WorldWideScience

Sample records for invasive urine biomarkers

  1. Urine Kidney Injury Molecule-1: A Potential Non-invasive Biomarker for Patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping L.; Mashni, Joseph W.; Sabbisetti, Venkata S.; Schworer, Charles M.; Wilson, George D.; Wolforth, Stacy C.; Kernen, Kenneth M.; Seifman, Brian D.; Amin, Mitual B.; Geddes, Timothy J.; Lin, Fan; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Hafron, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of urine KIM-1 as a biomarker for supporting a diagnosis of kidney cancers before operation. Methods A total of 19 patients were enrolled in the study based on preoperative imaging studies. Pre-operative and follow-up (1 month) uKIM-1 levels were measured and normalized with uCr levels and renal tumors were stained for KIM-1 using immunohistochemical techniques. Results The percentage of KIM-1 positive staining RCC cells ranged from 10 to 100% and the staining intensity ranged from 1+ to 3+. Based on the KIM-1 staining, 19 cases were divided into the KIM-1-negative staining group (n =7) and the KIM-1-positive group (n = 12). Serum creatinine (sCR) levels were significantly elevated after nephrectomy in both groups. In the KIM-1 negative group, uKIM-1/uCr remained at a similar level before (0.37 ± 0.1 ng/mg Cr) and after nephrectomy (0.32 ± 0.01 ng/mg Cr). However, in the KIM-1 positive group, elevated uKIM-1/uCr at 1.20 ± 0.31 ng/mg Cr was significantly reduced to 0.36± 0.1 ng/mg Cr, which was similar to the pre-operative uKIM-1/uCr (0.37 ± 0.1 ng/mg Cr) in the KIM-1 negative group. Conclusion Our study showed significant reduction in uKIM-1/uCr after nephrectomy, suggesting that urine KIM-1 may serve as a surrogate biomarker for kidney cancer and a non-invasive pre-operative measure to evaluate the malignant potential of renal masses. PMID:23979814

  2. Effectiveness of urine fibronectin as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker in bladder cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fan; Shen, Yifan; Xu, Tianyuan; Wang, Xianjin; Gao, Fengbin; Zhong, Shan; Chen, Shanwen; Shen, Zhoujun

    2018-03-21

    Previous researches pointed out that the measurement of urine fibronectin (Fn) could be a potential diagnostic test for bladder cancer (BCa). We conducted this meta-analysis to fully assess the diagnostic value of urine Fn for BCa detection. A systematic literature search in PubMed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, Cochrane library, and CBM was carried out to identify eligible studies evaluating the urine Fn in diagnosing BCa. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were established. We applied the STATA 13.0, Meta-Disc 1.4, and RevMan 5.3 software to the meta-analysis. Eight separate studies with 744 bladder cancer patients were enrolled in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR were 0.80 (95%CI = 0.77-0.83), 0.79 (95%CI = 0.73-0.84), and 15.18 (95%CI = 10.07-22.87), respectively, and the area under the curve (AUC) of SROC was 0.83 (95%CI = 0.79-0.86). The diagnostic power of a combined method (urine Fn combined with urine cytology) was also evaluated, and its sensitivity and AUC were significantly higher (0.86 (95%CI = 0.82-0.90) and 0.89 (95%CI = 0.86-0.92), respectively). Meta-regression along with subgroup analysis based on various covariates revealed the potential sources of the heterogeneity and the detailed diagnostic value of each subgroup. Sensitivity analysis supported that the result was robust. No threshold effect and publication bias were found in this meta-analysis. Urine Fn may become a promising non-invasive biomarker for bladder cancer with a relatively satisfactory diagnostic power. And the combination of urine Fn with cytology could be an alternative option for detecting BCa in clinical practice. The potential value of urine Fn still needs to be validated in large, multi-center, and prospective studies.

  3. Urine Exosomes: An Emerging Trove of Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, J M; Koritzinsky, E H; Glispie, D M; Star, R A; Yuen, P S T

    Exosomes are released by most cells and can be isolated from all biofluids including urine. Exosomes are small vesicles formed as part of the endosomal pathway that contain cellular material surrounded by a lipid bilayer that can be traced to the plasma membrane. Exosomes are potentially a more targeted source of material for biomarker discovery than unfractionated urine, and provide diagnostic and pathophysiological information without an invasive tissue biopsy. Cytoplasmic contents including protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lipids have all been studied within the exosomal fraction. Many prospective urinary exosomal biomarkers have been successfully identified for a variety of kidney or genitourinary tract conditions; detection of systemic conditions may also be possible. Isolation and analysis of exosomes can be achieved by several approaches, although many require specialized equipment or involve lengthy protocols. The need for timely analysis in the clinical setting has driven considerable innovation with several promising options recently emerging. Consensus on exosome isolation, characterization, and normalization procedures would resolve critical clinical translational bottlenecks for existing candidate exosomal biomarkers and provide a template for additional discovery studies. 2017 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mass spectrometric based approaches in urine metabolomics and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Mona M; Adamko, Darryl J; El-Aneed, Anas

    2017-03-01

    Urine metabolomics has recently emerged as a prominent field for the discovery of non-invasive biomarkers that can detect subtle metabolic discrepancies in response to a specific disease or therapeutic intervention. Urine, compared to other biofluids, is characterized by its ease of collection, richness in metabolites and its ability to reflect imbalances of all biochemical pathways within the body. Following urine collection for metabolomic analysis, samples must be immediately frozen to quench any biogenic and/or non-biogenic chemical reactions. According to the aim of the experiment; sample preparation can vary from simple procedures such as filtration to more specific extraction protocols such as liquid-liquid extraction. Due to the lack of comprehensive studies on urine metabolome stability, higher storage temperatures (i.e. 4°C) and repetitive freeze-thaw cycles should be avoided. To date, among all analytical techniques, mass spectrometry (MS) provides the best sensitivity, selectivity and identification capabilities to analyze the majority of the metabolite composition in the urine. Combined with the qualitative and quantitative capabilities of MS, and due to the continuous improvements in its related technologies (i.e. ultra high-performance liquid chromatography [UPLC] and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography [HILIC]), liquid chromatography (LC)-MS is unequivocally the most utilized and the most informative analytical tool employed in urine metabolomics. Furthermore, differential isotope tagging techniques has provided a solution to ion suppression from urine matrix thus allowing for quantitative analysis. In addition to LC-MS, other MS-based technologies have been utilized in urine metabolomics. These include direct injection (infusion)-MS, capillary electrophoresis-MS and gas chromatography-MS. In this article, the current progresses of different MS-based techniques in exploring the urine metabolome as well as the recent findings in providing

  5. First-void urine: A potential biomarker source for triage of high-risk human papillomavirus infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keer, Severien; Pattyn, Jade; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Ieven, Margareta; Van Damme, Pierre; Vorsters, Alex

    2017-09-01

    Great interest has been directed towards the use of first-void urine as a liquid biopsy for high-risk human papillomavirus DNA testing. Despite the high correlations established between urinary and cervical infections, human papillomavirus testing is unable to distinguish between productive and transforming high-risk infections that have the tendency to progress to cervical cancer. Thus far, investigations have been primarily confined to the identification of biomarkers for triage of high-risk human papillomavirus-positive women in cervicovaginal specimens and tissue biopsies. This paper reviews urinary biomarkers for cervical cancer and triage of high-risk human papillomavirus infections and elaborates on the opportunities and challenges that have emerged regarding the use of first-void urine as a liquid biopsy for the analysis of both morphological- (conventional cytology and novel immunohistochemical techniques) and molecular-based (HPV16/18 genotyping, host/viral gene methylation, RNA, and proteins) biomarkers. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Web of Science for studies investigating the use of urine as a biomarker source for cervical cancer screening. Five studies were identified reporting on biomarkers that are still in preclinical exploratory or clinical assay development phases and on assessments of non-invasive (urine) samples. Although large-scale validation studies are still needed, we conclude that methylation of both host and viral genes in urine has been proven feasible for use as a molecular cervical cancer triage and screening biomarker in phase two studies. This is especially promising and underscores our hypothesis that human papillomavirus DNA and candidate human and viral biomarkers are washed away with the initial, first-void urine, together with exfoliated cells, debris and impurities that line the urethra opening. Similar to the limitations of self-collected cervicovaginal samples, first-void urine will likely not fulfil the

  6. Urine protein concentration estimation for biomarker discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Mistry, Hiten D.; Bramham, Kate; Weston, Andrew; Ward, Malcolm; Thompson, Andrew; Chappell, Lucy C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the study of urinary proteomics as a diagnostic tool for renal disease and pre-eclampsia which requires accurate measurement of urinary protein. We compared different protein assays (Bicinchoninic acid (BCA), Lowry and Bradford) against the ‘gold standard’ amino-acid assay in urine from 43 women (8 non-pregnant, 34 pregnant, including 8 with pre-eclampsia. BCA assay was superior to both Lowry and Bradford assays (Bland Altman bias: 0.08) compared to amino-aci...

  7. Urine Metabonomics Reveals Early Biomarkers in Diabetic Cognitive Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lili; Zhuang, Pengwei; Lin, Mengya; Kang, Mingqin; Liu, Hongyue; Zhang, Yuping; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Yunlong; Zhang, Yanjun

    2017-09-01

    Recently, increasing attention has been paid to diabetic encephalopathy, which is a frequent diabetic complication and affects nearly 30% of diabetics. Because cognitive dysfunction from diabetic encephalopathy might develop into irreversible dementia, early diagnosis and detection of this disease is of great significance for its prevention and treatment. This study is to investigate the early specific metabolites biomarkers in urine prior to the onset of diabetic cognitive dysfunction (DCD) by using metabolomics technology. An ultra-high performance liquid-chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q/TOF-MS) platform was used to analyze the urine samples from diabetic mice that were associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and nonassociated with MCI in the stage of diabetes (prior to the onset of DCD). We then screened and validated the early biomarkers using OPLS-DA model and support vector machine (SVM) method. Following multivariate statistical and integration analysis, we found that seven metabolites could be accepted as early biomarkers of DCD, and the SVM results showed that the prediction accuracy is as high as 91.66%. The identities of four biomarkers were determined by mass spectrometry. The identified biomarkers were largely involved in nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, glutathione metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, and sphingolipid metabolism. The present study first revealed reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis of DCD. It provides new insight and strategy for the early diagnosis and treatment of DCD.

  8. Urine Trefoil Factors as Prognostic Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanari, Toshio; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Keiko; Morinaga, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Masashi; Onishi, Akifumi; Ogawa-Akiyama, Ayu; Kano, Yuzuki; Mise, Koki; Ohmoto, Yasukazu; Shikata, Kenichi; Wada, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are increased in serum and urine in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, whether the levels of TFF predict the progression of CKD remains to be elucidated. We determined the TFF levels using peptide-specific ELISA in spot urine samples and performed a prospective cohort study. The association between the levels of urine TFFs and other urine biomarkers as well as the renal prognosis was analyzed in 216 CKD patients (mean age: 53.7 years, 47.7% female, 56.9% with chronic glomerulonephritis, and mean eGFR: 58.5 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ). The urine TFF1 and TFF3 levels significantly increased with the progression of CKD stages, but not the urine TFF2 levels. The TFF1 and TFF3 peptide levels predicted the progression of CKD ≥ stage 3b by ROC analysis (AUC 0.750 and 0.879, resp.); however, TFF3 alone predicted CKD progression in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio 3.854, 95% confidence interval 1.316-11.55). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated that patients with a higher TFF1 and TFF3 alone, or in combination with macroalbuminuria, had a significantly worse renal prognosis. The data suggested that urine TFF peptides are associated with renal progression and the outcomes in patients with CKD.

  9. Urine stability studies for novel biomarkers of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Chirag R; Butrymowicz, Isabel; Yu, Angela; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Park, Meyeon; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Reeves, W Brian; Devarajan, Prasad; Kimmel, Paul L; Siew, Edward D; Liu, Kathleen D

    2014-04-01

    The study of novel urinary biomarkers of acute kidney injury has expanded exponentially. Effective interpretation of data and meaningful comparisons between studies require awareness of factors that can adversely affect measurement. We examined how variations in short-term storage and processing might affect the measurement of urine biomarkers. Cross-sectional prospective. Hospitalized patients from 2 sites: Yale New Haven Hospital (n=50) and University of California, San Francisco Medical Center (n=36). We tested the impact of 3 urine processing conditions on these biomarkers: (1) centrifugation and storage at 4°C for 48 hours before freezing at -80°C, (2) centrifugation and storage at 25°C for 48 hours before freezing at -80°C, and (3) uncentrifuged samples immediately frozen at -80°C. Urine concentrations of 5 biomarkers: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin 18 (IL-18), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), and cystatin C. We measured urine biomarkers by established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Biomarker values were log-transformed, and agreement with a reference standard of immediate centrifugation and storage at -80°C was compared using concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs). Neither storing samples at 4°C for 48 hours nor centrifugation had a significant effect on measured levels, with CCCs higher than 0.9 for all biomarkers tested. For samples stored at 25°C for 48 hours, excellent CCC values (>0.9) also were noted between the test sample and the reference standard for NGAL, cystatin C, L-FABP and KIM-1. However, the CCC for IL-18 between samples stored at 25°C for 48 hours and the reference standard was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.66-0.96). No comparisons to fresh, unfrozen samples; no evaluation of the effect of protease inhibitors. All candidate markers tested using the specified assays showed high stability with both short-term storage at 4°C and without centrifugation

  10. Urine biomarkers in the early stages of diseases: current status and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jian; Gao, Youhe

    2018-02-01

    As a noninvasive and easily available biological fluid, the urine is becoming an important source for disease biomarker study. Change is essential for the usefulness of a biomarker. Without homeostasis mechanisms, urine can accommodate more changes, especially in the early stages of diseases. In this review, we summarize current status and discuss perspectives on the discovery of urine biomarkers in the early stages of diseases. We emphasize the advantages of urine biomarkers compared to plasma biomarkers for the diagnosis of diseases at early stages, propose a urine biomarker research roadmap, and highlight a novel membrane storage technique that enables large-scale urine sample collection and storage efficiently and economically. It is anticipated that urine biomarker studies will greatly promote early diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and prognosis of a variety of diseases, and provide strong support for translational and precision medicine.

  11. The Urine Proteome as a Biomarker of Radiation Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukut; Halligan, Brian D.; Wakim, Bassam T.; Savin, Virginia J.; Cohen, Eric P.; Moulder, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Terrorist attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation, and early biomarkers of radiation injury would be critical for triage, treatment and follow-up of such individuals. However, no such biomarkers have yet been proven to exist. We tested the potential of high throughput proteomics to identify protein biomarkers of radiation injury after total body X-ray irradiation in a rat model. Subtle functional changes in the kidney are suggested by an increased glomerular permeability for macromolecules measured within 24 hours after TBI. Ultrastructural changes in glomerular podocytes include partial loss of the interdigitating organization of foot processes. Analysis of urine by LC-MS/MS and 2D-GE showed significant changes in the urine proteome within 24 hours after TBI. Tissue kallikrein 1-related peptidase, cysteine proteinase inhibitor cystatin C and oxidized histidine were found to be increased while a number of proteinase inhibitors including kallikrein-binding protein and albumin were found to be decreased post-irradiation. Thus, TBI causes immediately detectable changes in renal structure and function and in the urinary protein profile. This suggests that both systemic and renal changes are induced by radiation and it may be possible to identify a set of biomarkers unique to radiation injury. PMID:19746194

  12. Urinary high molecular weight matrix metalloproteinases as non-invasive biomarker for detection of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Seleim, Manar F; Abdalla, Mohga S; Sharada, Hayat M; Abdel Wahab, Abdel Hady A

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key molecules for tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Over-expression of different MMPs in tumor tissues can disturb the homeostasis and increase the level of various body fluids. Many MMPs including high molecular weights (HMWs) were detected in the urine of prostate and bladder cancer patients. Our aim here is to assess the usefulness of HMW MMPs as non invasive biomarkers in bilharzial bladder cancer in Egyptian patients. Methods The activ...

  13. Comparison of proteomic biomarker panels in urine and serum for ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Høgdall, Estrid

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to confirm previously found candidate epithelial ovarian cancer biomarkers in urine and to compare a paired serum biomarker panel and a urine biomarker panel from the same study cohort with regard to the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the ...

  14. Urine Galactomannan-to-Creatinine Ratio for Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Reischies, Frederike M. J.; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Prattes, Juergen; Krause, Robert; Eigl, Susanne; List, Agnes; Quehenberger, Franz; Strenger, Volker; Wölfler, Albert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Galactomannan (GM) testing of urine specimens may provide important advantages, compared to serum testing, such as easy noninvasive sample collection. We evaluated a total of 632 serial urine samples from 71 patients with underlying hematological malignancies and found that the urine GM/creatinine ratio, i.e., (urine GM level × 100)/urine creatinine level, which takes urine dilution into account, reliably detected invasive aspergillosis and may be a promising diagnostic tool for patients with...

  15. Diagnostic and Prognostic MicroRNA Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer in Cell-free Urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rasmussen, Anne Karin; Thomsen, Anni Rønfeldt

    2017-01-01

    Background: Widespread use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for prostate cancer (PC) detection has led to extensive overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Urine-based microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers could be useful in PC diagnosis and prognosis. Objective: To train and validate urine-based micro......RNA (miRNA) biomarkers that may assist in PC diagnosis and prognosis. Design, setting, and participants: We profiled the expression levels of 92 miRNAs via reverse transcriptase–poymerase chain reaction in cell-free urine samples from 29 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 215 patients...... could help in primary diagnosis of PC and guide treatment decisions. Further validation studies are warranted. Patient summary: Using two large patient cohorts, we searched for novel prostate cancer biomarkers in urine. We found two new sets of microRNA biomarkers in urine that could accurately predict...

  16. Urinary biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Emily; Nisenblat, Vicki; Farquhar, Cindy; Fraser, Ian; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M Louise

    2015-12-23

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis which is a costly chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the 'gold standard' diagnostic test for endometriosis, but it is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no simple non-invasive or minimally-invasive tests available in clinical practice that accurately diagnoses endometriosis. 1. To provide summary estimates of the diagnostic accuracy of urinary biomarkers for the diagnosis of pelvic endometriosis compared to surgical diagnosis as a reference standard.2. To assess the diagnostic utility of biomarkers that could differentiate ovarian endometrioma from other ovarian masses.Urinary biomarkers were evaluated as replacement tests for surgical diagnosis and as triage tests to inform decisions to undertake surgery for endometriosis. The searches were not restricted to particular study design, language or publication dates. We searched the following databases to 20 April - 31 July 2015: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, LILACS, OAIster, TRIP and ClinicalTrials.gov (trial register). MEDION, DARE, and PubMed were also searched to identify reviews and guidelines as reference sources of potentially relevant studies. Recently published papers not yet indexed in the major databases were also sought. The search strategy incorporated words in the title, abstract, text words across the record and the medical subject headings (MeSH) and was modified for each database. Published peer-reviewed, randomised controlled or cross-sectional studies of any size were considered, which included prospectively collected samples from any population of reproductive-aged women suspected of having one or more of the following target conditions: ovarian, peritoneal or deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). We included studies comparing the diagnostic test accuracy of one or more urinary biomarkers with surgical visualisation of endometriotic lesions. Two

  17. Metabolomic Biomarkers in Urine of Cushing’s Syndrome Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotłowska, Alicja; Puzyn, Tomasz; Sworczak, Krzysztof; Stepnowski, Piotr; Szefer, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Cushing’s syndrome (CS) is a disease which results from excessive levels of cortisol in the human body. The disorder is associated with various signs and symptoms which are also common for the general population not suffering from compound hypersecretion. Thus, more sensitive and selective methods are required for the diagnosis of CS. This follow-up study was conducted to determine which steroid metabolites could serve as potential indicators of CS and possible subclinical hypercortisolism in patients diagnosed with so called non-functioning adrenal incidentalomas (AIs). Urine samples from negative controls (n = 37), patients with CS characterized by hypercortisolism and excluding iatrogenic CS (n = 16), and patients with non-functioning AIs with possible subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (n = 25) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatograph equipped with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Statistical and multivariate methods were applied to investigate the profile differences between examined individuals. The analyses revealed hormonal differences between patients with CS and the rest of examined individuals. The concentrations of selected metabolites of cortisol, androgens, and pregnenetriol were elevated whereas the levels of tetrahydrocortisone were decreased for CS when opposed to the rest of the study population. Moreover, after analysis of potential confounding factors, it was also possible to distinguish six steroid hormones which discriminated CS patients from other study subjects. The obtained discriminant functions enabled classification of CS patients and AI group characterized by mild hypersecretion of cortisol metabolites. It can be concluded that steroid hormones selected by applying urinary profiling may serve the role of potential biomarkers of CS and can aid in its early diagnosis. PMID:28146078

  18. Metabolomic Biomarkers in Urine of Cushing's Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotłowska, Alicja; Puzyn, Tomasz; Sworczak, Krzysztof; Stepnowski, Piotr; Szefer, Piotr

    2017-01-29

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a disease which results from excessive levels of cortisol in the human body. The disorder is associated with various signs and symptoms which are also common for the general population not suffering from compound hypersecretion. Thus, more sensitive and selective methods are required for the diagnosis of CS. This follow-up study was conducted to determine which steroid metabolites could serve as potential indicators of CS and possible subclinical hypercortisolism in patients diagnosed with so called non-functioning adrenal incidentalomas (AIs). Urine samples from negative controls ( n = 37), patients with CS characterized by hypercortisolism and excluding iatrogenic CS ( n = 16), and patients with non-functioning AIs with possible subclinical Cushing's syndrome ( n = 25) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatograph equipped with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Statistical and multivariate methods were applied to investigate the profile differences between examined individuals. The analyses revealed hormonal differences between patients with CS and the rest of examined individuals. The concentrations of selected metabolites of cortisol, androgens, and pregnenetriol were elevated whereas the levels of tetrahydrocortisone were decreased for CS when opposed to the rest of the study population. Moreover, after analysis of potential confounding factors, it was also possible to distinguish six steroid hormones which discriminated CS patients from other study subjects. The obtained discriminant functions enabled classification of CS patients and AI group characterized by mild hypersecretion of cortisol metabolites. It can be concluded that steroid hormones selected by applying urinary profiling may serve the role of potential biomarkers of CS and can aid in its early diagnosis.

  19. Urine Galactomannan-to-Creatinine Ratio for Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Patients with Hematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischies, Frederike M J; Raggam, Reinhard B; Prattes, Juergen; Krause, Robert; Eigl, Susanne; List, Agnes; Quehenberger, Franz; Strenger, Volker; Wölfler, Albert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Galactomannan (GM) testing of urine specimens may provide important advantages, compared to serum testing, such as easy noninvasive sample collection. We evaluated a total of 632 serial urine samples from 71 patients with underlying hematological malignancies and found that the urine GM/creatinine ratio, i.e., (urine GM level × 100)/urine creatinine level, which takes urine dilution into account, reliably detected invasive aspergillosis and may be a promising diagnostic tool for patients with hematological malignancies. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01576653.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Urinary Cell-Free DNA Quantification as Non-Invasive Biomarker in Patients with Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisuda, Antonin; Pazourkova, Eva; Soukup, Viktor; Horinek, Ales; Hrbáček, Jan; Capoun, Otakar; Svobodova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Korabecna, Marie; Mares, Jaroslav; Hanuš, Tomáš; Babjuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of urinary cell-free DNA (ucfDNA) belongs to potential bladder cancer markers, but the reported results are inconsistent due to the use of various non-standardised methodologies. The aim of the study was to standardise the methodology for ucfDNA quantification as a potential non-invasive tumour biomarker. In total, 66 patients and 34 controls were enrolled into the study. Volumes of each urine portion (V) were recorded and ucfDNA concentrations (c) were measured using real-time PCR. Total amounts (TA) of ucfDNA were calculated and compared between patients and controls. Diagnostic accuracy of the TA of ucfDNA was determined. The calculation of TA of ucfDNA in the second urine portion was the most appropriate approach to ucfDNA quantification, as there was logarithmic dependence between the volume and the concentration of a urine portion (p = 0.0001). Using this methodology, we were able to discriminate between bladder cancer patients and subjects without bladder tumours (p = 0.0002) with area under the ROC curve of 0.725. Positive and negative predictive value of the test was 90 and 45%, respectively. Quantification of ucf DNA according to our modified method could provide a potential non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis of patients with bladder cancer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Combined serum and EPS-urine proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology for discovery of potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mo; Chen, Lizhu; Yuan, Zhengwei; Yang, Zeyu; Li, Yue; Shan, Liping; Yin, Bo; Fei, Xiang; Miao, Jianing; Song, Yongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignant tumors and a major cause of cancer-related death for men worldwide. The aim of our study was to identify potential non-invasive serum and expressed prostatic secretion (EPS)-urine biomarkers for accurate diagnosis of PCa. Here, we performed a combined isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to compare protein profiles using pooled serum and EPS-urine samples from 4 groups of patients: benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), localized PCa and metastatic PCa. The differentially expressed proteins were rigorously selected and further validated in a large and independent cohort using classical ELISA and Western blot assays. Finally, we established a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of 3 proteins (serum PF4V1, PSA, and urinary CRISP3) with an excellent diagnostic capacity to differentiate PCa from BPH [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.941], which showed an evidently greater discriminatory ability than PSA alone (AUC, 0.757) (P<0.001). Importantly, even when PSA level was in the gray zone (4-10 ng/mL), a combination of PF4V1 and CRISP3 could achieve a relatively high diagnostic efficacy (AUC, 0.895). Furthermore, their combination also had the potential to distinguish PCa from HGPIN (AUC, 0.934). Our results demonstrated that the combined application of serum and EPS-urine biomarkers can improve the diagnosis of PCa and provide a new prospect for non-invasive PCa detection.

  2. Metabolomic biomarkers in serum and urine in women with preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Austdal

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of magnetic resonance (MR metabolomics for study of preeclampsia, for improved phenotyping and elucidating potential clues to etiology and pathogenesis.Urine and serum samples from pregnant women with preeclampsia (n = 10, normal pregnancies (n = 10 and non-pregnant women (n = 10 matched by age and gestational age were analyzed with MR spectroscopy and subjected to multivariate analysis. Metabolites were then quantified and compared between groups.Urine and serum samples revealed clear differences between women with preeclampsia and both control groups (normal pregnant and non-pregnant women. Nine urine metabolites were significantly different between preeclampsia and the normal pregnant group. Urine samples from women with early onset preeclampsia clustered together in the multivariate analysis. The preeclampsia serum spectra showed higher levels of low and very-low density lipoproteins and lower levels of high-density lipoproteins when compared to both non-pregnant and normal pregnant women.The MR determined metabolic profiles in urine and serum from women with preeclampsia are clearly different from normal pregnant women. The observed differences represent a potential to examine mechanisms underlying different preeclampsia phenotypes in urine and serum samples in larger studies. In addition, similarities between preeclampsia and cardiovascular disease in metabolomics are demonstrated.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and biomarkers of serum and urine wile diagnostics of kidney cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolsky Yu.Ye.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: improvement of differential diagnostics of benign and malignant renal tumors basing on complex estimation of the results of MRTand the level of such biomarkers as vascular endothelial growth factor, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in blood serum and urine. Material and Methods. A total of 106 patients including the main group of 60 patients with renal cancer (RC, the group of comparison of 16 patients with benign renal tumors and the control group of 30 practically healthy persons were examined. ELISA was employed for detection of the biomarkers in blood serum and urine. The tumors were diagnosed by MRT Results. The increase of the level of the biomarkers in blood serum and urine was registered independently of the character of neoplastic process; more significant increase was observed in patients with RC, especially at the early stages of the disease. Some peculiarities of changing of the level of the biomarkers depending on the dimensions of malignant tumors were found. Conclusion. At the early stages of RC complex detection of the abovementioned biomarkers in blood serum and urine can serve an additional clinical diagnostic and prognostic criterion.

  4. Monitoring OH-PCBs in PCB transport worker's urine as a non-invasive exposure assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yuki; Suzuki, Motoharu; Matsumura, Chisato; Okuno, Toshihiro; Tsurukawa, Masahiro; Fujimori, Kazuo; Kannan, Narayanan; Weber, Roland; Nakano, Takeshi

    2018-04-14

    In this study, we analyzed hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) in urine of both PCB transport workers and PCB researchers. A method to monitor OH-PCB in urine was developed. Urine was solid-phase extracted with 0.1% ammonia/ methanol (v/v) and glucuronic acid/sulfate conjugates and then decomposed using β-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase. After alkaline digestion/derivatization, the concentration of OH-PCBs was determined by HRGC/HRMS-SIM. In the first sampling campaign, the worker's OH-PCB levels increased several fold after the PCB waste transportation work, indicating exposure to PCBs. The concentration of OH-PCBs in PCB transport workers' urine (0.55~11 μg/g creatinine (Cre)) was higher than in PCB researchers' urine (PCB storage area. In the second sampling, after recommended PCB exposure reduction measures had been enacted, the worker's PCB levels did not increase during handling of PCB equipment. This suggests that applied safety measures improved the situation. Hydroxylated trichlorobiphenyls (OH-TrCBs) were identified as a major homolog of OH-PCBs in urine. Also, hydroxylated tetrachlorobiphenyls (OH-TeCBs) to hydroxylated hexachlorobiphenyls (OH-HxCBs) were detected. For the sum of ten selected major indicators, a strong correlation to total OH-PCBs were found and these can possibly be used as non-invasive biomarkers of PCB exposure in workers managing PCB capacitors and transformer oils. We suggest that monitoring of OH-PCBs in PCB management projects could be considered a non-invasive way to detect exposure. It could also be used as a tool to assess and improve PCB management. This is highly relevant considering the fact that in the next 10 years, approx. 14 million tons of PCB waste need to be managed. Also, the selected populations could be screened to assess whether exposure at work, school, or home has taken place.

  5. A Standardized and Reproducible Urine Preparation Protocol for Cancer Biomarkers Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Beretov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A suitable and standardized protein purification technique is essential to maintain consistency and to allow data comparison between proteomic studies for urine biomarker discovery. Ultimately, efforts should be made to standardize urine preparation protocols. The aim of this study was to develop an optimal analytical protocol to achieve maximal protein yield and to ensure that this method was applicable to examine urine protein patterns that distinguish disease and disease-free states. In this pilot study, we compared seven different urine sample preparation methods to remove salts, and to precipitate and isolate urinary proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE profiles showed that the sequential preparation of urinary proteins by combining acetone and trichloroacetic acid (TCA alongside high speed centrifugation (HSC provided the best separation, and retained the most urinary proteins. Therefore, this approach is the preferred method for all further urine protein analysis.

  6. Metabolomic biomarkers in serum and urine in women with preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Austdal, Marie; Skråstad, Ragnhild; Gundersen, Astrid; Austgulen, Rigmor; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Bathen, Tone Frost

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the potential of magnetic resonance (MR) metabolomics for study of preeclampsia, for improved phenotyping and elucidating potential clues to etiology and pathogenesis. Methods Urine and serum samples from pregnant women with preeclampsia (n = 10), normal pregnancies (n = 10) and non-pregnant women (n = 10) matched by age and gestational age were analyzed with MR spectroscopy and subjected to multivariate analysis. Metabolites were then quantified and compared ...

  7. Deoxynivalenol Biomarkers in the Urine of UK Vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Wells

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is produced by Fusarium graminearum and is one of the most commonly occurring trichothecenes. Vegetarians are alleged to be a high-risk group for DON exposure due to high intakes of cereals susceptible to the growth of the mycotoxin. This study provides the levels of DON and de-epoxi Deoxynivalenol (DOM-1 in urine analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS in UK vegetarians. Over two consecutive days, morning urine samples were collected from 32 vegetarians and 31 UK adult volunteers, and associated food consumption 24 h prior to the sample was recorded. Statistically significant differences between the weight of the UK adults and vegetarians (t = 3.15. df = 61, p ≤ 0.005 two-tailed were observed. The mean levels of DON in urine for adults on day 1 was 3.05 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 2.98 ng free DON/mg creatinine. Even though high mean levels were observed, most adults were within the tolerable daily intake. However, for vegetarians, the mean level of urinary DON on day 1 was 6.69 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 3.42 ng free DON/mg creatinine. These levels equate to up to 32% of vegetarians exceeding recommended tolerable daily intakes (TDI of exposure (1 µg/kg b.w./day.

  8. Deoxynivalenol Biomarkers in the Urine of UK Vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Liz; Hardie, Laura; Williams, Courtney; White, Kay; Liu, Yunru; De Santis, Barbara; Debegnach, Francesca; Moretti, Georgio; Greetham, Stephanie; Brera, Carlo; Papageorgiou, Maria; Thatcher, Natalie J; Rigby, Alan; Atkin, Stephen L; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2017-06-22

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is produced by Fusarium graminearum and is one of the most commonly occurring trichothecenes. Vegetarians are alleged to be a high-risk group for DON exposure due to high intakes of cereals susceptible to the growth of the mycotoxin. This study provides the levels of DON and de-epoxi Deoxynivalenol (DOM-1) in urine analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in UK vegetarians. Over two consecutive days, morning urine samples were collected from 32 vegetarians and 31 UK adult volunteers, and associated food consumption 24 h prior to the sample was recorded. Statistically significant differences between the weight of the UK adults and vegetarians ( t = 3.15. df = 61, p ≤ 0.005 two-tailed) were observed. The mean levels of DON in urine for adults on day 1 was 3.05 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 2.98 ng free DON/mg creatinine. Even though high mean levels were observed, most adults were within the tolerable daily intake. However, for vegetarians, the mean level of urinary DON on day 1 was 6.69 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 3.42 ng free DON/mg creatinine. These levels equate to up to 32% of vegetarians exceeding recommended tolerable daily intakes (TDI) of exposure (1 µg/kg b.w./day).

  9. Non-invasive biomarkers and pulmonary function in smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Borrill, Zo? L; Roy, Kay; Vessey, Rupert S; Woodcock, Ashley A; Singh, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Zoë L Borrill1, Kay Roy1, Rupert S Vessey2, Ashley A Woodcock1, Dave Singh11Medicines Evaluation Unit, University of Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Southmoor Rd, Manchester, UK; 2Glaxo Smith Kline, Philadelphia, USAAbstract: Limited information exists regarding measurement, reproducibility and interrelationships of non-invasive biomarkers in smokers. We compared exhaled breath condensate (EBC) leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and 8-isoprostane, exhaled nitric oxide, induced sputum, spirometr...

  10. Three new potential ovarian cancer biomarkers detected in human urine with equalizer bead technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Yip, Tai-Tung

    2008-01-01

    samples were aliquotted and frozen at -80 degrees until the time of analysis. The urine was fractionated using equalizer bead technology and then analyzed with surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Biomarkers were purified and identified using combinations...... of chromatographic techniques and tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Benign and malignant ovarian cancer cases were compared; 21 significantly different peaks (p...OBJECTIVE: To examine whether urine can be used to measure specific ovarian cancer proteomic profiles and whether one peak alone or in combination with other peaks or CA125 has the sensitivity and specificity to discriminate between ovarian cancer pelvic mass and benign pelvic mass. METHODS...

  11. Proximal tubule proteins are significantly elevated in bladder urine of patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction and may represent novel biomarkers: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Claire; Harel, Miriam; Lynch, Miranda L; Herbst, Katherine W; Ferrer, Fernando A; Shapiro, Linda H

    2016-04-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is the major cause of hydronephrosis in children and may lead to renal injury and early renal dysfunction. However, diagnosis of the degree of obstruction and severity of renal injury relies on invasive and often inconclusive renal scans. Biomarkers from voided urine that detect early renal injury are highly desirable because of their noninvasive collection and their potential to assist in earlier and more reliable diagnosis of the severity of obstruction. Early in response to UPJO, increased intrarenal pressure directly impacts the proximal tubule brush border. We hypothesize that single-pass, apically expressed proximal tubule brush border proteins will be shed into the urine early and rapidly and will be reliable noninvasive urinary biomarkers, providing the tools for a more reliable stratification of UPJO patients. We performed a prospective cohort study at Connecticut Children's Medical Center. Bladder urine samples from 12 UPJO patients were obtained prior to surgical intervention. Control urine samples were collected from healthy pediatric patients presenting with primary nocturnal enuresis. We determined levels of NGAL, KIM-1 (previously identified biomarkers), CD10, CD13, and CD26 (potentially novel biomarkers) by ELISA in control and experimental urine samples. Urinary creatinine levels were used to normalize the urinary protein levels measured by ELISA. Each of the proximal tubule proteins outperformed the previously published biomarkers. No differences in urinary NGAL and KIM-1 levels were observed between control and obstructed patients (p = 0.932 and p = 0.799, respectively). However, levels of CD10, CD13, and CD26 were significantly higher in the voided urine of obstructed individuals when compared with controls (p = 0.002, p = 0.024, and p = 0.007, respectively) (Figure). Targeted identification of reliable, noninvasive biomarkers of renal injury is critical to aid in diagnosing patients at risk, guiding

  12. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL as a biomarker for acute canine kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ya-Jane

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomarkers for the early prediction of canine acute kidney injury (AKI are clinically important. Recently, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL was found to be a sensitive biomarker for the prediction of human AKI at a very early stage and the development of AKI after surgery. However, NGAL has not yet been studied with respect to dog kidney diseases. The application of NGAL canine AKI was investigated in this study. Results The canine NGAL gene was successfully cloned and expressed. Polyclonal antibodies against canine NGAL were generated and used to develop an ELISA for measuring NGAL protein in serum and urine samples that were collected from 39 dogs at different time points after surgery. AKI was defined by the standard method, namely a serum creatinine increase of greater than or equal to 26.5 μmol/L from baseline within 48 h. At 12 h after surgery, compared to the group without AKI (12 dogs, the NGAL level in the urine of seven dogs with AKI was significantly increased (median 178.4 pg/mL vs. 88.0 pg/mL, and this difference was sustained to 72 h. Conclusion As the increase in NGAL occurred much earlier than the increase in serum creatinine, urine NGAL seems to be able to serve as a sensitive and specific biomarker for the prediction of AKI in dogs.

  13. Potential of non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Chen, Weisheng; Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Buhong; Chen, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis was presented. Urine SERS spectra were measured on esophagus cancer patients (n = 56) and healthy volunteers (n = 36) for control analysis. Tentative assignments of the urine SERS spectra indicated some interesting esophagus cancer-specific biomolecular changes, including a decrease in the relative content of urea and an increase in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of esophagus cancer patients compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and differentiate the SERS spectra between normal and esophagus cancer urine. The diagnostic algorithms utilizing a multivariate analysis method achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 89.3% and specificity of 83.3% for separating esophagus cancer samples from normal urine samples. These results from the explorative work suggested that silver nano particle-based urine SERS analysis coupled with PCA-LDA multivariate analysis has potential for non-invasive detection of esophagus cancer.

  14. Potential of non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Buhong; Chen, Rong; Chen, Weisheng

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis was presented. Urine SERS spectra were measured on esophagus cancer patients (n = 56) and healthy volunteers (n = 36) for control analysis. Tentative assignments of the urine SERS spectra indicated some interesting esophagus cancer-specific biomolecular changes, including a decrease in the relative content of urea and an increase in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of esophagus cancer patients compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and differentiate the SERS spectra between normal and esophagus cancer urine. The diagnostic algorithms utilizing a multivariate analysis method achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 89.3% and specificity of 83.3% for separating esophagus cancer samples from normal urine samples. These results from the explorative work suggested that silver nano particle-based urine SERS analysis coupled with PCA–LDA multivariate analysis has potential for non-invasive detection of esophagus cancer. (letter)

  15. Non-invasive optical detection of esophagus cancer based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Chen, Weiwei; Lin, Duo; Huang, Lingling; Wu, Shanshan; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) approach was utilized for urine biochemical analysis with the aim to develop a label-free and non-invasive optical diagnostic method for esophagus cancer detection. SERS spectrums were acquired from 31 normal urine samples and 47 malignant esophagus cancer (EC) urine samples. Tentative assignments of urine SERS bands demonstrated esophagus cancer specific changes, including an increase in the relative amounts of urea and a decrease in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of normal compared with EC. The empirical algorithm integrated with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to identify some important urine SERS bands for differentiation between healthy subjects and EC urine. The empirical diagnostic approach based on the ratio of the SERS peak intensity at 527 to 1002 cm-1 and 725 to 1002 cm-1 coupled with LDA yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 72.3% and specificity of 96.8%, respectively. The area under the receive operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.954, which further evaluate the performance of the diagnostic algorithm based on the ratio of the SERS peak intensity combined with LDA analysis. This work demonstrated that the urine SERS spectra associated with empirical algorithm has potential for noninvasive diagnosis of esophagus cancer.

  16. Paired Serum and Urine Concentrations of Biomarkers of Diethyl Phthalate, Methyl Paraben, and Triclosan in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Li, Qian; Lambertini, Luca; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Manservisi, Fabiana; Falcioni, Laura; Bua, Luciano; Silva, Manori J.; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M.; Chen, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to environmental chemicals, including phthalates and phenols such as parabens and triclosan, is ubiquitous within the U.S. general population. Objective This proof-of-concept rodent study examined the relationship between oral doses of three widely used personal care product ingredients [diethyl phthalate (DEP), methyl paraben (MPB), and triclosan] and urine and serum concentrations of their respective biomarkers. Methods Using female Sprague-Dawley rats, we carried out two rounds of experiments with oral gavage doses selected in accordance with no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) derived from previous studies: 1,735 (DEP), 1,050 (MPB), 50 (triclosan) mg/kg/day. Administered doses ranged from 0.005 to 173 mg/kg/day, 10–100,000 times below the NOAEL for each chemical. Controls for the MPB and triclosan experiments were animals treated with olive oil (vehicle) only; controls for the DEP serum experiments were animals treated with the lowest doses of MPB and triclosan. Doses were administered for 5 days with five rats in each treatment group. Urine and blood serum, collected on the last day of exposure, were analyzed for biomarkers. Relationships between oral dose and biomarker concentrations were assessed using linear regression. Results Biomarkers were detected in all control urine samples at parts-per-billion levels, suggesting a low endemic environmental exposure to the three chemicals that could not be controlled even with all of the precautionary measures undertaken. Among the exposed animals, urinary concentrations of all three biomarkers were orders of magnitude higher than those in serum. A consistently positive linear relationship between oral dose and urinary concentration was observed (R2 > 0.80); this relationship was inconsistent in serum. Conclusions Our study highlights the importance of carefully considering the oral dose used in animal experiments and provides useful information in selecting doses for future studies

  17. Storage Time and Urine Biomarker Levels in the ASSESS-AKI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kathleen D.; Siew, Edward D.; Reeves, W. Brian; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Go, Alan S.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Bennett, Michael R.; Devarajan, Prasad; Ikizler, T. Alp; Kaufman, James S.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although stored urine samples are often used in biomarker studies focused on acute and chronic kidney disease, how storage time impacts biomarker levels is not well understood. Methods 866 subjects enrolled in the NIDDK-sponsored ASsessment, Serial Evaluation, and Subsequent Sequelae in Acute Kidney Injury (ASSESS-AKI) Study were included. Samples were processed under standard conditions and stored at -70°C until analyzed. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) were measured in urine samples collected during the index hospitalization or an outpatient visit 3 months later. Mixed effects models were used to determine the effect of storage time on biomarker levels and stratified by visit. Results Median storage was 17.8 months (25–75% IQR 10.6–23.7) for samples from the index hospitalization and 14.6 months (IQR 7.3–20.4) for outpatient samples. In the mixed effects models, the only significant association between storage time and biomarker concentration was for KIM-1 in outpatient samples, where each month of storage was associated with a 1.7% decrease (95% CI -3% to -0.3%). There was no relationship between storage time and KIM-1 levels in samples from the index hospitalization. Conclusion There was no significant impact of storage time over a median of 18 months on urine KIM-1, NGAL, IL-18 or L-FABP in hospitalized samples; a statistically significant effect towards a decrease over time was noted for KIM-1 in outpatient samples. Additional studies are needed to determine whether longer periods of storage at -70°C systematically impact levels of these analytes. PMID:27788160

  18. Concentrations versus amounts of biomarkers in urine: a comparison of approaches to assess pyrethroid exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Michèle

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of human exposure to non-persistent pesticides such as pyrethroids is often based on urinary biomarker measurements. Urinary metabolite levels of these pesticides are usually reported in volume-weighted concentrations or creatinine-adjusted concentrations measured in spot urine samples. It is known that these units are subject to intra- and inter-individual variations. This research aimed at studying the impact of these variations on the assessment of pyrethroid absorbed doses at individual and population levels. Methods Using data obtained from various adult and infantile populations, the intra and inter-individual variability in the urinary flow rate and creatinine excretion rate was first estimated. Individual absorbed doses were then calculated using volume-weighted or creatinine-adjusted concentrations according to published approaches and compared to those estimated from the amounts of biomarkers excreted in 15- or 24-h urine collections, the latter serving as a benchmark unit. The effect of the units of measurements (volume-weighted or creatinine adjusted concentrations or 24-h amounts on results of the comparison of pyrethroid biomarker levels between two populations was also evaluated. Results Estimation of daily absorbed doses of permethrin from volume-weighted or creatinine-adjusted concentrations of biomarkers was found to potentially lead to substantial under or overestimation when compared to doses reconstructed directly from amounts excreted in urine during a given period of time (-70 to +573% and -83 to +167%, respectively. It was also shown that the variability in creatinine excretion rate and urinary flow rate may introduce a bias in the case of between population comparisons. Conclusion The unit chosen to express biomonitoring data may influence the validity of estimated individual absorbed dose as well as the outcome of between population comparisons.

  19. Storage Time and Urine Biomarker Levels in the ASSESS-AKI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen D Liu

    Full Text Available Although stored urine samples are often used in biomarker studies focused on acute and chronic kidney disease, how storage time impacts biomarker levels is not well understood.866 subjects enrolled in the NIDDK-sponsored ASsessment, Serial Evaluation, and Subsequent Sequelae in Acute Kidney Injury (ASSESS-AKI Study were included. Samples were processed under standard conditions and stored at -70°C until analyzed. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, interleukin-18 (IL-18, and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP were measured in urine samples collected during the index hospitalization or an outpatient visit 3 months later. Mixed effects models were used to determine the effect of storage time on biomarker levels and stratified by visit.Median storage was 17.8 months (25-75% IQR 10.6-23.7 for samples from the index hospitalization and 14.6 months (IQR 7.3-20.4 for outpatient samples. In the mixed effects models, the only significant association between storage time and biomarker concentration was for KIM-1 in outpatient samples, where each month of storage was associated with a 1.7% decrease (95% CI -3% to -0.3%. There was no relationship between storage time and KIM-1 levels in samples from the index hospitalization.There was no significant impact of storage time over a median of 18 months on urine KIM-1, NGAL, IL-18 or L-FABP in hospitalized samples; a statistically significant effect towards a decrease over time was noted for KIM-1 in outpatient samples. Additional studies are needed to determine whether longer periods of storage at -70°C systematically impact levels of these analytes.

  20. MCP-1 in urine as biomarker of disease activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbado, Julia; Martin, Debora; Vega, Luisa; Almansa, Raquel; Gonçalves, Lisbeth; Nocito, Mercedes; Jimeno, Antonio; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Bermejo-Martin, Jesus F

    2012-11-01

    Conventional clinical parameters are not sensitive or specific enough for detecting ongoing disease activity in the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Measurement of cytokines in urine is an encouraging approach to detection of early flares in this disease. Here we have profiled 27 different cytokines, chemokines and celular growth factors in the urine of 48 patients previously diagnosed of SLE as potential biomarkers of disease activity. Correlation analysis with Bonferroni correction showed that MCP-1 was the only immune mediator which levels in urine correlated directly with the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) score (correlation coefficient, p): MCP-1 (0.45,0.003). MCP-1 correlated inversely with levels of C3 complement protein in serum (-0.50,0.001). MCP-1 showed significant higher levels in patients with severe disease activity in comparison with those exhibiting mild activity. Levels of this chemokine were also higher in patients with severe disease activity in comparison with patients with inactive disease and healthy controls. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) for detection of severe disease (SLEDAI⩾8) was as follows for MCP-1: [AUROC, (IC95%), p]: [0.81 (0.65-0.96) 0.003]. In addition, MCP-1 showed a good result in the AUROC analysis for detecting renal involvement [0.70 (0.52-0.87) 0.050]. When correlation analysis were repeated excluding those patients with active renal disease (n=14), levels of MCP-1 in urine kept on showing a significant positive association with SLEDAI-2K score. In conclusion, multiplex-based cytokine profiling in urine demonstrated the superiority of MCP-1 over a wide range of cytokines as biomarker of disease activity in SLE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Blood biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Shaikh, Rabia; Farquhar, Cindy; Jordan, Vanessa; Scheffers, Carola S; Mol, Ben Willem J; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M Louise

    2016-05-01

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, a costly chronic disease causing pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive or minimally invasive tests available in clinical practice to accurately diagnose endometriosis. Although other reviews have assessed the ability of blood tests to diagnose endometriosis, this is the first review to use Cochrane methods, providing an update on the rapidly expanding literature in this field. To evaluate blood biomarkers as replacement tests for diagnostic surgery and as triage tests to inform decisions on surgery for endometriosis. Specific objectives include:1. To provide summary estimates of the diagnostic accuracy of blood biomarkers for the diagnosis of peritoneal, ovarian and deep infiltrating pelvic endometriosis, compared to surgical diagnosis as a reference standard.2. To assess the diagnostic utility of biomarkers that could differentiate ovarian endometrioma from other ovarian masses. We did not restrict the searches to particular study designs, language or publication dates. We searched CENTRAL to July 2015, MEDLINE and EMBASE to May 2015, as well as these databases to 20 April 2015: CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, LILACS, OAIster, TRIP, ClinicalTrials.gov, DARE and PubMed. We considered published, peer-reviewed, randomised controlled or cross-sectional studies of any size, including prospectively collected samples from any population of reproductive-aged women suspected of having one or more of the following target conditions: ovarian, peritoneal or deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). We included studies comparing the diagnostic test accuracy of one or more blood biomarkers with the findings of surgical visualisation of endometriotic lesions. Two authors independently collected and performed a quality assessment of data from each study. For each diagnostic test

  2. Effect of freeze/thaw cycles on several biomarkers in urine from patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Luo, Yi; Lu, Huijuan; Wang, Niansong; Shen, Yixie; Chen, Ruihua; Fang, Pingyan; Yu, Hong; Wang, Congrong; Jia, Weiping

    2015-04-01

    Urine samples were collected from eleven randomly selected patients with kidney disease, including diabetic nephropathy, chronic nephritis, and nephritic syndrome. Urine samples were treated with one of four protocols for freezing and thawing: freeze directly and thaw directly; freeze directly and thaw by temperature gradient; freeze by temperature gradient and thaw directly; and freeze by temperature gradient and thaw by temperature gradient. After one to six freeze/thaw cycles at -20°C or -80°C, different biomarkers showed differential stabilities. The concentrations of total protein, calcium, and potassium did not change significantly after five freeze/thaw cycles at either -20°C or -80°C. Albumin could only sustain three freeze/thaw cycles at -20°C before it started to degrade. We recommend that urine be stored at -80°C as albumin and the organic ions could sustain five and six freeze/thaw cycles, respectively, using the simple "direct freeze and direct thaw" protocol. Furthermore, in most cases, gradient freeze/thaw cycles are not necessary for urine sample storage.

