated the atomic geometry, electronic band structure, and optical absorption of nitrogen hyperdoped silicon based on first-principles calculations. The results show that all the paired nitrogen defects we studied do not introduce intermediate band, while most of single nitrogen defects can introduce intermediate band in the gap. Considering the stability of the single defects and the rapid resolidification following the laser melting process in our sample preparation method, we conclude that the substitutional nitrogen defect, whose fraction was tiny and could be neglected before, should have considerable fraction in the hyperdoped silicon and results in the visible sub-band-gap absorption as observed in the experiment. Furthermore, our calculations show that the substitutional nitrogen defect has good stability, which could be one of the reasons why the sub-band-gap absorptance remains almost unchanged after annealing.

  16. Electronic structure of heavy fermions: narrow temperature-independent bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Andrews, A.B.; Thompson, J.D.; Smith, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Moshopoulou, E.; Fisk, Z. [NHMFL, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Menovsky, A.A. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Natuurkundig Lab.; Canfield, P.C.; Olson, C.G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Ames Lab.

    1997-02-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from ARPES data reported here for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable. (orig.).

  17. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B. [and others

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  18. Structure of nearly degenerate dipole bands in {sup 108}Ag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, J. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Palit, R., E-mail: palit@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Saha, S.; Trivedi, T. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Datta, P. [Ananda Mohan College, Kolkata 700009 (India); Carroll, J.J. [US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Donthi, R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Garg, U. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jadhav, S.; Jain, H.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Karamian, S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kumar, S. [University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Litz, M.S. [US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mehta, D. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Naidu, B.S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Naik, Z. [Sambalpur University, Sambalpur 143005 (India); Sihotra, S. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); and others

    2013-08-09

    The high spin negative parity states of {sup 108}Ag have been investigated with the {sup 11}B + {sup 100}Mo reaction at 39 MeV beam energy using the INGA facility at TIFR, Mumbai. From the γ–γ coincidence analysis, an excited negative parity band has been established and found to be nearly degenerate with the ground state band. The spin and parity of the levels are assigned using angular correlation and polarization measurements. This pair of degenerate bands in {sup 108}Ag is studied using the recently developed microscopic triaxial projected shell model approach. The observed energy levels and the ratio of the electromagnetic transition probabilities of these bands in this isotope are well reproduced by the present model. Further, it is shown that the partner band has a different quasiparticle structure as compared to the yrast band.

  19. Inverse boundary element calculations based on structural modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller

    2007-01-01

    The inverse problem of calculating the flexural velocity of a radiating structure of a general shape from measurements in the field is often solved by combining a Boundary Element Method with the Singular Value Decomposition and a regularization technique. In their standard form these methods solve...... for the unknown normal velocities of the structure at the relatively large number of nodes in the numerical model. Efficiently the regularization technique smoothes the solution spatially, since a fast spatial variation is associated with high index singular values, which is filtered out or damped...... in the regularization. Hence, the effective number of degrees of freedom in the model is often much lower than the number of nodes in the model. The present paper deals with an alternative formulation possible for the subset of radiation problems in which a (structural) modal expansion is known for the structure...

  20. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-08-20

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain.

  1. Electronic structure of NiO: Correlation and band effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z. (Stanford Electronics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California (USA)); List, R.S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA)); Dessau, D.S.; Wells, B.O. (Stanford Electronics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California (USA)); Jepsen, O. (Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, D-7000 Stuttgart 80 (Federal Republic of Germany)); Arko, A.J.; Barttlet, R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA)); Shih, C.K. (Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas (USA)); Parmigiani, F. (IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California (USA)); Huang, J.C.; Lindberg, P.A.P. (Stanford Electronics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California (USA))

    1991-08-15

    We have performed angle-resolved-photoemission experiments and local-density-functional (LDA) band calculations on NiO to study correlation and band effects of this conceptually important compound. Our experimental result suggests a dual nature of the electronic structure of NiO. On the one hand, the LDA band calculation has some relevance to the electronic structure of NiO, and the inclusion of the antiferromagnetic order is essential. For the lower O 2{ital p} bands, the LDA calculation agrees almost perfectly with experimental energy positions and dispersion relations. On the other hand, discrepancies between the experiment and the LDA calculation do exist, especially for the Ni 3{ital d} bands and the O 2{ital p} bands that are heavily mixed with the Ni 3{ital d} bands. It appears that the main discrepancies between the experimental results and the LDA calculation are concentrated in the regions of the insulating gap and the valence-band satellite. In addition to these results, we also report the interesting angle and photon-energy dependence of the satellite emission. The above results show that the angle-resolved-photoemission studies can provide much additional information about the electronic structure of correlated materials like NiO.

  2. Band Structure in Yang-Mills Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Bachas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    We show how Yang-Mills theory on $S^3\\times R$ can exhibit a spectrum with continuous bands if coupled either to a topological 3-form gauge field, or to a dynamical axion with heavy Peccei-Quinn scale. The basic mechanism consists in associating winding histories to a bosonic zero mode whose role is to convert a circle in configuration space into a helix. The zero mode is, respectively, the holonomy of the 3-form field or the axion momentum. In these models different theta sectors coexist but are not mixed by local operators. Our analysis sheds light on, and extends Seiberg's proposal for modifying the topological sums in quantum field theories. It refutes a recent claim that $B+L$ violation at LHC is unsuppressed.

  3. Unfolding the band structure of GaAsBi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, R.; Sweeney, S. J.; Florescu, Marian

    2017-02-01

    Typical supercell approaches used to investigate the electronic properties of GaAs(1-x)Bi(x) produce highly accurate, but folded, band structures. Using a highly optimized algorithm, we unfold the band structure to an approximate E≤ft(\\mathbf{k}\\right) relation associated with an effective Brillouin zone. The dispersion relations we generate correlate strongly with experimental results, confirming that a regime of band gap energy greater than the spin-orbit-splitting energy is reached at around 10% bismuth fraction. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the unfolding algorithm throughout the Brillouin zone (BZ), which is key to enabling transition rate calculations, such as Auger recombination rates. Finally, we show the effect of disorder on the effective masses and identify approximate values for the effective mass of the conduction band and valence bands for bismuth concentrations from 0-12%.

  4. Band structure characteristics of T-square fractal phononic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-Jian; Fan You-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The T-square fractal two-dimensional phononic crystal model is presented in this article.A comprehensive study is performed for the Bragg scattering and locally resonant fractal phononic crystal.We find that the band structures of the fractal and non-fractal phononic crystals at the same filling ratio are quite different through using the finite element method.The fractal design has an important impact on the band structures of the two-dimensional phononic crystals.

  5. Band Gap Properties of Magnetoelectroelastic Grid Structures with Initial Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Ze; LI Feng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of elastic waves in magnetoelectroelastic grid structures is studied.Band gap properties are presented and the effects of the magnetoelectroelastic coupling and initial stress are considered. Numerical calculations are performed using the plane-wave expansion method.The results show that the band gap width can be tuned by the initial stress.It is hoped that our results will be helpful for designing acoustic filters with magnetoelectroelastic materials and grid structures.

  6. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    -sectional area. To study the band-gap for travelling waves, a repeated inner segment of the optimized beams is analyzed using Floquet theory and the waveguide finite element (WFE) method. Finally, the frequency response is computed for the optimized beams when these are subjected to an external time......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...

  7. Nonequilibrium band structure of nano-devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenbuchner, S.; Sabathil, M.; Majewski, J. A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P.; Beham, E.; Zrenner, A.; Lugli, P.

    2002-03-01

    A method is developed for calculating, in a consistent manner, the realistic electronic structure of three-dimensional (3-D) heterostructure quantum devices under bias and its current density close to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium electronic structure is characterized by local Fermi levels that are calculated self-consistently. We have applied this scheme to predict asymmetric Stark shifts and tunneling of confined electrons and holes in single-dot GaAs/InGaAs photodiodes.

  8. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-01

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  9. Phonon band structures of the three dimensional latticed pentamode metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The artificially designed three-dimensional (3D pentamode metamaterials have such an extraordinary characteristic that the solid materials behave like liquids. Meanwhile, the ideal structure of the pentamode metamaterials arranges in the same way as that of the diamond crystals. In the present research, we regard three types of pentamode metamaterials derived from the 3D crystal lattices as research objects. The phonon band structures of the candidate pentamode structures are calculated by using the finite element method (FEM. We illustrate the relation between the ratio of the bulk modulus B and the shear modulus G of different combinations of D and d. Finally, we find out the relationship between the phonon band structure and the structure parameters. It is useful for generating the phonon band structure and controlling elastic wave propagation.

  10. Electronic structure of the valence band of II--VI wide band gap semiconductor interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    In this work we present the electronic band structure for (001)--CdTe interfaces with some other II--VI zinc blende semiconductors. We assume ideal interfaces. We use tight binding Hamiltonians with an orthogonal basis ($s p^3 s^*$). We make use of the well--known Surface Green's Function Matching method to calculate the interface band structure. In our calculation the dominion of the interface is constituted by four atomic layers. We consider here anion--anion interfaces only. We have includ...

  11. Band-structure engineering in conjugated 2D polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzler, Rico

    2016-10-26

    Conjugated polymers find widespread application in (opto)electronic devices, sensing, and as catalysts. Their common one-dimensional structure can be extended into the second dimension to create conjugated planar sheets of covalently linked molecules. Extending π-conjugation into the second dimension unlocks a new class of semiconductive polymers which as a consequence of their unique electronic properties can find usability in numerous applications. In this article the theoretical band structures of a set of conjugated 2D polymers are compared and information on the important characteristics band gap and valence/conduction band dispersion is extracted. The great variance in these characteristics within the investigated set suggests 2D polymers as exciting materials in which band-structure engineering can be used to tailor sheet-like organic materials with desired electronic properties.

  12. Basement structures over Rio Grande Rise from gravity inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Renata Regina; Hackspacher, Peter Christian; de Souza, Iata Anderson; Lima Costa, Iago Sousa

    2017-04-01

    The basement depth in the Rio Grande Rise (RGR), South Atlantic, is estimated from combining gravity data obtained from satellite altimetry, marine surveys, bathymetry, sediment thickness and crustal thickness information. We formulate a crustal model of the region by inverse gravity modeling. The effect of the sediment layer is evaluated using the global sediment thickness model of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and fitting the sediment compaction model to observed density values from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) reports. The Global Relief Model ETOPO1 and constraining data from seismic interpretation on crustal thickness are integrated in the inversion process. The modeled Moho depth values vary between 6 and 27 km over the area, being thicker under the RGR and also in the direction of São Paulo Plateau. The inversion for the gravity-equivalent basement topography is applied to gravity residual data, which is free from the gravity effect of sediments and from the gravity effect of the estimated Moho interface. We find several short-wavelengths structures not present in the bathymetry data. Our model shows a rift crossing the entire Rio Grande Rise deeper than previously presented in literature, with depths up to 5 km in the East Rio Grande Rise (ERGR) and deeper in the West Rio Grande Rise (WRGR), reaching 6.4 km. An interesting NS structure that goes from 34°S and extends through de São Paulo Ridge may be related to the South Atlantic Opening and could reveal an extinct spreading center.

  13. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Han; Freund, Robert M; Peraire, Jaime; Johnson, Steven G

    2014-01-01

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniq...

  14. Optimal control of large space structures via generalized inverse matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Fang, Xiaowen

    1987-01-01

    Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) is a control scheme that decouples the space structure into n independent second-order subsystems according to n controlled modes and controls each mode independently. It is well-known that the IMSC eliminates control and observation spillover caused when the conventional coupled modal control scheme is employed. The independent control of each mode requires that the number of actuators be equal to the number of modelled modes, which is very high for a faithful modeling of large space structures. A control scheme is proposed that allows one to use a reduced number of actuators to control all modeled modes suboptimally. In particular, the method of generalized inverse matrices is employed to implement the actuators such that the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system are as closed as possible to those specified by the optimal IMSC. Computer simulation of the proposed control scheme on a simply supported beam is given.

  15. Millimeter-wave waveguiding using photonic band structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyahu, Danny; Sadovnik, Lev S.; Manasson, Vladimir A.

    2000-07-01

    Current trends in device miniaturization and integration, especially in the development of microwave monolithic integrated circuits, calls for flexible, arbitrarily shaped and curved interconnects. Standard dielectric waveguides and microstrip lines are subject to prohibitive losses and their functionality is limited because of their unflexible structures. The problem is addressed by confining the wave- guiding path in a substrate with a Photonic Band Gap structure in a manner that will result in the guided mode being localized within the band gap. Two devices implementing Photonic Band Structures for millimeter waves confinement are presented. The first waveguide is a linear defect in triangular lattice created in a silicon slab (TE mode). The structure consists of parallel air holes of circular cross sections. The silicon was laser drilled to create the 2D crystal. The second device consists of alumina rods arranged in a triangular lattice, surrounded by air and sandwiched between two parallel metal plates (TM mode). Electromagnetic wave (W-band) confinement was obtained in both devices for straight and bent waveguides. Three branch waveguides (intersecting line defects) was studied as well. Measurements confirmed the lowloss waveguide confinement property of the utilizing Photonic Band Gap structure. This structure can find applications in power combiner/splitter and other millimeter wave devices.

  16. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    -sectional area. To study the band-gap for travelling waves, a repeated inner segment of the optimized beams is analyzed using Floquet theory and the waveguide finite element (WFE) method. Finally, the frequency response is computed for the optimized beams when these are subjected to an external time......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...

  17. Band Structure in the Doubly Magic Nucleus 56Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Bao-Guo; GUO Hong-Chao

    2004-01-01

    @@ Band structures near yrast lines of the Z = N doubly magic nucleus 56Ni are investigated with the configurationdependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky approach. The observed deformed bands are confirmed as highly deformed and their properties are explained theoretically. The calculated transition quadrupole moments Qt, ~ 1.7 eb at low spin as well as the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia J1) and J(2) for configurations of interest are found to be generally in good agreement with the observed results. Two terminating states at 20+ and 29- for the two observed bands and other terminations in 56Ni are also predicted. It is found that the configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky approach is better in the description of nuclear properties and band structures at high spin than other models.

  18. Band structure engineering in van der Waals heterostructures via dielectric screening: the GΔW method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Kirsten T.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2017-06-01

    The idea of combining different two-dimensional (2D) crystals in van der Waals heterostructures (vdWHs) has led to a new paradigm for band structure engineering with atomic precision. Due to the weak interlayer couplings, the band structures of the individual 2D crystals are largely preserved upon formation of the heterostructure. However, regardless of the details of the interlayer hybridisation, the size of the 2D crystal band gaps are always reduced due to the enhanced dielectric screening provided by the surrounding layers. The effect can be significant (on the order of electron volts) but its precise magnitude is non-trivial to predict because of the non-local nature of the screening in quasi-2D crystals. Moreover, the effect is not captured by effective single-particle methods such as density functional theory. Here we present an efficient and general method for calculating the band gap renormalization of a 2D material embedded in an arbitrary vdWH. The method evaluates the change in the GW self-energy of the 2D material from the change in the screened Coulomb interaction. The latter is obtained using the quantum-electrostatic heterostructure (QEH) model. We benchmark the GΔW method against full first-principles GW calculations and use it to unravel the importance of screening-induced band structure renormalisation in various vdWHs. A main result is the observation that the size of the band gap reduction of a given 2D material when inserted into a heterostructure scales inversely with the polarisability of the 2D material. Our work demonstrates that dielectric engineering via van der Waals heterostructuring represents a promising strategy for tailoring the band structure of 2D materials.

  19. Coupling between Fano and Bragg bands in photonic band structure of two-dimensional metallic photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Markos, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and transmission spectrum of two-dimensional array of metallic rods is investigated numerically. Based on the recent analysis of the band structure of two-dimensional photonic crystal with dielectric rods [P. Marko\\v{s}, Phys. Rev. A 92 043814 (2015)] we identify two types of bands in the frequency spectrum: Bragg (P) bands resulting from a periodicity and Fano (F) bands which arise from Fano resonances associated with each of the cylinders within the periodic structure. It is shown that the existence of Fano band in a certain frequency range is manifested by a Fano resonance in the transmittance. In particular, we re-examine the symmetry properties of the H- polarized band structure in the frequency range where the spectrum consists of the localized modes associated with the single scatterer resonances and we explore process of formation of Fano bands by identifying individual terms in the expansion of the LCAO states. We demonstrate how the interplay between the two scattering mechanisms affects p...

  20. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhizhong, E-mail: zzyan@bit.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57078 Siegen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  1. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2012-03-01

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  2. On structure-based priors in Bayesian geophysical inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pasquale, G.; Linde, N.

    2017-03-01

    Bayesian methods are extensively used to analyse geophysical data sets. A critical and somewhat overlooked component of high-dimensional Bayesian inversion is the definition of the prior probability density function that describes the joint probability of model parameters before considering available data sets. If insufficient prior information is available about model parameter correlations, then it is tempting to assume that model parameters are uncorrelated. When working with a spatially gridded model representation, this overparametrization leads to posterior realizations with far too much variability to be deemed realistic from a geological perspective. In this study, we introduce a new approach for structure-based prior sampling with Markov chain Monte Carlo that is suitable when only limited prior information is available. We evaluate our method using model structure measures related to standard roughness and damping metrics for l1- and l2-norms. We show that our structure-based prior approach is able to adequately sample the chosen prior distribution of model structure. The usefulness and applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on synthetic and field-based crosshole ground penetrating radar data. We find that our method provides posterior model realizations and statistics that are significantly more satisfactory than those based on underlying assumptions of uncorrelated model parameters or on explicit penalties on model structure within an empirical Bayes framework.

  3. Hubbard-U band-structure methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, R.C.; Christensen, Niels Egede; Svane, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen a large increase in the number of electronic-structure calculations that involve adding a Hubbard term to the local-density approximation band-structure Hamiltonian. The Hubbard term is then determined either at the mean-field level or with sophisticated many-body techniq...

  4. Extremal inversion of lunar travel time data. [seismic velocity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, N.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The tau method, developed by Bessonova et al. (1974), of inversion of travel times is applied to lunar P-wave travel time data to find limits on the velocity structure of the moon. Tau is the singular solution to the Clairaut equation. Models with low-velocity zones, with low-velocity zones at differing depths, and without low-velocity zones, were found to be consistent with data and within the determined limits. Models with and without a discontinuity at about 25-km depth have been found which agree with all travel time data to within two standard deviations. In other words, the existence of the discontinuity and its size and location have not been uniquely resolved. Models with low-velocity channels are also possible.

  5. Bulk band structure of Bi2Te3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michiardi, Matteo; Aguilera, Irene; Bianchi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The bulk band structure of Bi2Te3 has been determined by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and compared to first-principles calculations. We have performed calculations using the local density approximation (LDA) of density functional theory and the one-shot GW approximation within the all......-electron full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave (FLAPW) formalism, fully taking into account spin-orbit coupling. Quasiparticle effects produce significant changes in the band structure of Bi2Te3 when compared to LDA. Experimental and calculated results are compared in the spectral regions where...... distinct differences between the LDA and GW results are present. Overall a superior agreement with GW is found, highlighting the importance of many-body effects in the band structure of this family of topological insulators....

  6. Complex band structure of topological insulator Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, J.; Li, S.; Dang, X.; Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, E. Y.; Velev, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    Topological insulators are very interesting from a fundamental point of view, and their unique properties may be useful for electronic and spintronic device applications. From the point of view of applications it is important to understand the decay behavior of carriers injected in the band gap of the topological insulator, which is determined by its complex band structure (CBS). Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the dispersion and symmetry of the complex bands of Bi2Se3 family of three-dimensional topological insulators. We compare the CBS of a band insulator and a topological insulator and follow the CBS evolution in both when the spin-orbit interaction is turned on. We find significant differences in the CBS linked to the topological band structure. In particular, our results demonstrate that the evanescent states in Bi2Se3 are non-trivially complex, i.e. contain both the real and imaginary contributions. This explains quantitatively the oscillatory behavior of the band gap obtained from Bi2Se3 (0 0 0 1) slab calculations.

  7. Novel band structures in germanene on aluminium nitride substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Miaojuan; Li, Mingming

    2017-09-01

    Germanene is difficult to grow epitaxially on conventional semiconductor substrates, and to open a sizable band gap is also a hot topic. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of germanene/aluminium nitride heterobilayers (Ge/AlN HBLs). The results indicate that the Dirac cone with the nearly linear band dispersion of germanene is almost maintained in the band gap of the substrate. Very low effective masses and high carrier mobilities are achieved, and the band gap of germanene can be effectively tuned from 0.004 to 0.46 eV. These results suggest a possible method to design effective field effect transistors that can operate at room temperature.

  8. Crystal Structure and Band Gap Engineering in Polyoxometalate-Based Inorganic-Organic Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumyabrata; Sarkar, Sumanta; Pan, Jaysree; Waghmare, Umesh V; Dhanya, R; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Peter, Sebastian C

    2016-04-04

    We have demonstrated engineering of the electronic band gap of the hybrid materials based on POMs (polyoxometalates), by controlling its structural complexity through variation in the conditions of synthesis. The pH- and temperature-dependent studies give a clear insight into how these experimental factors affect the overall hybrid structure and its properties. Our structural manipulations have been successful in effectively tuning the optical band gap and electronic band structure of this kind of hybrids, which can find many applications in the field of photovoltaic and semiconducting devices. We have also addressed a common crystallographic disorder observed in Keggin-ion (one type of heteropolyoxometalate [POMs])-based hybrid materials. Through a combination of crystallographic, spectroscopic, and theoretical analysis of four new POM-based hybrids synthesized with tactically varied reaction conditions, we trace the origin and nature of the disorder associated with it and the subtle local structural coordination involved in its core picture. While the crystallography yields a centrosymmetric structure with planar coordination of Si, our analysis with XPS, IR, and Raman spectroscopy reveals a tetrahedral coordination with broken inversion symmetry, corroborated by first-principles calculations.

  9. Self-isospectrality, tri-supersymmetry and band structure

    CERN Document Server

    Correa, Francisco; Nieto, Luis-Miguel; Plyushchay, Mikhail S

    2008-01-01

    We reveal an unexpected hidden supersymmetric structure in a self-isospectral system constructed on the base of the periodic finite-gap associated Lame equation. It admits three different choices of the Z_2-grading, under which three basic nontrivial integrals of motion coherently change their fermionic/bosonic nature, and generate a certain nonlinear supersymmetry. These integrals reflect the band structure, its separability, and characteristic properties of the band-edge states of the system, which can be interpreted as an electron in one-dimensional crystal produced by periodic electric and magnetic fields.

  10. Fabrication and optical properties of Alq 3 doped PMMA microsphere arrays templated by ZnO inverse opal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ming; Deng, Lier; Zhao, Ailun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Dawei

    2010-07-01

    PMMA microsphere arrays are fabricated by a double replicating method with common used polystyrene colloidal crystal template. High quality ZnO inverse opals formed by electrodeposition play the key role between the PMMA microsphere arrays and polystyrene colloidal crystals. The electrodeposition method has advantage on fabricating IO structures with high solid fraction. After the subsequently in-situ polymerization of MMA in the voids of ZnO inverse opals, the ZnO is removed by hydrochloric acid solution. Microsphere arrays fabricated by PMMA or PMMA doped with Alq 3 are prepared. Reflection stop bands are detected from the formed PMMA microsphere arrays. Solid fraction from 37% to 50% of the PMMA arrays can be formed by different in-situ polymerization modes of MMA. The photoluminescence of Alq 3 in the PMMA spheres is partly suppressed at the wavelength of the photonic stop band induced by PMMA arrays.

  11. Computing approximate blocking probability of inverse multiplexing and sub-band conversion in the flexible-grid optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yamei; You, Shanhong

    2016-07-01

    With the rapid growth of data rate, the optical network is evolving from fixed-grid to flexible-grid to provide spectrum-efficient and scalable transport of 100 Gb/s services and beyond. Also, the deployment of wavelength converter in the existing network can increase the flexibility of routing and wavelength allocation (RWA) and improve blocking performance of the optical networks. In this paper, we present a methodology for computing approximate blocking probabilities of the provision of multiclass services in the flexible-grid optical networks with sub-band spectrum conversion and inverse multiplexing respectively. Numerical calculation results based on the model are compared to the simulation results for the different cases. It is shown that the calculation results match well with the simulation results for the flexible-grid optical networks at different scenarios.

  12. Tunable band structure and effective mass of disordered chalcopyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Lian; Xie, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Yong-Hong

    2017-02-01

    The band structure and effective mass of disordered chalcopyrite photovoltaic materials Cu1- x Ag x Ga X 2 ( X = S, Se) are investigated by density functional theory. Special quasirandom structures are used to mimic local atomic disorders at Cu/Ag sites. A local density plus correction method is adopted to obtain correct semiconductor band gaps for all compounds. The bandgap anomaly can be seen for both sulfides and selenides, where the gap values of Ag compounds are larger than those of Cu compounds. Band gaps can be modulated from 1.63 to 1.78 eV for Cu1- x Ag x Ga Se 2, and from 2.33 to 2.64 eV for Cu1- x Ag x Ga S 2. The band gap minima and maxima occur at around x = 0:5 and x = 1, respectively, for both sulfides and selenides. In order to show the transport properties of Cu1- x Ag x Ga X 2, the effective mass is shown as a function of disordered Ag concentration. Finally, detailed band structures are shown to clarify the phonon momentum needed by the fundamental indirect-gap transitions. These results should be helpful in designing high-efficiency photovoltaic devices, with both better absorption and high mobility, by Ag-doping in CuGa X 2.

  13. Higher degree moment tensor inversion of Mani earthquake using far-field broad- band recording

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Breakthrough point source model, extended earthquake source model is used to calculate more seismic source parameters in this paper. We express seismic source using higher degree moment tensors, to reduce a large number terms originally presenting in higher degree moment tensor representation, Haskell rupture model is used. We inverted the source parameters of Mani earthquake in Tibet using broad-band body wave of 32 stations of Global Seismograph Network (GSN), the results show that it is a strike-slip fault, rupture direction is 75° , rupture duration is 19 s, the fault plan is f =77° , d =88° , l =0° , the auxiliary plane is f =347° , d =90° , l =178° , and the fault dimension is 47 km′ 28 km. These results will give new quantitative data for earth dynamics and have practical meaning for seismic source tomography research.

  14. Electronic band structure effects in monolayer, bilayer, and hybrid graphene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, Conor

    Since its discovery in 2005, graphene has been the focus of intense theoretical and experimental study owing to its unique two-dimensional band structure and related electronic properties. In this thesis, we explore the electronic properties of graphene structures from several perspectives including the magnetoelectrical transport properties of monolayer graphene, gap engineering and measurements in bilayer graphene, and anomalous quantum oscillation in the monolayer-bilayer graphene hybrids. We also explored the device implications of our findings, and the application of some experimental techniques developed for the graphene work to the study of a complex oxide, Ca3Ru2O7, exhibiting properties of strongly correlated electrons. Graphene's high mobility and ballistic transport over device length scales, make it suitable for numerous applications. However, two big challenges remain in the way: maintaining high mobility in fabricated devices, and engineering a band gap to make graphene compatible with logical electronics and various optical devices. We address the first challenge by experimentally evaluating mobilities in scalable monolayer graphene-based field effect transistors (FETs) and dielectric-covered Hall bars. We find that the mobility is limited in these devices, and is roughly inversely proportional to doping. By considering interaction of graphene's Dirac fermions with local charged impurities at the interface between graphene and the top-gate dielectric, we find that Coulomb scattering is responsible for degraded mobility. Even in the cleanest devices, a band gap is still desirable for electronic applications of graphene. We address this challenge by probing the band structure of bilayer graphene, in which a field-tunable energy band gap has been theoretically proposed. We use planar tunneling spectroscopy of exfoliated bilayer graphene flakes demonstrate both measurement and control of the energy band gap. We find that both the Fermi level and

  15. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  16. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  17. Doping-dependent quasiparticle band structure in cuprate superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eder, R; Ohta, Y.; Sawatzky, G.A

    1997-01-01

    We present an exact diagonalization study of the single-particle spectral function in the so-called t-t'-t ''-J model in two dimensions. As a key result, we find that hole doping leads to a major reconstruction of the quasiparticle band structure near (pi,0): whereas for the undoped system the quasi

  18. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong;

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate the flexibility and advantages of a non-uniform pseudo-spectral time domain (nu-PSTD) method through studies of the wave propagation characteristics on photonic band-gap (PBG) structures in stratified medium Design/methodology/approach - A nu-PSTD method is proposed...

  19. Design for maximum band-gaps in beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to extend earlier optimum design results for transversely vibrating Bernoulli-Euler beams by determining new optimum band-gap beam structures for (i) different combinations of classical boundary conditions, (ii) much larger values of the orders n and n-1 of adjacent upper and lowe...

  20. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Roark A.; /MIT /MIT /NIFS, Gifu /JAERI, Kyoto /LLNL, Livermore; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; /MIT; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  1. Photonic crystal digital alloys and their band structure properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongkug; Kim, Dong-Uk; Jeon, Heonsu

    2011-09-26

    We investigated semi-disordered photonic crystals (PCs), digital alloys, and made thorough comparisons with their counterparts, random alloys. A set of diamond lattice PC digital alloys operating in a microwave regime were prepared by alternately stacking two kinds of sub-PC systems composed of alumina and silica spheres of the same size. Measured transmission spectra as well as calculated band structures revealed that when the digital alloy period is short, band-gaps of the digital alloys are practically the same as those of the random alloys. This study indicates that the concept of digital alloys holds for photons in PCs as well.

  2. Waveguiding in surface plasmon polariton band gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Østergaard, John Erland; Leosson, Kristjan

    2001-01-01

    Using near-held optical microscopy, we investigate propagation and scattering of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP's) excited in the wavelength range of 780-820 nm at nanostructured gold-film surfaces with areas of 200-nm-wide scatterers arranged in a 400-nm-period triangular lattice containing line...... defects. We observe the SPP reflection by such an area and SPP guiding along line defects at 782 nm, as well as significant deterioration of these effects is 815 nm, thereby directly demonstrating the SPP band gap effect and showing first examples of SPP channel waveguides in surface band gap structures....

  3. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BANDED STRUCTURES IN DUAL-PHASE STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Krebs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dual-Phase (DP steels are composed of martensite islands dispersed in a ductile ferrite matrix, which provides a good balance between strength and ductility. Current processing conditions (continuous casting followed by hot and cold rolling generate 'banded structures' i.e., irregular, parallel and alternating bands of ferrite and martensite, which are detrimental to mechanical properties and especially for in-use properties. We present an original and simple method to quantify the intensity and wavelength of these bands. This method, based on the analysis of covariance function of binary images, is firstly tested on model images. It is compared with ASTM E-1268 standard and appears to be more robust. Then it is applied on real DP steel microstructures and proves to be sufficiently sensitive to discriminate samples resulting from different thermo-mechanical routes.

  4. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  5. HOMOTOPY SOLUTION OF THE INVERSE GENERALIZED EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书; 王波; 胡继忠

    2004-01-01

    The structural dynamics problems, such as structural design, parameter identification and model correction, are considered as a kind of the inverse generalized eigenvalue problems mathematically. The inverse eigenvalue problems are nonlinear. In general, they could be transformed into nonlinear equations to solve. The structural dynamics inverse problems were treated as quasi multiplicative inverse eigenalue problems which were solved by homotopy method for nonlinear equations. This method had no requirements for initial value essentially because of the homotopy path to solution. Numerical examples were presented to illustrate the homotopy method.

  6. Development of X-band accelerating structures for high gradients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Bini; M. G. Grimaldi; L. Romano; F. Ruffino; R. Parodi; V. Chimenti; A. Marcelli; L. Palumbo; B. Spataro; V. A. Dolgashev; S. Tantawi; A.D. Yeremian; Y. Higashi

    2012-01-01

    Short copper standing wave (SW) structures operating at an X-band frequency have been recently designed and manufactured at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) using the vacuum brazing technique.High power tests of the structures have been performed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.In this manuscript we report the results of these tests and the activity in progress to enhance the high gradient performance of the next generation of structures,particularly the technological characterization of high performance coatings obtained via molybdenum sputtering.

  7. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, H; Lee, K Y K; Freund, R M; Peraire, J; Johnson, S G

    2014-09-22

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniques such as a simple approach to impose symmetry constraints. We also demonstrate a technique for robust topology optimization, in which some uncertainty is included in each voxel and we optimize the worst-case gap, and we show that the resulting band gaps have increased robustness to systematic fabrication errors.

  8. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  9. Methodology Using Inverse Methods for Pit Characterization in Multilayer Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin, John C.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Murphy, R. Kim; Concordia, Michael; Judd, David R.; Lindgren, Eric; Knopp, Jeremy

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a methodology incorporating ultrasonic and eddy current data and NDE models to characterize pits in first and second layers. Approaches such as equivalent pit dimensions, approximate probe models, and iterative inversion schemes were designed to improve the reliability and speed of inverse methods for second layer pit characterization. A novel clutter removal algorithm was developed to compensate for coherent background noise. Validation was achieved using artificial and real pitting corrosion samples.

  10. Band structure, band offsets, substitutional doping, and Schottky barriers of bulk and monolayer InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the electronic structure of the layered semiconductor InSe. We calculate the band structure of the monolayer and bulk material using density functional theory, hybrid functionals, and G W . The band gap of the monolayer InSe is calculated to be 2.4 eV in screened exchange hybrid functional, close to the experimental photoluminescence gap. The electron affinities and band offsets are calculated for vertical stacked-layer heterostructures, and are found to be suitable for tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) in combination with WS e2 or similar. The valence-band edge of InSe is calculated to lie 5.2 eV below the vacuum level, similar to that for the closed shell systems HfS e2 or SnS e2 . Hence InSe would be suitable to act as a p -type drain in the TFET. The intrinsic defects are calculated. For Se-rich layers, the Se adatom (interstitial) is found to be the most stable defect, whereas for In-rich layers, the Se vacancy is the most stable for the neutral state. Antisites tend to have energies just above those of vacancies. The Se antisite distorts towards a bond-breaking distortion as in the EL2 center of GaAs. Both substitutional donors and acceptors are calculated to be shallow, and effective dopants. They do not reconstruct to form nondoping configurations as occurs in black phosphorus. Finally, the Schottky barriers of metals on InSe are found to be strongly pinned by metal induced gap states (MIGS) at ˜0.5 eV above the valence-band edge. Any interfacial defects would lead to a stronger pinning at a similar energy. Overall, InSe is an effective semiconductor combining the good features of 2D (lack of dangling bonds, etc.) with the good features of 3D (effective doping), which few others achieve.

  11. Energetic stabilization of the Mizoguchi structure for magnetite by band-structure effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Satpathy, S.

    1993-03-01

    We show that the Mizoguchi structure is energetically stabilized over the Verwey structure for magnetite by electron hopping on the B sublattice. We use the one-band Cullen-Callen model Hamiltonian for the electronic band structure taking the nearest-neighbor and the second-neighbor Coulomb interactions, U1 and U2, into account. There is a competition between the Coulomb and the band-structure energies. The Coulomb energy tends to favor the Verwey structure while the band-structure energy tends to favor the Mizoguchi structure. We find that for U1band-structure energy) term dominates making the Mizoguchi structure energetically favorable over the Verwey structure. For a larger value of U1, the band-structure effect alone is insufficient, making it necessary to invoke other mechanisms such as the electron-phonon coupling earlier proposed by other authors, to stabilize the Mizoguchi structure. The energy of a single ``reversed-ring'' excitation in the Mizoguchi structure is calculated to be of the order of a few meV. The small energy is consistent with Cullen's explanation of the absence of cell doubling in the Ca plane as observed in diffraction experiments. The Mizoguchi order is unstable with respect to the formation of reversed-ring excitations if only U1 is present, but is stabilized by a small value of U2.

  12. Band structure of absorptive two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lem, Han; Tip, Adriaan; Moroz, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    The band structure for an absorptive two-dimensional photonic crystal made from cylinders consisting of a Drude material is calculated. Absorption causes the spectrum to become complex and form islands in the negative complex half-plane. The boundaries of these islands are not always formed by the eigenvalues calculated for Bloch vectors on the characteristic path, and we find a hole in the spectrum. For realistic parameter values, the real part of the spectrum is hardly influenced by absorption, typically less than 0.25%. The employed method uses a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker procedure together with analytical continuation. This results in an efficient approach that allows these band-structure calculations to be done on a Pentium III personal computer.

  13. Parameterization and algebraic structure of 3-band orthogonal wavelet systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a complete parameterization for the 3-band compact wavelet systems is presented. Using the parametric result, a program of the filterbank design is completed, which can give not only the filterbanks but also the graphs of all possible scaling functions and their corresponding wavelets. Especially some symmetric wavelets with small supports are given. Finally an algebraic structure for this kind of wavelet systems is characterized.

  14. Inversion of Nighttime PM2.5 Mass Concentration in Beijing Based on the VIIRS Day-Night Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoran Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to monitor nighttime particular matter (PM air quality in urban area, a back propagation neural network (BP neural network inversion model is established, using low-light radiation data from the day/night band (DNB of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP satellite. The study focuses on the moonless and cloudless nights in Beijing during March–May 2015. A test is carried out by selecting surface PM2.5 data from 12 PM2.5 automatic monitoring stations and the corresponding night city light intensity from DNB. As indicated by the results, the linear correlation coefficient (R between the results and the corresponding measured surface PM2.5 concentration is 0.91, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE is 14.02 μg/m3 with the average of 59.39 μg/m3. Furthermore, the BP neural network model shows better accuracy when air relative humility ranges from 40% to 80% and surface PM2.5 concentration exceeds 40 μg/m3. The study provides a superiority approach for monitoring PM2.5 air quality from space with visible light remote sensing data at night.

  15. Band gaps in grid structure with periodic local resonator subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2017-09-01

    The grid structure is widely used in architectural and mechanical field for its high strength and saving material. This paper will present a study on an acoustic metamaterial beam (AMB) based on the normal square grid structure with local resonators owning both flexible band gaps and high static stiffness, which have high application potential in vibration control. Firstly, the AMB with variable cross-section frame is analytically modeled by the beam-spring-mass model that is provided by using the extended Hamilton’s principle and Bloch’s theorem. The above model is used for computing the dispersion relation of the designed AMB in terms of the design parameters, and the influences of relevant parameters on band gaps are discussed. Then a two-dimensional finite element model of the AMB is built and analyzed in COMSOL Multiphysics, both the dispersion properties of unit cell and the wave attenuation in a finite AMB have fine agreement with the derived model. The effects of design parameters of the two-dimensional model in band gaps are further examined, and the obtained results can well verify the analytical model. Finally, the wave attenuation performances in three-dimensional AMBs with equal and unequal thickness are presented and discussed.

  16. Crossing points in the electronic band structure of vanadium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav N. Shrivastava

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic band structures of several models of vanadium oxide are calculated. In the models 1-3, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 4 vanadium atoms. In model 1, a=b=c 2.3574 Å; in model 2, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 2.3574 Å; and in model 3, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 4.7148 Å. In the models 4-6, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 2 vanadium atoms. In model 4, a=b= 4.551 Å and c= 2.851 Å; in model 5, a=b=c= 3.468 Å; and in model 6, a=b=c= 3.171 Å. We have searched for a crossing point in the band structure of all the models. In model 1 there is a point at which five bands appear to meet but the gap is 7.3 meV. In model 2 there is a crossing point between G and F points and there is a point between F and Q with the gap ≈ 3.6608 meV. In model 3, the gap is very small, ~ 10-5 eV. In model 4, the gap is 5.25 meV. In model 5, the gap between Z and G points is 2.035 meV, and in model 6 the gap at Z point is 4.3175 meV. The crossing point in model 2 looks like one line is bent so that the supersymmetry is broken. When pseudopotentials are replaced by a full band calculation, the crossing point changes into a gap of 2.72 x 10-4 eV.

  17. Structural similarity regularization scheme for multiparameter seismic full waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, M.; Liang, L.; Abubakar, A.; Van den Berg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new regularization scheme for multiparameter seismic full-waveform inversion (FWI). Using this scheme, we can constrain spatial variations of parameters which are having a weak sensitivity with the one that having a good sensitivity to the measurement, assuming that these parameters h

  18. Hybrid density functional theory band structure engineering in hematite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozun, Zachary D; Henkelman, Graeme

    2011-06-14

    We present a hybrid density functional theory (DFT) study of doping effects in α-Fe(2)O(3), hematite. Standard DFT underestimates the band gap by roughly 75% and incorrectly identifies hematite as a Mott-Hubbard insulator. Hybrid DFT accurately predicts the proper structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of hematite and, unlike the DFT+U method, does not contain d-electron specific empirical parameters. We find that using a screened functional that smoothly transitions from 12% exact exchange at short ranges to standard DFT at long range accurately reproduces the experimental band gap and other material properties. We then show that the antiferromagnetic symmetry in the pure α-Fe(2)O(3) crystal is broken by all dopants and that the ligand field theory correctly predicts local magnetic moments on the dopants. We characterize the resulting band gaps for hematite doped by transition metals and the p-block post-transition metals. The specific case of Pd doping is investigated in order to correlate calculated doping energies and optical properties with experimentally observed photocatalytic behavior.

  19. Wakefield Monitor Experiments with X-Band Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Malina, Lukas; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating structures for CLIC must be aligned with a precision of a few um with respect to the beam trajectory in order to mitigate emittance growth due to transverse wake fields. We report on first results from wake field monitor tests in an X-band structure, with a probe beam at the CLIC Test Facility. The monitors are currently installed in the CLIC Two-Beam Module. In order to fully demonstrate the feasibility of using wakefield monitors for CLIC, the precision of the monitors must be verified using a probe beam while simultaneously filling the structure with high power rf used to drive the accelerating mode. We outline plans to perform such a demonstration in the CLIC Test Facility.

  20. Collective Band Structures in Neutron-Rich 108Mo Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Huai-Bo; WANG Jian-Guo; XU Qiang; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; J. H. Hamilton; A. V. Ramayya; J. K. Hwang; Y. X. Luo; J. O. Rasmussen; I. Y. Lee; CHE Xing-Lai

    2007-01-01

    High spin states in the neutron-rich 108Mo nucleus are studied by measuring prompt γ-rays following the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with a Gammasphere detector array. The ground-state band is confirmed, and the one-phonon γ-vibrational band is updated with spin up to 12 h. A new collective band with the band head level at 1422.4 keV is suggested as a two-phonon γ-vibrational band. Another new band is proposed as a two-quasi-proton excitation band. Systematic characteristics of the collective bands are discussed.

  1. Band Structure Asymmetry of Bilayer Graphene Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.Q.; Henriksen, E.A.; Jiang, Z.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Kim, P.; Stormer, H.L.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2008-12-10

    We report on infrared spectroscopy of bilayer graphene integrated in gated structures. We observe a significant asymmetry in the optical conductivity upon electrostatic doping of electrons and holes. We show that this finding arises from a marked asymmetry between the valence and conduction bands, which is mainly due to the inequivalence of the two sublattices within the graphene layer and the next-nearest-neighbor interlayer coupling. From the conductivity data, the energy difference of the two sublattices and the interlayer coupling energy are directly determined.

  2. Electronic band structure of calcium selenide under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louail, L. [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, University of Setif, Setif (Algeria)], E-mail: llouail@yahoo.fr; Haddadi, K.; Maouche, D.; Ali Sahraoui, F.; Hachemi, A. [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, University of Setif, Setif (Algeria)

    2008-09-01

    Energy band structures under pressure of calcium selenide (CaSe) were calculated using the plane-wave pseudopotential code CASTEP. The results show a progressive transition from a direct to an indirect gap semiconductor at a pressure of about 2 GPa, in the B1 phase. An insulator-conductor change was also observed at 70 GPa, in the B2 phase. Concerning CaSe, these two results could not be evidenced in previous literature. Hence, our work is a first attempt in this direction.

  3. Ordered macroporous platinum electrode and enhanced mass transfer in fuel cells using inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Park, Hee-Young; Kim, Minhyoung; Lim, Ju Wan; Chung, Dong Young; Lee, Myeong Jae; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opal structures are attractive materials for various applications in electrochemical devices because of the benefits derived from their periodic structures: relatively large surface areas, large voidage, low tortuosity and interconnected macropores. However, a direct application of an inverse opal structure in membrane electrode assemblies has been considered impractical because of the limitations in fabrication routes including an unsuitable substrate. Here we report the demonstration of a single cell that maintains an inverse opal structure entirely within a membrane electrode assembly. Compared with the conventional catalyst slurry, an ink-based assembly, this modified assembly has a robust and integrated configuration of catalyst layers; therefore, the loss of catalyst particles can be minimized. Furthermore, the inverse-opal-structure electrode maintains an effective porosity, an enhanced performance, as well as an improved mass transfer and more effective water management, owing to its morphological advantages.

  4. Optical Properties of One-dimensional Three-component Photonic Band Gap Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical study of the optical properties of one-dimensional three-component photonic band gap structure, which is composed of three alternating dielectric layers of different refractive indices and thickness in a unit cell, is performed. This one-dimensional photonic band gap structure exhibits the transparency band and forbidden band. We find that there are several mini-bands of the allowed transmission to be created within the photonic band gap region of the structure if a defect designed specially is introduced inside the structure. This characteristic is very important for some practical applications.

  5. Calculation of band structure in (101)-biaxially strained Si

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The structure model used for calculation was defined according to Vegard’s rule and Hooke’s law. Calculations were performed on the electronic structures of(101)-biaxially strained Si on relaxed Si1-X GeX alloy with Ge fraction ranging from X = 0 to 0.4 in steps of 0.1 by CASTEP approach. It was found that [±100] and [00±1] valleys(-4) splitting from the [0±10] valley(-2) constitute the conduction b0and(CB) edge,that valence band(VB) edge degeneracy is partially lifted and that the electron mass is un-altered under strain while the hole mass decreases in the [100] and [010] directions. In addition,the fitted dependences of CB splitting energy,VB splitting energy and indirect bandgap on X are all linear.

  6. Inverse Proximity Effect in Superconductor-ferromagnet Bilayer Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Jing

    2010-04-05

    Measurements of the polar Kerr effect using a zero-area-loop Sagnac magnetometer on Pb/Ni and Al/(Co-Pd) proximity-effect bilayers show unambiguous evidence for the 'inverse proximity effect,' in which the ferromagnet (F) induces a finite magnetization in the superconducting (S) layer. To avoid probing the magnetic effects in the ferromagnet, the superconducting layer was prepared much thicker than the light's optical penetration depth. The sign and size of the effect, as well as its temperature dependence agree with recent predictions by Bergeret et al.[1].

  7. Contribution of 3D inversion of Electrical Resistivity Tomography data applied to volcanic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for geological structures imaging. Such structures can present complex characteristics that conventional 2D inversion processes cannot perfectly integrate. Here we present a new 3D inversion algorithm named EResI, firstly developed for levee investigation, and presently applied to the study of a complex lava dome (the Puy de Dôme volcano, France). EResI algorithm is based on a conventional regularized Gauss-Newton inversion scheme and a 3D non-structured discretization of the model (double grid method based on tetrahedrons). This discretization allows to accurately model the topography of investigated structure (without a mesh deformation procedure) and also permits a precise location of the electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that a complete 3D unstructured discretization limits the number of inversion cells and is better adapted to the resolution capacity of tomography than a structured discretization. This study shows that a 3D inversion with a non-structured parametrization has some advantages compared to classical 2D inversions. The first advantage comes from the fact that a 2D inversion leads to artefacts due to 3D effects (3D topography, 3D internal resistivity). The second advantage comes from the fact that the capacity to experimentally align electrodes along an axis (for 2D surveys) depends on the constrains on the field (topography...). In this case, a 2D assumption induced by 2.5D inversion software prevents its capacity to model electrodes outside this axis leading to artefacts in the inversion result. The last limitation comes from the use of mesh deformation techniques used to accurately model the topography in 2D softwares. This technique used for structured discretization (Res2dinv) is prohibed for strong topography (>60 %) and leads to a small computational errors. A wide geophysical survey was carried out

  8. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125-131Ce nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Bharti; Suram Singh; S K Khosa

    2010-04-01

    The negative parity yrast bands of neutron-deficient 125-131Ce nuclei are studied by using the projected shell model approach. Energy levels, transition energies and (1)/(2) ratios are calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The calculations reproduce the band-head spins of negative parity yrast bands and indicate the multi-quasiparticle structure for these bands.

  9. Towards structural integration of airborne Ku-band SatCom antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Harmen; Verpoorte, Jaco; Hulzinga, Adriaan; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Baggen, Rens

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes research towards a fully structurally integrated Ku-band SatCom antenna. This antenna covers the complete receive band for aeronautical earth stations and DVB-S broadcast in Ku band (10.7 - 12.75 GHz). The antenna front-end consists of 32 tiles where each tile has 8×8 Ku-band

  10. Rigorous Approach in Investigation of Seismic Structure and Source Characteristicsin Northeast Asia: Hierarchical and Trans-dimensional Bayesian Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustac, M.; Kim, S.; Tkalcic, H.; Rhie, J.; Chen, Y.; Ford, S. R.; Sebastian, N.

    2015-12-01

    Conventional approaches to inverse problems suffer from non-linearity and non-uniqueness in estimations of seismic structures and source properties. Estimated results and associated uncertainties are often biased by applied regularizations and additional constraints, which are commonly introduced to solve such problems. Bayesian methods, however, provide statistically meaningful estimations of models and their uncertainties constrained by data information. In addition, hierarchical and trans-dimensional (trans-D) techniques are inherently implemented in the Bayesian framework to account for involved error statistics and model parameterizations, and, in turn, allow more rigorous estimations of the same. Here, we apply Bayesian methods throughout the entire inference process to estimate seismic structures and source properties in Northeast Asia including east China, the Korean peninsula, and the Japanese islands. Ambient noise analysis is first performed to obtain a base three-dimensional (3-D) heterogeneity model using continuous broadband waveforms from more than 300 stations. As for the tomography of surface wave group and phase velocities in the 5-70 s band, we adopt a hierarchical and trans-D Bayesian inversion method using Voronoi partition. The 3-D heterogeneity model is further improved by joint inversions of teleseismic receiver functions and dispersion data using a newly developed high-efficiency Bayesian technique. The obtained model is subsequently used to prepare 3-D structural Green's functions for the source characterization. A hierarchical Bayesian method for point source inversion using regional complete waveform data is applied to selected events from the region. The seismic structure and source characteristics with rigorously estimated uncertainties from the novel Bayesian methods provide enhanced monitoring and discrimination of seismic events in northeast Asia.

  11. Structural Evolution of a Warm Frontal Precipitation Band During GCPEx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Brian A.; Naeger, Aaron; Molthan, Andrew; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A warm frontal precipitation band developed over a few hours 50-100 km to the north of a surface warm front. The 3-km WRF was able to realistically simulate band development, although the model is somewhat too weak. Band genesis was associated with weak frontogenesis (deformation) in the presence of weak potential and conditional instability feeding into the band region, while it was closer to moist neutral within the band. As the band matured, frontogenesis increased, while the stability gradually increased in the banding region. Cloud top generating cells were prevalent, but not in WRF (too stable). The band decayed as the stability increased upstream and the frontogenesis (deformation) with the warm front weakened. The WRF may have been too weak and short-lived with the band because too stable and forcing too weak (some micro issues as well).

  12. A Brief Introduction to Band Structure in Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Iannucci, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Without our ability to model and manipulate the band structure of semiconducting materials, the modern digital computer would be impractically large, hot, and expensive. In the undergraduate QM curriculum, we studied the effect of spatially periodic potentials on the spectrum of a charged particle in one dimension. We would like to understand how to extend these methods to model actual crystalline materials. Along the way, we will explore the construction of periodic potentials in three dimensions, and we use this framework to relate the single-particle Hamiltonian to the potential contribution from each atom. We then construct a crude model system analogous to the semiconductor silicon, and demonstrate the appearance of level splitting and band gaps as the strength of the potential is varied, in accordance with our intuition from the one-dimensional case. We discuss refinements of the model to include many-particle effects, and finally we show how a careful choice of the potential function leads to good agre...

  13. Band Structure for a Lattice with a Single Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, G.; Moshinsky, M.

    1998-03-01

    We study the band structure of a chain of scatterers that in general cannot be described by means of a potential. In order to describe these kind of systems we have followed the ideas of Wigner who stressed though that an interaction should be described by a R matrix. In particular, we have considered an infinite sequence of scatterers, each one described by means of a R matrix with a single resonance. This study is an extension of a recent paper ( M. Moshinsky and G. Monsivais, J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 23), 573-588, (1997) where we have studied the delay time for a single scatterer using a R matrix. We compare our results with those than appear in the description of some superlattices.

  14. A Compact UWB Band-Pass Filter Using Embedded Circular Slot Structures for Improved Upper Stop-band Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Ren, Jian; Mikkelsen, Jan Hvolgaard;

    2016-01-01

    structures into the ring resonator. This is different from conventional designs using cascaded bandstop/low-pass filters for stop-band response suppression, which usually leads to big circuit sizes. And hence the proposed approach can reduce the circuit size significantly. A prototype filter with a compact...... size (13.6 mm×6.75 mm) has been implemented for experimental validation. The measured results show a −3 dB frequency band from 3.4 GHz to 11.7 GHz and > 20 dB upper stop-band suppression from 12.5 GHz to 20GHz....

  15. Band structure engineering strategies of metal oxide semiconductor nanowires and related nanostructures: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyadasa, Adimali; Wang, Sibo; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2017-07-01

    The electronic band structure of a solid state semiconductor determines many of its physical and chemical characteristics such as electrical, optical, physicochemical, and catalytic activity. Alteration or modification of the band structure could lead to significant changes in these physical and chemical characteristics, therefore we introduce new mechanisms of creating novel solid state materials with interesting properties. Over the past three decades, research on band structure engineering has allowed development of various methods to modify the band structure of engineered materials. Compared to bulk counterparts, nanostructures generally exhibit higher band structure modulation capabilities due to the quantum confinement effect, prominent surface effect, and higher strain limit. In this review we will discuss various band structure engineering strategies in semiconductor nanowires and other related nanostructures, mostly focusing on metal oxide systems. Several important strategies of band structure modulation are discussed in detail, such as doping, alloying, straining, interface and core-shell nanostructuring.

  16. Spatial structure of several diffuse interstellar band carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Janez

    2017-07-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) hold a lot of information about the state and the structure of the interstellar medium (ISM). Structure can most directly be observed by extensive spectroscopic surveys, including surveys of stars where DIBs are especially important, as they are conveniently found in all observed bands. Large surveys lack the quality of spectra to detect weak DIBs, so many spectra from small regions on the sky have to be combined before a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is achieved. However, the clumpiness of the DIB clouds is unknown, which poses a problem, as the measured properties can end up being averaged over a too large area. We use a technique called Gaussian processes to accurately measure profiles of interstellar absorption lines in 145 high SNR and high-resolution spectra of hot stars. Together with Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, we also get reliable estimates of the uncertainties. We derive scales at which column densities of 18 DIBs, CH, CH+, Ca I and Ca II show some spatial correlation. This correlation scale is associated with the size of the ISM clouds. Scales expressed as the angle on the sky vary significantly from DIB to DIB between ∼0.23° for the DIB at 5512 Å and 3.5° for the DIB at 6196 Å, suggesting that different DIB carriers have different clumpiness but occupy the same general space. Our study includes lines of sight all over the northern Milky Way, as well as out of the Galactic plane, covering regions with different physical conditions. The derived correlation scales therefore represent a general image of the Galactic ISM on the scales of ∼5-100 pc.

  17. Band structure systematics and symmetries in even-even nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, Gh.; Ivascu, M.; Ur, C. A.

    1993-07-01

    It is shown that the experimental in-band energy ratios for the even-even nuclei obey universal systematics similar to those observed by Mallmann for the quasiground band. Systematic correlations between energy ratios belonging to different bands are also found in certain cases. Finally, correlations between mixed energy ratios are shown to be useful in characterizing the evolution of the nulcear collectivity.

  18. Band inversion amplifies (31) P-(31) P nuclear overhauser effects: Relaxation mechanism and dynamic behavior of ATP in the human brain by (31) P MRS at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2017-04-01

    To develop an improved method to measure the (31) P nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) for evaluation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) dynamics in terms of correlation time (τc ), and contribution of dipole-dipole (DD) and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) mechanisms to T1 relaxation of ATP in human brain. The NOE of ATP in human brain was evaluated by monitoring changes in magnetization in the β-ATP signal following a band inversion of all downfield (31) P resonances. The magnetization changes observed were analyzed using the Bloch-McConnell-Solomon formulation to evaluate the relaxation and motion dynamic parameters that describe interactions of ATP with cellular solids in human brain tissue. The maximal transient NOE, observed as a reduction in the β-ATP signal, was 24 ± 2% upon band inversion of γ- and α-ATP, which is 2-3-fold higher than achievable by frequency-selective inversion of either γ- or α-ATP. The rate of (31) P-(31) P cross relaxation (0.21 ± 0.02 s(-1) ) led to a τc value of (9.1 ± 0.8) × 10(-8) s for ATP in human brain. The T1 relaxation of β-ATP is dominated by CSA over the DD mechanism (60%: 40%). The band inversion method proved effective in amplifying (31) P NOE, and thus facilitating ATP τc and relaxation measurements. This technique renders ATP a potentially useful reporter molecule for cellular environments. Magn Reson Med 77:1409-1418, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. A Banding Structure in a Ni-Cu-Si Cast Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi ZHENG; Yufeng ZHENG; Hongyu ZHANG; Xiaofeng SUN; Hengrong GUAN; Zhuangqi HU

    2008-01-01

    The solidified microstructure of a Ni-Cu-Si cast alloy has been investigated, and a kind of banding structure was observed. The results showed that, the banding structure was composed of coarser particles which were Ni3Si type of precipitates and similar to the fine particles precipitate uniformly distributed within matrix of Ni solid solution, in both crystal structure and composition. The formation of bandings was resulted from cast thermal stress and dislocation walls. It was found that the cracks propagated along these bandings in tensile test. The banding structure can be depressed by reducing the cast thermal stress, which can improve the Qtensile ductility.

  20. Enlargement of Photonic Band Gaps and Physical Picture of Photonic Band Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; SHI Jun-Jie

    2006-01-01

    @@ Light propagation in a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC), consisting of alternative slabs with refractive indices (layer thicknesses) n1 (a) and n2 (b), is investigated. An important optimal parameter matching condition,n1a ≈ n2b, is obtained for the largest photonic band gap (PBG). Moreover, we find that the exact analytical solutions for the electric/magnetic field eigenmodes at the band edges are standing waves with odd or even symmetry about the centre of each layer. The electric/magnetic field eigenfunctions at the top and bottom of the nth band have n and n - 1 nodes in one period of PC, respectively. The PBG arises from the symmetric differences of the field eigenfunctions at the band edges.

  1. Electronic structure of graphene: (Nearly) free electron bands versus tight-binding bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, E.; Silkin, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    In our previous paper (Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 89}, 165430 (2014)) we have found that in graphene, in distinction to the four occupied bands, which can be described by the simple tight-binding model (TBM) with four atomic orbitals per atom, the two lowest lying at the $\\Gamma$-point unoccupied bands (one of them of a $\\sigma$ type and the other of a $\\pi$ type) can not be described by such model. In the present work we suggest a minimalistic model for these two bands, based on (nearly) free electrons model (FEM), which correctly describes the symmetry of these bands, their dispersion law and their localization with respect to the graphene plane.

  2. Effects of extrinsic and intrinsic perturbations on the electronic structure of graphene: Retaining an effective primitive cell band structure by band unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Paulo V. C.; Stafström, Sven; Björk, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    We use a band unfolding technique to recover an effective primitive cell picture of the band structure of graphene under the influence of different types of perturbations. This involves intrinsic perturbations, such as structural defects, and external ones, comprising nitrogen substitutions and the inclusion of graphene in adsorbed systems. In such cases, the band unfolding provides a reliable and efficient tool for quantitatively analyzing the effect of doping and defects on the electronic structure of graphene. We envision that this approach will become a standard method in the computational analysis of graphene's electronic structure in related systems.

  3. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  4. DeHaas-vanAlphen Effect and LMTO Band-structure of LaSn3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulet, R. M.; Jan, J. -P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Results of de Haas-van Alphen experiments in the intermetallic compound LaSn3 can be explained by a linear muffin-tin orbital band structure calculation without involving the f bands of lanthanum.......Results of de Haas-van Alphen experiments in the intermetallic compound LaSn3 can be explained by a linear muffin-tin orbital band structure calculation without involving the f bands of lanthanum....

  5. Structural mechanisms of formation of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sokovikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of plastic deformation instability and localization in materials subjected to dynamic loading and high-velocity perforation. We investigate the behavior of samples dynamically loaded during Hopkinson-Kolsky pressure bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions. Experiments were carried out using samples of a special shape and appropriate test rigging, which allowed us to realize a plane strain state. Also, the shear-compression specimens proposed in were investigated. The lateral surface of the samples was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. Use of a transmission electron microscope for studying the surface of samples showed that in the regions of strain localization there are parts taking the shape of bands and honeycomb structure in the deformed layer. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was investigated using a high-speed infra-red camera. A specially designed ballistic set-up for studying perforation was used to test samples in different impulse loading regimes followed by plastic flow instability and plug ejection. Changes in the velocity of the rear surface at different time of plug ejection were analyzed by Doppler interferometry techniques. The microstructure of tested samples was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The subsequent processing of 3D deformation relief data enabled estimation of the distribution of plastic strain gradients at different time of plug formation and ejection. It has been found that in strain localization areas the subgrains are elongated taking the shape of bands and undergo fragmentation leading to the formation of super-microcrystalline structure, in which the

  6. Tomographic inversion of prismatic reflections for the delineation of steeply dipping structures; Inversion tomographique des reflexions prismatiques en vue de la delineation des structures tres pentees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalca, M.

    2005-11-15

    Seismic imaging of salt flanks still remains a challenge for oil exploration. We propose here to exploit the kinematic information contained in prismatic reflections for the delineation of steeply dipping structures, such as faults or overhangs of salt bodies. This double reflection (on a steeply dipping structure and on a sedimentary interface) contains in fact precious information on the geometry of such structures, information that we try to exploit in travel-time tomography. We first carry out a precise kinematic analysis of these unusual reflections, to better understand under which conditions prismatic reflections can be observed in surface data; and we propose some interpretative guidelines, of great help for identifying such reflections in seismic data. We then study the tomographic inversion of prismatic reflections. Our first attempts at inverting prismatic reflections by standard travel-time tomography reveal a major difficulty due to the possible non definition of the standard forward map. We thus propose a new formulation of travel-time tomography which ensures the definition of the forward map and therefore a robust inversion of prismatic reflections. This approach shows its efficiency for delineating steeply dipping (and/or overhanging) structures on different synthetic experiments. We finally illustrate the benefit of jointly using the information contained in prismatic reflections and in primary events for the velocity model building (simultaneous determination of velocities and interface geometries), through the joint inversion of events interpreted and picked on a realistic synthetic dataset (BP-AIT 2004). (author)

  7. Pattern reconfigurable antenna using electromagnetic band gap structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M. F.; Rahim, M. K. A.; Majid, H. A.; Hamid, M. R.; Yusoff, M. F. M.; Dewan, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a single rectangular patch antenna incorporated with an array of electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures is proposed. The proposed antenna features radiation pattern agility by means of connecting the shorting pin vias to the EBG unit cells. The proposed design consists of 32 mm × 35.5 mm rectangular patch antenna and 10.4-mm-square mushroom-like EBG unit cells. The EBGs are placed at both sides of the antenna radiating patch and located on the thicker substrate of thickness, h. The copper tape which represents the PIN diode is used to control the connection between the EBG's via and the ground plane as reconfigurable mechanism of the antenna. The simulated result shows by switching the ON and OFF EBG structures in either sides or both, the directional radiation pattern can be tilted from 0 to +14°. The proposed antenna exhibits 7.2 dB realized gain at 2.42 GHz. The parametric study on EBG and antenna is also discussed.

  8. A cellular automata-based deterministic inversion algorithm for the characterization of linear structural heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, P.; Jardani, A.; Lecoq, N.

    2017-03-01

    Inverse problem permits to map the subsurface properties from a few observed data. The inverse problem can be physically constrained by a priori information on the property distribution in order to limit the nonuniqueness of the solution. The geostatistical information is often chosen as a priori information; however, when the field properties present a spatial locally distributed high variability, the geostatistical approach becomes inefficient. Therefore, we propose a new method adapted for fields presenting linear structures (such as a fractured field). The Cellular Automata-based Deterministic Inversion (CADI) method is, as far as we know when this paper is produced, the first inversion method which permits a deterministic inversion based on a Bayesian approach and using a dynamic optimization to generate different linear structures iteratively. The model is partitioned in cellular automaton subspaces, each one controlling a different zone of the model. A cellular automata subspace structures the properties of the model in two units ("structure" and "background") and control their dispensing direction and their values. The partitioning of the model in subspaces permits to monitor a large-scale structural model with only a few pilot-parameters and to generate linear structures with local direction changes. Thereby, the algorithm can easily handle with large-scale structures, and a sensitivity analysis is possible on these structural pilot-parameters, which permits to considerably accelerate the optimization process in order to find the best structural geometry. The algorithm has been successfully tested on simple, to more complex, theoretical models with different inversion techniques by using seismic and hydraulic data.

  9. Inverse Finite Element Method Investigation for Adaptive Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research project is evaluating an innovative technique that uses fiber optic strain sensors to measure structural deformations and full field strains. An...

  10. Projected shell model study of band structure of 90Nb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Dhanvir; Gupta, Anuradha; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study of two-quasiparticle bands of the odd-odd 90Nb nucleus is performed using the projected shell model approach. Yrast band with some other bands have been obtained and back-bending in moment of inertia has also been calculated and compared with the available experimental. On comparing the available experimental data, it is found that the treatment with PSM provides a satisfactory explanation of the available data.

  11. Design of an X-band accelerating structure using a newly developed structural optimization procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2017-05-01

    An X-band high gradient accelerating structure is a challenging technology for implementation in advanced electron linear accelerator facilities. The present work discusses the design of an X-band accelerating structure for dedicated application to a compact hard X-ray free electron laser facility at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, and numerous design optimizations are conducted with consideration for radio frequency (RF) breakdown, RF efficiency, short-range wakefields, and dipole/quadrupole field modes, to ensure good beam quality and a high accelerating gradient. The designed X-band accelerating structure is a constant gradient structure with a 4π/5 operating mode and input and output dual-feed couplers in a racetrack shape. The design process employs a newly developed effective optimization procedure for optimization of the X-band accelerating structure. In addition, the specific design of couplers providing high beam quality by eliminating dipole field components and reducing quadrupole field components is discussed in detail.

  12. Monte Carlo waveform inversion and deep continental structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijzert, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of the three dimensional structure of the earth is limited by the uneven distribution of earthquake sources and seismic stations. The distribution of the earthquakes is fixed as most earthquakes occur along the plate boundaries. The use of artificial sources can improve the distribution of

  13. Normal Orthodox Semigroups with Inverse Transversals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUFeng-lin

    2003-01-01

    A normal orthodox semigroup is an orthodox semigroup whose idempotent elements form a normal band.We deal with congruces on a normal orthodox semigroup with an iverse transversal .A structure theorem for such semigroup is obtained.Munn(1966)gave a fundamental inverse semigroup Following Munn's idea ,we give a fundamental normal orthodox semigroup with an inverse transversal.

  14. Analysis of the linear approximation of seismic inversions for various structural pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Buldgen, G; Dupret, M A

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to space-based photometry missions CoRoT and Kepler, we benefit from a wealth of seismic data for stars other than the sun. In the future, K2, Tess, and Plato will complement this data and provide observations in addition to those already at hand. The availability of this data leads to questions on how it is feasible to extend linear structural inversion techniques to stars other than the sun. Linked to this problem is the question of the validity of the linear assumption. In this study, we analyse its limitations with respect to changes of structural variables.We wish to provide a more extended theoretical background to structural linear inversions by doing a study of the validity of the linear assumption for various structural variables. First, we recall the origins of the linear assumption for structural stellar inversions and explain its importance for asteroseismic studies. We recall the impact of unknown structural quantities such as the mass and the radius of the star on structural inversion res...

  15. A unified perspective of complex band structure: interpretations, formulations, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Matthew G.

    2017-02-01

    Complex band structure generalizes conventional band structure by also considering wavevectors with complex components. In this way, complex band structure describes both the bulk-propagating states from conventional band structure and the evanescent states that grow or decay from one unit cell to the next. Even though these latter states are excluded by translational symmetry, they become important when translational symmetry is broken via, for example, a surface or impurity. Many studies over the last 80 years have directly or indirectly developed complex band structure for an impressive range of applications, but very few discuss its fundamentals or compare its various results. In this work we build upon these previous efforts to expose the physical foundation of complex band structure, which mathematically implies its existence. We find that a material’s static and dynamic electronic structure are both completely described by complex band structure. Furthermore, we show that complex band structure reflects the minimal, intrinsic information contained in the material’s Hamiltonian. These realizations then provide a context for comparing and unifying the different formulations and applications of complex band structure that have been reported over the years. Ultimately, this discussion introduces the idea of examining the amount of information contained in a material’s Hamiltonian so that we can find and exploit the minimal information necessary for understanding a material’s properties.

  16. Band Structure and Fermi-Surface Properties of Ordered beta-Brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Christensen, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    The band structure of ordered β-brass (β′-CuZn) has been calculated throughout the Brillouin zone by the augmented-plane-wave method. The present band model differs from previous calculations with respect to the position and width of the Cu 3d band. The derived dielectric function ε2(ω) and the p...

  17. Inversion of thicknesses of multi-layered structures from eddy current testing measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄平捷; 吴昭同

    2004-01-01

    Luquire et al. ' s impedance change model of a rectangular cross section probe coil above a structure with an arbitrary number of parallel layers was used to study the principle of measuring thicknesses of multi-layered structures in terms of eddy current testing voltage measurements. An experimental system for multi-layered thickness measurement was developed and several fitting models to formulate the relationships between detected impedance/voltage measurements and thickness are put forward using least square method. The determination of multi-layered thicknesses was investigated after inversing the voltage outputs of the detecting system. The best fitting and inversion models are presented.

  18. Inversion of thicknesses of multi-layered structures from eddy current testing measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ping-jie(黄平捷); WU Zhao-tong(吴昭同)

    2004-01-01

    Luquire et al.'s impedance change model of a rectangular cross section probe coil above a structure with an arbitrary number of parallel layers was used to study the principle of measuring thicknesses of multi-layered structures in terms of eddy current testing voltage measurements. An experimental system for multi-layered thickness measurement was developed and several fitting models to formulate the relationships between detected impedance/voltage measurements and thickness are put forward using least square method. The determination of multi-layered thicknesses was investigated after inversing the voltage outputs of the detecting system. The best fitting and inversion models are presented.

  19. True photonic band-gap mode-control in VCSEL structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, F.; Madsen, M.; Birkedal, Dan;

    2003-01-01

    Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect....

  20. Self-consistent treatment of v-groove quantum wire band structure in no parabolic approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crnjanski Jasna V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-consistent no parabolic calculation of a V-groove-quantum-wire (VQWR band structure is presented. A comparison with the parabolic flat-band model of VQWR shows that both, the self-consistency and the nonparabolicity shift sub band edges, in some cases even in the opposite directions. These shifts indicate that for an accurate description of inter sub band absorption, both effects have to be taken into the account.

  1. Secondary Structure Predictions for Long RNA Sequences Based on Inversion Excursions and MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehdego, Daniel T; Zhang, Boyu; Kodimala, Vikram K R; Johnson, Kyle L; Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2013-05-01

    Secondary structures of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Experimental observations and computing limitations suggest that we can approach the secondary structure prediction problem for long RNA sequences by segmenting them into shorter chunks, predicting the secondary structures of each chunk individually using existing prediction programs, and then assembling the results to give the structure of the original sequence. The selection of cutting points is a crucial component of the segmenting step. Noting that stem-loops and pseudoknots always contain an inversion, i.e., a stretch of nucleotides followed closely by its inverse complementary sequence, we developed two cutting methods for segmenting long RNA sequences based on inversion excursions: the centered and optimized method. Each step of searching for inversions, chunking, and predictions can be performed in parallel. In this paper we use a MapReduce framework, i.e., Hadoop, to extensively explore meaningful inversion stem lengths and gap sizes for the segmentation and identify correlations between chunking methods and prediction accuracy. We show that for a set of long RNA sequences in the RFAM database, whose secondary structures are known to contain pseudoknots, our approach predicts secondary structures more accurately than methods that do not segment the sequence, when the latter predictions are possible computationally. We also show that, as sequences exceed certain lengths, some programs cannot computationally predict pseudoknots while our chunking methods can. Overall, our predicted structures still retain the accuracy level of the original prediction programs when compared with known experimental secondary structure.

  2. Valence band energy spectrum of HgTe quantum wells with an inverted band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, G. M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Rut, O. E.; Sherstobitov, A. A.; Germanenko, A. V.; Dvoretski, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.

    2017-07-01

    The energy spectrum of the valence band in HgTe /CdxHg1 -xTe quantum wells of a width (8 -20 ) nm has been studied experimentally by magnetotransport effects and theoretically in the framework of a four-band k P method. Comparison of the Hall density with the density found from a period of the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations clearly shows that the degeneracy of states of the top of the valence band is equal to 2 at the hole density p top of the valence band consists of four spin-degenerate extremes located at k ≠0 (valleys) which gives the total degeneracy K =8 . It is shown that taking into account the "mixing of states" at the interfaces leads to the removal of the spin degeneracy that reduces the degeneracy to K =4 . Accounting for any additional asymmetry, for example, due to the difference in the mixing parameters at the interfaces, the different broadening of the boundaries of the well, etc., leads to reduction of the valleys degeneracy, making K =2 . It is noteworthy that for our case twofold degeneracy occurs due to degeneracy of two single-spin valleys. The hole effective mass (mh) determined from analysis of the temperature dependence of the amplitude of the SdH oscillations shows that mh is equal to (0.25 ±0.02 ) m0 and weakly increases with the hole density. Such a value of mh and its dependence on the hole density are in a good agreement with the calculated effective mass.

  3. Microscopic Structure of the Superdeformed Rotational Band in (132) Ce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, K.; Sugawara-Tanabe, K.

    1990-06-01

    The self-consistent cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation with the monopole- and quadrupole-pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole interactions, predicts that the superdeformed band in (132) Ce becomes yrast for spins I >= 32. The result indicates that many dissociated nucleon pairs contribute to the ``rigidification'' of the superdeformed system, in contrast to the s-band in which the decoupling of nucleon pairs occurs only in specific high-j orbitals.

  4. Quasi-3D Waveform Inversion for Velocity Structures and Source Process Analyses Using its Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikima, K.; Koketsu, K.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we propose an efficient waveform inversion method for 2-D velocity structures and 3-D velocity structures are constructed by interpolating the results of the 2-D inversions. We apply these methods to a source process study of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake. We will first construct a velocity model, then determine the source processes of this earthquake sequence using the Green's function calculated with the resultant 3-D velocity model. We formulate the inversion procedure in a 2-D cross section. In a 2-D problem, an earthquake is forced to be a line source. Therefore, we introduce approximate transformation from a line source to a point source (Vidale and Helmberger, 1987). We use the 2-D velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference scheme, so that the source representation is somewhat different from the original 'source box method' and we apply additional corrections to calculated waveforms. The boundary shapes of layers are expressed by connected nodes and we invert observed waveforms for layer thicknesses at the nodes. We perform 2-D velocity inversions along cross sections which involve a medium-size earthquake and observation points. We assemble the results for many stations and interpolated them to construct the 3-D velocity model. Finally, we calculate waveforms from the target earthquake by the 3-D finite difference method with this velocity model to confirm the validity of the model. We next perform waveform inversions for source processes of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake sequence using the resultant 3-D velocity model. We divide the fault plane into northern and southern subplanes, so that the southern subplane includes the hypocenter of the mainshock and the largest foreshock. The strike directions of the northern and southern subplanes were N-S and NE-SW, respectively. The Green's functions for these source inversions are calculated using the reciprocal theorem. We determine the slip models using the 3- D structure and

  5. Bayesian statistical modeling of spatially correlated error structure in atmospheric tracer inverse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mukherjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse modeling applications in atmospheric chemistry are increasingly addressing the challenging statistical issues of data synthesis by adopting refined statistical analysis methods. This paper advances this line of research by addressing several central questions in inverse modeling, focusing specifically on Bayesian statistical computation. Motivated by problems of refining bottom-up estimates of source/sink fluxes of trace gas and aerosols based on increasingly high-resolution satellite retrievals of atmospheric chemical concentrations, we address head-on the need for integrating formal spatial statistical methods of residual error structure in global scale inversion models. We do this using analytically and computationally tractable spatial statistical models, know as conditional autoregressive spatial models, as components of a global inversion framework. We develop Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to explore and fit these spatial structures in an overall statistical framework that simultaneously estimates source fluxes. Additional aspects of the study extend the statistical framework to utilize priors in a more physically realistic manner, and to formally address and deal with missing data in satellite retrievals. We demonstrate the analysis in the context of inferring carbon monoxide (CO sources constrained by satellite retrievals of column CO from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT instrument on the TERRA satellite, paying special attention to evaluating performance of the inverse approach using various statistical diagnostic metrics. This is developed using synthetic data generated to resemble MOPITT data to define a~proof-of-concept and model assessment, and then in analysis of real MOPITT data.

  6. Benchmarking inverse statistical approaches for protein structure and design with exactly solvable models

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquin, Hugo; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    Inverse statistical approaches to determine protein structure and function from Multiple Sequence Alignments (MSA) are emerging as powerful tools in computational biology. However the underlying assumptions of the relationship between the inferred effective Potts Hamiltonian and real protein structure and energetics remain untested so far. Here we use lattice protein model (LP) to benchmark those inverse statistical approaches. We build MSA of highly stable sequences in target LP structures, and infer the effective pairwise Potts Hamiltonians from those MSA. We find that inferred Potts Hamiltonians reproduce many important aspects of 'true' LP structures and energetics. Careful analysis reveals that effective pairwise couplings in inferred Potts Hamiltonians depend not only on the energetics of the native structure but also on competing folds; in particular, the coupling values reflect both positive design (stabilization of native conformation) and negative design (destabilization of competing folds). In addi...

  7. First Principles Study of Band Structure and Band Gap Engineering in Graphene for Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-20

    successfully to realise the full applications of graphene? What is the current status of the graphene based devices or Electronics ? How the graphene...gap value has increased to 1.5eV. It is reflected in the density of states (Fig.20c). The nitrogen atoms are at a distance of 5Ȧ. And there is a...completely modified.The calculation of surface doping of graphene with S is repeated with 96 atom simulation cell. The band gap value is 0.7 eV. The value of

  8. Electronic Structure of the Kitaev Material α-RuCl3 Probed by Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Choong Hyun; Kim, Beom Hyun; Lee, Kyung Dong; Won, Choong Jae; Oh, Ji Seop; Han, Moonsup; Chang, Young Jun; Hur, Namjung; Sato, Hitoshi; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Changyoung; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-12-21

    Recently, α-RuCl3 has attracted much attention as a possible material to realize the honeycomb Kitaev model of a quantum-spin-liquid state. Although the magnetic properties of α-RuCl3 have been extensively studied, its electronic structure, which is strongly related to its Kitaev physics, is poorly understood. Here, the electronic structure of α-RuCl3 was investigated by photoemission (PE) and inverse-photoemission (IPE) spectroscopies. The band gap was directly measured from the PE and IPE spectra and was found to be 1.9 eV, much larger than previously estimated values. Local density approximation (LDA) calculations showed that the on-site Coulomb interaction U could open the band gap without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, the SOC should also be incorporated to reproduce the proper gap size, indicating that the interplay between U and SOC plays an essential role. Several features of the PE and IPE spectra could not be explained by the results of LDA calculations. To explain such discrepancies, we performed configuration-interaction calculations for a RuCl6(3-) cluster. The experimental data and calculations demonstrated that the 4d compound α-RuCl3 is a Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator rather than a quasimolecular-orbital insulator. Our study also provides important physical parameters required for verifying the proposed Kitaev physics in α-RuCl3.

  9. Photonic band gap of one-dimensional periodic structure containing dispersive left-handed metamaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanshan Wang; Tian Sang; Fengli Wang; Yonggang Wu; Lingyan Chen

    2008-01-01

    Band structures of one-dimensional(1D)photonic crystals(PCs)containing dispersive left-handed metamaterials are studied theoretically.The results show that the structure possesses a type of photonic band gap originating from total internal reflection(TIR).In contrast to photonic band gaps corresponding to zero average refractive index and zero phase.the TIR gap exhibits sharp angular effect and has no polarization effect.It should also be noted that band structures of transverse electric(TE) and transverse magnetic(TM) mode waves are exactly the same in the PCs we studied.

  10. Theoretical study on the band structure and optical properties of 4H-SiC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng-Shou; Xie Chang-Kun; Pan Hai-Bin; Xu Fa-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the band structure and optical properties of 4H-SiC by using a full potential linearized augmented plane waves (FPLAPW) method. The density of states (DOS) and band structure are presented. The imaginary part of the dielectric function has been obtained directly from the band structure calculation. With band gap correction, the real part of the dielectric function has been derived from the imaginary part by the Kramers-Kronig (KK) dispersion relationship. The values of reflectivity for normal incidence as a function of photon energy have also been calculated.We found the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Analysis of the linear approximation of seismic inversions for various structural pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldgen, G.; Reese, D. R.; Dupret, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Thanks to the space-based photometry missions CoRoT and Kepler, we now benefit from a wealth of seismic data for stars other than the sun. In the future, K2, Tess, and Plato will complement this data and provide observations in addition to those already at hand. The availability of this data leads to questions on how it is feasible to extend kernel-based, linear structural inversion techniques to stars other than the sun. Linked to the inversion problem is the question of the validity of the linear assumption. In this study, we analyse the limitations of this assumption with respect to changes of structural variables. Aims: We wish to provide a more extended theoretical background to structural linear inversions by doing a study of the validity of the linear assumption for various structural variables. We thus point towards limitations in inversion techniques in the asteroseismic and helioseismic cases. Methods: First, we recall the origins of the linear assumption for structural stellar inversions and explain its importance for asteroseismic studies. We also briefly recall the impact of unknown structural quantities such as the mass and the radius of the star on structural inversion results. We then explain how kernels for new structural variables can be derived using two methods, one suited to asteroseismic targets, the other to helioseismic targets. For this second method, we present a new structural pair, namely the (A,Y) structural kernels. The kernels are then tested in various numerical experiments that enable us to evaluate the weaknesses of different structural pairs and the domains of validity of their respective linear regime. Results: The numerical tests we carry out allow us to disentangle the impact of various uncertainties in stellar models on the verification of the linear integral relations. We show the importance of metallicity, the impact of the equation of state, extra-mixing, and inaccuracies in the microphysics on the verification of

  12. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Themagnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-ra

  13. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.G.; Byelov, D.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-r

  14. Bayesian inversion of free oscillations for Earth's radial (an)elastic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R. W L; Käufl, P.J.; Valentine, A. P.; Trampert, J.

    2014-01-01

    We perform a Bayesian inversion of degree-zero spheroidal mode splitting function measurements for radial (1-D) Earth structure, in terms of the Voigt averages of P-wave (VP) and S-wave (VS) velocities, density, bulk and shear attenuation, using neural networks. The method is flexible and allows us

  15. Source Identification in Structural Acoustics with an Inverse Frequency Response Function Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R.