  3. Endometrial biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devashana; Hull, M Louise; Fraser, Ian; Miller, Laura; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Johnson, Neil; Nisenblat, Vicki

    2016-04-20

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, which is a costly, chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but it is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive tests available in clinical practice that accurately diagnose endometriosis. This is the first diagnostic test accuracy review of endometrial biomarkers for endometriosis that utilises Cochrane methodologies, providing an update on the rapidly expanding literature in this field. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the endometrial biomarkers for pelvic endometriosis, using a surgical diagnosis as the reference standard. We evaluated the tests as replacement tests for diagnostic surgery and as triage tests to inform decisions to undertake surgery for endometriosis. We did not restrict the searches to particular study designs, language or publication dates. To identify trials, we searched the following databases: CENTRAL (2015, July), MEDLINE (inception to May 2015), EMBASE (inception to May 2015), CINAHL (inception to April 2015), PsycINFO (inception to April 2015), Web of Science (inception to April 2015), LILACS (inception to April 2015), OAIster (inception to April 2015), TRIP (inception to April 2015) and ClinicalTrials.gov (inception to April 2015). We searched DARE and PubMed databases up to April 2015 to identify reviews and guidelines as sources of references to potentially relevant studies. We also performed searches for papers recently published and not yet indexed in the major databases. The search strategies incorporated words in the title, abstract, text words across the record and the medical subject headings (MeSH). We considered published peer-reviewed, randomised controlled or cross-sectional studies of any size that included prospectively collected samples from any population of reproductive-aged women suspected of having one or more of the following target

  4. Flavonoids in human urine as biomarkers for intake of fruits and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Freese, R.; Kleemola, P.

    2002-01-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds ubiquitously found in human diets. We have studied the association between urinary excretion of flavonoids and the intake of fruits and vegetables to evaluate the usefulness of flavonoids as a biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Levels of 12 dietary...... relevant flavonoids were determined by LC-MS in urine samples collected prior to an intervention study, when the subjects were on their habitual diet (n = 94), and after they had participated in an intervention study with diets either high or low in fruits, berries, and vegetables (n = 77). Both flavonoid...... glycosides and aglycones were included in the assay, but only the flavonoid aglycones were detectable. Thus, the flavonols quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, and tamarixetin, the dihydrochalcone phloretin, and the flavanones naringenin and hesperetin were quantified in the enzymatically hydrolyzed urine...

  5. Detection of cervical cancer biomarker patterns in blood plasma and urine by differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C; Merchant, Michael L; Helm, C William; Jenson, Alfred B; Klein, Jon B; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Improved methods for the accurate identification of both the presence and severity of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and extent of spread of invasive carcinomas of the cervix (IC) are needed. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has recently been shown to detect specific changes in the thermal behavior of blood plasma proteins in several diseases. This methodology is being explored to provide a complementary approach for screening of cervical disease. The present study evaluated the utility of DSC in differentiating between healthy controls, increasing severity of CIN and early and advanced IC. Significant discrimination was apparent relative to the extent of disease with no clear effect of demographic factors such as age, ethnicity, smoking status and parity. Of most clinical relevance, there was strong differentiation of CIN from healthy controls and IC, and amongst patients with IC between FIGO Stage I and advanced cancer. The observed disease-specific changes in DSC profiles (thermograms) were hypothesized to reflect differential expression of disease biomarkers that subsequently bound to and affected the thermal behavior of the most abundant plasma proteins. The effect of interacting biomarkers can be inferred from the modulation of thermograms but cannot be directly identified by DSC. To investigate the nature of the proposed interactions, mass spectrometry (MS) analyses were employed. Quantitative assessment of the low molecular weight protein fragments of plasma and urine samples revealed a small list of peptides whose abundance was correlated with the extent of cervical disease, with the most striking plasma peptidome data supporting the interactome theory of peptide portioning to abundant plasma proteins. The combined DSC and MS approach in this study was successful in identifying unique biomarker signatures for cervical cancer and demonstrated the utility of DSC plasma profiles as a complementary diagnostic tool to evaluate cervical cancer

  6. Detection of cervical cancer biomarker patterns in blood plasma and urine by differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola C Garbett

    Full Text Available Improved methods for the accurate identification of both the presence and severity of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and extent of spread of invasive carcinomas of the cervix (IC are needed. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC has recently been shown to detect specific changes in the thermal behavior of blood plasma proteins in several diseases. This methodology is being explored to provide a complementary approach for screening of cervical disease. The present study evaluated the utility of DSC in differentiating between healthy controls, increasing severity of CIN and early and advanced IC. Significant discrimination was apparent relative to the extent of disease with no clear effect of demographic factors such as age, ethnicity, smoking status and parity. Of most clinical relevance, there was strong differentiation of CIN from healthy controls and IC, and amongst patients with IC between FIGO Stage I and advanced cancer. The observed disease-specific changes in DSC profiles (thermograms were hypothesized to reflect differential expression of disease biomarkers that subsequently bound to and affected the thermal behavior of the most abundant plasma proteins. The effect of interacting biomarkers can be inferred from the modulation of thermograms but cannot be directly identified by DSC. To investigate the nature of the proposed interactions, mass spectrometry (MS analyses were employed. Quantitative assessment of the low molecular weight protein fragments of plasma and urine samples revealed a small list of peptides whose abundance was correlated with the extent of cervical disease, with the most striking plasma peptidome data supporting the interactome theory of peptide portioning to abundant plasma proteins. The combined DSC and MS approach in this study was successful in identifying unique biomarker signatures for cervical cancer and demonstrated the utility of DSC plasma profiles as a complementary diagnostic tool to evaluate

  7. Microchip ELISA coupled with cell phone to detect ovarian cancer HE4 biomarker in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ShuQi; Akbas, Ragip; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of death from gynecologic cancers in the USA, and early diagnosis can potentially increase 5-year survival rate. Detection of biomarkers derived from hyperplasia of epithelial tissue by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) proves to be a practical way of early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, ELISA is commonly performed in a laboratory setting, and it cannot be used in a clinical setting for on-site consultation. We have shown a microchip ELISA that detects HE4, an ovarian cancer biomarker, from urine using a cell phone integrated with a mobile application for imaging and data analysis. In microchip ELISA, HE4 from urine was first absorbed on the surface; the primary and secondary antibodies were subsequently anchored on the surface via immuno-reaction; and addition of substrate led to color development because of enzymatic labeling. The microchip after color development was imaged using a cell phone, and the color intensity was analyzed by an integrated mobile application. By comparing with an ELISA standard curve, the concentration of HE4 was reported on the cell phone screen. The presented microchip ELISA coupled with a cell phone is portable as opposed to traditional ELISA, and this method can facilitate the detection of ovarian cancer at the point-of-care (POC).

  8. Urinary long noncoding RNAs in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: new architects in cancer prognostic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; D'Elia, Carolina; Musi, Gennaro; de Cobelli, Ottavio; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cimmino, Amelia

    2017-06-01

    Several reports over the last 10 years provided evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in bladder cancers. lncRNAs are longer than 200 nucleotides and function as important regulators of gene expression, interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A large number of lncRNAs has oncogenic function and is more expressed in tumor compared with normal tissues. Their overexpression may be associated with tumor formation, progression, and metastasis in a variety of tumors including bladder cancer. Although lncRNAs have been shown to have critical regulatory roles in cancer biology, the biological functions and prognostic values in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence suggests that several lncRNAs expression profiles in bladder malignancies are associated with poor prognosis, and they can be detected in biological fluids, such as urines. Here, we review current progress in the biology and the implication of lncRNAs associated with bladder cancer, and we discuss their potential use as diagnosis and prognosis biomarkers in bladder malignancies with a focus on their role in high-risk nonmuscle-invasive tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Astronaut Bones: Stable Calcium Isotopes in Urine as a Biomarker of Bone Mineral Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulan, J.; Gordon, G. W.; Romaniello, S. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S.

    2016-12-01

    Bone loss is a common health concern, in conditions ranging from osteoporosis to cancer. Bone loss due to unloading is also an important health issue for astronauts. We demonstrate stable calcium isotopes, a tool developed in geochemistry, are capable of detecting real-time quantitative changes in net bone mineral balance (BMB) using serum and urine [1]. We validated this technique by comparing with DEXA and biomarker data in subjects during bed rest, a ground-based analog of space flight effects [2-4]. We now apply this tool to assess changes in astronauts' BMB before, during and after 4-6 month space missions. There is stable isotope fractionation asymmetry between bone formation and resorption. During bone formation there is a mass-dependent preference for "lighter" calcium isotopes to be removed from serum and incorporated into bone mineral. During bone resorption, there is no measurable isotopic discrimination between serum and bone. Hence, when bone formation rates exceed that of resorption, serum and urine become isotopically "heavy" due to the sequestration of "light" calcium in bone. Conversely, when bone resorption exceeds bone formation, serum and urine become isotopically "light" due to the release of the sequestered light calcium from bone. We measured Ca isotopes in urine of thirty International Space Station astronauts. Average Ca isotope values in astronauts' urine shift isotopically lighter during microgravity, consistent with negative net BMB. Within a month of return to Earth, astronauts returned to within error of their δ44Ca value prior to departure. Urine samples from astronauts testing bone loss countermeasures showed bisphosphonates provide a viable pharmacological countermeasure. Some, but not all, individuals appear able to resist bone loss through diet and intensive resistive exercise alone. This is a promising new technique for monitoring BMB in astronauts, and hopefully someday on the way to/from Mars, this also has important clinical

  10. Development and application of non-invasive biomarkers for carcinogen-DNA adduct analysis in occupationally exposed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaska, G; Cudnik, J; Jaeger, M; Rothman, N; Hayes, R; Bhatnagar, V J; Kayshup, S J

    1996-07-17

    Biological monitoring of exposures to carcinogenic compounds in the workplace can be a valuable adjunct to environmental sampling and occupational medicine. Carcinogen-DNA adduct analysis has promise as a biomarker of effective dose if target organ samples can be obtained non-invasively. We have developed non-invasive techniques using exfoliated urothelial and bronchial cells collected in urine and sputum, respectively. First morning urine samples were collected from 33 workers exposed to benzidine or benzidine-based dyes and controls matched for age, education, and smoking status. Sufficient DNA for 32P-postlabelling analysis was obtained from every sample. Mean levels of a specific DNA adduct (which co-chromatographed with standard characterized by MS) were elevated significantly in the benzidine-exposed workers relative to controls. In addition, workers exposed to benzidine had higher adduct levels than those exposed to benzidine-based dyes. This study demonstrates the usefulness of these non-invasive techniques for exposure/effect assessment. To be useful in occupational studies, biomarkers must also be sensitive to exposure interventions. We have conducted topical application studies of used gasoline engine oils in mice and found that the levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts in skin and lung can be significantly lowered if skin cleaning is conducted in a timely manner. The combination of useful, non-invasive techniques to monitor exposure and effect and industrial hygiene interventions can be used to detect and prevent exposures to a wide range of carcinogens including those found in used gasoline engine oils and jet exhausts.

  11. Multicentric validation of proteomic biomarkers in urine specific for diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhalaf, Alaa; Zürbig, Petra; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2010-01-01

    /d and diabetic retinopathy (n = 66). Controls were matched for gender and diabetes duration (n = 82). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Proteome analysis was performed blinded using high-resolution capillary electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry (CE-MS). Data were evaluated employing the previously......BACKGROUND: Urine proteome analysis is rapidly emerging as a tool for diagnosis and prognosis in disease states. For diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), urinary proteome analysis was successfully applied in a pilot study. The validity of the previously established proteomic biomarkers...... with respect to the diagnostic and prognostic potential was assessed on a separate set of patients recruited at three different European centers. In this case-control study of 148 Caucasian patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and duration ≥5 years, cases of DN were defined as albuminuria >300 mg...

  12. Factors affecting the accuracy of urine-based biomarkers of BSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruddat Viola

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy diseases are untreatable, uniformly fatal degenerative syndromes of the central nervous system that can be transmitted both within as well as between species. The bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE epidemic and the emergence of a new human variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD, have profoundly influenced beef production processes as well as blood donation and surgical procedures. Simple, robust and cost effective diagnostic screening and surveillance tools are needed for both the preclinical and clinical stages of TSE disease in order to minimize both the economic costs and zoonotic risk of BSE and to further reduce the risk of secondary vCJD. Objective Urine is well suited as the matrix for an ante-mortem test for TSE diseases because it would permit non-invasive and repeated sampling. In this study urine samples collected from BSE infected and age matched control cattle were screened for the presence of individual proteins that exhibited disease specific changes in abundance in response to BSE infection that might form the basis of such an ante-mortem test. Results Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE was used to identify proteins exhibiting differential abundance in two sets of cattle. The known set consisted of BSE infected steers and age matched controls throughout the course of the disease. The blinded unknown set was composed of BSE infected and control samples of both genders, a wide range of ages and two different breeds. Multivariate analyses of individual protein abundance data generated classifiers comprised of the proteins best able to discriminate between the samples based on disease state, breed, age and gender. Conclusion Despite the presence of confounding factors, the disease specific changes in abundance exhibited by a panel of urine proteins permitted the creation of classifiers able to discriminate between control and infected cattle

  13. Determination of gouty arthritis' biomarkers in human urine using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Wen Xiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Creatinine, uric acid, hypoxanthine and xanthine are important diagnostic biomarkers in human urine for gouty arthritis or renal disease diacrisis. A simple method for simultaneous determination of these biomarkers in urine based on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC with ultraviolet (UV detector was proposed. After pretreatment by dilution, centrifugation and filtration, the biomarkers in urine samples were separated by ODS-BP column by elution with methanol/50 mM NaH2PO4 buffer solution at pH 5.26 (5:95. Good linearity between peak areas and concentrations of standards was obtained for the biomarkers with correlation coefficients in the range of 0.9957–0.9993. The proposed analytical method has satisfactory repeatability (the recovery of data in a range of creatinine, uric acid, hypoxanthine and xanthine was 93.49–97.90%, 95.38–96.45%, 112.46–115.78% and 90.82–97.13% with standard deviation of <5%, respectively and the limits of detection (LODs, S/N≥3 for creatinine, uric acid, hypoxanthine, and xanthine were 0.010, 0.025, 0.050 and 0.025 mg/L, respectively. The established method was proved to be simple, accurate, sensitive and reliable for the quantitation of gouty arthritis' biomarkers in human urine samples. The ratio of creatinine to uric acid was found to be a possible factor for assessment of gouty arthritis. Keywords: Gouty arthritis, Creatinine, Uric acid, Hypoxanthine, Xanthine, High-performance liquid chromatography

  14. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta: a novel urinary biomarker for recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiayu; He, Weifeng; Song, Yajun; Wang, Ying; Simpson, Richard J; Zhang, Xiaorong; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun; Huang, Chibing

    2014-01-01

    Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in the urological system with a high risk of recurrence, and effective non-invasive biomarkers for NMIBC relapse are still needed. The human urinary proteome can reflect the status of the microenvironment of the urinary system and is an ideal source for clinical diagnosis of urinary system diseases. Our previous work used proteomics to identify 1643 high-confidence urinary proteins in the urine from a healthy population. Here, we used bioinformatics to construct a cancer-associated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network comprising 16 high-abundance urinary proteins based on the urinary proteome database. As a result, platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRB) was selected for further validation as a candidate biomarker for NMIBC diagnosis and prognosis. Although the levels of urinary PDGFRB showed no significant difference between patients pre- and post-surgery (n = 185, P>0.05), over 3 years of follow-up, urinary PDGFRB was shown to be significantly higher in relapsed patients (n = 68) than in relapse-free patients (n = 117, P<0.001). The levels of urinary PDGFRB were significantly correlated with the risk of 3-year recurrence of NMIBC, and these levels improved the accuracy of a NMIBC recurrence risk prediction model that included age, tumor size, and tumor number (area under the curve, 0.862; 95% CI, 0.809 to 0.914) compared to PDGFR alone. Therefore, we surmise that urinary PDGFRB could serve as a non-invasive biomarker for predicting NMIBC recurrence.

  15. Pilot study of the pharmacokinetics of betel nut and betel quid biomarkers in saliva, urine, and hair of betel consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, Adrian A.; Li, Xingnan; Lai, Jennifer F.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 600 million people worldwide practise the carcinogenic habit of betel nut/quid chewing. Carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds have been identified in saliva or urine of betel chewers and the betel alkaloid arecoline in hair from habitual betel quid chewers. However, the pharmacokinetic parameters of these compounds have been little explored. Assessment of betel use by biomarkers is urgently needed to evaluate the effectiveness of cessation programmes aimed at reducing betel consumpti...

  16. Blood biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Shaikh, Rabia; Farquhar, Cindy; Jordan, Vanessa; Scheffers, Carola S.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M. Louise

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, a costly chronic disease causing pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive or minimally invasive

  17. Identification of potential urine proteins and microRNA biomarkers for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieru; Zhu, Xiaojie; Xiong, Xuekai; Ge, Pan; Liu, Han; Ren, Ningning; Khan, Farhan Anwar; Zhou, Xia; Zhang, Li; Yuan, Xu; Chen, Xi; Chen, Yingyu; Hu, Changmin; Robertson, Ian D; Chen, Huanchun; Guo, Aizhen

    2018-04-11

    This study identified urinary biomarkers for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis. The urine proteomic profiles of 45 pulmonary tuberculosis patients prior to anti-TB treatment and 45 healthy controls were analyzed and compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Nineteen differentially expressed proteins were identified preliminarily, and western blotting and qRT-PCR were performed to confirm these changes at the translational and transcriptional levels, respectively, using samples from 122 additional pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 73 additional healthy controls. Two proteins, mannose-binding lectin 2 and a 35-kDa fragment of inter-α-trypsin inhibitor H4, exhibited the highest differential expression. We constructed a protein-microRNA interaction network that primarily involved complement and inflammatory responses. Eleven microRNAs from microRNA-target protein interactions were screened and validated using qRT-PCR with some of the above samples, including 97 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 48 healthy controls. Only miR-625-3p exhibited significant differential expression (p tuberculosis diagnosis than individual biomarkers or any two-biomarker combination and generated a diagnostic sensitivity of 85.87% and a specificity of 87.50%. These novel urine biomarkers may significantly improve tuberculosis diagnosis.

  18. Tumor antigens as proteogenomic biomarkers in invasive ductal carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Winther, Ole

    2014-01-01

    directly linked to the hallmarks of cancer. The results found by proteogenomic analysis of the 32 tumor antigens studied here, capture largely the same pathway irregularities as those elucidated from large-scale screening of genomics analyses, where several thousands of genes are often found......Background: The majority of genetic biomarkers for human cancers are defined by statistical screening of high-throughput genomics data. While a large number of genetic biomarkers have been proposed for diagnostic and prognostic applications, only a small number have been applied in the clinic....... Similarly, the use of proteomics methods for the discovery of cancer biomarkers is increasing. The emerging field of proteogenomics seeks to enrich the value of genomics and proteomics approaches by studying the intersection of genomics and proteomics data. This task is challenging due to the complex nature...

  19. Characterization of Novel Non-Invasive Biomarkers for the Evaluation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Renal Fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Daniel Guldager Kring

    urin. Biomarkørerne som blev evalueret inkluderede nedbrydning af COL I (C1M), III (C3A, C3C, C3M, sauC3M), IV (C4M, C4Ma3), VI (C6M), og opbygning af COL I (PINP), III (Pro-C3), IV (P4NP 7S), og VI (Pro-C6). Biologisk relevans af en eller flere af biomarkørerne blev testet i en kohorte af patienter...... af C3M og sauC3M i urin (begge psauC3M i urin var...

  20. miRandola 2017: a curated knowledge base of non-invasive biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, Francesco; Di Bella, Sebastiano; Vannini, Federica

    2018-01-01

    miRandola (http://mirandola.iit.cnr.it/) is a database of extracellular non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that was initially published in 2012, foreseeing the relevance of ncRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers. An increasing amount of experimental evidence shows that ncRNAs are frequently dysregulated in dise...

  1. Urinary biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Emily; Nisenblat, Vicki; Farquhar, Cindy; Fraser, Ian; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M. Louise

    2015-01-01

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis which is a costly chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the 'gold standard' diagnostic test for endometriosis, but it is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no simple non-invasive

  2. Eyeblink Conditioning: A Non-Invasive Biomarker for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition,…

  3. Endometrial biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Devashana; Hull, M. Louise; Fraser, Ian; Miller, Laura; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Johnson, Neil; Nisenblat, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, which is a costly, chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but it is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive tests

  4. Blood biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Shaikh, Rabia; Farquhar, Cindy; Jordan, Vanessa; Scheffers, Carola S.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M. Louise

    2016-01-01

    Background About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, a costly chronic disease causing pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive or minimally

  5. Clinical utility and development of biomarkers in invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains very difficult, and there are limited treatment options for the disease. Pre-clinical models have been used to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of Aspergillus infection and to assess the pathogenicity and virulence of the organism. Extensive efforts in Aspergillus research have significantly expanded the genomic information about this microorganism. The standardization of animal models of invasive aspergillosis can be used to enhance the evaluation of genomic information about the organism to improve the diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis. One approach to this process has been the award of a contract by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to establish and standardize animal models of invasive aspergillosis for the development of new diagnostic technologies for both pulmonary and disseminated Aspergillus infection. This work utilizes molecular approaches for the genetic manipulation of Aspergillus strains that can be tested in animal-model systems to establish new diagnostic targets and tools. Studies have evaluated the performance characteristics of assays for cell-wall antigens of Aspergillus including galactomannan and beta-D-glucan, as well as for DNA targets in the organism, through PCR. New targets, such as proteomic and genomic approaches, and novel detection methods, such as point-of-care lateral-flow devices, have also been evaluated. The goal of this paper is to provide a framework for evaluating genomic targets in animal models to improve the diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis toward ultimately improving the outcomes for patients with this frequently fatal infection.

  6. Pilot study of the pharmacokinetics of betel nut and betel quid biomarkers in saliva, urine, and hair of betel consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Adrian A; Li, Xingnan; Lai, Jennifer F

    2016-10-01

    Approximately 600 million people worldwide practise the carcinogenic habit of betel nut/quid chewing. Carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds have been identified in saliva or urine of betel chewers and the betel alkaloid arecoline in hair from habitual betel quid chewers. However, the pharmacokinetic parameters of these compounds have been little explored. Assessment of betel use by biomarkers is urgently needed to evaluate the effectiveness of cessation programmes aimed at reducing betel consumption to decrease the burden of cancers in regions of high betel consumption. In the search for biomarkers of betel consumption, we measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) the appearance and disappearance of betel alkaloids (characteristic for betel nuts), N-nitroso compounds, and chavibetol (characteristic for Piper Betle leaves) in saliva (n=4), hair (n=2), and urine (n=1) of occasional betel nut/quid chewers. The betel alkaloids arecoline, guvacoline, guvacine, and arecaidine were detected in saliva of all four participants and peaked within the first 2 h post-chewing before returning to baseline levels after 8 h. Salivary chavibetol was detected in participants consuming Piper Betle leaves in their quid and peaked ~1 h post-chewing. Urinary arecoline, guvacoline, and arecaidine excretion paralleled saliva almost exactly while chavibetol glucuronide excretion paralleled salivary chavibetol. No betel nut related compounds were detected in the tested hair samples using various extraction methods. From these preliminary results, we conclude that betel exposure can only be followed on a short-term basis (≤8 h post-chewing) using the applied biomarkers from urine and saliva while the feasibility of using hair has yet to be validated. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. EDRN Pre-Validation of Multiplex Biomarker in Urine — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this proposal is to begin to establish an EDRN “pre-validation” trial of a multiplex set of transcripts, including the ETS gene fusions, in post-DRE urine sediments. As can be evidenced by our preliminary data, we have established the utility of this multiplex urine test (which includes TMPRSS-ERG, SPINK1, PCA3 and GOLPH2) in a cohort of prospectively collected urine sediments from the University of Michigan EDRN CEVC site (collected by co-I, Dr. John Wei). In this proposal, we will run this multiplex assay on prospectively collected post-DRE urines collected from other EDRN sites. The idea is to couple this “pre-validation” study with an EDRN validation trial under consideration for the Gen-Probe PCA3 urine test (directed by Drs. John Wei and Harry Rittenhouse).

  8. Toward Precision Medicine: A Cancer Molecular Subtyping Nano-Strategy for RNA Biomarkers in Tumor and Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin M; Wee, Eugene J H; Mainwaring, Paul N; Wang, Yuling; Trau, Matt

    2016-12-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease which manifests as different molecular subtypes due to the complex nature of tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. The concept of precision medicine aims to exploit this cancer heterogeneity by incorporating diagnostic technology to characterize each cancer patient's molecular subtype for tailored treatments. To characterize cancer molecular subtypes accurately, a suite of multiplexed bioassays have currently been developed to detect multiple oncogenic biomarkers. Despite the reliability of current multiplexed detection techniques, novel strategies are still needed to resolve limitations such as long assay time, complex protocols, and difficulty in interpreting broad overlapping spectral peaks of conventional fluorescence readouts. Herein a rapid (80 min) multiplexed platform strategy for subtyping prostate cancer tumor and urine samples based on their RNA biomarker profiles is presented. This is achieved by combining rapid multiplexed isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) of target RNA biomarkers with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) nanotags for "one-pot" readout. This is the first translational application of a RT-RPA/SERS-based platform for multiplexed cancer biomarker detection to address a clinical need. With excellent sensitivity of 200 zmol (100 copies) and specificity, we believed that this platform methodology could be a useful tool for rapid multiplexed subtyping of cancers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Urine leak in minimally invasive partial nephrectomy: analysis of risk factors and role of intraoperative ureteral catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Zargar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To investigate risk factors for urine leak in patients undergoing minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN and to determine the role of intraoperative ureteral catheterization in preventing this postoperative complication. Materials and Methods MIPN procedures done from September 1999 to July 2012 at our Center were reviewed from our IRB-approved database. Patient and tumor characteristics, operative techniques and outcomes were analyzed. Patients with evidence of urine leak were identified. Outcomes were compared between patients with preoperative ureteral catheterization (C-group and those without (NC-group. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors predicting postoperative urine leak. Results A total of 1,019 cases were included (452 robotic partial nephrectomy cases and 567 laparoscopic partial nephrectomy cases. Five hundred twenty eight patients (51.8% were in the C-group, whereas 491 of them (48.2% in the NC-group. Urine leak occurred in 31(3% cases, 4.6% in the C-group and 1.4% in the NC-group (p<0.001. Tumors in NC-group had significantly higher RENAL score, shorter operative and warm ischemic times. On multivariable analysis, tumor proximity to collecting system (OR=9.2; p<0.01, surgeon’s early operative experience (OR=7.8; p<0.01 and preoperative moderate to severe CKD (OR=3.1; p<0.01 significantly increased the odds of the occurrence of a postoperative urine leak. Conclusion Clinically significant urine leak after MIPN in a high volume institution setting is uncommon. This event is more likely to occur in cases of renal masses that are close to the collecting system, in patients with preoperative CKD and when operating surgeon is still in the learning curve for the procedure. Our findings suggest that routine intraoperative ureteral catheterization during MIPN does not reduce the probability of postoperative urine leak. In addition, it adds to the overall operative time.

  10. Composite Biomarkers For Non-invasive Screening, Diagnosis And Prognosis Of Colorectal Cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-09-11

    The present invention concerns particular biomarkers for diagnosing and/or prognosticating colorectal cancer, in particular in a non-invasive manner. The methods and compositions concern analysis of methylation patterns of one or more genes from a set of 29 genes identified as described herein. In certain embodiments, the gene set includes at least P15.INK4b, SST, GAS7, CNRIP1, and PIK3CG.

  11. Composite Biomarkers For Non-invasive Screening, Diagnosis And Prognosis Of Colorectal Cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham; Incitti, Roberto; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention concerns particular biomarkers for diagnosing and/or prognosticating colorectal cancer, in particular in a non-invasive manner. The methods and compositions concern analysis of methylation patterns of one or more genes from a set of 29 genes identified as described herein. In certain embodiments, the gene set includes at least P15.INK4b, SST, GAS7, CNRIP1, and PIK3CG.

  12. Evaluation of flavonoids and enterolactone in overnight urine as intake biomarkers of fruits, vegetables and beverages in the Inter99 cohort study using the method of triads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz; Bysted, Anette; Brantsaeter, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    in 24 h urine as an alternative and more feasible biomarker of fruit, vegetable and beverage intake. A total of 191 individuals in the Inter99 cohort in Denmark completed the validation study. Concentrations of nine urinary flavonoid aglycones (quercetin, isorhamnetin, tamarixetin, kaempferol......, hesperetin, naringenin, eriodictyol, phloretin and apigenin) and enterolactone were determined in overnight and 24 h urine samples, and their validity as biomarkers of fruit, vegetable and beverage intake was evaluated in relation to two independent reference methods (Inter99 FFQ data and plasma carotenoids...

  13. Identification of urine metabolites associated with 5-year changes in biomarkers of glucose homoeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, N.; Skaaby, T.; Pietzner, M.

    2017-01-01

    of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index values. Methods: Urine metabolites in 3986 participants at both baseline and 5-year follow-up of the population-based Inter99 study were analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Linear regression and analyses of covariance models were used to detect associations between urine...... associated with a decrease in HbA1c over time. Analyses of 5-year changes in fasting glucose and HOMA-IR index showed similar findings, with high baseline levels of lactic acid, beta-d-glucose, creatinine, alanine and 1-methylnicotinamide associated with increases in both parameters. Conclusion: Several...

  14. The utility of biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma: review of urine-based 1H-NMR studies – what the clinician needs to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartlidge CR

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Caroline R Cartlidge,1 M R Abellona U,2 Alzhraa M A Alkhatib,2 Simon D Taylor-Robinson1 1Department of Surgery and Cancer, Liver Unit, Division of Digestive Health, 2Department of Surgery and Cancer, Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the fifth most common malignancy, the third most common cause of cancer death, and the most common primary liver cancer. Overall, there is a need for more reliable biomarkers for HCC, as those currently available lack sensitivity and specificity. For example, the current gold-standard biomarker, serum alpha-fetoprotein, has a sensitivity of roughly only 70%. Cancer cells have different characteristic metabolic signatures in biofluids, compared to healthy cells; therefore, metabolite analysis in blood or urine should lead to the detection of suitable candidates for the detection of HCC. With the advent of metabonomics, this has increased the potential for new biomarker discovery. In this article, we look at approaches used to identify biomarkers of HCC using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy of urine samples. The various multivariate statistical analysis techniques used are explained, and the process of biomarker identification is discussed, with a view to simplifying the knowledge base for the average clinician. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, biomarkers, metabonomics, urine, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 1H-NMR 

  15. Nonylphenol Toxicity Evaluation and Discovery of Biomarkers in Rat Urine by a Metabolomics Strategy through HPLC-QTOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Xin Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonylphenol (NP was quantified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS in the urine and plasma of rats treated with 0, 50, and 250 mg/kg/day of NP for four consecutive days. A urinary metabolomic strategy was originally implemented by high performance liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF-MS to explore the toxicological effects of NP and determine the overall alterations in the metabolite profiles so as to find potential biomarkers. It is essential to point out that from the observation, the metabolic data were clearly clustered and separated for the three groups. To further identify differentiated metabolites, multivariate analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA, orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA, high-resolution MS/MS analysis, as well as searches of Metlin and Massbank databases, were conducted on a series of metabolites between the control and dose groups. Finally, five metabolites, including glycine, glycerophosphocholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, malonaldehyde (showing an upward trend, and tryptophan (showing a downward trend, were identified as the potential urinary biomarkers of NP-induced toxicity. In order to validate the reliability of these potential biomarkers, an independent validation was performed by using the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM-based targeted approach. The oxidative stress reflected by urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG levels was elevated in individuals highly exposed to NP, supporting the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction was a result of xenoestrogen accumulation. This study reveals a promising approach to find biomarkers to assist researchers in monitoring NP.

  16. Label-free SPR detection of gluten peptides in urine for non-invasive celiac disease follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Moreno, Maria de Lourdes; Cebolla, Angel; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-05-15

    Motivated by the necessity of new and efficient methods for dietary gluten control of celiac patients, we have developed a simple and highly sensitive SPR biosensor for the detection of gluten peptides in urine. The sensing methodology enables rapid and label-free quantification of the gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) by using G12 mAb. The overall performance of the biosensor has been in-depth optimized and evaluated in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility, reaching a limit of detection of 0.33 ng mL(-1). Besides, the robustness and stability of the methodology permit the continuous use of the biosensor for more than 100 cycles with excellent repeatability. Special efforts have been focused on preventing and minimizing possible interferences coming from urine matrix enabling a direct analysis in this fluid without requiring extraction or purification procedures. Our SPR biosensor has proven to detect and identify gluten consumption by evaluating urine samples from healthy and celiac individuals with different dietary gluten conditions. This novel biosensor methodology represents a novel approach to quantify the digested gluten peptides in human urine with outstanding sensitivity in a rapid and non-invasive manner. Our technique should be considered as a promising opportunity to develop Point-of-Care (POC) devices for an efficient, simple and accurate gluten free diet (GFD) monitoring as well as therapy follow-up of celiac disease patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of organic acids as potential biomarkers in the urine of autistic children using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Żurawicz, Ewa; Struck, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Michał

    2014-09-01

    There is a need to identify metabolic phenotypes in autism as they might each require unique approaches to prevention. Biological markers can help define autism subtypes and reveal potential therapeutic targets. The aim of the study was to identify alterations of small molecular weight compounds and to find potential biomarkers. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was employed to evaluate major metabolic changes in low molecular weight urine metabolites of 14 children with autism spectrum disorders vs. 10 non-autistic subjects. The results prove the usefulness of an identified set of 21 endogenous compounds (including 14 organic acids), whose levels are changed in diseased children. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method combined with multivariate statistical analysis techniques provide an efficient way of depicting metabolic perturbations of diseases, and may potentially be applicable as a novel strategy for the noninvasive diagnosis and treatment of autism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous pentafluorobenzyl derivatization and GC-ECNICI-MS measurement of nitrite and malondialdehyde in human urine : Close positive correlation between these disparate oxidative stress biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanff, Erik; Eisenga, Michele F.; Beckmann, Bibiana; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Urinary nitrite and malondialdehyde (MDA) are biomarkers of nitrosative and oxidative stress, respectively. At physiological pH values of urine and plasma, nitrite and MDA exist almost entirely in their dissociated forms, i.e., as ONO- (ONOH, p Kappa a =3.4) and -CH(CHO)(2) (CH2(CHO)(2), p Kappa a

  19. New Potential Biomarker for Methasterone Misuse in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianli; Lu, Jianghai; Wu, Yun; Wang, Xiaobing; Xu, Youxuan; Zhang, Yinong; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-24

    In this study, methasterone urinary metabolic profiles were investigated by liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) in full scan and targeted MS/MS modes with accurate mass measurement. A healthy male volunteer was asked to take the drug and liquid-liquid extraction was employed to process urine samples. Chromatographic peaks for potential metabolites were hunted out with the theoretical [M - H](-) as a target ion in a full scan experiment and actual deprotonated ions were studied in targeted MS/MS experiment. Fifteen metabolites including two new sulfates (S1 and S2), three glucuronide conjugates (G2, G6 and G7), and three free metabolites (M2, M4 and M6) were detected for methasterone. Three metabolites involving G4, G5 and M5 were obtained for the first time in human urine samples. Owing to the absence of helpful fragments to elucidate the steroid ring structure of methasterone phase II metabolites, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was employed to obtain structural information of the trimethylsilylated phase I metabolite released after enzymatic hydrolysis and the potential structure was inferred using a combined MS method. Metabolite detection times were also analyzed and G2 (18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-2α, 17α-dimethyl-androst-13-en-3α-ol-ξ-O-glucuronide) was thought to be new potential biomarker for methasterone misuse which can be detected up to 10 days.

  20. Simultaneous determination of renal function biomarkers in urine using a validated paper-based microfluidic analytical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Eduardo Luiz; Milani, Maria Izabel; Carrilho, Emanuel; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2018-01-02

    In this paper, we describe a validated paper-based microfluidic analytical device for the simultaneous quantification of two important biomarkers of renal function in urine. This paper platform provides an inexpensive, simple, and easy to use colorimetric method for the quantification of creatinine (CRN) and uric acid (UA) in urine samples. The microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) consists of a main channel with three identical arms, each containing a circular testing zone and a circular uptake zone. Creatinine detection is based on the Jaffé reaction, in which CRN reacts with picrate to form an orange-red product. Uric acid quantification is based on the reduction of Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ by UA, which is detected in a colorimetric reaction using 1,10-phenanthroline. Under optimum conditions, obtained through chemometrics, the concentrations of the analytes showed good linear correlations with the effective intensities, and the method presented satisfactory repeatability. The limits of detection and the linear ranges, respectively, were 15.7 mg L -1 and 50-600 mg L -1 for CRN and 16.5 mg L -1 and 50-500 mg L -1 for UA. There were no statistically significant differences between the results obtained using the μPAD and a chromatographic comparative method (Student's t-test at 95% confidence level). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomarkers of chronic kidney disease in the urine of diabetic/hypertensive patients by means of Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elzo Everton de Sousa; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martis; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and arterial hypertension (AH) are common diseases that, if untreated, predispose the patient to renal failure. This study aimed to evaluate possible biomarkers in the urine of patients with DM and AH capable to predict the chronic renal disease, by means of Raman spectroscopy. Urines were obtained from patients with DM and AH, and separated into four groups: no symptoms of diseases related to DM and AH (G1), with low clinical complications (G2), with severe clinical complications (G3), and with chronic kidney disease (G4) arised from DM and AH. It has been used a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830nm, 250mW, 20s accumulation). In the spectra of urine it was identified Raman peaks at 680cm-1 (creatinine), 1004cm-1 (urea) and 1128cm-1 (glucose). The results revealed that G2, G3 and G4 presented the creatinine peak with lower intensity than G1 (p < 0.05). It was observed that G2, G3 and G4 showed lower intensity of the urea peak compared to G1 (p < 0.05) and G4 showed lower intensity compared to G2 and G3 (p < 0.05). Despite not significant, the glucose peak showed lower intensity in G1 when compared to the other groups. A model for classification of groups according to clinical criteria, using Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression, taking as inputs the intensities of creatine, urea and glucose peaks allowed correct classification of 88.9% for G1, 36.8% for G2, 43.8% for G3 and 84.2% for G4. These results demonstrated the possibility of obtaining diagnostic information for complications of kidney disease associated to DM and AH, particularly the renal failure.

  2. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  3. Nutrition and biomarkers in psychiatry : research on micronutrient deficiencies in schizophrenia, the role of the intestine in the hyperserotonemia of autism, and a method for non-hypothesis driven discovery of biomarkers in urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemperman, Ramses Franciscus Jacobus

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the study of markers of nutrition and intestinal motility in mental disorders with a focus on schizophrenia and autism, and the development, evaluation and application of a biomarker discovery method for urine. The aim of the thesis is to investigate the role of long-chain

  4. Urine and serum microRNA-1 as novel biomarkers for myocardial injury in open-heart surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian; Mao, Anqiong; Wang, Xiaobin; Duan, Xiaoxia; Yao, Yi; Zhang, Chunxiang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA-1 (miR-1) is a cardio-specific/enriched microRNA. Our recent studies have revealed that serum and urine miR-1 could be a novel sensitive biomarker for acute myocardial infarction. Open-heart surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are often accompanied with surgery injury and CPB-associated injury on the hearts. However, the association of miR-1 and these intra-operative and post-operative cardiac injures is unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that urine and serum miR-1 might be a novel biomarker for myocardial injuries in open-heart surgeries with CPB. Serum and urine miR-1 levels in 20 patients with elective mitral valve surgery were measured at pre-surgery, pre-CPB, 60 min post-CBP, and 24h post-CBP. Serum cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) was used as a positive control biomarker for cardiac injury. Compared with these in pre-operative and pre-CPB groups, the levels of miR-1 in serum and urine from patients after open-heart surgeries and CPB were significant increased at all observed time points. A similar pattern of serum cTnI levels and their strong positive correlation with miR-1 levels were identified in these patients. The results suggest that serum and urine miR-1 may be a novel sensitive biomarker for myocardial injury in open-heart surgeries with CPB.

  5. Correlation between Circulating Fungal Biomarkers and Clinical Outcome in Invasive Aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysios Neofytos

    Full Text Available Objective means are needed to predict and assess clinical response in patients treated for invasive aspergillosis (IA. We examined whether early changes in serum galactomannan (GM and/or β-D-glucan (BDG can predict clinical outcomes. Patients with proven or probable IA were prospectively enrolled, and serial GM and BDG levels and GM optical density indices (GMI were calculated twice weekly for 6 weeks following initiation of standard-of-care antifungal therapy. Changes in these biomarkers during the first 2 and 6 weeks of treatment were analyzed for associations with clinical response and survival at weeks 6 and 12. Among 47 patients with IA, 53.2% (25/47 and 65.9% (27/41 had clinical response by weeks 6 and 12, respectively. Changes in biomarkers during the first 2 weeks were associated with clinical response at 6 weeks (GMI, P = 0.03 and 12 weeks (GM+BDG composite, P = 0.05; GM, P = 0.04; GMI, P = 0.02. Changes in biomarkers during the first 6 weeks were also associated with clinical response at 6 weeks (GM, P = 0.05; GMI, P = 0.03 and 12 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.02; GM, P = 0.02; GMI, P = 0.01. Overall survival rates at 6 weeks and 12 weeks were 87.2% (41/47 and 79.1% (34/43, respectively. Decreasing biomarkers in the first 2 weeks were associated with survival at 6 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.03; BDG, P = 0.01; GM, P = 0.03 and at 12 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.01; BDG, P = 0.03; GM, P = 0.01; GMI, P = 0.007. Similar correlations occurred for biomarkers measured over 6 weeks. Patients with negative baseline GMI and/or persistently negative GMI during the first 2 weeks were more likely to have CR and survival. These results suggest that changes of biomarkers may be informative to predict and/or assess response to therapy and survival in patients treated for IA.

  6. Urine microRNAs as biomarkers for bladder cancer: a diagnostic meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Y

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Yidong Cheng,* Xiaheng Deng,* Xiao Yang,* Pengchao Li, Xiaolei Zhang, Peng Li, Jun Tao, Qiang Lu, Zengjun Wang Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The diagnostic value of microRNA (miRNA detection in patients with bladder cancer (BCa is controversial. We performed a diagnostic meta-analysis to evaluate current evidence on the use of miRNA assays to diagnose BCa. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science for studies published before March 31, 2015. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, diagnostic odds ratio, and area under the curve (AUC were calculated to evaluate the overall test performance. Subgroup analyses were used to explore the between-study heterogeneity. Deeks’ funnel plot asymmetry test was used to test publication bias. We applied the software of RevMan 5.2 and Stata 11.0 to the meta-analysis. Results: A total of 23 studies from nine articles were included in the meta-analysis, with a total of 719 patients and 494 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68–0.80 and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.70–0.80, respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio was 3.03 (95% CI, 2.50–3.67; negative likelihood ratio was 0.33 (95% CI, 0.27–0.42; and diagnostic odds ratio was 9.07 (95% CI, 6.35–12.95. The pooled AUC was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.78–0.85. Subgroup analyses indicated that the multiple miRNAs assays and urine supernatant assays showed high accuracies in diagnosing BCa. Conclusion: The miRNA assays may serve as potential noninvasive diagnostic tool for the detection of BCa. However, the clinical application of miRNA assays for BCa diagnosis still needs further validation by large prospective studies. Keywords: microRNAs, bladder cancer, diagnostic accuracy, meta-analysis

  7. Detection of tobacco-related biomarkers in urine samples by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy coupled with thin-layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongfu; Han, Sungyub; Li, Xiao Sheryl

    2013-08-01

    The nicotine metabolites, cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (3HC) are considered as superior biomarkers for identifying tobacco exposure. More importantly, the ratio of 3HC to cotinine is a good indicator to phenotype individuals for cytochrome P450 2A6 activity and to individualize pharmacotherapy for tobacco addiction. In this paper, a simple, robust and novel method based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy coupled with thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was developed to directly quantify the biomarkers in human urine samples. This is the first time surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to detect cotinine and 3HC in urine samples. The linear dynamic range for the detection of cotinine is from 40 nM to 8 μM while that of 3HC is from 1 μM to 15 μM. The detection limits are 10 nM and 0.2 μM for cotinine and 3HC, respectively. The proposed method was further validated by quantifying the concentration of both cotinine and 3HC in smokers' urine samples. This TLC-SERS method allows the direct detection of cotinine in the urine samples of both active and passive smokers and the detection of 3HC in smokers.

  8. Analysis of 3,5-dichloroaniline as a biomarker of vinclozolin and iprodione in human urine using liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Christian H; Littorin, Margareta; Amilon, Asa; Jönsson, Bo A G

    2007-01-01

    The fungicides vinclozolin and iprodione are widely used in agriculture. These pesticides are dicarboximide fungicides containing the common moiety 3,5-dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA). It has been suggested that low-level exposures to such compounds may be associated with adverse health effects such as endocrine disruption. In this study a method using liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was developed for the analysis of 3,5-DCA as a biomarker of exposure to these fungicides in human urine. The urine samples were treated by basic hydrolysis to degrade the fungicides, their metabolites and conjugates to 3,5-DCA. The 3,5-DCA was then extracted using toluene and derivatized using pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA). Analysis of the derivative was carried out using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in the negative ion mode. Quantification of the derivative was performed using [(13)C(6)]-labeled 3,4-DCA as an internal standard with good precision and linearity in the range 0.1-200 ng/mL urine. The limit of detection was determined to be 0.1 ng/mL. The metabolites in urine were found to be stable during storage at -20 degrees C. To validate 3,5-DCA as a biomarker the method was applied in a human experimental exposure to iprodione and vinclozolin. Two healthy volunteers received 200 microg single oral doses of each pesticide followed by urine sampling during 72-120 h post-exposure. Between 78-107% of the dose was recovered as 3,5-DCA in the urine after exposure. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis in febrile, neutropenic patients: a multi-state model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Schwarzinger

    Full Text Available The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis expectedly depends on the timing of test results relative to the empirical administration of antifungal therapy during neutropenia, although a dynamic evaluation framework is lacking.We developed a multi-state model describing simultaneously the likelihood of empirical antifungal therapy and the risk of invasive aspergillosis during neutropenia. We evaluated whether the first positive test result with a biomarker is an independent predictor of invasive aspergillosis when both diagnostic information used to treat and risk factors of developing invasive aspergillosis are taken into account over time. We applied the multi-state model to a homogeneous cohort of 185 high-risk patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Patients were prospectively screened for galactomannan antigenemia twice a week for immediate treatment decision; 2,214 serum samples were collected on the same days and blindly assessed for (1->3- β-D-glucan antigenemia and a quantitative PCR assay targeting a mitochondrial locus.The usual evaluation framework of biomarker performance was unable to distinguish clinical benefits of β-glucan or PCR assays. The multi-state model evidenced that the risk of invasive aspergillosis is a complex time function of neutropenia duration and risk management. The quantitative PCR assay accelerated the early detection of invasive aspergillosis (P = .010, independently of other diagnostic information used to treat, while β-glucan assay did not (P = .53.The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis is better apprehended by the evaluation of time-varying predictors in a multi-state model. Our results provide strong rationale for prospective studies testing a preemptive antifungal therapy, guided by clinical, radiological, and bi-weekly blood screening with galactomannan antigenemia and a standardized quantitative PCR assay.

  10. The Urine Proteome as a Biomarker of Radiation Injury: Submitted to Proteomics- Clinical Applications Special Issue: "Renal and Urinary Proteomics (Thongboonkerd)"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukut; Halligan, Brian D; Wakim, Bassam T; Savin, Virginia J; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E

    2008-06-18

    Terrorist attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation, and early biomarkers of radiation injury would be critical for triage, treatment and follow-up of such individuals. However, no such biomarkers have yet been proven to exist. We tested the potential of high throughput proteomics to identify protein biomarkers of radiation injury after total body X-ray irradiation in a rat model. Subtle functional changes in the kidney are suggested by an increased glomerular permeability for macromolecules measured within 24 hours after TBI. Ultrastructural changes in glomerular podocytes include partial loss of the interdigitating organization of foot processes. Analysis of urine by LC-MS/MS and 2D-GE showed significant changes in the urine proteome within 24 hours after TBI. Tissue kallikrein 1-related peptidase, cysteine proteinase inhibitor cystatin C and oxidized histidine were found to be increased while a number of proteinase inhibitors including kallikrein-binding protein and albumin were found to be decreased post-irradiation. Thus, TBI causes immediately detectable changes in renal structure and function and in the urinary protein profile. This suggests that both systemic and renal changes are induced by radiation and it may be possible to identify a set of biomarkers unique to radiation injury.

  11. Hydration, Fluid Intake, and Related Urine Biomarkers among Male College Students in Cangzhou, China: A Cross-Sectional Study—Applications for Assessing Fluid Intake and Adequate Water Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to assess the associations between fluid intake and urine biomarkers and to determine daily total fluid intake for assessing hydration status for male college students. A total of 68 male college students aged 18–25 years recruited from Cangzhou, China completed a 7-day cross-sectional study. From day 1 to day 7; all subjects were asked to complete a self-administered 7-day 24-h fluid intake record. The foods eaten by subjects were weighed and 24-h urine was collected for three consecutive days on the last three consecutive days. On the sixth day, urine osmolality, specific gravity (USG, pH, and concentrations of potassium, sodium, and chloride was determined. Subjects were divided into optimal hydration, middle hydration, and hypohydration groups according to their 24-h urine osmolality. Strong relationships were found between daily total fluid intake and 24-h urine biomarkers, especially for 24-h urine volume (r = 0.76; p < 0.0001 and osmolality (r = 0.76; p < 0.0001. The percentage of the variances in daily total fluid intake (R2 explained by PLS (partial least squares model with seven urinary biomarkers was 68.9%; two urine biomarkers—24-h urine volume and osmolality—were identified as possible key predictors. The daily total fluid intake for assessing optimal hydration was 2582 mL, while the daily total fluid intake for assessing hypohydration was 2502 mL. Differences in fluid intake and urine biomarkers were found among male college students with different hydration status. A strong relationship existed between urine biomarkers and fluid intake. A PLS model identified that key variables for assessing daily total fluid intake were 24-h urine volume and osmolality. It was feasibility to use total fluid intake to judge hydration status.

  12. Exhaled hydrogen peroxide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : an analysis of its applicability as a non-invasive biomarker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, Wendy Johanna Cornelia van

    2003-01-01

    Several non-invasive biomarkers have been used to investigate the pathophysiology, treatment and prognosis of COPD. However, for most markers there is no standardized procedure and few randomised studies have been performed with COPD patients. We have developed an efficient, sensitive and

  13. A novel immunotherapy of Brucellosis in cows monitored non invasively through a specific biomarker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Mohan Saxena

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease causing huge economic losses worldwide. Currently no effective immunotherapy for Brucellosis or any biomarker to monitor the efficacy of therapy is available. Treatment is ineffective and animals remain carrier lifelong. S19 and RB51 are live attenuated vaccine strains of Brucella abortus. However, S19 induces only antibody, ineffective for intracellular pathogen. RB51 induces cell mediated immunity (CMI but it is Rifampicin resistant. Both organisms are secreted in milk and can infect humans and cause abortions in animals. Phage lysed bacteria (lysates retain maximum immunogenicity as opposed to killing by heat or chemicals. We report here the successful immunotherapy of bovine Brucellosis by phage lysates of RB51 (RL and S19 (SL. The SL induced strong antibody response and RL stimulated CMI. In vitro restimulation of leukocytes from RL immunized cattle induced interferon gamma production. A single subcutaneous dose of 2 ml of cocktail lysate (both RL and SL, eliminated live virulent Brucella from Brucellosis affected cattle with plasma level of Brucella specific 223 bp amplicon undetectable by RT-PCR and blood negative for live Brucella by culture in 3 months post-immunization. This is the first report on minimally invasive monitoring of the efficacy of antibacterial therapy employing plasma RNA specific for live bacteria as a biomarker as well as on the use of RB51 phage lysate for successful immunotherapy of Brucellosis in cattle.

  14. Development of biosensors for non-invasive measurements of heart failure biomarkers in saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcacer, Albert; Streklas, Angelos; Baraket, Abdoullatif; Zine, Nadia; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Bausells, Joan

    2017-06-01

    Biomedical engineering research today is focused on non-invasive techniques for detection of biomarkers related to specific health issues 1. Three metal layer microelectrode (μE) sensors have been implemented to detect specific biomarkers which can be found in human saliva related with heart failure problems 2 such as interleukin and Tumore Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), and used as highly sensitive saliva sensors. We designed specialized μEs combining different technologies for multiple measurements aiming to a lab-on-a-chip future integration. Measurements are based to basic principles of Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Thus, certain planar technology was used involving three metal layers of gold, platinum and silver deposited over an oxidized silicon substrate following standard cleanroom procedures of lithography for the definition of μEs, sputtering physical vapor deposition (PVD) for gold, evaporation PVD for silver and platinum, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for passivation layer of silicon nitride.

  15. Host Factors and Biomarkers Associated with Poor Outcomes in Adults with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Hanada

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD causes considerable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify host factors and biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in adult patients with IPD in Japan, which has a rapidly-aging population.In a large-scale surveillance study of 506 Japanese adults with IPD, we investigated the role of host factors, disease severity, biomarkers based on clinical laboratory data, treatment regimens, and bacterial factors on 28-day mortality.Overall mortality was 24.1%, and the mortality rate increased from 10.0% in patients aged ˂50 years to 33.1% in patients aged ≥80 years. Disease severity also increased 28-day mortality, from 12.5% among patients with bacteraemia without sepsis to 35.0% in patients with severe sepsis and 56.9% with septic shock. The death rate within 48 hours after admission was high at 54.9%. Risk factors for mortality identified by multivariate analysis were as follows: white blood cell (WBC count <4000 cells/μL (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-12.8, p < .001; age ≥80 years (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.0-21.6, p = .002; serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.5-8.1, p < .001; underlying liver disease (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6-7.8, p = .002; mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.6, p < .001; and lactate dehydrogenase ≥300 IU/L (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.0, p = .001. Pneumococcal serotype and drug resistance were not associated with poor outcomes.Host factors, disease severity, and biomarkers, especially WBC counts and serum creatinine, were more important determinants of mortality than bacterial factors.

  16. Graphene-based biomimetic materials targeting urine metabolite as potential cancer biomarker: application over different conductive materials for potentiometric transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truta, Liliana A.A.N.A.; Ferreira, Nádia S.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2015-01-01

    This works presents a novel surface Smart Polymer Antibody Material (SPAM) for Carnitine (CRT, a potential biomarker of ovarian cancer), tested for the first time as ionophore in potentiometric electrodes of unconventional configuration. The SPAM material consisted of a 3D polymeric network created by surface imprinting on graphene layers. The polymer was obtained by radical polymerization of (vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride and 4-styrenesulfonic acid (signaling the binding sites), and vinyl pivalate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (surroundings). Non-imprinted material (NIM) was prepared as control, by excluding the template from the procedure. These materials were then used to produce several plasticized PVC membranes, testing the relevance of including the SPAM as ionophore, and the need for a charged lipophilic additive. The membranes were casted over solid conductive supports of graphite or ITO/FTO. The effect of pH upon the potentiometric response was evaluated for different pHs (2-9) with different buffer compositions. Overall, the best performance was achieved for membranes with SPAM ionophore, having a cationic lipophilic additive and tested in HEPES (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) buffer, pH 5.1. Better slopes were achieved when the membrane was casted on conductive glass (−57.4mV/decade), while the best detection limits were obtained for graphite-based conductive supports (3.6×10−5mol/L). Good selectivity was observed against BSA, ascorbic acid, glucose, creatinine and urea, tested for concentrations up to their normal physiologic levels in urine. The application of the devices to the analysis of spiked samples showed recoveries ranging from 91% (± 6.8%) to 118% (± 11.2%). Overall, the combination of the SPAM sensory material with a suitable selective membrane composition and electrode design has lead to a promising tool for point-of-care applications. PMID:26456975

  17. Non-invasive Pregnancy Diagnosis from Urine by the Cuboni Reaction and the Barium Chloride Test in Donkeys (Equus asinus) and Alpacas (Vicugna pacos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubátová, A; Fedorova, T; Skálová, I; Hyniová, L

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate two chemical tests for non-invasive pregnancy diagnosis from urine, the Cuboni reaction and the barium chloride test, in donkeys (Equus asinus) and alpacas (Vicugna pacos). The research was carried out from April 2013 to September 2014. Urine samples were collected on five private Czech farms from 18 jennies and 12 alpaca females. Urine was collected non-invasively into plastic cups fastened on a telescopic rod, at 6-9 week intervals. In total, 60 and 54 urine samples from alpacas and jennies, respectively, were collected. The Cuboni reaction was performed by the State Veterinary Institute Prague. The barium chloride test was done with 5 ml of urine mixed together with 5 ml of 1% barium chloride solution. Results of the Cuboni reaction were strongly influenced by the reproductive status of jennies; the test was 100% successful throughout the second half of pregnancy. However, no relationship was found between the real reproductive status of alpaca females and results of the Cuboni reaction. It was concluded that the barium chloride test is not suitable for pregnancy diagnosis either in donkeys, due to significant influence of season on the results, or in alpacas, because no relationship between results of the test and the reproductive status of alpaca females was found. In conclusion, the Cuboni reaction has potential to become a standard pregnancy diagnostic method in donkeys.

  18. Comparative Study of Seven Commercial Kits for Human DNA Extraction from Urine Samples Suitable for DNA Biomarker-Based Public Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bali, Latifa; Diman, Aurélie; Bernard, Alfred; Roosens, Nancy H. C.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Human genomic DNA extracted from urine could be an interesting tool for large-scale public health studies involving characterization of genetic variations or DNA biomarkers as a result of the simple and noninvasive collection method. These studies, involving many samples, require a rapid, easy, and standardized extraction protocol. Moreover, for practicability, there is a necessity to collect urine at a moment different from the first void and to store it appropriately until analysis. The present study compared seven commercial kits to select the most appropriate urinary human DNA extraction procedure for epidemiological studies. DNA yield has been determined using different quantification methods: two classical, i.e., NanoDrop and PicoGreen, and two species-specific real-time quantitative (q)PCR assays, as DNA extracted from urine contains, besides human, microbial DNA also, which largely contributes to the total DNA yield. In addition, the kits giving a good yield were also tested for the presence of PCR inhibitors. Further comparisons were performed regarding the sampling time and the storage conditions. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, an important gene related to smoking has been genotyped using the developed tools. We could select one well-performing kit for the human DNA extraction from urine suitable for molecular diagnostic real-time qPCR-based assays targeting genetic variations, applicable to large-scale studies. In addition, successful genotyping was possible using DNA extracted from urine stored at −20°C for several months, and an acceptable yield could also be obtained from urine collected at different moments during the day, which is particularly important for public health studies. PMID:25365790

  19. Comparative study of seven commercial kits for human DNA extraction from urine samples suitable for DNA biomarker-based public health studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bali, Latifa; Diman, Aurélie; Bernard, Alfred; Roosens, Nancy H C; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J

    2014-12-01

    Human genomic DNA extracted from urine could be an interesting tool for large-scale public health studies involving characterization of genetic variations or DNA biomarkers as a result of the simple and noninvasive collection method. These studies, involving many samples, require a rapid, easy, and standardized extraction protocol. Moreover, for practicability, there is a necessity to collect urine at a moment different from the first void and to store it appropriately until analysis. The present study compared seven commercial kits to select the most appropriate urinary human DNA extraction procedure for epidemiological studies. DNA yield has been determined using different quantification methods: two classical, i.e., NanoDrop and PicoGreen, and two species-specific real-time quantitative (q)PCR assays, as DNA extracted from urine contains, besides human, microbial DNA also, which largely contributes to the total DNA yield. In addition, the kits giving a good yield were also tested for the presence of PCR inhibitors. Further comparisons were performed regarding the sampling time and the storage conditions. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, an important gene related to smoking has been genotyped using the developed tools. We could select one well-performing kit for the human DNA extraction from urine suitable for molecular diagnostic real-time qPCR-based assays targeting genetic variations, applicable to large-scale studies. In addition, successful genotyping was possible using DNA extracted from urine stored at -20°C for several months, and an acceptable yield could also be obtained from urine collected at different moments during the day, which is particularly important for public health studies.

  20. A Multi-Center Prospective Study to Validate an Algorithm Using Urine and Plasma Biomarkers for Predicting Gleason ≥3+4 Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars

    2017-01-01

    a prospective multicenter study recruiting patients from community-based practices. Patients and Methods: Urine and plasma samples from 2528 men were tested prospectively. Results were correlated with biopsy findings, if a biopsy was performed as deemed necessary by the practicing urologist. Of the 2528......Background: Unnecessary biopsies and overdiagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) remain a serious healthcare problem. We have previously shown that urine- and plasma-based prostate-specific biomarkers when combined can predict high grade prostate cancer (PCa). To further validate this test, we performed...... of high grade prostate cancer with negative predictive value (NPV) of 90% to 97% for Gleason ≥3+4 and between 98% to 99% for Gleason ≥4+3....

  1. Fecal lipocalin 2, a sensitive and broadly dynamic non-invasive biomarker for intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Delgado, Maria A; Young, Andrew N; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation has classically been defined histopathologically, especially by the presence of immune cell infiltrates. However, more recent studies suggest a role for "low-grade" inflammation in a variety of disorders ranging from metabolic syndrome to cancer, which is defined by modest elevations in pro-inflammatory gene expression. Consequently, there is a need for cost-effective, non-invasive biomarkers that, ideally, would have the sensitivity to detect low-grade inflammation and have a dynamic range broad enough to reflect classic robust intestinal inflammation. Herein, we report that, for assessment of intestinal inflammation, fecal lipocalin 2 (Lcn-2), measured by ELISA, serves this purpose. Specifically, using a well-characterized mouse model of DSS colitis, we observed that fecal Lcn-2 and intestinal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, CXCL1, TNFα) are modestly but significantly induced by very low concentrations of DSS (0.25 and 0.5%), and become markedly elevated at higher concentrations of DSS (1.0 and 4.0%). As expected, careful histopathologic analysis noted only modest immune infiltrates at low DSS concentration and robust colitis at higher DSS concentrations. In accordance, increased levels of the neutrophil product myeloperoxidase (MPO) was only detected in mice given 1.0 and 4.0% DSS. In addition, fecal Lcn-2 marks the severity of spontaneous colitis development in IL-10 deficient mice. Unlike histopathology, MPO, and q-RT-PCR, the assay of fecal Lcn-2 requires only a stool sample, permits measurement over time, and can detect inflammation as early as 1 day following DSS administration. Thus, assay of fecal Lcn-2 by ELISA can function as a non-invasive, sensitive, dynamic, stable and cost-effective means to monitor intestinal inflammation in mice.

  2. Stability of miR-126 in Urine and Its Potential as a Biomarker for Renal Endothelial Injury with Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using miR-126 in the urine as a biomarker for diabetic nephropathy. Methods. miRNAs were extracted from the urine samples of T2DM patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN; n=92, T2DM without DN (n=86, and 85 healthy volunteers using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Stability of urinary miR-126 and factors that affected the stability were assessed. A subgroup analysis was also carried out to compare the urinary miR-126 level in T2DM patients well controlled by the treatment versus those who were not well controlled. Results. Urinary miR-126 was stable when the urine samples were kept at room temperature for extended period of time, 4°C, −20°C, and −80°C for up to 12 hours or subjected to 10 freeze-and-thaw cycle. Urinary miR-126 was significantly higher in T2DM patients with DN (5.76±0.33 versus 3.25±0.45 in T2DM patients without DN. Successful treatment significantly reduced urinary miR-126 in T2DM patients with DN to 3.89±0.52 (P<0.05. Conclusion. miR-126 in the urine is stable and it could be used as a biomarker of DN and to monitor the treatment response.

  3. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of ethyl palmitate calibration and resolution with ethyl oleate as biomarker ethanol sub acute in urine application study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaniti, Ni Made; Manurung, Manuntun

    2016-03-01

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry is used to separate two and more compounds and identify fragment ion specific of biomarker ethanol such as palmitic acid ethyl ester (PAEE), as one of the fatty acid ethyl esters as early detection through conyugated reaction. This study aims to calibrate ethyl palmitate and develop analysis with oleate acid. This methode can be used analysis ethanol and its chemistry biomarker in ethanol sub-acute consumption as analytical forensic toxicology. The result show that ethanol level in urine rats Wistar were 9.21 and decreased 6.59 ppm after 48 hours consumption. Calibration curve of ethyl palmitate was y = 0.2035 x + 1.0465 and R2 = 0.9886. Resolution between ethyl palmitate and oleate were >1.5 as good separation with fragment ion specific was 88 and the retention time was 18 minutes.

  4. Using urine as a biomarker in human exposure risk associated with arsenic and other heavy metals contaminating drinking groundwater in intensively agricultural areas of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsasuluk, Pokkate; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Siriwong, Wattasit; Robson, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Urine used as a biomarker was collected and compared between two groups of participants: (1) a groundwater-drinking group and (2) a non-groundwater-drinking group in intensively agricultural areas in Ubon Ratchathani province, Thailand. The statistical relationship with the metal concentration in shallow groundwater wells was established with urine data. According to the groundwater data, the health risk assessment results for four metals appeared to be higher for participants who drank groundwater than for the other group. The carcinogenic risk and non-carcinogenic risk of arsenic (As) were found in 25.86 and 31.03% of participants, respectively. For lead (Pb), 13.79% of the participants had a non-carcinogenic risk. Moreover, 30 of the 58 participants in the groundwater-drinking group had As urine higher than the standard, and 26, 2 and 9 of the 58 participants had above-standard levels for cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg) in urine, respectively. Both the risk assessment and biomarker level of groundwater-drinking participants were higher than in the other group. The results showed an average drinking rate of approximately 4.21 ± 2.73 L/day, which is twice as high as the standard. Interestingly, the As levels in the groundwater correlated with those in the urine of the groundwater-drinking participants, but not in the non-groundwater-drinking participants, as well as with the As-related cancer and non-carcinogenic risks. The hazard index (HI) of the 100 participants ranged from 0.00 to 25.86, with an average of 1.51 ± 3.63 higher than the acceptable level, revealing that 28 people appeared to have non-carcinogenic risk levels (24 and 4 people for groundwater-drinking participants and non-groundwater-drinking participants, respectively). Finally, the associated factors of heavy metals in urine were the drinking water source, body weight, smoking, sex and use of personal protective equipment.

  5. Detection of Volatile Compounds Emitted from Nasal Secretions and Serum: Towards Non-Invasive Identification of Diseased Cattle Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin L. Maurer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive diagnostics and finding biomarkers of disease in humans have been a very active research area. Some of the analytical technologies used for finding biomarkers of human disease are finding their use in livestock. Non-invasive sample collection from diseased cattle using breath and headspace of fecal samples have been reported. In this work, we explore the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from bovine nasal secretions and serum for finding biomarkers for bovine respiratory disease (BRD. One hundred nasal swabs and 100 serum samples (n = 50 for both ‘sick’ and ‘healthy’ were collected at the time of treatment for suspected BRD. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME was used to collect headspace samples that were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. It was possible to separate sick cattle using non-invasive analyses of nasal swabs and also serum samples by analyzing and comparing volatiles emitted from each group of samples. Four volatile compounds were found to be statistically significantly different between ‘sick’ and ‘normal’ cattle nasal swabs samples. Five volatile compounds were found to be significantly different between ‘sick’ and ‘normal’ cattle serum samples, with phenol being the common marker. Future studies are warranted to improve the extraction efficiency targeting VOCs preliminarily identified in this study. These findings bring us closer to the long-term goal of real-time, animal-side detection and separation of sick cattle.

  6. Use of the local false discovery rate for identification of metabolic biomarkers in rat urine following Genkwa Flos-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuojing Li

    Full Text Available Metabolomics is concerned with characterizing the large number of metabolites present in a biological system using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and HPLC/MS (high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Multivariate analysis is one of the most important tools for metabolic biomarker identification in metabolomic studies. However, analyzing the large-scale data sets acquired during metabolic fingerprinting is a major challenge. As a posterior probability that the features of interest are not affected, the local false discovery rate (LFDR is a good interpretable measure. However, it is rarely used to when interrogating metabolic data to identify biomarkers. In this study, we employed the LFDR method to analyze HPLC/MS data acquired from a metabolomic study of metabolic changes in rat urine during hepatotoxicity induced by Genkwa flos (GF treatment. The LFDR approach was successfully used to identify important rat urine metabolites altered by GF-stimulated hepatotoxicity. Compared with principle component analysis (PCA, LFDR is an interpretable measure and discovers more important metabolites in an HPLC/MS-based metabolomic study.

  7. Estimation of Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Food (Raw and Cooked in a Rural Village of Northern Chile. Urine as a Biomarker of Recent Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Pablo Diaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate both the contribution of drinking water and food (raw and cooked to the total (t-As and inorganic (i-As arsenic intake and the exposure of inhabitants of Socaire, a rural village in Chile´s Antofagasta Region, by using urine as biomarker. The i-As intake from food and water was estimated using samples collected between November 2008 and September 2009. A 24-hour dietary recall questionnaire was given to 20 participants. Drinking water, food (raw and cooked and urine samples were collected directly from the homes where the interviewees lived. The percentage of i-As/t-As in the drinking water that contributed to the total intake was variable (26.8–92.9. Cereals and vegetables are the food groups that contain higher concentrations of i-As. All of the participants interviewed exceeded the reference intake FAO/OMS (149.8 µg∙i-As·day−1 by approximately nine times. The concentration of t-As in urine in each individual ranged from 78 to 459 ng·mL−1. Estimated As intake from drinking water and food was not associated with total urinary As concentration. The results show that both drinking water and food substantially contribute to i-As intake and an increased exposure risk to adult residents in contaminated areas.

  8. Estimation of Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Food (Raw and Cooked) in a Rural Village of Northern Chile. Urine as a Biomarker of Recent Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Oscar Pablo; Arcos, Rafael; Tapia, Yasna; Pastene, Rubén; Velez, Dínoraz; Devesa, Vicenta; Montoro, Rosa; Aguilera, Valeska; Becerra, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate both the contribution of drinking water and food (raw and cooked) to the total (t-As) and inorganic (i-As) arsenic intake and the exposure of inhabitants of Socaire, a rural village in Chile´s Antofagasta Region, by using urine as biomarker. The i-As intake from food and water was estimated using samples collected between November 2008 and September 2009. A 24-hour dietary recall questionnaire was given to 20 participants. Drinking water, food (raw and cooked) and urine samples were collected directly from the homes where the interviewees lived. The percentage of i-As/t-As in the drinking water that contributed to the total intake was variable (26.8–92.9). Cereals and vegetables are the food groups that contain higher concentrations of i-As. All of the participants interviewed exceeded the reference intake FAO/OMS (149.8 µg∙i-As·day−1) by approximately nine times. The concentration of t-As in urine in each individual ranged from 78 to 459 ng·mL−1. Estimated As intake from drinking water and food was not associated with total urinary As concentration. The results show that both drinking water and food substantially contribute to i-As intake and an increased exposure risk to adult residents in contaminated areas. PMID:26006131

  9. Blood Aspergillus RNA is a promising alternative biomarker for invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanan; Paderu, Padmaja; Railkar, Radha; Douglas, Cameron; Iannone, Robert; Shire, Norah; Perlin, David S

    2016-11-01

    A critical challenge for the successful application of antifungal therapies for invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a lack of reliable biomarkers to assess early treatment response. Patients with proven or probable IA were prospectively enrolled, and serial blood samples were collected at 8 specified time points during 12-week antifungal therapy. Total nucleic acid was extracted from 2.5 ml blood and tested for Aspergillus-specific RNA by a pan-Aspergillus real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay. Serum 1, 3-β-D-glucan (BG) and galactomannan (GM) were measured in parallel. Clinical outcome was evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks. Overall, 48/328 (14.6%) blood samples from 29/46 (63%) patients had positive NASBA detection at baseline and/or some point during the study. Positive NASBA results during the first 4 and 6 weeks of treatment are significantly associated with the 12-week outcome. Blood RNA load change during weeks 4-6 may be informative to predict outcome at 12 weeks. While independent of serum GM, the kinetic change of circulating Aspergillus RNA appears to be well correlated with that of BG on some patient individuals. Monitoring blood Aspergillus RNA during the first 4-6 weeks of antifungal treatment may help assess therapeutic response. Combination of circulating Aspergillus RNA and BG may be a useful adjunct to assess response. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The role of non-invasive biomarkers in detecting acute respiratory effects of traffic-related air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, M C; Kulkarni, N; Maestrelli, P

    2014-09-01

    The role of non-invasive methods in the investigation of acute effects of traffic-related air pollution is not clearly established. We evaluated the usefulness of non-invasive biomarkers in detecting acute air pollution effects according to the age of participants, the disease status, their sensitivity compared with lung function tests and their specificity for a type of pollutant. Search terms lead to 535 titles, among them 128 had potentially relevant abstracts. Sixtynine full papers were reviewed, while 59 articles were excluded as they did not meet the selection criteria. Methods used to assess short-term effects of air pollution included analysis of nasal lavage (NAL) for the upper airways, and induced sputum (IS), exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) for central and lower airways. There is strong evidence that FeNO evaluation is useful independently from subject age, while IS analysis is suitable almost for adults. Biomarker changes are generally observed upon pollutant exposure irrespective of the disease status of the participants. None of the biomarkers identified are specific for a type of pollutant exposure. Based on experimental exposure studies, there is moderate evidence that IS analysis is more sensitive than lung function tests, whereas this is not the case for biomarkers obtained by NAL or EBC. Cells and some cytokines (IL-6, IL-8 and myeloperoxidase) have been measured both in the upper respiratory tract (NAL) and in the lower airways (IS). Overall, the response to traffic exposure seems different in the two compartments. In conclusion, this survey of current literature displays the complexity of this research field, highlights the significance of short-term studies on traffic pollution and gives important tips when planning studies to detect acute respiratory effects of air pollution in a non-invasive way. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry (DMS-MS) in Radiation Biodosimetry: Rapid and High-Throughput Quantitation of Multiple Radiation Biomarkers in Nonhuman Primate Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhidan; Coy, Stephen L.; Pannkuk, Evan L.; Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Fornace, Albert J.; Vouros, Paul

    2018-05-01

    High-throughput methods to assess radiation exposure are a priority due to concerns that include nuclear power accidents, the spread of nuclear weapon capability, and the risk of terrorist attacks. Metabolomics, the assessment of small molecules in an easily accessible sample, is the most recent method to be applied for the identification of biomarkers of the biological radiation response with a useful dose-response profile. Profiling for biomarker identification is frequently done using an LC-MS platform which has limited throughput due to the time-consuming nature of chromatography. We present here a chromatography-free simplified method for quantitative analysis of seven metabolites in urine with radiation dose-response using urine samples provided from the Pannkuk et al. (2015) study of long-term (7-day) radiation response in nonhuman primates (NHP). The stable isotope dilution (SID) analytical method consists of sample preparation by strong cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE) to remove interferences and concentrate the metabolites of interest, followed by differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) ion filtration to select the ion of interest and reduce chemical background, followed by mass spectrometry (overall SID-SPE-DMS-MS). Since no chromatography is used, calibration curves were prepared rapidly, in under 2 h (including SPE) for six simultaneously analyzed radiation biomarkers. The seventh, creatinine, was measured separately after 2500× dilution. Creatinine plays a dual role, measuring kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and indicating kidney damage at high doses. The current quantitative method using SID-SPE-DMS-MS provides throughput which is 7.5 to 30 times higher than that of LC-MS and provides a path to pre-clinical radiation dose estimation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic method development based on ultravioletvisible detector for the analysis of 1-hydroxypyrene (PAH biomarker) in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Atif; Gulfraz, Mohammad; Anwar, Mohammad Asad; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2015-01-01

    1-hydroxypyrene is an important biomarker of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which appears in the urine of exposed human subjects. In developing countries, where advanced instruments are not available, the importance of this biomarker demands convenient and sensitive methods for determination purposes. This study aimed at developing a methodology to quantify 1-hydroxypyrene (a biomarker of PAHs exposure) based on the UV-visible detector in the reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). A 20 μl injection of sample was used for manual injection into the HPLC Shimadzu, equipped with the SPD-20 A UV-visible detector, the LC-20AT pump and the DGU-20A5 degasser. The C-18 column was used for the purpose of the analysis. The method showed a good linearity (the range: R2 = 0.979-0.989), and high detectability up to the nmol level. The average retention was 6.37, with the accuracy of 2%, and the percentage of recovery remained 108%. The overall performance of this method was comparable (in terms of detection sensitivity) and relatively better than previously reported studies using the HPLC system equipped with the UV-detector. This method is suitable and reliable for the detection/quantification of the 1-OHP in human urine samples, using the UV-detector, however, it is less sensitive as compared to the results of a florescence detector. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Headspace-programmed temperature vaporization-mass spectrometry for the rapid determination of possible volatile biomarkers of lung cancer in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Antón, Ana; Ramos, Álvaro García; Del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; Pavón, José Luis Pérez; Cordero, Bernardo Moreno; Pozas, Ángel Pedro Crisolino

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new method for the rapid determination of five volatile compounds described in the literature as possible biomarkers of lung cancer in urine samples. The method is based on the coupling of a headspace sampler, a programmed temperature vaporizer in solvent-vent injection mode, and a mass spectrometer (HS-PTV-MS). This configuration is known as an electronic nose based on mass spectrometry. Once the method was developed, it was used for the analysis of urine samples from lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Multivariate calibration models were employed to quantify the biomarker concentrations in the samples. The detection limits ranged between 0.16 and 21 μg/L. For the assignment of the samples to the patient group or the healthy individuals, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used, comparing the concentrations obtained with the median of a reference set of healthy individuals. To date, this is the first time that multivariate calibration and non-parametric methods have been combined to classify biological samples from profile signals obtained with an electronic nose. When significant differences in the concentration of one or more biomarkers were found with respect to the reference set, the sample is considered as a positive one and a new analysis was performed using a chromatographic method (HS-PTV-GC/MS) to confirm the result. The main advantage of the proposed HS-PTV-MS methodology is that no prior chromatographic separation and no sample manipulation are required, which allows an increase of the number of samples analyzed per hour and restricts the use of time-consuming techniques to only when necessary. Graphical abstract Schematic diagram of the developed methodology.

  14. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry (DMS-MS) in Radiation Biodosimetry: Rapid and High-Throughput Quantitation of Multiple Radiation Biomarkers in Nonhuman Primate Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhidan; Coy, Stephen L; Pannkuk, Evan L; Laiakis, Evagelia C; Fornace, Albert J; Vouros, Paul

    2018-05-07

    High-throughput methods to assess radiation exposure are a priority due to concerns that include nuclear power accidents, the spread of nuclear weapon capability, and the risk of terrorist attacks. Metabolomics, the assessment of small molecules in an easily accessible sample, is the most recent method to be applied for the identification of biomarkers of the biological radiation response with a useful dose-response profile. Profiling for biomarker identification is frequently done using an LC-MS platform which has limited throughput due to the time-consuming nature of chromatography. We present here a chromatography-free simplified method for quantitative analysis of seven metabolites in urine with radiation dose-response using urine samples provided from the Pannkuk et al. (2015) study of long-term (7-day) radiation response in nonhuman primates (NHP). The stable isotope dilution (SID) analytical method consists of sample preparation by strong cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE) to remove interferences and concentrate the metabolites of interest, followed by differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) ion filtration to select the ion of interest and reduce chemical background, followed by mass spectrometry (overall SID-SPE-DMS-MS). Since no chromatography is used, calibration curves were prepared rapidly, in under 2 h (including SPE) for six simultaneously analyzed radiation biomarkers. The seventh, creatinine, was measured separately after 2500× dilution. Creatinine plays a dual role, measuring kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and indicating kidney damage at high doses. The current quantitative method using SID-SPE-DMS-MS provides throughput which is 7.5 to 30 times higher than that of LC-MS and provides a path to pre-clinical radiation dose estimation. Graphical Abstract.

  15. Identification and quantification of (5'R)- and (5'S)-8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosines in human urine as putative biomarkers of oxidatively induced damage to DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaruga, Pawel, E-mail: pawel.jaruga@nist.gov [Biochemical Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz (Poland); Dizdaroglu, Miral [Biochemical Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2010-06-18

    Biomarkers of oxidatively induced DNA damage are of great interest and can potentially be used for the early detection of disease, monitoring the progression of disease and determining the efficacy of therapy. The present work deals with the measurement in human urine of (5'R)-8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (R-cdA) and (5'S)-8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (S-cdA). These modified nucleosides had hitherto not been considered or investigated to be present in urine as possible biomarkers of oxidatively induced DNA damage. Urine samples were collected from volunteers, purified and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with isotope-dilution. R-cdA and S-cdA were detected in urine and quantified. Creatinine levels were also measured. In addition, we measured 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine that is commonly used as a biomarker. This study shows, for the first time, that R-cdA and S-cdA exist in human urine and can be identified and quantified by LC-MS/MS. We propose that R-cdA and S-cdA may be well-suited biomarkers for disease processes such as carcinogenesis.

  16. Agreement of pesticide biomarkers between morning void and 24-h urine samples from farmers and their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Deanna P; Alexander, Bruce H; Adgate, John L; Eberly, Lynn E; Mandel, Jack S; Acquavella, John F; Bartels, Michael J; Brzak, Kathy A

    2007-07-01

    In pesticide biomonitoring studies, researchers typically collect either single voids or daily (24-h) urine samples. Collection of 24-h urine samples is considered the "gold-standard", but this method places a high burden on study volunteers, requires greater resources, and may result in misclassification of exposure or underestimation of dose due to noncompliance with urine collection protocols. To evaluate the potential measurement error introduced by single void samples, we present an analysis of exposure and dose for two commonly used pesticides based on single morning void (MV) and 24-h urine collections in farmers and farm children. The agreement between the MV concentration and its corresponding 24-h concentration was analyzed using simple graphical and statistical techniques and risk assessment methodology. A consistent bias towards overprediction of pesticide concentration was found among the MVs, likely in large part due to the pharmacokinetic time course of the analytes in urine. These results suggest that the use of single voids can either over- or under-estimate daily exposure if recent pesticide applications have occurred. This held true for both farmers as well as farm children, who were not directly exposed to the applications. As a result, single void samples influenced the number of children exposed to chlorpyrifos whose daily dose estimates were above levels of toxicologic significance. In populations where fluctuations in pesticide exposure are expected (e.g., farm families), the pharmacokinetics of the pesticide and the timing of exposure events and urine collection must be understood when relying on single voids as a surrogate for longer time-frames of exposure.

  17. Analysis of 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutylanilide (DTMBA) as a new potential biomarker of exposure to vinclozolin in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Hurtado, Marycarmen; López-González, Ma de Lourdes; Escobar-Wilches, Derly Constanza; Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo

    2018-05-01

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide with anti-androgenic properties whose metabolism is not fully understood, and data on urinary elimination of either V or its metabolites are limited. Therefore the kinetics of urinary elimination of V and its metabolites, after an oral dose in adult male rats were investigated. A single oral dose of V (100 mg/kg) suspended in corn oil was administered to male adult Wistar rats, and urine was collected at different times after dosing. V and its metabolites were extracted from urine, then enzymatically hydrolyzed using β-glucuronidase/sulfatase of H. pomatia, and analyzed by HPLC/DAD. Urinary pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the analyte concentrations adjusted by creatinine levels. V and its metabolites 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutylanilide (DTMBA, formerly denoted as M5), 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1), 3,5-dichloroaniline (M3), and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2) were efficiently detected. The mean urine concentrations of V and M1 metabolite were fitted to a two-compartmental model for pharmacokinetic analysis. DTMBA approximately represented 88% of the total excreted metabolites, it was easily detected up to 168 h after dosing and its half-lives were 21.5 and 74.1 h, respectively. M1 was the second most abundant metabolite and was detected up to 144 h after being void. V and M3 were detected before 48 h, and M2 exhibited the lowest levels during the first 8 h after dosing. DTMBA, the most abundant V metabolite is quickly eliminated by urine, it is chemically stable, specific and could represent a useful alternative to be used as a biomarker of exposure to V. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Katkor(R cat litter, a non-invasive method of collecting cat urine for phosphate determination : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Delport

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to compare the collection of cat urine, for phosphate concentration determination, by catheterisation with that via a proprietary cat litter (Katkor (R. The passage of urine through the litter or its retention in the litter for a period of 2 hours did not affect the concentration of phosphates compared with that of the original sample. Apart from a small volume of urine trapped in the litter by capillary action, and some urine adhering to the funnel in which the litter was placed, the litter proved to be an excellent medium for routine urine collection from cats, and more especially as an alternative to catheterisation when regular collection from a particular cat is required.

  19. Prostate-Specific G-Protein Coupled Receptor, an Emerging Biomarker Regulating Inflammation and Prostate Cancer Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M; Siwko, S; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent among men in developed countries, but a significant proportion of detected cancers remain indolent, never progressing into aggressive carcinomas. This highlights the need to develop refined biomarkers that can distinguish between indolent and potentially dangerous cases. The prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR, or OR51E2) is an olfactory receptor family member with highly specific expression in human prostate epithelium that is highly overexpressed in PIN and prostate cancer. PSGR has been functionally implicated in prostate cancer cell invasiveness, suggesting a potential role in the transition to metastatic PCa. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing PSGR in the prostate were reported to develop an acute inflammatory response followed by emergence of low grade PIN, whereas mice with compound PSGR overexpression and loss of PTEN exhibited accelerated formation of invasive prostate adenocarcinoma. This article will review recent PSGR findings with a focus on its role as a potential prostate cancer biomarker and regulator of prostate cancer invasion and inflammation.

  20. Biomarkers in an invasive fish species, Oreochromis niloticus, to assess the effects of pollution in a highly degraded Brazilian River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde-Arias, Ana Rosa; Inácio, Alan F; de Alburquerque, Carla; Freire, Marina M; Moreira, Josino C

    2008-07-25

    Paraiba do Sul watershed is one of the most important Brazilian water bodies (5.5 million people depend on the river). It is in a critical environmental situation, polluted by industrial discharges, non-treated urban wastes, and pesticides, which have had cumulatively negative effects. This study analyzes the effects of pollution, with a biomarker approach, by using the invasive fish species, Oreochromis niloticus, as a sentinel species. The approach comprehends a general biomarker of the health of individual fish, the condition factor, a biomarker of genotoxicity, the micronuclei test; and specific biomarkers of contaminant exposure such as metallothionein (MT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The results revealed different effects in fish from diverse locations with varying degrees of pollution. Low AChE activities were found in fish from the region with strong agriculture activity, showing the effects of pesticides. Fish from an industrialized and heavily environmentally degraded area presented high levels of MT and low AChE activities, indicating an intricate polluted condition. It is noteworthy that fish located just upstream of the main water-treatment plant of the metropolitan area Rio de Janeiro presented high levels of MT, showing to be affected by metals. This can be an alert to public health officials. O. niloticus has proven a suitable sentinel species to assess the effects of pollutions in an aquatic system with a complex and serious polluted situation. The present study also shows the usefulness of integrating a set of biomarkers to define the exposure and the effects of anthropogenic inputs among impacted and reference sites in this water body.

  1. Discovery of safety biomarkers for atorvastatin in rat urine using mass spectrometry based metabolomics combined with global and targeted approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Bhowmik Salil; Lee, Young-Joo; Yi, Hong Jae; Chung, Bong Chul; Jung, Byung Hwa

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a safety biomarker for atorvastatin, this drug was orally administrated to hyperlipidemic rats, and a metabolomic study was performed. Atorvastatin was given in doses of either 70 mg kg -1 day -1 or 250 mg kg -1 day -1 for a period of 7 days (n = 4 for each group). To evaluate any abnormal effects of the drug, physiological and plasma biochemical parameters were measured and histopathological tests were carried out. Safety biomarkers were derived by comparing these parameters and using both global and targeted metabolic profiling. Global metabolic profiling was performed using liquid chromatography/time of flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) with multivariate data analysis. Several safety biomarker candidates that included various steroids and amino acids were discovered as a result of global metabolic profiling, and they were also confirmed by targeted metabolic profiling using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (CE/MS). Serum biochemical and histopathological tests were used to detect abnormal drug reactions in the liver after repeating oral administration of atorvastatin. The metabolic differences between control and the drug-treated groups were compared using PLS-DA score plots. These results were compared with the physiological and plasma biochemical parameters and the results of a histopathological test. Estrone, cortisone, proline, cystine, 3-ureidopropionic acid and histidine were proposed as potential safety biomarkers related with the liver toxicity of atorvastatin. These results indicate that the combined application of global and targeted metabolic profiling could be a useful tool for the discovery of drug safety biomarkers.

  2. Discovery of safety biomarkers for atorvastatin in rat urine using mass spectrometry based metabolomics combined with global and targeted approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Bhowmik Salil [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, (305-333) 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Joo; Yi, Hong Jae [College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Bong Chul [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Byung Hwa, E-mail: jbhluck@kist.re.kr [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, (305-333) 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-19

    In order to develop a safety biomarker for atorvastatin, this drug was orally administrated to hyperlipidemic rats, and a metabolomic study was performed. Atorvastatin was given in doses of either 70 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} or 250 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} for a period of 7 days (n = 4 for each group). To evaluate any abnormal effects of the drug, physiological and plasma biochemical parameters were measured and histopathological tests were carried out. Safety biomarkers were derived by comparing these parameters and using both global and targeted metabolic profiling. Global metabolic profiling was performed using liquid chromatography/time of flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) with multivariate data analysis. Several safety biomarker candidates that included various steroids and amino acids were discovered as a result of global metabolic profiling, and they were also confirmed by targeted metabolic profiling using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (CE/MS). Serum biochemical and histopathological tests were used to detect abnormal drug reactions in the liver after repeating oral administration of atorvastatin. The metabolic differences between control and the drug-treated groups were compared using PLS-DA score plots. These results were compared with the physiological and plasma biochemical parameters and the results of a histopathological test. Estrone, cortisone, proline, cystine, 3-ureidopropionic acid and histidine were proposed as potential safety biomarkers related with the liver toxicity of atorvastatin. These results indicate that the combined application of global and targeted metabolic profiling could be a useful tool for the discovery of drug safety biomarkers.

  3. Metabolomics reveals dose effects of low-dose chronic exposure to uranium in rats: identification of candidate biomarkers in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Stéphane; Favé, Gaëlle; Maillot, Matthieu; Manens, Line; Delissen, Olivia; Blanchardon, Éric; Dublineau, Isabelle; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Bohand, Sandra; Martin, Jean-Charles; Souidi, Maâmar

    2016-01-01

    Data are sparse about the potential health risks of chronic low-dose contamination of humans by uranium (natural or anthropogenic) in drinking water. Previous studies report some molecular imbalances but no clinical signs due to uranium intake. In a proof-of-principle study, we reported that metabolomics is an appropriate method for addressing this chronic low-dose exposure in a rat model (uranium dose: 40 mg L -1 ; duration: 9 months, n = 10). In the present study, our aim was to investigate the dose-effect pattern and identify additional potential biomarkers in urine samples. Compared to our previous protocol, we doubled the number of rats per group (n = 20), added additional sampling time points (3 and 6 months) and included several lower doses of natural uranium (doses used: 40, 1.5, 0.15 and 0.015 mg L -1 ). LC-MS metabolomics was performed on urine samples and statistical analyses were made with SIMCA-P+ and R packages. The data confirmed our previous results and showed that discrimination was both dose and time related. Uranium exposure was revealed in rats contaminated for 9 months at a dose as low as 0.15 mg L -1 . Eleven features, including the confidently identified N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide and 4-hydroxyphenylacetylglycine, discriminated control from contaminated rats with a specificity and a sensitivity ranging from 83 to 96 %, when combined into a composite score. These findings show promise for the elucidation of underlying radiotoxicologic mechanisms and the design of a diagnostic test to assess exposure in urine, in a dose range experimentally estimated to be above a threshold between 0.015 and 0.15 mg L -1 .

  4. NovaSil clay intervention in Ghanaians at high risk for aflatoxicosis: II. Reduction in biomarkers of aflatoxin exposure in blood and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Afriyie-Gyawu, E; Tang, Y; Johnson, N M; Xu, L; Tang, L; Huebner, H J; Ankrah, N-A; Ofori-Adjei, D; Ellis, W; Jolly, P E; Williams, J H; Wang, J-S; Phillips, T D

    2008-05-01

    The efficacy of NovaSil clay (NS) to reduce aflatoxin (AF) biomarkers of exposure was evaluated in 656 blood samples and 624 urine samples collected from study participants during a 3-month phase IIa clinical intervention trial in Ghana. NS was delivered before meals via capsules. Serum AFB (1)-albumin adduct was measured by radioimmunoassay and urinary AFM (1) metabolites were quantified by immunoaffinity-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence methods. Levels of AFB (1) -albumin adduct in serum samples collected at baseline and at 1 month were similar (p = 0.2354 and p = 0.3645, respectively) among the placebo (PL), low dose (LD, 1.5 g NS day (-1)), and high dose (HD, 3.0 g NS day (-1)) groups. However, the levels of AFB (1)-albumin adduct at 3 months were significantly decreased in both the LD group (p clay can be used to reduce effectively the bioavailability of dietary AF based on a reduction of AF-specific biomarkers.

  5. Conversion to Sirolimus Ameliorates Cyclosporine-Induced Nephropathy in the Rat: Focus on Serum, Urine, Gene, and Protein Renal Expression Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Sereno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocols of conversion from cyclosporin A (CsA to sirolimus (SRL have been widely used in immunotherapy after transplantation to prevent CsA-induced nephropathy, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these protocols remain nuclear. This study aimed to identify the molecular pathways and putative biomarkers of CsA-to-SRL conversion in a rat model. Four animal groups (n=6 were tested during 9 weeks: control, CsA, SRL, and conversion (CsA for 3 weeks followed by SRL for 6 weeks. Classical and emergent serum, urinary, and kidney tissue (gene and protein expression markers were assessed. Renal lesions were analyzed in hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and Masson’s trichrome stains. SRL-treated rats presented proteinuria and NGAL (serum and urinary as the best markers of renal impairment. Short CsA treatment presented slight or even absent kidney lesions and TGF-β, NF-κβ, mTOR, PCNA, TP53, KIM-1, and CTGF as relevant gene and protein changes. Prolonged CsA exposure aggravated renal damage, without clear changes on the traditional markers, but with changes in serums TGF-β and IL-7, TBARs clearance, and kidney TGF-β and mTOR. Conversion to SRL prevented CsA-induced renal damage evolution (absent/mild grade lesions, while NGAL (serum versus urine seems to be a feasible biomarker of CsA replacement to SRL.

  6. Urine and plasma metabonomics coupled with UHPLC-QTOF/MS and multivariate data analysis on potential biomarkers in anemia and hematinic effects of herb pair Gui-Hong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujiao; Lin, Hang; Qu, Cheng; Tang, Yuping; Shen, Juan; Li, Weixia; Yue, Shijun; Kai, Jun; Shang, Guanxiong; Zhu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Changbin; Liu, Pei; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Li; Qian, Li; Qian, Dawei; Duan, Jin-ao

    2015-07-21

    The compatibility of Angelicae Sinensis Radix (Danggui) and Carthami Flos (Honghua), a famous herb pair Gui-Hong, can produce synergistic and complementary hematinic effects. Our previous studies have indicated that Gui-Hong has therapeutic potential treatment in hemolytic and aplastic anemia (HAA). The present study aimed to investigate the hematinic effects of Danggui, Honghua and Gui-Hong on HAA rats induced by acetyl phenylhydrazine (APH) and cyclophosphamide (CP) and to explore the underlying hematinic regulation mechanisms. Rats were divided into 5 groups, and drugs were administered by oral gavage one time each day for continuous 7 days from the experiment began. Urine and plasma were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS). Partial least-squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) models were built to evaluate the therapeutic effects of Danggui, Honghua and Gui-Hong. Pearson correlation matrix analysis method was used to discover the correlations between potential biomarkers and biochemical indicators of HAA rats. Seven potential biomarkers contribute to the separation of model group and control group were tentatively identified. The levels of l-kynurenine, phenylalanine, nicotinic acid and sphingosine increased significantly (Pmetabonomics method is a promising tool in the efficacy and mechanism research of traditional Chinese medicines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Realising the Potential of Urine and Saliva as Diagnostic Tools in Sport and Exercise Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Angus; Costello, Joseph T

    2017-01-01

    Accurate monitoring of homeostatic perturbations following various psychophysiological stressors is essential in sports and exercise medicine. Various biomarkers are routinely used as monitoring tools in both clinical and elite sport settings. Blood collection and muscle biopsies, both invasive in nature, are considered the gold standard for the analysis of these biomarkers in exercise science. Exploring non-invasive methods of collecting and analysing biomarkers that are capable of providing accurate information regarding exercise-induced physiological and psychological stress is of obvious practical importance. This review describes the potential benefits, and the limitations, of using saliva and urine to ascertain biomarkers capable of identifying important stressors that are routinely encountered before, during, or after intense or unaccustomed exercise, competition, over-training, and inappropriate recovery. In particular, we focus on urinary and saliva biomarkers that have previously been used to monitor muscle damage, inflammation, cardiovascular stress, oxidative stress, hydration status, and brain distress. Evidence is provided from a range of empirical studies suggesting that urine and saliva are both capable of identifying various stressors. Although additional research regarding the efficacy of using urine and/or saliva to indicate the severity of exercise-induced psychophysiological stress is required, it is likely that these non-invasive biomarkers will represent "the future" in sports and exercise medicine.

  8. Development of a universal metabolome-standard method for long-term LC-MS metabolome profiling and its application for bladder cancer urine-metabolite-biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chien-Lun; Li, Liang

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale metabolomics study requires a quantitative method to generate metabolome data over an extended period with high technical reproducibility. We report a universal metabolome-standard (UMS) method, in conjunction with chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), to provide long-term analytical reproducibility and facilitate metabolome comparison among different data sets. In this method, UMS of a specific type of sample labeled by an isotope reagent is prepared a priori. The UMS is spiked into any individual samples labeled by another form of the isotope reagent in a metabolomics study. The resultant mixture is analyzed by LC-MS to provide relative quantification of the individual sample metabolome to UMS. UMS is independent of a study undertaking as well as the time of analysis and useful for profiling the same type of samples in multiple studies. In this work, the UMS method was developed and applied for a urine metabolomics study of bladder cancer. UMS of human urine was prepared by (13)C2-dansyl labeling of a pooled sample from 20 healthy individuals. This method was first used to profile the discovery samples to generate a list of putative biomarkers potentially useful for bladder cancer detection and then used to analyze the verification samples about one year later. Within the discovery sample set, three-month technical reproducibility was examined using a quality control sample and found a mean CV of 13.9% and median CV of 9.4% for all the quantified metabolites. Statistical analysis of the urine metabolome data showed a clear separation between the bladder cancer group and the control group from the discovery samples, which was confirmed by the verification samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) test showed that the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.956 in the discovery data set and 0.935 in the verification data set. These results demonstrated the utility of the UMS method for long-term metabolomics and

  9. A prospective study of fungal biomarkers to improve management of invasive fungal diseases in a mixed specialty critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento, Alida Fe; Dunne, Katie; Joyce, Eimear Ann; Palmer, Michael; Johnson, Elizabeth; White, P Lewis; Springer, Jan; Loeffler, Juergen; Ryan, Thomas; Collins, Daniel; Rogers, Thomas R

    2017-08-01

    The diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases (IFD) in critical care patients (CrCP) is difficult. The study investigated the performance of a set of biomarkers for diagnosis of IFD in a mixed specialty critical care unit (CrCU). A prospective observational study in patients receiving critical care for ≥7days was performed. Serum samples were tested for the presence of: (1-3) - β-d-glucan (BDG), galactomannan (GM), and Aspergillus fumigatus DNA. GM antigen detection was also performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. The patients were classified using published definitions for IFD and a diagnostic algorithm for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Performance parameters of the assays were determined. In patients with proven and probable IFD, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of a single positive BDG were 63%, 83%, 65% and 83% respectively. Specificity increased to 86% with 2 consecutive positive results. The mean BDG value of patients with proven and probable IFD was significantly higher compared to those with fungal colonization and no IFD (p value<0.0001). New diagnostic criteria which incorporate these biomarkers, in particular BDG, and host factors unique to critical care patients should enhance diagnosis of IFD and positively impact antifungal stewardship programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comprehensive Workflow of Mass Spectrometry-Based Untargeted Metabolomics in Cancer Metabolic Biomarker Discovery Using Human Plasma and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen She

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Current available biomarkers lack sensitivity and/or specificity for early detection of cancer. To address this challenge, a robust and complete workflow for metabolic profiling and data mining is described in details. Three independent and complementary analytical techniques for metabolic profiling are applied: hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC–LC, reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP–LC, and gas chromatography (GC. All three techniques are coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS in the full scan acquisition mode, and both unsupervised and supervised methods are used for data mining. The univariate and multivariate feature selection are used to determine subsets of potentially discriminative predictors. These predictors are further identified by obtaining accurate masses and isotopic ratios using selected ion monitoring (SIM and data-dependent MS/MS and/or accurate mass MSn ion tree scans utilizing high resolution MS. A list combining all of the identified potential biomarkers generated from different platforms and algorithms is used for pathway analysis. Such a workflow combining comprehensive metabolic profiling and advanced data mining techniques may provide a powerful approach for metabolic pathway analysis and biomarker discovery in cancer research. Two case studies with previous published data are adapted and included in the context to elucidate the application of the workflow.