    2002-01-01

    Inverse source identification based on acoustic measurements is essential for the investigation and understanding of sound fields generated by structural vibrations of various devices and machinery. Acoustic pressure measurements performed on a grid in the nearfield of a surface can be used to deter

  16. Inverse load calculation procedure for offshore wind turbines and application to a 5-MW wind turbine support structure: Inverse load calculation procedure for offshore wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahn, T. [Pahn Ingenieure, Am Seegraben 17b 03051 Cottbus Germany; Rolfes, R. [Institut f?r Statik und Dynamik, Leibniz Universit?t Hannover, Appelstra?e 9A 30167 Hannover Germany; Jonkman, J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA

    2017-02-20

    A significant number of wind turbines installed today have reached their designed service life of 20 years, and the number will rise continuously. Most of these turbines promise a more economical performance if they operate for more than 20 years. To assess a continued operation, we have to analyze the load-bearing capacity of the support structure with respect to site-specific conditions. Such an analysis requires the comparison of the loads used for the design of the support structure with the actual loads experienced. This publication presents the application of a so-called inverse load calculation to a 5-MW wind turbine support structure. The inverse load calculation determines external loads derived from a mechanical description of the support structure and from measured structural responses. Using numerical simulations with the software fast, we investigated the influence of wind-turbine-specific effects such as the wind turbine control or the dynamic interaction between the loads and the support structure to the presented inverse load calculation procedure. fast is used to study the inverse calculation of simultaneously acting wind and wave loads, which has not been carried out until now. Furthermore, the application of the inverse load calculation procedure to a real 5-MW wind turbine support structure is demonstrated. In terms of this practical application, setting up the mechanical system for the support structure using measurement data is discussed. The paper presents results for defined load cases and assesses the accuracy of the inversely derived dynamic loads for both the simulations and the practical application.

  17. Design and analysis of defected ground structure transformer for dual-band antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Wa Choi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel dual-band antenna design methodology utilising a dual-frequency impedance transformer with defected ground structure (DGS. The proposed dual-frequency DGS impedance transformer generates a second resonant frequency from a conventional single-band antenna, resulting dual-band operation. Simulation studies illustrate that the adopted design achieves versatile configurations for arbitrary operating frequencies and diverse input impedance ranges in planar antenna structures. To experimentally verify the proposed design methodology, a dual-frequency DGS impedance transformer was implemented for a 2.4 GHz monopole antenna to obtain a 900/2400 MHz dual-band antenna. Measurement shows that the 10 dB return loss bandwidth in 900 MHz band is 34.4 MHz, whereas that in 2400 MHz band is wider than 530 MHz. Typical monopole radiation patterns are observed at both operating bands.

  18. Structure of dipole bands in doubly odd 102Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, V.; Sihotra, S.; Malik, S. S.; Bhat, G. H.; Palit, R.; Sheikh, J. A.; Kumar, S.; Singh, N.; Singh, K.; Goswamy, J.; Sethi, J.; Saha, S.; Trivedi, T.; Mehta, D.

    2016-10-01

    Excited states in the transitional doubly odd 102Ag nucleus were populated in the 75As(31P,p 3 n ) fusion-evaporation reaction using the 125 MeV incident 31P beam. The subsequent deexcitations were investigated through in-beam γ -ray spectroscopic techniques using the Indian National Gamma Array spectrometer equipped with 21 clover Ge detectors. The level scheme in 102Ag has been established up to excitation energy ˜6.5 MeV and angular momentum 19 ℏ . The earlier reported level scheme is considerably extended and modified to result in a pair of nearly degenerate negative-parity dipole bands. Lifetime measurements for the states of these two dipole bands have been performed by using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The two nearly degenerate bands exhibit different features with regard to kinetic moment of inertia, and the reduced transition probabilities B (M 1 ) and B (E 2 ) , which do not favor these to be chiral partners. These bands are discussed in the framework of the hybrid version of tilted-axis cranking (tac) model calculations and assigned the π g9 /2⊗ν h11 /2 and π g9 /2⊗ν h11 /2(d5/2/g7 /2) 2 configurations. The tac model calculations are extended to the nearly degenerate bands observed in the heavier doubly odd Ag-108104 isotopes.

  19. The band gap variation of a two dimensional binary locally resonant structure in thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Wang, Xian; Li, Yue-ming

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the numerical investigation of thermal effect on band gap dynamical characteristic for a two-dimensional binary structure composed of aluminum plate periodically filled with nitrile rubber cylinder is presented. Initially, the band gap of the binary structure variation trend with increasing temperature is studied by taking the softening effect of thermal stress into account. A breakthrough is made which found the band gap being narrower and shifting to lower frequency in thermal environment. The complete band gap which in higher frequency is more sensitive to temperature that it disappears with temperature increasing. Then some new transformed models are created by changing the height of nitrile rubber cylinder from 1mm to 7mm. Simulations show that transformed model can produce a wider band gap (either flexure or complete band gap). A proper forbidden gap of elastic wave can be utilized in thermal environment although both flexure and complete band gaps become narrower with temperature. Besides that, there is a zero-frequency flat band appearing in the first flexure band, and it becomes broader with temperature increasing. The band gap width decreases trend in thermal environment, as well as the wider band gap induced by the transformed model with higher nitrile rubber cylinder is useful for the design and application of phononic crystal structures in thermal environment.

  20. The band gap variation of a two dimensional binary locally resonant structure in thermal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the numerical investigation of thermal effect on band gap dynamical characteristic for a two-dimensional binary structure composed of aluminum plate periodically filled with nitrile rubber cylinder is presented. Initially, the band gap of the binary structure variation trend with increasing temperature is studied by taking the softening effect of thermal stress into account. A breakthrough is made which found the band gap being narrower and shifting to lower frequency in thermal environment. The complete band gap which in higher frequency is more sensitive to temperature that it disappears with temperature increasing. Then some new transformed models are created by changing the height of nitrile rubber cylinder from 1mm to 7mm. Simulations show that transformed model can produce a wider band gap (either flexure or complete band gap. A proper forbidden gap of elastic wave can be utilized in thermal environment although both flexure and complete band gaps become narrower with temperature. Besides that, there is a zero-frequency flat band appearing in the first flexure band, and it becomes broader with temperature increasing. The band gap width decreases trend in thermal environment, as well as the wider band gap induced by the transformed model with higher nitrile rubber cylinder is useful for the design and application of phononic crystal structures in thermal environment.

  1. Neuro-fuzzy inverse model control structure of robotic manipulators utilized for physiotherapy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Fahmy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new neuro-fuzzy controller for robot manipulators. First, an inductive learning technique is applied to generate the required inverse modeling rules from input/output data recorded in the off-line structure learning phase. Second, a fully differentiable fuzzy neural network is developed to construct the inverse dynamics part of the controller for the online parameter learning phase. Finally, a fuzzy-PID-like incremental controller was employed as Feedback servo controller. The proposed control system was tested using dynamic model of a six-axis industrial robot. The control system showed good results compared to the conventional PID individual joint controller.

  2. Solving the structural inverse gravity problem by the modified gradient methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyshko, P. S.; Akimova, E. N.; Misilov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    New methods for solving the three-dimensional inverse gravity problem in the class of contact surfaces are described. Based on the approach previously suggested by the authors, new algorithms are developed. Application of these algorithms significantly reduces the number of the iterations and computing time compared to the previous ones. The algorithms have been numerically implemented on the multicore processor. The example of solving the structural inverse gravity problem for a model of four-layer medium (with the use of gravity field measurements) is constructed.

  3. Band structures in silicene on monolayer gallium phosphide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Miaojuan; Li, Mingming; Zhang, Changwen; Yuan, Min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ji, Weixiao; Chen, Xinlian

    2016-07-01

    Opening a sizable band gap in the zero-gap silicene is a key issue for its application in nanoelectronics. We design new 2D silicene and GaP heterobilayer (Si/GaP HBL) composed of silicene and monolayer (ML) GaP. Based on first-principles calculations, we find that the interaction energies are in the range of -295.5 to -297.5 meV per unit cell, indicating a weak interaction between silicene and gallium phosphide (GaP) monolayer. The band gap changes ranging from 0.06 to 0.44 eV in hybrid HBLs. An unexpected indirect-direct band gap crossover is also observed in HBLs, dependent on the stacking pattern. These provide a possible way to design effective FETs out of silicene on GaP monolayer.

  4. The spin polarized band structure of strained thin films of gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldfried, C.; Dowben, P.A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Vescovo, E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1998-12-31

    The magnetic properties of strained thin films of gadolinium are characterized by a wave vector and thickness dependence of the exchange splitting. The spin-resolved band structure has been mapped by spin polarized photoemission, and provides considerable insight into the relationship between magnetism of local moment systems, and band structure.

  5. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. I. Calculation of band structure and emission spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede; Feuerbacher, B.

    1974-01-01

    The electronic energy-band structure of tungsten has been calculated by means of the relativistic-augmented-plane-wave method. A series of mutually related potentials are constructed by varying the electronic configuration and the amount of Slater exchange included. The best band structure...

  6. Band structures of TiO2 doped with N, C and B*

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This study on the band structures and charge densities of nitrogen (N)-, carbon (C)- and boron (B)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) by first-principles simulation with the CASTEP code (Segall et al., 2002) showed that the three 2p bands of impurity atom are located above the valence-band maximum and below the Ti 3d bands, and that along with the decreasing of impurity atomic number, the fluctuations become more intensive. We cannot observe obvious band-gap narrowing in our result. Therefore, the...

  7. Comparative studies in method for stratigraphical structure measurement of ice cores: Identification of cloudy bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morimasa Takata; Hitoshi Shoji; Atsushi Miyamoto; Kimiko Shimohara

    2003-01-01

    Cloudy bands are typical stratigraphic structure in deep ice core.Detailed recording of cloudy bands is important for dating of ice core since pair of series cloudy band and clear layer is corresponds to annual layer and it sometimes corresponds to volcanic ash layer.We developed two type scanners, transmitted light method and laser tomograph method for the stratigraphic study.Measurements were carried out for NGRIP deep ice core, which containing many cloudy bands, using the two type scanners and digital camera.We discussed about the possibility of identification of cloudy bands by each method and about advantage and disadvantage of measurements and their results.

  8. Precise integration method without inverse matrix calculation for structural dynamic equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mengfu; F. T. K. Au

    2007-01-01

    The precise integration method proposed for linear time-invariant homogeneous dynamic systems can provide accurate numerical results that approach an exact solution at integration points. However, difficulties arise when the algorithm is used for non-homogeneous dynamic systems due to the inverse matrix calculation required. In this paper, the structural dynamic equalibrium equations are converted into a special form, the inverse matrix calculation is replaced by the Crout decomposition method to solve the dynamic equilibrium equations, and the precise integration method without the inverse matrix calculation is obtained. The new algorithm enhances the present precise integration method by improving both the computational accuracy and efficiency. Two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Structure of the murine constitutive androstane receptor complexed to androstenol: a molecular basis for inverse agonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, L.; Vincent, J.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Dussault, I.; Lin, M.; Ianculescu, I.; Sherman, M.A.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E. (Tennesse)

    2010-03-08

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a 'reverse' paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligand binding pocket, but unlike many nuclear receptor ligands, it makes no contacts with helix H12/AF2. The transition from constitutive to basal activity (androstenol bound) appears to be associated with a ligand-induced kink between helices H10 and H11. This disrupts the previously predicted salt bridge that locks H12 in the transcriptionally active conformation. This mechanism of inverse agonism is distinct from traditional nuclear receptor antagonists thereby offering a new approach to receptor modulation.

  10. Topological phases of a three-dimensional topological insulator with structure inversion asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyong; Wang, Zaijun; Zheng, Qiang; Peng, Jie

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the topological phases of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) without the top-bottom inversion symmetry. We calculate the momentum depended spin Chern number to extract the phase diagram. Various phases are found and we address the dependence of phase boundaries on the strength of inversion asymmetry. Opposite to the quasi-two-dimensional thin film TI, in our 3D system the TI state is stabilized by the structure inversion asymmetry (SIA). With a strong SIA the 3D TI phase can exist even under a large Zeeman field. In a tight-binding form, the surface modes are discussed to confirm with the phase diagram. Particularly we find that the SIA cannot destroy the surface states but open a gap on its spectrum.

  11. Visco-acoustic transmission waveform inversion of velocity structure in space-frequency domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guihua Long; Xiaofan Li; Meigen Zhang; Tong Zhu

    2009-01-01

    According to the least square criterion of minimizing the misfit between modeled and observed data, this paper provides a preconditioned gradient method to invert the visco-acoustic velocity structure on the basis of using sparse matrix LU factorization technique to directly solve the visco-acoustic wave forward problem in space-frequency domain. Numerical results obtained in an inclusion model inversion and a layered homogeneous model inversion demonstrate that different scale media have their own frequency responses, and the strategy of using low-frequency inverted result as the starting model in the high-frequency inversion can greatly reduce the non-uniqueness of their solutions. It can also be observed in the experi-ments that the fast convergence of the algorithm can be achieved by using diagonal elements of Hessian matrix as the pre-conditioned operator, which fully incorporates the advantage of quadratic convergence of Gauss-Newton method.

  12. Seismic source inversion using Green's reciprocity and a 3-D structural model for the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simutė, S.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a feasibility study for seismic source inversions using a 3-D velocity model for the Japanese Islands. The approach involves numerically calculating 3-D Green's tensors, which is made efficient by exploiting Green's reciprocity. The rationale for 3-D seismic source inversion has several aspects. For structurally complex regions, such as the Japan area, it is necessary to account for 3-D Earth heterogeneities to prevent unknown structure polluting source solutions. In addition, earthquake source characterisation can serve as a means to delineate existing faults. Source parameters obtained for more realistic Earth models can then facilitate improvements in seismic tomography and early warning systems, which are particularly important for seismically active areas, such as Japan. We have created a database of numerically computed 3-D Green's reciprocals for a 40°× 40°× 600 km size area around the Japanese Archipelago for >150 broadband stations. For this we used a regional 3-D velocity model, recently obtained from full waveform inversion. The model includes attenuation and radial anisotropy and explains seismic waveform data for periods between 10 - 80 s generally well. The aim is to perform source inversions using the database of 3-D Green's tensors. As preliminary steps, we present initial concepts to address issues that are at the basis of our approach. We first investigate to which extent Green's reciprocity works in a discrete domain. Considering substantial amounts of computed Green's tensors we address storage requirements and file formatting. We discuss the importance of the initial source model, as an intelligent choice can substantially reduce the search volume. Possibilities to perform a Bayesian inversion and ways to move to finite source inversion are also explored.

  13. Benchmarking Inverse Statistical Approaches for Protein Structure and Design with Exactly Solvable Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Jacquin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Inverse statistical approaches to determine protein structure and function from Multiple Sequence Alignments (MSA are emerging as powerful tools in computational biology. However the underlying assumptions of the relationship between the inferred effective Potts Hamiltonian and real protein structure and energetics remain untested so far. Here we use lattice protein model (LP to benchmark those inverse statistical approaches. We build MSA of highly stable sequences in target LP structures, and infer the effective pairwise Potts Hamiltonians from those MSA. We find that inferred Potts Hamiltonians reproduce many important aspects of 'true' LP structures and energetics. Careful analysis reveals that effective pairwise couplings in inferred Potts Hamiltonians depend not only on the energetics of the native structure but also on competing folds; in particular, the coupling values reflect both positive design (stabilization of native conformation and negative design (destabilization of competing folds. In addition to providing detailed structural information, the inferred Potts models used as protein Hamiltonian for design of new sequences are able to generate with high probability completely new sequences with the desired folds, which is not possible using independent-site models. Those are remarkable results as the effective LP Hamiltonians used to generate MSA are not simple pairwise models due to the competition between the folds. Our findings elucidate the reasons for the success of inverse approaches to the modelling of proteins from sequence data, and their limitations.

  14. Effect of acicular ferrite on banded structures in low-carbon microalloyed steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Shi; Ze-sheng Yan; Yong-chang Liu; Xu Yang; Cheng Zhang; Hui-jun Li

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acicular ferrite (AF) on banded structures in low-carbon microalloyed steel with Mn segregation during both iso-thermal transformation and continuous cooling processes was studied by dilatometry and microscopic observation. With respect to the iso-thermal transformation process, the specimen isothermed at 550°C consisted of AF in Mn-poor bands and martensite in Mn-rich bands, whereas the specimen isothermed at 450°C exhibited two different morphologies of AF that appeared as bands. At a continuous cooling rate in the range of 4 to 50°C/s, a mixture of AF and martensite formed in both segregated bands, and the volume fraction of martensite in Mn-rich bands was always higher than that in Mn-poor bands. An increased cooling rate resulted in a decrease in the difference of martensite volume fraction between Mn-rich and Mn-poor bands and thereby leaded to less distinct microstructural banding. The results show that Mn segregation and cooling rate strongly affect the formation of AF-containing banded structures. The formation mechanism of microstructural banding was also discussed.

  15. Collective motions and band structures in A = 60 to 80, even--even nuclei. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.H.; Robinson, R.L.; Ramayya, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence for and the theoretical understanding of the richness of the collective band structures as illustrated by at least seven bands seen in levels of /sup 68/Ge, /sup 74/Se are reviewed. The experimental data on even-even nuclei in the A = 60 to 80 region have now revealed a wide variety of collective bands with different structures. The even parity yrast cascades alone are seen to involve multiple collective structures. In addition to the ground-state bands, strong evidence is presented for both neutron and proton rotation-aligned bands built on the same orbital, (g/sub 9///sub 2/)/sup 2/, in one nucleus. Several other nuclei also show the crossing of RAL bands around the 8/sup +/ level in this region. Evidence continues to be strong experimentally and supported theoretically that there is some type of shape transition and shape coexistence occurring now both in the Ge and Se isotopes around N = 40. Negative parity bands with odd and even spins with very collective nature are seen in several nuclei to high spin. These bands seem best understood in the RAL model. Very collective bands with ..delta..I = 1, extending from 2/sup +/ to 9/sup +/ are seen with no rotation-alignment. The purity of these bands and their persistence to such high spin establish them as an independent collective mode which is best described as a gamma-type vibration band in a deformed nucleus. In addition to all of the above bands, new bands are seen in /sup 76/Kr and /sup 74/Se. The nature of these bands is not presently known. 56 references. (JFP)

  16. Study on relationships of electromagnetic band structures and left/right handed structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chu; CHEN ZhiNing; WANG YunYi; YANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    Two types of dual periodic circuits are introduced. The distributions of passbands and stopbands are generated from their dispersion relationships. Based on the study, Brillouin diagrams of three representative special cases are drawn; S parameters of these three cases are simulated by Aglient ADS; the S parameters of one of the three cases are verified by an experiment. The phase characteristics are compared with those generated from the dispersion relationship. The theoretical analysis and the experimental verification show that both types of the periodic structures can behave as electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures, right-handed structures (RHS), and left-handed structures (LHS), when they operate at different frequency ranges. Thus, the possibility of a physical structure showing these three different characteristics at different frequency ranges is proven.

  17. Band Structure and Optical Properties of Ordered AuCu3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Lengkeek, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    The optical spectra of ordered AuCu3 have been measured at low temperatures by a direct ellipsometric technique. We find several structural elements above the absorption edge as well as in the infrared. The measured spectra are interpreted in terms of the interband absorption calculated from an ab...... initio band structure obtained by the relativistic linear muffin-tin orbitals method. The band calculation reveals that ordered AuCu3 has distinct copper and gold d bands positioned in and hybridizing with an s band common to copper and gold. The calculated state density is found to be in good agreement...

  18. Learning the Inverse Dynamics of Robotic Manipulators in Structured Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-An; Huang, Han-Pang; Hsu, Huan-Kun; Lai, Wei-Zh; Cheng, Chih-Chun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the modeling of inverse dynamics without prior kinematic information for holonomic rigid-body robots. Despite success in compensating robot dynamics and friction, general inverse dynamics models are nontrivial. Rigid-body models are restrictive or inefficient; learning-based models are generalizable yet require large training data. The structured kernels address the dilemma by embedding the robot dynamics in reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The proposed kernels autonomously converge to rigid-body models but require fewer samples; with a semi-parametric framework that incorporates additional parametric basis for friction, the structured kernels can efficiently model general rigid-body robots. We tested the proposed scheme in simulations and experiments; the models that consider the structure of function space are more accurate.

  19. Polymeric Inverse Glasses for Development of Noniridescent Structural Colors in Full Visible Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Ho; Sim, Jae Young; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2016-05-18

    Amorphous colloidal array with short-range order displays noniridescent structural colors due to the isotropic nature of the colloidal arrangement. The low angle dependence renders the colloidal glasses, which is promising for various coloration applications. Nevertheless, the colloidal glasses are difficult to develop red structural color due to strong cavity-like resonance from individual particles in the blue region. To suppress the cavity mode and develop the colors in the full visible range, we prepare inverse glasses composed of amorphous array of air cavities with short-range order. To produce the structures in a simple and reproducible manner, monodisperse silica particles are dispersed in a photocurable resin of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) at a volume fraction of 0.3. The particles spontaneously form the amorphous array with short-range order, which is rapidly captured in polymeric films by photopolymerization of the resin. Selective removal of silica particles from the polymerized resin leaves behind amorphous array of air cavities. The inverse glasses display structural colors with negligible backscattering in blue due to short optical path and low index in each cavity. Therefore, the colors can be tuned in full visible range by simply controlling the cavity size. The photocurable suspensions of silica particles can be patterned by photolithography, which enables the production of freestanding films containing patterned inverse glasses with noniridescent structural colors.

  20. Band structures of TiO2 doped with N, C and B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This study on the band structures and charge densities of nitrogen (N)-, carbon (C)- and boron (B)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) by first-principles simulation with the CASTEP code (Segall et al., 2002) showed that the three 2p bands of impurity atom are located above the valence-band maximum and below the Ti 3d bands, and that along with the decreasing of impurity atomic number, the fluctuations become more intensive. We cannot observe obvious band-gap narrowing in our result.Therefore, the cause of absorption in visible light might be the isolated impurity atom 2p states in band-gap rather than the band-gap narrowing.

  1. Extension and inversion structures in the Tethys-Atlantic linkage zone, Algarve Basin, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Adrià; Fernández, Oscar; Terrinha, Pedro; Muñoz, Josep Anton

    2016-07-01

    The Algarve Basin is a Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary basin overlying Carboniferous basement, located in the southwestern margin of the Iberian Peninsula. Its structure reveals a protracted tectonic history comprising various pulses of Mesozoic extension followed by Cenozoic compression. This work deals with the structure along the northern margin, where the Mesozoic extensional structures and Cenozoic inversion structures crop out. The strike of the extensional structures ranges from E-W to N-S, as controlled by a shift from Tethyan-dominated extension in the east to Atlantic-dominated extension in the west. Contractional structures are inverted extensional structures, following their same trends. It is argued that the thickness of the Hettangian evaporite layer exerts a strong control on the structural style throughout the basin during the extensional and inversion episodes. The basin is affected by thick-skinned deformation along the northern margin, where salt is thin or absent, basement involved fault systems and short-cut structures. Basinward, as the Hettangian salt thickens, the margin is affected by thin-skinned deformation, with listric and down-to-the-basin growth faults, diapirism and salt-cored detachment folds. The aim was to discuss the key tectonic features, the relevance of salt, and understand the nature, timing, and significance of all these structures in the regional tectonic evolution.

  2. Structural results for La Palma island using 3-D gravity inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, A. G.; FernáNdez, J.; GonzáLez, P. J.; Rundle, J. B.; Prieto, J. F.; Arjona, A.

    2009-05-01

    A recent gravity survey composed of 317 bench marks all over the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) is used, in combination with satellite data for regional aspects, to obtain results about structural properties of the island connected with the tectonic environment and local volcanism. To that end, a nonlinear three-dimensional gravity inversion approach is considered. The inversion scheme provides, in a nonsubjective form, the geometry of the anomalous bodies constructed in a random growth process. Results from the inversion can be interpreted in the framework of the geologic evolution of this ocean island volcano as a complex composite volcano with a large central body with high-density corresponding to the older intrusive part of the basalt complex. New unexpected features are enlightened, such as large thermal anomalies in the upper mantle southward of La Palma, as well as fracture en echelon zones associable to a slow active process of dislocation related to the recent volcanism in the southern half of the island. The results obtained for La Palma as a test site testify to the usefulness of the developed gravity inversion methodology for structural studies on islands in general.

  3. High-Pressure Crystal Structure, Lattice Vibrations, and Band Structure of BiSbO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errandonea, Daniel; Muñoz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Hernández, Placida; Gomis, Oscar; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Popescu, Catalin; Patwe, Sadeque J; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2016-05-16

    The high-pressure crystal structure, lattice-vibrations, and electronic band structure of BiSbO4 were studied by ab initio simulations. We also performed Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance measurements, as well as synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. High-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements show that the crystal structure of BiSbO4 remains stable up to at least 70 GPa, unlike other known MTO4-type ternary oxides. These experiments also give information on the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameters. Calculations properly describe the crystal structure of BiSbO4 and the changes induced by pressure on it. They also predict a possible high-pressure phase. A room-temperature pressure-volume equation of state is determined, and the effect of pressure on the coordination polyhedron of Bi and Sb is discussed. Raman- and infrared-active phonons were measured and calculated. In particular, calculations provide assignments for all the vibrational modes as well as their pressure dependence. In addition, the band structure and electronic density of states under pressure were also calculated. The calculations combined with the optical measurements allow us to conclude that BiSbO4 is an indirect-gap semiconductor, with an electronic band gap of 2.9(1) eV. Finally, the isothermal compressibility tensor for BiSbO4 is given at 1.8 GPa. The experimental (theoretical) data revealed that the direction of maximum compressibility is in the (0 1 0) plane at ∼33° (38°) to the c-axis and 47° (42°) to the a-axis. The reliability of the reported results is supported by the consistency between experiments and calculations.

  4. Inversion-symmetric topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Taylor L.; Prodan, Emil; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2011-06-01

    We analyze translationally invariant insulators with inversion symmetry that fall outside the current established classification of topological insulators. These insulators exhibit no edge or surface modes in the energy spectrum and hence they are not edge metals when the Fermi level is in the bulk gap. However, they do exhibit protected modes in the entanglement spectrum localized on the cut between two entangled regions. Their entanglement entropy cannot be made to vanish adiabatically, and hence the insulators can be called topological. There is a direct connection between the inversion eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian band structure and the midgap states in the entanglement spectrum. The classification of protected entanglement levels is given by an integer N, which is the difference between the negative inversion eigenvalues at inversion symmetric points in the Brillouin zone, taken in sets of 2. When the Hamiltonian describes a Chern insulator or a nontrivial time-reversal invariant topological insulator, the entirety of the entanglement spectrum exhibits spectral flow. If the Chern number is zero for the former, or time reversal is broken in the latter, the entanglement spectrum does not have spectral flow, but, depending on the inversion eigenvalues, can still exhibit protected midgap bands similar to impurity bands in normal semiconductors. Although spectral flow is broken (implying the absence of real edge or surface modes in the original Hamiltonian), the midgap entanglement bands cannot be adiabatically removed, and the insulator is “topological.” We analyze the linear response of these insulators and provide proofs and examples of when the inversion eigenvalues determine a nontrivial charge polarization, a quantum Hall effect, an anisotropic three-dimensional (3D) quantum Hall effect, or a magnetoelectric polarization. In one dimension, we establish a link between the product of the inversion eigenvalues of all occupied bands at all inversion

  5. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, C. A.; O'Brien, W. A.; Penninger, M. W.; Schneider, W. F.; Gillett-Kunnath, M.; Zajicek, J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge1-xCx (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge0.998C0.002 shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge0.998C0.002 using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III-V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  6. Ultra-broad band and dual-band highly efficient polarization conversion based on the three-layered chiral structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai-kai; Xiao, Zhong-yin; Tang, Jing-yao; Liu, De-jun; Wang, Zi-hua

    2016-07-01

    In the paper, a novel three-layered chiral structure is proposed and investigated, which consists of a split-ring resonator sandwiched between two layers of sub-wavelength gratings. This designed structure can achieve simultaneously asymmetric transmission with an extremely broad bandwidth and high amplitude as well as multi-band 90° polarization rotator with very low dispersion. Numerical simulations adopted two kinds of softwares with different algorithms demonstrate that asymmetric parameter can reach a maximum of 0.99 and over than 0.8 from 4.6 to 16.8 GHz, which exhibit magnitude and bandwidth improvement over previous chiral metamaterials in microwave bands (S, C, X and Ku bands). Specifically, the reason of high amplitude is analyzed in detail based on the Fabry-perot like resonance. Subsequently, the highly efficient polarization conversion with very low dispersion between two orthogonal linearly polarized waves is also analyzed by the optical activity and ellipticity. Finally, the electric fields are also investigated and further demonstrate the correctness of the simulated and calculated results.

  7. Energy band structure tailoring of vertically aligned InAs/GaAsSb quantum dot structure for intermediate-band solar cell application by thermal annealing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chu, Ting-Fu; Huang, Tien-Hao

    2014-12-15

    This study presents an band-alignment tailoring of a vertically aligned InAs/GaAs(Sb) quantum dot (QD) structure and the extension of the carrier lifetime therein by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Arrhenius analysis indicates a larger activation energy and thermal stability that results from the suppression of In-Ga intermixing and preservation of the QD heterostructure in an annealed vertically aligned InAs/GaAsSb QD structure. Power-dependent and time-resolved photoluminescence were utilized to demonstrate the extended carrier lifetime from 4.7 to 9.4 ns and elucidate the mechanisms of the antimony aggregation resulting in a band-alignment tailoring from straddling to staggered gap after the RTA process. The significant extension in the carrier lifetime of the columnar InAs/GaAsSb dot structure make the great potential in improving QD intermediate-band solar cell application.

  8. Design and Additive Manufacturing of 3D Phononic Band Gap Structures Based on Gradient Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Wormser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for gradient based maximization of phononic band gaps. The approach is a geometry projection method combining parametric shape optimization with density based topology optimization. By this approach, we obtain, in a two dimension setting, cellular structures exhibiting relative and normalized band gaps of more than 8 and 1.6, respectively. The controlling parameter is the minimal strut size, which also corresponds with the obtained stiffness of the structure. The resulting design principle is manually interpreted into a three dimensional structure from which cellular metal samples are fabricated by selective electron beam melting. Frequency response diagrams experimentally verify the numerically determined phononic band gaps of the structures. The resulting structures have band gaps down to the audible frequency range, qualifying the structures for an application in noise isolation.

  9. Chaos and band structure in a three-dimensional optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L E

    2015-04-01

    Classical chaos is known to affect wave propagation because it signifies the presence of broken symmetries. The effect of chaos has been observed experimentally for matter waves, electromagnetic waves, and acoustic waves. When these three types of waves propagate through a spatially periodic medium, the allowed propagation energies form bands. For energies in the band gaps, no wave propagation is possible. We show that optical lattices provide a well-defined system that allows a study of the effect of chaos on band structure. We have determined the band structure of a body-centered-cubic optical lattice for all theoretically possible couplings, and we find that the band structure for those lattices realizable in the laboratory differs significantly from that expected for the bands in an "empty" body-centered-cubic crystal. However, as coupling is increased, the lattice becomes increasingly chaotic and it becomes possible to produce band structure that has behavior qualitatively similar to the "empty" body-centered-cubic band structure, although with fewer degeneracies.

  10. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2014-01-01

    We coupled a radiative transfer model and a soil hydrologic model (HYDRUS 1D) with an optimization routine to derive soil hydraulic parameters, surface roughness, and soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot using measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band), rainfall, and potential soil evaporation. The robustness of the approach was evaluated using five 28-d data sets representing different meteorological conditions. We considered two soil hydraulic property models: the unimodal Mualem-van Genuchten and the bimodal model of Durner. Microwave radiative transfer was modeled by three different approaches: the Fresnel equation with depth-averaged dielectric permittivity of either 2-or 5-cm-thick surface layers and a coherent radiative transfer model (CRTM) that accounts for vertical gradients in dielectric permittivity. Brightness temperatures simulated by the CRTM and the 2-cm-layer Fresnel model fitted well to the measured ones. L-band brightness temperatures are therefore related to the dielectric permittivity and soil moisture in a 2-cm-thick surface layer. The surface roughness parameter that was derived from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling was similar to direct estimates from laser profiler measurements. The laboratory-derived water retention curve was bimodal and could be retrieved consistently for the different periods from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling. A unimodal soil hydraulic property function underestimated the hydraulic conductivity near saturation. Surface soil moisture contents simulated using retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were compared with in situ measurements. Depth-specific calibration relations were essential to derive soil moisture from near-surface installed sensors. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA.

  11. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  12. Inverse period-doubling bifurcations determine complex structure of bursting in a one-dimensional non-autonomous map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiujing; Chen, Zhenyang; Bi, Qinsheng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a simple one-dimensional non-autonomous map, in which some novel bursting patterns (e.g., "fold/double inverse flip" bursting, "fold/multiple inverse flip" bursting, and "fold/a cascade of inverse flip" bursting) can be observed. Typically, these bursting patterns exhibit complex structures containing a chain of inverse period-doubling bifurcations. The active states related to these bursting can be period-2(n) (n = 1, 2, 3,…) attractors or chaotic attractors, which may evolve to quiescence by a chain of inverse period-doubling bifurcations when the slow excitation decreases through period-doubling bifurcation points of the map. This accounts for the complex inverse period-doubling bifurcation structures observed in bursting patterns. Our findings enrich the possible routes to bursting as well as the underlying mechanisms of bursting.

  13. Tuning the band gap in hybrid tin iodide perovskite semiconductors using structural templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Jeremy L; Martin, James D; Mitzi, David B

    2005-06-27

    Structural distortions within the extensive family of organic/inorganic hybrid tin iodide perovskite semiconductors are correlated with their experimental exciton energies and calculated band gaps. The extent of the in- and out-of-plane angular distortion of the SnI4(2-) perovskite sheets is largely determined by the relative charge density and steric requirements of the organic cations. Variation of the in-plane Sn-I-Sn bond angle was demonstrated to have the greatest impact on the tuning of the band gap, and the equatorial Sn-I bond distances have a significant secondary influence. Extended Hückel tight-binding band calculations are employed to decipher the crystal orbital origins of the structural effects that fine-tune the band structure. The calculations suggest that it may be possible to tune the band gap by as much as 1 eV using the templating influence of the organic cation.

  14. Detailed study of the TE band structure of two dimensional metallic photonic crystals with square symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedghi, Aliasghar [Islamic Azad University, Shabestar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Valiaghaie, Soma [Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soufiani, Ahad Rounaghi [Islamic Azad University, Sufian (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    By virtue of the efficiency of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map method, we have calculated, for H-polarization (TE mode), the band structure of 2D photonic crystals with a square lattice composed of metallic rods embedded in an air background. The rod in the unit cell is chosen to be circular in shape. Here, from a practical point of view, in order to obtain maximum band gaps, we have studied the band structure as a function of the size of the rods. We have also studied the flat bands appearing in the band structures and have shown that for frequencies around the surface plasmon frequency, the modes are highly localized at the interface between the metallic rods and the air background.

  15. Detailed Study of the TE band structure of two dimensional metallic photonic crystals with square symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedghi, Aliasghar; Valiaghaie, Soma; Soufiani, Ahad Rounaghi

    2014-10-01

    By virtue of the efficiency of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map method, we have calculated, for H-polarization (TE mode), the band structure of 2D photonic crystals with a square lattice composed of metallic rods embedded in an air background. The rod in the unit cell is chosen to be circular in shape. Here, from a practical point of view, in order to obtain maximum band gaps, we have studied the band structure as a function of the size of the rods. We have also studied the flat bands appearing in the band structures and have shown that for frequencies around the surface plasmon frequency, the modes are highly localized at the interface between the metallic rods and the air background.

  16. Obtaining the band structure of a complicated photonic crystal by linear operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴良; 叶卓; 何赛灵

    2003-01-01

    Absolute band gaps can be created by lifting the degeneracy in the bands of a photonic crystal.To calculate the band structure of a complicated photonic crystal generated by e.g.symmetry breaking,general forms of all possible linear operations are presented in terms of matrices and a procedure to combine these operations is given.Other forms of linear operations(such as the addition,subtraction,and translation transforms) are also presented to obtain an explicit expression for the Fourier coefficient of the dielectric function in the plane-wave expansion method.With the present method,band structures for various complicated photonic crystals(related through these linear operations) can be obtained easily and quickly.As a numerical example,a large absolute band gap for a complicated photonic crystal structure of GaAs is found in the high region of normalized frequency.

  17. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyukhin, S., E-mail: sergkoz@igic.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Jain, H. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  18. Photonic Band Gaps in Two-Dimensional Crystals with Fractal Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘征; 徐建军; 林志方

    2003-01-01

    We simulate the changes of the photonic band structure of the crystal in two dimensions with a quasi-fractal structure when it is fined to a fractal. The result shows that when the dielectric distribution is fined, the photonic band structure will be compressed on the whole and the ground photonic band gap (PBG) closed while the next PBGs shrunk, in conjunction with their position declining in the frequency spectrum. Furthermore, the PBGs in the high zone are much more sensitive than those in low zones.

  19. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure of anatase and rutile TiO2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jakub Szlachetko; Katarzyna Michalow-Mauke; Maarten Nachtegaal; Jacinto Sá

    2014-03-01

    Electronic structures of rutile and anatase polymorph of TiO2 were determined by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurements and FEFF9.0 calculations. Difference between crystalline structures led to shifts in the rutile Ti -band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., decrease in band gap. Anatase possesses localized states located in the band gap where electrons can be trapped, which are almost absent in the rutile structure. This could well explain the reported longer lifetimes in anatase. It was revealed that HR-XAS is insufficient to study in-depth unoccupied states of investigated materials because it overlooks the shallow traps.

  20. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lin

    2012-01-01

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham...

  1. Inversion of ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) waveforms for oceanic crust structure: a synthetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyan; Wang, Yanbin; Chen, Yongshun John

    2016-08-01

    The waveform inversion method is applied—using synthetic ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) data—to study oceanic crust structure. A niching genetic algorithm (NGA) is used to implement the inversion for the thickness and P-wave velocity of each layer, and to update the model by minimizing the objective function, which consists of the misfit and cross-correlation of observed and synthetic waveforms. The influence of specific NGA method parameters is discussed, and suitable values are presented. The NGA method works well for various observation systems, such as those with irregular and sparse distribution of receivers as well as single receiver systems. A strategy is proposed to accelerate the convergence rate by a factor of five with no increase in computational complexity; this is achieved using a first inversion with several generations to impose a restriction on the preset range of each parameter and then conducting a second inversion with the new range. Despite the successes of this method, its usage is limited. A shallow water layer is not favored because the direct wave in water will suppress the useful reflection signals from the crust. A more precise calculation of the air-gun source signal should be considered in order to better simulate waveforms generated in realistic situations; further studies are required to investigate this issue.

  2. ELECTRONIC-STRUCTURE OF LA2-XSRXNIO4 STUDIED BY PHOTOEMISSION AND INVERSE-PHOTOEMISSION SPECTROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EISAKI, H; UCHIDA, S; MIZOKAWA, T; NAMATAME, H; FUJIMORI, A; VANELP, J; KUIPER, P; SAWATZKY, GA; HOSOYA, S; KATAYAMAYOSHIDA, H

    1992-01-01

    The electronic structure of La2-xSrxNiO4 is studied by use of photoemission spectroscopy, bremsstrahlung-isochromat spectroscopy (BIS), and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. Quantitative analyses are made on the valence-band and Ni 2p core-level photoemission spectra through configuration-interacti

  3. ELECTRONIC-STRUCTURE OF LA2-XSRXNIO4 STUDIED BY PHOTOEMISSION AND INVERSE-PHOTOEMISSION SPECTROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EISAKI, H; UCHIDA, S; MIZOKAWA, T; NAMATAME, H; FUJIMORI, A; VANELP, J; KUIPER, P; SAWATZKY, GA; HOSOYA, S; KATAYAMAYOSHIDA, H

    1992-01-01

    The electronic structure of La2-xSrxNiO4 is studied by use of photoemission spectroscopy, bremsstrahlung-isochromat spectroscopy (BIS), and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. Quantitative analyses are made on the valence-band and Ni 2p core-level photoemission spectra through

  4. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...

  5. Observation of banded spherulites and lamellar structures by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜勇; 罗艳红; 范泽夫; 王霞瑜; 徐军; 郭宝华; 李林

    2003-01-01

    Lamellar structures of banded spherulites of poly(ε-caprolactone)/poly(vinyl chloride) (PCL/PVC) blends are observed using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface of the PCL/PVC banded spherulites presents to be concentric periodic ups and downs. The period of the bands corresponds to the extinction rings under the polarized optical microscopy observation. The lamellae with edge-on orientation in the ridges and the flat-on lamellae in the valleys of the banded spherulites are observed clearly. The twisting between the edge-on and flat-on lamellae is also observed.

  6. Acoustic band pinning in the phononic crystal plates of anti-symmetric structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Chen; Zhu Xue-Feng; Chen Qian; Yuan Ying; Liang Bin; Cheng Jian-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic bands are studied numerically for a Lamb wave propagating in an anti-symmetric structure of a onedimensional periodic plate by using the method of supercell plane-wave expansion.The results show that all the bands are pinned in pairs at the Brillouin zone boundary as long as the anti-symmetry remains and acoustic band gaps (ABGs) only appear between certain bands.In order to reveal the relationship between the band pinning and the anti-symmetry,the method of eigenmode analysis is introduced to calculate the displacement fields of different plate structures.Further,the method of harmony response analysis is employed to calculate the reference spectra to verify the accuracy of numerical calculations of acoustic band map,and both the locations and widths of ABGs in the acoustic band map are in good agreement with those of the reference spectra.The investigations show that the pinning effect is very sensitive to the anti-symmetry of periodic plates,and by introducing different types of breakages,more ABGs or narrow pass bands will appear,which is meaningful in band gap engineering.