  11. Biomarkers of oxidative stress study V: ozone exposure of rats and its effect on lipids, proteins, and DNA in plasma and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiiska, Maria B; Basu, Samar; Brot, Nathan; Cooper, Christopher; Saari Csallany, A; Davies, Michael J; George, Magdalene M; Murray, Dennis M; Jackson Roberts, L; Shigenaga, Mark K; Sohal, Rajindar S; Stocker, Roland; Van Thiel, David H; Wiswedel, Ingrid; Hatch, Gary E; Mason, Ronald P

    2013-08-01

    Ozone exposure effect on free radical-catalyzed oxidation products of lipids, proteins, and DNA in the plasma and urine of rats was studied as a continuation of the international Biomarker of Oxidative Stress Study (BOSS) sponsored by NIEHS/NIH. The goal was to identify a biomarker for ozone-induced oxidative stress and to assess whether inconsistent results often reported in the literature might be due to the limitations of the available methods for measuring the various types of oxidative products. The time- and dose-dependent effects of ozone exposure on rat plasma lipid hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, F2-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls, methionine oxidation, and tyrosine- and phenylalanine oxidation products, as well as urinary malondialdehyde and F2-isoprostanes were investigated with various techniques. The criterion used to recognize a marker in the model of ozone exposure was that a significant effect could be identified and measured in a biological fluid seen at both doses at more than one time point. No statistically significant differences between the experimental and the control groups at either ozone dose and time point studied could be identified in this study. Tissue samples were not included. Despite all the work accomplished in the BOSS study of ozone, no available product of oxidation in biological fluid has yet met the required criteria of being a biomarker. The current negative findings as a consequence of ozone exposure are of great importance, because they document that in complex systems, as the present in vivo experiment, the assays used may not provide meaningful data of ozone oxidation, especially in human studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Linking stress and immunity: Immunoglobulin A as a non-invasive physiological biomarker in animal welfare studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Molly; Conners, Melinda G; Hall, Katie; Miller, Lance J

    2018-04-26

    As the animal welfare community strives to empirically assess how care and management practices can help maintain or even enhance welfare, the development of tools for non-invasively measuring physiological biomarkers is essential. Of the suite of physiological biomarkers, Immunoglobulin A (IgA), particularly the secretory form (Secretory IgA or SIgA), is at the forefront because of its crucial role in mucosal immunity and links to physical health, stress, and overall psychological well-being. While interpretation of SIgA values on short time scales is complex, long-term SIgA patterns are consistent: conditions that create chronic stress lead to suppression of SIgA. In contrast, when welfare is enhanced, SIgA concentrations are predicted to stabilize at higher concentrations. In this review, we examine how SIgA concentrations are reflective of both physiological stress and immune function. We then review the literature associating SIgA concentrations with various metrics of animal welfare and provide detailed methodological considerations for SIgA monitoring. Overall, our aim is to provide an in-depth discussion regarding the value of SIgA as physiological biomarker to studies aiming to understand the links between stress and immunity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Recommended oral sodium bicarbonate administration for urine alkalinization did not affect the concentration of mitomycin-C in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ho Kyung; Kim, Sung Han; Ahn, Kyung-Ohk; Lee, Sang-Jin; Park, Weon Seo; Kim, Sohee; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Do Hoon; Joung, Jae Young; Chung, Jinsoo; Joo, Jungnam; Jeong, Kyung-Chae

    2017-11-10

    Sodium bicarbonate has been reported to maximize the efficacy of intravesical instillation of mitomycin-C (IVI-MMC) therapy by urine alkalinization in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). This study aimed to analyze the changes in MMC concentration according to urinary pH and evaluate the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate to maintain the concentration of active form of MMC during IVI-MMC. We prospectively enrolled 26 patients with NMIBC after transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Patients with very high-risk and low-risk NMIBC were excluded. Urinary creatinine, volume, pH, and concentrations of MMC and its degraded form were measured immediately before and after IVI-MMC. The patients were administered 1.5 g of oral sodium bicarbonate during the preceding evening, in the morning, and immediately before the fourth cycle of the six-cycle IVI-MMC. The correlation between MMC concentration and urinary pH changes was explored with or without oral bicarbonate therapy. Recurrence without progression to muscle-invasive disease was noted in 4 of 26 patients in a 23.7-month follow-up. The mean urinary pH before and after the therapy increased from 6.03 to 6.50, and 6.46 to 7.24, without or with oral SB therapy, respectively. Despite this increase, the concentration of active form of MMC did not change significantly. No correlation was found between urinary pH and MMC concentration. Urine alkalinization by SB administration did not maintain the high concentration of urinary MMC. Urine alkalinization by sodium bicarbonate administration for IVI-MMC did not maintain the high concentration of active urinary MMC in NMIBC.

  14. Evaluation of the biomarker candidate MFAP4 for non-invasive assessment of hepatic fibrosis in hepatitis C patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracht, Thilo; Mölleken, Christian; Ahrens, Maike

    2016-01-01

    in a retrospective study including n = 542 hepatitis C patients. We applied a univariate logistic regression model based on MFAP4 serum levels and furthermore derived a multivariate model including also age and gender. Youden-optimal cutoffs for binary classification were determined for both models without......). CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed the applicability of MFAP4 as a novel serum biomarker for assessment of hepatic fibrosis and identification of high-risk patients with severe fibrosis stages in hepatitis C. The combination of MFAP4 with existing tests might lead to a more accurate non-invasive diagnosis of hepatic...... fibrosis and allow a cost-effective disease management in the era of new direct acting antivirals....

  15. Simultaneous pentafluorobenzyl derivatization and GC-ECNICI-MS measurement of nitrite and malondialdehyde in human urine: Close positive correlation between these disparate oxidative stress biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanff, Erik; Eisenga, Michele F; Beckmann, Bibiana; Bakker, Stephan J L; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2017-02-01

    Urinary nitrite and malondialdehyde (MDA) are biomarkers of nitrosative and oxidative stress, respectively. At physiological pH values of urine and plasma, nitrite and MDA exist almost entirely in their dissociated forms, i.e., as ONO - (ONOH, pK a =3.4) and - CH(CHO) 2 (CH 2 (CHO) 2 , pK a =4.5). Previously, we reported that nitrite and MDA react with pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) bromide (PFB-Br) in aqueous acetone. Here, we report on the simultaneous derivatization of nitrite and MDA and their stable-isotope labeled analogs O 15 NO - (4μM) and CH 2 (CDO) 2 (1μM or 10μM) with PFB-Br (10μL) to PFBNO 2 , PFB 15 NO 2 , C(PFB) 2 (CHO) 2 ), C(PFB) 2 (CDO) 2 by heating acetonic urine (urine-acetone, 100:400μL) for 60min at 50°C. After acetone evaporation under a stream of nitrogen, derivatives were extracted with ethyl acetate (1mL). A 1-μL aliquot of the ethyl acetate phase dried over anhydrous Na 2 SO 4 was injected in the splitless mode for simultaneous GC-MS analysis in the electron capture negative-ion chemical ionization mode. Quantification was performed by selected-ion monitoring (SIM) the anions [M-PFB] - m/z 46 for ONO - , m/z 47 for O 15 NO - , m/z 251 for - C(PFB)(CHO) 2 , and m/z 253 for - C(PFB)(CDO) 2 . The retention times were 3.18min for PFB-ONO 2 /PFB-O 15 NO 2 , and 7.13min for - C(PFB)(CHO) 2 / - C(PFB)(CDO) 2 . Use of CH 2 (CDO) 2 at 1μM but not at 10μM was associated with an unknown interference with the C(PFB) 2 (CDO) 2 peak. Endogenous MDA can be quantified using O 15 NO - (4μM) and CH 2 (CDO) 2 (10μM) as the internal standards. The method is also useful for the measurement of nitrate and creatinine in addition to nitrite and MDA. Nitrite and MDA were measured by this method in urine of elderly healthy subjects (10 females, 9 males; age, 60-70 years; BMI, 25-30kg/m 2 ). Creatinine-corrected excretion rates did not differ between males and females for MDA (62.6 [24-137] vs 80.2 [52-118]nmol/mmol, P=0.448) and for nitrite (102 [71-174] vs

  16. Evaluation of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Cytokines as Biomarkers for Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in At-Risk Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Samuel M.; Lagrou, Katrien; Rodrigues, Cláudia S.; Campos, Cláudia F.; Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Rodrigues, Fernando; Silvestre, Ricardo; Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Maertens, Johan A.; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho

    2017-01-01

    Background: Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an infection that primarily affects immunocompromised hosts, including hematological patients and stem-cell transplant recipients. The diagnosis of IPA remains challenging, making desirable the availability of new specific biomarkers. High-throughput methods now allow us to interrogate the immune system for multiple markers of inflammation with enhanced resolution. Methods: To determine whether a signature of alveolar cytokines could be associated with the development of IPA and used as a diagnostic biomarker, we performed a nested case-control study involving 113 patients at-risk. Results: Among the 32 analytes tested, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-23, and TNFα were significantly increased among patients with IPA, defining two clusters able to accurately differentiate cases of infection from controls. Genetic variants previously reported to confer increased risk of IPA compromised the production of specific cytokines and impaired their discriminatory potential toward infection. Collectively, our data indicated that IL-8 was the best performing cytokine, with alveolar levels ≥904 pg/mL predicting IPA with elevated sensitivity (90%), specificity (73%), and negative predictive value (88%). Conclusions: These findings highlight the existence of a specific profile of alveolar cytokines, with IL-8 being the dominant discriminator, which might be useful in supporting current diagnostic approaches for IPA. PMID:29238334

  17. Non-invasive detection of candidate pregnancy protein biomarkers in the feces of captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, E; Stoops, M A; Roth, T L

    2012-07-15

    Currently, there is no method of accurately and non-invasively diagnosing pregnancy in polar bears. Specific proteins may exhibit altered profiles in the feces of pregnant bears, but predicting appropriate candidate proteins to investigate is speculative at best. The objective of this study was to identify potential pregnancy biomarker proteins based on their increased abundance in the feces of pregnant polar bears compared to pseudopregnant females (controls) using two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Three 2D-DIGE gels were performed to evaluate fecal protein profiles from controls (n=3) and pregnant polar bears (n=3). There were 2224.67±52.39 (mean±SEM) spots resolved per gel. Of these, only five proteins were elevated in the pregnant group (P99.9% confidence interval. The 11 spots represented seven distinct proteins, five of which were significantly more abundant in the pregnant group: IgGFc-binding protein, filamin-C, carboxypeptidase B, transthyretin, and immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region. To our knowledge, this was the first study that employed 2D-DIGE to identify differentially expressed proteins in fecal samples to characterize a physiological condition other than those related to gastrointestinal disorders. These promising results provided a strong foundation for ensuing efforts to develop a non-invasive pregnancy assay for use in both captive and wild polar bears. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bilirubin - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conjugated bilirubin - urine; Direct bilirubin - urine ... Bilirubin is not normally found in the urine. ... Increased levels of bilirubin in the urine may be due to: Biliary tract disease Cirrhosis Gallstones in the biliary tract Hepatitis Liver disease ...

  19. Angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 as non-invasive biomarker of cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Bartolomé, Ángel; López-Rodríguez, Rosario; Borque, María Jesús; González-Moreno, Leticia; Real-Martínez, Yolanda; García-Buey, Luisa; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo; Sanz-Cameno, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of peripheral blood concentrations of angiopoietins (Ang) as cirrhosis biomarkers of chronic hepatitis C (CHC). METHODS Ang1 and Ang2 serum levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in samples from 179 cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic CHC patients, classified according to the METAVIR system. Groups were compared by non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. Subsequently, the association of peripheral concentrations of angiopoietins with the stage of fibrosis was analyzed using Spearman correlation test. Finally, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of circulating angiopoietins for cirrhosis diagnosis were determined by the study of the respective area under the curve of receiver operator characteristics (AUC-ROC). RESULTS Peripheral blood concentrations of Ang1 and Ang2 in CHC patients were significantly related to fibrosis. While Ang1 was decreased in cirrhotic subjects compared to non-cirrhotic (P < 0.0001), Ang2 was significantly increased as CHC progressed to the end stage of liver disease (P < 0.0001). Consequently, Ang2/Ang1 ratio was notably amplified and significantly correlated with fibrosis (P < 0.0001). Interestingly, the individual performance of each angiopoietin for the diagnosis of cirrhosis reached notable AUC-ROC values (above 0.7, both), but the Ang2/Ang1 ratio was much better (AUC-ROC = 0.810) and displayed outstanding values of sensitivity (71%), specificity (84%) and accuracy (82.1%) at the optimal cut-off (10.33). Furthermore, Ang2/Ang1 ratio improved the performance of many other previously described biomarkers or scores of liver cirrhosis in CHC. CONCLUSION Ang2/Ang1 ratio might constitute a useful tool for monitoring the progression of chronic liver disease towards cirrhosis and play an important role as therapeutic target. PMID:27956798

  20. Recommendations and Standardization of Biomarker Quantification Using NMR-based Metabolomics with Particular Focus on Urinary Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2016-01-08

    NMR-based metabolomics has shown considerable promise in disease diagnosis and biomarker discovery because it allows one to non-destructively identify and quantify large numbers of novel metabolite biomarkers in both biofluids and tissues. Indeed, precise metabolite quantification is a necessary prerequisite to move any chemical biomarker or biomarker panel from the lab into the clinic. Among the many biofluids (urine, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and saliva) commonly used for disease diagnosis and prognosis, urine has several advantages. It is abundant, sterile, easily obtained, needs little sample preparation and does not require any invasive medical procedures for collection. Furthermore, urine captures and concentrates many “unwanted” or “undesirable” compounds throughout the body, thereby providing a rich source of potentially useful disease biomarkers. However, the incredible variation in urine chemical concentrations due to effects such as gender, age, diet, life style, health conditions, and physical activity make the analysis of urine and the identification of useful urinary biomarkers by NMR quite challenging. In this review, we discuss a number of the most significant issues regarding NMR-based urinary metabolomics with a specific emphasis on metabolite quantification for disease biomarker applications. We also propose a number of data collection and instrumental recommendations regarding NMR pulse sequences, acceptable acquisition parameter ranges, relaxation effects on quantitation, proper handling of instrumental differences, as well as recommendations regarding sample preparation and biomarker assessment.

  1. Recommendations and Standardization of Biomarker Quantification Using NMR-based Metabolomics with Particular Focus on Urinary Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Roy, Raja; McKay, Ryan T.; Ryan, Danielle; Brennan, Lorraine; Tenori, Leonardo; Luchinat, Claudio; Gao, Xin; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; Raftery, Daniel; Steinbeck, Christoph; Salek, Reza M; Wishart, David S.

    2016-01-01

    NMR-based metabolomics has shown considerable promise in disease diagnosis and biomarker discovery because it allows one to non-destructively identify and quantify large numbers of novel metabolite biomarkers in both biofluids and tissues. Indeed, precise metabolite quantification is a necessary prerequisite to move any chemical biomarker or biomarker panel from the lab into the clinic. Among the many biofluids (urine, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and saliva) commonly used for disease diagnosis and prognosis, urine has several advantages. It is abundant, sterile, easily obtained, needs little sample preparation and does not require any invasive medical procedures for collection. Furthermore, urine captures and concentrates many “unwanted” or “undesirable” compounds throughout the body, thereby providing a rich source of potentially useful disease biomarkers. However, the incredible variation in urine chemical concentrations due to effects such as gender, age, diet, life style, health conditions, and physical activity make the analysis of urine and the identification of useful urinary biomarkers by NMR quite challenging. In this review, we discuss a number of the most significant issues regarding NMR-based urinary metabolomics with a specific emphasis on metabolite quantification for disease biomarker applications. We also propose a number of data collection and instrumental recommendations regarding NMR pulse sequences, acceptable acquisition parameter ranges, relaxation effects on quantitation, proper handling of instrumental differences, as well as recommendations regarding sample preparation and biomarker assessment.

  2. miR-210 inhibits trophoblast invasion and is a serum biomarker for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Lauren; Olarerin-George, Anthony O; Schwartz, Nadav; Srinivas, Sindhu; Bastek, Jamie; Hogenesch, John B; Elovitz, Michal A

    2013-11-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by hypertension and proteinuria in pregnant women. Its exact cause is unknown. Preeclampsia increases the risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although delivery, often premature, is the only known cure, early targeted interventions may improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Successful intervention requires a better understanding of the molecular etiology of preeclampsia and the development of accurate methods to predict women at risk. To this end, we tested the role of miR-210, a miRNA up-regulated in preeclamptic placentas, in first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. miR-210 overexpression reduced trophoblast invasion, a process necessary for uteroplacental perfusion, in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent manner. Conversely, miR-210 inhibition promoted invasion. Furthermore, given that the placenta secretes miRNAs into the maternal circulation, we tested if serum expression of miR-210 was associated with the disease. We measured miR-210 expression in two clinical studies: a case-control study and a prospective cohort study. Serum miR-210 expression was significantly associated with a diagnosis of preeclampsia (P = 0.007, area under the receiver operator curves = 0.81) and was predictive of the disease, even months before clinical diagnosis (P preeclampsia that can help in identifying at-risk women for monitoring and treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of serum microRNAs profile of PCOS and identification of novel non-invasive biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wei; Zhao, Chun; Ji, Chenbo; Ding, Hongjuan; Cui, Yugui; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Liu, Jiayin

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age, is characterized by polycystic ovaries, chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Despite the high prevalence of hyperandrogenemia, a definitive endocrine marker for PCOS has so far not been identified. Circulating miRNAs have recently been shown to serve as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in patients with cancers. Our current study focused on the altered expression of serum miRNAs and their correlation with PCOS. We systematically used the TaqMan Low Density Array followed by individual quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to identify and validate the expression of serum miRNAs of PCOS patients. The expression levels of three miRNAs (miR-222, miR-146a and miR-30c) were significantly increased in PCOS patients with respect to the controls in our discovery evaluation and followed validation. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) is 0.799, 0.706, and 0.688, respectively. The combination of the three miRNAs using multiple logistic regression analysis showed a larger AUC (0.852) that was more efficient for the diagnosis of PCOS. In addition, logistic binary regression analyses show miR-222 is positively associated with serum insulin, while miR-146a is negatively associated with serum testosterone. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis indicated that the predicted targets function of the three miRNAs mainly involved in the metastasis, cell cycle, apoptosis and endocrine. Serum miRNAs are differentially expressed between PCOS patients and controls. We identified and validated a class of three serum miRNAs that could act as novel non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of PCOS. These miRNAs may be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Characterization of Serum MicroRNAs Profile of PCOS and Identification of Novel Non-Invasive Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Long

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age, is characterized by polycystic ovaries, chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Despite the high prevalence of hyperandrogenemia, a definitive endocrine marker for PCOS has so far not been identified. Circulating miRNAs have recently been shown to serve as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in patients with cancers. Our current study focused on the altered expression of serum miRNAs and their correlation with PCOS. Method and Results: We systematically used the TaqMan Low Density Array followed by individual quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to identify and validate the expression of serum miRNAs of PCOS patients. The expression levels of three miRNAs (miR-222, miR-146a and miR-30c were significantly increased in PCOS patients with respect to the controls in our discovery evaluation and followed validation. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC is 0.799, 0.706, and 0.688, respectively. The combination of the three miRNAs using multiple logistic regression analysis showed a larger AUC (0.852 that was more efficient for the diagnosis of PCOS. In addition, logistic binary regression analyses show miR-222 is positively associated with serum insulin, while miR-146a is negatively associated with serum testosterone. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis indicated that the predicted targets function of the three miRNAs mainly involved in the metastasis, cell cycle, apoptosis and endocrine. Conclusion: Serum miRNAs are differentially expressed between PCOS patients and controls. We identified and validated a class of three serum miRNAs that could act as novel non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of PCOS. These miRNAs may be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS.

  5. Adjustment of Serum HE4 to reduced Glomerular filtration and its use in Biomarker-based prediction of deep Myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chovanec, Josef; Selingerova, Iveta; Greplova, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Background: We investigated the efficacy of circulating biomarkers together with histological grade and age to predict deep myometrial invasion (dMI) in endometrial cancer patients. Methods: HE4ren was developed adjusting HE4 serum levels towards decreased glomerular filtration rate as quantified...... levels to reduced eGFR that enables quantification of time-dependent changes in HE4 production and elimination irrespective of age and renal function in women. Utilizing HE4ren improves performance of biomarker-based models for prediction of dMI in endometrial cancer patients....

  6. Evaluation of the biomarker candidate MFAP4 for non-invasive assessment of hepatic fibrosis in hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracht, Thilo; Mölleken, Christian; Ahrens, Maike; Poschmann, Gereon; Schlosser, Anders; Eisenacher, Martin; Stühler, Kai; Meyer, Helmut E; Schmiegel, Wolff H; Holmskov, Uffe; Sorensen, Grith L; Sitek, Barbara

    2016-07-04

    The human microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is located to extracellular matrix fibers and plays a role in disease-related tissue remodeling. Previously, we identified MFAP4 as a serum biomarker candidate for hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in hepatitis C patients. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the potential of MFAP4 as biomarker for hepatic fibrosis with a focus on the differentiation of no to moderate (F0-F2) and severe fibrosis stages and cirrhosis (F3 and F4, Desmet-Scheuer scoring system). MFAP4 levels were measured using an AlphaLISA immunoassay in a retrospective study including n = 542 hepatitis C patients. We applied a univariate logistic regression model based on MFAP4 serum levels and furthermore derived a multivariate model including also age and gender. Youden-optimal cutoffs for binary classification were determined for both models without restrictions and considering a lower limit of 80 % sensitivity (correct classification of F3 and F4), respectively. To assess the generalization error, leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) was performed. MFAP4 levels were shown to differ between no to moderate fibrosis stages F0-F2 and severe stages (F3 and F4) with high statistical significance (t test on log scale, p value <2.2·10(-16)). In the LOOCV, the univariate classification resulted in 85.8 % sensitivity and 54.9 % specificity while the multivariate model yielded 81.3 % sensitivity and 61.5 % specificity (restricted approaches). We confirmed the applicability of MFAP4 as a novel serum biomarker for assessment of hepatic fibrosis and identification of high-risk patients with severe fibrosis stages in hepatitis C. The combination of MFAP4 with existing tests might lead to a more accurate non-invasive diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis and allow a cost-effective disease management in the era of new direct acting antivirals.

  7. Urine Epidermal Growth Factor, Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 or Their Ratio as Biomarkers for Interstitial Fibrosis and Tubular Atrophy in Primary Glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supanat Worawichawong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The degree of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis (IFTA is an important prognostic factor in glomerulonephritis. Imbalance between pro-inflammatory cytokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein- 1 (MCP-1 and protective cytokines such as epidermal growth factor (EGF likely determine IFTA severity. In separate studies, elevated MCP-1 and decreased EGF have been shown to be associated with IFTA severity. In this study, we aim to evaluate the predictive value of urinary EGF/MCP-1 ratio compared to each biomarker individually for moderate to severe IFTA in primary glomerulonephritis (GN. Methods: Urine samples were collected at biopsy from primary GN (IgA nephropathy, focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy. MCP-1 and EGF were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: EGF, MCP-1 and EGF/MCP-1 ratio from primary GN, all correlated with IFTA (n=58. By univariate analysis, glomerular filtration rate, EGF, and EGF/MCP-1 ratio were associated with IFTA. By multivariate analysis, only EGF/MCP-1 ratio was independently associated with IFTA. EGF/MCP-1 ratio had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 74 % for IFTA. EGF/MCP-1 had good discrimination for IFTA (AUC=0.85, but the improvement over EGF alone was not significant. Conclusion: EGF/MCP-1 ratio is independently associated IFTA severity in primary glomerulonephritis, but the ability of EGF/MCP-1 ratio to discriminate moderate to severe IFTA may not be much better than EGF alone.

  8. Detection of prostate cancer-specific transcripts in extracellular vesicles isolated from post-DRE urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Kathryn L; Patil, Dattatraya; Douglas, Kristen J S; Lee, Grace; Wehrmeyer, Kathryn; Torlak, Mersiha; Clark, Jeremy; Cooper, Colin S; Moreno, Carlos S; Sanda, Martin G

    2017-06-01

    The measurement of gene expression in post-digital rectal examination (DRE) urine specimens provides a non-invasive method to determine a patient's risk of prostate cancer. Many currently available assays use whole urine or cell pellets for the analysis of prostate cancer-associated genes, although the use of extracellular vesicles (EVs) has also recently been of interest. We investigated the expression of prostate-, kidney-, and bladder-specific transcripts and known prostate cancer biomarkers in urine EVs. Cell pellets and EVs were recovered from post-DRE urine specimens, with the total RNA yield and quality determined by Bioanalyzer. The levels of prostate, kidney, and bladder-associated transcripts in EVs were assessed by TaqMan qPCR and targeted sequencing. RNA was more consistently recovered from the urine EV specimens, with over 80% of the patients demonstrating higher RNA yields in the EV fraction as compared to urine cell pellets. The median EV RNA yield of 36.4 ng was significantly higher than the median urine cell pellet RNA yield of 4.8 ng. Analysis of the post-DRE urine EVs indicated that prostate-specific transcripts were more abundant than kidney- or bladder-specific transcripts. Additionally, patients with prostate cancer had significantly higher levels of the prostate cancer-associated genes PCA3 and ERG. Post-DRE urine EVs are a viable source of prostate-derived RNAs for biomarker discovery and prostate cancer status can be distinguished from analysis of these specimens. Continued analysis of urine EVs offers the potential discovery of novel biomarkers for pre-biopsy prostate cancer detection. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Urine Cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine cytology Overview Urine cytology is a test to look for abnormal cells in your urine. It's used with other tests and procedures to diagnose ... bladder cancer. Your doctor might recommend a urine cytology test if you have blood in your urine ( ...

  10. Non-invasive identification of protein biomarkers for early pregnancy diagnosis in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C Koester

    Full Text Available Approximately 80% of cheetahs living in typical zoological collections never reproduce. In more than 60% of breedings, the female is confirmed to ovulate, but parturition fails to occur. It is unknown if these non-pregnant intervals of elevated progesterone (deemed luteal phases are conception failures or a pregnancy terminating in embryonic/fetal loss. There have been recent advances in metabolic profiling and proteome analyses in many species with mass spectrometry used to identify 'biomarkers' and mechanisms indicative of specific physiological states (including pregnancy. Here, we hypothesized that protein expression in voided cheetah feces varied depending on pregnancy status. We: 1 identified the expansive protein profile present in fecal material of females; and 2 isolated proteins that may be candidates playing a role in early pregnancy establishment and diagnosis. Five hundred and seventy unique proteins were discovered among samples from pregnant (n = 8, non-pregnant, luteal phase (n = 5, and non-ovulatory control (n = 5 cheetahs. Four protein candidates were isolated that were significantly up-regulated and two were down-regulated in samples from pregnant compared to non-pregnant or control counterparts. One up-regulated candidate, immunoglobulin J chain (IGJ; an important component of the secretory immune system was detected using a commercially available antibody via immunoblotting. Findings revealed that increased IGJ abundance could be used to detect pregnancy successfully in >80% of 23 assessed females within 4 weeks after mating. The discovery of a novel fecal pregnancy marker improves the ability to determine reproductive, especially gestational, status in cheetahs managed in an ex situ insurance and source population.

  11. Non-invasive identification of protein biomarkers for early pregnancy diagnosis in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Diana C; Wildt, David E; Maly, Morgan; Comizzoli, Pierre; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 80% of cheetahs living in typical zoological collections never reproduce. In more than 60% of breedings, the female is confirmed to ovulate, but parturition fails to occur. It is unknown if these non-pregnant intervals of elevated progesterone (deemed luteal phases) are conception failures or a pregnancy terminating in embryonic/fetal loss. There have been recent advances in metabolic profiling and proteome analyses in many species with mass spectrometry used to identify 'biomarkers' and mechanisms indicative of specific physiological states (including pregnancy). Here, we hypothesized that protein expression in voided cheetah feces varied depending on pregnancy status. We: 1) identified the expansive protein profile present in fecal material of females; and 2) isolated proteins that may be candidates playing a role in early pregnancy establishment and diagnosis. Five hundred and seventy unique proteins were discovered among samples from pregnant (n = 8), non-pregnant, luteal phase (n = 5), and non-ovulatory control (n = 5) cheetahs. Four protein candidates were isolated that were significantly up-regulated and two were down-regulated in samples from pregnant compared to non-pregnant or control counterparts. One up-regulated candidate, immunoglobulin J chain (IGJ; an important component of the secretory immune system) was detected using a commercially available antibody via immunoblotting. Findings revealed that increased IGJ abundance could be used to detect pregnancy successfully in >80% of 23 assessed females within 4 weeks after mating. The discovery of a novel fecal pregnancy marker improves the ability to determine reproductive, especially gestational, status in cheetahs managed in an ex situ insurance and source population.

  12. Importance of Urine Dipstick in Evaluation of Young Febrile Infants With Positive Urine Culture: A Spanish Pediatric Emergency Research Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Roberto; Benito, Helvia; Mozun, Rebeca; Trujillo, Juan E; Merino, Pedro A; de la Torre, Mercedes; Gomez, Borja; Mintegi, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics define urinary tract infection (UTI) as the growth of greater than 50,000 ufc/mL of a single bacterium in a urine culture with a positive urine dipstick or with a urinalysis associated. Our objective was to evaluate the adequacy of this cutoff point for the diagnosis of UTI in young febrile infants. Subanalysis of a prospective multicenter study developed in RISeuP-SPERG Network between October 11 and September 13. To carry out the study, it was performed a comparison of analytical and microbiological characteristics of patients younger than 90 days with fever without focus, taking into account the results of urine dipstick and urine culture. Of a total of 3333 infants younger than 90 days with fever without focus which were included in the study, 538 were classified as UTI in accordance with American Academy of Pediatrics' guidelines. These patients were similar to those who had a positive urine dipstick and a urine culture yielding of 10,000 to 50,000 ufc/mL, and they were different from those who had a normal urine dipstick and a urine culture >50,000 ufc/mL, being focused on the isolated bacteria and blood biomarkers values. Forty-five invasive bacterial infections were diagnosed (5.9% of the 756 with a urine culture >10,000 ufc/mL). Half of the infants with a normal urine dipstick diagnosed with invasive bacterial infections were younger than 15 days. It might be inadequate to use a threshold of 50,000 cfu/mL to consider a urine culture as positive in young febrile infants given the fact that it would misdiagnose several UTIs.

  13. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Protein Adducts: Potential Non-invasive Biomarkers of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Induced Liver Toxicity and Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qingsu; Zhao, Yuewei; Lin, Ge; Beland, Frederick A; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2016-08-15

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are phytochemicals present in hundreds of plant species from different families widely distributed in many geographical regions around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common type of poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. There have been many large-scale human poisonings caused by the consumption of food contaminated with toxic PAs. PAs require metabolic activation to generate pyrrolic metabolites to exert their toxicity. In this study, we developed a novel method to quantify pyrrole-protein adducts present in the blood. This method involves the use of AgNO3 in acidic ethanol to cleave the thiol linkage of pyrrole-protein (DHP-protein) adducts, and the resulting 7,9-di-C2H5O-DHP is quantified by HPLC-ES-MS/MS multiple reaction monitoring analysis in the presence of a known quantity of isotopically labeled 7,9-di-C2D5O-DHP internal standard. Using this method, we determined that diester-type PAs administered to rats produced higher levels of DHP-protein adducts than other types of PAs. The results suggest that DHP-protein adducts can potentially serve as minimally invasive biomarkers of PA exposure.

  14. L-cysteine capped lanthanum hydroxide nanostructures for non-invasive detection of oral cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sachchidanand; Gupta, Pramod K; Bagbi, Yana; Sarkar, Tamal; Solanki, Pratima R

    2017-03-15

    In this paper, we present the result of studies related to the in situ synthesis of amino acid (L-Cysteine) capped lanthanum hydroxide nanoparticles [Cys-La(OH) 3 NPs] towards the fabrication of efficient immunosensor for non-invasive detection of oral cancer. The characterization of Cys-La(OH) 3 NPs was carried out by different techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. These Cys-La(OH) 3 NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto an indium-tin-oxide glass substrate and used for immobilization of anti-cytokeratin fragment-21-1 (anti-Cyfra-21-1) for the electrochemical detection of Cyfra-21-1. This immunosensor shows a broad detection range of 0.001-10.2ngmL -1 , the low detection limit of 0.001ngmL -1 , and high sensitivity of 12.044µA (ng per mL cm -2 ) -1 with a response time of 5min. This immunosensor was found to be more advanced in terms of high sensitivity and low detection limit as compared to previously reported biosensors and commercially available ELISA kit (Kinesis DX). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance evaluation of automated urine microscopy as a rapid, non-invasive approach for the diagnosis of non-gonococcal urethritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Marcus J; Nori, Achyuta V; Patel, Sheel; Laing, Ken; Ajayi, Margarita; Copas, Andrew J; Butcher, Philip D; Hay, Phillip; Sadiq, Syed Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gram-stained urethral smear (GSUS), the standard point-of-care test for non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) is operator dependent and poorly specific. The performance of rapid automated urine flow cytometry (AUFC) of first void urine (FVU) white cell counts (UWCC) for predicting Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis urethral infections was assessed and its application to asymptomatic infection was evaluated. Methods Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, determining FVU-UWCC threshold for predicting M. genitalium or C. trachomatis infection was performed on 208 ‘training’ samples from symptomatic patients and subsequently validated using 228 additional FVUs obtained from prospective unselected patients. Results An optimal diagnostic threshold of >29 UWC/µL gave sensitivities and specificities for either infection of 81.5% (95% CI 65.1% to 91.6%) and 85.8% (79.5% to 90.4%), respectively, compared with 86.8% (71.1% to 95%) and 64.7% (56.9% to 71.7%), respectively, for GSUS, using the training set samples. FVU-UWCC demonstrated sensitivities and specificities of 69.2% (95% CI 48.1% to 84.9%) and 92% (87.2% to 95.2%), respectively, when using validation samples. In asymptomatic patients where GSUS was not used, AUFC would have enabled more infections to be detected compared with clinical considerations only (71.4% vs 28.6%; p=0.03). The correlation between UWCC and bacterial load was stronger for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis (τ=0.426, p≤0.001 vs τ=0.295, p=0.022, respectively). Conclusions AUFC offers improved specificity over microscopy for predicting C. trachomatis or M. genitalium infection. Universal AUFC may enable non-invasive diagnosis of asymptomatic NGU at the PoC. The degree of urethral inflammation exhibits a stronger association with pathogen load for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis. PMID:25614466

  16. Urinary Biomarkers of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manxia An

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are the measurable changes associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood, urine is not subject to homeostatic mechanisms. Therefore, greater fluctuations could occur in urine than in blood, better reflecting the changes in human body. The roadmap of urine biomarker era was proposed. Although urine analysis has been attempted for clinical diagnosis, and urine has been monitored during the progression of many diseases, particularly urinary system diseases, whether urine can reflect brain disease status remains uncertain. As some biomarkers of brain diseases can be detected in the body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood, there is a possibility that urine also contain biomarkers of brain diseases. This review summarizes the clues of brain diseases reflected in the urine proteome and metabolome.

  17. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  18. Identification and Validation of Protein Biomarkers of Response to Neoadjuvant Platinum Chemotherapy in Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Baras

    Full Text Available The 5-year cancer specific survival (CSS for patients with muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (MIBC treated with cystectomy alone is approximately 50%. Platinum based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC plus cystectomy results in a marginal 5-10% increase in 5-year CSS in MIBC. Interestingly, responders to NAC (biomarkers detectable by immunohistochemistry (IHC. These candidate biomarkers were subsequently tested in tissue microarrays derived from an independent cohort of NAC naive MIBC biopsy specimens from whom the patients were treated with neoadjuvant gemcitabine cisplatin NAC and subsequent cystectomy. The clinical parameters that have been previously associated with NAC response were also examined in our cohort.Our analyses of the available mRNA gene expression data in a discovery cohort (n = 33 and the HPA resulted in 8 candidate protein biomarkers. The combination of GDPD3 and SPRED1 resulted in a multivariate classification tree that was significantly associated with NAC response status (Goodman-Kruskal γ = 0.85 p<0.0001 in our independent NAC treated MIBC cohort. This model was independent of the clinical factors of age and clinical tumor stage, which have been previously associated with NAC response by our group. The combination

  19. Assessment of oxidative stress biomarkers - neuroprostanes and dihomo-isoprostanes - in the urine of elite triathletes after two weeks of moderate-altitude training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Flores, Libia Alejandra; Medina, Sonia; Cejuela, Roberto; Martínez-Sanz, José Miguel; Oger, Camille; Galano, Jean-Marie; Durand, Thierry; Casas-Pina, Teresa; Martínez-Hernández, Pedro; Ferreres, Federico; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    This randomized and controlled trial investigated whether the increase in elite training at different altitudes altered the oxidative stress biomarkers of the nervous system. This is the first study to investigate four F4-neuroprostanes (F4-NeuroPs) and four F2-dihomo-isoprostanes (F2-dihomo-IsoPs) quantified in 24-h urine. The quantification was carried out by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS). Sixteen elite triathletes agreed to participate in the project. They were randomized in two groups, a group submitted to altitude training (AT, n = 8) and a group submitted to sea level training (SLT) (n = 8), with a control group (Cg) of non-athletes (n = 8). After the experimental period, the AT group triathletes gave significant data: 17-epi-17-F2t-dihomo-IsoP (from 5.2 ± 1.4 μg/mL 24 h(-1) to 6.6 ± 0.6 μg/mL 24 h(-1)), ent-7(RS)-7-F2t-dihomo-IsoP (from 6.6 ± 1.7 μg/mL 24 h(-1) to 8.6 ± 0.9 μg/mL 24 h(-1)), and ent-7-epi-7-F2t-dihomo-IsoP (from 8.4 ± 2.2 μg/mL 24 h(-1) to 11.3 ± 1.8 μg/mL 24 h(-1)) increased, while, of the neuronal degeneration-related compounds, only 10-epi-10-F4t-NeuroP (8.4 ± 1.7 μg/mL 24 h(-1)) and 10-F4t-NeuroP (5.2 ± 2.9 μg/mL 24 h(-1)) were detected in this group. For the Cg and SLT groups, no significant changes had occurred at the end of the two-week experimental period. Therefore, and as the main conclusion, the training at moderate altitude increased the F4-NeuroPs- and F2-dihomo-isoPs-related oxidative damage of the central nervous system compared to similar training at sea level.

  20. Mining the human urine proteome for monitoring renal transplant injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Gao, Yuqian; He, Jintang; Wang, Anyou; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Shi, Tujin; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Salvatierra, Oscar; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2016-06-01

    The human urinary proteome reflects systemic and inherent renal injury perturbations and can be analyzed to harness specific biomarkers for different kidney transplant injury states. 396 unique urine samples were collected contemporaneously with an allograft biopsy from 396 unique kidney transplant recipients. Centralized, blinded histology on the graft was used to classify matched urine samples into categories of acute rejection (AR), chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), BK virus nephritis (BKVN), and stable graft (STA). Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics using iTRAQ based discovery (n=108) and global label-free LC-MS analyses of individual samples (n=137) for quantitative proteome assessment were used in the discovery step. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) was applied to identify and validate minimal urine protein/peptide biomarkers to accurately segregate organ injury causation and pathology on unique urine samples (n=151). A total of 958 proteins were initially quantified by iTRAQ, 87% of which were also identified among 1574 urine proteins detected in LC-MS validation. 103 urine proteins were significantly (p<0.05) perturbed in injury and enriched for humoral immunity, complement activation, and lymphocyte trafficking. A set of 131 peptides corresponding to 78 proteins were assessed by SRM for their significance in an independent sample cohort. A minimal set of 35 peptides mapping to 33 proteins, were modeled to segregate different injury groups (AUC =93% for AR, 99% for CAN, 83% for BKVN). Urinary proteome discovery and targeted validation identified urine protein fingerprints for non-invasive differentiation of kidney transplant injuries, thus opening the door for personalized immune risk assessment and therapy.

  1. Polyamine Metabolites Profiling for Characterization of Lung and Liver Cancer Using an LC-Tandem MS Method with Multiple Statistical Data Mining Strategies: Discovering Potential Cancer Biomarkers in Human Plasma and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines, one of the most important kind of biomarkers in cancer research, were investigated in order to characterize different cancer types. An integrative approach which combined ultra-high performance liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry detection and multiple statistical data processing strategies including outlier elimination, binary logistic regression analysis and cluster analysis had been developed to discover the characteristic biomarkers of lung and liver cancer. The concentrations of 14 polyamine metabolites in biosamples from lung (n = 50 and liver cancer patients (n = 50 were detected by a validated UHPLC-MS/MS method. Then the concentrations were converted into independent variables to characterize patients of lung and liver cancer by binary logic regression analysis. Significant independent variables were regarded as the potential biomarkers. Cluster analysis was engaged for further verifying. As a result, two values was discovered to identify lung and liver cancer, which were the product of the plasma concentration of putrescine and spermidine; and the ratio of the urine concentration of S-adenosyl-l-methionine and N-acetylspermidine. Results indicated that the established advanced method could be successfully applied to characterize lung and liver cancer, and may also enable a new way of discovering cancer biomarkers and characterizing other types of cancer.

  2. Performance evaluation of automated urine microscopy as a rapid, non-invasive approach for the diagnosis of non-gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Marcus J; Nori, Achyuta V; Patel, Sheel; Laing, Ken; Ajayi, Margarita; Copas, Andrew J; Butcher, Philip D; Hay, Phillip; Sadiq, Syed Tariq

    2015-05-01

    Gram-stained urethral smear (GSUS), the standard point-of-care test for non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) is operator dependent and poorly specific. The performance of rapid automated urine flow cytometry (AUFC) of first void urine (FVU) white cell counts (UWCC) for predicting Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis urethral infections was assessed and its application to asymptomatic infection was evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, determining FVU-UWCC threshold for predicting M. genitalium or C. trachomatis infection was performed on 208 'training' samples from symptomatic patients and subsequently validated using 228 additional FVUs obtained from prospective unselected patients. An optimal diagnostic threshold of >29 UWC/µL gave sensitivities and specificities for either infection of 81.5% (95% CI 65.1% to 91.6%) and 85.8% (79.5% to 90.4%), respectively, compared with 86.8% (71.1% to 95%) and 64.7% (56.9% to 71.7%), respectively, for GSUS, using the training set samples. FVU-UWCC demonstrated sensitivities and specificities of 69.2% (95% CI 48.1% to 84.9%) and 92% (87.2% to 95.2%), respectively, when using validation samples. In asymptomatic patients where GSUS was not used, AUFC would have enabled more infections to be detected compared with clinical considerations only (71.4% vs 28.6%; p=0.03). The correlation between UWCC and bacterial load was stronger for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis (τ=0.426, p≤0.001 vs τ=0.295, p=0.022, respectively). AUFC offers improved specificity over microscopy for predicting C. trachomatis or M. genitalium infection. Universal AUFC may enable non-invasive diagnosis of asymptomatic NGU at the PoC. The degree of urethral inflammation exhibits a stronger association with pathogen load for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. A needle extraction utilizing a molecularly imprinted-sol-gel xerogel for on-line microextraction of the lung cancer biomarker bilirubin from plasma and urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Jabbar, Dunia; Colmsjö, Anders; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2014-10-31

    In the present work, a needle trap utilizing a molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel was prepared for the on-line microextraction of bilirubin from plasma and urine samples. Each prepared needle could be used for approximately one hundred extractions before it was discarded. Imprinted and non-imprinted sol-gel xerogel were applied for the extraction of bilirubin from plasma and urine samples. The produced molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel polymer showed high binding capacity and fast adsorption/desorption kinetics for bilirubin in plasma and urine samples. The adsorption capacity of molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel polymer was approximately 60% higher than that of non-imprinted polymer. The effect of the conditioning, washing and elution solvents, pH, extraction time, adsorption capacity and imprinting factor were investigated. The limit of detection and the lower limit of quantification were set to 1.6 and 5nmolL(-1), respectively using plasma or urine samples. The standard calibration curves were obtained within the concentration range of 5-1000nmolL(-1) in both plasma and urine samples. The coefficients of determination values (R(2)) were ≥0.998 for all runs. The extraction recovery was approximately 80% for BR in the human plasma and urine samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sample handling for mass spectrometric proteomic investigations of human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Høgdall, Claus; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; T'jampens, Davy; Hellmann, Marja-Leena; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Fung, Eric T; Høgdall, Estrid

    2008-09-01

    Because of its non-invasive sample collection method, human urine is an attractive biological material both for discovering biomarkers and for use in future screening trials for different diseases. Before urine can be used for these applications, standardized protocols for sample handling that optimize protein stability are required. In this explorative study, we examine the influence of different urine collection methods, storage temperatures, storage times, and repetitive freeze-thaw procedures on the protein profiles obtained by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Prospectively collected urine samples from 11 women were collected as either morning or midday specimens. The effects of storage temperature, time to freezing, and freeze-thaw cycles were assessed by calculating the number, intensity, and reproducibility of peaks visualized by SELDI-TOF-MS. On the CM10 array, 122 peaks were detected and 28 peaks were found to be significantly different between urine types, storage temperature and time to freezing. On the IMAC-Cu array, 65 peaks were detected and 1 peak was found to be significantly different according to time to freezing. No significant differences were demonstrated for freeze-thaw cycles. Optimal handling and storage conditions are necessary in clinical urine proteomic investigations. Collection of urine with a single and consistently performed protocol is needed to reduce analytical bias. Collecting only one urine type, which is stored for a limited period at 4°C until freezing at -80°C prior to analysis will provide the most stable profiles. Copyright © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Serum miR-206 and other muscle-specific microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Kong, Min; Ye, Yuanzhen; Hong, Siqi; Cheng, Li; Jiang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Creatine kinase has been utilized as a diagnostic marker for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but it correlates less well with the DMD pathological progression. In this study, we hypothesized that muscle-specific microRNAs (miR-1, -133, and -206) in serum may be useful for monitoring the DMD pathological progression, and explored the possibility of these miRNAs as potential non-invasive biomarkers for the disease. By using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in a randomized and controlled trial, we detected that miR-1, -133, and -206 were significantly over-expressed in the serum of 39 children with DMD (up to 3.20 ± 1.20, 2(-ΔΔCt) ): almost 2- to 4-fold enriched in comparison to samples from the healthy controls (less than 1.15 ± 0.34, 2(-ΔΔCt) ). To determine whether these miRNAs were related to the clinical features of children with DMD, we analyzed the associations compared to creatine kinase. There were very good inverse correlations between the levels of these miRNAs, especially miR-206, and functional performances: high levels corresponded to low muscle strength, muscle function, and quality of life. Moreover, by receiver operating characteristic curves analyses, we revealed that these miRNAs, especially miR-206, were able to discriminate DMD from controls. Thus, miR-206 and other muscle-specific miRNAs in serum are useful for monitoring the DMD pathological progression, and hence as potential non-invasive biomarkers for the disease. There has been a long-standing need for reliable, non-invasive biomarkers for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We found that the levels of muscle-specific microRNAs, especially miR-206, in the serum of DMD were 2- to 4-fold higher than in the controls. High levels corresponded to low muscle strength, muscle function, and quality of life (QoL). These miRNAs were able to discriminate DMD from controls by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves analyses. Thus, miR-206 and other

  6. Determination of Phthalate Metabolites in Human Serum and Urine as Biomarkers for Phthalate Exposure Using Column-Switching LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Yeon Jeong

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion:The accuracy and precision of the analytical method indicate that urinary metabolite determination can be a more acceptable biomarker for studying phthalate exposure and adverse health outcomes.

  7. Myoglobin urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin urine test; Myositis - myoglobin urine test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin urine test ... The test involves only normal urination, which should cause no discomfort.

  8. Non-invasively collected amniotic fluid as a source of possible biomarkers for premature rupture of membranes investigated by proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consonni, Sara; Mainini, Veronica; Pizzardi, Agnese; Gianazza, Erica; Chinello, Clizia; Locatelli, Anna; Magni, Fulvio

    2014-02-01

    Preterm delivery is one of the main causes of perinatal morbidity and mortality and it accounts for 75 % of perinatal mortality and more than half of the long-term morbidity. We applied a proteomic approach based on mass spectrometry (MS) for biomarkers discovery of preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM) by investigating amniotic fluid (AF) invasively and non-invasively collected. Amniotic fluid was obtained from vagina of women with pPROM (group 1), PROM at term (group 2) and by genetic amniocentesis (group 3). Pre-fractionated AF proteome was analyzed through matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS. The characterization of proteins/peptides of interest was obtained by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem MS. Three peptides overexpressed in pPROM and able to discriminate the groups 1 and 2 were detected. One peptide was identified as the fragment Gly452LAVPDGPLGLPPKPro466 of the protein KIAA1522, expressed by fetal brain and liver. This peptide was overexpressed in a patient of the group 3, completely asymptomatic at the time of the amniocentesis, who later developed pPROM. Amniotic fluid invasively and non-invasively collected can be analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS to obtain proteomic profiles. Proteomic analysis identified a peptide with promising diagnostic capability for pPROM.

  9. Src Family Kinases Mediate Betel Quid-Induced Oral Cancer Cell Motility and Could Be a Biomarker for Early Invasion in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Yi-Fu Chen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Betel quid (BQ-chewing oral cancer is a prevalent disease in many countries of Southeast Asia. Yet, the precise disease mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we show that BQ extract-induced cell motility in three oral cancer cells (Ca9-22, SAS, and SCC9 presumably involves the Src family kinases (SFKs. Besides, BQ extract can markedly induce cell migration of wild type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs but not MEFs lacking three SFK members, namely, Src, Yes, and Fyn, indicating the requirement of SFKs for BQ-induced cell motility. Betel quid extract can also elevate cellular SFK activities because phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 at the catalytic domain is increased, which in turn promotes phosphorylation of an in vitro substrate, enolase. Furthermore, we identified that areca nut, a major component of BQ, is the key factor accounting for BQ-induced cell migration and invasion through SFKs-mediated signaling pathways. Immunohistochemistry revealed that, particularly in BQ-chewing cases, the activity of SFKs was significantly higher in tumor-adjacent mucosa than that in solid tumor areas (P < .01. These results suggest a possible role of SFKs in tumor-host interface and thus in early tumor invasion in vivo. Consistent with this is the observation that activation of SFKs is colocalized with invasive tumor fronts in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Together, we conclude that SFKs may represent a potential biomarker of invasion and therapeutic target in BQ-induced oral cancer.

  10. The miRNA Mirage: How Close Are We to Finding a Non-Invasive Diagnostic Biomarker in Endometriosis? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Swati; Tapmeier, Thomas T.; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Kirtley, Shona; Zondervan, Krina T.; Becker, Christian M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common disorder of the reproductive age group, characterised by the presence of ectopic endometrial tissue. The disease not only causes enormous suffering to the affected women, but also brings a tremendous medical and economic burden to bear on society. There is a long lag phase between the onset and diagnosis of the disease, mainly due to its non-specific symptoms and the lack of a non-invasive test. Endometriosis can only be diagnosed invasively by laparoscopy. A specific, non-invasive test to diagnose endometriosis is an unmet clinical need. The recent discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) as modulators of gene expression, and their stability and specificity, make them an attractive candidate biomarker. Various studies on miRNAs in endometriosis have identified their cardinal role in the pathogenesis of the disease, and have proposed them as potential biomarkers in endometriosis. Rationale/Objectives: The aims of this review were to study the role of circulatory miRNAs in endometriosis, and bring to light whether circulatory miRNAs could be potential non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose the disease. Search methods: Three databases, PubMed, EMBASE, and BIOSIS were searched, using a combination of Mesh or Emtree headings and free-text terms, to identify literature relating to circulating miRNAs in endometriosis published from 1996 to 31 December 2017. Only peer-reviewed, full-text original research articles in English were included in the current review. The studies meeting the inclusion criteria were critically assessed and checked using the QUADAS-2 (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies) tool. The dysregulated miRNAs were assessed regarding the concordance between the various studies and their role in the disease. Outcomes: Nine studies were critically analysed, and 42 different miRNAs were found to be dysregulated in them, with only one common miRNA (miR-20a) differentially expressed in more than one study. miR-17-5p/20a

  11. A miniaturized near infrared spectrometer for non-invasive sensing of bio-markers as a wearable healthcare solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jungmok; Druzhin, Vladislav V.; Anikanov, Alexey G.; Afanasyev, Sergey V.; Shchekin, Alexey; Medvedev, Anton S.; Morozov, Alexander V.; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Sang Kyu; Moon, Hyunseok; Jang, Hyeongseok; Shim, Jaewook; Park, Jongae

    2017-02-01

    A novel miniaturized near-infrared spectrometer readily mountable to wearable devices for continuous monitoring of individual's key bio-markers was proposed. Spectrum is measured by sequential illuminations with LED's, having independent spectrum profiles and a continuous detection of light radiations from the skin tissue with a single cell PD. Based on Tikhonov regularization with singular value decomposition, a spectrum resolution less than 10nm was reconstructed based on experimentally measured LED profiles. A prototype covering first overtone band (1500-1800nm) where bio-markers have pronounced absorption peaks was fabricated and verified of its performance. Reconstructed spectrum shows that the novel concept of miniaturized spectrometer is valid.