  7. Probing the Spin-Polarized Electronic Band Structure in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zefang; Zhao, Liang; Mak, Kin Fai; Shan, Jie

    2017-02-01

    We study the electronic band structure in the K/K' valleys of the Brillouin zone of monolayer WSe2 and MoSe2 by optical reflection and photoluminescence spectroscopy on dual-gated field-effect devices. Our experiment reveals the distinct spin polarization in the conduction bands of these compounds by a systematic study of the doping dependence of the A and B excitonic resonances. Electrons in the highest-energy valence band and the lowest-energy conduction band have antiparallel spins in monolayer WSe2, and parallel spins in monolayer MoSe2. The spin splitting is determined to be hundreds of meV for the valence bands and tens of meV for the conduction bands, which are in good agreement with first principles calculations. These values also suggest that both n- and p-type WSe2 and MoSe2 can be relevant for spin- and valley-based applications

  8. Valence and conduction band structure of the quasi-two-dimensional semiconductor Sn S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racke, David A.; Neupane, Mahesh R.; Monti, Oliver L. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the momentum-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of both the valence and the conduction band region in the quasi-two-dimensional van der Waals-layered indirect band gap semiconductor Sn S2 . Using a combination of angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission (AR-2PPE) spectroscopy, we characterize the band structure of bulk Sn S2 . Comparison with density functional theory calculations shows excellent quantitative agreement in the valence band region and reveals several localized bands that likely originate from defects such as sulfur vacancies. Evidence for a moderate density of defects is also observed by AR-2PPE in the conduction band region, leading to localized bands not present in the computational results. The energetic structure and dispersion of the conduction bands is captured well by the computational treatment, with some quantitative discrepancies remaining. Our results provide a broader understanding of the electronic structure of Sn S2 in particular and van der Waals-layered semiconductors in general.

  9. Disorder enabled band structure engineering of a topological insulator surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yishuai; Chiu, Janet; Miao, Lin; He, Haowei; Alpichshev, Zhanybek; Kapitulnik, A.; Biswas, Rudro R.; Wray, L. Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are bulk insulators with Z2 topological electronic order that gives rise to conducting light-like surface states. These surface electrons are exceptionally resistant to localization by non-magnetic disorder, and have been adopted as the basis for a wide range of proposals to achieve new quasiparticle species and device functionality. Recent studies have yielded a surprise by showing that in spite of resisting localization, topological insulator surface electrons can be reshaped by defects into distinctive resonance states. Here we use numerical simulations and scanning tunnelling microscopy data to show that these resonance states have significance well beyond the localized regime usually associated with impurity bands. At native densities in the model Bi2X3 (X=Bi, Te) compounds, defect resonance states are predicted to generate a new quantum basis for an emergent electron gas that supports diffusive electrical transport.

  10. Shape and Stress Sensing of Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Structures Using an Inverse Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerracchio, Priscilla; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The marked increase in the use of composite and sandwich material systems in aerospace, civil, and marine structures leads to the need for integrated Structural Health Management systems. A key capability to enable such systems is the real-time reconstruction of structural deformations, stresses, and failure criteria that are inferred from in-situ, discrete-location strain measurements. This technology is commonly referred to as shape- and stress-sensing. Presented herein is a computationally efficient shape- and stress-sensing methodology that is ideally suited for applications to laminated composite and sandwich structures. The new approach employs the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM) as a general framework and the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) as the underlying plate theory. A three-node inverse plate finite element is formulated. The element formulation enables robust and efficient modeling of plate structures instrumented with strain sensors that have arbitrary positions. The methodology leads to a set of linear algebraic equations that are solved efficiently for the unknown nodal displacements. These displacements are then used at the finite element level to compute full-field strains, stresses, and failure criteria that are in turn used to assess structural integrity. Numerical results for multilayered, highly heterogeneous laminates demonstrate the unique capability of this new formulation for shape- and stress-sensing.

  11. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-05

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  12. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-01

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  13. Band Structure Calculation of Si and Ge by Non-Local Empirical Pseudo-Potential Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong; RAVAIOLI Umberto

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the princ iple of spatial nonlocal empirical pseudopotential and its detailed calculation procedure is presented. Consequently, this technique is employed to calculate the band structuresof Silicon and Germaniun. By comparing the results with photoemission experimental data, the validity and accuracy of this calculation are fully conformed for valence or conductance band,respectively. Thus it can be concluded that the spin-orbit Hamiltonian will only affect the energy band gap and another conductance or valence band structure. Therefore, this nonlocal approach without spin-orbit part is adequate for the device simulation of only one carrier transport such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET)'s, and it can significantly reduce the complication of band structure calculation.

  14. First-principle study of energy band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Guo, Zhankui; Xu, Kewei; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-07-01

    First-principle calculation is carried out to study the energy band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs). Hydrogen passivation is found to be crucial to convert the indirect band gaps into direct ones as a result of enhanced interactions between electrons and nuclei at the edge boundaries, as evidenced from the shortened bond length as well as the increased differential charge density. Ribbon width usually leads to the oscillatory variation of band gaps due to quantum confinement no matter hydrogen passivated or not. Mechanical strain may change the crystal symmetry, reduce the overlapping integral of C-C atoms, and hence modify the band gap further, which depends on the specific ribbon width sensitively. In practical applications, those effects will be hybridized to determine the energy band structure and subsequently the electronic properties of graphene. The results can provide insights into the design of carbon-based devices.

  15. Magnon band structure and magnon density in one-dimensional magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Rong-ke; Huang, Te; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2014-11-01

    By using Callen's Green's function method and the Tyablikov and Anderson-Callen decoupling approximations, we systematically study the magnon band structure and magnon density perpendicular to the superlattice plane of one-dimensional magnonic crystals, with a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with ferromagnetic (FM) or antiferromagnetic (AFM) interlayer exchange coupling. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy and external magnetic field on the magnon-energy band and magnon density in the Kx-direction are investigated in three situations: a) the magnon band of magnetic superlattices with FM interlayer coupling, b) separate and c) overlapping magnon bands of magnetic superlattices with AFM interlayer coupling. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study the magnon band structure and magnon density of magnonic crystals and the results are beneficial for the design of magnonic-crystal waveguides or gigahertz-range spin-wave filters.

  16. Structures associated with inversion of the Donbas Foldbelt (Ukraine and Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintot, Aline; Stephenson, Randell; Stovba, Sergiy; Maystrenko, Yuriy

    2003-09-01

    The Donbas Foldbelt is part of the Prypiat-Dnieper-Donets intracratonic rift basin (Belarus-Ukraine-southern Russia) that developed in Late Devonian times and was reactivated in Early Carboniferous. To the southeast, the Donbas Foldbelt joins the contiguous, deformed Karpinsky Swell. Basin "inversions" led first to the uplift of the Palaeozoic series (mainly Carboniferous but also syn-rift Devonian strata in the southwesternmost part of the Donbas Foldbelt, which are deeply buried in the other parts of the rift system), and later to the formation of the fold-and-thrust belt. The general structural trend of the Donbas Foldbelt, formed mainly during rifting, is WNW-ESE. This is the strike of the main rift-related fault zones and also of the close to tight "Main Anticline" of the Donbas Foldbelt that developed along the previous rift axis. The Main Anticline is structurally unique in the Donbas Foldbelt and its formation was initiated in Permian times, during a period of (trans) tensional reactivation, during which active salt movements occurred. A relief inversion of the basin also took place at this time with a pronounced uplift of the southern margin of the basin and the adjacent Ukrainian Shield. Subsequently, Cimmerian and Alpine phases of tectonic inversion of the Donbas Foldbelt led to the development of flat and shallow thrusts commonly associated with folds into the basin. A fan-shaped deformation pattern is recognised in the field, with south-to southeast-vergent compressive structures, south of the Main Anticline, and north- to northwest-vergent ones, north of it. These compressive structures are clearly superimposed onto the WNW-ESE structural grain of the initial rift basin. Shortening structures that characterise the tectonic inversion of the basin are (regionally) orientated NW-SE and N-S. Because of the obliquity of the compressive trends relative to the WNW-ESE strike of inherited structures (major preexisting normal faults and the Main Anticline), in

  17. Structured x-ray beams from twisted electrons by inverse Compton scattering of laser light

    CERN Document Server

    Seipt, D; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01

    The inverse Compton scattering of laser light on high-energetic twisted electrons is investigated with the aim to construct spatially structured x-ray beams. In particular, we analyze how the properties of the twisted electrons, such as the topological charge and aperture angle of the electron Bessel beam, affects the energy and angular distribution of scattered x-rays. We show that with suitably chosen initial twisted electron states one can synthesize tailor-made x-ray beam profiles with a well-defined spatial structure, in a way not possible with ordinary plane-wave electron beams.

  18. UAl2 : Fine structure of the f bands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, R.A. de; Koelling, D.D.; Weger, M.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic structure of the C15, or cubic-Laves-phase material, UAl2 has been calculated using the linearized relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The anomalous behavior of the electrical resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility can be explained by the fine structure of the

  19. Theoretical study of band structure of odd-mass 115,117I isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhanvir; Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2016-05-01

    By using the microscopic approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich 115,117I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of back bending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work.

  20. B3LYP, BLYP and PBE DFT band structures of the nucleotide base stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres, Zs; Bogár, F.; Ladik, J.

    DFT crystal orbital (band structure) calculations have been performed for the nucleotide base stacks of cytosine, thymine, adenine, and guanine arranged in DNA B geometry. The band structures obtained with PBE, BLYP, and B3LYP functionals are presented and compared to other related experimental and theoretical results. The influence of the quality of the basis set on the fundamental gap values was also investigated using Clementi's double ζ, 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets.

  1. Electronic- and band-structure evolution in low-doped (Ga,Mn)As

    OpenAIRE

    Yastrubchak, O.; J. Sadowski; Krzyzanowska, H.; Gluba, L.; Zuk, J.; Domagala, J. Z.; Andrearczyk, T.; Wosinski, T.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been applied to study the electronic- and band-structure evolution in (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers with increasing Mn doping in the range of low Mn content, up to 1.2%. Structural and magnetic properties of the layers were characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and SQUID magnetometery, respectively. The revealed results of decrease in the band-gap transition energy with increasing Mn content in very low-doped ...

  2. Waveform inversion for localized seismic structure and its application to D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, K.; Geller, R. J.; Fuji, N.; Konishi, K.

    2008-12-01

    In order to fully extract information on localized seismic structure from observed seismic data, we have developed a methodology for seismic waveform inversion. The calculation of synthetic seismograms and their partial derivatives are the key steps in such an inversion. We have developed accurate and efficient methods for calculating broadband synthetic seismograms for spherically symmetric transversely isotropic media for both shallow and deep events, which allows us to compute synthetics up to 2 Hz or higher frequencies (Kawai et al. 2006, GJI). Then, wWe formulate the inverse problem of waveform inversion for localized structure using the efficient algorithm of Geller and Hara (1993), computing partial derivatives for the 3-D anisotropic elastic parameters, including anelasticity, at particular points in space. Our method allows us to conduct both local and multi-scale global waveform inversion using pixel (or local shell) parameterization. We previouslyhave conducted waveform inversion for the vertical profile of the shear velocity in the lowermost mantle beneath Central America and the Arctic, beneath which the shear velocity is faster than the global average (Kawai et al., 2007ab, GRL). The obtained models suggest that the S-velocity increase in D'' may be localized in the zone from 100-200 km above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), while the S-velocity does not significantly deviate from PREM in the zone from 0-100 km above the CMB. In this studywork, we studied D'' beneath the Pacific, where the S-velocity is supposed thought to be slower than the global average on the basis of by many tomographic studies. models (e.g. Takeuchi 2007). We use the transverse component of broadband waveforms (for the period range, 8- 200 s). observed waveforms. We found 1-1.5% velocity decreases and increases in the zones from 400-500 km and from 300-400 km above the CMB, respectively. In addition, we found 0.5-1% velocity increases and decreases in the zones from 100-200 km

  3. Inverse computational feedback optimization imaging applied to time varying changes in a homogeneous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel J; Manwaring, Mark L; Soule, Terence

    2008-01-01

    The technique of inverse computational feedback optimization imaging allows for the imaging of varying tissue without the continuous need of a complex imaging systems such as an MRI or CT. Our method trades complex imaging equipment for computing power. The objective is to use a baseline scan from an imaging system along with finite element method computational software to calculate the physically measurable parameters (such as voltage or temperature). As the physically measurable parameters change the computational model is iteratively run until it matches the measured values. Optimization routines are implemented to accelerate the process of finding the new values. Presented is a computational model demonstrating how the inverse imaging technique would work with a simple homogeneous sample with a circular structure. It demonstrates the ability to locate an object with only a few point measurements. The presented computational model uses swarm optimization techniques to help find the object location from the measured data (which in this case is voltage).

  4. Newton`s iteration for inversion of Cauchy-like and other structured matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, V.Y. [Lehman College, Bronx, NY (United States); Zheng, Ailong; Huang, Xiaohan; Dias, O. [CUNY, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We specify some initial assumptions that guarantee rapid refinement of a rough initial approximation to the inverse of a Cauchy-like matrix, by mean of our new modification of Newton`s iteration, where the input, output, and all the auxiliary matrices are represented with their short generators defined by the associated scaling operators. The computations are performed fast since they are confined to operations with short generators of the given and computed matrices. Because of the known correlations among various structured matrices, the algorithm is immediately extended to rapid refinement of rough initial approximations to the inverses of Vandermonde-like, Chebyshev-Vandermonde-like and Toeplitz-like matrices, where again, the computations are confined to operations with short generators of the involved matrices.

  5. Dual-Band Terahertz Left-Handed Metamaterial with Fishnet Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Qiu-Jiao; LIU Jin-Song; WANG Ke-Jia; YI Xu-Nong; YANG Hong-Wu

    2011-01-01

    We present the design of a dual-band left-handed metamaterial with fishnet structure in the terahertz regime. Its left-handed properties are described by the retrieved effective electromagnetic parameters. We introduce an equivalent circuit which offers a theoretical explanation for the left-handed behavior of the dual-band fishnet metamaterial, and investigate its losses receiving higher figure of merit. The design is beneficial to the development of frequency agile and broadband THz materials and devices. The dual-band fishnet metamaterial can be extended to infrared and optical frequency ranges by regulating the structural parameters.

  6. Realization of Band-Notch UWB Monopole Antenna Using AMC Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design, simulation and testing of an Ultra Wide Band (UWB planar monopole antenna with WLAN band-notch characteristic. The proposed antenna consists, the combination of planar monopole antenna with partial ground and a pair of AMC structures. The AMC structure used for the design is mushroom-like. Design equation of EBG parameters is also proposed for FR4 substrate using transmission line model. Using proposed equations, Mushroom-like EBG structure is integrated along the feed line of a monopole antenna for WLAN (5 GHz – 6 GHz band rejection. TheCurrent distribution and equivalent circuit model of antenna is used to explain band-notch characteristic of EBG resonator. The proposed antenna is fabricated on an FR4 substrate with a thickness of 1.6 mmand εr = 4.4. The measured VSWR characteristic is less than 2 for complete UWB band except for WLAN band i.e. 5 GHz – 6 GHz. The gain of the proposed structure is around 2 dBi – 6.7 dBi for complete UWBband except for WLAN band where it is reduced to -4 dBi. The measured radiation pattern of proposed antenna is omnidirectional along H plane and bidirectional in E plane. A nearly constant group delaywith variations < 2ns, except for the notched bandwidth makes proposed antenna suitable for UWB application.

  7. Determination of Conduction and Valence Band Electronic Structure of LaTiOx Ny Thin Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Markus; Szlachetko, Jakub; Castelli, Ivano E; Marzari, Nicola; Döbeli, Max; Wokaun, Alexander; Pergolesi, Daniele; Lippert, Thomas

    2017-05-09

    The nitrogen substitution into the oxygen sites of several oxide materials leads to a reduction of the band gap to the visible-light energy range, which makes these oxynitride semiconductors potential photocatalysts for efficient solar water splitting. Oxynitrides typically show a different crystal structure compared to the pristine oxide material. As the band gap is correlated to both the chemical composition and the crystal structure, it is not trivial to distinguish which modifications of the electronic structure induced by the nitrogen substitution are related to compositional and/or structural effects. Here, X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy are used to investigate the electronic structures of orthorhombic perovskite LaTiOx Ny thin films in comparison with films of the pristine oxide LaTiOx with similar orthorhombic structure and cationic oxidation state. Experiment and theory show the expected upward shift in energy of the valence band maximum that reduces the band gap as a consequence of the nitrogen incorporation. This study also shows that the conduction band minimum, typically considered almost unaffected by nitrogen substitution, undergoes a significant downward shift in energy. For a rational design of oxynitride photocatalysts, the observed changes of both the unoccupied and occupied electronic states have to be taken into account to justify the total band-gap narrowing induced by the nitrogen incorporation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Electric-field tuning of the surface band structure of topological insulator Sb2Te3 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Ha, Jeonghoon; Levy, Niv; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph

    2013-08-02

    We measured the response of the surface state spectrum of epitaxial Sb(2)Te(3) thin films to applied gate electric fields by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The gate dependent shift of the Fermi level and the screening effect from bulk carriers vary as a function of film thickness. We observed a gap opening at the Dirac point for films thinner than four quintuple layers, due to the coupling of the top and bottom surfaces. Moreover, the top surface state band gap of the three quintuple layer films was found to be tunable by a back gate, indicating the possibility of observing a topological phase transition in this system. Our results are well explained by an effective model of 3D topological insulator thin films with structure inversion asymmetry, indicating that three quintuple layer Sb(2)Te(3) films are topologically nontrivial and belong to the quantum spin Hall insulator class.

  9. Low-frequency photonic band structures in graphene-like triangular metallic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang

    2016-11-01

    We study the low frequency photonic band structures in triangular metallic lattice, displaying Dirac points in the frequency spectrum, and constructed upon the lowest order regular polygonal tiles. We show that, in spite of the unfavourable geometrical conditions intrinsic to the structure symmetry, the lowest frequency photonic bands are formed by resonance modes sustained by local structure patterns, with the corresponding electric fields following a triangular distribution at low structure filling rate and a honeycomb distribution at high filling rate. For both cases, the lowest photonic bands, and thus the plasma gap, can be described in the framework of a tight binding model, and analysed in terms of local resonance modes and their mutual correlations. At high filling rate, the Dirac points and their movement following the structure deformation are described in the same framework, in relation with local structure patterns and their variations, as well as the particularity of the metallic lattice that enhances the topological anisotropy.

  10. Photonic band gaps in materials with triply periodic surfaces and related tubular structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K; Kole, JS

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the photonic band gap of triply periodic bicontinuous cubic structures and of tubular structures constructed from the skeletal graphs of triply periodic minimal surfaces. The effect of the symmetry and topology of the periodic dielectric structures on the existence and the characteristi

  11. Inversion of X-band nautical radar data for sea-state monitoring: a new technique to estimate the surface currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafino, F.; Lugni, C.; Raffa, F.; Soldovieri, F.

    2009-04-01

    The inversion of X-band marine images sequences allows obtaining the sea state parameter estimation and the reconstruction of the wave height evolution [1-4]. This result is possible tanks to the fact that the backscattering from the sea is "visible", under some conditions, on the marine radar images. These radar signatures, that typically are suppressed because represent a noise (clutter) for the navigation, are the "useful signal" to be processed in order to achieve information about the sea state: peak wave length, period and direction, current speed and direction and the evolution of surface elevation. The backscattering phenomena is due to the Bragg resonance with ocean waves of wavelengths similar to those of the transmitted electromagnetic waves. In particular, the longer waves modulate the backscattering phenomenon and thus they become visible in the "radar" images. As a consequence, the radar image is not a direct representation of the sea state and thus a processing procedure is needed in order to reconstruct the sea state. After a Fourier Transform of the data, a spectral filter is used to erase all the undesired phenomenon via a dispersion relation. The use of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) allows the passage from the radar spectrum to sea spectrum; finally, the resulting spectrum is Fourier transformed to return to the space-time domain. A key step of the whole procedure is the generation of the spectral filter. To built the filter the surface currents have to be estimated, if they are not correctly determined the results of the overall inversion are quite poor. This drawback is further increased when the values of the surface current become high or the data are acquired by a moving vessel, since the problem of the determination of the current is quite complicated and particular attention needs the filtering procedure. This work presents an innovative procedure able to estimate the free-surface current values with high accuracy compared to the

  12. Photonic band structure of ZnO photonic crystal slab laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamilov, A; Cao, H

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported on the first realization of ultraviolet photonic crystal laser based on zinc oxide [Appl. Phys. Lett. {\\bf 85}, 3657 (2004)]. Here we present the details of structural design and its optimization. We develop a computational super-cell technique, that allows a straightforward calculation of the photonic band structure of ZnO photonic crystal slab on sapphire substrate. We find that despite of small index contrast between the substrate and the photonic layer, the low order eigenmodes have predominantly transverse-electric (TE) or transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization. Because emission from ZnO thin film shows strong TE preference, we are able to limit our consideration to TE bands, spectrum of which can possess a complete photonic band gap with an appropriate choice of structure parameters. We demonstrate that the geometry of the system may be optimized so that a sizable band gap is achieved.

  13. Design of sensor networks for instantaneous inversion of modally reduced order models in structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, K.; Lourens, E.; Van Nimmen, K.; Reynders, E.; De Roeck, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2015-02-01

    In structural dynamics, the forces acting on a structure are often not well known. System inversion techniques may be used to estimate these forces from the measured response of the structure. This paper first derives conditions for the invertibility of linear system models that apply to any instantaneous input estimation or joint input-state estimation algorithm. The conditions ensure the identifiability of the dynamic forces and system states, their stability and uniqueness. The present paper considers the specific case of modally reduced order models, which are generally obtained from a physical, finite element model, or from experimental data. It is shown how in this case the conditions can be directly expressed in terms of the modal properties of the structure. A distinction is made between input estimation and joint input-state estimation. Each of the conditions is illustrated by a conceptual example. The practical implementation is discussed for a case study where a sensor network for a footbridge is designed.

  14. Polar semiconductor heterojunction structure energy band diagram considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuxun; Wen, Cheng P.; Wang, Maojun; Hao, Yilong

    2016-03-01

    The unique nature of built-in electric field induced positive/negative charge pairs of polar semiconductor heterojunction structure has led to a more realistic device model for hexagonal III-nitride HEMT. In this modeling approach, the distribution of charge carriers is dictated by the electrostatic potential profile instead of Femi statistics. The proposed device model is found suitable to explain peculiar properties of GaN HEMT structures, including: (1) Discrepancy in measured conventional linear transmission line model (LTLM) sheet resistance and contactless sheet resistance of GaN HEMT with thin barrier layer. (2) Below bandgap radiation from forward biased Nickel Schottky barrier diode on GaN HEMT structure. (3) GaN HEMT barrier layer doping has negligible effect on transistor channel sheet charge density.

  15. Design for a Crane Metallic Structure Based on Imperialist Competitive Algorithm and Inverse Reliability Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiao-Ning; Zhi, Bo

    2017-07-01

    Uncertainties in parameters such as materials, loading, and geometry are inevitable in designing metallic structures for cranes. When considering these uncertainty factors, reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) offers a more reasonable design approach. However, existing RBDO methods for crane metallic structures are prone to low convergence speed and high computational cost. A unilevel RBDO method, combining a discrete imperialist competitive algorithm with an inverse reliability strategy based on the performance measure approach, is developed. Application of the imperialist competitive algorithm at the optimization level significantly improves the convergence speed of this RBDO method. At the reliability analysis level, the inverse reliability strategy is used to determine the feasibility of each probabilistic constraint at each design point by calculating its α-percentile performance, thereby avoiding convergence failure, calculation error, and disproportionate computational effort encountered using conventional moment and simulation methods. Application of the RBDO method to an actual crane structure shows that the developed RBDO realizes a design with the best tradeoff between economy and safety together with about one-third of the convergence speed and the computational cost of the existing method. This paper provides a scientific and effective design approach for the design of metallic structures of cranes.

  16. The C-Band accelerating structures for SPARC photoinjector energy upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesini, D.; Boni, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Lollo, V.; Marcellini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spizzo, V.; Mostacci, A.; Campogiani, G.; Persichelli, S.; Enomoto, A.; Higo, T.; Kakihara, K.; Kamitani, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Sugimura, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Verdú-Andrés, S.

    2013-05-01

    The use of C-Band structures for electron acceleration and production of high quality beams has been proposed and adopted in several linac projects all over the world. The two main projects that adopted such type of structures are the Japanese Free Electron Laser (FEL) project in Spring-8 and the SwissFEL project at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Also the energy upgrade of the SPARC photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Italy) from 150 to more than 240 MeV will be done by replacing a low gradient S-Band accelerating structure with two C-band structures. The structures are Traveling Wave (TW) and Constant Impedance (CI), have symmetric axial input couplers and have been optimized to work with a SLED RF input pulse. The paper presents the design criteria of the structures, the realization procedure and the low and high power RF test results on a prototype. The high power tests have been carried out by the Frascati INFN Laboratories in close collaboration with the Japanese Laboratory KEK. Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of the operation of the prototype at 50 MV/m with about 10-6 breakdowns per pulse per meter. Such high gradients have not been reached before in C-Band systems and demonstrated the possibility to use C-band accelerators, if needed, at such high field level. The results of the internal inspection of the structure after the high power test are also presented.

  17. Phononic band gaps and vibrations in one- and two-dimensional mass-spring structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J. S.

    2003-10-01

    The vibrational response of finite periodic lattice structures subjected to periodic loading is investigated. Special attention is devoted to the response in frequency ranges with gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice. The effects of boundaries, viscous damping, and imperfections are studied by analyzing two examples; a 1-D filter and a 2-D wave guide. In 1-D the structural response in the band gap is shown to be insensitive to damping and small imperfections. In 2-D the similar effect of damping is noted for one type of periodic structure, whereas for another type the band gap effect is nearly eliminated by damping. In both 1-D and 2-D it is demonstrated how the free structural boundaries affect the response in the band gap due to local resonances. Finally, 2-D wave guides are considered by replacing the periodic structure with a homogeneous structure in a straight and a 90° bent path, and it is shown how the vibrational response is confined to the paths in the band gap frequency ranges.

  18. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  19. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin

    2011-09-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  20. Electronic Band Structures of TiO2 with Heavy Nitrogen Doping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Jinbo; LI Qi; LIANG Wei; SHANG Jianku

    2008-01-01

    The first-principles density-functional calculation was conducted to investigate the electronic band structures of titanium dioxide with heavy nitrogen doping (TiO2-xNx).The calculation results indicate that when x≤0.25,isolated N 2p states appear above the valence-band maximum of TiO2 without a band-gap narrowing between O 2p and Ti 3d states.When x≥0.50,an obvious band gap narrowing between O 2p and Ti 3d states was observed along with the existence of isolated N 2p states above the valence-band of TiO2,indicating that the mechanism proposed by Asahi et al operates under heavy nitrogen doping condition.

  1. Berry phase and band structure analysis of the Weyl semimetal NbP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelius, Philip; Gooth, Johannes; Bäßler, Svenja; Zierold, Robert; Wiegand, Christoph; Niemann, Anna; Reith, Heiko; Shekhar, Chandra; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-01-01

    Weyl semimetals are often considered the 3D-analogon of graphene or topological insulators. The evaluation of quantum oscillations in these systems remains challenging because there are often multiple conduction bands. We observe de Haas-van Alphen oscillations with several frequencies in a single crystal of the Weyl semimetal niobium phosphide. For each fundamental crystal axis, we can fit the raw data to a superposition of sinusoidal functions, which enables us to calculate the characteristic parameters of all individual bulk conduction bands using Fourier transform with an analysis of the temperature and magnetic field-dependent oscillation amplitude decay. Our experimental results indicate that the band structure consists of Dirac bands with low cyclotron mass, a non-trivial Berry phase and parabolic bands with a higher effective mass and trivial Berry phase. PMID:27667203

  2. CRS Stacking for Improved Imaging of Inversion Structures in the Donbas Foldbelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyoli, E.; Gajewski, D.; Huebscher, C.

    2002-12-01

    The Donbas Foldbelt in the southeastern part of the Dniepr-Donets Basin, Ukraine, displays exceptional characteristics for the study of processes involving repeated destabilisation of cratonic interiors, including rifting and its reactivation during basin uplift and inversion. To image the present state of the crustal evolution of this area a multinational study comprising a combined refraction / reflection profile was carried out in summer 2000. The reflection profile comprises 133~km of deep seismic data where Vibroseis and explosive sources were used to achieve a nominal fold of 60-85. In this presentation we focus on some key areas of the reflection section which are critical to estimate the amount of inversion of the basin. To better image these zones, which already show clear indications of substantial inversion in the conventional processed time migrated section we applied a new stacking technology, the Common Reflection Surface (CRS) stack. This new stacking technique is based on a three parametric search whereas for the conventional CMP stack only one parameter (the stacking velocity) is determined. Although this multiparameter search is more time consuming a multi-fold advantage is obtained. The signal to noise ratio of the reflection section is better than for the conventional CMP section. The continuity of the reflection events in the CRS stack is much improved against the CMP stack and additional information of the structure can be derived from the additional parameters determined by the CRS stacking method. The improved continuity and S / N-ratio is clearly visible when the CRS and CMP stack results of the key areas are compared. The enhanced image quality of the key zones of the Donbas Foldbelt better allow to estimate the amount of inversion and, thus, aid the geological interpretation and velocity/depth model construction.

  3. Complex Crustal Structure Beneath Western Turkey Revealed by 3D Seismic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubuk-Sabuncu, Yesim; Taymaz, Tuncay; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present a 3D radially anisotropic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle structure beneath the Sea of Marmara and surroundings based on the full waveform inversion method. The intense seismic activity and crustal deformation are observed in the Northwest Turkey due to transition tectonics between the strike-slip North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the extensional Aegean region. We have selected and simulated complete waveforms of 62 earthquakes (Mw > 4.0) occurred during 2007-2015, and recorded at (Δ DAD). The spectral-element solver of the wave equation, SES3D algorithm, is used to simulate seismic wave propagation in 3D spherical coordinates (Fichtner, 2009). The Large Scale Seismic Inversion Framework (LASIF) workflow tool is also used to perform full seismic waveform inversion (Krischer et al., 2015). The initial 3D Earth model is implemented from the multi-scale seismic tomography study of Fichtner et al. (2013). Discrepancies between the observed and simulated synthetic waveforms are determined using the time-frequency misfits which allows a separation between phase and amplitude information (Fichtner et al., 2008). The conjugate gradient optimization method is used to iteratively update the initial Earth model when minimizing the misfit. The inversion is terminated after 19 iterations since no further advances are observed in updated models. Our analysis revealed shear wave velocity variations of the shallow and deeper crustal structure beneath western Turkey down to depths of ~35-40 km. Low shear wave velocity anomalies are observed in the upper and mid crustal depths beneath major fault zones located in the study region. Low velocity zones also tend to mark the outline of young volcanic areas. Our final 3D Earth model is tested using forward wave simulations of earthquakes (M ≥ 3.7) that were not used during the inversion process. The comparison of observed and synthetic seismograms, calculated by initial and final models, showed significant

  4. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiz, F., E-mail: fethimaiz@gmail.com [University of Cartage, Nabeul Engineering Preparatory Institute, Merazka, 8000 Nabeul (Tunisia); King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-10-01

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results.

  5. Band gap formation and control in coupled periodic ferromagnetic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskaya, A. Yu.; Sadovnikov, A. V.; Grishin, S. V.; Romanenko, D. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the formation of additional bandgaps in the spectrum of spin waves in coupled magnonic crystals. We present the analytical model, which reveals the mechanism of bandgaps formation in coupled structures. In particular, the formation of one, two, or three bandgaps in the region of the first Bragg resonance is demonstrated and control of its characteristics by the variation of the complex coupling coefficient between magnonic crystals is shown. The spatially-resolved Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and microwave measurements demonstrate the bandgap splitting in the spin-wave spectrum. The main advantage of proposed coupled structure, as compared to the conventional magnonic crystal, is the tunability of multiple bandgaps in the spin-wave spectrum, which enables potential applications in the frequency selective magnonic devices.

  6. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ∼ 7~\\text{eV} ) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν ≳ 400~\\text{eV} ) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of \\text{Ce}M\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}5} (M=\\text{Rh} , \\text{Ir} , and \\text{Co} ) and \\text{YbR}{{\\text{h}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UFeG}{{\\text{a}}5} , their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all \\text{U}~5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UP}{{\\text{d}}3} and \\text{U}{{\\text{O}}2} are essentially explained by the localized model that treats \\text{U}~5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion \\text{U} -based compounds such as the hidden-order compound \\text{UR}{{\\text{u}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} , their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures

  7. Tunable band structures of polycrystalline graphene by external and mismatch strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Tao Wu; Xing-Hua Shi; Yu-Jie Wei

    2012-01-01

    Lacking a band gap largely limits the application of graphene in electronic devices.Previous study shows that grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline graphene can dramatically alter the electrical properties of graphene.Here,we investigate the band structure of polycrystalline graphene tuned by externally imposed strains and intrinsic mismatch strains at the GB by density functional theory (DFT) calculations.We found that graphene with symmetrical GBs typically has zero band gap even with large uniaxial and biaxial strain.However,some particular asymmetrical GBs can open a band gap in graphene and their band structures can be substantially tuned by external strains.A maximum band gap about 0.19 eV was observed in matched-armchair GB (5,5) | (3,7) with a misorientation of θ =13° when the applied uniaxial strain increases to 9%.Although mismatch strain is inevitable in asymmetrical GBs,it has a small influence on the band gap of polycrystalline graphene.

  8. Magnon band structure and magnon density in one-dimensional magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Rong-ke, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Huang, Te [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Zhang, Zhi-dong [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-11-15

    By using Callen's Green's function method and the Tyablikov and Anderson–Callen decoupling approximations, we systematically study the magnon band structure and magnon density perpendicular to the superlattice plane of one-dimensional magnonic crystals, with a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with ferromagnetic (FM) or antiferromagnetic (AFM) interlayer exchange coupling. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy and external magnetic field on the magnon-energy band and magnon density in the K{sub x}-direction are investigated in three situations: a) the magnon band of magnetic superlattices with FM interlayer coupling, b) separate and c) overlapping magnon bands of magnetic superlattices with AFM interlayer coupling. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study the magnon band structure and magnon density of magnonic crystals and the results are beneficial for the design of magnonic-crystal waveguides or gigahertz-range spin-wave filters. - Highlights: • A quantum approach has been developed to study the magnon band of magnonic crystals. • The separate and overlapping magnon bands of magnetic superlattices are investigated. • The results are beneficial for the design of gigahertz-range spin-wave filters.

  9. Synthesis and photonic bandgap characterization of polymer inverse opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales; Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Centro Tecnologico de Ondas; Lopez-Tejeira, F.; Sanchez-Dehesa, J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada

    2001-03-16

    Polymer inverse opals with long-range order have been fabricated and their photonic crystal behavior examined. Good agreement between band structure calculations and experiment is found. It is envisaged that these inverse opals could be used for the modification of the electronic properties of incorporated luminescent materials and as matrices for the synthesis of spherical colloidal particles. (orig.)

  10. A short remark on the band structure of free-edge platonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael J. A.; Meylan, Michael H.; McPhedran, Ross C.; Poulton, Chris G.

    2014-10-01

    A corrected version of the multipole solution for a thin plate perforated in a doubly periodic fashion is presented. It is assumed that free-edge boundary conditions are imposed at the edge of each cylindrical inclusion. The solution procedure given here exploits a well-known property of Bessel functions to obtain the solution directly, in contrast to the existing incorrect derivation. A series of band diagrams and an updated table of values are given for the resulting system (correcting known publications on the topic), which shows a spectral band at low frequency for the free-edge problem. This is in contrast to clamped-edge boundary conditions for the same biharmonic plate problem, which features a low-frequency band gap. The numerical solution procedure outlined here is also simplified relative to earlier publications, and exploits the spectral properties of complex-valued matrices to determine the band structure of the structured plate.

  11. Deformation analysis of ferrite/pearlite banded structure under uniaxial tension using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochuan; Wang, Yong; Yang, Jia; Qiao, Zhixia; Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The ferrite/pearlite banded structure causes the anisotropic behavior of steel. In this paper, digital image correlation (DIC) was used to analyze the micro deformation of this microstructure under uniaxial tension. The reliability of DIC for this application was verified by a zero-deformation experiment. The results show that the performance of DIC can satisfy the requirements of the tensile deformation measurement. Then, two uniaxial tensile tests in different directions (longitudinal direction and transverse direction) were carried out and DIC was used to measure the micro deformation of the ferrite/pearlite banded structure. The measured results show that the ferrite bands undergo the main deformation in the transverse tension, which results in the relatively weaker tensile properties in the transverse direction than in the longitudinal direction. This work is useful to guide the modification of the bands morphology and extend the application scope of DIC.

  12. Study on electro-optic properties of two-dimensional PLZT photonic crystal band structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Kai; WU Xiao-gang; WANG Mei-ting

    2011-01-01

    The band characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) photonic cystals are analyzed by finite element method. The electro-optic effect of PLZT can cause the refractive index change when it is imposed by the applied electric field, and the band structure of 2D photonic crystals based on PLZT varies accordingly. The effect of the applied electric field on the structural characteristics of the first and second band gaps in 2D PLZT photonic crystals is analyzed in detail. And the results show that for each band gap, the variations of start wavelength, cut-off wavelength and bandwidth are proportional to quadratic of the electric field.

  13. Band structure engineering in van der Waals heterostructures via dielectric screening: the GΔW method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kirsten Trøstrup; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    precise magnitude is non-trivial to predict because of the non-local nature of the screening in quasi-2D crystals. Moreover, the effect is not captured by effective single-particle methods such as density functional theory. Here we present an efficient and general method for calculating the band gap......The idea of combining different two-dimensional (2D) crystals in van der Waals heterostructures (vdWHs) has led to a new paradigm for band structure engineering with atomic precision. Due to the weak interlayer couplings, the band structures of the individual 2D crystals are largely preserved upon...... formation of the heterostructure. However, regardless of the details of the interlayer hybridisation, the size of the 2D crystal band gaps are always reduced due to the enhanced dielectric screening provided by the surrounding layers. The effect can be significant (on the order of electron volts) but its...

  14. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively.

  15. An Innovations-Based Noise Cancelling Technique on Inverse Kepstrum Whitening Filter and Adaptive FIR Filter in Beamforming Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsoo Jeong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an acoustic noise cancelling technique using an inverse kepstrum system as an innovations-based whitening application for an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR filter in beamforming structure. The inverse kepstrum method uses an innovations-whitened form from one acoustic path transfer function between a reference microphone sensor and a noise source so that the rear-end reference signal will then be a whitened sequence to a cascaded adaptive FIR filter in the beamforming structure. By using an inverse kepstrum filter as a whitening filter with the use of a delay filter, the cascaded adaptive FIR filter estimates only the numerator of the polynomial part from the ratio of overall combined transfer functions. The test results have shown that the adaptive FIR filter is more effective in beamforming structure than an adaptive noise cancelling (ANC structure in terms of signal distortion in the desired signal and noise reduction in noise with nonminimum phase components. In addition, the inverse kepstrum method shows almost the same convergence level in estimate of noise statistics with the use of a smaller amount of adaptive FIR filter weights than the kepstrum method, hence it could provide better computational simplicity in processing. Furthermore, the rear-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure has shown less signal distortion in the desired signal than the front-end kepstrum method and the front-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure.

  16. Structure and giant inverse magnetocaloric effect of epitaxial Ni-Co-Mn-Al films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, N.; Kucza, D.; Yildirim, O.; Yuzuak, E.; Dincer, I.; Behler, A.; Weise, B.; Helmich, L.; Boehnke, A.; Klimova, S.; Waske, A.; Elerman, Y.; Hütten, A.

    2015-05-01

    The structural, magnetic, and magnetocaloric properties of epitaxial Ni-Co-Mn-Al thin films with different compositions have been studied. The films were deposited on MgO(001) substrates by co-sputtering on heated substrates. All films show a martensitic transformation, where the transformation temperatures are strongly dependent on the composition. The structure of the martensite phase is shown to be 14 M . The metamagnetic martensitic transformation occurs from strongly ferromagnetic austenite to weakly magnetic martensite. The structural properties of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy and temperature dependent x-ray diffraction. Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties were analyzed using temperature dependent and isothermal magnetization measurements. We find that Ni41Co10.4Mn34.8Al13.8 films show giant inverse magnetocaloric effects with magnetic entropy change of 17.5 J kg-1K-1 for μ0Δ H =5 T.

  17. Band structure properties of (BGa)P semiconductors for lattice matched integration on (001) silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Nadir; Sweeney, Stephen [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Hosea, Jeff [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK and Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Liebich, Sven; Zimprich, Martin; Volz, Kerstin; Stolz, Wolfgang [Material Sciences Center and Faculty of Physics, Philipps-University, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Kunert, Bernerdette [NAsP III/V GmbH, Am Knechtacker 19, 35041 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    We report the band structure properties of (BGa)P layers grown on silicon substrate using metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy. Using surface photo-voltage spectroscopy we find that both the direct and indirect band gaps of (BGa)P alloys (strained and unstrained) decrease with Boron content. Our experimental results suggest that the band gap of (BGa)P layers up to 6% Boron is large and suitable to be used as cladding and contact layers in GaP-based quantum well heterostructures on silicon substrates.

  18. Pathway to Oxide Photovoltaics via Band-Structure Engineering of SnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Haowei; Bikowski, Andre; Zakutayev, Andriy; Lany, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    All-oxide photovoltaics could open rapidly scalable manufacturing routes, if only oxide materials with suitable electronic and optical properties were developed. SnO has exceptional doping and transport properties among oxides, but suffers from a strongly indirect band gap. Here, we address this shortcoming by band-structure engineering through isovalent but heterostructural alloying with divalent cations (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Zn). Using first-principles calculations, we show that suitable band gaps and optical properties close to that of direct semiconductors are achievable, while the comparatively small effective masses are preserved in the alloys. Initial thin film synthesis and characterization support the feasibility of the approach.

  19. Photonic band structures of two-dimensional photonic crystals with deformed lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Xiang-Hua; Zheng Wan-Hua; Ma Xiao-Tao; Ren Gang; Xia Jian-Bai

    2005-01-01

    Using the plane-wave expansion method, we have calculated and analysed the changes of photonic band structures arising from two kinds of deformed lattices, including the stretching and shrinking of lattices. The square lattice with square air holes and the triangular lattice with circular air holes are both studied. Calculated results show that the change of lattice size in some special ranges can enlarge the band gap, which depends strongly on the filling factor of air holes in photonic crystals; and besides, the asymmetric band edges will appear with the broken symmetry of lattices.

  20. Analysis of two-dimensional photonic band gap structure with a rhombus lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limei Qi; Ziqiang Yang; Xi Gao; Zheng Liang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The relative band gap for a rhombus lattice photonic crystal is studied by plane wave expansion method and high frequency structure simulator (HFSS) simulation. General wave vectors in the first Briliouin zone are derived. The relative band gap as a function of air-filling factor and background material is investigated, respectively, and the nature of photonic band gap for different lattice angles is analyzed by the distribution of electric energy. These results would provide theoretical instruction for designing optical integrated devices using photonic crystal with a rhombus lattice.

  1. Electronic band structure of Cu(2)O by spin density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M; Schwartz, R; Stolz, H; Redmer, R

    2009-01-07

    The band structure of Cu(2)O is calculated using density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation. By taking spin-orbit coupling into account the split between the Γ(7)(+) and the Γ(8)(+) valence band states is obtained as 128 meV. The highest valence band shows a noticeable nonparabolicity close to the Γ point. This is important for the quantitative description of excitons in this material, which is considered to be the best candidate for the confirmation that Bose-Einstein condensation also occurs in excitonic systems.

  2. Band structure in doubly-odd nuclei with mass around 130

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashiyama, K [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yoshinaga, N [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan)

    2006-10-10

    Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A {approx} 130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The doublet bands turn out to be realized by the chopsticks-like motion of two angular momenta of the unpaired neutron and the unpaired proton, weakly coupled with the quadrupole collective excitations of the even-even part of the nucleus.

  3. Engineering the electronic structure and band gap of boron nitride nanoribbon via external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad

    2016-06-01

    By using the third nearest neighbor modified tight binding (3NN-TB) method, the electronic structure and band gap of BNNRs under transverse electric fields are explored. The band gap of the BNNRs has a decreasing with increasing the intensity of the applied electric field, independent on the ribbon edge types. Furthermore, an analytic model for the dependence of the band gap in armchair and zigzag BNNRs on the electric field is proposed. The reduction of E g is similar for some N a armchair and N z zigzag BNNRs independent of their edges.

  4. Study of periodic band gap structure of the magnetized plasma photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-feng; MA Li; LIU Shao-bin

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the periodic band gaps of the one dimension magnetized plasma photonic crystals are studied with the piecewise linear current density recursive convolution (PLCDRC) finite-differential time-domain (FDTD) method. In fre-quency-domain, the transmission coefficients of electromagnetic Gaussian pulses are computed, and the effects of the periodic structure constant, plasma layer thickness and parameters of plasma on the properties of periodic band gaps of magnetized photonic crystals are analyzed. The results show that the periodic band gaps depend strongly on the plasma parameters.

  5. The LDA+U calculation of electronic band structure of GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahuguna, B. P.; Sharma, R. O.; Saini, L. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the electronic band structure of bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) using first principle approach. A series of calculations has been performed by applying norm-conserving pseudopotentials and ultrasoft non-norm-conserving pseudopotentials within the density functional theory. These calculations yield too small band gap as compare to experiment. Thus, we use semiemperical approach called local density approximation plus the multi-orbital mean-field Hubbard model (LDA+U), which is quite effective in order to describe the band gap of GaAs.

  6. Carrier-carrier relaxation kinetics in quantum well semiconductor structures with nonparabolic energy bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dery, H.; Tromborg, Bjarne; Eisenstein, G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe carrier-carrier scattering dynamics in an inverted quantum well structure including the nonparabolic nature of the valance band. A solution of the semiconductor Bloch equations yields strong evidence to a large change in the temporal evolution of the carrier distributions compared...... to the case of parabolic bands. The nonparabolic bands and the consequent change in the density of states reduce considerably the degree of gain saturation while decreasing the time constant governing the relaxation. This results in a measurable reduction of the role played by carrier-carrier scattering...

  7. Band gap expansion, shear inversion phase change behaviour and low-voltage induced crystal oscillation in low-dimensional tin selenide crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robin; Suyetin, Mikhail; Lister, Samantha; Dyson, M Adam; Trewhitt, Harrison; Goel, Sanam; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazu; Giusca, Cristina; Kashtiban, Reza J; Hutchison, John L; Dore, John C; Bell, Gavin R; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Sloan, Jeremy

    2014-05-28

    In common with rocksalt-type alkali halide phases and also semiconductors such as GeTe and SnTe, SnSe forms all-surface two atom-thick low dimensional crystals when encapsulated within single walled nanotubes (SWNTs) with diameters below ∼1.4 nm. Whereas previous density functional theory (DFT) studies indicate that optimised low-dimensional trigonal HgTe changes from a semi-metal to a semi-conductor, low-dimensional SnSe crystals typically undergo band-gap expansion. In slightly wider diameter SWNTs (∼1.4-1.6 nm), we observe that three atom thick low dimensional SnSe crystals undergo a previously unobserved form of a shear inversion phase change resulting in two discrete strain states in a section of curved nanotube. Under low-voltage (i.e. 80-100 kV) imaging conditions in a transmission electron microscope, encapsulated SnSe crystals undergo longitudinal and rotational oscillations, possibly as a result of the increase in the inelastic scattering cross-section of the sample at those voltages.

  8. Study on band gap structure of Fibonacci quantum superlattices by using the transfer matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, V.; Castro-Palacio, J. C.; Marí, B.; Monsoriu, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    The scattering properties of particles in a one-dimensional Fibonacci sequence based potential have been analyzed by means of the Transfer Matrix Method. The electronic band gaps are examined comparatively with those obtained using the corresponding periodic potentials. The reflection coefficient shows self-similar properties for the Fibonacci superlattices. Moreover, by using the generalized Bragg's condition, the band gaps positions are derived from the golden mean involved in the design of the superlattice structure.

  9. Coexisting Honeycomb and Kagome Characteristics in the Electronic Band Structure of Molecular Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Sami; Ropo, Matti; Nieminen, Jouko; Akola, Jaakko; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-06-08

    We uncover the electronic structure of molecular graphene produced by adsorbed CO molecules on a copper (111) surface by means of first-principles calculations. Our results show that the band structure is fundamentally different from that of conventional graphene, and the unique features of the electronic states arise from coexisting honeycomb and Kagome symmetries. Furthermore, the Dirac cone does not appear at the K-point but at the Γ-point in the reciprocal space and is accompanied by a third, almost flat band. Calculations of the surface structure with Kekulé distortion show a gap opening at the Dirac point in agreement with experiments. Simple tight-binding models are used to support the first-principles results and to explain the physical characteristics behind the electronic band structures.

  10. Dual-Band Perfect Absorption by Breaking the Symmetry of Metamaterial Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Le Dinh; Qui, Vu Dinh; Dinh, Tiep Hong; Hai, Pham; Giang, Trinh Thị; Cuong, Tran Manh; Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh

    2017-02-01

    Since the first proposal of Landy et al. (Phys Rev Lett 100:207402, 2008), the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) has rapidly become one of the most crucial research trends. Recently, dual-band, multi-band and broadband MPA have been highly desirable in electronic applications. In this paper, we demonstrate and evaluate a MPA structure which can generate dual-band absorption operating at the microwave frequency by breaking the symmetry of structure. There is an agreement between simulation and experimental results. The results can be explained by using the equivalent LC circuit and the electric field distribution of this structure. In addition, various structures with different symmetry configurations were studied to gain greater insight into the absorption.

  11. Effect of pressure on the band structure of BC{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manju, M.S.; Harikrishnan, G.; Ajith, K.M., E-mail: ajith@nitk.ac.in [Computational Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka Surathkal, Mangalore-575025 (India); Valsakumar, M.C. [Indian Institute of Technology, Ahalia Campus, Kozhipara, Palakkad-678557 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to study the effect of pressure on the band structure of two dimensional BC{sub 3} sheet. BC{sub 3} is a semiconductor at ambient conditions having a band gap of ~0.3 eV. Electronic structure calculations are carried out on BC{sub 3} at pressures of 5, 20, 50 and 100 GPa. The system shows a semiconductor – metal transition by the application of pressure without any structural transition.

  12. Self-consistent photonic band structure of dielectric superlattices containing nonlinear optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousse, V; Vigneron, J P

    2001-02-01

    The theory of photonic crystals is extended to include the optical Kerr effect taking place in weak third-order, nonlinear materials present in the unit cell. The influence on the dispersion relations of the illumination caused by a single Bloch mode transiting through the crystal structure is examined. Special attention is given to the modification of the photonic gap width and position. Assuming an instantaneous change of refractive index with illumination, the nonlinear band structure problem is solved as a sequence of ordinary, linear band structure calculations, carried out in a plane-wave field representation.

  13. Band structure and phonon properties of lithium fluoride at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, J. M., E-mail: amitjignesh@yahoo.co.in [Government Engineering College, Gandhinagar 382028, Gujarat (India); Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Mitesh [Government Polytechnic for Girls, Athwagate, Surat395001, Gujarat (India); Gajjar, P. N., E-mail: pngajjar@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India)

    2016-05-23

    High pressure structural and electronic properties of Lithium Fluoride (LiF) have been studied by employing an ab-initio pseudopotential method and a linear response scheme within the density functional theory (DFT) in conjunction with quasi harmonic Debye model. The band structure and electronic density of states conforms that the LiF is stable and is having insulator behavior at ambient as well as at high pressure up to 1 Mbar. Conclusions based on Band structure, phonon dispersion and phonon density of states are outlined.

  14. Low band gap frequencies and multiplexing properties in 1D and 2D mass spring structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the propagation of elastic waves in 1D and 2D mass spring structures. An analytical and computation model is presented for the 1D and 2D mass spring systems with different examples. An enhancement in the band gap values was obtained by modeling the structures to obtain low frequency band gaps at small dimensions. Additionally, the evolution of the band gap as a function of mass value is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the local resonance property in frequency ranges within the gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice in the 1D and 2D mass spring system. A linear defect formed of a row of specific masses produces an elastic waveguide that transmits at the narrow pass band frequency. The frequency of the waveguides can be selected by adjusting the mass and stiffness coefficients of the materials constituting the waveguide. Moreover, we pay more attention to analyze the wave multiplexer and DE-multiplexer in the 2D mass spring system. We show that two of these tunable waveguides with alternating materials can be employed to filter and separate specific frequencies from a broad band input signal. The presented simulation data is validated through comparison with the published research, and can be extended in the development of resonators and MEMS verification.

  15. Photonic Band Gap Structures with Periodically Arranged Atoms in a Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-Yu; CHEN Fang; ZHOU Jian-Ying

    2005-01-01

    @@ Linear transmission, reflection and absorption spectra for a new two-dimensional photonic crystal with periodically arranged resonant atoms are examined. Numerical results show that a twin-gap structure with forbidden bands displaced from a non-doped bandgap structure can be produced as a result of atomic polarization. The absorption spectrum is also significantly altered compared to the single atom entity.

  16. Phononic band gaps and vibrations in one- and two-dimensional mass-spring structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The vibrational response of finite periodic lattice structures subjected to periodic loading is investigated. Special attention is devoted to the response in frequency ranges with gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice. The effects of boundaries, viscous dampin...

  17. Phononic band gaps and vibrations in one- and two-dimensional mass-spring structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The vibrational response of finite periodic lattice structures subjected to periodic loading is investigated. Special attention is devoted to the response in frequency ranges with gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice. The effects of boundaries, viscous dampin...

  18. Electronic band structure of a type-Ⅱ 'W' quantum well calculated by an eight-band k·p model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xiu; Gu Yong-Xian; Wang Qing; Wei Xin; Chen Liang-Hui

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation of type-Ⅱ 'W' quantum wells for the InAs/Ga1-xInxSb/AlSb family, where 'W' denotes the conduction profile of the material. We focus our attention on using the eight-band k·p model to calculate the band structures within the framework of finite element method. For the sake of clarity, the simulation in this paper is simplified and based on only one period-AlSb/InAs/Ga1-xInxSb/InAs/AlSb. The obtained numerical results include the energy levels and wavefunctions of carriers. We discuss the variations of the electronic properties by changing several important parameters, such as the thickness of either InAs or Ga1-xInxSb layer and the alloy composition in Ga1-xInxSb separately. In the last part, in order to compare the eight-band k·p model, we recalculate the conduction bands of the 'W' structure using the one-band k·p model and then discuss the difference between the two results, showing that conduction bands are strongly coupled with valence bands in the narrow band gap structure. The in-plane energy dispersions, which illustrate the suppression of the Auger recombination process, are also obtained.

  19. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-07

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.

  20. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.

  1. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications. PMID:27600885

  2. Enhanced power factor and reduced Lorenz number in the Wiedemann-Franz law due to pudding mold type band structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Hidetomo; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    We study the relationship between the shape of the electronic band structure and the thermoelectric properties. In order to study the band shape dependence of the thermoelectric properties generally, we first adopt models with band structures having the dispersion E ( k ) ˜ | k | n with n = 2, 4, and 6. We consider one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems and calculate the thermoelectric properties using the Boltzmann equation approach within the constant quasi-particle lifetime approximation. n = 2 corresponds to the usual parabolic band structure, while the band shape for n = 4 and 6 has a flat portion at the band edge, so that the density of states diverges at the bottom of the band. We call this kind of band structure the "pudding mold type band". n ≥ 4 belong to the pudding mold type band, but since the density of states diverges even for n = 2 in the one dimensional system, this is also categorized as the pudding mold type. Due to the large density of states and the rapid change of the group velocity around the band edge, the spectral conductivity of the pudding mold type band structures becomes larger than that of the usual parabolic band structures. It is found that the pudding mold type band has a coexistence of a large Seebeck coefficient and a large electric conductivity and a small Lorenz number in the Wiedemann-Franz law due to the specific band shape. We also find that the low dimensionality of the band structure can contribute to large electronic conductivity and hence a small Lorenz number. We conclude that the pudding mold type band, especially in low dimensional systems, can enhance not only the power factor but also the dimensionless figure of merit due to stronger reduction of the Lorenz number.

  3. A Novel Inversion Method of Manufacturing Flaws in the Packaging of Conformal Load-Bearing Antenna Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite material is widely used in the conformal load-bearing antenna structure (CLAS, and the manufacturing flaws in the packaging process of the CLAS will lead to the degradation of its wave-transparent property. For this problem, a novel inverse method of the flaw’s dimension by antenna-radome system’s far field data has been proposed. Two steps are included in the inversion: the first one is the inversion from the far filed data to the transmission coefficient of the CLAS’s radome; the second one is the inversion from the transmission coefficient to the flaw’s dimension. The inversion also has a good potential for the separable multilayer composite material radome. A 12.5 GHz CLAS with microstrip antenna array is used in the simulation, which indicates the effectiveness of the novel inversion method. Finally, the error analysis of the inversion method is presented by numerical simulation; the results is that the inversed error could be less than 10%, if the measurement error of far field data is less than 0.45 dB in amplitude and ±5° in phase.

  4. Rotational band structure in Mg32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, H. L.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Poves, A.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Bowry, M.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Gade, A.; Ideguchi, E.; Iwasaki, H.; Langer, C.; Lee, I. Y.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E.; Morse, C.; Richard, A. L.; Rissanen, J.; Smalley, D.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wiens, A.; Williams, S. J.; Wimmer, K.; Yamamato, T.

    2016-03-01

    There is significant evidence supporting the existence of deformed ground states within the neutron-rich N ≈ 20 neon, sodium, and magnesium isotopes that make up what is commonly called the “island of inversion.” However, the rotational band structures, which are a characteristic fingerprint of a rigid nonspherical shape, have yet to be observed. In this work, we report on a measurement and analysis of the yrast (lowest lying) rotational band in 32 Mg up to spin I = 6 + produced in a two-step projectile fragmentation reaction and observed using the state-of-the-art γ -ray tracking detector array, GRETINA ( γ -ray energy tracking in-beam nuclear array). Large-scale shell-model calculations using the SDPF-U-MIX effective interaction show excellent agreement with the new data. Moreover, a theoretical analysis of the spectrum of rotational states as a function of the pairing gap, together with cranked-shell-model calculations, provides intriguing evidence for a reduction in pairing correlations with increased angular momentum, also in line with the shell-model results.

  5. The Effects of 3-D Velocity Structure on a Finite Fault Inversion of the 1989 M 7.1 Loma Prieta Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P.; Archuleta, R.

    2002-12-01

    Several excellent studies on finite fault source of the 1989 M 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake have been completed using different data sets and approaches (Beroza, 1991; Hartzell et al., 1991; Steidl et al., 1991; Wald, et al., 1991). Most of these studies find low slip in the hypocentral region and a bimodal distribution of slip with respect to the hypocenter. The seismic moment ranges from 2.3x1019 to 3.5x1019 N-m, spanning approximately the same range determined teleseismically at longer periods. In addition to the similarities, the differences in these models were also indicated by Beroza (1995). The location of the high-slip areas and, specially, the rake differs among these models. The lateral variations in velocity structure may be one important effect causing the differences among the source models. To address this problem, we determine a finite fault source model for the Loma Prieta earthquake through the inversion of ground motion using 3D Green's functions. We used the 3D crustal model recently developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (Brocher et al., 1997) and a 3D viscoelastic finite-difference method (Liu and Archuleta, 1999) to compute the Green's functions. The data from 16 three-component stations and Green's functions are band-passed between 0.05-1.0 Hz. A global inversion algorithm (Liu and Archuleta, 2001) is employed to solve for the two components of fault slip, rise time, rupture time and the shape of source function for each subfault. In the inversion process we limit the time window to the direct P and S waves to mitigate the influence of the uncertainties in the 3D-velocity structure on later arrivals. We also perform another inversion using 1-D synthetic Green's functions. To insure that the inversion results are comparable, both inversions will use exactly same procedure, data, source parameterization and constraint conditions. By quantitatively comparing spatial distributions of source parameters and the fit between the data and the

  6. Measurements and Kernels for Source-Structure Inversions in Noise Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2013-01-01

    Seismic noise cross correlations are used to image crustal structure and heterogeneity. Typically, seismic networks are only anisotropically illuminated by seismic noise, a consequence of the non-uniform distribution of sources. Here, we study the sensitivity of such a seismic network to structural heterogeneity in a 2-D setting. We compute finite-frequency cross-correlation sensitivity kernels for travel-time, waveform-energy and waveform-difference measurements. In line with expectation, wavespeed anomalies are best imaged using travel times and the source distribution using cross-correlation energies. Perturbations in attenuation and impedance are very difficult to image and reliable inferences require a high degree of certainty in the knowledge of the source distribution and wavespeed model (at least in the case of transmission tomography studied here). We perform single-step Gauss-Newton inversions for the source distribution and the wavespeed, in that order, and quantify the associated Cram\\'{e}r-Rao lo...

  7. S-wave velocity structure inferred from receiver function inversion in Tengchong volcanic area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺传松; 王椿镛; 吴建平

    2004-01-01

    Tengchong volcanic area is located near the impinging and underthrust margin of India and Eurasia plates. The volcanic activity is closely related to the tectonic environment. The deep structure characteristics are inferred from the receiver function inversion with the teleseismic records in the paper. The results show that the low velocity zone is influenced by the NE-trending Dayingjiang fault. The S-wave low velocity structure occurs obviously in the southern part of the fault, but unobviously in its northern part. There are low velocity zones in the shallow position, which coincides with the seismicity. It also demonstrates that the low velocity zone is directly related to the thermal activity in the volcanic area. Therefore, we consider that the volcano may be alive again.

  8. Model Data Fusion: developing Bayesian inversion to constrain equilibrium and mode structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hole, M J; Bertram, J; Svensson, J; Appel, L C; Blackwell, B D; Dewar, R L; Howard, J

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a new probabilistic "data fusion" framework based on Bayesian principles has been developed on JET and W7-AS. The Bayesian analysis framework folds in uncertainties and inter-dependencies in the diagnostic data and signal forward-models, together with prior knowledge of the state of the plasma, to yield predictions of internal magnetic structure. A feature of the framework, known as MINERVA (J. Svensson, A. Werner, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 50, 085022, 2008), is the inference of magnetic flux surfaces without the use of a force balance model. We discuss results from a new project to develop Bayesian inversion tools that aim to (1) distinguish between competing equilibrium theories, which capture different physics, using the MAST spherical tokamak; and (2) test the predictions of MHD theory, particularly mode structure, using the H-1 Heliac.

  9. Band structure of fcc-C60 solid state crystal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Javanbakht

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the architecture of the C60 cluster to drive its atomic positions which can be seen at room temperature. We then used the obtained carbon positions as a basis set for the fcc structure to construct the fcc-C60 compound. Self consistent calculations were performed based on the density functional theory (DFT utilizing the accurate WIEN2K code to solve the single-particle Kohen-Sham equation within the augmented plane waves plus local orbital (APW+lo method. The cohesive energy has been found to be 1.537 eV for the fcc-C60 . The calculated small cohesive energy that results from the weak Van der Waals-London interactions among a C60 cluster with its nearest neighbors is in good agreement with experiment. The electron densities of states (DOSs were calculated for a C60 macromolecule as well as the fcc-C60 compound and the results were compared with each other. The band gap from DOS calculations has been found to be 0.7 eV. Band structures were also calculated within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA. The band structure calculation results in 1.04 eV for the direct band gap. Two kinds of σ and π bonds were determined in the band structure. Our results are in good agreement with experiment and pseudopotential calculations.

  10. UWB Band-notched Adjustable Antenna Using Concentric Split-ring Slots Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y.; Hong, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a kind of concentric split-ring slots structure is utilized to design a novel triple-band-notched UWB antenna. Firstly, a concentric split-ring slots structure that has a higher VSWR than that of a single slot at notch frequency is presented. What's more, the structure is very simple and feasible to obtain notched-band at different frequency by adjustment of the length of slot. Secondly, a triple-band-notched antenna, whose notched bands are at 3.52-3.81 GHz for WiMAX and 5.03-5.42 GHz and 5.73-56.17 GHz for WLAN, is designed by using this structure. At last, a compact size of 24 × 30 mm2 of the proposed antenna has been fabricated and measured and it is shown that the proposed antenna has a broadband matched impedance (3.05-14 GHz, VSWR < 2), relatively stable gain and good omnidirectional radiation patterns at low bands.

  11. Ab initio theory for ultrafast magnetization dynamics with a dynamic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, B. Y.; Haag, M.; Fähnle, M.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced modifications of magnetic materials on very small spatial dimensions and ultrashort timescales are a promising field for novel storage and spintronic devices. Therefore, the contribution of electron-electron spin-flip scattering to the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnets after an ultrashort laser excitation is investigated. In this work, the dynamical change of the band structure resulting from the change of the magnetization in time is taken into account on an ab initio level. We find a large influence of the dynamical band structure on the magnetization dynamics and we illustrate the thermalization and relaxation process after laser irradiation. Treating the dynamical band structure yields a demagnetization comparable to the experimental one.

  12. Graphene Oxide Regulated Tin Oxide Nanostructures: Engineering Composition, Morphology, Band Structure, and Photocatalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2015-12-16

    A facile, one-step hydrothermal method has been developed to fabricate tin oxide-reduced graphene oxide (Sn-RGO) nanocomposites with tunable composition, morphology, and energy band structure by utilizing graphene oxide (GO) as a multifunctional two-dimensional scaffold. By adjusting the GO concentration during synthesis, a variety of tin oxide nanomaterials with diverse composition and morphology are obtained. Simultaneously, the varying of GO concentration can also narrow the bandgap and tune the band edge positions of the Sn-RGO nanocomposites. As a result, the Sn-RGO nanocomposites with controllable composition, morphology, and energy band structure are obtained, which exhibit efficient photoactivities toward methyl orange (MO) degradation under visible-light irradiation. It is expected that our work would point to the new possibility of using GO for directing synthesis of semiconductor nanomaterials with tailored structure and physicochemical properties.

  13. Electronic band structure and optical properties of the cubic, Sc, Y and La hydride systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterman, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations are used to interpret the optical spectra of the cubic Sc, Y and La hydride systems. Self-consistent band calculations of ScH/sub 2/ and YH/sub 2/ were carried out. The respective joint densities of states are computed and compared to the dielectric functions determined from the optical measurements. Additional calculations were performed in which the Fermi level or band gap energies are rigidly shifted by a small energy increment. These calculations are then used to simulate the derivative structure in thermomodulation spectra and relate the origin of experimental interband features to the calculated energy bands. While good systematic agreement is obtained for several spectral features, the origin of low-energy interband transitions in YH/sub 2/ cannot be explained by these calculated bands. A lattice-size-dependent premature occupation of octahedral sites by hydrogen atoms in the fcc metal lattice is suggested to account for this discrepancy. Various non-self-consistent calculations are used to examine the effect of such a premature occupation. Measurements of the optical absorptivity of LaH/sub x/ with 1.6 < x < 2.9 are presented which, as expected, indicate a more premature occupation of the octahedral sites in the larger LaH/sub 2/ lattice. These experimental results also suggest that, in contrast to recent calculations, LaH/sub 3/ is a small-band-gap semiconductor.

  14. Band structures in two-dimensional phononic crystals with periodic Jerusalem cross slot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinggang; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Kunpeng; Song, Ruifang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of periodic Jerusalem cross slot in air matrix with a square lattice is presented. The dispersion relations and the transmission coefficient spectra are calculated by using the finite element method based on the Bloch theorem. The formation mechanisms of the band gaps are analyzed based on the acoustic mode analysis. Numerical results show that the proposed phononic crystal structure can yield large band gaps in the low-frequency range. The formation mechanism of opening the acoustic band gaps is mainly attributed to the resonance modes of the cavities inside the Jerusalem cross slot structure. Furthermore, the effects of the geometrical parameters on the band gaps are further explored numerically. Results show that the band gaps can be modulated in an extremely large frequency range by the geometry parameters such as the slot length and width. These properties of acoustic waves in the proposed phononic crystals can potentially be applied to optimize band gaps and generate low-frequency filters and waveguides.

  15. Crustal structure of the northern Menderes Massif, western Turkey, imaged by joint gravity and magnetic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Klaus; Gallardo, Luis A.; Wedin, Francis; Sener, Kerim

    2016-10-01

    In western Anatolia, the Anatolide domain of the Tethyan orogen is exposed in one of the Earth's largest metamorphic core complexes, the Menderes Massif. The Menderes Massif experienced a two-stage exhumation: tectonic denudation in the footwall of a north-directed Miocene extensional detachment, followed by fragmentation by E-W and NW-SE-trending graben systems. Along the northern boundary of the core complex, the tectonic units of the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture zone overly the stage one footwall of the core complex, the northern Menderes Massif. In this study, we explore the structure of the upper crust in the northern Menderes Massif with cross-gradient joint inversion of gravity and aeromagnetic data along a series of 10-km-deep profiles. Our inversions, which are based on gravity and aeromagnetic measurements and require no geological and petrophysical constraints, reveal the salient features of the Earth's upper crust. We image the northern Menderes Massif as a relatively homogenous domain of low magnetization and medium to high density, with local anomalies related to the effect of interspersed igneous bodies and shallow basins. In contrast, both the northern and western boundaries of the northern Menderes Massif stand out as domains where dense mafic, metasedimentary and ultramafic domains with a weak magnetic signature alternate with low-density igneous complexes with high magnetization. With our technique, we are able to delineate Miocene basins and igneous complexes, and map the boundary between intermediate to mafic-dominated subduction-accretion units of the suture zone and the underlying felsic crust of the Menderes Massif. We demonstrate that joint gravity and magnetic inversion are not only capable of imaging local and regional changes in crustal composition, but can also be used to map discontinuities of geodynamic significance such as the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture and the West Anatolia Transfer Zone.

  16. Cherenkov oscillator operating at the second band gap of leakage waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyu-Ha; Park, Seong Hee; Lee, Kitae; Jeong, Young Uk

    2016-10-01

    An electromagnetic wave source operating around second band gaps of metallic grating structures is presented. The considered metallic grating structures are not perfect periodic but inhomogeneously structured within a period to have a second band gap where the wavelength is equal to the period of the structures. The radiation mechanism by an electron beam in the structures is different from the well-known Smith-Purcell radiation occurring in perfect periodic grating structures. That is, the radiating wave has a single frequency and the radiation is unidirectional. When the energy of the electron beam is synchronized at the standing wave point in the dispersion curves, strong interaction happens and coherent radiation perpendicular to the grating surface is generated with relatively lower starting oscillation current.

  17. Cherenkov oscillator operating at the second band gap of leakage waveguide structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Ha Jang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An electromagnetic wave source operating around second band gaps of metallic grating structures is presented. The considered metallic grating structures are not perfect periodic but inhomogeneously structured within a period to have a second band gap where the wavelength is equal to the period of the structures. The radiation mechanism by an electron beam in the structures is different from the well-known Smith-Purcell radiation occurring in perfect periodic grating structures. That is, the radiating wave has a single frequency and the radiation is unidirectional. When the energy of the electron beam is synchronized at the standing wave point in the dispersion curves, strong interaction happens and coherent radiation perpendicular to the grating surface is generated with relatively lower starting oscillation current.

  18. Multi-quasiparticle {gamma}-band structure in neutron-deficient Ce and Nd isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikh, J.A. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar, 190 006 (India); Bhat, G.H. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar, 190 006 (India); Palit, R.; Naik, Z. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai, 400 005 (India); Sun, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: sunyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2009-06-01

    The newly developed multi-quasiparticle triaxial projected shell model approach is employed to study the high-spin band structures in neutron-deficient even-even Ce- and Nd-isotopes. It is observed that {gamma}-bands are built on each intrinsic configuration of the triaxial mean-field deformation. Due to the fact that a triaxial configuration is a superposition of several K-states, the projection from these states results in several low-lying bands originating from the same intrinsic configuration. This generalizes the well-known concept of the surface {gamma}-oscillation in deformed nuclei based on the ground-state to {gamma}-bands built on multi-quasiparticle configurations. This new feature provides an alternative explanation on the observation of two I=10 aligning states in {sup 134}Ce and both exhibiting a neutron character.

  19. Multi-Quasiparticle Gamma-Band Structure in Neutron-Deficient Ce and Nd Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikh, Javid [ORNL; Bhat, G. H. [University of Kashmir, Srinagar, India; Palit, R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India; Naik, Z. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India; Sun, Y. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai

    2009-01-01

    The newly developed multi-quasiparticle triaxial projected shell-model approach is employed to study the high-spin band structures in neutron-deficient even-even Ce and Nd isotopes. It is observed that gamma bands are built on each intrinsic configuration of the triaxial mean-field deformation. Due to the fact that a triaxial configuration is a superposition of several K states, the projection from these states results in several low-lying bands originating from the same intrinsic configuration. This generalizes the well-known concept of the surface gamma oscillation in deformed nuclei based on the ground state to gamma bands built on multi-quasiparticle configurations. This new feature provides an alternative explanation on the observation of two I=10 aligning states in ^{134}Ce and both exhibiting a neutron character.

  20. TUNABLE Band Structures of 2d Multi-Atom Archimedean-Like Phononic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. L.; Chen, C. Q.; Tian, X. G.

    2012-06-01

    Two dimensional multi-atom Archimedean-like phononic crystals (MAPCs) can be obtained by adding "atoms" at suitable positions in primitive cells of traditional simple lattices. Band structures of solid-solid and solid-air MAPCs are computed by the finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch theory. For the solid-solid system, our results show that the MAPCs can be suitably designed to split and shift band gaps of the corresponding traditional simple phononic crystal (i.e., with only one scatterer inside a primitive cell). For the solid-air system, the MAPCs have more and wider band gaps than the corresponding traditional simple phononic crystal. Numerical calculations for both solid-solid and solid-air MAPCs show that the band gap of traditional simple phononic crystal can be tuned by appropriately adding "atoms" into its primitive cell.

  1. Microscopic structure of deformed and superdeformed collective bands in rotating nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasil, J.; Iudice, N. Lo; Andreozzi, F.; Knapp, F.; Porrino, A.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate in self-consistent cranked Nilsson plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation the structure of Hg190,192,194 in their evolution from normal to superdeformation and from low to high rotational frequencies. The analysis of the energy levels suggests a splitting of few normally deformed bands into two or more branches. The investigation of the dynamical moments of inertia supports the octupole character of the low-lying negative parity superdeformed bands, in agreement with previous theoretical predictions and experimental findings. As a more direct confirm of their octupole nature, we obtain strong E1 transitions linking those bands to the yrast superdeformed band, in agreement with experiments. A similar result is shown to hold also for Dy152. Like in Dy152, the collectivity of the low-lying scissors mode gets enhanced with the onset of superdeformation.

  2. Valence band structure of strained Si/(111)Si1-xGex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The strained Si techique has been widely adopted in the high-speed and high-performance devices and circuits. Based on the valence band E-k relations of strained Si/(111)Si1-xGex, the valence band and hole effective mass along the [111] and [-110] directions were obtained in this work. In comparison with the relaxed Si, the valence band edge degeneracy was partially lifted, and the significant change was observed band structures along the [111] and [-110] directions, as well as in its corresponding hole effective masses with the increasing Ge fraction. The results obtained can provide valuable references to the investigation concerning the Si-based strained devices enhancement and the conduction channel design related to stress and orientation.

  3. Crystal structure and band gap of AlGaAsN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munich, D. P.; Pierret, R. F.

    1987-09-01

    Quantum dielectric theory is applied to the quaternary alloy Al xGa 1- xAs 1- yN y to predict its electronic properties as a function of Al and N mole fractions. Results are presented for the expected crystal structure, minimum electron energy band gap, and direction in k-space of the band gap minimum for all x and y values. The results suggest that, for a proper choice of x and y, Al xGa 1- xAs 1- yN y could exhibit certain advantages over Al xGa 1- xAs when utilized in field-effect transistor structures.

  4. Quantum Devices Based on Modern Band Structure Engineering and Epitaxial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    Modern band structure engineering is based both on the important discoveries of the past century and modern epitaxial technology. The general goal is to control the behavior of charge carriers on an atomic scale, which affects how they interact with each other and their environment. Starting from the basic semiconductor heterostructure, band structure engineering has evolved into a powerful discipline, employing lower dimensionality to demonstrate new material properties. Several modern technologies under development are used as examples of how this discipline is enabling new types of devices and new functionality in areas with immediate application.

  5. Identify Structural Flaw Location and Type with an Inverse Algorithm of Resonance Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei; Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin

    2015-10-20

    To evaluate the fitness-for-service of a structural component and to quantify its remaining useful life, aging and service-induced structural flaws must be quantitatively determined in service or during scheduled maintenance shutdowns. Resonance inspection (RI), a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique, distinguishes the anomalous parts from the good parts based on changes in the natural frequency spectra. Known for its numerous advantages, i.e., low inspection cost, high testing speed, and broad applicability to complex structures, RI has been widely used in the automobile industry for quality inspection. However, compared to other contemporary direct visualization-based NDE methods, a more widespread application of RI faces a fundamental challenge because such technology is unable to quantify the flaw details, e.g. location, dimensions, and types. In this study, the applicability of a maximum correlation-based inverse RI algorithm developed by the authors is further studied for various flaw cases. It is demonstrated that a variety of common structural flaws, i.e. stiffness degradation, voids, and cracks, can be accurately retrieved by this algorithm even when multiple different types of flaws coexist. The quantitative relations between the damage identification results and the flaw characteristics are also developed to assist the evaluation of the actual state of health of the engineering structures.

  6. Eddy Current Inversion Models for Estimating Dimensions of Defects in Multilayered Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In eddy current nondestructive evaluation, one of the principal challenges is to determine the dimensions of defects in multilayered structures from the measured signals. It is a typical inverse problem which is generally considered to be nonlinear and ill-posed. In the paper, two effective approaches have been proposed to estimate the defect dimensions. The first one is a partial least squares (PLS regression method. The second one is a kernel partial least squares (KPLS regression method. The experimental research is carried out. In experiments, the eddy current signals responding to magnetic field changes are detected by a giant magnetoresistive (GMR sensor and preprocessed for noise elimination using a wavelet packet analysis (WPA method. Then, the proposed two approaches are used to construct the inversion models of defect dimension estimation. Finally, the estimation results are analyzed. The performance comparison between the proposed two approaches and the artificial neural network (ANN method is presented. The comparison results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed two methods. Between them, the KPLS regression method gives a better prediction performance than the PLS regression method at present.

  7. Potential Vorticity Structure and Inversion of the Cyclogenesis Over the Yangtze River and Huaihe River Valleys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the potential vorticity structure and inversion of the cyclogenesis over the Yangtze River and Huaihc River valleys during 21-23 June 2003 are investigated with a potential vorticity (PV) framework.The cyclogenesis is manifested by a lower-tropospheric PV anomaly over the Yangtze River and Huaihe River valleys at early stages mainly due to latent heat release, which greatly affects the evolution of the associated lower-tropospheric geopotential height and wind fields as demonstrated by piecewise PV inversion. At later stages, an upper-tropospheric PV anomaly develops, resulting in the growth of ridges over the cyclone in both the upstream and downstream, which provide a favorable background field for the low-level cyclone development. But the effect of a surface thermal anomaly always impedes the development of the cyclone to different extents during this cyclogenesis. It is further demonstrated that the position and the strength of the PV anomaly are closely related to the low-level cyclone development, and the lower-tropospheric PV anomaly seems to constitute the most significant feature, for instance, contributing about 60% to the low-level jet (LLJ).

  8. The Chemiluminescence and Structure Properties of Normal/Inverse Diffusion Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The flame emission spectrometry was applied to detect the distribution of excited radicals in two types CH4/O2 coflow jet diffusion flames (normal and inverse diffusion flames. Combining the image analysis along with the spectrometry, the chemiluminescence and structure characteristics of these diffusion flames were investigated. The results show that the inverse diffusion flame (IDF with relatively high inlet oxygen velocity is composed of two regions: a bright base and a tower on top of the base, which is quite different from the normal diffusion flame (NDF. The flame is divided into two regions along the flame axis based on maximum OH* position (Region I: initial reaction zone; Region II: further oxidation zone. The degree of the further oxidization taking place in Region II is obvious in accordance with OH* distribution, which is the main difference in reaction zone between fuel-rich condition and fuel-lean condition for NDFs. For IDFs, the change of OH* distribution with increasing equivalence O/C ratio ([O/C]e in Region II is not conspicuous. More OH* and CH* are generated in IDFs, due to the inner high-speed O2 flow promoting the mixing of fuel and oxygen to a certain extent.

  9. Structurally coupled inversion of ERT and refraction seismic data combined with cluster-based model integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kristofer; Ronczka, Mathias; Günther, Thomas; Wennermark, Marcus; Rücker, Carsten; Dahlin, Torleif

    2017-08-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and refraction seismics are among the most frequently used geophysical methods for site-investigations and the combined results can be very helpful to fill in the gaps between the point measurements made by traditional geotechnical methods such as Cone Penetration Test (CPT), core-drilling and geophysical borehole logging. The interpretation of the results from a geophysical investigation constituting a single method often yields ambiguous results. Hence, an approach utilizing multiple techniques is often necessary. To facilitate interpretation of such a combined dataset, we propose a more controlled and objective approach and present a method for a structurally coupled inversion of 2D electrical resistivity and refraction seismic data using unstructured meshes. Mean shift clustering is used to combine the two images and to compare the separate and coupled inversion methodologies. Two synthetic examples are used to demonstrate the method, and a field-data example is included as a proof of concept. In all cases a significant improvement by the coupling is visible. The methodology can be used as a tool for improved data interpretation and for obtaining a more comprehensive and complete picture of the subsurface by combining geophysical methods.

  10. Electronic structure of a narrow-gap semiconductor FeGa3 investigated by photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, M.; Shimada, K.; Utsumi, Y.; Morimoto, O.; Sato, H.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Hadano, Y.; Takabatake, T.

    2011-06-01

    We have performed a photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopic study of a narrow-gap semiconductor FeGa3, in order to characterize the occupied and unoccupied electronic states. The energy-gap size was found to be ~0.4 eV, and the valence-band maximum (VBM) was located around the A point of the Brillouin zone. We observed a dispersive Ga 4sp derived band near the Fermi level (EF), and Fe 3d narrow bands located at -0.5 and -1.1 eV away from EF. In contrast to the case of FeSi, there was no temperature-dependent peak enhancement at the VBM on cooling. The observed density of states and band dispersions were reasonably reproduced by the LDA+U calculation with the on-site effective Coulomb interaction Ueff~3 eV to the Fe 3d states. Present results indicate that, in spite of sizable Ueff/W~0.6 (W: band width), electron correlation effects are not significant in FeGa3 compared with FeSi since the VBM consists of the dispersive band with the reduced Fe 3d contribution, and the energy gap is large.