  12. RNA Biomarkers: Frontier of Precision Medicine for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Xi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available As an essential part of central dogma, RNA delivers genetic and regulatory information and reflects cellular states. Based on high‐throughput sequencing technologies, cumulating data show that various RNA molecules are able to serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of various diseases, for instance, cancer. In particular, detectable in various bio‐fluids, such as serum, saliva and urine, extracellular RNAs (exRNAs are emerging as non‐invasive biomarkers for earlier cancer diagnosis, tumor progression monitor, and prediction of therapy response. In this review, we summarize the latest studies on various types of RNA biomarkers, especially extracellular RNAs, in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, and illustrate several well‐known RNA biomarkers of clinical utility. In addition, we describe and discuss general procedures and issues in investigating exRNA biomarkers, and perspectives on utility of exRNAs in precision medicine.

  13. Sniffer mice discriminate urine odours of patients with bladder cancer: A proof-of-principle study for non-invasive diagnosis of cancer-induced odours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Katsuoka, Yoji; Yoneda, Kimihiko; Nonomura, Mitsuo; Uchimoto, Shinya; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko; Mizutani, Yoichi

    2017-11-07

    Similar to fingerprints, humans have unique, genetically determined body odours. In case of urine, the odour can change due to variations in diet as well as upon infection or tumour formation. We investigated the use of mice in a manner similar to "sniffer dogs" to detect changes in urine odour in patients with bladder cancer. We measured the odour discrimination thresholds of mice in a Y-maze, using urine mixtures from patients with bladder cancer (Stage I) and healthy volunteers (dietary variations) as well as occult blood- or antibiotic drug metabolite-modulated samples. Threshold difference indicated that intensities of urinary olfactory cues increase in the following order: dietary variation < bladder cancer < occult blood < antibiotic drug metabolites. After training with patient urine mixtures, sniffer mice discriminated between urine odours of pre- and post-transurethral resection in individual patients with bladder cancer in an equal-occult blood diluted condition below the detection level of dietary variations, achieving a success rate of 100% (11/11). Furthermore, genetic ablation of all dorsal olfactory receptors elevated the discrimination thresholds of mice by ≥ 10 5 -fold. The marked reduction in discrimination sensitivity indicates an essential role of the dorsal olfactory receptors in the recognition of urinary body odours in mice.

  14. Urine Odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor. Brunzel NA. Physical examination of urine. In: Fundamentals of Urine and Body Fluid Analysis. 3rd ed. St. Louis, Mo.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013:97. McPherson RA, et al., eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. St. Louis, Mo.: ...

  15. Eu3+ functionalized Sc-MOFs: Turn-on fluorescent switch for ppb-level biomarker of plastic pollutant polystyrene in serum and urine and on-site detection by smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao; Miao, Tifang; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Chi; Yan, Bing

    2017-11-15

    The harm of plastic pollutants for human and environment is being paid more and more attention. Polystyrene (PS) and styrene are toxic compounds used in large quantities in the production of fiberglass reinforced polyesters. In this work, a simple method was designed for independent detecting polystyrene and styrene biomarker (phenylglyoxylic acid, PGA) in serum and urine. We prepared Eu3+ functionalized Sc-based metal-organic frameworks as turn-on fluorescent switch for PGA. The distinct enhanced luminescence is observed from the Eu@MOFs with addition of PGA. The fabricated fluorescent switch has several appealing features including high sensitivity (LOD = 4.16 ppb), quick response time (less than 5s) and broad linear range (0.02mg/mL to 0.5mg/mL). Furthermore, Eu@MOFs exhibits excellent selectivity that it is not affected by congeneric biomarkers. More interestingly, a paper-based probe has been devised. The paper-based fluorescence probe would perform an obvious fluorescence change from navy to red with the variety of PGA content. The practicability of the on-site detection platform for quantitative analysis using a colour scanning APP in smartphone has been also demonstrated by coupled with our proposed paper based fluorescence probe. This work first provides a fast, accurate and sensitive method for independent monitoring PS biomarker PGA, and the paper-based probe exhibit a new idea for design portable and easy to operate sensing devices combine with smartphone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous analysis of naphthols, phenanthrols, and 1-hydroxypyrene in urine as biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure: intraindividual variance in the urinary metabolite excretion profiles caused by intervention with {beta}-naphthoflavone induction in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elovaara, Eivor; Mikkola, Jouni [Laboratory of Toxicokinetics and Metabolism, Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, 00250, Helsinki (Finland); Vaeaenaenen, Virpi [Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, 00250, Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-04-01

    Two fluorimetric HPLC methods are described for the quantification of naphthols, phenanthrols and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) in urine specimens obtained from male Wistar rats exposed to naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were given intraperitoneally, either alone (1.0 mmol/kg body weight) or as an equimolar mixture (0.33 mmol/kg), using the same dosages for repeated treatments on week 1 and week 2. Between these treatments, PAH-metabolizing activities encoded by aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-controlled genes were induced in the rats with {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}NF). Chromatographic separation of five phenanthrols (1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 9-isomers) was accomplished using two different RP C-18 columns. Despite selective detection (programmable wavelengths), the quantification limits in the urine ranged widely: 1-OHP (0.18 {mu}g/l) urine as naphthols ({<=}4.0%), phenanthrols ({<=}1.1%), and 1-OHP ({<=}2.4%) was low. Urinary disposition increased differentially in {beta}NF-induced rats: naphthols, 9-phenanthrol (1- to-2-fold); 2-, 3-, and 4-phenanthrols (4- to 5-fold); 1-phenanthrol and 1-OHP (over 11-fold). The OH-metabolites were analyzed before and after enzymatic hydrolysis ({beta}-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase). The percentage excreted as a free phenol in urine varied for 1-OHP (2-11%), 1-naphthol (36-51%), 2-naphthol (59-65%), and the phenanthrols (29-94%). 1-Naphthyl- and 1-pyrenyl {beta}-d-glucuronide served as measures for the completeness of enzymatic hydrolysis. Characteristic differences observed in the urinary disposition of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene are described, as well as important factors (dose, metabolic capacity, relative urinary output) associated with biomarker validation

  17. Study on IL-2 and CA 15-3 level as combined biomarkers in monitoring chemotherapeutic response among invasive breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Ahmed Muthanna Abdul; Hamid, Auni Fatin Abdul; Shahfiza Noor, Nurul; Appalanaido, Gokula Kumar; Bariyah Sahul Hamid, Shahrul

    2017-05-01

    In Malaysia, breast cancer is the most frequent type of disease among women. This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of carbohydrate antigen (CA 15-3) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) levels as combined biomarkers in monitoring breast cancer patient’s response to chemotherapy. Ethical approval was obtained to recruit patients with histologically confirmed invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) attending Oncology Clinic at Advanced Medical and Dental Institute. Whole blood was collected from 10 IDC breast cancer patients’ pre and post primary chemotherapy. Plasma was separated from the whole blood to determine the CA 15-3 level and IL-2 level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) pre and post-treatment. In addition, the histological findings, tumour stage and other patients’ data were obtained from the medical record. Findings showed that IL-2 had borderline significant changes between pre- and post-chemotherapy (p = 0.074) whereas for CA 15-3, there was insignificant differences of CA 15-3 level between pre and post-chemotherapy (p > 0.05). It was noted that only CA 15-3 level had significant correlation with tumour size. This study demonstrates that IL-2 level requires further investigation in a larger sample size to correlate its potential use as combined biomarker with CA 15-3 in monitoring response to chemotherapy.

  18. Study of urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratio in spot urine sample as a biomarker of 3A4 enzyme activity in healthy and epileptic subjects of Egyptian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Desoky, Ehab S; Mohamed, Hanan O; Farghaly, Wafaa M A; Hamed, Sherifa A; Hedaya, Mohsen A; Siest, Jean-Pascal

    2005-06-01

    The ratio of urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol/cortisol (6 beta-OHC/FC) in morning spot urine samples collected from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. was studied using ELIZA kits (Stabiligen) in a group of healthy adult Egyptians (control group) of both sex (n=65, age range: 16-48 years). The frequency distribution of urinary 6 beta-OHC/FC ratio was widely distributed among subjects with higher values in males in comparison to females. No bimodality in either sex was observed. Another group of adult epileptic patients (n=16) was studied for the influence of chronic carbamazepine antiepileptic drug administration on urinary 6 beta-OHC/FC ratio in spot urine samples. The induction property of carbamazepine on CYP3A4 was observed through significant increase (p=0.01) in 6 beta-OHC/FC ratio among epileptic patients in comparison with control subjects. In conclusion, the frequency distribution of urinary 6 beta-OHC/FC ratio among Egyptians shows sexual dimorphism. Also, measurement of urinary 6 beta-OHC/FC ratio provides a simple non-invasive method to monitor CYP3A4 enzyme induction during administration of carbamazepine antiepileptic drug.

  19. Performance of transient elastography and serum fibrosis biomarkers for non-invasive evaluation of recurrent fibrosis after liver transplantation: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mamatha; Tazari, Mahmood; Sebastiani, Giada

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent fibrosis after liver transplantation (LT) impacts on long-term graft and patient survival. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the accuracy of non-invasive methods to diagnose significant recurrent fibrosis (stage F2-F4) following LT. Studies comparing serum fibrosis biomarkers, namely AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), fibrosis score 4 (FIB-4), or transient elastography (TE) with liver biopsy in LT recipients were systematically identified through electronic databases. In the meta-analysis, we calculated the weighted pooled odds ratio and used a fixed effect model, as there was no significant heterogeneity between studies. Eight studies were included for APRI, four for FIB-4, and twelve for TE. The mean prevalence of significant liver fibrosis was 37.4%. The summary odds ratio was significantly higher for TE (21.17, 95% CI confidence interval 14.10-31.77, p = 1X10-30) as compared to APRI (9.02, 95% CI 5.79-14.07; p = 1X10-30) and FIB-4 (7.08, 95% CI 4.00-12.55; p = 1.93X10-11). In conclusion, TE performs best to diagnose recurrent fibrosis in LT recipients. APRI and FIB-4 can be used as an estimate of significant fibrosis at centres where TE is not available. Longitudinal assessment of fibrosis by means of these non-invasive tests may reduce the need for liver biopsy.

  20. Metagenomic analysis of faecal microbiome as a tool towards targeted non-invasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Jun; Feng, Qiang; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2017-01-01

    known associations of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus stomatis with CRC, we found significant associations with several species, including Parvimonas micra and Solobacterium moorei. We identified 20 microbial gene markers that differentiated CRC and control microbiomes, and validated 4...... in the independent Chinese cohort with AUC=0.84 and OR of 23. These genes were enriched in early-stage (I-II) patient microbiomes, highlighting the potential for using faecal metagenomic biomarkers for early diagnosis of CRC. CONCLUSIONS: We present the first metagenomic profiling study of CRC faecal microbiomes...

  1. DNA methylation based biomarkers: Practical considerations and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How Kit, Alexandre; Tost, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    of biochemical molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA or lipids, whereby protein biomarkers have been the most extensively studied and used, notably in blood-based protein quantification tests or immunohistochemistry. The rise of interest in epigenetic mechanisms has allowed the identification of a new type...... of biomarker, DNA methylation, which is of great potential for many applications. This stable and heritable covalent modification mostly affects cytosines in the context of a CpG dinucleotide in humans. It can be detected and quantified by a number of technologies including genome-wide screening methods...... as well as locus- or gene-specific high-resolution analysis in different types of samples such as frozen tissues and FFPE samples, but also in body fluids such as urine, plasma, and serum obtained through non-invasive procedures. In some cases, DNA methylation based biomarkers have proven to be more...

  2. Update on Biomarkers for the Detection of Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Amelie; Burney, Richard O.; O, Dorien F.; D'Hooghe, Thomas; Giudice, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is histologically characterized by the displacement of endometrial tissue to extrauterine locations including the pelvic peritoneum, ovaries, and bowel. An important cause of infertility and pelvic pain, the individual and global socioeconomic burden of endometriosis is significant. Laparoscopy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of the condition. However, the invasive nature of surgery, coupled with the lack of a laboratory biomarker for the disease, results in a mean latency of 7–11 years from onset of symptoms to definitive diagnosis. Unfortunately, the delay in diagnosis may have significant consequences in terms of disease progression. The discovery of a sufficiently sensitive and specific biomarker for the nonsurgical detection of endometriosis promises earlier diagnosis and prevention of deleterious sequelae and represents a clear research priority. In this review, we describe and discuss the current status of biomarkers of endometriosis in plasma, urine, and endometrium. PMID:26240814

  3. Update on Biomarkers for the Detection of Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Fassbender

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is histologically characterized by the displacement of endometrial tissue to extrauterine locations including the pelvic peritoneum, ovaries, and bowel. An important cause of infertility and pelvic pain, the individual and global socioeconomic burden of endometriosis is significant. Laparoscopy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of the condition. However, the invasive nature of surgery, coupled with the lack of a laboratory biomarker for the disease, results in a mean latency of 7–11 years from onset of symptoms to definitive diagnosis. Unfortunately, the delay in diagnosis may have significant consequences in terms of disease progression. The discovery of a sufficiently sensitive and specific biomarker for the nonsurgical detection of endometriosis promises earlier diagnosis and prevention of deleterious sequelae and represents a clear research priority. In this review, we describe and discuss the current status of biomarkers of endometriosis in plasma, urine, and endometrium.

  4. Black Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old boy was born at term of healthy, non-consanguineous Iranian parents. His mother attended in the clinic with the history of sometimes discoloration of diapers after passing urine. She noticed that first at the age of one month with intensified in recent months. His Physical examination and growth parameters were normal. His mother denied taking any medication (sorbitol, nitrofurantoin, metronidazole, methocarbamol, sena and methyldopa (5. Qualitative urine examination showed dark black discoloration. By this history, alkaptonuria was the most clinical suspicious. A 24-hour-urine sample was collected and sent for quantitative measurements. The urine sample was highly positive for homogentisic acid and negative for porphyrin metabolites.

  5. Urine Preservative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M. (Inventor); Nillen, Jeannie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is CPG, a combination of a chlorhexidine salt (such as chlorhexidine digluconate, chlorhexidine diacetate, or chlorhexidine dichloride) and n-propyl gallate that can be used at ambient temperatures as a urine preservative.

  6. Urine Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs can darken urine, including the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and primaquine, the antibiotics metronidazole (Flagyl) and nitrofurantoin ( ... Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the ...

  7. Immunoelectrophoresis - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from an infant, you may need extra collection bags. How the Test will Feel The test involves ... urine, it normally consists of mainly albumin. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  8. Ketones urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  9. Exhaled carbon monoxide: a non-invasive biomarker of short-term exposure to outdoor air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herve Lawin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In urban settings of Africa with rapidly increasing population, traffic-related air pollution is a major contributor to outdoor air pollution (OAP. Although OAP has been identified as a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, there is however, lack of a simple biomarker to assess levels of exposure to OAP in resource-poor settings. This study evaluated the role of exhaled carbon monoxide (exhCO as a potential biomarker of exposure to ambient carbon monoxide (ambCO from OAP. Methods This was a descriptive study conducted among male commercial motorcycle riders in Cotonou – the economic capital of Benin. The participants’ AmbCO was measured using a portable carbon monoxide (CO data logger for 8 h during the period of their shift. ExhCO was measured just before and immediately after their shift (8-h Participants were asked not to cook or to smoke during the day of the measurements. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between ambCO and exhCO for the last 2, 4 and 6 h of their shift. Results Of 170 participants who completed the study, their mean ± SD age was 42.2 ± 8.4 years, and their mean ± SD daily income was 7.3 ± 2.7$. Also, 95% of the participants’ used solid fuels for cooking and only 2% had ever smoked. Average exhCO increased by 5.1 ppm at the end of the shift (p = 0.004. Post-shift exhCO was significantly associated to ambCO, this association was strongest for the last 2 h of OAP exposure before exhCO measurement (β = 0.34, p < 0.001. Conclusion ExhCO level was associated with recent exposure to ambCO from OAP with measurable increase after 8 h of exposure. These findings suggest that ExhCO may be a potential biomarker of short-term exposure to OAP.

  10. Optimisation and validation of a HS-SPME-GC-IT/MS method for analysis of carbonyl volatile compounds as biomarkers in human urine: Application in a pilot study to discriminate individuals with smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calejo, Isabel; Moreira, Nathalie; Araújo, Ana Margarida; Carvalho, Márcia; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; de Pinho, Paula Guedes

    2016-02-01

    A new and simple analytical approach consisting of an automated headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) sampler coupled to gas chromatography-ion trap/mass spectrometry detection (GC-IT/MS) with a prior derivatization step with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) was developed to detect volatile carbonyl metabolites with low molecular weights in human urine. A central composite design (CCD) was used to optimise the PFBHA concentration and extraction conditions that affect the efficiency of the SPME procedure. With a sample volume of 1 mL, optimal conditions were achieved by adding 300 mg/L of PFBHA and allowing the sample to equilibrate for 6 min at 62°C and then extracting the samples for 51 min at the same temperature, using a divinylbenzene/polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/PDMS) fibre. The method allowed the simultaneous identification and quantification of 44 carbonyl compounds consisting of aldehydes, dialdehydes, heterocyclic aldehydes and ketones. The method was validated with regards to the linearity, inter- and intra-day precision and accuracy. The detection limits ranged from 0.009 to 0.942 ng/mL, except for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (15 ng/mL), and the quantification limits varied from 0.029 to 1.66 ng/mL, except for butanal (2.78 ng/mL), 2-butanone (2.67 ng/mL), 4-heptanone (3.14 ng/mL) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (50.0 ng/mL). The method accuracy was satisfactory, with recoveries ranging from 90 to 107%. The proof of applicability of the methodology was performed in a pilot target analysis of urine samples obtained from 18 healthy smokers and 18 healthy non-smokers (control group). Chemometric supervised analysis was performed using the volatile patterns acquired for these samples and clearly showed the potential of the volatile carbonyl profiles to discriminate urine from smoker and non-smoker subjects. 5-Methyl-2-furfural (p<0.0001), 2-methylpropanal, nonanal and 2-methylbutanal (p<0.05) were identified as potentially useful

  11. The point-of-care colorimetric detection of the biomarker of phenylamine in the human urine based on Tb3+ functionalized metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Jia; Yan, Bing

    2018-07-05

    Phenylamine has been recognized as one of the most important industrially relevant ingredient and a crucial intermediate in chemical products. Yet, its internal exposure detection in human remains largely elusive due to the lack of potent monitoring method. Hereby this issue is addressed with a probe based on lanthanide functionalized organic-inorganic hybrid material Al(OH)(bpydc) (1) through post-synthetically modified metal-organic framework. The as-synthesized Tb 3+ @1 exhibits the strong luminescence of Tb 3+ originated from efficient energy transfer from the ligand, which can sense the biological metabolite p-aminophenol (PAP) of the phenylamine in the human urine. Linear correlation between the integrated fluorescence intensity and the concentration of PAP was investigated, enabling quantitative analysis of PAP in physiologically ranges (0.005-5 mg mL -1 ) with low detection limit (5 μg mL -1 ). This probe demonstrates excellent sensitivity, high selectivity, good reusability and quick response to PAP. Furthermore, a simple and rapid smartphone-based medical portable test paper was developed, whose quantitative color change can be easily distinguished visually. Hence, the PAP sensing platform can serve as a potential diagnostic tool for home monitoring of PAP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Soluble CD146, an innovative and non-invasive biomarker of embryo selection for in vitro fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Bouvier

    Full Text Available Although progress was made in in vitro fertilization (IVF techniques, the majority of embryos transferred fail to implant. Morphology embryo scoring is the standard procedure for most of IVF centres for choosing the best embryo, but remains limited since even the embryos classified as "top quality" may not implant. As it has been shown that i CD146 is involved in embryo implantation and ii membrane form is shed to generate soluble CD146 (sCD146, we propose that sCD146 in embryo supernatants may constitute a new biomarker of embryo selection. Immunocytochemical staining showed expression of CD146 in early embryo stages and sCD146 was detected by ELISA and Western-blot in embryo supernatants from D2. We retrospectively studied 126 couples who underwent IVF attempt. The embryo culture medium from each transferred embryo (n = 222 was collected for measurement of sCD146 by ELISA. Significantly higher sCD146 concentrations were present in embryo supernatants that did not implant (n = 185 as compared to those that successfully implanted (n = 37 (1310 +/- 1152 pg.mL-1 vs. 845+/- 1173 pg.mL-1, p = 0.024. Sensitivity analysis performed on single embryo transfers (n = 71 confirmed this association (p = 0.0054. The computed ROC curve established that the optimal sCD146 concentration for embryo implantation is under 1164 pg.mL-1 (sensitivity: 76%, specificity: 48%, PPV: 25% and NPV: 92%. Over this sCD146 threshold, the implantation rate was significantly lower (9% with sCD146 levels >1164 pg.ml-1 vs. 22% with sCD146 levels ≤ 1164 pg.mL-1, p = 0.01. Among the embryos preselected by morphologic scoring, sCD146 determination could allow a better selection of the embryo(s, thus improving the success of elective single embryo transfer. This study establishes the proof of concept for the use of sCD146 as a biomarker for IVF by excluding the embryo with the highest sCD146 level. A multicentre prospective study will now be necessary to further establish its use in

  13. Size-exclusion chromatography-based enrichment of extracellular vesicles from urine samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Lozano-Ramos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Renal biopsy is the gold-standard procedure to diagnose most of renal pathologies. However, this invasive method is of limited repeatability and often describes an irreversible renal damage. Urine is an easily accessible fluid and urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs may be ideal to describe new biomarkers associated with renal pathologies. Several methods to enrich EVs have been described. Most of them contain a mixture of proteins, lipoproteins and cell debris that may be masking relevant biomarkers. Here, we evaluated size-exclusion chromatography (SEC as a suitable method to isolate urinary EVs. Following a conventional centrifugation to eliminate cell debris and apoptotic bodies, urine samples were concentrated using ultrafiltration and loaded on a SEC column. Collected fractions were analysed by protein content and flow cytometry to determine the presence of tetraspanin markers (CD63 and CD9. The highest tetraspanin content was routinely detected in fractions well before the bulk of proteins eluted. These tetraspanin-peak fractions were analysed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM and nanoparticle tracking analysis revealing the presence of EVs.When analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, tetraspanin-peak fractions from urine concentrated samples contained multiple bands but the main urine proteins (such as Tamm–Horsfall protein were absent. Furthermore, a preliminary proteomic study of these fractions revealed the presence of EV-related proteins, suggesting their enrichment in concentrated samples. In addition, RNA profiling also showed the presence of vesicular small RNA species.To summarize, our results demonstrated that concentrated urine followed by SEC is a suitable option to isolate EVs with low presence of soluble contaminants. This methodology could permit more accurate analyses of EV-related biomarkers when further characterized by -omics technologies compared with other approaches.

  14. A 3-plex methylation assay combined with the FGFR3 mutation assay sensitively detects recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandimalla, Raju; Masius, Roy; Beukers, Willemien

    2013-01-01

    is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a urine assay for the diagnosis of recurrences in patients with a previous primary NMIBC G1/G2 by using cystoscopy as the reference standard. Experimental Design: We selected eight CpG islands (CGI) methylated in bladder cancer from our earlier genome-wide study......Purpose: DNA methylation is associated with bladder cancer and these modifications could serve as useful biomarkers. FGFR3 mutations are present in 60% to 70% of non–muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Low-grade bladder cancer recurs in more than 50% of patients. The aim of this study......, and nonmalignant urines (n = 130). Results: The 3-plex assay identified recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine with a sensitivity of 74% in the validation set. In combination with the FGFR3 mutation assay, a sensitivity of 79% was reached (specificity of 77%). Sensitivity of FGFR3 and cytology was 52% and 57...

  15. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Female urinary tract Male urinary tract Calcium urine test References Bringhurst FR, Demay MB, Kronenberg HM. Hormones and disorders of mineral metabolism. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  16. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  17. EPR oxygen imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRI of pyruvate metabolism as non-invasive biomarkers of tumor treatment response to a glycolysis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Yasui, Hironobu; Morris, H. Douglas; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Lizak, Martin; Merkle, Hellmut; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Choudhuri, Rajani; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koretsky, Alan P.; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2012-01-01

    The hypoxic nature of tumors results in treatment resistance and poor prognosis. To spare limited oxygen for more crucial pathways, hypoxic cancerous cells suppress mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and promote glycolysis for energy production. Thereby, inhibition of glycolysis has the potential to overcome treatment resistance of hypoxic tumors. Here, EPR imaging was used to evaluate oxygen dependent efficacy on hypoxia-sensitive drug. The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) blocks glycolysis pathway by inhibiting hypoxia inducible enzymes, and enhanced cytotoxicity of 3-BP under hypoxic conditions has been reported in vitro. However, the efficacy of 3-BP was substantially attenuated in hypoxic tumor regions (pO2 < 10 mmHg) in vivo using squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII)-bearing mouse model. Metabolic MRI studies using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled pyruvate showed that monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1) is the major transporter for pyruvate and the analog 3-BP in SCCVII tumor. The discrepant results between in vitro and in vivo data were attributed to biphasic oxygen dependent expression of MCT1 in vivo. Expression of MCT1 was enhanced in moderately hypoxic (8–15 mmHg) tumor regions, but down regulated in severely hypoxic (< 5 mmHg) tumor regions. These results emphasize the importance of non-invasive imaging biomarkers to confirm the action of hypoxia-activated drugs. PMID:22692861

  18. Identification of novel non-invasive biomarkers of urinary chronic pelvic pain syndrome: findings from the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Adelle; Curatolo, Adam; Sachdev, Monisha; Stephens, Alisa J; Mullins, Chris; Landis, J Richard; van Bokhoven, Adrie; El-Hayek, Andrew; Froehlich, John W; Briscoe, Andrew C; Roy, Roopali; Yang, Jiang; Pontari, Michel A; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Richard S; Moses, Marsha A

    2017-07-01

    To examine a series of candidate markers for urological chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS), selected based on their proposed involvement in underlying biological processes so as to provide new insights into pathophysiology and suggest targets for expanded clinical and mechanistic studies. Baseline urine samples from Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network study participants with UCPPS (n = 259), positive controls (PCs; chronic pain without pelvic pain, n = 107) and healthy controls (HCs, n = 125) were analysed for the presence of proteins that are suggested in the literature to be associated with UCPPS. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, MMP-9/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) complex (also known as Lipocalin 2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) and NGAL were assayed and quantitated using mono-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for each protein. Log-transformed concentration (pg/mL or ng/mL) and concentration normalized to total protein (pg/μg) values were compared among the UCPPS, PC and HC groups within sex using the Student's t-test, with P values adjusted for multiple comparisons. Multivariable logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curves assessed the utility of the biomarkers in distinguishing participants with UCPPS and control participants. Associations of protein with symptom severity were assessed by linear regression. Significantly higher normalized concentrations (pg/μg) of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and MMP-9 in men and VEGF concentration (pg/mL) in women were associated with UCPPS vs HC. These proteins provided only marginal discrimination between UCPPS participants and HCs. In men with UCCPS, pain severity was significantly positively associated with concentrations of MMP-9 and MMP-9/NGAL complex, and urinary severity was significantly positively associated with MMP-9, MMP-9/NGAL complex and VEGF-R1. In women with UCPPS, pain

  19. MiR-339-5p inhibits breast cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and may be a potential biomarker for breast cancer prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zheng-sheng; Xu, Xiao-chun; Wu, Qiang; Wang, Chao-qun; Wang, Xiao-nan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jing-jing; Mao, Shan-shan; Zhang, Gui-hong; Zhang, Nong

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Detection of their expression may lead to identifying novel markers for breast cancer. We profiled miRNA expression in three breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-468) and then focused on one miRNA, miR-339-5p, for its role in regulation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion and target gene expression. We then analyzed miR-339-5p expression in benign and cancerous breast tissue specimens. A number of miRNAs were differentially expressed in these cancer cell lines. Real-time PCR indicated that miR-339-5p expression was downregulated in the aggressive cell lines MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 and in breast cancer tissues compared with benign tissues. Transfection of miR-339-5p oligonucleotides reduced cancer cell growth only slightly but significantly decreased tumor cell migration and invasion capacity compared with controls. Real-time PCR analysis showed that BCL-6, a potential target gene of miR-339-5p, was downregulated in MDA-MB-231 cells by miR-339-5p transfection. Furthermore, the reduced miR-339-5p expression was associated with an increase in metastasis to lymph nodes and with high clinical stages. Kaplan-Meier analyses found that the patients with miR-339-5p expression had better overall and relapse-free survivals compared with those without miR-339-5p expression. Cox proportional hazards analyses showed that miR-339-5p expression was an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer patients. MiR-339-5p may play an important role in breast cancer progression, suggesting that miR-339-5p should be further evaluated as a biomarker for predicting the survival of breast cancer patients

  20. Biomarkers of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Russell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Need for Novel Biomarkers: Brain tumors are the leading cause of death by solid tumors in children. Although improvements have been made in their radiological detection and treatment, our capacity to promptly diagnose pediatric brain tumors in their early stages remains limited. This contrasts several other cancers where serum biomarkers such as CA 19-9 and CA 125 facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Aim: The aim of this article is to review the latest literature and highlight biomarkers which may be of clinical use in the common types of primary pediatric brain tumor. Methods: A PubMed search was performed to identify studies reporting biomarkers in the bodily fluids of pediatric patients with brain tumors. Details regarding the sample type (serum, cerebrospinal fluid or urine, biomarkers analyzed, methodology, tumor type and statistical significance were recorded. Results: A total of 12 manuscripts reporting 19 biomarkers in 367 patients vs. 397 controls were identified in the literature. Of the 19 biomarkers identified, 12 were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, 2 from serum, 3 from urine, and 2 from multiple bodily fluids. All but one study reported statistically significant differences in biomarker expression between patient and control groups.Conclusions: This review identifies a panel of novel biomarkers for pediatric brain tumors. It provides a platform for the further studies necessary to validate these biomarkers and, in addition, highlights several techniques through which new biomarkers can be discovered.

  1. Usefulness of Transcriptional Blood Biomarkers as a Non-invasive Surrogate Marker of Mucosal Healing and Endoscopic Response in Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planell, Núria; Masamunt, M Carme; Leal, Raquel Franco; Rodríguez, Lorena; Esteller, Miriam; Lozano, Juan J; Ramírez, Anna; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes Setsuko; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Alfaro, Ignacio; Ordás, Ingrid; Visvanathan, Sudha; Ricart, Elena; Guardiola, Jordi; Panés, Julián; Salas, Azucena

    2017-10-27

    Ulcerative colitis [UC] is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. Colonoscopy remains the gold standard for evaluating disease activity, as clinical symptoms are not sufficiently accurate. The aim of this study is to identify new accurate non-invasive biomarkers based on whole-blood transcriptomics that can predict mucosal lesions and response to treatment in UC patients. Whole-blood samples were collected for a total of 152 UC patients at endoscopy. Blood RNA from 25 UC individuals and 20 controls was analysed using microarrays. Genes that correlated with endoscopic activity were validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction in an independent group of 111 UC patients, and a prediction model for mucosal lesions was evaluated. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed in a longitudinal cohort of 16 UC patients who started anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy and were followed up for 14 weeks. Microarray analysis identified 122 genes significantly altered in the blood of endoscopically active UC patients. A significant correlation with the degree of endoscopic activity was observed in several genes, including HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12. Using HP as a predictor of endoscopic disease activity, an accuracy of 67.3% was observed, compared with 52.4%, 45.2%, and 30.3% for C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count, respectively. Finally, at 14 weeks of treatment, response to anti-TNF therapy induced alterations in blood HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12 transcripts that correlated with changes in endoscopic activity. Transcriptional changes in UC patients are sensitive to endoscopic improvement and appear to be an effective tool to monitor patients over time. © European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) 2017.

  2. HumanMethylation450K Array–Identified Biomarkers Predict Tumour Recurrence/Progression at Initial Diagnosis of High-risk Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark O Kitchen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (HR-NMIBC is a clinically unpredictable disease. Despite clinical risk estimation tools, many patients are undertreated with intra-vesical therapies alone, whereas others may be over-treated with early radical surgery. Molecular biomarkers, particularly DNA methylation, have been reported as predictive of tumour/patient outcomes in numerous solid organ and haematologic malignancies; however, there are few reports in HR-NMIBC and none using genome-wide array assessment. We therefore sought to identify novel DNA methylation markers of HR-NMIBC clinical outcomes that might predict tumour behaviour at initial diagnosis and help guide patient management. Patients and methods: A total of 21 primary initial diagnosis HR-NMIBC tumours were analysed by Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays and subsequently bisulphite Pyrosequencing. In all, 7 had not recurred at 1 year after resection and 14 had recurred and/or progressed despite intra-vesical BCG. A further independent cohort of 32 HR-NMIBC tumours (17 no recurrence and 15 recurrence and/or progression despite BCG were also assessed by bisulphite Pyrosequencing. Results: Array analyses identified 206 CpG loci that segregated non-recurrent HR-NMIBC tumours from clinically more aggressive recurrence/progression tumours. Hypermethylation of CpG cg11850659 and hypomethylation of CpG cg01149192 in combination predicted HR-NMIBC recurrence and/or progression within 1 year of diagnosis with 83% sensitivity, 79% specificity, and 83% positive and 79% negative predictive values. Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of a unique HR-NMIBC tumour cohort encompassing known 1-year clinical outcomes. Our analyses identified potential novel epigenetic markers that could help guide individual patient management in this clinically unpredictable disease.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA as a non-invasive biomarker: Accurate quantification using real time quantitative PCR without co-amplification of pseudogenes and dilution bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Afshan N.; Shahni, Rojeen; Rodriguez-de-Ledesma, Ana; Laftah, Abas; Cunningham, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial dysfunction is central to many diseases of oxidative stress. → 95% of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome. → Dilution of untreated genomic DNA leads to dilution bias. → Unique primers and template pretreatment are needed to accurately measure mitochondrial DNA content. -- Abstract: Circulating mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) is a potential non-invasive biomarker of cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, the latter known to be central to a wide range of human diseases. Changes in MtDNA are usually determined by quantification of MtDNA relative to nuclear DNA (Mt/N) using real time quantitative PCR. We propose that the methodology for measuring Mt/N needs to be improved and we have identified that current methods have at least one of the following three problems: (1) As much of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome, many commonly used MtDNA primers co-amplify homologous pseudogenes found in the nuclear genome; (2) use of regions from genes such as β-actin and 18S rRNA which are repetitive and/or highly variable for qPCR of the nuclear genome leads to errors; and (3) the size difference of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes cause a 'dilution bias' when template DNA is diluted. We describe a PCR-based method using unique regions in the human mitochondrial genome not duplicated in the nuclear genome; unique single copy region in the nuclear genome and template treatment to remove dilution bias, to accurately quantify MtDNA from human samples.

  4. The use of 18F-Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET as a non-invasive pharmacodynamic biomarker to determine the minimally pharmacologically active dose of AZD8835, a novel PI3Kα inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maynard

    Full Text Available The phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K, AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signal transduction pathway is frequently de-regulated and activated in human cancer and is an important therapeutic target. AZD8835 is a PI3K inhibitor, with selectivity against PI3K α and δ isoforms, which is currently in Phase 1 clinical trials. 18F-Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET is a non-invasive pharmacodynamic imaging biomarker that has become an integral part of drug development. It has been used widely with PI3K inhibitors both clinically and pre-clinically because of the role of the PI3K pathway in glucose metabolism. In this study we investigated the potential of 18F-FDG PET as a non-invasive pharmacodynamic biomarker for AZD8835. We sought to understand if 18F-FDG PET could determine the minimally effective dose of AZD8835 and correlate with other pharmacodynamic biomarkers for validation of its use in clinical development. 18F-FDG PET scans were performed in nude mice in the BT474C breast xenograft model. Mice were fasted prior to imaging and static 18F-FDG PET was performed. Treatment groups received AZD8835 by oral gavage at a dose volume of 10ml/kg. Treatment groups received either 3, 6, 12.5, 25 or 50mg/kg AZD8835. Tumour growth was monitored throughout the study, and at the end of the imaging procedure, tumours were taken and a full pharmacodynamic analysis was performed.Results showed that AZD8835 reduced 18F-FDG uptake at a dose of 12.5, 25 and 50mg/kg with no significant reduction at doses of 3 and 6mg/kg. These results were consistent with other pharmacodynamics biomarkers measured and show 18F-FDG PET as a sensitive biomarker with the ability to determine the minimal effective dose of AZD8835.Our pre-clinical studies support the use of 18F-FDG PET imaging as a sensitive and non- invasive pharmacodynamic biomarker (understanding the role of PI3K signalling in glucose uptake for AZD8835 with a decrease in 18

  5. Idiopathic recurrent calcium urolithiasis (IRCU: pathophysiology evaluated in light of oxidative metabolism, without and with variation of several biomarkers in fasting urine and plasma - a comparison of stone-free and -bearing male patients, emphasizing mineral, acid-base, blood pressure and protein status*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwilie PO

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IRCU is traditionally considered as lifestyle disease (associations with, among others, overweight, obesity, hypertension, type-2 diabetes, arising from excess, in 24 h urine, of calcium (Ca salts (calcium oxalate (CaOx, calcium phosphate (CaPi, supersaturation of, and crystallization in, tubular fluid and urine, causing crystal-induced epithelial cell damage, proteinuria, crystal aggregation and uroliths. Methods Another picture emerges from the present uncontrolled study of 154 male adult IRCU patients (75 stone-bearing (SB and 79 age-matched stone-free (SF, in whom stone-forming and other parameters in fasting urine and plasma were contrasted with five biomarkers (see footnote of oxidative metabolism (OM, without and with variation of markers. Results 1 In SB vs. SF unstratified OM biomarkers were statistically unchanged, but the majority of patients was overweight; despite, in SB vs. SF urine pH, total and non-albumin protein concentration were elevated, fractional urinary uric acid excretion and blood bicarbonate decreased, whereas urine volume, sodium, supersaturation with CaOx and CaPi (as hydroxyapatite were unchanged; 2 upon variation of OM markers (strata below and above median numerous stone parameters differed significant!', among others urine volume, total protein, Ca/Pi ratio, pH, sodium, potassium, plasma Ca/Pi ratio and parathyroid hormone, blood pressure, renal excretion of non-albumin protein and other substances; 3 a significant shift from SF to SB patients occurred with increase of urine pH, decrease of blood bicarbonate, and increase of diastolic blood pressure, whereas increase of plasma uric acid impacted only marginally; 4 in both SF and SB patients a strong curvilinear relationship links a rise of urine Ca/Pi to urine Ca/Pi divided by plasma Ca/Pi, but in SB urine Ca/Pi failed to correlate significantly with urine hydroxyapatite supersaturation; 5 also in SB, plasma Ca/Pi and urinary nitrate were

  6. The urine biomarker panel [IGFBP7]x[TIMP-2] (NephroCheck® parameter does not correlate with IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 gene expression in urinary sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Knafl

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is frequently observed in serious infections, following nephrotoxic medication, surgery and trauma. Here we tested whether the detection of two recently identified biomarkers for AKI, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2 and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 (IGFBP7, depends on the expression of these proteins in cells of the urinary sediment.We collected urine samples of 33 kidney transplant recipients and 14 non-transplanted patients who all had AKI (stages 1-3 according to KDIGO, and measured [IGFBP7]x[TIMP-2] using the NephroCheck® Astute1 40 ™ meter. Concomitantly, we analyzed IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 mRNA expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR from urinary sediment of the same patients, and correlated the results with [IGFBP7]x[TIMP-2] (protein, by linear regression analysis. We also determined the association between [IGFBP7]x[TIMP-2] and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and between IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 mRNA expression and markers of inflammation. Light microscopy and confocal immunofluorescence served to illustrate changes in the urinary sediment over the time course of renal function improvement.Of the 47 analyzed AKI patients, 14 presented with ascending urinary tract infection. Serum creatinine (sCr, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and eGFR in all patients were 3.9±2.28 mg/dL, 47.59±23.1 mg/dL and 22.88±16.0 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively, on average ±standard deviation. [IGFBP7]x[TIMP-2] was 2.33±9.95 (ng/ml2/1000, and did not associate with IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 gene expression (r = -0.0220, p = 0.4216; respectively r = 0.0972, p = 0.1909. [IGFBP7]x[TIMP-2] did not associate with eGFR; IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 mRNA expression. Improvement of renal function went along with disappearance of casts, decrease in aquaporin1 positive renal epithelial cells and leukocytes from the urinary sediment.The gene expression pattern of IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 from urinary sediment, which contains

  7. Cell-free mitochondrial DNA copy number variation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A study of non-invasive biomarker from Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Srivastava, Shilpee; Singh, Seram Anil; Das, Anup Kumar; Das, Ganesh Chandra; Dhar, Bishal; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Mondal, Rosy

    2017-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. The lifestyle, food habits, and customary practices manifest the Northeast Indian population toward higher susceptibility to develop head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Here, we have investigated the association of smoke and smokeless tobacco, and alcohol with copy number variation of cell-free mitochondrial DNA and cell-free nuclear DNA in cases and controls. Cell-free DNA from plasma was isolated from 50 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cases and 50 controls with informed written consent using QIAamp Circulating Nucleic Acid Kit. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was done for copy number variation in cell-free mitochondrial DNA and cell-free nuclear DNA. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic application between the two study groups using clinicopathological parameters. The levels of cell-free nuclear DNA and cell-free mitochondrial DNA of cases in association with smoke and smokeless tobacco, alcohol with smoking (p squamous cell carcinoma cases and controls, we distinguished cell-free mitochondrial DNA (cutoff: 19.84 raw Ct; sensitivity: 84%; specificity: 100%; p < 0.001) and cell-free nuclear DNA (cutoff: 463,282 genomic equivalent/mL; sensitivity: 53%; specificity: 87%; p < 0.001). The copy number variation in cases (cell-free nuclear DNA: 5451.66 genomic equivalent/mL and cell-free mitochondrial DNA: 29,103,476.15 genomic equivalent/mL) and controls (cell-free nuclear DNA: 1650.9 genomic equivalent/mL and cell-free mitochondrial DNA: 9,189,312.54 genomic equivalent/mL), respectively. Our result indicates that the cell-free mitochondrial DNA content is highly associated with smoke and smokeless tobacco, betel quid chewing, and alcohol which shows greater promises, holding the key characteristics of diagnostic biomarkers, that is, minimal invasiveness, high specificity, and sensitivity.

  8. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  9. Assessment of range of uric and serum biomarkers in determination of bladder cancer severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkov V.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish efficiency of a range of uric and serum biomarkers of bladder cancer for diagnostics and the prognosis of risk of development of disease recurrence. Material and methods: TPA and TPS, VEGF level research in blood serum, UBC in urine in 176 people, among which 135 patients with bladder cancer (RMP have been conducted. Group of comparison has included16 patients (patients with cystitis. The control group has been made of 25 almost healthy men. 75 patients had non-muscle invasive RMP (Ta-1N0M0. Results. It has been statistically determined that reliable growth of of TPA, TPS in blood serum and UBC in urine in patients with non-muscle invasive RMP in comparison with patients in groups of control and comparison has been established. The increase of UBC in urine of patients of this group with recurrence of tumoral growth within a year has been noted. In comparison with cytological research of urine sedimentation, molecular markers of RMP (the uric UBC and serum TPA, TPS possess diagnostic sensitivity, allow to confirm the presence of disease, to carry out diagnostics of stages of organ and extra invasion. RMP is possible to consider as an additional prognostic serum marker increase in the VEGF level in blood serum. Conclusion. Inclusion in diagnostic process in the clinical research of biomarkers showed that identification of NMIRMP increased from 18,1% in 2006 to 55,6% in 2011. The chosen volume of complex treatment allowed to reduce recurrence and lethality in the first two years from 32 to 15,5%.

  10. Molecular biomarkers to guide precision medicine in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Minke; Mehra, Niven; Sedelaar, Michiel; Gerritsen, Winald; Schalken, Jack A

    2017-08-01

    Major advances through tumor profiling technologies, that include next-generation sequencing, epigenetic, proteomic and transcriptomic methods, have been made in primary prostate cancer, providing novel biomarkers that may guide precision medicine in the near future. Areas covered: The authors provided an overview of novel molecular biomarkers in tissue, blood and urine that may be used as clinical tools to assess prognosis, improve selection criteria for active surveillance programs, and detect disease relapse early in localized prostate cancer. Expert commentary: Active surveillance (AS) in localized prostate cancer is an accepted strategy in patients with very low-risk prostate cancer. Many more patients may benefit from watchful waiting, and include patients of higher clinical stage and grade, however selection criteria have to be optimized and early recognition of transformation from localized to lethal disease has to be improved by addition of molecular biomarkers. The role of non-invasive biomarkers is challenging the need for repeat biopsies, commonly performed at 1 and 4 years in men under AS programs.

  11. Evaluation of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in Cynomolgus monkeys treated with gentamicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, Jean-Charles; Zhou, Xiaobing; Yang, Yi; Gury, Thierry; Qu, Zhe; Palazzi, Xavier; Léonard, Jean-François; Slaoui, Mohamed; Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Guizon, Isabelle; Boitier, Eric; Filali-Ansary, Aziz; Berg, Bart H.J. van den; Poetz, Oliver; Joos, Thomas; Zhang, Tianyi; Wang, Jufeng; Detilleux, Philippe; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Most studies to evaluate kidney safety biomarkers have been performed in rats. This study was conducted in Cynomolgus monkeys in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in this species. Groups of 3 males were given daily intramuscular injections of gentamicin, a nephrotoxic agent known to produce lesions in proximal tubules, at dose-levels of 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg/day for 10 days. Blood and 16-h urine samples were collected on Days − 7, − 3, 2, 4, 7, and at the end of the dosing period. Several novel kidney safety biomarkers were evaluated, with single- and multiplex immunoassays and in immunoprecipitation-LC/MS assays, in parallel to histopathology and conventional clinical pathology parameters. Treatment with gentamicin induced a dose-dependent increase in kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis, ranging from minimal to mild severity at 10 mg/kg/day, moderate at 25 mg/kg/day, and to severe at 50 mg/kg/day. The results showed that the novel urinary biomarkers, microalbumin, α1-microglobulin, clusterin, and osteopontin, together with the more traditional clinical pathology parameters, urinary total protein and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), were more sensitive than blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (sCr) to detect kidney injury in the monkeys given 10 mg/kg/day gentamicin for 10 days, a dose leading to an exposure which is slightly higher than the desired therapeutic exposure in clinics. Therefore, these urinary biomarkers represent non-invasive biomarkers of proximal tubule injury in Cynomolgus monkeys which may be potentially useful in humans. - Highlights: • Gentamicin induced kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis in Cynomolgus monkey • Urinary clusterin and osteopontin were sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury. • Microalbumin and α1-microglobulin in urine were also more sensitive than serum creatinine.

  12. Evaluation of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in Cynomolgus monkeys treated with gentamicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, Jean-Charles, E-mail: jean-charles.gautier@sanofi.com [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Zhou, Xiaobing [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Yang, Yi [Sanofi R& D, Bridgewater (United States); Gury, Thierry [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Qu, Zhe [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Palazzi, Xavier; Léonard, Jean-François; Slaoui, Mohamed; Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Guizon, Isabelle; Boitier, Eric; Filali-Ansary, Aziz [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Berg, Bart H.J. van den; Poetz, Oliver; Joos, Thomas [Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at the University Tübingen (Germany); Zhang, Tianyi [Frontage Laboratories, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jufeng [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Detilleux, Philippe [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Li, Bo, E-mail: libo@nifdc.org.cn [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Most studies to evaluate kidney safety biomarkers have been performed in rats. This study was conducted in Cynomolgus monkeys in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in this species. Groups of 3 males were given daily intramuscular injections of gentamicin, a nephrotoxic agent known to produce lesions in proximal tubules, at dose-levels of 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg/day for 10 days. Blood and 16-h urine samples were collected on Days − 7, − 3, 2, 4, 7, and at the end of the dosing period. Several novel kidney safety biomarkers were evaluated, with single- and multiplex immunoassays and in immunoprecipitation-LC/MS assays, in parallel to histopathology and conventional clinical pathology parameters. Treatment with gentamicin induced a dose-dependent increase in kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis, ranging from minimal to mild severity at 10 mg/kg/day, moderate at 25 mg/kg/day, and to severe at 50 mg/kg/day. The results showed that the novel urinary biomarkers, microalbumin, α1-microglobulin, clusterin, and osteopontin, together with the more traditional clinical pathology parameters, urinary total protein and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), were more sensitive than blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (sCr) to detect kidney injury in the monkeys given 10 mg/kg/day gentamicin for 10 days, a dose leading to an exposure which is slightly higher than the desired therapeutic exposure in clinics. Therefore, these urinary biomarkers represent non-invasive biomarkers of proximal tubule injury in Cynomolgus monkeys which may be potentially useful in humans. - Highlights: • Gentamicin induced kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis in Cynomolgus monkey • Urinary clusterin and osteopontin were sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury. • Microalbumin and α1-microglobulin in urine were also more sensitive than serum creatinine.

  13. The urine marker test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Stine Nylandsted; Elsborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urine sample collection for doping control tests is a key component of the World Anti-Doping Agency's fight against doping in sport. However, a substantial number of athletes experience difficulty when having to urinate under supervision. Furthermore, it cannot always be ensured...... that athletes are actually delivering their own urine. A method that can be used to alleviate the negative impact of a supervised urination procedure and which can also identify urine as coming from a specific athlete is the urine marker test. Monodisperse low molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEGs......) are given orally prior to urination. Urine samples can be traced to the donor by analysis of the PEGs previously given. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the use of the urine marker during urine doping control testing. METHODS: Two studies investigated athletes' acceptance...

  14. Urine Proteomics in the Era of Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Beasley-Green

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With the technological advances of mass spectrometry (MS-based platforms, clinical proteomics is one of the most rapidly growing areas in biomedical research. Urine proteomics has become a popular subdiscipline of clinical proteomics because it is an ideal source for the discovery of noninvasive disease biomarkers. The urine proteome offers a comprehensive view of the local and systemic physiology since the proteome is primarily composed of proteins/peptides from the kidneys and plasma. The emergence of MS-based proteomic platforms as prominent bioanalytical tools in clinical applications has enhanced the identification of protein-based urinary biomarkers. This review highlights the characteristics of urine that make it an attractive biofluid for biomarker discovery and the impact of MS-based technologies on the clinical assessment of urinary protein biomarkers.