  11. Complete multipactor suppression in an X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, C. [Euclid Techlabs, LLC, 5900 Harper Rd, Solon, Ohio 44139, USA; High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Gold, S. H. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Fischer, Richard [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2016-05-09

    Multipactor is a major issue limiting the gradient of rf-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures. Theoretical models have predicted that an axial magnetic field applied to DLA structures may completely block the multipactor discharge. However, previous attempts to demonstrate this magnetic field effect in an X-band traveling-wave DLA structure were inconclusive, due to the axial variation of the applied magnetic field, and showed only partial suppression of the multipactor loading [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 213503 (2013)]. The present experiment has been performed under improved conditions with a uniform axial magnetic field extending along the length of an X-band standing-wave DLA structure. Multipactor loading began to be continuously reduced starting from 3.5 kG applied magnetic field and was completely suppressed at 8 kG. Dependence of multipactor suppression on the rf gradient inside the DLA structure was also measured.

  12. Band gap structures in two-dimensional super porous phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Sun, Xiu-zhan; Chen, Shao-ting

    2013-02-01

    As one kind of new linear cellular alloys (LCAs), Kagome honeycombs, which are constituted by triangular and hexagonal cells, attract great attention due to the excellent performance compared to the ordinary ones. Instead of mechanical investigation, the in-plane elastic wave dispersion in Kagome structures are analyzed in this paper aiming to the multi-functional application of the materials. Firstly, the band structures in the common two-dimensional (2D) porous phononic structures (triangular or hexagonal honeycombs) are discussed. Then, based on these results, the wave dispersion in Kagome honeycombs is given. Through the component cell porosity controlling, the effects of component cells on the whole responses of the structures are investigated. The intrinsic relation between the component cell porosity and the critical porosity of Kagome honeycombs is established. These results will provide an important guidance in the band structure design of super porous phononic crystals.

  13. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  14. Study on temperature property of band structures in onedimensional photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using transfer matrix method, the optical transmission properties in one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal is analyzed.When the temperature varies, not only the refractive index of the optical medium is changed because of the thermo-optical effect, but also the thickness of the optical medium is changed due to the thermal-expansion effect. Thus, the structure of 1/4 wave-plate stack in original photonic crystal is destroyed and the band structure varies. In this work, the effects of the temperature variation on the first and second band gap in a 1-D photonic crystal are analyzed in detail. It is found that the changes of the starting wavelength, the cut-off wavelength and the forbidden band width depend linearly on the temperature.

  15. Global Evolutionary Algorithms in the Design of Electromagnetic Band Gap Structures with Suppressed Surface Waves Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kovacs

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the automated design and optimization of electromagnetic band gap structures suppressing the propagation of surface waves. For the optimization, we use different global evolutionary algorithms like the genetic algorithm with the single-point crossover (GAs and the multi-point (GAm one, the differential evolution (DE and particle swarm optimization (PSO. The algorithms are mutually compared in terms of convergence velocity and accuracy. The developed technique is universal (applicable for any unit cell geometry. The method is based on the dispersion diagram calculation in CST Microwave Studio (CST MWS and optimization in Matlab. A design example of a mushroom structure with simultaneous electromagnetic band gap properties (EBG and the artificial magnetic conductor ones (AMC in the required frequency band is presented.

  16. Joint 3D seismic travel time and full channel electrical resistivity inversion with cross gradient structure constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Near surface geophysical exploration for the purpose of engineering design or construction For this reason, geophysical imaging demands a higher resolution and a better quantitative interpretation. Seismic travel time tomography and direct current resistivity tomography are two main methods for the near surface survey. Because of the limited coverage of observation system and the complex physical relationship between physical parameters and observations, individual geophysical method suffers issues of non-uniqueness and resolution limitation to some degree. We have developed a joint inversion method to combine seismic travel time tomography and full channel resistivity tomography. For the full channel resistivity survey, it uses two electrodes for power supply and all the other electrodes for recording. Compared with the traditional resistivity method, it collects more data and has a better model converge. Our joint inversion strategy relies on the structure constraint enforced through minimizing cross gradients between seismic velocity and resistivity models (Gallardo, 2003). For resistivity tomography, sensitivity kernels are obtained through the adjoint method by solving the electrostatic field equation with the finite-difference method. For seismic travel time tomography, ray paths and travel times are calculated using the fast marching method. We have tested our joint inversion method for a 2D cross-hole problem where two small zones with high and low velocity/resistivity anomalies. Seismic/electrical sources/receivers are installed in two boreholes. For separate seismic inversion, the smearing effect is evident and two anomaly zones are distorted and misplaced. For separate electric resistivity inversion, although two anomaly zones are positioned correctly their values are not accurate. By joint inversion, two velocity anomaly zones are clearly imaged and the smearing effect is greatly reduced. In comparison, for the resistivity model, the two anomaly zones

  17. Metal-like Band Structures of Ultrathin Si {111} and {112} Surface Layers Revealed through Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Huang, Michael H

    2017-07-11

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on Si (100), (110), (111), and (112) planes with tunable number of planes for evaluation of their band structures and density of states profiles. The purpose is to see whether silicon can exhibit facet-dependent properties derived from the presence of a thin surface layer having different band structures. No changes have been observed for single to multiple layers of Si (100) and (110) planes with a consistent band gap between the valence band and the conduction band. However, for 1, 2, 4, and 5 Si (111) and (112) planes, metal-like band structures were obtained with continuous density of states going from the valence band to the conduction band. For 3, 6, and more Si (111) planes, as well as 3 and 6 Si (112) planes, the same band structure as that seen for Si (100) and (110) planes has been obtained. Thus, beyond a layer thickness of five Si (111) planes at ≈1.6 nm, normal semiconductor behavior can be expected. The emergence of metal-like band structures for the Si (111) and (112) planes are related to variation in Si-Si bond length and bond distortion plus 3s and 3p orbital electron contributions in the band structure. This work predicts possession of facet-dependent electrical properties of silicon with consequences in FinFET transistor design. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. New band structures and an unpaired crossing in {sup 78}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, H.; Doring, J.; Johns, R.A.; Solomon, G.; Tabor, S.; Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D.; Lerma, F.; Sarantites, D.; Baktash, C.; Rudolph, D.; Yu, C.H.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.; Birriel, I.; Saladin, J.; Winchell, D.; Wood, V.Q.; Ragnarsson, I.

    1998-07-06

    High-spin states in {sup 78}Kr were studied using the {sup 58}Ni({sup 23}Na,3p) reaction at 70 MeV and the {sup 58}Ni({sup 28}Si,{alpha}4p) reaction at 130 MeV. Prompt {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences were measured using the Pitt-FSU detector array and the GAMMASPHERE-MICROBALL array. Results from these experiments have led to 26 new excitation levels, some of which have been grouped into 3 new bands. Spins were assigned based on directional correlations of oriented nuclei. Two of the new negative-parity bands appear to form a signature-partner pair based on a two-quasineutron structure, in contrast to the previously known two-quasiproton negative-parity bands. A forking has been observed at the 24{sup +} state in the yrast band, which calculations suggest may result from an unpaired crossing. The available evidence suggests oblate shapes in the yrast band coexist with prolate shapes in the negative-parity bands.

  19. New band structures and an unpaired crossing in {sup 78}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, H.; Doering, J.; Johns, G.D.; Kaye, R.A.; Solomon, G.Z.; Tabor, S.L. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Doering, J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D.R.; Lerma, F.; Sarantites, D.G. [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Baktash, C.; Rudolph, D.; Yu, C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Birriel, I.; Saladin, J.X.; Winchell, D.F.; Wood, V.Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    1999-02-01

    High-spin states in {sup 78}Kr were studied using the {sup 58}Ni({sup 23}Na,3p) reaction at 70 MeV and the {sup 58}Ni({sup 28}Si,{alpha}4p) reaction at 130 MeV. Prompt {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences were measured using the Pitt-FSU detector array and the GAMMASPHERE-MICROBALL array. Results from these experiments have led to 26 new excitation levels, some of which have been grouped into 3 new bands. Spins were assigned based on directional correlations of oriented nuclei. Two of the new negative-parity bands appear to form a signature-partner pair based on a two-quasineutron structure, in contrast to the previously known two-quasiproton negative-parity bands. A forking has been observed at the 24{sup +} state in the yrast band, which calculations suggest may result from an unpaired crossing. The available evidence suggests oblate shapes in the yrast band coexist with prolate shapes in the negative-parity bands. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Structural interpretation of El Hierro (Canary Islands) rifts system from gravity inversion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz-Maza, S.; Montesinos, F. G.; Martí, J.; Arnoso, J.; Calvo, M.; Borreguero, A.

    2017-08-01

    Recent volcanism in El Hierro Island is mostly concentrated along three elongated and narrow zones which converge at the center of the island. These zones with extensive volcanism have been identified as rift zones. The presence of similar structures is common in many volcanic oceanic islands, so understanding their origin, dynamics and structure is important to conduct hazard assessment in such environments. There is still not consensus on the origin of the El Hierro rift zones, having been associated with mantle uplift or interpreted as resulting from gravitational spreading and flank instability. To further understand the internal structure and origin of the El Hierro rift systems, starting from the previous gravity studies, we developed a new 3D gravity inversion model for its shallower layers, gathering a detailed picture of this part of the island, which has permitted a new interpretation about these rifts. Previous models already identified a main central magma accumulation zone and several shallower high density bodies. The new model allows a better resolution of the pathways that connect both levels and the surface. Our results do not point to any correspondence between the upper parts of these pathways and the rift identified at the surface. Non-clear evidence of progression toward deeper parts into the volcanic system is shown, so we interpret them as very shallow structures, probably originated by local extensional stresses derived from gravitational loading and flank instability, which are used to facilitate the lateral transport of magma when it arrives close to the surface.

  1. Tectonic inversion in the Wandel Sea Basin: A new structural model of Kilen (eastern North Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svennevig, Kristian; Guarnieri, Pierpaolo; Stemmerik, Lars

    2016-12-01

    The seminunatak Kilen in eastern North Greenland, with its complexly deformed Carboniferous-Cretaceous strata, is a key area to understand the tectonic history of the transform plate boundary between eastern North Greenland and Svalbard. Detailed 3-D geological mapping from oblique photogrammetry along with limited ground fieldwork and interpretation of previously published data forms the basis for a new structural model of Kilen. Previous structural models interpreted rhombic-shaped fault patterns as the evidence for strike-slip tectonics. These structures are here interpreted to be the result of a post-Coniacian NE-SW extension with NW-SE trending normal faults followed by later, N-S compression of presumable Paleocene-Eocene age, folding the faults passively and suggesting the presence of a basal detachment. Furthermore, two thrust sheets have been distinguished on Kilen: a lower Kilen Thrust Sheet and an upper Hondal Elv Thrust Sheet separated by a subhorizontal fault: the Central Detachment. The style of deformation and the structures described are interpreted as the result of Paleocene-Eocene N-S directed compression resulting in basin inversion with strike-slip faults only having minor status. This indicates that the Greenland margin as exposed on Kilen and the conjugate Svalbard margin in the West Spitsbergen fold-and-thrust belt are more similar than previously anticipated.

  2. An Efficient Inverse Kinematic Algorithm for a PUMA560-Structured Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huashan Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient inverse kinematics (IK approach which features fast computing performance for a PUMA560‐structured robot manipulator. By properties of the orthogonal matrix and block matrix, the complex IK matrix equations are transformed into eight pure algebraic equations that contain the six unknown joint angle variables, which makes the solving compact without computing the reverses of the 4×4 homogeneous transformation matrices. Moreover, the appropriate combination of related equations ensures that the solutions are free of extraneous roots in the solving process, and the wrist singularity problem of the robot is also addressed. Finally, a case study is given to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Structure of raft-model membrane by using the inverse contrast variation neutron scattering method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Mitsuhiro [Department of Physics, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8510 (Japan); Hirai, Harutaka [Department of Physics, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8510 (Japan); Koizumi, Masaharu [Department of Physics, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8510 (Japan); Kasahara, Kohji [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Yuyama, Kohei [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Suzuki, Naoko [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    By means of the inverse contrast variation method in small-angle neutron scattering, we have studied the structure of a small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of ganglioside, cholesterol and dipalmitoyl-phosphocholine. The SUV treated has a similar lipid composition as in a plasma membrane with microdomains, so-called rafts. The present results indicate an asymmetric distribution of lipid components within the bilayer of the vesicle, that is, a predominant distribution of ganglioside and cholesterol at the outer leaflet of the vesicle bilayer. The deviation from the linearity in a pseudo-Stuhrmannplot strongly suggests the presence of a large heterogeneity of lipid composition in a bilayer, namely a clustering of ganglioside and cholesterol molecules. This deviation is enhanced by temperature elevation, meaning that ganglioside-cholesterol clusters become larger with holding liquid-ordered (L{sub o}) phase.

  4. Automatically inferred Markov network models for classification of chromosomal band pattern structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granum, E; Thomason, M G

    1990-01-01

    A structural pattern recognition approach to the analysis and classification of metaphase chromosome band patterns is presented. An operational method of representing band pattern profiles as sharp edged idealized profiles is outlined. These profiles are nonlinearly scaled to a few, but fixed number of "density" levels. Previous experience has shown that profiles of six levels are appropriate and that the differences between successive bands in these profiles are suitable for classification. String representations, which focuses on the sequences of transitions between local band pattern levels, are derived from such "difference profiles." A method of syntactic analysis of the band transition sequences by dynamic programming for optimal (maximal probability) string-to-network alignments is described. It develops automatic data-driven inference of band pattern models (Markov networks) per class, and uses these models for classification. The method does not use centromere information, but assumes the p-q-orientation of the band pattern profiles to be known a priori. It is experimentally established that the method can build Markov network models, which, when used for classification, show a recognition rate of about 92% on test data. The experiments used 200 samples (chromosome profiles) for each of the 22 autosome chromosome types and are designed to also investigate various classifier design problems. It is found that the use of a priori knowledge of Denver Group assignment only improved classification by 1 or 2%. A scheme for typewise normalization of the class relationship measures prove useful, partly through improvements on average results and partly through a more evenly distributed error pattern. The choice of reference of the p-q-orientation of the band patterns is found to be unimportant, and results of timing of the execution time of the analysis show that recent and efficient implementations can process one cell in less than 1 min on current standard

  5. Photonic Band Structure of Dispersive Metamaterials Formulated as a Hermitian Eigenvalue Problem

    KAUST Repository

    Raman, Aaswath

    2010-02-26

    We formulate the photonic band structure calculation of any lossless dispersive photonic crystal and optical metamaterial as a Hermitian eigenvalue problem. We further show that the eigenmodes of such lossless systems provide an orthonormal basis, which can be used to rigorously describe the behavior of lossy dispersive systems in general. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  6. Monolithic dual-band HgCdTe infrared detector structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parish, G

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic HgCdTe photoconductive device structure is presented that is suitable for dual-band optically registered infrared photodetection in the two atmospheric transmission windows of 3-5 mu m and 8-12 mu m, which correspond to the mid...

  7. Direct Measurement of the Band Structure of a Buried Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miwa, Jill; Hofmann, Philip; Simmons, Michelle Y.;

    2013-01-01

    We directly measure the band structure of a buried two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The buried 2DEG forms 2 nm beneath the surface of p-type silicon, because of a dense delta-type layer of phosphorus n-type dopants which have been placed there. ...

  8. Band structure of thin films by the linear augmented-plane-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Madsen, J.; Andersen, Ole Krogh

    1978-01-01

    We present a linear augmented-plane-wave method for solving the band-structure problem in thin crystalline films. The potential is separated into a muffin-tin potential inside the film, a potential depending exclusively on the normal coordinate outside the film, and corrections in both regions...

  9. Evolution of structural relaxation spectra of glycerol within the gigahertz band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franosch, T.; Göauttze, W.; Mayr, M. R.; Singh, A. P.

    1997-03-01

    The structural relaxation spectra and the crossover from relaxation to oscillation dynamics, as measured by Wuttke et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3052 (1994)] for glycerol within the GHz band by depolarized light scattering, are described by the solutions of a schematic mode coupling theory model. The applicability of scaling laws for the discussion of the model solutions is considered.

  10. Band structure of one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals using the Fresnel coefficients method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.

    2016-11-01

    The current study has examined the band structures of two types of photonic crystals (PCs). The first is a one-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystal (1DMMPC) composed of double-layered units for which both layers of each unit are dielectric. The second type is a very similar one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal (1DPPC) also composed of double-layered units in which the first layer is a dielectric material but the second is a plasma layer. This study compares the band structures of the 1DMMPC with specific optical characteristics of the 1DPPC using the Fresnel coefficients method and also compares the results of this method with the results of the transfer matrix method. It is concluded that the dependency of the electric permittivity of the plasma layer on the incident field frequency causes differences in the band structures in 1DMMPC and 1DPPC for both TE and TM polarizations and their gaps reside in different frequencies. The band structures of the 1DMMPC and 1DPPC are confirmed by the results of the transfer matrix method.

  11. Band structure and optical properties of LiKB4O7 single crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smok, P; Seinert, H; Kityk, [No Value; Berdowski, J

    2003-01-01

    The band structure (BS), electronic charge density distribution and linear optical properties of the LiKB4O7 (LKB4) single crystal are calculated using a self-consistent norm-conserving pseudo-potential method within the framework of the local density approximation theory. Dispersion of the imaginar

  12. Band structure and optical properties of LiKB4O7 single crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smok, P; Seinert, H; Kityk, [No Value; Berdowski, J

    2003-01-01

    The band structure (BS), electronic charge density distribution and linear optical properties of the LiKB4O7 (LKB4) single crystal are calculated using a self-consistent norm-conserving pseudo-potential method within the framework of the local density approximation theory. Dispersion of the imaginar

  13. Surface plasmon polariton band gap structures: implications to integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Volkov, V. S.; Østergaard, John Erland;

    2001-01-01

    Conventional photonic band gap (PBG) structures are composed of regions with periodic modulation of refractive index that do not allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a certain interval of wavelengths, i.e., that exhibit the PBG effect. The PBG effect is essentially an interference ph...

  14. Hyper-temporal c-band SAR for baseline woody structural assessments in deciduous savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathieu, Renaud SA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ) in generating large-scale woody resources maps. Using airborne LiDAR as calibration, we investigated the relationships between hyper-temporal C-band ASAR data and woody structural parameters, namely total canopy cover (TCC) and total canopy volume (TCV), in a...

  15. Doping and strain dependence of the electronic band structure in Ge and GeSn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chi; Gallagher, James; Senaratne, Charutha; Brown, Christopher; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Kouvetakis, John; Menendez, Jose

    2015-03-01

    A systematic study of the effect of dopants and strain on the electronic structure of Ge and GeSn alloys is presented. Samples were grown by UHV-CVD on Ge-buffered Si using Ge3H8 and SnD4 as the sources of Ge and Sn, and B2H6/P(GeH3)3 as dopants. High-energy critical points in the joint-density of electronic states were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry, which yields detailed information on the strain and doping dependence of the so-called E1, E1 +Δ1 , E0' and E2 transitions. The corresponding dependencies of the lowest direct band gap E0 and the fundamental indirect band gap Eindwere studied via room-T photoluminescence spectroscopy. Of particular interest for this work were the determination of deformation potentials, band gap renormalization effects, Burstein-Moss shifts due to the presence of carriers at band minima, and the dependence of other critical point parameters, such as amplitudes and phase angles, on the doping concentration. The selective blocking of transitions due to high doping makes it possible to investigate the precise k-space location of critical points. These studies are complemented with detailed band-structure calculations within a full-zone k-dot- p approach. Supported by AFOSR under DOD AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0208 and DOD AFOSR FA9550-13-1-0022.

  16. Design of UWB Monopole Antenna with Dual Notched Bands Using One Modified Electromagnetic-Bandgap Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1–10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX and the wireless local area network (WLAN at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively.

  17. High Power Test on an x-Band Slotted-Iris Accelerator Structure at NLCTA

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, C; Fandos, R; Grudiev, A; Heikkinen, S; Laurent, L; Rodríguez, José Alberto; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W

    2007-01-01

    The CLIC study group at CERN has built two X-band HDS (Hybrid Damped Structure) accelerating structures for high-power testing in NLCTA at SLAC. These accelerating structures are novel with respect to their rf-design and their fabrication technique. The eleven-cell constant impedance structures, one made out of copper and one out of molybdenum, are assembled from clamped high-speed milled quadrants. They feature the same heavy higher-order-mode damping as nominal CLIC structures achieved by slotted irises and radial damping waveguides for each cell. The X-band accelerators are exactly scaled versions of structures tested at 30 GHz in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. The results of the X-band tests are presented and compared to those at 30 GHz to determine frequency scaling, and are compared to the extensive copper data from the NLC structure development program to determine material dependence and make a basic validation of the HDS design. INTRODUCTION

  18. A study using a through-space/bond interaction analysis for the band structures of substituted polyacetylene-Be systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Shinichirou; Aoki, Yuriko; Imamura, Akira (Dept. of Chemistry, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    The band structures of dopant-polymer systems for poly(monofluoroacetylene), (C{sub 2}FH){sub x}, and poly(monohydroxyacetylene), (C{sub 2}H(OH)){sub x}, have been studied using the through-space/bond interaction analysis. It was found that these systems have small band gaps when Be atoms are used as dopants. These small gaps are caused by the band constructed mainly from the orbital of the Be atoms, and the band of Be atoms appears among the band gap of the polymer systems; these band structures are similar to those of the n-type semiconductors. The features of these donor bands near the band gaps are discussed in terms of the through-space/bond interactions by using variational and perturbational methods. Finally, in connection with these systems, a new switching system is proposed. (orig.).

  19. Quasiparticle bands and structural phase transition of iron from Gutzwiller density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickling, Tobias; Bünemann, Jörg; Gebhard, Florian; Boeri, Lilia

    2016-05-01

    We use the Gutzwiller density-functional theory to calculate ground-state properties and band structures of iron in its body-centered-cubic (bcc) and hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) phases. For a Hubbard interaction U =9 eV and Hund's-rule coupling J =0.54 eV , we reproduce the lattice parameter, magnetic moment, and bulk modulus of bcc iron. For these parameters, bcc is the ground-state lattice structure at ambient pressure up to a pressure of pc=41 GPa where a transition to the nonmagnetic hcp structure is predicted, in qualitative agreement with experiment (pcexp=10 ,...,15 GPa ) . The calculated band structure for bcc iron is in good agreement with ARPES measurements. The agreement improves when we perturbatively include the spin-orbit coupling.

  20. Inverse Jacobi multiplier as a link between conservative systems and Poisson structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isaac A.; Hernández-Bermejo, Benito

    2017-08-01

    Some aspects of the relationship between conservativeness of a dynamical system (namely the preservation of a finite measure) and the existence of a Poisson structure for that system are analyzed. From the local point of view, due to the flow-box theorem we restrict ourselves to neighborhoods of singularities. In this sense, we characterize Poisson structures around the typical zero-Hopf singularity in dimension 3 under the assumption of having a local analytic first integral with non-vanishing first jet by connecting with the classical Poincaré center problem. From the global point of view, we connect the property of being strictly conservative (the invariant measure must be positive) with the existence of a Poisson structure depending on the phase space dimension. Finally, weak conservativeness in dimension two is introduced by the extension of inverse Jacobi multipliers as weak solutions of its defining partial differential equation and some of its applications are developed. Examples including Lotka-Volterra systems, quadratic isochronous centers, and non-smooth oscillators are provided.

  1. Investigation of band structure of {sup 103,105}Rh using microscopic computational technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit, E-mail: akbcw2@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India); Singh, Suram, E-mail: suramsingh@gmail.com [Assistant Professor, Department of Physics Govt. Degree College, Kathua-184142 (India); Bharti, Arun, E-mail: arunbharti-2003@yahoo.co.in [Professor, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India)

    2015-08-28

    The high-spin structure in {sup 61}Cu nucleus is studied in terms of effective two body interaction. In order to take into account the deformed BCS basis, the basis states are expanded in terms of the core eigenfunctions. Yrast band with some other bands havew been obtained and back-bending in moment of inertia has also been calculated and compared with the available experimental data for {sup 61}Cu nucleus. On comparing the available experimental as well as other theoretical data, it is found that the treatment with PSM provides a satisfactory explanation of the available data.

  2. Flexural vibration band gaps in thin plates with two-dimensional binary locally resonant structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Dian-Long; Wang Gang; Liu Yao-Zong; Wen Ji-Hong; Qiu Jing

    2006-01-01

    The complete flexural vibration band gaps are studied in the thin plates with two-dimensional binary locally resonant structures, i.e. the composite plate consisting of soft rubber cylindrical inclusions periodically placed in a host material. Numerical simulations show that the low-frequency gaps of flexural wave exist in the thin plates. The width of the first gap decreases monotonically as the matrix density increases. The frequency response of the finite periodic thin plates is simulated by the finite element method, which provides attenuations of over 20dB in the frequency range of the band gaps. The findings will be significant in the application of phononic crystals.

  3. Normal Orthodox Semigroups with Inverse Transversals%具有逆断面的正规纯正半群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱凤林

    2003-01-01

    A normal orthodox semigroup is an orthodox semigroup whose idempotent elements form a normal band. We deal with congruences on a normal orthodox semigroup with an inverse transversal. A structure theorem for such semigroup is obtained. Munn(1966) gave a fundamental inverse semigroup. Following Munn's idea, we give a fundamental normal orthodox semigroup with an inverse transversal.

  4. Electronic band structure effects in the stopping of protons in copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quashie, Edwin E.; Saha, Bidhan C.; Correa, Alfredo A.

    2016-10-01

    We present an ab initio study of the electronic stopping power of protons in copper over a wide range of proton velocities v =0.02 -10 a .u . where we take into account nonlinear effects. Time-dependent density functional theory coupled with molecular dynamics is used to study electronic excitations produced by energetic protons. A plane-wave pseudopotential scheme is employed to solve the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations for a moving ion in a periodic crystal. The electronic excitations and the band structure determine the stopping power of the material and alter the interatomic forces for both channeling and off-channeling trajectories. Our off-channeling results are in quantitative agreement with experiments, and at low velocity they unveil a crossover region of superlinear velocity dependence (with a power of ˜1.5 ) in the velocity range v =0.07 -0.3 a .u . , which we associate to the copper crystalline electronic band structure. The results are rationalized by simple band models connecting two separate regimes. We find that the limit of electronic stopping v →0 is not as simple as phenomenological models suggest and it is plagued by band-structure effects.

  5. Simultaneous inversion for anisotropic and structural crustal properties by stacking of radial and transverse receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Frederik; Rümpker, Georg; Kaviani, Ayoub; Singh, Manvendra

    2016-04-01

    The well-known H-κ-stacking method of Zhu and Kanamori (2000) has developed into a standard tool to infer the thickness of the crust, H, and the average P to S-wave velocity ratio, κ. The stacking approach allows for the largely automated analysis of teleseismic waveforms recorded in the distance range between 30° and 95° . Here, we present an extension of the method to include the inversion for anisotropic crustal properties. For a single anisotropic crustal layer, this involves the computation of delay times and amplitudes for 20 P-to-S converted phases and their crustal reverberations, instead of (up to) five phases in the isotropic case (Kaviani and Rümpker, 2015). The delay times and amplitudes exhibit a complex dependency on slowness and backazimuth. They can be calculated semi-analytically from the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system matrix, as defined by Woodhouse (1974). A comparison of the calculated delay times and amplitudes with those obtained by similar methods (Frederiksen and Bostock, 2000) shows a very good agreement between the results. In our approach, the crust exhibits hexagonal anisotropy with a horizontal symmetry axis, such that the anisotropic properties are defined by two parameters: the orientation of the symmetry axis w.r.t. North, φ, and the percentage of anisotropy, a. The inversion, thus, involves a grid search in a 4-dimensional parameter space (H, κ, φ, a) and the stacking of both radial and transverse receiver functions. Known input parameters are the average P-wave velocity of the crust, and the slowness vector (as given by the event-receiver configuration and a global 1D-velocity model). The computations are performed by the new software package AnStack which is based on MATLAB. Synthetic test show that the extended anisotropic stacking has advantages compared to the conventional H-κ stacking as it may allow for inversions at even higher noise levels. We further test for the effect of the azimuthal distribution of

  6. Electronic structure and optical properties of noncentrosymmetric LiGaSe2: Experimental measurements and DFT band structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Ananchenko, L. N.; Isaenko, L. I.; Yelisseyev, A. P.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2017-04-01

    We report on measurements of X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectra for pristine and Ar+ ion-irradiated surfaces of LiGaSe2 single crystal grown by Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Electronic structure of the LiGaSe2 compound is studied from a theoretical and experimental viewpoint. In particular, total and partial densities of states of LiGaSe2 are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing the augmented plane wave + local orbitals (APW + lo) method and they are verified by data of X-ray spectroscopy measurements. The DFT calculations indicate that the main contributors to the valence band of LiGaSe2 are the Se 4p states, which contribute mainly at the top and in the upper portion of the valence band, with also essential contributions of these states in the lower portion of the band. Other substantial contributions to the valence band of LiGaSe2 emerge from the Ga 4s and Ga 4p states contributing mainly at the lower ant upper portions of the valence band, respectively. With respect to the conduction band, the calculations indicate that its bottom is composed mainly from contributions of the unoccupied Ga s and Se p states. The present calculations are confirmed experimentally when comparing the XP valence-band spectrum of the LiGaS2 single crystal on a common energy scale with the X-ray emission bands representing the energy distribution of the Ga 4p and Se 4p states. Measurements of the fundamental absorption edges at room temperature reveal that bandgap value, Eg, of LiGaSe2 is equal to 3.47 eV and the Eg value increases up to 3.66 eV when decreasing temperature to 80 K. The main optical characteristics of the LiGaSe2 compound are clarified by the DFT calculations.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of structurally constrained quinazolinone derivatives as potent and selective histamine H3 receptor inverse agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Tsuyoshi; Mizutani, Takashi; Sekino, Etsuko; Ishikawa, Shiho; Ito, Sayaka; Mitobe, Yuko; Miyamoto, Yasuhisa; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Tanaka, Takeshi; Ishihara, Akane; Takenaga, Norihiro; Tokita, Shigeru; Sato, Nagaaki

    2008-11-13

    A series of structurally constrained derivatives of the potent H 3 inverse agonist 1 was designed, synthesized, and evaluated as histamine H 3 receptor inverse agonists. As a result, the N-cyclobutylpiperidin-4-yloxy group as in 2f was identified as an optimal surrogate structure for the flexible 1-pyrrolidinopropoxy group of 1. Subsequent optimization of the quinazolinone core of 2f revealed that substitution at the 5-position of the quinazolinone ring influences potency. Representative derivatives 5a and 5s showed improved potency in a histamine release assay in rats and a receptor occupancy assay in mice.

  8. Disorder effects on the band structure of ZnGeN2: Role of exchange defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skachkov, Dmitry; Quayle, Paul C.; Kash, Kathleen; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2016-11-01

    The role of exchange defects on the band structure of ZnGeN2 is investigated. Exchange defects are defined through the exchange of cations Zn and Ge starting from the ideal P n a 21 crystal structure, which obeys the local octet rule. Each such exchange creates several nitrogen-centered tetrahedra which violate the local octet rule, although overall charge neutrality is preserved. We study several distributions of exchange defects, some with all antisites making up the exchange defect close to each other and with increasing numbers of exchange defects, and others where the two types of antisites ZnGe and GeZn are kept separated from each other. We also compare the results for these models with a fully random distribution of Zn and Ge on the cation sites. We show that for a single-nearest-neighbor exchange defect, the band gap is narrowed by about 0.5 eV due to two effects: (1) the ZnGe antisites form filled acceptor states just above and merging with the valence-band maximum (VBM) of perfect crystal ZnGeN2 and (2) the GeZn antisites form a resonance in the conduction band which lowers the conduction-band minimum (CBM). When more exchange defects are created, these acceptor states broaden into bands which can lower the gap further. When tetrahedra occur surrounded completely by four Zn atoms, states even deeper in the gap are found localized all near these tetrahedra, forming a separate intermediate band. Finally, for phase-segregated ZnGe and GeZn, the gap is significantly more reduced, but no separate band is found to occur. The ZnGe acceptorlike states now form a percolating defect band which is significantly wider and hence reaches deeper into the gap. In all cases, the wave functions near the top of the new VBM remain, to some extent, localized near the ZnGe sites. For a fully random case, the gap is even more severely reduced by almost 3 eV. The total energy of the system increases with the number of octet-rule-violating tetrahedra and the energy cost per

  9. Tectonic inversion of compressional structures in the Southern portion of the Paramirim Corridor, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cerqueira Pereira Cruz

    Full Text Available The Paramirim Corridor represents the maximum inversion zone of the Paramirim Aulacogen. Reverse-to-reverse dextral shear zones and various types of folds dominate such corridor. These structures reflect a stress field that is WSW-ENE oriented, developed in units of Aulacogen basement, as well as in the Lagoa Real Intrusive Suite, of Statherian age, in Espinhaço and São Francisco supergroups, of Statherian-Tonian and Cryogenian ages, respectively, and in the Macaúbas-Santo Onofre Group, of Tonian age at the most. A rich collection of extensional structures truncate compressional structures of the Paramirim Corridor, characterized by normal shear zones and foliation, which is sometimes mylonitic, down-dip stretching lineation, drag folds, traction fractures and S/C structures. In these shear zones, quartz occurs truncated by the foliation, while feldspars are fractured and altered to white mica. Distribution of the quartz c-axes is at a maximum of 14° from the Z-axis. Thus, it suggests that the deformation activated mainly the basal glide planes in the direction. The paleostress study using the Win-Tensor software demonstrated that the regimen ranged between radial and pure distention. The S1 direction oscillated around a vertical trend, while s3 was sub-horizontal, with a predominant N230-050° direction. Ar-Ar ages in biotite obtained from the extensional shear zones ranged from 480 and 490 Ma. Together, data obtained for the structures associated with the late extensional regimen described in the present study suggest that its nucleation is associated with distal and brittle-ductile sectors of the gravitational collapse zone of Araçuaí-West Congo Orogen.

  10. Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited State Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloh, Frank E

    2014-10-02

    The Shockley-Queisser analysis provides a theoretical limit for the maximum energy conversion efficiency of single junction photovoltaic cells. But besides the semiconductor bandgap no other semiconductor properties are considered in the analysis. Here, we show that the maximum conversion efficiency is limited further by the excited state entropy of the semiconductors. The entropy loss can be estimated with the modified Sackur-Tetrode equation as a function of the curvature of the bands, the degeneracy of states near the band edges, the illumination intensity, the temperature, and the band gap. The application of the second law of thermodynamics to semiconductors provides a simple explanation for the observed high performance of group IV, III-V, and II-VI materials with strong covalent bonding and for the lower efficiency of transition metal oxides containing weakly interacting metal d orbitals. The model also predicts efficient energy conversion with quantum confined and molecular structures in the presence of a light harvesting mechanism.

  11. Ab initio electronic band structure study of III-VI layered semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín, Daniel; Rubio-Ponce, Alberto; Cantarero, Andrés

    2013-08-01

    We present a total energy study of the electronic properties of the rhombohedral γ-InSe, hexagonal ɛ-GaSe, and monoclinic GaTe layered compounds. The calculations have been done using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method, including spin-orbit interaction. The calculated valence bands of the three compounds compare well with angle resolved photoemission measurements and a discussion of the small discrepancies found has been given. The present calculations are also compared with recent and previous band structure calculations available in the literature for the three compounds. Finally, in order to improve the calculated band gap value we have used the recently proposed modified Becke-Johnson correction for the exchange-correlation potential.

  12. Ground-based testing of the dynamics of flexible space structures using band mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. F.; Chew, Meng-Sang

    1991-01-01

    A suspension system based on a band mechanism is studied to provide the free-free conditions for ground based validation testing of flexible space structures. The band mechanism consists of a noncircular disk with a convex profile, preloaded by torsional springs at its center of rotation so that static equilibrium of the test structure is maintained at any vertical location; the gravitational force will be directly counteracted during dynamic testing of the space structure. This noncircular disk within the suspension system can be configured to remain unchanged for test articles with the different weights as long as the torsional spring is replaced to maintain the originally designed frequency ratio of W/k sub s. Simulations of test articles which are modeled as lumped parameter as well as continuous parameter systems, are also presented.

  13. Band structure and itinerant magnetism in quantum critical NbFe2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, A. P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Singh, David J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations of the band structure and magnetic ordering in the C14 Laves phase compound NbFe{sub 2}. The magnetism is itinerant in the sense that the moments are highly dependent on ordering. We find an overestimation of the magnetic tendency within the local spin-density approximation, similar to other metals near magnetic quantum critical points. We also find a competition between different magnetic states due to band-structure effects. These lead to competing magnetic tendencies due to competing interlayer interactions, one favoring a ferrimagnetic solution and the other an antiferromagnetic state. While the structure contains Kagome lattice sheets, which could, in principle, lead to strong magnetic frustration, the calculations do not show dominant nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions within these sheets. These results are discussed in relation to experimental observations.

  14. Study on Band Structure of YbB6 and Analysis of Its Optical Conductivity Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The electronic structure of YbB6 crystal was studied by means of density functional (GGA+U) method.The calculations were performed by FLAPW method.The high accurate band structure was achieved.The correlation between the feature of the band structure and the Yb-B6 bonding in YbB6 was analyzed.On this basis, some optical constants of YbB6 such as reflectivity, dielectric function, optical conductivity, and energy-loss function were calculated.The results are in good agreement with the experiments.The real part of the optical conductivity spectrum and the energy-loss function spectrum were analyzed in detail.The assignments of the spectra were carried out to correlate the spectral peaks with the interband electronic transitions, which justify the reasonable part of previous empirical assignments and renew the missed or incorrect ones.

  15. Identification of Upper Crustal Structures Beneath Central Java, Indonesia from of Surface Wave Dispersion Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulhan, Zulfakriza; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Luehr, Birger-G.; Bodin, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Our previous study on MERAMEX data (Zulfakriza et al., 2014) obtained features of the tomographic images which correlate well with the surface geology of central Java in periods between 1 to 12 sec. Kendeng Basin and active volcanoes in the central part of this region are clearly imaged with low group velocities with values around 0.8 km/sec, while the carbonate structures in the southern part of the region correspond to higher group velocities in the range of 1.8 to 2.0 km/sec. In this current study, we invert dispersion curves obtained from seismic noise tomography to estimate shear wave-depth profiles of the region. The results are used to discuss the spatial variation of shear wave velocities for a depth range down from the surface to upper crust. Most of the shear wave velocity anomalies, including the upper crustal areas of the Kendeng basin and active volcanoes, are consistent with our previous study of Rayleigh wave group velocities and fit to the regional geology. Keywords: Dispersion Inversion; shear wave velocity; Central Java, Indonesia. Reference: Zulfakriza, Z., Saygin, E., Cummins, P., Widiyantoro, S., Nugraha, A., Luehr, B.-G., Bodin, T., 2014. Upper crustal structure of central Java, Indonesia, from transdimensional seismic ambient noise tomography. Geophys. J. Int. 197.

  16. Crustal structure and tectonics of Bangladesh: New constraints from inversion of receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun; Bhushan, Kirti; Singh, Chandrani; Steckler, Michael S.; Akhter, S. Humayun; Seeber, Leonardo; Kim, Won-Young; Tiwari, Ashwani K.; Biswas, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    An understanding of the sedimentary and crustal structure of the Bengal Basin and of the tectonics deforming it remains elusive due to lack of seismic data from Bangladesh. Taking advantage of recently available data from 11 seismic stations deployed over Bangladesh, we determine the crustal structure beneath each station using 2768 high quality receiver functions (RFs). Inversion of the RFs reveals a highly variable thickness of the overlying sediments beneath the Bengal Basin. The thickness of the sediments increases dramatically across the Hinge Zone of the Early Cretaceous passive margin from 3 to 17 km. The thick sediments partly represent progradation of the continental margin due to the influx of clastic sediments from the Himalayas. The Moho shallows across the region. This reflects thinning of the crystalline crust from 38 km in the Indian Craton to 34 km at the Hinge Zone to 4.0 km/s) at lower crustal levels supports an influence of the Kerguelen plume igneous activity during rifting. We invert data for a station near the Dauki Fault, which marks the southern boundary of the uplifted Shillong plateau, for dip and anisotropic effects. Our results show the Dauki as a north-dipping thrust fault at Jaflong with a dip angle of 32° and strike (110°) close to its surficial expression. A strong anisotropy (~ 15%) and the sense of shear (plunge: 24°, trend: 79°) compliment the dipping geometry and deformation seems to be related to the initiation of the Dauki Fault.

  17. Geological structure guided well log interpolation for high-fidelity full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangkang; Chen, Hanming; Xiang, Kui; Chen, Xiaohong

    2016-11-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a promising technique for inverting a high-resolution subsurface velocity model. The success of FWI highly depends on a fairly well initial velocity model. We propose a method for building a good initial velocity model that can be put into the FWI framework for inverting a nearly perfect velocity structure. We use a well log interpolated velocity model as a high-fidelity initial model for the subsequent FWI. The interpolation problem is solved via a least-squares method with a geological structural regularization. In order to obtain the geological structure of subsurface reflectors, an initial reverse time migration (RTM) with a fairly realistic initial velocity model is conducted, and the local slope of subsurface structure is roughly calculated from the RTM image. The well log interpolated initial velocity model can be very close to the true velocity while containing a small velocity anomaly or oversmoothing caused by the imperfect velocity interpolation. The anomaly and oversmoothing effect can be compensated during the subsequent FWI iterations. We use a relatively simple-layered model and the more complicated Marmousi velocity model to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach. We start from a very smooth velocity model and obtain a nearly perfect FWI result which is much better than the traditional FWI result without the velocity interpolation. The migrated images from the RTM method using different velocity models are also compared to further confirm the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Regarding the field deployment, we suggest that future drilling of exploration wells can be seismic-oriented, which can help fully utilize the information of well logs for building initial subsurface velocity model and will facilitate a wide application of the proposed methodology.