  15. Comparative miRNA Analysis of Urine Extracellular Vesicles Isolated through Five Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Urine extracellular vesicles are a valuable low-invasive source of information, especially for the cells of the genitourinary tract. In the search for biomarkers, different techniques have been developed to isolate and characterize the cargo of these vesicles. In the present work, we compare five of these different isolation methods (three commercial isolation kits, ultracentrifugation, and lectin-based purification and perform miRNA profiling using a multiplex miRNA assay. The results showed high correlation through all isolation techniques, and 48 out of 68 miRNAs were detected above the detection limit at least 10 times. The results obtained by multiplex assay were validated through Taqman qPCR. In addition, using this technique combined with a clinically friendly extracellular vesicle (uEV-enrichment method, we performed the analysis of selected miRNAs in urine from patients affected with bladder cancer, benign prostate hyperplasia, or prostate cancer. Importantly, we found that those miRNAs could be detected in almost 100% of the samples, and no significant differences were observed between groups. Our results support the feasibility of analyzing exosomes-associated miRNAs using a methodology that requires a small volume of urine and is compatible with a clinical environment and high-throughput analysis.

  16. The discovery of putative urine markers for the specific detection of prostate tumor by integrative mining of public genomic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    Full Text Available Urine has emerged as an attractive biofluid for the noninvasive detection of prostate cancer (PCa. There is a strong imperative to discover candidate urinary markers for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of PCa. The rising flood of various omics profiles presents immense opportunities for the identification of prospective biomarkers. Here we present a simple and efficient strategy to derive candidate urine markers for prostate tumor by mining cancer genomic profiles from public databases. Prostate, bladder and kidney are three major tissues from which cellular matters could be released into urine. To identify urinary markers specific for PCa, upregulated entities that might be shed in exosomes of bladder cancer and kidney cancer are first excluded. Through the ontology-based filtering and further assessment, a reduced list of 19 entities encoding urinary proteins was derived as putative PCa markers. Among them, we have found 10 entities closely associated with the process of tumor cell growth and development by pathway enrichment analysis. Further, using the 10 entities as seeds, we have constructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI subnetwork and suggested a few urine markers as preferred prognostic markers to monitor the invasion and progression of PCa. Our approach is amenable to discover and prioritize potential markers present in a variety of body fluids for a spectrum of human diseases.

  17. Flavonoids as fruit and vegetable intake biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz

    of fruit and vegetable intakes. In Paper I, the urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids in morning spot urine (i.e. all urine voids from midnight including the first morning void) was also found to respond to moderate increases in the intake of fruits and vegetables. However, the association was somewhat...... weaker than in 24h urine samples, indicating that the 24h urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids is a stronger biomarker of the intake of fruit and vegetables than the urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids in morning spot urine. In Paper II, the biokinetic profiles of some of the most important dietary......-individual variation in the absorption and urinary recovery of the flavonoids, and this makes it very difficult to separate individuals according to intake by use of the flavonoid biomarker in urine. The intra-individual variation was on the contrary low, and Paper II therefore supports the assumption, that 24h...

  18. Urine specific gravity test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  19. Maple syrup urine disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000373.htm Maple syrup urine disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a disorder in ...

  20. Urine drug screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug screen - urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence may indicate that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  1. Minimally-invasive, microneedle-array extraction of interstitial fluid for comprehensive biomedical applications: transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, exosome research, and biomarker identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert M; Miller, Philip R; Ebrahimi, Parwana; Polsky, Ronen; Baca, Justin T

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial fluid (ISF) has recently garnered interest as a biological fluid that could be used as an alternate to blood for biomedical applications, diagnosis, and therapy. ISF extraction techniques are promising because they are less invasive and less painful than venipuncture. ISF is an alternative, incompletely characterized source of physiological data. Here, we describe a novel method of ISF extraction in rats, using microneedle arrays, which provides volumes of ISF that are sufficient for downstream analysis techniques such as proteomics, genomics, and extracellular vesicle purification and analysis. This method is potentially less invasive than previously reported techniques. The limited invasiveness and larger volumes of extracted ISF afforded by this microneedle-assisted ISF extraction method provide a technique that is less stressful and more humane to laboratory animals, while also allowing for a reduction in the numbers of animals needed to acquire sufficient volumes of ISF for biomedical analysis and application.

  2. Urine Tests (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the urine sample. In certain situations, a sterile bag can be placed around a baby’s diaper area to collect a urine sample. If you have any questions about urine tests, talk with your doctor. Reviewed by: Yamini Durani, MD ...

  3. Detection of urinary excreted fungal galactomannan-like antigens for diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon F Dufresne

    Full Text Available Mortality associated with invasive aspergillosis (IA remains high, partly because of delayed diagnosis. Detection of microbial exoantigens, released in serum and other body fluids during infection, may help timely diagnosis. In course of IA, Aspergillus galactomannan (GM, a well established polysaccharide biomarker, is released in body fluids including urine. Urine is an abundant, safely collected specimen, well-suited for point-of-care (POC testing, which could play an increasing role in screening for early disease. Our main objective was to demonstrate GM antigenuria as a clinically relevant biological phenomenon in IA and establish proof-of-concept that it could be translated to POC diagnosis. Utilizing a novel IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb476 that recognizes GM-like antigens from Aspergillus and other molds, we demonstrated antigenuria in an experimental animal IA model (guinea pig, as well as in human patients. In addition, we investigated the chemical nature of the urinary excreted antigen in human samples, characterized antigen detection in urine by immunoassays, described a putative assay inhibitor in urine, and indicated means of alleviation of the inhibition. We also designed and used a lateral flow immunochromatographic assay to detect urinary excreted antigen in a limited number of IA patient urine samples. In this study, we establish that POC diagnosis of IA based on urinary GM detection is feasible. Prospective studies will be necessary to establish the performance characteristics of an optimized device and define its optimal clinical use.

  4. Biomarkers of coronary endothelial health: correlation with invasive measures of collateral function, flow and resistance in chronically occluded coronary arteries and the effect of recanalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladwiniec, Andrew; Ettelaie, Camille; Cunnington, Michael S; Rossington, Jennifer; Thackray, Simon; Alamgir, Farquad; Hoye, Angela

    2016-06-01

    In the presence of a chronically occluded coronary artery, the collateral circulation matures by a process of arteriogenesis; however, there is considerable variation between individuals in the functional capacity of that collateral network. This could be explained by differences in endothelial health and function. We aimed to examine the relationship between the functional extent of collateralization and levels of biomarkers that have been shown to relate to endothelial health. We measured four potential biomarkers of endothelial health in 34 patients with mature collateral networks who underwent a successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for a chronic total coronary occlusion (CTO) before PCI and 6-8 weeks after PCI, and examined the relationship of biomarker levels with physiological measures of collateralization. We did not find a significant change in the systemic levels of sICAM-1, sE-selectin, microparticles or tissue factor 6-8 weeks after PCI. We did find an association between estimated retrograde collateral flow before CTO recanalization and lower levels of sICAM-1 (r=0.39, P=0.026), sE-selectin (r=0.48, P=0.005) and microparticles (r=0.38, P=0.03). Recanalization of a CTO and resultant regression of a mature collateral circulation do not alter systemic levels of sICAM-1, sE-selectin, microparticles or tissue factor. The identified relationship of retrograde collateral flow with sICAM-1, sE-selectin and microparticles is likely to represent an association with an ability to develop collaterals rather than their presence and extent.

  5. Adjustment of serum HE4 to reduced glomerular filtration and its use in biomarker-based prediction of deep myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chovanec, Josef; Selingerova, Iveta; Greplova, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    based on single-institution data from 120 EC patients and validated against multicentric data from 379 EC patients. Results: In non-cancer individuals, serum HE4 levels increase log-linearly with reduced glomerular filtration of eGFR = 90 ml/min/1.73 m2. HE4ren, adjusting HE4 serum levels to decreased e...... levels to reduced eGFR that enables quantification of time-dependent changes in HE4 production and elimination irrespective of age and renal function in women. Utilizing HE4ren improves performance of biomarker-based models for prediction of dMI in endometrial cancer patients....

  6. Serial-omics characterization of equine urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Horse urine is easily collected and contains molecules readily measurable using mass spectrometry that can be used as biomarkers representative of health, disease or drug tampering. This study aimed at analyzing microliter levels of horse urine to purify, identify and quantify proteins, polar metabolites and non-polar lipids. Urine from a healthy 12 year old quarter horse mare on a diet of grass hay and vitamin/mineral supplements with limited pasture access was collected for serial-omics characterization. The urine was treated with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE and methanol to partition into three distinct layers for protein, non-polar lipid and polar metabolite content from a single liquid-liquid extraction and was repeated two times. Each layer was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to obtain protein sequence and relative protein levels as well as identify and quantify small polar metabolites and lipids. The results show 46 urine proteins, many related to normal kidney function, structural and circulatory proteins as well as 474 small polar metabolites but only 10 lipid molecules. Metabolites were mostly related to urea cycle and ammonia recycling as well as amino acid related pathways, plant diet specific molecules, etc. The few lipids represented triglycerides and phospholipids. These data show a complete mass spectrometry based-omics characterization of equine urine from a single 333 μL mid-stream urine aliquot. These omics data help serve as a baseline for healthy mare urine composition and the analyses can be used to monitor disease progression, health status, monitor drug use, etc.

  7. Adiponectin, Leptin, IGF-1, and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha As Potential Serum Biomarkers for Non-Invasive Diagnosis of Colorectal Adenoma in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Soleimani, Akbar; Nichols, Alexandra; Sodhi, Komal; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Nunlee-Bland, Gail; Nouraie, Seyed Mehdi; Brim, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    The potential role of adiponectin, leptin, IGF-1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as biomarkers in colorectal adenoma is not clear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the blood serum levels of these biomarkers in colorectal adenoma. The case-control study consisted of serum from 180 African American patients with colon adenoma (cases) and 198 healthy African Americans (controls) at Howard University Hospital. We used ELISA for adiponectin, leptin, IGF-1, and TNF-α detection and quantification. Statistical analysis was performed by t -test and multivariate logistic regression. The respective differences in median leptin, adiponectin, IGF-1, and TNF-α levels between control and case groups (13.9 vs. 16.4), (11.3 vs. 46.0), (4.5 vs. 12.9), and (71.4 vs. 130.8) were statistically significant ( P  IGF-1 were 2.0 (95% CI = 1.6-2.5; P  IGF-1 concentrations with age ( r  = 0.17, P  IGF-1, and leptin concentration with body mass index (BMI) ( r  = 0.44, P  IGF-1, and TNF-α high levels correlate with higher risk of colon adenoma and can thus be used for colorectal adenomas risk assessment.

  8. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Virginia M., E-mail: vweaver@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Vargas, Gonzalo García [Faculty of Medicine, University of Juárez of Durango State, Durango (Mexico); Secretaría de Salud del Estado de Coahuila, Coahuila, México (Mexico); Silbergeld, Ellen K. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rothenberg, Stephen J. [Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Fadrowski, Jeffrey J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rubio-Andrade, Marisela [Faculty of Medicine, University of Juárez of Durango State, Durango (Mexico); Parsons, Patrick J. [Laboratory of Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, Albany, NY (United States); Steuerwald, Amy J. [Laboratory of Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. - Highlights: • Positive associations between urine metals and creatinine-based eGFR are unexpected. • Optimal approach to urine concentration adjustment for urine biomarkers uncertain. • We compared urine concentration adjustment methods. • Positive associations observed only with urine creatinine adjustment. • Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment needed.

  9. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. - Highlights: • Positive associations between urine metals and creatinine-based eGFR are unexpected. • Optimal approach to urine concentration adjustment for urine biomarkers uncertain. • We compared urine concentration adjustment methods. • Positive associations observed only with urine creatinine adjustment. • Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment needed

  10. Evaluation of sestamibi scanning as a predictor of risk of development of breast cancer and as a non-invasive biomarker for breast cancer chemoprevention trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Preston, D.; McMillin, C.H.; Dusing, R.; Zalles, C.M.; Fabian, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sestamibi scintimammography is becoming increasingly accepted as an adjunct to conventional breast imaging by mammography and ultrasound. We sought to determine whether it might serve to detect/quantify pre-cancerous breast lesions, specifically hyperplasia with atypia which, when detected by random periareolar fine needle aspiration (FNA), is known to be associated with increased risk for subsequent development of breast cancer. If a parameter derived from sestamibi scanning could be shown to correlate with and predict for atypia, then this could serve 1) to refine estimates of risk of development of breast cancer; and 2) as a surrogate endpoint biomarker in clinical breast cancer chemoprevention trials. To this end, we performed sestamibi scanning on both breasts of 65 women at high risk for development of breast cancer who also underwent FNA. Seventeen women (26%) exhibited non-proliferative cytology; 30 (46%) had hyperplasia; and 18 (28%) had hyperplasia with atypia in the FNA specimen. Since the fine needle aspiration specimens from both breasts are pooled to provide a single result, we likewise pooled the sestamibi results from both breasts so as to consider the most abnormal finding. Twenty-five women (39%) were characterized as having an abnormal sestamibi scan with heterogenous, focal, intense uptake. There was no correlation between an abnormal scan and cytologic evidence of hyperplasia with atypia. Neither was there a correlation between any of a variety of quantitative measures of the sestamibi scans and the cytological classification. At this time, there is no indication for the use of sestamibi scanning for the prediction of risk of subsequent development of breast cancer, or as a surrogate endpoint biomarker in clinical breast cancer chemoprevention trials

  11. Calcium in Urine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Calcium, Serum; Calcium and Phosphates, Urine; ...

  12. EVALUATION OF DISPOSABLE DIAPERS FOR QUANTATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF PESTICIDE METABOLITES AND CREATININE IN URINE SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project consisted of a laboratory study to evaluate an extraction and analysis method for quantifying biomarkers of pesticide exposure and creatinine in urine samples collected with commercially-available disposable diapers. For large exposure studies, such as the National ...

  13. Evaluating engrailed-2 and cytokines in urine with serum PSA as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating engrailed-2 and cytokines in urine with serum PSA as potential biomarkers in patients with prostatism at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. B Donald-Buri, K Patel, P Musau, E.N. Fish ...

  14. Flavonoids as fruit and vegetable intake biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz

    calculation of the bivariate correlation coefficients is the common approach when using only one reference method. Back in 2002, a strictly controlled dietary intervention study indicated that the sum of 7 different flavonoid aglycones excreted in 24h urine samples potentially could be used as a biomarker...... and cohort studies. The Ph.D. thesis contains four scientific papers. Paper I provides evidence that the sum of 7 flavonoids in 24h urine respond in a linear and sensitive manner to moderate increases in the intake of fruits and vegetables, and thus consolidates that the flavonoids are a valid biomarker...... of fruit and vegetable intakes. In Paper I, the urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids in morning spot urine (i.e. all urine voids from midnight including the first morning void) was also found to respond to moderate increases in the intake of fruits and vegetables. However, the association was somewhat...

  15. MicroRNA profiling of dogs with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder using blood and urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael S; Zwingenberger, Allison; Westropp, Jodi L; Barrett, Laura E; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Ghosh, Paramita; Vinall, Ruth L

    2017-11-15

    Early signs of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) are frequently assumed to be caused by other lower urinary tract diseases (LUTD) such as urinary tract infections, resulting in late diagnosis of TCC which could be fatal. The development of a non-invasive clinical test for TCC could dramatically reduce mortality. To determine whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can be used as non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers, we assessed miRNA expression in blood and/or urine from dogs with clinically normal bladders (n = 28), LUTD (n = 25), and TCC (n = 17). Expression levels of 5 miRNA associated with TCC pathophysiology (miR-34a, let-7c, miR-16, miR-103b, and miR-106b) were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. Statistical analyses using ranked ANOVA identified significant differences in miR-103b and miR-16 levels between urine samples from LUTD and TCC patients (miR-103b, p = 0.002; and miR-16, p = 0.016). No statistically significant differences in miRNA levels were observed between blood samples from LUTD versus TCC patients. Expression levels of miR-34a trended with miR-16, let-7c, and miR-103b levels in individual normal urine samples, however, this coordination was completely lost in TCC urine samples. In contrast, co-ordination of miR-34a, miR-16, let-7c, and miR-103b expression levels was maintained in blood samples from TCC patients. Our combined data indicate a potential role for miR-103b and miR-16 as diagnostic urine biomarkers for TCC, and that further investigation of miR-103b and miR-16 in the dysregulation of coordinated miRNA expression in bladder carcinogenesis is warranted.

  16. IMAC fractionation in combination with LC-MS reveals H2B and NIF-1 peptides as potential bladder cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzi, Maria; Zoidakis, Jerome; Papadopoulos, Theofilos; Zürbig, Petra; Katafigiotis, Ioannis; Stravodimos, Konstantinos; Lazaris, Andreas; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Ploumidis, Achilles; Mischak, Harald; Mullen, William; Vlahou, Antonia

    2013-09-06

    Improvement in bladder cancer (BC) management requires more effective diagnosis and prognosis of disease recurrence and progression. Urinary biomarkers attract special interest because of the noninvasive means of urine collection. Proteomic analysis of urine entails the adoption of a fractionation methodology to reduce sample complexity. In this study, we applied immobilized metal affinity chromatography in combination with high-resolution LC-MS/MS for the discovery of native urinary peptides potentially associated with BC aggressiveness. This approach was employed toward urine samples from patients with invasive BC, noninvasive BC, and benign urogenital diseases. A total of 1845 peptides were identified, corresponding to a total of 638 precursor proteins. Specific enrichment for proteins involved in nucleosome assembly and for zinc-finger transcription factors was observed. The differential expression of two candidate biomarkers, histone H2B and NIF-1 (zinc finger 335) in BC, was verified in independent sets of urine samples by ELISA and by immunohistochemical analysis of BC tissue. The results collectively support changes in the expression of both of these proteins with tumor progression, suggesting their potential role as markers for discriminating BC stages. In addition, the data indicate a possible involvement of NIF-1 in BC progression, likely as a suppressor and through interactions with Sox9 and HoxA1.

  17. Pink urine syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis del Carpio-Orantes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present images we allude to a syndrome of low incidence, characterized by pink urine, being related to factors such as obesity, and being triggered by abdominal surgeries, use of propofol, among others. Being favoured by the presence of abundant crystals of uric acid in the urine confers the typical pink coloration.

  18. Prostate cancer biomarker profiles in urinary sediments and exosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Siebren; Birker, Ingrid L.; Smit, Frank P.; Leyten, Gisele H. J. M.; de Reijke, Theo M.; van Oort, Inge M.; Mulders, Peter F. A.; Jannink, Sander A.; Schalken, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary biomarker tests for diagnosing prostate cancer have gained considerable interest. Urine is a complex mixture that can be subfractionated. We evaluated 2 urinary fractions that contain nucleic acids, ie cell pellets and exosomes. The influence of digital rectal examination before urine

  19. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) to Exosomal Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filella, Xavier; Foj, Laura

    2016-10-26

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa), in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis.

  20. Urinary Exosomes: The Potential for Biomarker Utility, Intercellular Signaling and Therapeutics in Urological Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Carrie A; Blackwell, Robert H; Foreman, Kimberly E; Kuo, Paul C; Flanigan, Robert C; Gupta, Gopal N

    2016-05-01

    Exosomes are small secreted vesicles that contain proteins, mRNA and miRNA with the potential to alter signaling pathways in recipient cells. While exosome research has flourished, few publications have specifically considered the role of genitourinary cancer shed exosomes in urine, their implication in disease progression and their usefulness as noninvasive biomarkers. In this review we examined the current literature on the role of exosomes in intercellular communication and as biomarkers, and their potential as delivery vehicles for therapeutic applications in bladder, prostate and renal cancer. We searched PubMed® and Google® with the key words prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, exosomes, microvesicles and urine. Relevant articles, including original research studies and reviews, were selected based on contents. A review of this literature was generated. Cancer exosomes can be isolated from urine using various techniques. Cancer cells have been found to secrete more exosomes than normal cells. These exosomes have a role in cellular communication by interacting with and depositing their cargo in target cells. Bladder, prostate and renal cancer exosomes have been shown to enhance migration, invasion and angiogenesis. These exosomes have also been shown to increase proliferation, confer drug resistance and promote immune evasion. Urinary exosomes can be isolated from bladder, kidney and prostate cancer. They serve as a potential reservoir for biomarker identification. Exosomes also have potential for therapeutics as siRNA or pharmacological agents can be loaded into exosomes. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Translational safety biomarkers of colonic barrier integrity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, Tim; Bueters, Ruud; van Heerden, Marjolein; Cuyckens, Filip; Vreeken, Rob; Goeminne, Nick; Lammens, Lieve

    2018-05-20

    The intestinal barrier controls intestinal permeability, and its disruption has been associated with multiple diseases. Therefore, preclinical safety biomarkers monitoring barrier integrity are essential during the development of drugs targeting the intestines, particularly if starting treatment early after onset of disease. Classical toxicology endpoints are not sensitive enough and therefore our objective was to identify non-invasive markers enabling early in vivo detection of colonic barrier perturbation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed intracolonically via the rectum, using sodium caprate or ibuprofen as tool compounds to alter barrier integrity. Several potentially translational biomarkers and probe molecules related to permeability, inflammation or tissue damage were evaluated, using various analytical platforms, including immunoassays, targeted metabolomics and highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Several markers were identified that allow early in vivo detection of colonic barrier integrity changes, before histopathological evidence of tissue damage. The most promising permeability markers identified were plasma fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000 and a lactulose/mannitol/sucralose mixture in urine. These markers showed maximum increases over 100-fold or approximately 10-50-fold, respectively. Intracolonic administration of the above probe molecules outperformed oral administration and inflammatory or other biomarkers, such as α 2 -macroglobulin, calprotectin, cytokines, prostaglandins and a panel of metabolic molecules to identify early and subtle changes in barrier integrity. However, optimal timing of probe administration and sample collection is important for all markers evaluated. Inclusion of these probe molecules in preclinical toxicity studies might aid in risk assessment and the design of a clinical biomarker plan, as several of these markers have translational potential. Copyright © 2018 John

  2. MR T2 value of the tibial nerve can be used as a potential non-invasive and quantitative biomarker for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dongye; Duan, Xiaohui; Yang, Zehong; Bai, Zhiqiang; Hu, Huijun; Shen, Jun; Wang, Chuan; Yan, Li

    2018-01-01

    To determine the role of quantitative tibial nerve T2 value in the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). MR imaging and T2 mapping of the tibial nerve were performed in 22 diabetic patients with DPN, 20 diabetic patients without DPN and 20 healthy controls. Nerve T2 values were measured, and compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic ability of T2 value to identify DPN. Nerve T2 value was 55.06 ± 4.05 ms, 48.91 ± 3.06 ms and 45.61 ± 1.86 ms in patients with DPN, patients without DPN and controls, respectively. Patients with DPN had significantly higher nerve T2 values than patients without DPN (P < 0.001). Nerve T2 values in patients without DPN were higher than in controls (P < 0.001). ROC analysis showed that T2 values had a diagnostic sensitivity of 81.8 %, specificity of 89.2 % and area under the curve of 0.922 for identifying patients with DPN from patients without DPN plus controls when the cutoff point was 51.34 ms. T2 value of the tibial nerve can be used as an alternative, non-invasive quantitative parameter to assess DPN in diabetic patients. circle Tibial nerves in patients with DPN showed T2 hyperintensity and enlargement. (orig.)

  3. MR T2 value of the tibial nerve can be used as a potential non-invasive and quantitative biomarker for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongye; Duan, Xiaohui; Yang, Zehong; Bai, Zhiqiang; Hu, Huijun; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wang, Chuan; Yan, Li [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Endocrinology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2018-03-15

    To determine the role of quantitative tibial nerve T2 value in the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). MR imaging and T2 mapping of the tibial nerve were performed in 22 diabetic patients with DPN, 20 diabetic patients without DPN and 20 healthy controls. Nerve T2 values were measured, and compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic ability of T2 value to identify DPN. Nerve T2 value was 55.06 ± 4.05 ms, 48.91 ± 3.06 ms and 45.61 ± 1.86 ms in patients with DPN, patients without DPN and controls, respectively. Patients with DPN had significantly higher nerve T2 values than patients without DPN (P < 0.001). Nerve T2 values in patients without DPN were higher than in controls (P < 0.001). ROC analysis showed that T2 values had a diagnostic sensitivity of 81.8 %, specificity of 89.2 % and area under the curve of 0.922 for identifying patients with DPN from patients without DPN plus controls when the cutoff point was 51.34 ms. T2 value of the tibial nerve can be used as an alternative, non-invasive quantitative parameter to assess DPN in diabetic patients. circle Tibial nerves in patients with DPN showed T2 hyperintensity and enlargement. (orig.)

  4. Biomarkers for Detecting Mitochondrial Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 Objectives: Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs are a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of slowly or rapidly progressive disorders with onset from birth to senescence. Because of their variegated clinical presentation, MIDs are difficult to diagnose and are frequently missed in their early and late stages. This is why there is a need to provide biomarkers, which can be easily obtained in the case of suspecting a MID to initiate the further diagnostic work-up. (2 Methods: Literature review. (3 Results: Biomarkers for diagnostic purposes are used to confirm a suspected diagnosis and to facilitate and speed up the diagnostic work-up. For diagnosing MIDs, a number of dry and wet biomarkers have been proposed. Dry biomarkers for MIDs include the history and clinical neurological exam and structural and functional imaging studies of the brain, muscle, or myocardium by ultrasound, computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, MR-spectroscopy (MRS, positron emission tomography (PET, or functional MRI. Wet biomarkers from blood, urine, saliva, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for diagnosing MIDs include lactate, creatine-kinase, pyruvate, organic acids, amino acids, carnitines, oxidative stress markers, and circulating cytokines. The role of microRNAs, cutaneous respirometry, biopsy, exercise tests, and small molecule reporters as possible biomarkers is unsolved. (4 Conclusions: The disadvantages of most putative biomarkers for MIDs are that they hardly meet the criteria for being acceptable as a biomarker (missing longitudinal studies, not validated, not easily feasible, not cheap, not ubiquitously available and that not all MIDs manifest in the brain, muscle, or myocardium. There is currently a lack of validated biomarkers for diagnosing MIDs.

  5. Creatinine urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine creatinine test ... Creatinine is a chemical waste product of creatine. Creatine is a chemical the body makes to supply ... done to see how well your kidneys work. Creatinine is removed by the body entirely by the ...

  6. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  7. Uric acid - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on ... are no risks with this test. Images Uric acid test Uric acid crystals References Burns CM, Wortmann RL. Clinical ...

  8. Purple Urine Bag Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    sudden onset, progressive left sided weakness involving both upper and ... computed tomography of the brain showed right ... included a complete blood count, renal functions which were ... Urine culture had a significant growth of Klebsiella.

  9. Targeted genomic biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy: from basic research to clinical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Mathew L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, more than 30,000 men succumbed to prostate cancer (PC) and more than 240,000 new PC cases were identified in the USA. Digital rectal examination, MRI, and a blood test for prostate specific antigen (PSA) determination play a significant role in detecting advanced PC. However, they are not considered reliable tools for early warning of PC, to detect recurrent cancer or to determine metastatic status of the disease. Unreliable diagnosis results in undertreatment or overtreatment of patients with minimal benefit, enormous morbidity, incontinence, and/or impotence. Histology remains the mainstay of PC confirmation. However, out of >750,000 biopsies performed each year in the USA, >65% show benign pathology, causing patient morbidity and costing hundreds of millions of healthcare dollars. Biological fluids, including urine, represent a promising source of biomarkers for detection and prediction of PC prognosis. Because urine is available non-invasively and readily, numerous studies targeting DNA, RNA, protein and metabolite based biomarkers have been performed. However, none have yet reached the clinic. Even FDA approved PCA3 test has low sensitivity and limitations in predicting aggressive PC

  10. Early diagnosis of asthma in young children by using non-invasive biomarkers of airway inflammation and early lung function measurements: study protocol of a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kant, Kim DG; Klaassen, Ester MM; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Nijhuis, Annedien J; van Schayck, Onno CP; Dompeling, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood, characterized by chronic airway inflammation. There are problems with the diagnosis of asthma in young children since the majority of the children with recurrent asthma-like symptoms is symptom free at 6 years, and does not have asthma. With the conventional diagnostic tools it is not possible to differentiate between preschool children with transient symptoms and children with asthma. The analysis of biomarkers of airway inflammation in exhaled breath is a non-invasive and promising technique to diagnose asthma and monitor inflammation in young children. Moreover, relatively new lung function tests (airway resistance using the interrupter technique) have become available for young children. The primary objective of the ADEM study (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring study), is to develop a non-invasive instrument for an early asthma diagnosis in young children, using exhaled inflammatory markers and early lung function measurements. In addition, aetiological factors, including gene polymorphisms and gene expression profiles, in relation to the development of asthma are studied. Methods/design A prospective case-control study is started in 200 children with recurrent respiratory symptoms and 50 control subjects without respiratory symptoms. At 6 years, a definite diagnosis of asthma is made (primary outcome measure) on basis of lung function assessments and current respiratory symptoms ('golden standard'). From inclusion until the definite asthma diagnosis, repeated measurements of lung function tests and inflammatory markers in exhaled breath (condensate), blood and faeces are performed. The study is registered and ethically approved. Discussion This article describes the study protocol of the ADEM study. The new diagnostic techniques applied in this study could make an early diagnosis of asthma possible. An early and reliable asthma diagnosis at 2–3 years will have consequences for the management of

  11. Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C. Kirkwood

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacogenomic biomarkers hold great promise for the future of medicine and have been touted as a means to personalize prescriptions. Genetic biomarkers for disease susceptibility including both Mendelian and complex disease promise to result in improved understanding of the pathophysiology of disease, identification of new potential therapeutic targets, and improved molecular classification of disease. However essential to fulfilling the promise of individualized therapeutic intervention is the identification of drug activity biomarkers that stratify individuals based on likely response to a particular therapeutic, both positive response, efficacy, and negative response, development of side effect or toxicity. Prior to the widespread clinical application of a genetic biomarker multiple scientific studies must be completed to identify the genetic variants and delineate their functional significance in the pathophysiology of a carefully defined phenotype. The applicability of the genetic biomarker in the human population must then be verified through both retrospective studies utilizing stored or clinical trial samples, and through clinical trials prospectively stratifying patients based on the biomarker. The risk conferred by the polymorphism and the applicability in the general population must be clearly understood. Thus, the development and widespread application of a pharmacogenomic biomarker is an involved process and for most disease states we are just at the beginning of the journey towards individualized therapy and improved clinical outcome.

  12. Appraisal of diagnostic ability of UCA1 as a biomarker of carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A K; Singh, P K; Rath, S K; Dalela, D; Goel, M M; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-11-01

    Initial diagnosis of carcinoma of the urinary bladder remains to be a challenge. Urine cytology, as an adjunct to cystoscopy, is less sensitive for low-grade tumors. Urothelial cancer associated 1 (UCA1) is a novel non-coding RNA gene, which plays a pivotal role in bladder cancer progression. Our aim is to investigate the significance of urinary UCA1 for the non-invasive diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder. We examined UCA1 expression in a bladder cancer cell line (T24) and in urine of 28 healthy individuals, 46 patients of non-malignant disorders, and 117 cases (69 primary and 48 recurrent cases) of histologically proven TCC prior to transurethral resection by using real-time PCR and compared it with voided urinary cytology. UCA1 expression was found in T24 cell line and also found to be significantly higher in the cancer group as compared to the controls (p0.05). UCA1 can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for TCC bladder as an adjunct to cytology in the early diagnosis of primary urinary bladder cancer.

  13. A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR FAST AND SAFE COLLECTION OF URINE IN NEW BORNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Clean urine samples are necessary to accurately diagnose several diseases in new-borns, especially Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs. A wide range of clinical interventions for urine collection is described in the literature including non-invasive and invasive methods. The most common non-invasive technique is urine collection using sterile bags, which is associated with significant patient discomfort and contamination of samples. Obtaining a clean-catch urine sample is the recommended method for urine collection in children able to co-operate. However, in children lacking sphincter control, urine catch is more difficult and time-consuming and invasive methods (catheterization and needle aspiration of urine from the bladder are sometimes needed. There are some stimulation techniques that facilitate emptying of the bladder in situations of bladder dysfunction. We hypothesized that the use of such methods in new-borns could facilitate the collection of a clean-catch urine sample. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate and safety of a new non-invasive technique to obtain clean-catch urine samples in newborns. AIM To describe and test a new technique to obtain midstream urine samples in newborns. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective, feasible and safety study conducted in Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Hospital, Warangal, (A secondary centre with a 20-bed neonatal unit, a 130-beded pediatric ward. This study was carried out over 7 months (January-July 2015. Patients consisted of 100 consecutively admitted infants aged less than 30 days who needed a urine analysis according to their attending physician. RESULTS This technique was successful in 72% of newborns. Mean time to sample collection was 56.99 Sec. No complications other than controlled crying were observed. CONCLUSION A new, quick and safe technique with a high success rate is described, whereby the discomfort and waste of time usually associated with bag

  14. Peptidomics of urine and other biofluids for cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauça, Josep Miquel; Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2014-08-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. The low diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of most current cancer biomarkers make early cancer diagnosis a challenging task. The comprehensive study of peptides and small proteins in a living system, known as "peptidomics," represents an alternative technological approach to the discovery of potential biomarkers for the assessment of a wide variety of pathologies. This review examines the current status of peptidomics for several body fluids, with a focus on urine, for cancer diagnostics applications. Several studies have used high-throughput technologies to characterize the peptide content of different body fluids. Because of its noninvasive collection and high stability, urine is a valuable source of candidate cancer biomarkers. A wide variety of preanalytical issues concerning patient selection and sample handling need to be considered, because not doing so can affect the quality of the results by introducing bias and artifacts. Optimization of both the analytical strategies and the processing of bioinformatics data is also essential to minimize the false-discovery rate. Peptidomics-based studies of urine and other body fluids have yielded a number of biomolecules and peptide panels with potential for diagnosing different types of cancer, especially of the ovary, prostate, and bladder. Large-scale studies are needed to validate these molecules as cancer biomarkers. © 2013 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  15. Biomarkers of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loumaye, Audrey; Thissen, Jean-Paul

    2017-12-01

    Cachexia is a complex multifactorial syndrome, characterized by loss of skeletal muscle and fat mass, which affects the majority of advanced cancer patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Interestingly, reversing muscle loss in animal models of cancer cachexia leads to prolong survival. Therefore, detecting cachexia and maintaining muscle mass represent a major goal in the care of cancer patients. However, early diagnosis of cancer cachexia is currently limited for several reasons. Indeed, cachexia development is variable according to tumor and host characteristics. In addition, safe, accessible and non-invasive tools to detect skeletal muscle atrophy are desperately lacking in clinical practice. Finally, the precise molecular mechanisms and the key players involved in cancer cachexia remain poorly characterized. The need for an early diagnosis of cancer cachexia supports therefore the quest for a biomarker that might reflect skeletal muscle atrophy process. Current research offers different promising ways to identify such a biomarker. Initially, the quest for a biomarker of cancer cachexia has mostly focused on mediators of muscle atrophy, produced by both tumor and host, in an attempt to define new therapeutic approaches. In another hand, molecules released by the muscle into the circulation during the atrophy process have been also considered as potential biomarkers. More recently, several "omics" studies are emerging to identify new muscular or circulating markers of cancer cachexia. Some genetic markers could also contribute to identify patients more susceptible to develop cachexia. This article reviews our current knowledge regarding potential biomarkers of cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Human Urine Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouatra, Souhaila; Aziat, Farid; Mandal, Rupasri; Guo, An Chi; Wilson, Michael R.; Knox, Craig; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Saleem, Fozia; Liu, Philip; Dame, Zerihun T.; Poelzer, Jenna; Huynh, Jessica; Yallou, Faizath S.; Psychogios, Nick; Dong, Edison; Bogumil, Ralf; Roehring, Cornelia; Wishart, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Urine has long been a “favored” biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify) a total of: 209 (209) by NMR, 179 (85) by GC-MS, 127 (127) by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40) by ICP-MS and 10 (10) by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database containing

  17. Cell-free nucleic acids as noninvasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-08-27

    Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA) have been reported by several authors in blood, stool, and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, and can thus potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests are very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis, and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation from large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes.

  18. Cell-free nucleic acids as noninvasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA) have been reported by several authors in blood, stool, and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, and can thus potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests are very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis, and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation from large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes.

  19. New biomarkers for sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-xin XIE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a higher sepsis rate in the intensive care unit (ICU patients, which is one of the most important causes for patient death, but the sepsis lacks specific clinical manifestations. Exploring sensitive and specific molecular markers for infection that accurately reflect infection severity and prognosis is very clinically important. In this article, based on our previous study, we introduce some new biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis and predicting the prognosis and severity of sepsis. Increase of serum soluble(s triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1 suggests a poor prognosis of septic patients, and changes of locus rs2234237 of sTREM-1 may be the one of important mechanisms. Additionally, urine sTREM-1 can provide an early warning of possible secondary acute kidney injury (AKI in sepsis patients. Serum sCD163 level was found to be a more important factor than procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in prognosis of sepsis, especially severe sepsis. Moreover, urine sCD163 also shows excellent performance in the diagnosis of sepsis and sepsis-associated AKI. Circulating microRNAs, such as miR-150, miR-297, miR-574-5p, miR -146a , miR-223, miR -15a and miR-16, also play important roles in the evaluation of status of septic patients. In the foreseeable future, newly-emerging technologies, including proteomics, metabonomics and trans-omics, may exert profound effects on the discovery of valuable biomarkers for sepsis.

  20. Lung cancer screening beyond low-dose computed tomography: the role of novel biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Naveed; Kumar, Rohit; Kavuru, Mani S

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common and lethal malignancy in the world. The landmark National lung screening trial (NLST) showed a 20% relative reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals with screening low-dose computed tomography. However, the poor specificity and low prevalence of lung cancer in the NLST provide major limitations to its widespread use. Furthermore, a lung nodule on CT scan requires a nuanced and individualized approach towards management. In this regard, advances in high through-put technology (molecular diagnostics, multi-gene chips, proteomics, and bronchoscopic techniques) have led to discovery of lung cancer biomarkers that have shown potential to complement the current screening standards. Early detection of lung cancer can be achieved by analysis of biomarkers from tissue samples within the respiratory tract such as sputum, saliva, nasal/bronchial airway epithelial cells and exhaled breath condensate or through peripheral biofluids such as blood, serum and urine. Autofluorescence bronchoscopy has been employed in research setting to identify pre-invasive lesions not identified on CT scan. Although these modalities are not yet commercially available in clinic setting, they will be available in the near future and clinicians who care for patients with lung cancer should be aware. In this review, we present up-to-date state of biomarker development, discuss their clinical relevance and predict their future role in lung cancer management.

  1. Breath biomarkers in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D

    2016-11-01

    Exhaled breath has joined blood and urine as a valuable resource for sampling and analyzing biomarkers in human media for assessing exposure, uptake metabolism, and elimination of toxic chemicals. This article focuses current use of exhaled gas, aerosols, and vapor in human breath, the methods for collection, and ultimately the use of the resulting data. Some advantages of breath are the noninvasive and self-administered nature of collection, the essentially inexhaustible supply, and that breath sampling does not produce potentially infectious waste such as needles, wipes, bandages, and glassware. In contrast to blood and urine, breath samples can be collected on demand in rapid succession and so allow toxicokinetic observations of uptake and elimination in any time frame. Furthermore, new technologies now allow capturing condensed breath vapor directly, or just the aerosol fraction alone, to gain access to inorganic species, lung pH, proteins and protein fragments, cellular DNA, and whole microorganisms from the pulmonary microbiome. Future applications are discussed, especially the use of isotopically labeled probes, non-targeted (discovery) analysis, cellular level toxicity testing, and ultimately assessing "crowd breath" of groups of people and the relation to dose of airborne and other environmental chemicals at the population level.

  2. Urine sample preparation for proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowy, Pawel; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2014-10-01

    Sample preparation for both environmental and more importantly biological matrices is a bottleneck of all kinds of analytical processes. In the case of proteomic analysis this element is even more important due to the amount of cross-reactions that should be taken into consideration. The incorporation of new post-translational modifications, protein hydrolysis, or even its degradation is possible as side effects of proteins sample processing. If protocols are evaluated appropriately, then identification of such proteins does not bring difficulties. However, if structural changes are provided without sufficient attention then protein sequence coverage will be reduced or even identification of such proteins could be impossible. This review summarizes obstacles and achievements in protein sample preparation of urine for proteome analysis using different tools for mass spectrometry analysis. The main aim is to present comprehensively the idea of urine application as a valuable matrix. This article is dedicated to sample preparation and application of urine mainly in novel cancer biomarkers discovery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider may be able to order a test that is done on just one urine sample (protein-to-creatinine ratio). Normal Results The normal ... Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test ... Abnormal results may be due to: A group ...

  4. Citric acid urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine - citric acid test; Renal tubular acidosis - citric acid test; Kidney stones - citric acid test; Urolithiasis - citric acid test ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. But the results ... test is usually done while you are on a normal diet. Ask your ...

  5. Non-invasive quantification of collagen turnover in renal transplant recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth G D Stribos

    Full Text Available Kidney allograft failure due to chronic injury/rejection remains the main cause of graft loss in renal transplant recipients (RTR. Here, we investigated whether specific biomarkers of extracellular matrix (ECM turnover are associated with allograft function and chronic kidney disease (CKD stage in RTR. Seventy-eight patients who attended the University Medical Center Groningen for a routine check-up after kidney transplantation were enrolled in the study. Plasma and/or 24h-urine samples were collected and specific matrix-metalloproteinase-generated neo-epitope fragments of collagens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated that urinary levels of C3M, a marker for collagen type III degradation, correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; r = 0.58, p<0.0001, with lower levels detected in the urine of patients with advanced CKD. In addition, plasma levels of Pro-C6, a marker for collagen type VI formation, significantly increased with disease progression and correlated with eGFR (r = -0.72, p<0.0001. Conversely, plasma C3M and urinary Pro-C6 levels showed no correlation with renal function. We identified two neo-epitope biomarkers of tissue turnover associated with ECM remodeling and fibrosis that can stratify patients by CKD stage. This is as promising first step towards non-invasive monitoring of ECM turnover in the kidneys.

  6. Automated color classification of urine dipstick image in urine examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmat, R. F.; Royananda; Muchtar, M. A.; Taqiuddin, R.; Adnan, S.; Anugrahwaty, R.; Budiarto, R.

    2018-03-01

    Urine examination using urine dipstick has long been used to determine the health status of a person. The economical and convenient use of urine dipstick is one of the reasons urine dipstick is still used to check people health status. The real-life implementation of urine dipstick is done manually, in general, that is by comparing it with the reference color visually. This resulted perception differences in the color reading of the examination results. In this research, authors used a scanner to obtain the urine dipstick color image. The use of scanner can be one of the solutions in reading the result of urine dipstick because the light produced is consistent. A method is required to overcome the problems of urine dipstick color matching and the test reference color that have been conducted manually. The method proposed by authors is Euclidean Distance, Otsu along with RGB color feature extraction method to match the colors on the urine dipstick with the standard reference color of urine examination. The result shows that the proposed approach was able to classify the colors on a urine dipstick with an accuracy of 95.45%. The accuracy of color classification on urine dipstick against the standard reference color is influenced by the level of scanner resolution used, the higher the scanner resolution level, the higher the accuracy.

  7. Urine pH test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urine test Male urinary tract References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky ... and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc . 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 ...

  8. Biomarkers in Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Better biomarkers are needed for guiding management of patients with vasculitis. Large cohorts and technological advances had led to an increase in pre-clinical studies of potential biomarkers. Recent findings The most interesting markers described recently include a gene expression signature in CD8+ T cells that predicts tendency to relapse or remain relapse-free in ANCA-associated vasculitis, and a pair of urinary proteins that are elevated in Kawasaki disease but not other febrile illnesses. Both of these studies used “omics” technologies to generate and then test hypotheses. More conventional hypothesis-based studies have indicated that the following circulating proteins have potential to improve upon clinically available tests: pentraxin-3 in giant cell arteritis and Takayasu’s arteritis; von Willebrand factor antigen in childhood central nervous system vasculitis; eotaxin-3 and other markers related to eosinophils or Th2 immune responses in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome); and MMP-3, TIMP-1, and CXCL13 in ANCA-associated vasculitis. Summary New markers testable in blood and urine have the potential to assist with diagnosis, staging, assessment of current disease activity, and prognosis. However, the standards for clinical usefulness, in particular the demonstration of either very high sensitivity or very high specificity, have yet to be met for clinically relevant outcomes. PMID:24257367

  9. Biomarker monitoring in sports doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottgiesser, Torben; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf

    2012-06-01

    Biomarker monitoring can be considered a new era in the effort against doping. Opposed to the old concept in doping control of direct detection of a prohibited substance in a biological sample such as urine or blood, the new paradigm allows a personalized longitudinal monitoring of biomarkers that indicate non-physiological responses independently of the used doping technique or substance, and may cause sanctioning of illicit practices. This review presents the development of biomarker monitoring in sports doping control and focuses on the implementation of the Athlete Biological Passport as the current concept of the World Anti Doping Agency for the detection of blood doping (hematological module). The scope of the article extends to the description of novel biomarkers and future concepts of application.

  10. Electrolytic pretreatment of urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Electrolysis has been under evaluation for several years as a process to pretreat urine for ultimate recovery of potable water in manned spacecraft applications. The conclusions that were drawn from this investigation are the following: (1) A platinum alloy containing 10 percent rhodium has been shown to be an effective, corrosion-resistant anode material for the electrolytic pretreatment of urine. Black platinum has been found to be suitable as a cathode material. (2) The mechanism of the reactions occurring during the electrolysis of urine is two-stage: (a) a total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) removal in the first stage is the result of electrochemical oxidation of urea to CO2, H2O, and ammonia followed by chloride interaction to produce N2 from ammonia, (b) after the urea has been essentially removed and the chloride ions have no more ammonia to interact with, the chloride ions start to oxidize to higher valence states, thus producing perchlorates. (3) Formation of perchlorates can be suppressed by high/low current operation, elevated temperature, and pH adjustment. (4) UV-radiation showed promise in assisting electrolytic TOC removal in beaker tests, but was not substantiated in limited single cell testing. This may have been due to non-optimum configurations of the single cell test rig and the light source.

  11. Value of Candida serum markers in patients with invasive candidiasis after myeloablative chemotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunel, F.M.; Mennink-Kersten, M.A.S.H.; Ruegebrink, D.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Donnelly, J.P.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Verweij, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    Invasive Candida infections are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Detection of circulating biomarkers has been shown to precede conventional diagnostic methods, which is important in improving outcome. We investigated the performance of multiple biomarkers using Candida antigen

  12. Value of Candida serum markers in patients with invasive candidiasis after myeloablative chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunel, Frans M. Verduyn; Mennink-Kersten, Monique A. S. H.; Ruegebrink, Dorien; van der Lee, Henrich A. L.; Donnelly, J. Peter; Blijlevens, Nicole M. A.; Verweij, Paul E.

    Invasive Candida infections are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Detection of circulating biomarkers has been shown to precede conventional diagnostic methods, which is important in improving outcome. We investigated the performance of multiple biomarkers using Candida antigen

  13. Characterization of nitrotyrosine as a biomarker for arthritis and joint injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misko, T P; Radabaugh, M R; Highkin, M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize the utility of nitrotyrosine (NT) as a biomarker for arthritis and joint injury. DESIGN: Synovial fluid, plasma, and urine from patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, meniscus injury and pseudogout...

  14. Biomarkers of multiorgan injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Saima; Molloy, Eleanor J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major contributor to neurodevelopmental deficits including cerebral palsy in term and near-term infants. The long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is difficult to predict with certainty in first few days of life. Multiorgan involvement is common but not part of the diagnostic criteria for NE. The most frequently involved organs are the heart, liver, kidneys and hematological system. Cerebral and organ involvement is associated with the release of organ specific biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. These biomarkers may have a role in the assessment of the severity of asphyxia and long-term outcome in neonates with NE.

  15. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  16. Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Invasive Candidiasis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Global Emergence ... antifungal drugs. Learn more about C. auris Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a ...

  17. Differences in urine cadmium associations with kidney outcomes based on serum creatinine and cystatin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Kim, Nam-Soo; Lee, Byung-Kook; Parsons, Patrick J.; Spector, June; Fadrowski, Jeffrey; Jaar, Bernard G.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Todd, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxicant; chronic exposure increases risk for chronic kidney disease. Recently, however, associations between urine cadmium and higher creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been reported. Analyses utilizing alternate biomarkers of kidney function allow evaluation of potential mechanisms for these observations. We compared associations of urine cadmium with kidney function measures based on serum cystatin C to those with serum creatinine in 712 lead workers. Mean (standard deviation) molybdenum-corrected urine cadmium, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) eGFR and multi-variable cystatin C eGFR were 1.02 (0.65) μg/g creatinine, and 97.4 (19.2) and 112.0 (17.7) mL/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively. The eGFR measures were moderately correlated (r s =0.5; p 2 ; 95% confidence interval=1.6, 6.6). Urine creatinine was associated with serum creatinine-based but not cystatin-C-based eGFRs. These results support a biomarker-specific, rather than a kidney function, effect underlying the associations observed between higher urine cadmium and creatinine-based kidney function measures. Given the routine use of serum and urine creatinine in kidney and biomarker research, additional research to elucidate the mechanism(s) for these associations is essential.

  18. miR-345 in metastatic colorectal cancer: a non-invasive biomarker for clinical outcome in non-KRAS mutant patients treated with 3rd line cetuximab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jakob V; Rossi, Simona; Jensen, Benny V

    2014-01-01

    for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with cetuximab and irinotecan. METHODS: From 138 patients with mCRC in 3rd line therapy with cetuximab and irinotecan in a prospective phase II study, 738 pretreatment miRNAs were isolated and profiled from whole blood...... to treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. CONCLUSION: We identified miR-345 in whole blood as a potential biomarker for clinical outcome. MiR-345 was a single prognostic biomarker for both OS and PFS in all patients and also in the non-KRAS mutant population....

  19. Urine cup for collection of urine from cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, V; Weiss, M F; Belo, A T; Belyea, R L; Martz, F A; Orma, A H

    1988-08-01

    A urine cup for continuous and complete collection of urine from cows was constructed from Plastisol, cotton webb strapping, Velcro Brand touch fasteners [corrected], snap-fasteners, denim patches, weather stripping, and vacuum hose. The urine cup was made from Plastisol using a heated lead mold. It was large enough to enclose a 9 cm x 6 cm area around the vulva of a cow and was attached by strapping and Velcro Brand touch fasteners [corrected] to patches glued to the rump. Urine cups were used repeatedly and provided for long-term collection of urine from cows, eliminating the need for indwelling catheters. Applications include long-term nutrient balance, radioisotope, and metabolism studies.