  18. Towards seismic data inversion for crustal thermo-chemical structure: what thermodynamics say

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaferia, Giovanni; Cammarano, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    decrease in VS and an increase in VP/VS when reaching melting temperature. The ratio VS/density of the bulk crustal rock shows a narrow variability across a wide range of temperatures (400-1000 K), dry compositions and water content. We suggest that this ratio can be used as a constraint in joint-inversions of gravity and seismic data or to derive the density distribution of the crust given a VS model. Sharp impedance jumps in correspondence of main phase transitions cause relevant seismic signature (i.e. receiver functions. In particular, the transformation of -Quartz in -Quartz represents a non-negligible seismic discontinuity, marked by increases in VP and VP/VS that are larger than those generated by compositional change at the upper-middle, middle-lower crust boundaries. Since the depth of the - Quartz transition is mainly controlled by temperature, information about the local geothermal gradient is fundamental for discriminating between compositionally-induced increase in VP and VP/VS from those related to the Quartz transition. Our findings can be used as a basis for an improved and geologically-consistent joint-inversion of surface wave and receiver functions for the Italian crust. Additional constraints from gravity data on density structure will be first tested with the purely seismically-based model and then included into the joint inversion.

  19. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron pitch angle (Dαα) and momentum (Dpp) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in Dαα and Dpp coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The Dpp diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than Dαα coefficients. For chorus waves, Dpp coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than Dαα coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of Dpp coefficient are generally larger than the values of Dαα coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3, whereas for whistler mode waves, the frequencies have been calculated for angle 10° and Landau

  20. Strain effect on graphene nanoribbon carrier statistic in the presence of non-parabolic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuani Che Rosid, N. A.; Ahmadi, M. T.; Ismail, Razali

    2016-09-01

    The effect of tensile uniaxial strain on the non-parabolic electronic band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) is investigated. In addition, the density of states and the carrier statistic based on the tight-binding Hamiltonian are modeled analytically. It is found that the property of AGNR in the non-parabolic band region is varied by the strain. The tunable energy band gap in AGNR upon strain at the minimum energy is described for each of n-AGNR families in the non-parabolic approximation. The behavior of AGNR in the presence of strain is attributed to the breakable AGNR electronic band structure, which varies the physical properties from its normality. The linear relation between the energy gap and the electrical properties is featured to further explain the characteristic of the deformed AGNR upon strain. Project supported by the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE), Malaysia under the Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS) (Grant No.Q.J130000.7823.4F477). We also thank the Research Management Center (RMC) of Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) for providing an excellent research environment.

  1. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  2. Electronic band structure of a Tl/Sn atomic sandwich on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruznev, D. V.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Matetskiy, A. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Alekseev, A. A.; Hsing, C. R.; Wei, C. M.; Eremeev, S. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional compound made of one monolayer of Tl and one monolayer of Sn on Si(111) has been found to have a sandwichlike structure in which the Sn layer (having the milk-stool arrangement) resides on the bulklike terminated Si(111) surface and the Tl layer (having the honeycomb-chained-trimer arrangement) is located above the Sn layer. The electronic band structure of the compound contains two spin-split surface-state bands, of which one is nonmetallic and the other is metallic. Near the Fermi level the metallic band is split with the momentum splitting Δ k∥=0.037 Å-1 and energy splitting Δ EF=167 meV. The steep dispersion of the band when crossing the Fermi level corresponds to an electron velocity of ≈8.5 ×105 m/s, which is comparable to the value reported for graphene. The 2D Fermi contours have almost circular shape with spin texture typical for hexagonal surfaces.

  3. Chromosome banding and gene localizations support extensive conservation of chromosome structure between cattle and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, R; Ansari, H A; Stranzinger, G F

    1991-01-01

    By using three gene probes, one derived from the porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and two from bovine cytokeratin genes, type I (KRTA) and type II (KRTB), the hypothesis of conservation of genome structure in two members of the family Bovidae was examined. Gene mapping data revealed the MHC to be in chromosome region 23q15----q23 in cattle (BOLA) and 20q15----q23 in sheep (OLA). KRTA was localized to chromosome region 19q25----q29 in cattle and 11q25----q29 in sheep and KRTB to 5q14----q22 in cattle and 3q14----q22 in sheep. The banding patterns of the chromosome arms to which the loci were assigned were identical in both species. Moreover, the resemblances of GTG- or QFQ-banding patterns between the cattle and sheep karyotypes illustrated further chromosome homologies. These studies, based on gene mapping comparisons and comparative cytogenetics, document that within bovid chromosomes, homology of banding patterns corresponds to a homologous genetic structure. Hence, we propose that gene assignments on identified chromosomal segments in one species of the Bovidae can be extrapolated, in general, to other bovid species based on the banding homologies presented here.

  4. Determination of the band structure of LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergk, B. [Hochfeld-Magnetlabor, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Bartkowiak, M.; Ignatchik, O. [Hochfeld-Magnetlabor, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Jaeckel, M. [Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Wosnitza, J.; Rosner, H.; Petzold, V. [MPI fuer chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Canfield, P. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames (United States). Ames Lab., Condensed Matter Physics

    2007-07-01

    We present de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) investigations on the nonmagnetic borocarbide superconductor LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C which have been performed by use of the torque method in high magnetic fields up to 32 T and at low temperatures down to 50 mK. The complex band structure is extracted from the quantum oscillations in the normal state. In comparison with full-potential-local-orbital calculations of the band structure we are able to assign the observed dHvA frequencies to the different bands. Temperature dependent dHvA investigations allowed the extraction of the effective band masses for the several Fermi-surface sheets. We observe an enhancement of the effective masses compared to the theoretical calculations which is due to electron-phonon interaction. Finally, we are able to examine the angular dependence of the electron-phonon coupling for the different Fermi-surface sheets. (orig.)

  5. Triaxial projected shell model description of high-spin band-structures in {sup 103,105}Rh isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, G.H. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Sheikh, J.A., E-mail: sjaphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Dar, W.A. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Jehangir, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Palit, R., E-mail: palit@tifr.res.in [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai (India); Ganai, P.A. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Srinagar 190 006 (India)

    2014-11-10

    High-spin band structures in odd-proton {sup 103,105}Rh are investigated using the microscopic triaxial projected shell model approach. It is demonstrated that the observed band structures built on one- and three-quasiparticle states are reproduced reasonably well in the present work. Further, it is evident from the analysis of the projected wavefunctions that side-band in the low-spin regime is the normal γ-band built on the ground-state configuration. However, in the high-spin regime, the side band is shown to be highly mixed and ceases to be a γ-band. We provide a complete set of electromagnetic transition probabilities for the two bands and the experimental measurements are desirable to test the predictions of the present work.

  6. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different dielectric materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E D V Nagesh; G Santosh Babu; V Subramanian; V Sivasubramanian; V R K Murthy

    2005-12-01

    We report the use of low dielectric constant materials to form two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures for achieving high gap-to-midgap ratio. The variable parameters chosen are the lattice spacing and the geometric structure. The selected geometries are square and triangular and the materials chosen are PTFE ( = 2.1), PVC ( = 2.38) and glass ( = 5.5). Using the plane-wave expansion method, proper lattice spacing is selected for each structure and material. The observed experimental results are analyzed with the help of the theoretical prediction.

  7. Alternative structure of TiO2 with higher energy valence band edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coh, Sinisa; Yu, Peter Y.; Aoki, Yuta; Saito, Susumu; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2017-02-01

    We propose an alternative structure of TiO2 anatase that has a higher energy oxygen p -like valence band maximum than pristine TiO2 anatase and thus has a much better alignment with the water splitting levels. This alternative structure is unique when considering a large subspace of possible structural distortions of TiO2 anatase. We propose two routes towards this state and argue that one of them might have been realized in the recently discovered so-called black TiO2.

  8. Experimental Studies of W-Band Accelerator Structures at High Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Marc E

    2001-02-09

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high-energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagnetic field solver. Manufacturing considerations of the small, delicate mm-wave components and the steps taken to reach a robust fabrication process are detailed. These devices were characterized under low power using a two-port vector network analyzer to verify tune and match, including measurements of the structures' fields using a bead-pull. The measurements are compared with theory throughout. Addition studies of the W-band structures were performed under high power utilizing a 11.424 GHz electron linac as a current source. Test results include W-band power levels of 200 kW, corresponding to fields in the PDA of over 20 MV/m, a higher gradient than any collider. Planar accelerator devices naturally have an rf quadrupole component of the accelerating field. Presented for the first time are the measurements of this effect.

  9. Band Structure of Photonic Crystals Fabricated by Two-Photon Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Rybin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretically the band-gap structures of several types of three-dimensional photonic crystals with the fcc lattice symmetry: synthetic opals, inverted yablonovite and woodpile. The samples of inverted yablonovite, inverted yablonovite with a glassy superstructure and woodpile are fabricated by two-photon polymerization through a direct laser writing technique, which allows the creation of complex three-dimensional photonic crystals with a resolution better than 100 nm. A material is polymerized along the trace of a moving laser focus, thus enabling the fabrication of any desirable three-dimensional structure by direct “recording” into the volume of a photosensitive material. The correspondence of the structures of the fabricated samples to the expected fcc lattices is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. We discuss theoretically how the complete photonic band-gap is modified by structural and dielectric parameters. We demonstrate that the photonic properties of opal and yablonovite are opposite: the complete photonic band gap appears in the inverted opal, and direct yablonovite is absent in direct opal and inverted yablonovite.

  10. Band Gap Opening Induced by the Structural Periodicity in Epitaxial Graphene Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Nair, Maya; Palacio, Irene; Celis, Arlensiú; Zobelli, Alberto; Gloter, Alexandre; Kubsky, Stefan; Turmaud, Jean-Philippe; Conrad, Matthew; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Conrad, Edward H; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Tejeda, Antonio

    2017-04-12

    The epitaxial graphene buffer layer on the Si face of hexagonal SiC shows a promising band gap, of which the precise origin remains to be understood. In this work, we correlate the electronic to the atomic structure of the buffer layer by combining angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM). We show that the band structure in the buffer has an electronic periodicity related to the structural periodicity observed in STM images and published X-ray diffraction. Our HR-STEM measurements show the bonding of the buffer layer to the SiC at specific locations separated by 1.5 nm. This is consistent with the quasi 6 × 6 periodic corrugation observed in the STM images. The distance between buffer C and SiC is 1.9 Å in the bonded regions and up to 2.8 Å in the decoupled regions, corresponding to a 0.9 Å corrugation of the buffer layer. The decoupled regions are sp(2) hybridized. Density functional tight binding (DFTB) calculations demonstrate the presence of a gap at the Dirac point everywhere in the buffer layer, even in the decoupled regions where the buffer layer has an atomic structure close to that of graphene. The surface periodicity also promotes band in the superperiodic Brillouin zone edges as seen by photoemission and confirmed by our calculations.

  11. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  12. Inversion structure and winter ozone distribution in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Seth; Tran, Trang

    2015-12-01

    The Uintah Basin in Utah, U.S.A. experiences high concentrations of ozone during some winters due to strong, multi-day temperature inversions that facilitate the buildup of pollution from local sources, including the oil and gas industry. Together, elevation of monitoring sites and proximity to oil and gas wells explain as much as 90% of spatial variability in surface ozone concentrations during inversion episodes (i.e., R2 = 0.90). Inversion conditions start earlier and last longer at lower elevations, at least in part because lower elevations are more insulated from winds aloft that degrade inversion conditions and dilute produced ozone. Surface air transport under inversions is dominated by light, diurnal upslope-downslope flow that limits net transport distances. Thus, different areas of the Basin are relatively isolated from each other, allowing spatial factors like elevation and proximity to sources to strongly influence ozone concentrations at individual sites.

  13. Investigation and calculation of filling factor of SnO2 inverse opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Shimin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Li, Jinpeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In the process of preparing inverse opal, the structure of inverse opal is affected by many factors, and the filling factor of inverse opal is difficult to directly test. In this paper, SnO2 inverse opal was prepared with the sol-gel method by cooperative opal template. The repetition times of the infiltrating precursor into the opal templates were investigated in detail. The band-gap positions of SnO2 inverse opal were tested. In order to prepare perfect inverse opal structure, the filling quantity of the precursor is greater, as the diameter of the PS microsphere of opal is bigger. The filling factor of air in inverse opal can be calculated with a formula derived from Bragg’s law. For inverse opal, the filling factor of air in inverse opal gradually enlarges as the diameter of the void increases.

  14. Band structure and optical properties of amber studied by first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan, E-mail: raozhifan@163.com [Analysis and Testing Center of Yunnan, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhou, Rong-Feng [Analysis and Testing Center of Yunnan, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2013-03-01

    The band structure and density of states of amber is studied by the first principles calculation based on density of functional theory. The complex structure of amber has 214 atoms and the band gap is 5.0 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The optical properties' results show that the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.65 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is at 172 nm and another higher peak is at 136 nm. These convince that the amber would have a pretty sheen and that amber is a good and suitable crystal for jewelry and ornaments.

  15. Impact of the Electronic Band Structure in High-Harmonic Generation Spectra of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancogne-Dejean, Nicolas; Mücke, Oliver D.; Kärtner, Franz X.; Rubio, Angel

    2017-02-01

    An accurate analytic model describing the microscopic mechanism of high-harmonic generation (HHG) in solids is derived. Extensive first-principles simulations within a time-dependent density-functional framework corroborate the conclusions of the model. Our results reveal that (i) the emitted HHG spectra are highly anisotropic and laser-polarization dependent even for cubic crystals; (ii) the harmonic emission is enhanced by the inhomogeneity of the electron-nuclei potential; the yield is increased for heavier atoms; and (iii) the cutoff photon energy is driver-wavelength independent. Moreover, we show that it is possible to predict the laser polarization for optimal HHG in bulk crystals solely from the knowledge of their electronic band structure. Our results pave the way to better control and optimize HHG in solids by engineering their band structure.

  16. Growth, Band Structure and Optical Properties of LiSrBO3 Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The bulk crystal of LiSrBO3(8.39 g) with a size of 21mm × 20mm × 15mm was grown by high temperature solution growth method. The relationship between growth habit and crystal structure was discussed. The transmission spectrum shows an UV absorption edge at about 300 nm. The melting temperature of this crystal was determined to be 942 ℃ by DTA-TG measurement. The band structure of the LiSrBO3 crystal was studied by means of the first principle method. An indirect band gap was found to be about 4.0 eV, and a low dielectric constant was estimated to be about 1.9 in terms of theoretical results.

  17. A first principle study of band structure of III-nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rashid [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: rasofi@hotmail.com; Akbarzadeh, H. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 841546 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazal-e-Aleem [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2005-12-15

    The band structure of both phases, zinc-blende and wurtzite, of aluminum nitride, indium nitride and gallium nitride has been studied using computational methods. The study has been done using first principle full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). For the exchange correlation potential, generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and an alternative form of GGA proposed by Engel and Vosko (GGA-EV) have been used. Results obtained for band structure of these compounds have been compared with experimental results as well as other first principle computations. Our results show a significant improvement over other theoretical work and are closer to the experimental data.

  18. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic properties of = 50 Ge and Se nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Ghorui; C R Praharaj

    2014-04-01

    The deformed configurations and rotational band structures in =50 Ge and Se nuclei are studied by deformed Hartree–Fock with quadrupole constraint and angular momentum projection. Apart from the `almost’ spherical HF solution, a well-deformed configuration occurs at low excitation. A deformed well-mixed = 1/2+ neutron orbit comes down in energy (from the shell above = 50) to break the = 50 spherical shell closure. A = 7− isomer is predicted in 84Se at fairly low excitation energy. At higher excitation energies (8 MeV), a deformed band with = 7/2+–1/2− (based on $h_{11/2}$) neutron 1p–1h excitation, for 82Ge and 84Se, is shown in our calculation. Our study gives insight into possible deformed structures at spherical shell closure.

  19. Impact of the electronic band structure in high-harmonic generation spectra of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Tancogne-Dejean, Nicolas; Kärtner, Franz X; Rubio, Angel

    2016-01-01

    An accurate analytic model describing high-harmonic generation (HHG) in solids is derived. Extensive first-principles simulations within a time-dependent density-functional framework corroborate the conclusions of the model. Our results reveal that: (i) the emitted HHG spectra are highly anisotropic and laser-polarization dependent even for cubic crystals, (ii) the harmonic emission is enhanced by the inhomogeneity of the electron-nuclei potential, the yield is increased for heavier atoms, and (iii) the cutoff photon energy is driver-wavelength independent. Moreover, we show that it is possible to predict the laser polarization for optimal HHG in bulk crystals solely from the knowledge of their electronic band structure. Our results pave the way to better control and optimize HHG in solids by engineering their band structure.

  20. Bound States and Band Structure - a Unified Treatment through the Quantum Hamilton - Jacobi Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjani, S S; Panigrahi, P K

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the Scarf potential, which exhibits both discrete energy bound states and energy bands, through the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi approach. The singularity structure and the boundary conditions in the above approach, naturally isolate the bound and periodic states, once the problem is mapped to the zero energy sector of another quasi-exactly solvable quantum problem. The energy eigenvalues are obtained without having to solve for the corresponding eigenfunctions explicitly. We also demonstrate how to find the eigenfunctions through this method.

  1. Band structures tunability of bulk 2D phononic crystals made of magneto-elastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Vasseur

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of contactless tunability of the band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals is demonstrated by employing magnetostrictive materials and applying an external magnetic field. The influence of the amplitude and of the orientation with respect to the inclusion axis of the applied magnetic field are studied in details. Applications to tunable selective frequency filters with switching functionnality and to reconfigurable wave-guides and demultiplexing devices are then discussed.

  2. Dispersion characteristics of a slow wave structure with a modified photonic band gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Xi; Yang Zi-Qiang; Cao Wei-Ping; Jiang Yan-Nan

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the dispersion characteristics of a modified photonic band-gap slow-wave structure with an open boundary by simulation and experiment. A mode launcher with a wheel radiator and a coupling probe is presented to excite a pure TM01-like mode. The cold test and simulation results show that the TM01-like mode is effectively excited and no parasitic modes appear. The dispersion characteristics obtained from the cold test are in good agreement with the calculated results.

  3. Band structure and Bloch states in birefringent 1D magnetophotonic crystals: An analytical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lévy, M; Levy, Miguel; Jalali, Amir A

    2007-01-01

    An analytical formulation for the band structure and Bloch modes in elliptically birefringent magnetophotonic crystals is presented. The model incorporates both the effects of gyrotropy and linear birefringence generally present in magneto-optic thin film devices. Full analytical expressions are obtained for the dispersion relation and Bloch modes in a layered stack photonic crystal and their properties are analyzed. It is shown that other models recently discussed in the literature are contained as special limiting cases of the formulation presented herein.

  4. Electronic Structure of CeRhIn$_{5}$: dHvA and Energy Band Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Donavan; Palm, E; Murphy, T.; Tozer, S.; Miller-Ricci, Eliza; Peabody, Lydia; Li, Charis Quay Huei; Alver, U.; Goodrich, R. G.; Sarrao, J. L.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Wills, J. M.; Fisk, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The de Haas - van Alphen effect and energy band calculations are used to study angular dependent extremal areas and effective masses of the Fermi surface of the highly correlated antiferromagnetic material CeRhIn$_5$. The agreement between experiment and theory is reasonable for the areas measured with the field applied along the (100) axis of the tetragonal structure, but disagree in size for the areas observed for the field applied along the (001) axis where the antiferromagnetic spin align...

  5. Short pulse equations and localized structures in frequency band gaps of nonlinear metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitsas, N.L. [School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, Athens 15773 (Greece); Horikis, T.P. [Department of Mathematics, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Shen, Y.; Kevrekidis, P.G.; Whitaker, N. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Frantzeskakis, D.J., E-mail: dfrantz@phys.uoa.g [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece)

    2010-03-01

    We consider short pulse propagation in nonlinear metamaterials characterized by a weak Kerr-type nonlinearity in their dielectric response. Two short-pulse equations (SPEs) are derived for the high- and low-frequency 'band gaps' (where linear electromagnetic waves are evanescent) with linear effective permittivity epsilon<0 and permeability mu>0. The structure of the solutions of the SPEs is also briefly discussed, and connections with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation are made.

  6. Surface plasmon polariton band gap structures: implications to integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Volkov, V. S.; Østergaard, John Erland

    2001-01-01

    PBG-based components within a few hundred micrometers, we realized that other two-dimensional waves, e.g., surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), might be employed for the same purpose. The SPP band gap (SPPBG) has been observed for the textured silver surfaces by performing angular measurements...... of the surface reflectivity. Here we report the results of our experimental and theoretical investigations of waveguiding in the SPPBG structures....

  7. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundr...

  8. Deletions, Inversions, Duplications: Engineering of Structural Variants using CRISPR/Cas in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Kraft

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural variations (SVs contribute to the variability of our genome and are often associated with disease. Their study in model systems was hampered until now by labor-intensive genetic targeting procedures and multiple mouse crossing steps. Here we present the use of CRISPR/Cas for the fast (10 weeks and efficient generation of SVs in mice. We specifically produced deletions, inversions, and also duplications at six different genomic loci ranging from 1.1 kb to 1.6 Mb with efficiencies up to 42%. After PCR-based selection, clones were successfully used to create mice via aggregation. To test the practicability of the method, we reproduced a human 500 kb disease-associated deletion and were able to recapitulate the human phenotype in mice. Furthermore, we evaluated the regulatory potential of a large genomic interval by deleting a 1.5 Mb fragment. The method presented permits rapid in vivo modeling of genomic rearrangements.

  9. Shell evolution approaching the N=20 island of inversion: structure of 26Na

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, G L; Orr, N A; Diget, C Aa; Matta, A; Hackman, G; Williams, S J; Celik, I C; Achouri, N L; Falou, H Al; Ashley, R; Austin, R A E; Ball, G C; Blackmon, J C; Boston, A J; Boston, H C; Brown, S M; Cross, D S; Djongolov, M; Drake, T E; Hager, U; Fox, S P; Fulton, B R; Galinski, N; Garnsworthy, A B; Jamieson, D; Kanungo, R; Leach, K; Orce, J N; Pearson, C J; Porter-Peden, M; Sarazin, F; Simpson, E C; Sjue, S; Smalley, D; Sumithrarachchi, C; Triambak, S; Unsworth, C; Wadsworth, R

    2015-01-01

    The levels in 26Na with single particle character have been observed for the first time using the d(25Na,p gamma) reaction at 5 MeV/nucleon. The measured excitation energies and the deduced spectroscopic factors are in good overall agreement with (0+1) hbar-omega shell model calculations performed in a complete spsdfp basis and incorporating a reduction in the N=20 gap. Notably, the 1p3/2 neutron configuration was found to play an enhanced role in the structure of the low-lying negative parity states in 26Na, compared to the isotone 28Al. Thus, the lowering of the 1p3/2 orbital relative to the 0f7/2 occuring in the neighbouring Z=10 and 12 nuclei -- 25,27Ne and 27,29Mg -- is seen to extend to Z=11. Together with the newly measured splitting of the spin multiplets formed by odd-odd proton-neutron coupling, this provides further, stronger constraints on the modelling of the transition into the island of inversion.

  10. Inverse solution technique of steady-state responses for local nonlinear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Guan, Xin; Zheng, Gangtie

    2016-03-01

    An inverse solution technique with the ability of obtaining complete steady-state primary harmonic responses of local nonlinear structures in the frequency domain is proposed in the present paper. In this method, the nonlinear dynamic equations of motion is first condensed from many to only one algebraic amplitude-frequency equation of relative motion. Then this equation is transformed into a polynomial form, and with its frequency as the unknown variable, the polynomial equation is solved by tracing all the solutions of frequency with the increase of amplitude. With this solution technique, some complicated dynamic behaviors such as sharp tuning, anomalous jumps, breaks in responses and detached resonance curves could be obtained. The proposed method is demonstrated and validated through a finite element beam under force excitations and a lumped parameter model with a local nonlinear element under base excitations. The phenomenon of detached resonance curves in the frequency response and its coupling effects with multiple linear modes in the latter example are observed.

  11. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-02-10

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEpSI is modest. This makes it even possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10,000-atom nanotubes on a single processor. We also show that the use of PEpSI does not lead to loss of accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  12. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, C; Zhang, H; Cao, Q P; Wang, X D; Zhang, D X; Ramamurty, U; Jiang, J Z

    2016-08-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and "liquid-like" regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested.

  13. Banding and electronic structures of metal azides——Sensitivity and conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖鹤鸣; 李永富

    1995-01-01

    By using both DV-Xα and EH-CO methods, the calculation studies of the structure-property relationships of a series of metal azides, of their clusters’ electronic structures in ground and excited states, of their systems with cation vacancy and the doped Pb(N3)2, as well as their crystal band structures have been conducted. The results show that the sensitivity of ionic-type metal azides varies with the degree of difficulty of electronic transition of the losing charge on N3. A metal azide with cation vacancies has a greater sensitivity than the perfect one. When doped with monovalent metal ions, lead azide’s sensitivity increased; when with trivalent ones, its sensitivity decreased; when with divalent ones, little of it changed. Compared with heavy metal azides. an alkali metal azide has a larger band gap, a smaller band width and a greater transition energy of frontier electron with a smaller amount of losing charge on N3, and thus has lower sensitivity and conductivity than heavy metal azides.

  14. Bayesian inversion of free oscillations for Earth's radial (an)elastic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, R. W. L.; Käufl, P. J.; Valentine, A. P.; Trampert, J.

    2014-12-01

    We perform a Bayesian inversion of degree-zero spheroidal mode splitting function measurements for radial (1-D) Earth structure, in terms of the Voigt averages of P-wave (VP) and S-wave (VS) velocities, density, bulk and shear attenuation, using neural networks. The method is flexible and allows us to assess the robustness of features in existing reference models, such as PREM. The Bayesian framework provides a means for quantifying uncertainties in the model parameters and for measuring the information content of the data. The analysis of the information content suggests that the free oscillations constrain most parameters better than body wave travel time data. Our most important findings can be summarised as follows. The data prefer an inner-outer core boundary (ICB) that lies in the depth range 5154.7-5165.7 km, i.e. deeper than in existing reference models; the effect on the travel time of inner-core-sensitive seismic phases is comparable to the estimated noise in such measurements. The density contrast at the ICB (0.73 g cm-3) is larger than in PREM (0.60 g cm-3) and ak135f (0.56 g cm-3), but our range including uncertainties (0.52-0.94 g cm-3) encompasses all previous estimates in the literature. The average VP and VS in the D″ region are smaller than in PREM, whereas the mean density is probably larger. The data cannot uniquely determine whether this density excess is restricted to the D″ region or distributed throughout the lower(most) mantle. The data cannot determine with certainty the presence or absence of a discontinuity at 220 km depth for VP,VS and density. If present, the jump in both velocities is likely smaller than in PREM. Shear attenuation parameters in the mantle deviate from PREM in a similar fashion to results from more recent studies. We find a non-homogeneous shear attenuation in the inner core, reinforcing the hypothesis that a distinct 'innermost inner core' may exist. The bulk attenuation in the mantle and the outer core is

  15. Paleoproterozoic Collisional Structures in the Hudson Bay Lithosphere Constrained by Multi-Observable Probabilistic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Afonso, J. C.; Porritt, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleozoic Hudson Bay intracratonic basin conceals a Paleoproterozoic Himalayan-scale continental collision, the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), which marks an important milestone in the assembly of the Canadian Shield. The geometry of the THO is complex due to the double-indentor geometry of the collision between the Archean Superior and Western Churchill cratons. Seismic observations at regional scale show a thick, seismically fast lithospheric keel beneath the entire region; an intriguing feature of recent models is a 'curtain' of slightly lower wavespeeds trending NE-SW beneath the Bay, which may represent the remnants of more juvenile material trapped between the two Archean continental cores. The seismic models alone, however, cannot constrain the nature of this anomaly. We investigate the thermal and compositional structure of the Hudson Bay lithosphere using a multi-observable probabilistic inversion technique. This joint inversion uses Rayleigh wave phase velocity data from teleseismic earthquakes and ambient noise, geoid anomalies, surface elevation and heat flow to construct a pseudo-3D model of the crust and upper mantle. Initially a wide range of possible mantle compositions is permitted, and tests are carried out to ascertain whether the lithosphere is stratified with depth. Across the entire Hudson Bay region, low temperatures and a high degree of chemical depletion characterise the mantle lithosphere. Temperature anomalies within the lithosphere are modest, as may be expected from a tectonically-stable region. The base of the thermal lithosphere lies at depths of >250 km, reaching to ~300 km depth in the centre of the Bay. Lithospheric stratification, with a more-depleted upper layer, is best able to explain the geophysical data sets and surface observables. Some regions, where intermediate-period phase velocities are high, require stronger mid-lithospheric depletion. In addition, a narrow region of less-depleted material extends NE-SW across the Bay

  16. Peculiarities of the band structure of multi-component photonic crystals with different dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samusev, A K; Samusev, K B; Rybin, M V; Limonov, M F

    2010-03-24

    In this work we offer a simple analytical method which allows us to determine and study the effects of the selective switching of photonic stop-bands in multi-component photonic crystals (Mc-PhCs) of any dimensionality. The calculations for Mc-PhCs with low dielectric contrast have been performed in the framework of the model based on the scattering form factor analysis. It has been shown that the effects of selective switching of photonic stop-bands predicted theoretically and found experimentally before in three-dimensional (3D) Mc-PhC have a general character and may be observed also in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Mc-PhCs. It is found that 1D, 2D and 3D Mc-PhCs demonstrate unexpectedly similar quasi-periodic behaviour of photonic stop-bands as a function of the reciprocal lattice vector. A proper choice of the structural and dielectric parameters can create a resonance photonic stop-band determining the Bragg wavelengths, to which a photonic crystal can never be transparent.

  17. Peculiarities of the band structure of multi-component photonic crystals with different dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samusev, A K; Samusev, K B; Rybin, M V; Limonov, M F, E-mail: m.rybin@mail.ioffe.r [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-24

    In this work we offer a simple analytical method which allows us to determine and study the effects of the selective switching of photonic stop-bands in multi-component photonic crystals (Mc-PhCs) of any dimensionality. The calculations for Mc-PhCs with low dielectric contrast have been performed in the framework of the model based on the scattering form factor analysis. It has been shown that the effects of selective switching of photonic stop-bands predicted theoretically and found experimentally before in three-dimensional (3D) Mc-PhC have a general character and may be observed also in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Mc-PhCs. It is found that 1D, 2D and 3D Mc-PhCs demonstrate unexpectedly similar quasi-periodic behaviour of photonic stop-bands as a function of the reciprocal lattice vector. A proper choice of the structural and dielectric parameters can create a resonance photonic stop-band determining the Bragg wavelengths, to which a photonic crystal can never be transparent.

  18. A Ku-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with overmoded slow-wave-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; He, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Jian-De; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Ling, Jun-Pu

    2016-12-01

    In order to enhance the power capacity, an improved Ku-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with overmoded slow-wave-structure (SWS) is proposed and investigated numerically and experimentally. The analysis of the dispersion relationship and the resonant curve of the cold test indicate that the device can operate at the near π mode of the TM01 mode, which is useful for mode selection and control. In the particle simulation, the improved Ku-band MILO generates a microwave with a power of 1.5 GW and a frequency of 12.3 GHz under an input voltage of 480 kV and input current of 42 kA. Finally, experimental investigation of the improved Ku-band MILO is carried out. A high-power microwave (HPM) with an average power of 800 MW, a frequency of 12.35 GHz, and pulse width of 35 ns is generated under a diode voltage of 500 kV and beam current of 43 kA. The consistency between the experimental and simulated far-field radiation pattern confirms that the operating mode of the improved Ku-band MILO is well controlled in π mode of the TM01 mode. Project supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61171021).

  19. Hyper-Temporal C-Band SAR for Baseline Woody Structural Assessments in Deciduous Savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Main

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems and their woody vegetation provide valuable resources and ecosystem services. Locally calibrated and cost effective estimates of these resources are required in order to satisfy commitments to monitor and manage change within them. Baseline maps of woody resources are important for analyzing change over time. Freely available, and highly repetitive, C-band data has the potential to be a viable alternative to high-resolution commercial SAR imagery (e.g., RADARSAT-2, ALOS2 in generating large-scale woody resources maps. Using airborne LiDAR as calibration, we investigated the relationships between hyper-temporal C-band ASAR data and woody structural parameters, namely total canopy cover (TCC and total canopy volume (TCV, in a deciduous savanna environment. Results showed that: the temporal filter reduced image variance; the random forest model out-performed the linear model; while the TCV metric consistently showed marginally higher accuracies than the TCC metric. Combinations of between 6 and 10 images could produce results comparable to high resolution commercial (C- & L-band SAR imagery. The approach showed promise for producing a regional scale, locally calibrated, baseline maps for the management of deciduous savanna resources, and lay a foundation for monitoring using time series of data from newer C-band SAR sensors (e.g., Sentinel1.

  20. Bow Ties in the Sky I: The Angular Structure of Inverse Compton Gamma-ray Halos in the Fermi Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Broderick, Avery E; Shalaby, Mohamad; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald; Chang, Philip; Lamberts, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Extended inverse Compton halos are generally anticipated around extragalactic sources of gamma rays with energies above 100 GeV. These result from inverse Compton scattered cosmic microwave background photons by a population of high-energy electron/positron pairs produced by the annihilation of the high-energy gamma rays on the infrared background. Despite the observed attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays, the halo emission has yet to be directly detected. Here, we demonstrate that in most cases these halos are expected to be highly anisotropic, distributing the up-scattered gamma rays along axes defined either by the radio jets of the sources or oriented perpendicular to a global magnetic field. We present a pedagogical derivation of the angular structure in the inverse Compton halo and provide an analytic formalism that facilitates the generation of mock images. We discuss exploiting this fact for the purpose of detecting gamma-ray halos in a set of companion papers.

  1. Bow Ties in the Sky. I: The Angular Structure of Inverse Compton Gamma-Ray Halos in the Fermi Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Tiede, Paul; Shalaby, Mohamad; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald; Chang, Philip; Lamberts, Astrid

    2016-12-01

    Extended inverse Compton halos are generally anticipated around extragalactic sources of gamma rays with energies above 100 GeV. These result from inverse Compton scattered cosmic microwave background photons by a population of high-energy electron/positron pairs produced by the annihilation of the high-energy gamma rays on the infrared background. Despite the observed attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays, the halo emission has yet to be directly detected. Here, we demonstrate that in most cases these halos are expected to be highly anisotropic, distributing the upscattered gamma rays along axes defined either by the radio jets of the sources or oriented perpendicular to a global magnetic field. We present a pedagogical derivation of the angular structure in the inverse Compton halo and provide an analytic formalism that facilitates the generation of mock images. We discuss exploiting this fact for the purpose of detecting gamma-ray halos in a set of companion papers.

  2. A Comparison of Solar p-Mode Parameters from MDI and Gong: Mode Frequencies and Structure Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Howe, R.; Schou, J.; Thompson, M. J.; Hill, F.; Komm, R.

    2003-01-01

    Helioseismic analysis of solar global oscillations allows investigation of the internal structure of the Sun. One important test of the reliability of the inferences from helioseismology is that the results from independent sets of contemporaneous data are consistent with one another. Here we compare mode frequencies from the Global Oscillation Network Group and Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO and resulting inversion results on the Sun's internal structure. The average relative differences between the data sets are typically less than 1 x 10(exp -5) substantially smaller than the formal errors in the differences; however, in some cases the frequency differences show a systematic behavior that might nonetheless influence the inversion results. We find that the differences in frequencies are not a result of instrumental effects but are almost entirely related to the data pipeline software. Inversion of the frequencies shows that their differences do not result in any significant effects on the resulting inferences on solar structure. We have also experimented with fitting asymmetric profiles to the oscillation power spectra and find that, compared with the symmetric fits, this causes no significant change in the inversion results.

  3. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  4. Fabrication of the CERN/PSI/ST X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dehler, Micha; Gudkov, Dmitry; Lebet, Serge; Riddone, Germana; Shi, Jiaru; Citterio, Alessandro; Zennaro, Riccardo; D'Auria, Gerardo; Serpico, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, PSI and Sincrotrone Trieste (ST), a multi- purpose X-band accelerating structure has been designed and fabricated, used for high gradients tests in the CLIC structure testing program and in the FEL projects of PSI and ST. The structure has 72 cells with a phase advance of 5 pi/6 and includes upstream and down-stream wakefield monitors to measure the beam alignment. The SLAC mode launcher design is used to feed it with RF power. Following the CERN fabrication procedures for high-gradient structure, diffusion bonding and brazing in hydrogen atmosphere is used to assemble the cells. After tuning, a vacuum bakeout is required before the feedthroughs for the wake field monitors are welded in as a last step. We describe the experiences gained in finishing the first two structures out of a series of four and present the results from the RF tuning and low level RF tests.

  5. DFT Study of Effects of Potassium Doping on Band Structure of Crystalline Cuprous Azide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU,Wei-Hua; ZHANG,Xiao-Wen; WEI,Tao; XIAO,He-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The structure and defect formation energies of the K-doped CuN3 were studied using density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The results show that the K-doping breaks the azide symmetry and causes asymmetric atomic displacement. As the K-doping level increases, the band gap of the doped system gradually increases. The K impurity is easily incorporated into the crystal thermodynamically. The Cu vacancy is easily created thermodynamically and the K impurity can serve as nucleation centers for vacancy clustering. Finally the effects of K-doping concentrations on the sensitivity of CuN3 were understood based on electronic structures.

  6. Extended Hückel theory for carbon nanotubes: band structure and transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienert, Andreas; Schuster, Jörg; Gessner, Thomas

    2013-05-02

    Extended Hückel theory (EHT) is a well established method for the description of the electronic structure of molecules and solids. In this article, we present a set of extended Hückel parameters for carbon nanotubes (CNTs), obtained by fitting the ab initio band structure of the (6,0) CNT. The new parameters are highly transferable to different types of CNTs. To demonstrate the versatility of the approach, we perform self-consistent EHT-based electron transport calculations for finite length CNTs with metal electrodes.

  7. Band structure calculation of GaSe-based nanostructures using empirical pseudopotential method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchy, A. V.; Volotovskiy, S. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Savin, V. V.; Golovashkin, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present the results of band structure computer simulation of GaSe- based nanostructures using the empirical pseudopotential method. Calculations were performed using a specially developed software that allows performing simulations using cluster computing. Application of this method significantly reduces the demands on computing resources compared to traditional approaches based on ab-initio techniques and provides receiving the adequate comparable results. The use of cluster computing allows to obtain information for structures that require an explicit account of a significant number of atoms, such as quantum dots and quantum pillars.

  8. Quasiparticle band structure for the Hubbard systems: Application to. alpha. -CeAl sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F. (Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain (ES)); Balle, S. (Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07071 Palma de Mallorca, Spain (ES)); Salvador, R. (Control Data Corporation, TALLAHASSEE, FL (USA) Supercomputer Computations Research Institute, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4052 (USA))

    1990-04-01

    A self-energy formalism for determining the quasiparticle band structure of the Hubbard systems is deduced. The self-energy is obtained from the dynamically screened Coulomb interaction whose bare value is the correlation energy {ital U}. A method for integrating the Schroedingerlike equation with the self-energy operator is given. The method is applied to the cubic Laves phase of {alpha}-CeAl{sub 2} because it is a clear Hubbard system with a very complex electronic structure and, moreover, this system provides us with sufficient experimental data for testing our method.

  9. Estimation of Q factors from reflection seismic data for a band-limited and stabilized inverse Q filter driven by an average-Q model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zengbao; Chen, Xiaohong; Wang, Yanghua; Li, Jingye

    2014-02-01

    Reliable Q estimation is desirable for model-based inverse Q filtering to improve seismic resolution. On the one hand, conventional methods estimate Q from the amplitude spectra or frequency variations of individual wavelets at different depth (or time) levels, which is vulnerable to the effects of spectral interference and ambient noise. On the other hand, most inverse Q filtering algorithms are sensitive to noise, in order not to boost them, sometimes at the expense of degrading compensation effect. In this paper, the average-Q values are obtained from reflection seismic data based on the Gabor transform spectrum of a seismic trace. We transform the 2-D time-variant frequency spectrum into the 1-D spectrum, and then estimate the average-Q values based on the amplitude attenuation and compensation functions, respectively. Driven by the estimated average-Q model, we also develop a modified inverse Q filtering algorithm by incorporating a time-variant bandpass filter (TVBF), whose high cut off frequency follows a hyperbola along the traveltime from a specified time. Finally, we test this modified inverse Q filtering algorithm on synthetic data and perform the Q estimation procedure on a real reflection seismic data, followed by applying the modified inverse Q filtering algorithm. The synthetic data test and the real data example demonstrate that the algorithm driven by average-Q model may enhance the seismic resolution, without degrading the signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Utility of natural generalised inverse technique in the interpretation of dyke structures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, M.M.M.; Murty, T.V.R.; Rao, P.R.; Lakshminarayana, S.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Murthy, K.S.R.

    Forward and Inverse methods of magnetic interpretation have been used to estimate the parameters of dyke like intrusion over the eastern continental shelf of India. In the forward problem, the tentative parameters of the causative source are assumed...

  11. Structure-Band Gap Relationships in Hexagonal Polytypes and Low-Dimensional Structures of Hybrid Tin Iodide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Mao, Lingling; Malliakas, Christos D; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2017-01-03

    The present study deals with the structural characterization and classification of the novel compounds 1-8 into perovskite subclasses and proceeds in extracting the structure-band gap relationships between them. The compounds were obtained from the employment of small, 3-5-atom-wide organic ammonium ions seeking to discover new perovskite-like compounds. The compounds reported here adopt unique or rare structure types akin to the prototype structure perovskite. When trimethylammonium (TMA) was employed, we obtained TMASnI3 (1), which is our reference compound for a "perovskitoid" structure of face-sharing octahedra. The compounds EASnI3 (2b), GASnI3 (3a), ACASnI3 (4), and IMSnI3 (5) obtained from the use of ethylammonium (EA), guanidinium (GA), acetamidinium (ACA), and imidazolium (IM) cations, respectively, represent the first entries of the so-called "hexagonal perovskite polytypes" in the hybrid halide perovskite library. The hexagonal perovskites define a new family of hybrid halide perovskites with a crystal structure that emerges from a blend of corner- and face-sharing octahedral connections in various proportions. The small organic cations can also stabilize a second structural type characterized by a crystal lattice with reduced dimensionality. These compounds include the two-dimensional (2D) perovskites GA2SnI4 (3b) and IPA3Sn2I7 (6b) and the one-dimensional (1D) perovskite IPA3SnI5 (6a). The known 2D perovskite BA2MASn2I7 (7) and the related all-inorganic 1D perovskite "RbSnF2I" (8) have also been synthesized. All compounds have been identified as medium-to-wide-band-gap semiconductors in the range of Eg = 1.90-2.40 eV, with the band gap progressively decreasing with increased corner-sharing functionality and increased torsion angle in the octahedral connectivity.

  12. Band Structure and Optical Properties of Kesterite Type Compounds: first principle calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaz, S.; Unver, H.; Ugur, G.; Mamedov, A. M.; Ozbay, E.

    2017-02-01

    In present work, our research is mainly focused on the electronic structures, optical and magnetic properties of Cu2FeSnZ4 (Z = S, Se) compounds by using ab initio calculations within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculations are performed by using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) based on the density functional theory. The band structure of the Cu2FeSnZ4 ( Z = S, Se) compounds for majority spin (spin-up) and minority spin (spin-down) were calculated. It is seen that for these compounds, the majority spin states cross the Fermi level and thus have the metallic character, while the minority spin states open the band gaps around the Fermi level and thus have the narrow-band semiconducting nature. For better understanding of the electronic states, the total and partial density of states were calculated, too. The real and imaginary parts of dielectric functions and hence the optical functions such as energy-loss function, the effective number of valance electrons and the effective optical dielectric constant for Cu2FeSnZ4 (Z = S, Se) compounds were also calculated.

  13. Band structure and spin texture of Bi2Se3 3 d ferromagnetic metal interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Velev, Julian P.; Dang, Xiaoqian; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-07-01

    The spin-helical surface states in a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), such as Bi2Se3 , are predicted to have superior efficiency in converting charge current into spin polarization. This property is said to be responsible for the giant spin-orbit torques observed in ferromagnetic metal/TI structures. In this work, using first-principles and model tight-binding calculations, we investigate the interface between the topological insulator Bi2Se3 and 3 d -transition ferromagnetic metals Ni and Co. We find that the difference in the work functions of the topological insulator and the ferromagnetic metals shift the topological surface states down about 0.5 eV below the Fermi energy where the hybridization of these surface states with the metal bands destroys their helical spin structure. The band alignment of Bi2Se3 and Ni (Co) places the Fermi energy far in the conduction band of bulk Bi2Se3 , where the spin of the carriers is aligned with the magnetization in the metal. Our results indicate that the topological surface states are unlikely to be responsible for the huge spin-orbit torque effect observed experimentally in these systems.

  14. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensors for large band low frequency monitoring and characterization of sites and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-10-01

    Among the different mechanical architectures present in literature, the Watts linkage is one of the most promising ones for the implementation of a new class of mechanical accelerometers (horizontal, vertical and angular). In this paper, we present monolithic implementations of uniaxial and triaxial mechanical seismometers and accelerometers based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum mechanical configuration, optimized for low frequency characterization of sites (including underground sites) and structures as inertial sensor (seismometer). This mechanical architecture allows the design and implementation of very large band monolithic sensors (10-7Hz 102 Hz), whose sensitivities for the most common applications are defined by the noise introduced by their readouts (e.g. ¡ 10-12 m/sqrt(Hz) with classical LVDT readouts). These unique features, coupled other relevant properties like scalability, compactness, lightness, high directivity, frequency tunability (typical resonance frequencies in the band 10-1 Hz 102 Hz), very high immunity to environmental noises and low cost make this class of sensors very effective for the implementation of uniaxial (horizontal and/or vertical) and triaxial seismometers and accelerometers for ground, space and underwater applications, including UHV and cryogenics ones. Typical applications of this class of monolithic sensors are in the field of earthquake engineering, seismology, geophysics, civil engineering, characterization of sites (including underground sites), structures (e.g. buildings, bridges, historical monuments), and, in general, in all applications requiring large band-low frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities and compactness.

  15. Crystal structure, conformation, vibration and optical band gap analysis of bis[ rac-propranolol nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, S.; Balasubramanian, T.; Nehru, K.; Kim, Youngmee

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of the title rac-propranolol salt, CHNO2+·NO3-, consists of two protonated propranolol residues and nitrate anions. Three virtually flat fragments, characteristics of most of the β-adrenolytics with oxy-methylene bridge are present in both the cations (A and B). The plane of the propranolol chain is twisted with respect to the plane of the aromatic ring in both the cations. Present study investigates the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions, which play an important role in biological functions. A gauche conformation is observed for the oxo-methylene bridge of cation A, while a trans conformation prevails in cation B. These conformations are found in majority of β-blockers. Presence of twenty intermolecular hydrogen bonds mediating through the anions stabilizes the crystal packing. Vibration analysis and earlier theoretical predictions complement the structure analysed. From the UV-Vis spectral analysis for the crystal, the optical band gap is found to be Eg = 5.12 eV, where as the chloride salt has Eg = 3.81 eV. The increase in the band gap may be attributed by the increase in the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Good optical transmittance in the entire visible region and the direct band gap property suggest that it is a suitable candidate for optical applications in UV region.

  16. Impurity effects on the band structure of one-dimensional photonic crystals: Experiment and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Luna-Acosta, G A; Kuhl, U; Stoeckmann, H -J

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of single impurities on the transmission in microwave realizations of the photonic Kronig-Penney model, consisting of arrays of Teflon pieces alternating with air spacings in a microwave guide. As only the first propagating mode is considered, the system is essentially one dimensional obeying the Helmholtz equation. We derive analytical closed form expressions from which the band structure, frequency of defect modes, and band profiles can be determined. These agree very well with experimental data for all types of single defects considered (e. g. interstitial, substitutional) and shows that our experimental set-up serves to explore some of the phenomena occurring in more sophisticated experiments. Conversely, based on the understanding provided by our formulas, information about the unknown impurity can be determined by simply observing certain features in the experimental data for the transmission. Further, our results are directly applicable to the closely related quantum 1D Kronig-Penn...

  17. The band structure of carbonmonoxide on 2-D Au islands on graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2014-06-01

    The dispersion of the occupied molecular orbitals of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Au 2D islands, vapor-deposited on graphene/Ru(0 0 0 1), is seen to be wave vector dependent, as revealed by angle-resolved photoemission. The band dispersion is similar to CO monolayers adsorbed on many single crystal metal surfaces. Thus not only are the adsorbed gold islands on graphene flat and crystalline, as evident in the dispersion of the Au d-states, but the CO molecular adlayer is both molecular and ordered as well. The experimental angle-resolved photoemission combined with model calculations of the occupied CO band structure, suggest that, in spite of being a very weakly bound adsorbate, the CO adlayer on Au 2D islands on graphene is strongly hybridized to the Au layer. . © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Qiu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, one-dimensional (1D and two-dimensional (2D graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC.

  19. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz;

    2013-01-01

    with one monolayer of InN and 40 monolayers of GaN. The results are compared with calculations performed for different types of superlattices: InN/GaN, InGaN/GaN, and InN/InGaN/GaN with single monolayers of InN and/or InGaN. The superlattices are simulated by band structure calculations based on the local......Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...

  20. Direct observation of the band structure in bulk hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henck, Hugo; Pierucci, Debora; Fugallo, Giorgia; Avila, José; Cassabois, Guillaume; Dappe, Yannick J.; Silly, Mathieu G.; Chen, Chaoyu; Gil, Bernard; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Sirotti, Fausto; Asensio, Maria C.; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2017-02-01

    A promising route towards nanodevice applications relies on the association of graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides with hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN ). Due to its insulating nature, h -BN has emerged as a natural substrate and gate dielectric for graphene-based electronic devices. However, some fundamental properties of bulk h -BN remain obscure. For example, the band structure and the position of the Fermi level have not been experimentally resolved. Here, we report a direct observation of parabolic dispersions of h -BN crystals using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We find that h -BN exfoliation on epitaxial graphene enables overcoming the technical difficulties of using ARPES with insulating materials. We show trigonal warping of the intensity maps at constant energy. The valence-band maxima are located around the K points, 2.5 eV below the Fermi level, thus confirming the residual p -type character of typical h -BN .

  1. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Tang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs) are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS) have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC.

  2. Impurity effects on the band structure of one-dimensional photonic crystals: experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Acosta, G A [Instituto de Fisica, BUAP Apartado Postal J-48, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); Schanze, H; Kuhl, U; Stoeckmann, H-J [Fachbereich Physik der Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Renthof 5, D-35032 (Germany)], E-mail: gluna@sirio.ifuap.buap.mx

    2008-04-15

    We study the effects of single impurities on the transmission in microwave realizations of the photonic Kronig-Penney model, consisting of arrays of Teflon pieces alternating with air spacings in a microwave guide. As only the first propagating mode is considered, the system is essentially one-dimensional (1D) obeying the Helmholtz equation. We derive analytical closed form expressions from which the band structure, frequency of defect modes and band profiles can be determined. These agree very well with experimental data for all types of single defects considered (e.g. interstitial and substitutional) and show that our experimental set-up serves to explore some of the phenomena occurring in more sophisticated experiments. Conversely, based on the understanding provided by our formulae, information about the unknown impurity can be determined by simply observing certain features in the experimental data for the transmission. Further, our results are directly applicable to the closely related quantum 1D Kronig-Penney model.

  3. Fermi surface and band structure of BiPd from ARPES studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohani, H.; Mishra, P.; Gupta, Anurag; Awana, V. P. S.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a detailed electronic structure study of the non-centrosymmetric superconductor BiPd based on our angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations. We observe a high intensity distribution on the Fermi surface (FS) of this compound resulting from various electron and hole like bands which are present in the vicinity of the Fermi energy (Ef). The near Ef states are primarily composed of Bi-6p with a little admixture of Pd-4dx2-y2/zy orbitals. There are various spin-orbit split bands involved in the crossing of Ef making a complex FS. The FS mainly consists of multi sheets of three dimensions which disfavor the nesting between different sheets of the FS. Our comprehensive study elucidates that BiPd could be a s-wave multiband superconductor.

  4. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id; Darma, Yudi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  5. Compact Dual-Band Planar Inverted-e-Shaped Antenna Using Defected Ground Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Piao Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel dual-band planar inverted-e-shaped antenna (PIEA using defected ground structure (DGS for Bluetooth and wireless local area network (WLAN applications. The PIEA can reduce electromagnetic interferences (EMIs and it is constructed on a compact printed circuit board (PCB size of 10 × 5 × 4 mm3. Experimental results indicate that the antenna with a compact meandered slit can improve the operating impedance matching and bandwidths at 2.4 and 5.5 GHz. The measured power gains at 2.4 and 5.5 GHz band are 1.99 and 3.71 dBi; antenna efficiencies are about 49.33% and 55.23%, respectively. Finally, the good performances of the proposed antenna can highly promote for mobile device applications.

  6. Dual Band and Beam-Steering Antennas Using Reconfigurable Feed on Sierpinski Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghun Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractal patch antennas based on the Sierpinski structure are studied in this paper. The antennas operate at dual bands (around 2 and 5 GHz and are designed to steer the beam directions at around 5 GHz band (the first harmonic. The antennas use reconfigurable triple feeds on the same antenna plane to have three beam directions. The same scale factor defines the geometrical self-similarity of the Sierpinski fractal. The proposed antennas are fabricated through three iterations from 1st order to 3rd order and utilize FR-4 (εr = 4.4 for the microwave substrate. The performances of the antennas, such as reflection coefficients and radiation patterns are verified by simulation and measurement. The results show that the properties of the proposed antennas in three orders are similar.

  7. Multiband frequency-reconfigurable antenna using metamaterial structure of electromagnetic band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Raimi; Rahim, M. K. A.; Himdi, Mohamed; Hamid, M. R.; Majid, H. A.; Jalil, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    A metamaterial of electromagnetic band gap (EBG) is incorporated to an antenna for frequency reconfigurability is proposed. The EBG consists of two identical unit cells that provide multiple band gaps at 1.88-1.94, 2.25-2.44, 2.67-2.94, 3.52-3.54, and 5.04-5.70 GHz with different EBG configurations. Subsequently, the antenna is incorporated with EBG. The corresponding incorporated structure successfully achieves various reconfigurable frequencies at 1.60, 1.91, 2.41, 3.26, 2.87, 5.21, and 5.54 GHz. The antenna has the potential to be implemented for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, WiMAX, LTE, and cognitive radio applications.

  8. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, K

    2003-01-01

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e sup + e sup - linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 (micro)m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  9. Cohesive band structure of carbon nanotubes for applications in quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vijay K; Bhattacharyya, Arkaprava

    2013-11-21

    An integrated cohesive band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) applicable to all chirality directions (n, m), starting from the Dirac cone of a graphene nanolayer in k-space, is demarcated, in direct contrast to dissimilar chiral and achiral versions in the published literature. The electron wave state of a CNT is quantized into one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure with a wrapping mode, satisfying the boundary conditions from one Dirac K-point to an equivalent neighboring one with an identical phase and returning to the same K point. The repetitive rotation for an identical configuration with added band index (n-m)mod3, yields one metallic (M) with zero bandgap corresponding to (n-m)mod3 = 0, semiconducting state SC1 with (n-m)mod3 = 1 and SC2 with (n-m)mod3 = 2. The band gap and effective mass of SC2 state are twice as large as those of SC1 state. A broad-spectrum expression signifying the linear dependence of the effective mass on the bandgap is obtained. Both the Fermi energy and the intrinsic velocity limiting the current to the saturation level is calculated as a function of the carrier concentration. Limitations of the parabolic approximation are pointed out. Several new features of the band structure are acquired in a seamlessly unified mode for all CNTs, making it suitable for all-encompassing applications. Applications of the theory to high-field transport are advocated with an example of a metallic CNT, in agreement with experimental observations. The mechanism behind the breakdown of the linear current-voltage relation of Ohm's law and the associated surge in resistance are explained on the basis of the nonequilibrium Arora's distribution function (NEADF). These results are important for the performance evaluation and characterization of a variety of applications on CNT in modern nanoscale circuits and devices.

  10. Wrench-Slip Reversals and Structural Inversions: Cenozoic Slide-Rule Tectonics in Sundaland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.D. Tjia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.174Most of continental Southeast Asia, that is, Sundaland and Indosinia, achieved a relative tectonic stability by the beginning of the Cenozoic. Since then a strong tectonic activity in Sundaland has been restricted to existing regional fault zones and to regional slow, vertical crustal movements elsewhere that produced small to very large sedimentary basins. On the other hand, regional deformation of Indosinia as a consequence of ductile shearing has continued into the Paleogene. Since the Oligocene, the northern part of Sundaland and Indosinia have been extruded differentially towards southeast along the Red River, Wang Chao (or Mae Ping, or Tonle Sap, and Three Pagodas - Axial Malay fault zones. The initial cause has been attributed to hard collision between Subplate India with Megaplate Eurasia. Plate dynamics in the region have changed substantially since Mid-Miocene as to force wrench-slip reversals along the major fault zones in Sundaland as well as in Indosinia. Concomitant structural inversions are demonstrated on seismic sections. In the core of Sundaland, earlier transtensional wrenching was succeeded by transpressive strike-slip faulting that on major faults of the Malay Basin manifested in reversals of sense. From the Hinge-line fault eastward, the transtensional left wrench slip was succeeded by transpressional dextral slip, while in the region to its west the wrench-slip kinematics was an earlier transtensional right slip followed by transpressional left slip. In the Strait of Malacca and eastern margin of Sumatra, right-lateral wrenching in the Neogene has been common. In certain places it could be established a wrench-slip of transtensional character in Oligocene-Early Miocene, and the transpressional wrench movement occurred mainly during the Middle to Late Miocene. The remarkable coincidence of termination of spreading of the South China Basin in Langhian, and that of the West Philippine and Caroline

  11. Wrench-Slip Reversals and Structural Inversions: Cenozoic Slide-Rule Tectonics in Sundaland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.D. Tjia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.174Most of continental Southeast Asia, that is, Sundaland and Indosinia, achieved a relative tectonic stability by the beginning of the Cenozoic. Since then a strong tectonic activity in Sundaland has been restricted to existing regional fault zones and to regional slow, vertical crustal movements elsewhere that produced small to very large sedimentary basins. On the other hand, regional deformation of Indosinia as a consequence of ductile shearing has continued into the Paleogene. Since the Oligocene, the northern part of Sundaland and Indosinia have been extruded differentially towards southeast along the Red River, Wang Chao (or Mae Ping, or Tonle Sap, and Three Pagodas - Axial Malay fault zones. The initial cause has been attributed to hard collision between Subplate India with Megaplate Eurasia. Plate dynamics in the region have changed substantially since Mid-Miocene as to force wrench-slip reversals along the major fault zones in Sundaland as well as in Indosinia. Concomitant structural inversions are demonstrated on seismic sections. In the core of Sundaland, earlier transtensional wrenching was succeeded by transpressive strike-slip faulting that on major faults of the Malay Basin manifested in reversals of sense. From the Hinge-line fault eastward, the transtensional left wrench slip was succeeded by transpressional dextral slip, while in the region to its west the wrench-slip kinematics was an earlier transtensional right slip followed by transpressional left slip. In the Strait of Malacca and eastern margin of Sumatra, right-lateral wrenching in the Neogene has been common. In certain places it could be established a wrench-slip of transtensional character in Oligocene-Early Miocene, and the transpressional wrench movement occurred mainly during the Middle to Late Miocene. The remarkable coincidence of termination of spreading of the South China Basin in Langhian, and that of the West Philippine and Caroline

  12. Band Structure and Fermi Surface of Cu2Sb by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    in four bands. The first and second bands contain closed sheets, degenerate along a plane in the absence of spin-orbit splitting. The third band contains a multiply-connected sheet. The fourth band consists of undulating columns, degenerate along a plane with the third band in the absence of spin...

  13. Contrasting 1D tunnel-structured and 2D layered polymorphs of V2O5: relating crystal structure and bonding to band gaps and electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Thomas M; Leedahl, Brett; Andrews, Justin L; Marley, Peter M; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Moewes, Alexander

    2016-06-21

    New V2O5 polymorphs have risen to prominence as a result of their open framework structures, cation intercalation properties, tunable electronic structures, and wide range of applications. The application of these materials and the design of new, useful polymorphs requires understanding their defining structure-property relationships. We present a characterization of the band gap and electronic structure of nanowires of the novel ζ-phase and the orthorhombic α-phase of V2O5 using X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The band gap is found to decrease from 1.90 ± 0.20 eV in the α-phase to 1.50 ± 0.20 eV in the ζ-phase, accompanied by the loss of the α-phase's characteristic split-off dxy band in the ζ-phase. States of dxy origin continue to dominate the conduction band edge in the new polymorph but the inequivalence of the vanadium atoms and the increased local symmetry of [VO6] octahedra results in these states overlapping with the rest of the V 3d conduction band. ζ-V2O5 exhibits anisotropic conductivity along the b direction, defining a 1D tunnel, in contrast to α-V2O5 where the anisotropic conductivity is along the ab layers. We explain the structural origins of the differences in electronic properties that exist between the α- and ζ-phase.

  14. Mangrove vegetation structure in Southeast Brazil from phased array L-band synthetic aperture radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Pereira, Francisca Rocha; Kampel, Milton; Cunha-Lignon, Marilia

    2016-07-01

    The potential use of phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) data for discriminating distinct physiographic mangrove types with different forest structure developments in a subtropical mangrove forest located in Cananéia on the Southern coast of São Paulo, Brazil, is investigated. The basin and fringe physiographic types and the structural development of mangrove vegetation were identified with the application of the Kruskal-Wallis statistical test to the SAR backscatter values of 10 incoherent attributes. The best results to separate basin to fringe types were obtained using copolarized HH, cross-polarized HV, and the biomass index (BMI). Mangrove structural parameters were also estimated using multiple linear regressions. BMI and canopy structure index were used as explanatory variables for canopy height, mean height, and mean diameter at breast height regression models, with significant R2=0.69, 0.73, and 0.67, respectively. The current study indicates that SAR L-band images can be used as a tool to discriminate physiographic types and to characterize mangrove forests. The results are relevant considering the crescent availability of freely distributed SAR images that can be more utilized for analysis, monitoring, and conservation of the mangrove ecosystem.

  15. A Reconfigurable Triple-Notch-Band Antenna Integrated with Defected Microstrip Structure Band-Stop Filter for Ultra-Wideband Cognitive Radio Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingsong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A printed reconfigurable ultra-wideband (UWB monopole antenna with triple narrow band-notched characteristics is proposed for cognitive radio applications in this paper. The triple narrow band-notched frequencies are obtained using a defected microstrip structure (DMS band stop filter (BSF embedded in the microstrip feed line and an inverted π-shaped slot etched in the rectangular radiation patch, respectively. Reconfigurable characteristics of the proposed cognitive radio antenna (CRA are achieved by means of four ideal switches integrated on the DMS-BSF and the inverted π-shaped slot. The proposed UWB CRA can work at eight modes by controlling switches ON and OFF. Moreover, impedance bandwidth, design procedures, and radiation patterns are presented for analysis and explanation of this antenna. The designed antenna operates over the frequency band between 3.1 GHz and 14 GHz (bandwidth of 127.5%, with three notched bands from 4.2 GHz to 6.2 GHz (38.5%, 6.6 GHz to 7.0 GHz (6%, and 12.2 GHz to 14 GHz (13.7%. The antenna is successfully simulated, fabricated, and measured. The results show that it has wide impedance bandwidth, multimodes characteristics, stable gain, and omnidirectional radiation patterns.

  16. $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O molecular structures of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed bands in $^{34}$S

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Yasutaka

    2014-01-01

    The structures of excited states in $^{34}$S are investigated using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method (GCM). The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter $\\beta$. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of two positive- and one negative-parity superdeformed (SD) bands are predicted, and low-lying states and other deformed bands are obtained. The SD bands have structures of $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O + two valence neutrons in molecular orbitals around the two $^{16}$O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the two valence neutrons are $\\delta^2$ and $\\pi^2$ for the positive-parity SD bands and $\\pi^1\\delta^1$ for the negative-parity SD band. The structural changes of the yrast states are also discussed.

  17. 8-band and 14-band kp modeling of electronic band structure and material gain in Ga(In)AsBi quantum wells grown on GaAs and InP substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S. [Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kudrawiec, R. [Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2015-08-07

    The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) with various bismuth concentrations (Bi ≤ 15%) within the 8-band and 14-band kp models. The 14-band kp model was obtained by extending the standard 8-band kp Hamiltonian by the valence band anticrossing (VBAC) Hamiltonian, which is widely used to describe Bi-related changes in the electronic band structure of dilute bismides. It has been shown that in the range of low carrier concentrations n < 5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, material gain spectra calculated within 8- and 14-band kp Hamiltonians are similar. It means that the 8-band kp model can be used to calculate material gain in dilute bismides QWs. Therefore, it can be applied to analyze QWs containing new dilute bismides for which the VBAC parameters are unknown. Thus, the energy gap and electron effective mass for Bi-containing materials are used instead of VBAC parameters. The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for 8 nm wide GaInAsBi QWs on GaAs and InP substrates with various compositions. In these QWs, Bi concentration was varied from 0% to 5% and indium concentration was tuned in order to keep the same compressive strain (ε = 2%) in QW region. For GaInAsBi/GaAs QW with 5% Bi, gain peak was determined to be at about 1.5 μm. It means that it can be possible to achieve emission at telecommunication windows (i.e., 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm) for GaAs-based lasers containing GaInAsBi/GaAs QWs. For GaInAsBi/Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As/InP QWs with 5% Bi, gain peak is predicted to be at about 4.0 μm, i.e., at the wavelengths that are not available in current InP-based lasers.

  18. Inversion of single-station teleseismic P-wave polarization-data for the velocity structure of Beijing area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Broadband three-component seismic data recorded by Beijingstation (BJI) of CDSN were used to calculate P-wave polarization of teleseismic events. These polarization data were then used in the inversion for the underground structure around the Beijing station, especially for the details of velocity discontinuities. The result shows that a conspicuous low velocity zone exists in the crust on the west of the station, which is in good agreement with previous studies. It proves the theory that polarization data could be applied to inversion for velocity structures, especially for boundaries with large velocity gradient. It also demonstrates the feasibility of velocity structure inversion with polarization data from high-quality broadband data recorded by a single station. Therefore, travel-times and polarization data can be jointly used to study velocity structure. Polarization data are more suitable for delineating the boundary of velocity anomalies. Moreover, if the polarization method is combined with receiver function method to fully exploit their complementarity, it is possible to obtain the lateral velocity variation around the station as well as the detailed vertical variation below the station.

  19. First-Principles Band Calculations on Electronic Structures of Ag-Doped Rutile and Anatase TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Xing-Gang; LIU An-Dong; HUANG Mei-Dong; LIAO Bin; WU Xiao-Ling

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structures of Ag-doped rutile and anatase TiO2 are studied by first-principles band calculations based on density funetionai theory with the full-potentiai linearized-augraented-plane-wave method.New occupied bands ore found between the band gaps of both Ag-doped rutile and anatase TiO2.The formation of these new bands Capri be explained mainly by their orbitals of Ag 4d states mixed with Ti 3d states and are supposed to contribute to their visible light absorption.

  20. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, A. K., E-mail: aktrip2001@yahoo.co.in; Singhal, R. P., E-mail: rpsiitbhu@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh (India); Khazanov, G. V., E-mail: George.V.Khazanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Avanov, L. A., E-mail: levon.a.avanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Electron pitch angle (D{sub αα}) and momentum (D{sub pp}) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in D{sub αα} and D{sub pp} coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The D{sub pp} diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients. For chorus waves, D{sub pp} coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of D{sub pp} coefficient are generally larger than the values of D{sub αα} coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3

  1. Core levels, valence band structure and unoccupied states of clean InN surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmerlich, Marcel; Eisenhardt, Anja; Schaefer, Juergen A.; Krischok, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik and Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In this study we used a surface analytics system directly connected to a MBE growth module to study the surface properties of thin InN films. The samples were prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) templates and exhibited a 2 x 2 reconstruction after growth. The prepared samples were analysed by photoelectron spectroscopy as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). For the occupied states, a very good agreement to available theoretical calculations is found. Although, the valence band maximum is located at 1.6 eV, indicating strong downward band bending of {proportional_to}0.9 eV, photoemission is detected up to E{sub F}. This indicates that the Fermi level is pinned above the conduction band minimum, as recently predicted. The spin-orbit splitting of the In 4d level at 17.8 eV could be resolved using He II radiation. Furthermore, from the fine structure of the secondary electron cascade peak we extract the energy of different unoccupied states 0 eV to 9 eV above the vacuum level. These measurements enable us to identify features in the InN EELS spectra, with a loss energy larger than 16 eV, as interband transitions from the In 4d level.

  2. On the Design of Laser Structured Ka Band Multi-Chip Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Mehdi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid prototyping of millimeter wave (MMW multi-chip module (MCM on low-cost ceramic-polymer composite substrate using laser ablation process is presented. A Ka band MCM front-end receiver is designed, fabricated and tested. The complete front-end receiver module except the IF and power distribution sections is realized on the single prescribed substrate. The measured receiver gain, noise figure and image rejection is 37 dB, 4.25 dB and 40 dB respectively. However, it deduced from the experimental results of the two front-end modules that the complex permittivity characteristics of the substrate are altered after the laser ablation process. The effective permittivity alteration phenomenon is further validated through the characterization and comparison of various laser ablated and chemically etched Ka band parallel-coupled band-pass filters. A simple and experimentally verified method is worked out to utilize the laser ablation structuring process on the prescribed substrate. It is anticipated that the proposed method can be applied to other laminated substrates as well with the prescribed manufacturing process.

  3. Gin-mediated DNA inversion: product structure and the mechanism of strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaar, R; van de Putte, P; Cozzarelli, N R

    1988-02-01

    Inversion of the G loop of bacteriophage Mu requires the phage-encoded Gin protein and a host factor. The topological changes in a supercoiled DNA substrate generated by the two purified proteins were analyzed. More than 99% of the inversion products were unknotted rings. This result excludes synapsis by way of a random collision of recombination sites, because the resulting entrapped supercoils would be converted into knots by recombination. Instead, the recombination sites must come together in the synaptic complex in an ordered fashion with a fixed number of supercoils between the sites. The linking number of the substrate DNA increases by four during recombination. Thus, in three successive rounds of inversion, the change in linking number was +4, +8, and +12, respectively. These results lead to a quantitative model for the mechanism of Gin recombination that includes the distribution of supercoils in the synaptic complex, their alteration by strand exchange, and specific roles for the two proteins needed for recombination.

  4. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  5. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  6. Design and Characterization of a W-Band Folded-Waveguide Slow-Wave Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathy, Murugan; Datta, Subrata Kumar

    2016-12-01

    A single-section slow-wave structure for a W-band folded-waveguide traveling-wave tube with operating bandwidth of around 4% was designed for delivering the output power of 50 W at the operating voltage of 13.5 kV and operating beam current of 80 mA. The design was carried out using analytical formulations and 3D electromagnetic simulations. The beam-wave interaction analysis was carried out using large signal Lagrangian analysis and particle-in-cell simulation. The folded-waveguide slow-wave structure along with input-output couplers and RF windows were fabricated. Cold test measurements were carried out for dispersion characteristics of the slow-wave structure and voltage standing-wave ratio and insertion loss characteristics of the RF window. The measured cold circuit parameters show close agreement with the analysis.

  7. Manipulation of Optoelectronic Properties and Band Structure Engineering of Ultrathin Te Nanowires by Chemical Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ahin; Amin, Kazi Rafsanjani; Tripathi, Shalini; Biswas, Sangram; Singh, Abhishek K; Bid, Aveek; Ravishankar, N

    2017-01-13

    Band structure engineering is a powerful technique both for the design of new semiconductor materials and for imparting new functionalities to existing ones. In this article, we present a novel and versatile technique to achieve this by surface adsorption on low dimensional systems. As a specific example, we demonstrate, through detailed experiments and ab initio simulations, the controlled modification of band structure in ultrathin Te nanowires due to NO2 adsorption. Measurements of the temperature dependence of resistivity of single ultrathin Te nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) devices exposed to increasing amounts of NO2 reveal a gradual transition from a semiconducting to a metallic state. Gradual quenching of vibrational Raman modes of Te with increasing concentration of NO2 supports the appearance of a metallic state in NO2 adsorbed Te. Ab initio simulations attribute these observations to the appearance of midgap states in NO2 adsorbed Te nanowires. Our results provide fundamental insights into the effects of ambient on the electronic structures of low-dimensional materials and can be exploited for designing novel chemical sensors.

  8. Estimating tropical forest structure using LIDAR AND X-BAND INSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palace, M. W.; Treuhaft, R. N.; Keller, M. M.; Sullivan, F.; Roberto dos Santos, J.; Goncalves, F. G.; Shimbo, J.; Neumann, M.; Madsen, S. N.; Hensley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are considered the most structurally complex of all forests and are experiencing rapid change due to anthropogenic and climatic factors. The high carbon stocks and fluxes make understanding tropical forests highly important to both regional and global studies involving ecosystems and climate. Large and remote areas in the tropics are prime targets for the use of remotely sensed data. Radar and lidar have previously been used to estimate forest structure, with an emphasis on biomass. These two remote sensing methods have the potential to yield much more information about forest structure, specifically through the use of X-band radar and waveform lidar data. We examined forest structure using both field-based and remotely sensed data in the Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil. We measured multiple structural parameters for about 70 plots in the field within a 25 x 15 km area that have TanDEM-X single-pass horizontally and vertically polarized radar interferometric data. High resolution airborne lidar were collected over a 22 sq km portion of the same area, within which 33 plots were co-located. Preliminary analyses suggest that X-band interferometric coherence decreases by about a factor of 2 (from 0.95 to 0.45) with increasing field-measured vertical extent (average heights of 7-25 m) and biomass (10-430 Mg/ha) for a vertical wavelength of 39 m, further suggesting, as has been observed at C-band, that interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is substantially more sensitive to forest structure/biomass than SAR. Unlike InSAR coherence versus biomass, SAR power at X-band versus biomass shows no trend. Moreover, airborne lidar coherence at the same vertical wavenumbers as InSAR is also shown to decrease as a function of biomass, as well. Although the lidar coherence decrease is about 15% more than the InSAR, implying that lidar penetrates more than InSAR, these preliminary results suggest that X-band InSAR may be useful for structure and

  9. Band structure and transport studies of copper selenide: An efficient thermoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Kriti; Gahtori, Bhasker; Bathula, Sivaiah; Auluck, S.; Dhar, Ajay

    2014-10-01

    We report the band structure calculations for high temperature cubic phase of copper selenide (Cu2Se) employing Hartree-Fock approximation using density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. These calculations were further extended to theoretically estimate the electrical transport coefficients of Cu2Se employing Boltzmann transport theory, which show a reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values. The calculated transport coefficients are discussed in terms of the thermoelectric (TE) performance of this material, which suggests that Cu2Se can be a potential p-type TE material with an optimum TE performance at a carrier concentration of ˜ 4 - 6 × 10 21 cm - 3 .

  10. Photonic Band Gaps in 3D Network Structures with Short-range Order

    CERN Document Server

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Noh, Heeso; Schreck, Carl F; Dufresne, Eric R; O'Hern, Corey S; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic study of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in three-dimensional (3D) photonic amorphous structures (PAS) with short-range order. From calculations of the density of optical states (DOS) for PAS with different topologies, we find that tetrahedrally connected dielectric networks produce the largest isotropic PBGs. Local uniformity and tetrahedral order are essential to the formation of PBGs in PAS, in addition to short-range geometric order. This work demonstrates that it is possible to create broad, isotropic PBGs for vector light fields in 3D PAS without long-range order.

  11. Exceptional contours and band structure design in parity-time symmetric photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Cerjan, Alexander; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of multidimensional parity-time symmetric periodic systems whose non-Hermitian periodicity is an integer multiple of the underlying Hermitian system's periodicity. This creates a natural set of degeneracies which can undergo thresholdless $\\mathcal{PT}$ transitions. We derive a $\\mathbf{k} \\cdot \\mathbf{p}$ perturbation theory suited to the continuous eigenvalues of such systems in terms of the modes of the underlying Hermitian system. In photonic crystals, such thresholdless $\\mathcal{PT}$ transitions are shown to yield significant control over the band structure of the system, and can result in all-angle supercollimation, a $\\mathcal{PT}$-superprism effect, and unidirectional behavior.

  12. W-Band Free Electron Laser for High Gradient Structure Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, S. M.; Whittum, D. H.; Donohue, J. T.

    1997-05-01

    We discuss the use of a free electron laser in support of material stress studies of W-band high-gradient accelerating structures. We propose the use of the linear induction accelerator LELIA (CEA/CESTA, France) to generate a 1-kiloamp, 80-ns FWHM electron pulse. We present a design for a helical FEL TE_11 amplifier that will generate high peak power (100's MW) at 93 GHz. We support our design with analytical estimates of gain, and with numerical simulations of power and phase development.

  13. Energy-band structure and intrinsic coherent properties in two weakly linked Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Yunbo; Liang, J.-Q.

    2003-06-01

    The energy-band structure and energy splitting due to quantum tunneling in two weakly linked Bose-Einstein condensates were calculated by using the instanton method. The intrinsic coherent properties of Bose-Josephson junction (BJJ) were investigated in terms of energy splitting. For EC/EJ≪1, the energy splitting is small and the system is globally phase coherent. In the opposite limit, EC/EJ≫1, the energy splitting is large and the system becomes phase dissipated. Our results suggest that one should investigate the coherence phenomena of BJJ in proper condition such as EC/EJ˜1.

  14. Competition between magnetic field dependent band structure and coherent backscattering in multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojetz, B.; Roche, S.; Miko, C.; Triozon, F.; Forró, L.; Strunk, C.

    2007-03-01

    Magnetotransport measurements in large diameter multiwall carbon nanotubes (20 40 nm) demonstrate the competition of a magnetic-field dependent bandstructure and Altshuler Aronov Spivak oscillations. By means of an efficient capacitive coupling to a backgate electrode, the magnetoconductance oscillations are explored as a function of Fermi level shift. Changing the magnetic field orientation with respect to the tube axis and by ensemble averaging, allows the contributions of different Aharonov Bohm phases to be identified. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical calculations of the band structure and the conductance.

  15. Staggering of the B(M1) value as a fingerprint of specific chiral bands structure

    CERN Document Server

    Grodner, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear chirality has been intensively studdied for the last several years in the context of experimental as well as theoretical approach. Characteristic gamma selection rules have been predicted for the strong chiral symmetry breaking limit that has been observed in Cs isotopes. The presented analysis shows that the gamma selection rules cannot be attributed only to chiral symmetry breaking. The selection rules relate to structural composition of the chiral rotational bands, i.e. to odd particle configuration and the deformation of the core.

  16. Exceptional Contours and Band Structure Design in Parity-Time Symmetric Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerjan, Alexander; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-05-20

    We investigate the properties of two-dimensional parity-time symmetric periodic systems whose non-Hermitian periodicity is an integer multiple of the underlying Hermitian system's periodicity. This creates a natural set of degeneracies that can undergo thresholdless PT transitions. We derive a k·p perturbation theory suited to the continuous eigenvalues of such systems in terms of the modes of the underlying Hermitian system. In photonic crystals, such thresholdless PT transitions are shown to yield significant control over the band structure of the system, and can result in all-angle supercollimation, a PT-superprism effect, and unidirectional behavior.

  17. First principles electronic band structure and phonon dispersion curves for zinc blend beryllium chalcogenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabhi, Shweta, E-mail: venu.mankad@gmail.com; Mankad, Venu, E-mail: venu.mankad@gmail.com; Jha, Prafulla K., E-mail: venu.mankad@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Maharaja Krishnakumasinhji Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar-364001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    A detailed theoretical study of structural, electronic and Vibrational properties of BeX compound is presented by performing ab-initio calculations based on density-functional theory using the Espresso package. The calculated value of lattice constant and bulk modulus are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data and agree reasonably well. BeX (X = S,Se,Te) compounds in the ZB phase are indirect wide band gap semiconductors with an ionic contribution. The phonon dispersion curves are represented which shows that these compounds are dynamically stable in ZB phase.

  18. Systematic study of the effect of HSE functional internal parameters on the electronic structure and band gap of a representative set of metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñes, Francesc; Lamiel-García, Oriol; Chul Ko, Kyoung; Yong Lee, Jin; Illas, Francesc

    2017-04-30

    The effect of the amount of Hartree-Fock mixing parameter (α) and of the screening parameter (w) defining the range separated HSE type hybrid functional is systematically studied for a series of seven metal oxides: TiO2 , ZrO2 , CuO2 , ZnO, MgO, SnO2 , and SrTiO3 . First, reliable band gap values were determined by comparing the optimal α reproducing the experiment with the inverse of the experimental dielectric constant. Then, the effect of the w in the HSE functional on the calculated band gap was explored in detail. Results evidence the existence of a virtually infinite number of combinations of the two parameters which are able to reproduce the experimental band gap, without a unique pair able to describe the full studied set of materials. Nevertheless, the results point out the possibility of describing the electronic structure of these materials through a functional including a screened HF exchange and an appropriate correlation contribution. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Inverse Sine Phase Detector Phase Locked Loop Associated with Modified Multi Band LC Quadrature Voltage Controlled Oscillator for Wireless Communication Systems at 0.9, 1.8, 2.4, 3.5 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Abdellaoui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study and in consequence of the restricted performance of the multi standard wireless receiver utilizing the classical architectures, we proposed and presented a new architecture of multi band wireless receiver based on an Inverse Sine Phase Detector Phase Locked Loop (ISPDPLL associated with modified multi band LC quadrature Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO, supporting GSM/DCS/DECT/Bluetooth/WiMax systems. Approach: To accomplish the multi standard receiving architecture at sufficiently good performance and at a low hardware cost, the proposed circuit, using an ISPDPLL associated with VCO based on switched capacitors utilizing a several numeric controlled capacitive branch and cross-coupled transistors, was implemented in 0.35 µm CMOS technology and designed to yield quadrature output signals (I-Q allowing to eliminate the dephasing block (90° employed in a multi band Zero IF architecture receiver, that make the proposed architecture amenable for monolithic integration and 4G multi standard application. Results: This novel system presented high performance and good potentiality to cover perfectly the wireless multi standard receiving on the large band with the same transmission condition. Conclusion/Recommendations: The performance of this system was analyzed and demonstrated to have a minimum phase noise, a good Factor Of Merit (FOM and wide tuning for these standard applications.

  20. Late Jurassic – early Cretaceous inversion of rift structures, and linkage of petroleum system elements across post-rift unconformity, U.S. Chukchi Shelf, arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseknecht, David W.; Connors, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Basin evolution of the U.S. Chukchi shelf involved multiple phases, including Late Devonian–Permian rifting, Permian–Early Jurassic sagging, Late Jurassic–Neocomian inversion, and Cretaceous–Cenozoic foreland-basin development. The focus of ongoing exploration is a petroleum system that includes sag-phase source rocks; inversion-phase reservoir rocks; structure spanning the rift, sag, and inversion phases; and hydrocarbon generation during the foreland-basin phase.