  20. Stratum corneum biomarkers for inflammatory skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focusses on development of biomarkers, obtained by a non-invasive sampling method, for skin inflammatory diseases relevant for occupational settings; irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and atopic dermatitis (AD). In various studies, in which different

  1. Comparison of Depletion Strategies for the Enrichment of Low-Abundance Proteins in Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Szymon; Vougas, Konstantinos; Zoidakis, Jerome; Latosinska, Agnieszka; Mullen, William; Spasovski, Goce; Mischak, Harald; Vlahou, Antonia; Jankowski, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Proteome analysis of complex biological samples for biomarker identification remains challenging, among others due to the extended range of protein concentrations. High-abundance proteins like albumin or IgG of plasma and urine, may interfere with the detection of potential disease biomarkers. Currently, several options are available for the depletion of abundant proteins in plasma. However, the applicability of these methods in urine has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we compared different, commercially available immunodepletion and ion-exchange based approaches on urine samples from both healthy subjects and CKD patients, for their reproducibility and efficiency in protein depletion. A starting urine volume of 500 μL was used to simulate conditions of a multi-institutional biomarker discovery study. All depletion approaches showed satisfactory reproducibility (n=5) in protein identification as well as protein abundance. Comparison of the depletion efficiency between the unfractionated and fractionated samples and the different depletion strategies, showed efficient depletion in all cases, with the exception of the ion-exchange kit. The depletion efficiency was found slightly higher in normal than in CKD samples and normal samples yielded more protein identifications than CKD samples when using both initial as well as corresponding depleted fractions. Along these lines, decrease in the amount of albumin and other targets as applicable, following depletion, was observed. Nevertheless, these depletion strategies did not yield a higher number of identifications in neither the urine from normal nor CKD patients. Collectively, when analyzing urine in the context of CKD biomarker identification, no added value of depletion strategies can be observed and analysis of unfractionated starting urine appears to be preferable.

  2. Cortisol in urine and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurwitz Eller, N; Netterstrøm, B; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis.......The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis....

  3. Urinary phenylacetylglutamine as dosing biomarker for patients with urea cycle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarani, M; Diaz, G A; Rhead, W; Lichter-Konecki, U; Bartley, J; Feigenbaum, A; Longo, N; Berquist, W; Berry, S A; Gallagher, R; Bartholomew, D; Harding, C O; Korson, M S; McCandless, S E; Smith, W; Vockley, J; Bart, S; Kronn, D; Zori, R; Cederbaum, S; Dorrani, N; Merritt, J L; Sreenath-Nagamani, Sandesh; Summar, M; Lemons, C; Dickinson, K; Coakley, D F; Moors, T L; Lee, B; Scharschmidt, B F

    2012-11-01

    to capture trough and peak, and the inconsistency between phenylacetic acid and urinary phenylacetylglutamine as a marker of waste nitrogen scavenging limit the utility of plasma levels for therapeutic monitoring. By contrast, 24-hour urinary phenylacetylglutamine and morning spot urine phenylacetylglutamine correlate strongly with dose and appear to be clinically useful non-invasive biomarkers for compliance and therapeutic monitoring. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Urinary apolipoprotein M as a biomarker of acute kidney injury in children undergoing heart surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarrer, Eva Martha Madsen; Andersen, Henrik Ørbæk; Helvind, Morten

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether apoM is excreted in urine of children undergoing heart surgery and the potential of apoM as early biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI). MATERIALS & METHODS: Urine was collected in children undergoing heart surgery. ApoM was measured with ELISA. U-apoM was characterized.......018). Sensitivity was 0.71 and specificity was 0.68 at a cutoff level at 1.45 nmol/l. CONCLUSION: ApoM is excreted in the urine of children after cardiac surgery. Its potential as biomarker of AKI deserves exploration....

  5. Exosomes As Potential Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Colorectal Cancer: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kha Wai Hon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of colorectal cancer (CRC cases have increased gradually year by year. In fact, CRC is one of the most widely diagnosed cancer in men and women today. This disease is usually diagnosed at a later stage of the development, and by then, the chance of survival has declined significantly. Even though substantial progress has been made in understanding the basic molecular mechanism of CRC, there is still a lack of understanding in using the available information for diagnosing CRC effectively. Liquid biopsies are minimally invasive and have become the epitome of a good screening source for stage-specific diagnosis, measuring drug response and severity of the disease. There are various circulating entities that can be found in biological fluids, and among them, exosomes, have been gaining considerable attention. Exosomes can be found in almost all biological fluids including serum, urine, saliva, and breast milk. Furthermore, exosomes carry valuable molecular information such as proteins and nucleic acids that directly reflects the source of the cells. Nevertheless, the inconsistent yield and isolation process and the difficulty in obtaining pure exosomes have become major obstacles that need to be addressed. The potential usage of exosomes as biomarkers have not been fully validated and explored yet. This review attempts to uncover the potential molecules that can be derived from CRC-exosomes as promising biomarkers or molecular targets for effective diagnosing of CRC.

  6. Proteomic profiling of urine for the detection of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakelam Michael JO

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death in the developed world. To date, no blood or stool biomarkers with both high sensitivity and specificity for potentially curable early stage disease have been validated for clinical use. SELDI and MALDI profiling are being used increasingly to search for biomarkers in both blood and urine. Both techniques provide information predominantly on the low molecular weight proteome ( Results We collected urine from 67 patients with colorectal cancer and 72 non-cancer control subjects, diluted to a constant protein concentration and generated MALDI and SELDI spectra. The intensities of 19 peaks differed significantly between cancer and non-cancer patients by both t-tests and after adjusting for confounders using multiple linear regressions. Logistic regression classifiers based on peak intensities identified colorectal cancer with up to 78% sensitivity at 87% specificity. We identified and independently quantified 3 of the discriminatory peaks using synthetic stable isotope peptides (an 1885 Da fragment of fibrinogen and hepcidin-20 or ELISA (β2-microglobulin. Conclusion Changes in the urine proteome may aid in the early detection of colorectal cancer.

  7. MICROBIOTA URINE BEFORE AND AFTER LITHOTRIPSY FOR RENAL STONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Naboka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL in spite of the low invasiveness and high efficiency is accompanied by an infectious- inflammatory complications and renal parenchymal injury . Dynamics of microbial spectrum urine and the impact of postoperative antibiotic therapy currently remains unexplored. The study included 30 patients subjected to ESWL. Bacteriological study was midstream morning urine before ESWL, 1, 3 days after ESWL, and midstream urine in the first urination after ESWL. All patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I consisted of patients (46.7% with antibiotic therapy . Group II patients (53.3 % antibiotic therapy was performed. In most cases (97.8 % were bacteriuria , while in 75% of cases highlighted in the various options bacterial associations representation aerobic- anaerobic mixed infection, among which was dominated by non-clostridial anaerobic bacteria in all samples. Revealed that after ESWL microbial spectrum urine does not change in any case within 3 days , except for Enterobacteriaceae, but the frequency of occurrence and level of bacteriuria vary for different periods after surgery and fees or absence of antibiotic therapy.

  8. Variation of nephrotoxicity biomarkers by urinary storage condition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jung-Min; Han, Young-Hwan; Choi, Su-Jeong; Park, Ju-Seong; Jang, Jeong-Jun; Bae, Re-Ji-Na; Lee, Mi Ju; Kim, Myoung Jun; Lee, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Duyeol; Lee, Hye-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Park, Cheol-Beom; Kang, Jin Seok; Kang, Jong-Koo

    2014-12-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the use of several nephrotoxicity biomarkers in preclinical experiments. In addition, it has been indicated that the result may have been influenced by secondary factors, such as sample storage condition or storage period. In this study, we have assessed the variation in urinary nephrotoxicity biomarkers as a result of urine storage conditions and storage period of the urine. Urine was sampled from specific pathogen-free Sprague-Dawley rats (19 weeks old), which were housed individually in hanged stainless steel wire mesh cages. Urine was stored at 20℃, at 4℃, or at -70℃ after sampling. The levels of the biomarkers such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M), cystatin-C (Cys-C), N-acetyl-β- D-glucosaminidase (NAG), micro albumin (MA), micro protein (MP) were measured at 6, 24, 48 and 144 hr after sampling. The B2M level was significantly decreased at 6, 24, 48, and 144 hr compared to 0 hr at -70℃ (p storage conditions. Taken together, B2M and Cys-C levels were modulated by storage temperature and period. For the enhancement of test accuracy, it is suggested that strict protocols be established for samples to minimize the effects of the storage conditions on the detected levels of biomarkers.

  9. Prostate cancer biomarker profiles in urinary sediments and exosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, S.; Birker, I.L.; Smit, F.P.; Leyten, G.H.J.M.; Reijke, T.M. de; Oort, I.M. van; Mulders, P.F.A.; Jannink, S.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Urinary biomarker tests for diagnosing prostate cancer have gained considerable interest. Urine is a complex mixture that can be subfractionated. We evaluated 2 urinary fractions that contain nucleic acids, ie cell pellets and exosomes. The influence of digital rectal examination before

  10. Urinary metalloproteinases: noninvasive biomarkers for breast cancer risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pories, Susan E; Zurakowski, David; Roy, Roopali

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and a disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM 12) can be detected in the urine of breast cancer patients and provide independent prediction of disease status. To evaluate the potential of urinary metalloproteinases as biomarkers to predict breast cancer risk statu...

  11. Unrestrictive identification of post-translational modifications in the urine proteome without enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Research on the human urine proteome may lay the foundation for the discovery of relevant disease biomarkers. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) have important effects on the functions of protein biomarkers. Identifying PTMs without enrichment adds no extra steps to conventional identification procedures for urine proteomics. The only difference is that this method requires software that can conduct unrestrictive identifications of PTMs. In this study, routine urine proteomics techniques were used to identify urine proteins. Unspecified PTMs were searched by MODa and PEAKS 6 automated software, followed by a manual search to screen out in vivo PTMs by removing all in vitro PTMs and amino acid substitutions. Results There were 75 peptides with 6 in vivo PTMs that were found by both MODa and PEAKS 6. Of these, 34 peptides in 18 proteins have novel in vivo PTMs compared with the annotation information of these proteins on the Universal Protein Resource website. These new in vivo PTMs had undergone methylation, dehydration, oxidation, hydroxylation, phosphorylation, or dihydroxylation. Conclusions In this study, we identified PTMs of urine proteins without the need for enrichment. Our investigation may provide a useful reference for biomarker discovery in the future. PMID:23317149

  12. Deep Space Environmental Effects on Immune, Oxidative Stress and Damage, and Health and Behavioral Biomarkers in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, B.; Zwart, S.; Smith, S. M.; Simonsen, L. C.; Williams, T.; Antonsen, E.

    2018-02-01

    Biomarkers will be assessed in biological samples (saliva, blood, urine, feces) collected from crewmembers and returned to Earth at various intervals, mirroring (where feasible) collection timepoints used on the International Space Station (ISS).

  13. Biomarkers to Monitor Gluten-Free Diet Compliance in Celiac Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Moreno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluten-free diet (GFD is the only treatment for celiac disease (CD. There is a general consensus that strict GFD adherence in CD patients leads to full clinical and histological remission accompanied by improvement in quality of life and reduced long-term complications. Despite the importance of monitoring the GFD, there are no clear guidelines for assessing the outcome or for exploring its adherence. Available methods are insufficiently accurate to identify occasional gluten exposure that may cause intestinal mucosal damage. Serological tests are highly sensitive and specific for diagnosis, but do not predict recovery and are not useful for follow-up. The use of serial endoscopies, it is invasive and impractical for frequent monitoring, and dietary interview can be subjective. Therefore, the detection of gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP in feces and urine have been proposed as new non-invasive biomarkers to detect gluten intake and verify GFD compliance in CD patients. These simple immunoassays in human samples could overcome some key unresolved scientific and clinical problems in CD management. It is a significant advance that opens up new possibilities for the clinicians to evaluate the CD treatment, GFD compliance, and improvement in the quality of life of CD patients.

  14. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in urine. A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsters, A; Micalessi, I; Bilcke, J; Ieven, M; Bogers, J; Van Damme, P

    2012-05-01

    The detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in urine, a specimen easily obtained by a non-invasive self-sampling method, has been the subject of a considerable number of studies. This review provides an overview of 41 published studies; assesses how different methods and settings may contribute to the sometimes contradictory outcomes; and discusses the potential relevance of using urine samples in vaccine trials, disease surveillance, epidemiological studies, and specific settings of cervical cancer screening. Urine sampling, storage conditions, sample preparation, DNA extraction, and DNA amplification may all have an important impact on HPV DNA detection and the form of viral DNA that is detected. Possible trends in HPV DNA prevalence in urine could be inferred from the presence of risk factors or the diagnosis of cervical lesions. HPV DNA detection in urine is feasible and may become a useful tool but necessitates further improvement and standardization.

  15. Catecholamines, Plasma and Urine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... blood pressure, and epinephrine increases heart rate and metabolism . After completing their actions, catecholamines are metabolized to ...

  16. Testing of the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for a soluble biomarker reflecting structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic literature search on 5 candidate biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syversen, Silje W; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for soluble biomarkers by assessing the strength of literature evidence in support of 5 candidate biomarkers. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted on the 5 soluble biomarkers RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), matrix...... metalloprotease (MMP-3), urine C-telopeptide of types I and II collagen (U-CTX-I and U CTX-II), focusing on the 14 OMERACT 8 criteria. Two electronic voting exercises were conducted to address: (1) strength of evidence for each biomarker as reflecting structural damage according to each individual criterion...

  17. Impedance ratio method for urine conductivity-invariant estimation of bladder volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schlebusch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive estimation of bladder volume could help patients with impaired bladder volume sensation to determine the right moment for catheterisation. Continuous, non-invasive impedance measurement is a promising technology in this scenario, although influences of body posture and unknown urine conductivity limit wide clinical use today. We studied impedance changes related to bladder volume by simulation, in-vitro and in-vivo measurements with pigs. In this work, we present a method to reduce the influence of urine conductivity to cystovolumetry and bring bioimpedance cystovolumetry closer to a clinical application.

  18. Elevated Eosinophil Protein X in Urine from Healthy Neonates Precedes Development of Atopy in the First 6 Years of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans

    2011-01-01

    -prostaglandin-F2a was associated with any of the atopic phenotypes. Conclusion Eosinophil protein-X in urine from asymptomatic neonates is a biomarker significantly associated with later development of allergic sensitization, nasal eosinophilia and eczema during the first 6 years of life. These findings suggest...... D2 metabolite) assessed in urine from healthy at-risk neonates precede development of atopic disease during the first 6 years of life. Methods We measured eosinophil protein-X (N=369), leukotriene-C4/D4/E4 (N=367), and 11ß-prostaglandin-F2a (N=366) in urine from 1-month-old children participating...... untill age 6 years. Associations between urinary biomarkers and development of atopic traits were investigated using general estimating equations, logistic regression and Cox regression. Measurements and Main Results Eosinophil protein-X in the urine of the asymptomatic 1-month-old neonates...

  19. The Cutoff Level for Urine Protein in Urine Immunofixation Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Curek, Gulten; Eren, Esin; Aydin, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) maintains its importance in diagnosing monoclonal gammopathies. In particular, urine IFE detects free light chains (FLC) in urine samples even at low concentrations and offers higher sensitivity compared to serum electrophoresis and serum IFE. The aim of the present study was to determine the place and significance of quantitative urinary protein measurement before IFE in interpreting the results of subsequent IFE and to determine the most appropriate protein concentrations for the appearance of bands. The records of a total of 600 patients, who underwent screening for Bence Jones proteinuria using IFE on 24-hour urine, were retrospectively reviewed. Urine IFE was performed using Helena SAS-I and SAS-I devices. The total protein concentration in the urine was quantitatively determined by the Pyrogallol red method, and the urine albumin level was determined using the immunoturbidimetric method. These analyses were measured on an Olympus/Beckmann AU5800. The evaluation of IFE results revealed that 311 patients had normal results, 108 patients had monoclonal bands, five patients had biclonal bands, 28 had polyclonal bands, and 148 patients had various degrees of proteinuria. ROC curves were created in order to determine the most appropriate urinary protein and albumin levels to observe bands in IFE. Accordingly, urine baseline protein level (mg/dL) showed the highest AUC value (cutoff value: 19.4 mg/dL, sensitivity: 92%, specificity: 98.2%, AUC: 0.972). The present study showed that quantitative protein measurement before IFE eliminated the disadvantages associated with the IFE method and its interpretation.

  20. Reproducibility of NMR Analysis of Urine Samples: Impact of Sample Preparation, Storage Conditions, and Animal Health Status

    OpenAIRE

    Schreier, Christina; Kremer, Werner; Huber, Fritz; Neumann, Sindy; Pagel, Philipp; Lienemann, Kai; Pestel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Spectroscopic analysis of urine samples from laboratory animals can be used to predict the efficacy and side effects of drugs. This employs methods combining 1H NMR spectroscopy with quantification of biomarkers or with multivariate data analysis. The most critical steps in data evaluation are analytical reproducibility of NMR data (collection, storage, and processing) and the health status of the animals, which may influence urine pH and osmolarity. Methods. We treated rats wit...

  1. Urine 1,6-Hexamethylene Diamine (HDA) Levels Among Workers Exposed to 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate (HDI)

    OpenAIRE

    Gaines, Linda G. T.; Fent, Kenneth W.; Flack, Sheila L.; Thomasen, Jennifer M.; Ball, Louise M.; Richardson, David B.; Ding, Kai; Whittaker, Stephen G.; Nylander-french, Leena A.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary 1,6-hexamethylene diamine (HDA) may serve as a biomarker for systemic exposure to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) in occupationally exposed populations. However, the quantitative relationships between dermal and inhalation exposure to HDI and urine HDA levels have not been established. We measured acid-hydrolyzed urine HDA levels along with dermal and breathing-zone levels of HDI in 48 automotive spray painters. These measurements were conducted over the course of an entire workd...

  2. Innovative biomarkers for predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus: relevance to dietary management of frailty in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikwuobe, John; Bellary, Srikanth; Griffiths, Helen R

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases in prevalence in the elderly. There is evidence for significant muscle loss and accelerated cognitive impairment in older adults with T2DM; these comorbidities are critical features of frailty. In the early stages of T2DM, insulin sensitivity can be improved by a "healthy" diet. Management of insulin resistance by diet in people over 65 years of age should be carefully re-evaluated because of the risk for falling due to hypoglycaemia. To date, an optimal dietary programme for older adults with insulin resistance and T2DM has not been described. The use of biomarkers to identify those at risk for T2DM will enable clinicians to offer early dietary advice that will delay onset of disease and of frailty. Here we have used an in silico literature search for putative novel biomarkers of T2DM risk and frailty. We suggest that plasma bilirubin, plasma, urinary DPP4-positive microparticles and plasma pigment epithelium-derived factor merit further investigation as predictive biomarkers for T2DM and frailty risk in older adults. Bilirubin is screened routinely in clinical practice. Measurement of specific microparticle frequency in urine is less invasive than a blood sample so is a good choice for biomonitoring. Future studies should investigate whether early dietary changes, such as increased intake of whey protein and micronutrients that improve muscle function and insulin sensitivity, affect biomarkers and can reduce the longer term complication of frailty in people at risk for T2DM.

  3. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fataneh Karandish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  4. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandish, Fataneh; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%-3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  5. Biomarkers in DILI: one more step forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Robles-Díaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite being relatively rare, drug-induced liver injury (DILI is a serious condition, both for the individual patient due to the risk of acute liver failure, and for the drug development industry and regulatory agencies due to associations with drug development attritions, black box warnings and postmarketing withdrawals. A major limitation in DILI diagnosis and prediction is the current lack of specific biomarkers. Despite refined usage of traditional liver biomarkers in DILI, reliable disease outcome predictions are still difficult to make. These limitations have driven the growing interest in developing new more sensitive and specific DILI biomarkers, which can improve early DILI prediction, diagnosis and course of action. Several promising DILI biomarker candidates have been discovered to date, including mechanistic-based biomarker candidates such as glutamate dehydrogenase, high-mobility group box 1 protein and keratin-18, which can also provide information on the injury mechanism of different causative agents. Furthermore, microRNAs have received much attention lately as potential non-invasive DILI biomarker candidates, in particular miR-122. Advances in omics technologies offer a new approach for biomarker exploration studies. The ability to screen a large number of molecules (for example metabolites, proteins or DNA simultaneously enables the identification of ‘toxicity signatures’, which may be used to enhance preclinical safety assessments and disease diagnostics. Omics-based studies can also provide information on the underlying mechanisms of distinct forms of DILI that may further facilitate the identification of early diagnostic biomarkers and safer implementation of personalized medicine. In this review we summarize recent advances in the area of DILI biomarker studies.

  6. Immunoreactive LH in long-term frozen human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet Kaur Surindar; Jimenez, Mark; Newman, Ron; Handelsman, David J

    2014-04-01

    Urine provides a convenient non-invasive alternative to blood sampling for measurement of certain hormones. Urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) measurements have been used for endocrinology research and anti-doping testing. However, the commercially available LH immunoassays are developed and validated for human blood samples but not urine so that LH assays intended for use with urine samples need thorough validation. Therefore, the present study evaluated the measurement of urinary LH immunoreactivity using previously validated immunofluorometric (IF) and immunochemiluminometric (ICL) LH assays after prolonged frozen storage. LH was measured in serial urine samples following administration of a single injection of one of two doses of recombinant human chorionic hormone (rhCG) with assays run at the end of study (2008) and again after four years of frozen (-20 °C) storage where samples were stored without adding preservatives. The ICL assay showed quantitatively reproducible LH measurements after prolonged -20 °C storage. However, the IF immunoassay gave consistently lower LH levels relative to ICL (2008) with a further proportionate reduction after four years of sample storage (2012). Yet, both the assays displayed similar patterns of the time-course of urine LH measurement both before and after four years of frozen storage. In conclusion, we found that both immunoassays are suitable for urinary LH measurements with ICL assay being more robust for quantitative urinary LH measurement such as for anti-doping purposes, whereas the IF could be applicable for research studies where urine LH levels are compared within-study but not in absolute terms. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Low cadmium exposure in males and lactating females–estimation of biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stajnko, Anja [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Falnoga, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid.falnoga@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Mazej, Darja [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jagodic, Marta [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Krsnik, Mladen [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Njegoševa 4, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kobal, Alfred B. [Department of Occupational Health, Idrija Mercury Mine, Arkova 43, Idrija (Slovenia); Prezelj, Marija [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Njegoševa 4, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kononenko, Lijana [Chemical Office of RS, Ministry of Health of RS, Ajdovščina 4, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Horvat, Milena [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2017-01-15

    Background: Urine cadmium (Cd) and renal function biomarkers, mostly analysed in urine spot samples, are well established biomarkers of occupational exposure. Their use and associations at low environmental level are common, but have recently been questioned, particularly in terms of physiological variability and normalisation bias in the case of urine spot samples. Aim: To determine the appropriateness of spot urine and/or blood Cd exposure biomarkers and their relationships with renal function biomarkers at low levels of exposure. To this end, we used data from Slovenian human biomonitoring program involving 1081 Slovenians (548 males, mean age 31 years; 533 lactating females, mean age 29 years; 2007–2015) who have not been exposed to Cd occupationally. Results: Geometric means (GMs) of Cd in blood and spot urine samples were 0.27 ng/mL (0.28 for males and 0.33 for females) and 0.19 ng/mL (0.21 for males and 0.17 for females), respectively. Differing results were obtained when contrasting normalisation by urine creatinine with specific gravity. GMs of urine albumin (Alb), alpha-1-microglobulin (A1M), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were far below their upper reference limits. Statistical analysis of unnormalised or normalised urine data often yielded inconsistent and conflicting results (or trends), so association analyses with unnormalised data were taken as more valid. Relatively weak positive associations were observed between urine Cd (ng/mL) and blood Cd (β=0.11, p=0.002 for males and β=0.33, p<0.001 for females) and for females between urine NAG and blood Cd (β=0.14, p=0.04). No associations were found between other renal function biomarkers and blood Cd. Associations between Cd and renal function biomarkers in urine were stronger (p<0.05, β=0.11–0.63). Mostly, all of the associations stayed significant but weakened after normalisation for diuresis. In the case of A1M, its associations with Cd were influenced by

  8. Low cadmium exposure in males and lactating females–estimation of biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajnko, Anja; Falnoga, Ingrid; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Mazej, Darja; Jagodic, Marta; Krsnik, Mladen; Kobal, Alfred B.; Prezelj, Marija; Kononenko, Lijana; Horvat, Milena

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urine cadmium (Cd) and renal function biomarkers, mostly analysed in urine spot samples, are well established biomarkers of occupational exposure. Their use and associations at low environmental level are common, but have recently been questioned, particularly in terms of physiological variability and normalisation bias in the case of urine spot samples. Aim: To determine the appropriateness of spot urine and/or blood Cd exposure biomarkers and their relationships with renal function biomarkers at low levels of exposure. To this end, we used data from Slovenian human biomonitoring program involving 1081 Slovenians (548 males, mean age 31 years; 533 lactating females, mean age 29 years; 2007–2015) who have not been exposed to Cd occupationally. Results: Geometric means (GMs) of Cd in blood and spot urine samples were 0.27 ng/mL (0.28 for males and 0.33 for females) and 0.19 ng/mL (0.21 for males and 0.17 for females), respectively. Differing results were obtained when contrasting normalisation by urine creatinine with specific gravity. GMs of urine albumin (Alb), alpha-1-microglobulin (A1M), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were far below their upper reference limits. Statistical analysis of unnormalised or normalised urine data often yielded inconsistent and conflicting results (or trends), so association analyses with unnormalised data were taken as more valid. Relatively weak positive associations were observed between urine Cd (ng/mL) and blood Cd (β=0.11, p=0.002 for males and β=0.33, p<0.001 for females) and for females between urine NAG and blood Cd (β=0.14, p=0.04). No associations were found between other renal function biomarkers and blood Cd. Associations between Cd and renal function biomarkers in urine were stronger (p<0.05, β=0.11–0.63). Mostly, all of the associations stayed significant but weakened after normalisation for diuresis. In the case of A1M, its associations with Cd were influenced by

  9. 2D-electrophoresis and the urine proteome map: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candiano, Giovanni; Santucci, Laura; Petretto, Andrea; Bruschi, Maurizio; Dimuccio, Veronica; Urbani, Andrea; Bagnasco, Serena; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2010-03-10

    The discovery of urinary biomarkers is a main topic in clinical medicine. The development of proteomics has rapidly changed the knowledge on urine protein composition and probably will modify it again. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has represented for years the technique of choice for the analysis of urine proteins and it is time to draw some conclusions. This review will focus on major methodological aspects related to urine sample collection, storage and analysis by 2D-PAGE and attempt to define an advanced normal urine protein map. Overall, 1118 spots were reproducibly found in normal urine samples but only 275 were characterized as isoforms of 82 proteins. One-hundred height spots belonging to 30 proteins were also detected in plasma and corresponded to typical plasma components. The identity of most of the proteins found in normal urine by 2D-PAGE remains to be determined, the majority being low-molecular weight proteins (urine composition. Technology advancements in concentrating procedure will improve sensitivity and give the possibility to purify proteins for mass spectrometry. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, E; Gabriel, F; Jeanne-Leroyer, C; Servant, V; Dumas, P-Y

    2018-02-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in a wide range of patients. Early recognition and diagnosis have become a major focus in improving the management and outcomes of this life-threatening disease. IPA typically occurs during a period of severe and prolonged neutropenia. However, solid organ transplant recipients, patients under immunosuppressive therapy or hospitalized in intensive care units are also at risk. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of a combination of clinical, biological and CT scan evidence. The microbiological diagnostic strategy should be adapted to the patient's profile. Conventional methods with culture and species identification remain the standard but early diagnosis has been improved by the use of biomarkers such as galactomannan antigen in serum or in bronchoalveolar lavage. The epidemiology of IPA should change with the increased use of antifungal prophylactic regimens and the arrival of targeted therapies. Other microbiological tools, such as PCR and other biomarkers, are currently being assessed. IPA must be considered in a wide range of patients. Its prognosis remains poor despite progress in the microbiological diagnosis and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2018 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination of biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurfjell, Lennart; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Lundqvist, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The New National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease (AD) incorporate biomarkers in the diagnostic criteria and suggest division of biomarkers into two categories: Aβ accumulation and neuronal degeneration or injury.......The New National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease (AD) incorporate biomarkers in the diagnostic criteria and suggest division of biomarkers into two categories: Aβ accumulation and neuronal degeneration or injury....

  12. Urine Sodium in 3 Consecutive Days Urine collected from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that salt sensitivity, which is a heritable trait, is a hallmark to hypertension in blacks. Previous studies on twenty-four hour urinary sodium were either incomplete or yielded contradictory results possibly from incomplete urine collection. This study attempted complete ...

  13. Exosomes: the future of biomarkers in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Properzi, Francesca; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted into the extracellular environment upon internal vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular content of exosomes is a fingerprint of the releasing cell type and of its status. For this reason, and because they are released in easily accessible body fluids such as blood and urine, they represent a precious biomedical tool. A growing body of evidence suggests that exosomes may be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of malignant tumors. This article focuses on the exploitation of exosomes as diagnostic tools for human tumors and discusses possible applications of the same strategies to other pathologies, such as neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Urine metabolomics in rats after administration of ketamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen C

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Congcong Wen,1 Meiling Zhang,2 Jianshe Ma,2 Lufeng Hu,3 Xianqin Wang,2 Guanyang Lin31Laboratory Animal Centre, 2Analytical and Testing Center, 3First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this study, we developed a urine metabonomic method, based on gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS, to evaluate the effect of ketamine on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminate analysis revealed that ketamine (50 mg/kg induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, at day 7, the level of alanine, butanoic acid, glutamine, butanedioic, trimethylsiloxy, L-aspartic acid, D-glucose, cholesterol, acetamide, and oleic acid of the ketamine group was increased, while the level of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, benzene­acetic acid, threitol, ribitol, xylitol, and glycine decreased. At day 14, the level of alanine, ethanedioic acid, L-proline, glycerol, tetradecanoic acid, l-serine, l-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, d-glucose, cholesterol, heptadecanoic acid, and acetamide in rat urine of the ketamine group was increased, while the 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, benzeneacetic acid, d-ribose, threitol, ribitol, glycine, pyrazine, and oleic acid levels decreased. Our results indicate that metabonomic methods based on GC-MS may be useful to elucidate ketamine abuse, through the exploration of biomarkers.Keywords: GC-MS, abuse, biomarker, metabolite

  15. Identification of microRNAs in blood and urine as tumour markers for the detection of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tölle, Angelika; Jung, Monika; Rabenhorst, Silke; Kilic, Ergin; Jung, Klaus; Weikert, Steffen

    2013-10-01

    Since differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been found to be highly associated with several types of cancer, the goal of the present study was to identify an miRNA fingerprint as a non‑invasive diagnostic tool to detect urinary bladder cancer using the easily accessible samples of whole blood and urine. Blood and urine samples from 4 controls and from patients suffering from superficial and invasive bladder cancer were analyzed using miRNA microarray consisting of 754 human miRNAs from the Sanger database v14. Using RT‑qPCR technique, 6 of the differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in the controls (20 blood, 19 urine samples) and patients with superficial (18 blood, 16 urine samples) or invasive (20 blood and urine samples each) tumours. Three blood miRNAs (miR‑26b‑5p, miR‑144‑5p, miR‑374‑5p) were found to be significantly upregulated in invasive bladder tumour patients (Pbladder tumours with 94% specificity and 65% sensitivity. The urine miR‑1255b‑5p reached 68% specificity and 85% sensitivity in the diagnosis of invasive tumours. This pilot study represents the first characterization of an miRNA profile for urinary bladder tumours in whole blood samples. In addition, it was shown that invasive bladder tumours could be identified by differentially expressed urine miRNAs. Further studies are needed to test the clinical usefulness for bladder cancer detection and surveillance.

  16. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  17. Biomarkers for Lupus Nephritis: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chiu Mok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney disease is one of the most serious manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Despite the improvement in the medical care of SLE in the past two decades, the prognosis of lupus nephritis remains unsatisfactory. Besides exploring more effective but less toxic treatment modalities that will further improve the remission rate, early detection and treatment of renal activity may spare patients from intensive immunosuppressive therapies and reduce renal damage. Conventional clinical parameters such as creatinine clearance, proteinuria, urine sediments, anti-dsDNA, and complement levels are not sensitive or specific enough for detecting ongoing disease activity in the lupus kidneys and early relapse of nephritis. Thus, novel biomarkers are necessary to enhance the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of lupus renal disease, prognostic stratification, monitoring of treatment response, and detection of early renal flares. This paper reviews promising biomarkers that have recently been evaluated in longitudinal studies of lupus nephritis.

  18. DETECTION OF WHOLE BODY OXIDATIVE STRESS IN URINE USING OXYGEN-18 LABELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    DETECTION OF WHOLE BODY OXIDATIVE STRESS IN URINE USING OXYGEN-18 LABELING. R Slade, J L McKee and G E Hatch. PTB, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.Reliable non-invasive markers for detecting oxidative stress in vivo are currently not available. We pr...

  19. Balkan endemic nephropathy: role of ochratoxins A through biomarkers.

    OpenAIRE

    Castegnaro, Marcel; Canadas, Delphine; Vrabcheva, Terry; Petkova-Bocharova, Theodora; Chernozemsky, Ivan N.; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie

    2006-01-01

    Biomarker: DNA adductsExposure/effect represented: ochratoxin A (OTA) / DNA damageStudy type: humans, Dark Agouti ratsStudy design: cross-sectional studyStudy size: 16 healthy volunteersAnalytical technique: OTA food intake, OTA blood concentration and urinary OTA excretion; DNA adducts in kidney of male and female rats using post labellingTissue/biological material/sample size: human blood and urine; Dark Agouti rat blood, urine and kidneyImpact on outcome (including dose-response): Average...

  20. Values of iodine metabolism biomarkers in assessing the iodine nutrition status in surgically treated patients with thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-hua; Wu, Lian; Yu, Song-lin; Fang, Hui-ling; Kamg, Wei-ming; Cheng, Xin-qi; Lu, Jie; Yu, Jian-chun; Qiu, Ling

    2015-04-01

    To assess the clinical application value of iodine metabolism biomarkers in assessing iodine nutrition status in surgically treated patients with thyroid disease. Blood,morning urine and 24-hour urine samples were collected in 31 healthy volunteers and in 30 surgically treated patients with thyroid disease before and after surgery. Iodine concentration was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The iodine metabolism biomarkers including serum iodine (SI), morning urine iodine(UI), morning urine iodine/urine creatinine ratio (UI/UCr), 24-hour urine iodine (24 h UI), and 24-hour urine iodine excretion (24 h UIE) were evaluated in these two groups. In addition, the validation coincidence rate of iodine metabolism biomarkers in healthy volunteers to different reference ranges including World Health Organization, Mayo Clinic, and Quest Diagnostics were calculated. The UI/UCr ratio of pre-operative thyroid disease patients was significantly lower than that of healthy volunteers (P0.05) between these two groups. The SI, UI ,and 24 h UI in postoperative thyroid disease patients were significantly higher than those of the pre-operative patients (all Piodine metabolism biomarkers. The UI/UCr ratio may be used for iodine nutrition evaluation in surgically treated patients with thyroid disease.

  1. CORRELATION OF SPOT URINE ALBUMIN AND 12-HOUR URINE PROTEIN WITH 24-HOUR URINE PROTEIN IN PRE-ECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vinayachandran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pre-eclampsia is defined as the development of new-onset hypertension in the second half of pregnancy often accompanied by new-onset proteinuria with other signs and symptoms. Proteinuria is defined by the excretion of 300 mg or more of protein in a 24-hour urine collection. To avoid time consumed in collection of 24-hour urine specimens, efforts have been made to develop faster methods to determine concentration of urine protein. Preliminary studies have suggested that 12-hour urine protein collection maybe adequate for evaluation of pre-eclampsia with advantage of early diagnosis and treatment of pre-eclampsia as well as potential for early hospital discharge and increased compliance with specimen collection. The aim of the study is to evaluate and correlate spot urine albumin and 12-hour urine protein with 24-hour urine protein in pre-eclampsia. MATERIALS AND METHODS A diagnostic evaluation study- a 24-hour urine protein, 12-hour urine protein and spot urine albumin results are analysed. Correlation of 12-hour urine protein and spot urine albumin with 24-hour urine protein is analysed using SPSS software. The strength of correlation was measured by Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r. Student’s t-test and Chi-square tests were used to compare patients with and without 24-hour urine protein ≥300 mg. Probability value of 165 mg with 24-hour urine protein ≥300 mg suggest that this test has role in the evaluation of women with suspected pre-eclampsia and could be substituted for 24-hour urine protein as a simple, faster and cheaper method.

  2. Measurement and application of purine derivatives: Creatinine ratio in spot urine samples of ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.B.; Jayasuriya, M.C.N.; Makkar, H.P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The daily excretion of purine derivatives in urine has been used to estimate the supply of microbial protein to ruminant animals. The method provides a simple and non-invasive tool to indicate the nutritional status of farm animals. However due to the need for complete collection of urine the potential application at farm level is restricted. Research conducted under the FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project has indicated that it is possible to use the purine derivatives:creatinine ratio measured in several spot urine samples collected within a day, as an index of microbial protein supply in a banding system for farm application. Some theoretical and experimental aspects in the measurement of purine derivatives:creatinine ratio in spot urine samples and the possible application of the banding system at the farm level are discussed. (author)

  3. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method for Future Exploration Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel urine pretreatment that will prevent biological growth or chemical instabilities in urine without using hazardous chemicals is proposed. Untreated urine...

  4. Bladder urine oxygen tension for assessing renal medullary oxygenation in rabbits: experimental and modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouralis, Ioannis; Kett, Michelle M.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Abdelkader, Amany; Layton, Anita T.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Smith, David W.; Lankadeva, Yugeesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tension (Po2) of urine in the bladder could be used to monitor risk of acute kidney injury if it varies with medullary Po2. Therefore, we examined this relationship and characterized oxygen diffusion across walls of the ureter and bladder in anesthetized rabbits. A computational model was then developed to predict medullary Po2 from bladder urine Po2. Both intravenous infusion of [Phe2,Ile3,Orn8]-vasopressin and infusion of NG-nitro-l-arginine reduced urinary Po2 and medullary Po2 (8–17%), yet had opposite effects on renal blood flow and urine flow. Changes in bladder urine Po2 during these stimuli correlated strongly with changes in medullary Po2 (within-rabbit r2 = 0.87–0.90). Differences in the Po2 of saline infused into the ureter close to the kidney could be detected in the bladder, although this was diminished at lesser ureteric flow. Diffusion of oxygen across the wall of the bladder was very slow, so it was not considered in the computational model. The model predicts Po2 in the pelvic ureter (presumed to reflect medullary Po2) from known values of bladder urine Po2, urine flow, and arterial Po2. Simulations suggest that, across a physiological range of urine flow in anesthetized rabbits (0.1–0.5 ml/min for a single kidney), a change in bladder urine Po2 explains 10–50% of the change in pelvic urine/medullary Po2. Thus, it is possible to infer changes in medullary Po2 from changes in urinary Po2, so urinary Po2 may have utility as a real-time biomarker of risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27385734

  5. A magnetic bead-based method for concentrating DNA from human urine for downstream detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Hali; Russ, Patricia K; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2013-01-01

    Due to the presence of PCR inhibitors, PCR cannot be used directly on most clinical samples, including human urine, without pre-treatment. A magnetic bead-based strategy is one potential method to collect biomarkers from urine samples and separate the biomarkers from PCR inhibitors. In this report, a 1 mL urine sample was mixed within the bulb of a transfer pipette containing lyophilized nucleic acid-silica adsorption buffer and silica-coated magnetic beads. After mixing, the sample was transferred from the pipette bulb to a small diameter tube, and captured biomarkers were concentrated using magnetic entrainment of beads through pre-arrayed wash solutions separated by small air gaps. Feasibility was tested using synthetic segments of the 140 bp tuberculosis IS6110 DNA sequence spiked into pooled human urine samples. DNA recovery was evaluated by qPCR. Despite the presence of spiked DNA, no DNA was detectable in unextracted urine samples, presumably due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. However, following extraction with the magnetic bead-based method, we found that ∼50% of spiked TB DNA was recovered from human urine containing roughly 5×10(3) to 5×10(8) copies of IS6110 DNA. In addition, the DNA was concentrated approximately ten-fold into water. The final concentration of DNA in the eluate was 5×10(6), 14×10(6), and 8×10(6) copies/µL for 1, 3, and 5 mL urine samples, respectively. Lyophilized and freshly prepared reagents within the transfer pipette produced similar results, suggesting that long-term storage without refrigeration is possible. DNA recovery increased with the length of the spiked DNA segments from 10±0.9% for a 75 bp DNA sequence to 42±4% for a 100 bp segment and 58±9% for a 140 bp segment. The estimated LOD was 77 copies of DNA/µL of urine. The strategy presented here provides a simple means to achieve high nucleic acid recovery from easily obtained urine samples, which does not contain inhibitors of PCR.

  6. A magnetic bead-based method for concentrating DNA from human urine for downstream detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hali Bordelon

    Full Text Available Due to the presence of PCR inhibitors, PCR cannot be used directly on most clinical samples, including human urine, without pre-treatment. A magnetic bead-based strategy is one potential method to collect biomarkers from urine samples and separate the biomarkers from PCR inhibitors. In this report, a 1 mL urine sample was mixed within the bulb of a transfer pipette containing lyophilized nucleic acid-silica adsorption buffer and silica-coated magnetic beads. After mixing, the sample was transferred from the pipette bulb to a small diameter tube, and captured biomarkers were concentrated using magnetic entrainment of beads through pre-arrayed wash solutions separated by small air gaps. Feasibility was tested using synthetic segments of the 140 bp tuberculosis IS6110 DNA sequence spiked into pooled human urine samples. DNA recovery was evaluated by qPCR. Despite the presence of spiked DNA, no DNA was detectable in unextracted urine samples, presumably due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. However, following extraction with the magnetic bead-based method, we found that ∼50% of spiked TB DNA was recovered from human urine containing roughly 5×10(3 to 5×10(8 copies of IS6110 DNA. In addition, the DNA was concentrated approximately ten-fold into water. The final concentration of DNA in the eluate was 5×10(6, 14×10(6, and 8×10(6 copies/µL for 1, 3, and 5 mL urine samples, respectively. Lyophilized and freshly prepared reagents within the transfer pipette produced similar results, suggesting that long-term storage without refrigeration is possible. DNA recovery increased with the length of the spiked DNA segments from 10±0.9% for a 75 bp DNA sequence to 42±4% for a 100 bp segment and 58±9% for a 140 bp segment. The estimated LOD was 77 copies of DNA/µL of urine. The strategy presented here provides a simple means to achieve high nucleic acid recovery from easily obtained urine samples, which does not contain inhibitors of PCR.

  7. Leukocyte counts in urine reflect the risk of concomitant sepsis in bacteriuric infants: A retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harper Marvin B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When urine infections are missed in febrile young infants with normal urinalysis, clinicians may worry about the risk – hitherto unverified – of concomitant invasion of blood and cerebrospinal fluid by uropathogens. In this study, we determine the extent of this risk. Methods In a retrospective cohort study of febrile 0–89 day old infants evaluated for sepsis in an urban academic pediatric emergency department (1993–1999, we estimated rates of bacteriuric sepsis (urinary tract infections complicated by sepsis after stratifying infants by urine leukocyte counts higher, or lower than 10 cells/hpf. We compared the global accuracy of leukocytes in urine, leukocytes in peripheral blood, body temperature, and age for predicting bacteruric sepsis. The global accuracy of each test was estimated by calculating the area under its receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests compared count data. Medians for data not normally distributed were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Two thousand two hundred forty-nine young infants had a normal screening dipstick. None of these developed bacteremia or meningitis despite positive urine culture in 41 (1.8%. Of 1516 additional urine specimens sent for formal urinalysis, 1279 had 0–9 leukocytes/hpf. Urine pathogens were isolated less commonly (6% vs. 76% and at lower concentrations in infants with few, compared to many urine leukocytes. Urine leukocytes (AUC: 0.94 were the most accurate predictors of bacteruric sepsis. Infants with urinary leukocytes Conclusion In young infants evaluated for fever, leukocytes in urine reflect the likelihood of bacteriuric sepsis. Infants with urinary tract infections missed because of few leukocytes in urine are at relatively low risk of invasive bacterial sepsis by pathogens isolated from urine.

  8. Steroid Hydroxylase Activities as Noninvasive Biomarkers of Toxicant Exposure and Effect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leblanc, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    .... The overall goal of this research project was to test the hypothesis that changes in the metabolic elimination of the steroid hormone testosterone could serve as a non-invasive biomarker of toxicant...

  9. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    biomarkers; prediction models; PCA3; TMPRSS2: ERG ; kallikreins; 4KScore; OncotypeDX; 5 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS What were the major goals and...urine, alone or in combination with TMPRSS2: ERG mRNA. (Lead site: FHCRC) Milestone 10. Urine specimens identified for analysis. Due 12/30/2014...COMPLETED Milestone 11. PCA3 and TMPRSS2: ERG validation complete in PASS cohort. Due 12/30/2015 Milestone 12. Manuscript submission of PCA3 and TMPRSS2: ERG

  10. Biomarkers for bladder cancer management: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Wang, Li; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; McBride, Russell; Galsky, Matthew D; Zhu, Jun; Boffetta, Paolo; Zhang, David Y; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and sensitive detection of bladder cancer is critical to diagnose this deadly disease at an early stage, estimate prognosis, predict response to treatment, and monitor recurrence. In past years, laboratory diagnosis and surveillance of urinary bladder cancer have improved significantly. Although urine cytology remains the gold standard test, many new urinary biomarkers have been identified. Furthermore, recent advances in genomic studies of bladder cancer have helped to refine our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, the biological basis for outcome disparities, and to inform more efficient treatment and surveillance strategies. In this article, the established diagnostic tests, newly identified biomarkers and genomic landscape of bladder cancer will be reviewed. PMID:25374904

  11. Standardizing the experimental conditions for using urine in NMR-based metabolomic studies with a particular focus on diagnostic studies: a review

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2014-11-21

    The metabolic composition of human biofluids can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information. Among the biofluids most commonly analyzed in metabolomic studies, urine appears to be particularly useful. It is abundant, readily available, easily stored and can be collected by simple, noninvasive techniques. Moreover, given its chemical complexity, urine is particularly rich in potential disease biomarkers. This makes it an ideal biofluid for detecting or monitoring disease processes. Among the metabolomic tools available for urine analysis, NMR spectroscopy has proven to be particularly well-suited, because the technique is highly reproducible and requires minimal sample handling. As it permits the identification and quantification of a wide range of compounds, independent of their chemical properties, NMR spectroscopy has been frequently used to detect or discover disease fingerprints and biomarkers in urine. Although protocols for NMR data acquisition and processing have been standardized, no consensus on protocols for urine sample selection, collection, storage and preparation in NMR-based metabolomic studies have been developed. This lack of consensus may be leading to spurious biomarkers being reported and may account for a general lack of reproducibility between laboratories. Here, we review a large number of published studies on NMR-based urine metabolic profiling with the aim of identifying key variables that may affect the results of metabolomics studies. From this survey, we identify a number of issues that require either standardization or careful accounting in experimental design and provide some recommendations for urine collection, sample preparation and data acquisition.

  12. Standardizing the experimental conditions for using urine in NMR-based metabolomic studies with a particular focus on diagnostic studies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Luchinat, Claudio; Turano, Paola; Tenori, Leonardo; Roy, Raja; Salek, Reza M; Ryan, Danielle; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel; Wang, Yulan; Brennan, Lorraine; Wishart, David S

    The metabolic composition of human biofluids can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information. Among the biofluids most commonly analyzed in metabolomic studies, urine appears to be particularly useful. It is abundant, readily available, easily stored and can be collected by simple, noninvasive techniques. Moreover, given its chemical complexity, urine is particularly rich in potential disease biomarkers. This makes it an ideal biofluid for detecting or monitoring disease processes. Among the metabolomic tools available for urine analysis, NMR spectroscopy has proven to be particularly well-suited, because the technique is highly reproducible and requires minimal sample handling. As it permits the identification and quantification of a wide range of compounds, independent of their chemical properties, NMR spectroscopy has been frequently used to detect or discover disease fingerprints and biomarkers in urine. Although protocols for NMR data acquisition and processing have been standardized, no consensus on protocols for urine sample selection, collection, storage and preparation in NMR-based metabolomic studies have been developed. This lack of consensus may be leading to spurious biomarkers being reported and may account for a general lack of reproducibility between laboratories. Here, we review a large number of published studies on NMR-based urine metabolic profiling with the aim of identifying key variables that may affect the results of metabolomics studies. From this survey, we identify a number of issues that require either standardization or careful accounting in experimental design and provide some recommendations for urine collection, sample preparation and data acquisition.

  13. Standardizing the experimental conditions for using urine in NMR-based metabolomic studies with a particular focus on diagnostic studies: a review

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Luchinat, Claudio; Turano, Paola; Tenori, Leonardo; Roy, Raja; Salek, Reza M.; Ryan, Danielle; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel; Wang, Yulan; Brennan, Lorraine; Wishart, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic composition of human biofluids can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information. Among the biofluids most commonly analyzed in metabolomic studies, urine appears to be particularly useful. It is abundant, readily available, easily stored and can be collected by simple, noninvasive techniques. Moreover, given its chemical complexity, urine is particularly rich in potential disease biomarkers. This makes it an ideal biofluid for detecting or monitoring disease processes. Among the metabolomic tools available for urine analysis, NMR spectroscopy has proven to be particularly well-suited, because the technique is highly reproducible and requires minimal sample handling. As it permits the identification and quantification of a wide range of compounds, independent of their chemical properties, NMR spectroscopy has been frequently used to detect or discover disease fingerprints and biomarkers in urine. Although protocols for NMR data acquisition and processing have been standardized, no consensus on protocols for urine sample selection, collection, storage and preparation in NMR-based metabolomic studies have been developed. This lack of consensus may be leading to spurious biomarkers being reported and may account for a general lack of reproducibility between laboratories. Here, we review a large number of published studies on NMR-based urine metabolic profiling with the aim of identifying key variables that may affect the results of metabolomics studies. From this survey, we identify a number of issues that require either standardization or careful accounting in experimental design and provide some recommendations for urine collection, sample preparation and data acquisition.

  14. Effects of Mountain Ultra-Marathon Running on ROS Production and Oxidative Damage by Micro-Invasive Analytic Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Mrakic-Sposta

    Full Text Available Aiming to gain a detailed insight into the physiological mechanisms involved under extreme conditions, a group of experienced ultra-marathon runners, performing the mountain Tor des Géants® ultra-marathon: 330 km trail-run in Valle d'Aosta, 24000 m of positive and negative elevation changes, was monitored. ROS production rate, antioxidant capacity, oxidative damage and inflammation markers were assessed, adopting micro-invasive analytic techniques.Forty-six male athletes (45.04±8.75 yr, 72.6±8.4 kg, 1.76±0.05 m were tested. Capillary blood and urine were collected before (Pre-, in the middle (Middle- and immediately after (Post- Race. Samples were analyzed for: Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS production by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance; Antioxidant Capacity by Electrochemistry; oxidative damage (8-hydroxy-2-deoxy Guanosine: 8-OH-dG; 8-isoprostane: 8-isoPGF2α and nitric oxide metabolites by enzymatic assays; inflammatory biomarkers (plasma and urine interleukin-6: IL-6-P and IL-6-U by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA; Creatinine and Neopterin by HPLC, hematologic (lactate, glucose and hematocrit and urine parameters by standard analyses.Twenty-five athletes finished the race, while twenty-one dropped out of it. A significant increase (Post-Race vs Pre of the ROS production rate (2.20±0.27 vs 1.65±0.22 μmol.min-1, oxidative damage biomarkers (8-OH-dG: 6.32±2.38 vs 4.16±1.25 ng.mg-1 Creatinine and 8-isoPGF2α: 1404.0±518.30 vs 822.51±448.91 pg.mg-1Creatinine, inflammatory state (IL-6-P: 66.42±36.92 vs 1.29±0.54 pg.mL-1 and IL-6-U: 1.33±0.56 vs 0.71±0.17 pg.mL1 and lactate production (+190%, associated with a decrease of both antioxidant capacity (-7% and renal function (i.e. Creatinine level +76% was found.The used micro-invasive analytic methods allowed us to perform most of them before, during and immediately after the race directly in the field, by passing the need of storing and transporting samples for further analysis

  15. Technology Development for Detection of Circulating Disease Biomarkers from Liquid Biopsies Using Multifunctional Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Mustafa

    detection methods were developed by utilizing nanomaterials as a capture nanoplatform, DNA/RNA as circulating diseases-specific biomarkers and biofluids as minimally invasive sources. The first multi-marker detection approach is to engineer water-soluble two-dimensional nanoassemblies and develop methodologies to detect circulating miRNAs and DNAs in human body fluids for the state-of-the art diagnostics. Nano-graphene oxide in this approach serves as a highly stable and functional template with extraordinary ssDNA adsorption capacity and fast and ultra-efficient fluorescence quenching capability lead us to engineer a fluorescently silent nano-platform. As a first application, we demonstrate the successful utilization of nano-graphene oxide based nanoplatform for the simultaneous detection of circulating prostate cancer biomarkers from various body fluids including blood, urine, and saliva. Later, we advanced nGO-based detection nanoplatform to an easily tunable and very highly controllable stimuli-responsive nano-device by attaching thermo-responsive polymers to advance its applications and minimize the drawbacks. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  16. Nutrient and energy recovery from urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntke, P.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: urine, urine treatment, nutrient recovery, microbial fuel cells, energy production from urine, membrane capacitive deionization.

    In conventional wastewater treatment plants large amounts of energy are required for the removal and recovery of nutrients (i.e. nitrogen and

  17. Raman spectroscopy applied to identify metabolites in urine of physically active subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Letícia Parada; Silveira, Landulfo; da Silva, Alexandre Galvão; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Rocco, Débora Dias Ferraretto Moura

    2017-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and non-destructive technique suitable for biological fluids analysis. In this work, dispersive Raman spectroscopy has been employed as a rapid and nondestructive technique to detect the metabolites in urine of physically active subjects before and after vigorous 30min pedaling or running compared to sedentary subjects. For so, urine samples from 9 subjects were obtained before and immediately after physical activities and submitted to Raman spectroscopy (830nm excitation, 250mW laser power, 20s integration time) and compared to urine from 5 sedentary subjects. The Raman spectra of urine from sedentary showed peaks related to urea, creatinine, ketone bodies, phosphate and other nitrogenous compounds. These metabolic biomarkers presented peaks with different intensities in the urine of physically active individuals after exercises compared to before, measured by the intensity of selected peaks the Raman spectra, which means different concentrations after training. These peaks presented different intensity values for each subject before physical activity, also behaving differently compared to the post-training: some subjects presented increase while others decrease the intensity. Raman spectroscopy may allow the development of a rapid and non-destructive test for metabolic evaluation of the physical training in active and trained subjects using urine samples, allowing nutrition adjustment with the sport's performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mycotoxin exposure in rural residents in northern Nigeria: a pilot study using multi-urinary biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Warth, Benedikt; Ogara, Isaac M; Abia, Wilfred A; Ezekiel, Victoria C; Atehnkeng, Joseph; Sulyok, Michael; Turner, Paul C; Tayo, Grace O; Krska, Rudolf; Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit

    2014-05-01

    A pilot, cross-sectional, correlational study was conducted in eight rural communities in northern Nigeria to investigate mycotoxin exposures in 120 volunteers (19 children, 20 adolescents and 81 adults) using a modern LC-MS/MS based multi-biomarker approach. First morning urine samples were analyzed and urinary biomarker levels correlated with mycotoxin levels in foods consumed the day before urine collection. A total of eight analytes were detected in 61/120 (50.8%) of studied urine samples, with ochratoxin A, aflatoxin M1 and fumonisin B1 being the most frequently occurring biomarkers of exposure. These mycotoxin biomarkers were present in samples from all age categories, suggestive of chronic (lifetime) exposures. Rough estimates of mycotoxin intake suggested some exposures were higher than the tolerable daily intake. Overall, rural consumer populations from Nasarawa were more exposed to several mixtures of mycotoxins in their diets relative to those from Kaduna as shown by food and urine biomarker data. This study has shown that mycotoxin co-exposure may be a major public health challenge in rural Nigeria; this calls for urgent intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prostatectomy-based validation of combined urine and plasma test for predicting high grade prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars

    2018-01-01

    standard formulas, while comparisons between groups were performed using the Wilcoxon Rank Sum, Kruskal-Wallis, Chi-Square, and Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: GS as assigned by standard 10-12 core biopsies was 3 + 3 in 90 (29.4%), 3 + 4 in 122 (39.8%), 4 + 3 in 50 (16.3%), and > 4 + 3 in 44 (14.4%) patients....... CONCLUSIONS: This plasma/urine biomarker test accurately predicts high grade cancer as determined by prostatectomy with a sensitivity at 92-97%, while the sensitivity of core biopsies was 78%....... of a test using cell-free RNA levels of biomarkers in predicting prostatectomy results. METHODS: This multicenter community-based prospective study was conducted using urine/blood samples collected from 306 patients. All recruited patients were treatment-naïve, without metastases, and had been biopsied...

  20. Development of Urinary Biomarkers for Internal Exposure by Cesium-137 Using a Metabolomics Approach in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Weber, Waylon; Mak, Tytus D.; Chung, Juijung; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Melo, Dunstana; Brenner, David J.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Cesium-137 is a fission product of uranium and plutonium in nuclear reactors and is released in large quantities during nuclear explosions or detonation of an improvised device containing this isotope. This environmentally persistent radionuclide undergoes radioactive decay with the emission of beta particles as well as gamma radiation. Exposure to 137Cs at high doses can cause acute radiation sickness and increase risk for cancer and death. The serious health risks associated with 137Cs exposure makes it critical to understand how it affects human metabolism and whether minimally invasive and easily accessible samples such as urine and serum can be used to triage patients in case of a nuclear disaster or a radiologic event. In this study, we have focused on establishing a time-dependent metabolomic profile for urine collected from mice injected with 137CsCl. The samples were collected from control and exposed mice on days 2, 5, 20 and 30 after injection. The samples were then analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/TOFMS) and processed by an array of informatics and statistical tools. A total of 1,412 features were identified in ESI+ and ESI− modes from which 200 were determined to contribute significantly to the separation of metabolomic profiles of controls from those of the different treatment time points. The results of this study highlight the ease of use of the UPLC/TOFMS platform in finding urinary biomarkers for 137Cs exposure. Pathway analysis of the statistically significant metabolites suggests perturbations in several amino acid and fatty acid metabolism pathways. The results also indicate that 137Cs exposure causes: similar changes in the urinary excretion levels of taurine and citrate as seen with external-beam gamma radiation; causes no attenuation in the levels of hexanoylglycine and N-acetylspermidine; and has unique effects on the levels of isovalerylglycine and tiglylglycine. PMID

  1. Recent developments in human biomonitoring: non-invasive assessment of target tissue dose and effects of pneumotoxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, A; Corradi, M

    2006-01-01

    Tobacco smoke and polluted environments substantially increase the lung burden of pneumotoxic chemicals, particularly pneumotoxic metallic elements. To achieve a better understanding of the early events between exposure to inhaled toxicants and the onset of adverse effects on the lung, the characterization of dose at the target organ would be extremely useful. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC), obtained by cooling exhaled air under conditions of spontaneous breathing, is a novel technique that could provide a non-invasive assessment of pulmonary pathobiology. Considering that EBC is water practically free of interfering solutes, it represents an ideal biological matrix for elemental characterization. Published data show that several toxic metals and trace elements are detectable in EBC, raising the possibility of using this medium to quantify the lung tissue dose of pneumotoxic substances. This novel approach may represent a significant advance over the analysis of alternative media (blood, serum, urine, hair), which are not as reliable (owing to interfering substances in the complex matrix) and reflect systemic rather than lung (target tissue) levels of both toxic metals and essential trace elements. Data obtained among workers occupationally exposed to either hard metals or chromium (VI) and in smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are reviewed to show that--together with biomarkers of exposure--EBC also allows the simultaneous quantification of biomarkers of effect directly sampled from the epithelial lining fluid, thus providing novel insights on both kinetic and dynamic aspects of metal toxicology.

  2. Diurnal variation and reliability of the urine lactate concentration after maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kosmidis, Ioannis; Sougioultzis, Michail; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Mougios, Vassilis

    2018-01-01

    The postexercise urine lactate concentration is a novel valid exercise biomarker, which has exhibited satisfactory reliability in the morning hours under controlled water intake. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diurnal variation of the postexercise urine lactate concentration and its reliability in the afternoon hours. Thirty-two healthy children (11 boys and 21 girls) and 23 adults (13 men and 10 women) participated in the study. All participants performed two identical sessions of eight 25 m bouts of maximal freestyle swimming executed every 2 min with passive recovery in between. These sessions were performed in the morning and afternoon and were separated by 3-4 days. Adults performed an additional afternoon session that was also separated by 3-4 days. All swimmers drank 500 mL of water before and another 500 mL after each test. Capillary blood and urine samples were collected before and after each test for lactate determination. Urine creatinine, urine density and body water content were also measured. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used as a reliability index between the morning and afternoon tests, as well as between the afternoon test and retest. Swimming performance and body water content exhibited excellent reliability in both children and adults. The postexercise blood lactate concentration did not show diurnal variation, showing a good reliability between the morning and afternoon tests, as well as high reliability between the afternoon test and retest. The postexercise urine density and lactate concentration were affected by time of day. However, when lactate was normalized to creatinine, it exhibited excellent reliability in children and good-to-high reliability in adults. The postexercise urine lactate concentration showed high reliability between the afternoon test and retest, independent of creatinine normalization. The postexercise blood and urine lactate concentrations were significantly correlated in all

  3. On-Demand Urine Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Inscore, Frank; Shende, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip was developed that is capable of extracting biochemical indicators from urine samples and generating their surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) so that the indicators can be quantified and identified. The development was motivated by the need to monitor and assess the effects of extended weightlessness, which include space motion sickness and loss of bone and muscle mass. The results may lead to developments of effective exercise programs and drug regimes that would maintain astronaut health. The analyzer containing the lab-on-a- chip includes materials to extract 3- methylhistidine (a muscle-loss indicator) and Risedronate (a bone-loss indicator) from the urine sample and detect them at the required concentrations using a Raman analyzer. The lab-on- a-chip has both an extractive material and a SERS-active material. The analyzer could be used to monitor the onset of diseases, such as osteoporosis.

  4. Determination of americium in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvydko, N.S.; Mikhajlova, O.A.; Popov, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the determination of americium 241 in urine by a raiochemical purification of the nuclide from uranium (upon co-precipitation of americium 241 with calcium and lanthanum), plutonium, thorum, and polonium 210 (upon co-precipitation of these radionuclides with zirconium iodate). α-Radioactivity was measured either in a thick layer of the americium 241 precipitate with a nonisotope carrier or in thin-layer preparations after electrolytic precipitation of americium 241 on a cathode

  5. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  6. Urine NGAL Predicts Severity of Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Michael; Dent, Catherine L.; Ma, Qing; Dastrala, Sudha; Grenier, Frank; Workman, Ryan; Syed, Hina; Ali, Salman; Barasch, Jonathan; Devarajan, Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: The authors have previously shown that urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), measured by a research ELISA, is an early predictive biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In this study, whether an NGAL immunoassay developed for a standardized clinical platform (ARCHITECT analyzer®, Abbott Diagnostics Division, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) can predict AKI after CPB was tested.

  7. Prostatectomy-based validation of combined urine and plasma test for predicting high grade prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars; Shahbaba, Babak; Uchio, Edward; Feddersen, Søren; Moylan, Donald; Wojno, Kirk; Shore, Neal

    2018-03-01

    Distinguishing between low- and high-grade prostate cancers (PCa) is important, but biopsy may underestimate the actual grade of cancer. We have previously shown that urine/plasma-based prostate-specific biomarkers can predict high grade PCa. Our objective was to determine the accuracy of a test using cell-free RNA levels of biomarkers in predicting prostatectomy results. This multicenter community-based prospective study was conducted using urine/blood samples collected from 306 patients. All recruited patients were treatment-naïve, without metastases, and had been biopsied, designated a Gleason Score (GS) based on biopsy, and assigned to prostatectomy prior to participation in the study. The primary outcome measure was the urine/plasma test accuracy in predicting high grade PCa on prostatectomy compared with biopsy findings. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using standard formulas, while comparisons between groups were performed using the Wilcoxon Rank Sum, Kruskal-Wallis, Chi-Square, and Fisher's exact test. GS as assigned by standard 10-12 core biopsies was 3 + 3 in 90 (29.4%), 3 + 4 in 122 (39.8%), 4 + 3 in 50 (16.3%), and > 4 + 3 in 44 (14.4%) patients. The urine/plasma assay confirmed a previous validation and was highly accurate in predicting the presence of high-grade PCa (Gleason ≥3 + 4) with sensitivity between 88% and 95% as verified by prostatectomy findings. GS was upgraded after prostatectomy in 27% of patients and downgraded in 12% of patients. This plasma/urine biomarker test accurately predicts high grade cancer as determined by prostatectomy with a sensitivity at 92-97%, while the sensitivity of core biopsies was 78%. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Role of Sarcosine, Uracil, and Kynurenic Acid Metabolism in Urine for Diagnosis and Progression Monitoring of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Gkotsos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate sarcosine, uracil, and kynurenic acid in urine as potential biomarkers in prostate cancer detection and progression monitoring. Sarcosine, uracil, and kynurenic acid were measured in urine samples of 32 prostate cancer patients prior to radical prostatectomy, 101 patients with increased prostate-specific antigen prior to ultrasonographically-guided prostatic biopsy collected before and after prostatic massage, and 15 healthy volunteers (controls. The results were related to histopathologic data, Gleason score, and PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen. Metabolites were measured after analysis of urine samples with Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS instrumentation. Multivariate, nonparametric statistical tests including receiver operating characteristics analyses, one-way analysis of variance (Kruskal–Wallis test, parametric statistical analysis, and Pearson correlation, were performed to evaluate diagnostic performance. Decreased median sarcosine and kynurenic acid and increased uracil concentrations were observed for patients with prostate cancer compared to participants without malignancy. Results showed that there was no correlation between the concentration of the studied metabolites and the cancer grade (Gleason score <7 vs. ≥7 and the age of the patients. Evaluation of biomarkers by ROC (Receiving Operating Characteristics curve analysis showed that differentiation of prostate cancer patients from participants without malignancy was not enhanced by sarcosine or uracil levels in urine. In contrast to total PSA values, kynurenic acid was found a promising biomarker for the detection of prostate cancer particularly in cases where collection of urine samples was performed after prostatic massage. Sarcosine and uracil in urine samples of patients with prostate cancer were not found as significant biomarkers for the diagnosis of prostate cancer

  9. Cardiac biomarkers in Neonatology

    OpenAIRE

    Vijlbrief, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the role for cardiac biomarkers in neonatology was investigated. Several clinically relevant results were reported. In term and preterm infants, hypoxia and subsequent adaptation play an important role in cardiac biomarker elevation. The elevated natriuretic peptides are indicative of abnormal function; elevated troponins are suggestive for cardiomyocyte damage. This methodology makes these biomarkers of additional value in the treatment of newborn infants, separate or as a co...

  10. The performance of fully automated urine analysis results for predicting the need of urine culture test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yüksel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Urinalysis and urine culture are most common tests for diagnosis of urinary tract infections. The aim of our study is to examine the diagnostic performance of urine analysis and the role of urine analysis to determine the requirements for urine culture. Methods: Urine culture and urine analysis results of 362 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Culture results were taken as a reference for chemical and microscopic examination of urine and diagnostic accuracy of the test parameters, that may be a marker for urinary tract infection, and the performance of urine analysis were calculated for predicting the urine culture requirements. Results: A total of 362 urine culture results of patients were evaluated and 67% of them were negative. The results of leukocyte esterase and nitrite in chemical analysis and leukocytes and bacteria in microscopic analysis were normal in 50.4% of culture negative urines. In diagnostic accuracy calculations, leukocyte esterase (86.1% and microscopy leukocytes (88.0% were found with high sensitivity, nitrite (95.4% and bacteria (86.6% were found with high specificity. The area under the curve was calculated as 0.852 in ROC analysis for microscopic examination for leukocytes. Conclusion: Full-automatic urine devices can provide sufficient diagnostic accuracy for urine analysis. The evaluation of urine analysis results in an effective way can predict the necessity for urine culture requests and especially may contribute to a reduction in the work load and cost. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 286-289

  11. Fumarase activity: an in vivo and in vitro biomarker for acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Mose; Eldirdiri, Abubakr; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde

    2017-01-01

    (2)] fumarate conversion to [1,4-C-13(2)] malate by fumarase has been proposed as a measure of necrosis in rat tumor models and in chemically induced AKI rats. Here we show that the degradation of cell membranes in connection with necrosis leads to elevated fumarase activity in plasma and urine and secondly...... that hyperpolarized [1,4-C-13(2)] malate production 24 h after reperfusion correlates with renal necrosis in a 40-min unilateral ischemic rat model. Fumarase activity screening on bio-fluids can detect injury severity, in bilateral as well as unilateral AKI models, differentiating moderate and severe AKI as well...... as short-and long-term AKI. Furthermore after verification of renal injury by bio-fluid analysis the precise injury location can be monitored by in vivo measurements of the fumarase activity non-invasively by hyperpolarized [1,4-C-13] fumarate MR imaging. The combined in vitro and in vivo biomarker of AKI...

  12. Crystallization of calcium oxalate in minimally diluted urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, T.; Rodgers, A.

    1998-09-01

    Crystallization of calcium oxalate was studied in minimally diluted (92%) urine using a mixed suspension mixed product crystallizer in series with a Malvern particle sizer. The crystallization was initiated by constant flow of aqueous sodium oxalate and urine into the reaction vessel via two independent feed lines. Because the Malvern cell was in series with the reaction vessel, noninvasive measurement of particle sizes could be effected. In addition, aliquots of the mixed suspension were withdrawn and transferred to a Coulter counter for crystal counting and sizing. Steady-state particle size distributions were used to determine nucleation and growth kinetics while scanning electron microscopy was used to examine deposited crystals. Two sets of experiments were performed. In the first, the effect of the concentration of the exogenous sodium oxalate was investigated while in the second, the effect of temperature was studied. Calcium oxalate nucleation and growth rates were found to be dependent on supersaturation levels inside the crystallizer. However, while growth rate increased with increasing temperature, nucleation rates decreased. The favored phases were the trihydrate at 18°C, the dihydrate at 38° and the monohydrate at 58°C. The results of both experiments are in agreement with those obtained in other studies that have been conducted in synthetic and in maximally diluted urine and which have employed invasive crystal counting and sizing techniques. As such, the present study lends confidence to the models of urinary calcium oxalate crystallization processes which currently prevail in the literature.

  13. Mass spectral analysis of urine proteomic profiles of dairy cows suffering from clinical ketosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuang; Shu, Shi; Xia, Cheng; Wang, Pengxian; Sun, Yuhang; Xu, Chuchu; Li, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    Ketosis is an important metabolic disorder in dairy cows during the transition period. The urine proteomics of ketosis has not been investigated using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). The aim is to determine differences between urine proteomic profiles of healthy cows and those with clinical ketosis, and facilitate studies of the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms that lead to liver pathology in ketosis. We analyzed the urine samples of 20 cows with clinical ketosis (group 1) and 20 control cows (group 2) using SELDI-TOF-MS. Thirty-nine peptide peaks differed between both groups. Polypeptides corresponding to 26 of these differential peptide peaks were identified using the SWISS-PROT protein database. We found that the peaks of 11 distinct polypeptides from the urine samples of the ketosis group were significantly reduced, compared with those of the control group as based on the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Among these were VGF (non-acronymic) protein, amyloid precursor protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, C1INH, apolipoprotein C-III, cystatin C, transthyretin, hepcidin, human neutrophil peptides, and osteopontin. These proteins may represent novel biomarkers of the metabolic changes that occur in dairy cows with ketosis. Our results will help to better understand the physiological changes and pathogenesis observed in cows with ketosis. The SELDI-TOF-MS can be used to understand the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of ketosis and identify biomarkers of the disease.

  14. Measurement of Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Level Based Sensor Color TCS3200 and Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniadi Wardana, Humaidillah; Indahwati, Elly; Arifah Fitriyah, Lina

    2018-04-01

    Design and measurement of Arduino-based urinary (non-invasive) urine glucose using RGB tcs3200 sensor. This research was conducted by making use of the urine in diabetes patients detected by sensor colours then measured levels of colour based on the RGB colour of the urine of diabetics. The detection is done on 4 urine samples with each consisting of 3 diabetics and 1 non-diabetics. Equipment used in this research, among others, Arduino Uno, colour sensor tcs3200, LCD 16x4. The results showed that the detection of RGB values in diabetics 230 with blue and not diabetics 200 with red.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Urine Protein/Creatinine Ratio Is Influenced by Urine Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Yu; Chen, Fu-An; Chen, Chun-Fan; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Shih, Chia-Jen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Wu-Chang; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, An-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Background The usage of urine protein/creatinine ratio to estimate daily urine protein excretion is prevalent, but relatively little attention has been paid to the influence of urine concentration and its impact on test accuracy. We took advantage of 24-hour urine collection to examine both urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPCR) and daily urine protein excretion, with the latter as the reference standard. Specific gravity from a concomitant urinalysis of the same urine sample was used to indicate the urine concentration. Methods During 2010 to 2014, there were 540 adequately collected 24h urine samples with protein concentration, creatinine concentration, total volume, and a concomitant urinalysis of the same sample. Variables associated with an accurate UPCR estimation were determined by multivariate linear regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to determine the discriminant cut-off values of urine creatinine concentration for predicting an accurate UPCR estimation in either dilute or concentrated urine samples. Results Our findings indicated that for dilute urine, as indicated by a low urine specific gravity, UPCR is more likely to overestimate the actual daily urine protein excretion. On the contrary, UPCR of concentrated urine is more likely to result in an underestimation. By ROC curve analysis, the best cut-off value of urine creatinine concentration for predicting overestimation by UPCR of dilute urine (specific gravity ≦ 1.005) was ≦ 38.8 mg/dL, whereas the best cut-off values of urine creatinine for predicting underestimation by UPCR of thick urine were ≧ 63.6 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.015), ≧ 62.1 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.020), ≧ 61.5 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.025), respectively. We also compared distribution patterns of urine creatinine concentration of 24h urine cohort with a concurrent spot urine cohort and found that the underestimation might be more profound in single voided samples

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Urine Protein/Creatinine Ratio Is Influenced by Urine Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Yu; Chen, Fu-An; Chen, Chun-Fan; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Shih, Chia-Jen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Wu-Chang; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, An-Hang

    2015-01-01

    The usage of urine protein/creatinine ratio to estimate daily urine protein excretion is prevalent, but relatively little attention has been paid to the influence of urine concentration and its impact on test accuracy. We took advantage of 24-hour urine collection to examine both urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPCR) and daily urine protein excretion, with the latter as the reference standard. Specific gravity from a concomitant urinalysis of the same urine sample was used to indicate the urine concentration. During 2010 to 2014, there were 540 adequately collected 24h urine samples with protein concentration, creatinine concentration, total volume, and a concomitant urinalysis of the same sample. Variables associated with an accurate UPCR estimation were determined by multivariate linear regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to determine the discriminant cut-off values of urine creatinine concentration for predicting an accurate UPCR estimation in either dilute or concentrated urine samples. Our findings indicated that for dilute urine, as indicated by a low urine specific gravity, UPCR is more likely to overestimate the actual daily urine protein excretion. On the contrary, UPCR of concentrated urine is more likely to result in an underestimation. By ROC curve analysis, the best cut-off value of urine creatinine concentration for predicting overestimation by UPCR of dilute urine (specific gravity ≦ 1.005) was ≦ 38.8 mg/dL, whereas the best cut-off values of urine creatinine for predicting underestimation by UPCR of thick urine were ≧ 63.6 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.015), ≧ 62.1 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.020), ≧ 61.5 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.025), respectively. We also compared distribution patterns of urine creatinine concentration of 24h urine cohort with a concurrent spot urine cohort and found that the underestimation might be more profound in single voided samples. The UPCR in samples with low

  17. Measurement of tritium concentration in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiyama, Shigenobu; Deshimaru, Takehide

    1979-01-01

    Concerning the safety management of the advanced thermal reactor ''Fugen'', the internal exposure management for tritium is important, because heavy water is used as the moderator in the reactor, and tritium is produced in the heavy water. Tritium is the radioactive nuclide with the maximum β-ray energy of 18 keV, and the radiation exposure is limited to the internal exposure in human bodies, as tritium is taken in through the skin and by breathing. The tritium concentration in urine of the operators of the Fugen plant was measured. As for tritium measurement, the analysis of raw urine, the analysis after passing through mixed ion exchange resin and the analysis after distillation are applied. The scintillator, the liquid scintillation counter, the ion exchange resin and the distillator are introduced. The preliminary survey was conducted on the urine sample, the scintillator the calibration, etc. The measuring condition, the measurement of efficiency, and the limitation of detection with various background are explained, with the many experimental data and the calculating formula. Concerning the measured tritium concentration in urine, the tritium concentrations in distilled urine, raw urine and the urine refined with ion exchange resin were compared, and the correlation formulae are presented. The actual tritium concentration value in urine was less than 50 pci/ml. The measuring methods of raw urine and the urine refined with ion exchange resin are adequate as they are quick and accurate. (Nakai, Y.)

  18. Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Cholangiocarcinoma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshering, Gyem; Dorji, Palden Wangyel; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2018-06-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a malignant tumor of the bile duct, is a major public health problem in many Southeast Asian countries, particularly Thailand. The slow progression makes it difficult for early diagnosis and most patients are detected in advanced stages. This study aimed to review all relevant articles related to the biomarkers for the diagnosis of CCA and point out potential biomarkers. A thorough search was performed in PubMed and ScienceDirect for CCA biomarker articles. Required data were extracted. A total of 46 articles that fulfilled the inclusion and had none of the exclusion criteria were included in the analysis (17, 22, 3, 4, and 1 articles on blood, tissue, bile, both blood and tissue, and urine biomarkers, respectively). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), either alone or in combination with other biomarkers, are the most commonly studied biomarkers in the serum. Their sensitivity and specificity ranged from 47.2% to 98.2% and 89.7% to 100%, respectively. However, in the tissue, gene methylations and DNA-related markers were the most studied CCA biomarkers. Their sensitivity and specificity ranged from 58% to 87% and 98% to 100%, respectively. Some articles investigated biomarkers both in blood and tissues, particularly CA19-9 and CEA, with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 33% to 100% and 50% to 97.7%, respectively. Although quite a number of biomarkers with a potential role in the early detection of CCA have been established, it is difficult to single out any particular marker that could be used in the routine clinical settings.

  19. Urine Exosome Isolation and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Jonathan M; Koritzinsky, Erik H; Glispie, Deonna M; Yuen, Peter S T

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-scale, membrane-enclosed vesicles that can potentially be used to detect nephrotoxicity, and reveal the subsequent response of the kidney. Epithelial cells of every nephron segment can contribute to the urinary exosome population, which is rich in potential biomarkers, including membrane proteins such as transporters and receptors, transcription factors, and microRNAs. These exosomal biomarkers may be up- or downregulated upon nephrotoxicant exposure. Exosome isolation is an area of ongoing research. Although faster and simpler methods have been developed, ultracentrifugation remains a mainstay for purification. A single ultracentrifugation step provides an enriched preparation suitable for biomarker discovery, and a second ultracentrifugation on a sucrose/D 2 O cushion provides the purest exosome preparation currently available and may be preferred for bioactivity assays. The concentration of exosomes can be determined using Nanosight Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis and their contents studied with a variety of approaches including western blots for proteins and RT-qPCR for microRNAs.

  20. Detection of titin fragments in urine in response to exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Kanda

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to determine the associations between blood biomarkers and exercise-induced muscle damage. However, poor correlations between the changes in biomarker levels and the magnitude of muscle symptoms have been reported. Recent advances in proteomic tools offer a strategy for the comprehensive analysis of protein expression, which can be used to identify biomarkers. Here, we used a proteomic analysis to identify urinary proteins that appear in response to a calf-raise exercise, including repetitive eccentric muscle contractions, and found that a titin (also known as connectin N-terminal fragment molecule appears in the urine after eccentric exercise. We measured the titin fragment in urine samples from nine individuals before and after eccentric exercise using a newly-established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found that the titin fragment excretion rate increased 96 h after the exercise (5.1 to 77.6 pg/min, p <0.01. The changes in the titin fragment excretion rate were correlated strongly with blood markers of muscle damage and with muscle symptoms. These findings suggest that the urinary titin fragment is potentially a noninvasive biomarker of muscle damage.

  1. The further development of the active urine collection device: a novel continence management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinnion, E; Jowitt, F; Clarke-O'Neill, S; Cottenden, A M; Fader, M; Sutherland, I

    2003-01-01

    Continence difficulties affect the lives of a substantial minority of the population. Women are far more likely than men to be affected by urinary incontinence but the range of management options for them is limited. There has been considerable interest in developing an external urine collection system for women but without success to date. This paper describes the development and preliminary clinical testing of an active urine collection device (AUCD), which could provide a solution for sufferers. The device uses stored vacuum, protected by a high bubble point filter, to remove urine as quickly as it is produced. This allows a small battery-operated pump to provide the required vacuum, enabling the device to be portable. Two different types of non-invasive patient/device interface were developed, and tested by volunteers: urinal and small pad. The slimline urinal was popular with users although liquid noise was a problem. The pad interface was successful on occasions but further work is necessary to produce a reliable pad. This study has successfully demonstrated that a prototype AUCD liquid handling system can remove urine at clinically relevant flowrates. While further development is required, volunteer tests have shown that the AUCD could be a useful advance in continence management.

  2. Biomarkers in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eHendren

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are complex, heterogeneous disorders caused by an interaction between genetic vulnerability and environmental factors. In an effort to better target the underlying roots of ASD for diagnosis and treatment, efforts to identify reliable biomarkers in genetics, neuroimaging, gene expression and measures of the body’s metabolism are growing. For this article, we review the published studies of potential biomarkers in autism and conclude that while there is increasing promise of finding biomarkers that can help us target treatment, there are none with enough evidence to support routine clinical use unless medical illness is suspected. Promising biomarkers include those for mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and immune function. Genetic clusters are also suggesting the potential for useful biomarkers.

  3. A urinary biomarker-based risk score correlates with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Rianne J; van der Leest, Marloes M G; Dijkstra, Siebren; Barentsz, Jelle O; Van Criekinge, Wim; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Schalken, Jack A; Mulders, Peter F A; van Oort, Inge M

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) diagnostics would greatly benefit from more accurate, non-invasive techniques for the detection of clinically significant disease, leading to a reduction of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the association between a novel urinary biomarker-based risk score (SelectMDx), multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) outcomes, and biopsy results for PCa detection. This retrospective observational study used data from the validation study of the SelectMDx score, in which urine was collected after digital rectal examination from men undergoing prostate biopsies. A subset of these patients also underwent a mpMRI scan of the prostate. The indications for performing mpMRI were based on persistent clinical suspicion of PCa or local staging after PCa was found upon biopsy. All mpMRI images were centrally reviewed in 2016 by an experienced radiologist blinded for the urine test results and biopsy outcome. The PI-RADS version 2 was used. In total, 172 patients were included for analysis. Hundred (58%) patients had PCa detected upon prostate biopsy, of which 52 (52%) had high-grade disease correlated with a significantly higher SelectMDx score (P < 0.01). The median SelectMDx score was significantly higher in patients with a suspicious significant lesion on mpMRI compared to no suspicion of significant PCa (P < 0.01). For the prediction of mpMRI outcome, the area-under-the-curve of SelectMDx was 0.83 compared to 0.66 for PSA and 0.65 for PCA3. There was a positive association between SelectMDx score and the final PI-RADS grade. There was a statistically significant difference in SelectMDx score between PI-RADS 3 and 4 (P < 0.01) and between PI-RADS 4 and 5 (P < 0.01). The novel urinary biomarker-based SelectMDx score is a promising tool in PCa detection. This study showed promising results regarding the correlation between the SelectMDx score and mpMRI outcomes, outperforming PCA3. Our results suggest that this risk

  4. Tissue- and Serum-Associated Biomarkers of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ranjit; Lahiri, Nivedita

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the world, is offering a challenge to human beings, with the current modes of treatment being a palliative approach. Lack of proper curative or preventive treatment methods encouraged extensive research around the world with an aim to detect a vaccine or therapeutic target biomolecule that could lead to development of a drug or vaccine against HCC. Biomarkers or biological disease markers have emerged as a potential tool as drug/vaccine targets, as they can accurately diagnose, predict, and even prevent the diseases. Biomarker expression in tissue, serum, plasma, or urine can detect tumor in very early stages of its development and monitor the cancer progression and also the effect of therapeutic interventions. Biomarker discoveries are driven by advanced techniques, such as proteomics, transcriptomics, whole genome sequencing, micro- and micro-RNA arrays, and translational clinics. In this review, an overview of the potential of tissue- and serum-associated HCC biomarkers as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets for drug development is presented. In addition, we highlight recently developed micro-RNA, long noncoding RNA biomarkers, and single-nucleotide changes, which may be used independently or as complementary biomarkers. These active investigations going on around the world aimed at conquering HCC might show a bright light in the near future. PMID:27398029

  5. Tissue- and Serum-Associated Biomarkers of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Chauhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the world, is offering a challenge to human beings, with the current modes of treatment being a palliative approach. Lack of proper curative or preventive treatment methods encouraged extensive research around the world with an aim to detect a vaccine or therapeutic target biomolecule that could lead to development of a drug or vaccine against HCC. Biomarkers or biological disease markers have emerged as a potential tool as drug/vaccine targets, as they can accurately diagnose, predict, and even prevent the diseases. Biomarker expression in tissue, serum, plasma, or urine can detect tumor in very early stages of its development and monitor the cancer progression and also the effect of therapeutic interventions. Biomarker discoveries are driven by advanced techniques, such as proteomics, transcriptomics, whole genome sequencing, micro- and micro-RNA arrays, and translational clinics. In this review, an overview of the potential of tissue- and serum-associated HCC biomarkers as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets for drug development is presented. In addition, we highlight recently developed micro-RNA, long noncoding RNA biomarkers, and single-nucleotide changes, which may be used independently or as complementary biomarkers. These active investigations going on around the world aimed at conquering HCC might show a bright light in the near future.

  6. Oncoprotein DEK as a tissue and urinary biomarker for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Antara; Adelson, Martin E; Mogilevkin, Yakov; Mordechai, Eli; Sidi, Abraham A; Trama, Jason P

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a significant healthcare problem in the United States of America with a high recurrence rate. Early detection of bladder cancer is essential for removing the tumor with preservation of the bladder, avoiding metastasis and hence improving prognosis and long-term survival. The objective of this study was to analyze the presence of DEK protein in voided urine of bladder cancer patients as a urine-based bladder cancer diagnostic test. We examined the expression of DEK protein by western blot in 38 paired transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) bladder tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissue. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine was analyzed by western blot in 42 urine samples collected from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals. The DEK protein is expressed in 33 of 38 bladder tumor tissues with no expression in adjacent normal tissue. Based on our sample size, DEK protein is expressed in 100% of tumors of low malignant potential, 92% of tumors of low grade and in 71% of tumors of high grade. Next, we analyzed 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals for DEK protein expression by western blot analysis. We are the first to show that the DEK protein is present in the urine of bladder cancer patients. Approximately 84% of TCC patient urine specimens were positive for urine DEK. Based on our pilot study of 38 bladder tumor tissue and 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals; DEK protein is expressed in bladder tumor tissue and voided urine of bladder cancer patients. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine is potentially a suitable biomarker for bladder cancer and that the screening for the presence of DEK protein in urine can be explored as a noninvasive diagnostic test for bladder cancer

  7. Green Urine in Traditional Persian Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolouri, Sepideh; Daneshfard, Babak; Jaladat, Amir-Mohammad; Tafazoli, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    The color of urine is an important factor in urine examination, which can help physicians differentiate various diseases. Today, it is known that certain dyes, drug intoxications, and diseases can induce green urine discoloration. In the view of traditional Persian medicine, which is based on humoral medicine, green urine discoloration is generally referred to the dominance of coldness in the body. In fact, it is considered to be a result of a special kind of humoral imbalance and fluid depletion or retention in the human body. Persian scholars believed that green urine could be an indicator of intoxication or a predictor of an imminent spasm or convulsion in pediatric patients. Further investigations could result in finding new diagnostic scales of urine color based on the teachings of traditional Persian medicine. PMID:27103627

  8. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  9. Urine Bag as a Modern Day Matula

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    Since time immemorial uroscopic analysis has been a staple of diagnostic medicine. It received prominence during the middle ages with the introduction of the matula. Urinary discoloration is generally due to changes in urochrome concentration associated with the presence of other endogenous or exogenous pigments. Observation of urine colors has received less attention due to the advances made in urinalysis. A gamut of urine colors can be seen in urine bags of hospitalized patients that may gi...

  10. Radioimmunoassay of triiodothyronine in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosowicz, J.; Gembicki, M.; Schneider, E.; Eder, M.

    1977-01-01

    In 21 cases of hypothyroidism, in 39 cases of hyperthyroidism, in 54 healthy subjects, in 23 pregnant women, and in certain internal diseases determinations of triiodothyronine were carried out in urine by radioimmunoassay. Anti-T 3 antibodies were obtained in rabbits and sheep immunized with a complex of bovine albumin with triiodothyronine ester. Labelled triiodothyronine of high specific activity was obtained by iodinating triodothyronine by the chloramine method. Determinations of triiodothyronine were performed in morning urine and the obtained values were calculated for one-hour excretion. In healthy subjects the excretion of T 3 was from 20 to 95 ng/hour, in hyperthyroidism it was significantly raised to from 120 to over 600 ng/hour, while in most cases of hypothyroidism it was decreased. In pregnancy the urinary excretion of T 3 was normal amounting to from 34 to 87 ng/hour, although in most cases the serum T 3 concentration was raised. In cases of anorexia nervosa and in obese starving subjects the excretion of T 3 fell significantly, and similarly low excretion was found in some cases of debilitating diseases and myocardial infarction. (author)

  11. Prognostic biomarkers in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attur, Mukundan; Krasnokutsky-Samuels, Svetlana; Samuels, Jonathan; Abramson, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Identification of patients at risk for incident disease or disease progression in osteoarthritis remains challenging, as radiography is an insensitive reflection of molecular changes that presage cartilage and bone abnormalities. Thus there is a widely appreciated need for biochemical and imaging biomarkers. We describe recent developments with such biomarkers to identify osteoarthritis patients who are at risk for disease progression. Recent findings The biochemical markers currently under evaluation include anabolic, catabolic, and inflammatory molecules representing diverse biological pathways. A few promising cartilage and bone degradation and synthesis biomarkers are in various stages of development, awaiting further validation in larger populations. A number of studies have shown elevated expression levels of inflammatory biomarkers, both locally (synovial fluid) and systemically (serum and plasma). These chemical biomarkers are under evaluation in combination with imaging biomarkers to predict early onset and the burden of disease. Summary Prognostic biomarkers may be used in clinical knee osteoarthritis to identify subgroups in whom the disease progresses at different rates. This could facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis and allow us to differentiate phenotypes within a heterogeneous knee osteoarthritis population. Ultimately, such findings may help facilitate the development of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). PMID:23169101

  12. Urine Telomerase for Diagnosis and Surveillance of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lamarca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer has increased incidence during last decades. For those patients with nonmuscle involved tumors, noninvasive diagnosis test and surveillance methods must be designed to avoid current cystoscopies that nowadays are done regularly in a lot of patients. Novel urine biomarkers have been developed during last years. Telomerase is important in cancer biology, improving the division capacity of cancer cells. Even urinary telomerase could be a potentially useful urinary tumor marker; its use for diagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients or its impact during surveillance is still unknown. Moreover, there will need to be uniformity and standardization in the assays before it can become useful in clinical practice. It does not seem to exist a real difference between the most classical assays for the detection of urine telomerase (TRAP and hTERT. However, the new detection methods with modified TeloTAGGG telomerase or with gold nanoparticles must also be taken into consideration for the correct development of this diagnosis method. Maybe the target population would be the high-risk groups within screening programs. To date there is no enough evidence to use it alone and to eliminate cystoscopies from the diagnosis and surveillance of these patients. The combination with cytology or FISH is still preferred.

  13. HCC Biomarkers in China and Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Santella

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    A number of different types of biomarkers have been used to understand the etiology and progression of hepatocellular cancer (HCC. Perhaps the most well known are the serum/ plasma markers of HBV or HCV infection. These markers include analysis of viral DNA or proteins or antibodies produced against the viral proteins. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg is most frequently used to determine chronic infection with high or low viral replication, while HBeAg is a measure of chronic infection with high viral replication. Analysis of antibodies includes measurement of anti-HBV core antigen, anti-HBV e antigen and anti-HBsAg. The response to immunization can be monitored by analysis of anti-HBsAg. The other major classes of biomarkers used in studies of HCC are biomarkers of exposure to environmental, lifestyle or dietary carcinogens, biomarkers of oxidative stress and early biologic response. In addition, studies of genetic susceptibility have studied polymorphisms in a number of pathways and their role in HCC risk. The biomarkers of exposure include the measurement of carcinogens in urine and carcinogen-DNA and protein adducts. Examples are measurement of aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites, and DNA and protein adducts.

    Biomarkers of oxidative stress include urinary isoprostanes and 8-oxodeoxyguanosine and oxidized plasma proteins. Most of these assays are immunologic although the use of high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC as well as gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS have been utilized. In nested case-control studies, many of these markers are associated with elevated risk. For example, elevated aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-albumin adducts, aflatoxin metabolites in urine and urinary isoprostanes were observed in baseline samples from

  14. Environmental Chemicals in Urine and Blood: Improving Methods for Creatinine and Lipid Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Upson, Kristen; Cook, Nancy R.; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Investigators measuring exposure biomarkers in urine typically adjust for creatinine to account for dilution-dependent sample variation in urine concentrations. Similarly, it is standard to adjust for serum lipids when measuring lipophilic chemicals in serum. However, there is controversy regarding the best approach, and existing methods may not effectively correct for measurement error. Objectives We compared adjustment methods, including novel approaches, using simulated case–control data. Methods Using a directed acyclic graph framework, we defined six causal scenarios for epidemiologic studies of environmental chemicals measured in urine or serum. The scenarios include variables known to influence creatinine (e.g., age and hydration) or serum lipid levels (e.g., body mass index and recent fat intake). Over a range of true effect sizes, we analyzed each scenario using seven adjustment approaches and estimated the corresponding bias and confidence interval coverage across 1,000 simulated studies. Results For urinary biomarker measurements, our novel method, which incorporates both covariate-adjusted standardization and the inclusion of creatinine as a covariate in the regression model, had low bias and possessed 95% confidence interval coverage of nearly 95% for most simulated scenarios. For serum biomarker measurements, a similar approach involving standardization plus serum lipid level adjustment generally performed well. Conclusions To control measurement error bias caused by variations in serum lipids or by urinary diluteness, we recommend improved methods for standardizing exposure concentrations across individuals. Citation O’Brien KM, Upson K, Cook NR, Weinberg CR. 2016. Environmental chemicals in urine and blood: improving methods for creatinine and lipid adjustment. Environ Health Perspect 124:220–227; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509693 PMID:26219104

  15. Advances in Biomarkers in Critical Ill Polytrauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru F; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Cradigati, Carmen A; Sarandan, Mirela; Nartita, Radu; Popovici, Sonia E; Bedreag, Ovidiu H

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the cases of critically ill polytrauma patients is given by both the primary, as well as the secondary, post-traumatic injuries. The severe injuries of organ systems, the major biochemical and physiological disequilibrium, and the molecular chaos lead to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in this type of patient. The 'gold goal' in the intensive therapy of such patients resides in the continuous evaluation and monitoring of their clinical status. Moreover, optimizing the therapy based on the expression of certain biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity is extremely important because of the clinical course of the critically ill polytrauma patient. In this paper we wish to summarize the recent studies of biomarkers useful for the intensive care unit (ICU) physician. For this study the available literature on specific databases such as PubMed and Scopus was thoroughly analyzed. Each article was carefully reviewed and useful information for this study extracted. The keywords used to select the relevant articles were "sepsis biomarker", "traumatic brain injury biomarker" "spinal cord injury biomarker", "inflammation biomarker", "microRNAs biomarker", "trauma biomarker", and "critically ill patients". For this study to be carried out 556 original type articles were analyzed, as well as case reports and reviews. For this review, 89 articles with relevant topics for the present paper were selected. The critically ill polytrauma patient, because of the clinical complexity the case presents with, needs a series of evaluations and specific monitoring. Recent studies show a series of either tissue-specific or circulating biomarkers that are useful in the clinical status evaluation of these patients. The biomarkers existing today, with regard to the critically ill polytrauma patient, can bring a significant contribution to increasing the survival rate, by adapting the therapy according to their expressions. Nevertheless, the necessity remains to

  16. The Urine Marker Test: An Alternative Approach to Supervised Urine Collection for Doping Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Stine Nylansted; Elsborg, Peter; Wetzke, Monika; Woldemariam, Getachew A; Huppertz, Bernd; Keller, Ruprecht; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Urine sample collection for doping control tests is a key component of the World Anti-Doping Agency's fight against doping in sport. However, a substantial number of athletes experience difficulty when having to urinate under supervision. Furthermore, it cannot always be ensured that athletes are actually delivering their own urine. A method that can be used to alleviate the negative impact of a supervised urination procedure and which can also identify urine as coming from a specific athlete is the urine marker test. Monodisperse low molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are given orally prior to urination. Urine samples can be traced to the donor by analysis of the PEGs previously given. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of the urine marker during urine doping control testing. Two studies investigated athletes' acceptance of this new method via two questionnaires (n = 253). Furthermore, a third study (n = 91) investigated whether ingestion of the marker can identify the urine as coming from a specific person and whether the marker interferes with the detection of prohibited substances. The results indicate that this new method finds wide acceptance both from athletes who have only heard about the procedure and those who have actually tested the new method. Furthermore, the marker, which can identify urine as coming from a specific person, does not interfere with the detection of prohibited substances.

  17. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments. PMID:26855534

  18. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-02-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments.

  19. Global metabolomics reveals potential urinary biomarkers of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma for diagnosis and staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Chen, Yanhua; Zhang, Ruiping; He, Jiuming; Song, Yongmei; Wang, Jingbo; Wang, Huiqing; Wang, Luhua; Zhan, Qimin; Abliz, Zeper

    2016-10-01

    We performed a metabolomics study using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) combined with multivariate data analysis (MVDA) to discriminate global urine profiles in urine samples from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients and healthy controls (NC). Our work evaluated the feasibility of employing urine metabolomics for the diagnosis and staging of ESCC. The satisfactory classification between the healthy controls and ESCC patients was obtained using the MVDA model, and obvious classification of early-stage and advanced-stage patients was also observed. The results suggest that the combination of LC-MS analysis and MVDA may have potential applications for ESCC diagnosis and staging. We then conducted LC-MS/MS experiments to identify the potential biomarkers with large contributions to the discrimination. A total of 83 potential diagnostic biomarkers for ESCC were screened out, and 19 potential biomarkers were identified; the variations between the differences in staging using these potential biomarkers were further analyzed. These biomarkers may not be unique to ESCCs, but instead result from any malignant disease. To further elucidate the pathophysiology of ESCC, we studied related metabolic pathways and found that ESCC is associated with perturbations of fatty acid β-oxidation and the metabolism of amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines.

  20. NMR-based metabonomics and correlation analysis reveal potential biomarkers associated with chronic atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiajia; Liu, Yuetao; Hu, Yinghuan; Tong, Jiayu; Li, Aiping; Qu, Tingli; Qin, Xuemei; Du, Guanhua

    2017-01-05

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is one of the most important pre-cancerous states with a high prevalence. Exploring of the underlying mechanism and potential biomarkers is of significant importance for CAG. In the present work, 1 H NMR-based metabonomics with correlative analysis was performed to analyze the metabolic features of CAG. 19 plasma metabolites and 18 urine metabolites were enrolled to construct the circulatory and excretory metabolome of CAG, which was in response to alterations of energy metabolism, inflammation, immune dysfunction, as well as oxidative stress. 7 plasma biomarkers and 7 urine biomarkers were screened to elucidate the pathogenesis of CAG based on the further correlation analysis with biochemical indexes. Finally, 3 plasma biomarkers (arginine, succinate and 3-hydroxybutyrate) and 2 urine biomarkers (α-ketoglutarate and valine) highlighted the potential to indicate risks of CAG in virtue of correlation with pepsin activity and ROC analysis. Here, our results paved a way for elucidating the underlying mechanisms in the development of CAG, and provided new avenues for the diagnosis of CAG and presented potential drug targets for treatment of CAG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomarkers of nanomaterial exposure and effect: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Manno, Maurizio; Schulte, Paul A.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have induced a widespread production and application of nanomaterials. As a consequence, an increasing number of workers are expected to undergo exposure to these xenobiotics, while the possible hazards to their health remain not being completely understood. In this context, biological monitoring may play a key role not only to identify potential hazards from and to evaluate occupational exposure to nanomaterials, but also to detect their early biological effects to better assess and manage risks of exposure in respect of the health of workers. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide a critical evaluation of potential biomarkers of nanomaterial exposure and effect investigated in human and animal studies. Concerning exposure biomarkers, internal dose of metallic or metal oxide nanoparticle exposure may be assessed measuring the elemental metallic content in blood or urine or other biological materials, whereas specific molecules may be carefully evaluated in target tissues as possible biomarkers of biologically effective dose. Oxidative stress biomarkers, such as 8-hydroxy-deoxy-guanosine, genotoxicity biomarkers, and inflammatory response indicators may also be useful, although not specific, as biomarkers of nanomaterial early adverse health effects. Finally, potential biomarkers from "omic" technologies appear to be quite innovative and greatly relevant, although mechanistic, ethical, and practical issues should all be resolved before their routine application in occupational settings could be implemented. Although all these findings are interesting, they point out the need for further research to identify and possibly validate sensitive and specific biomarkers of exposure and effect, suitable for future use in occupational biomonitoring programs. A valuable contribution may derive from the studies investigating the biological behavior of nanomaterials and the factors influencing their toxicokinetics and reactivity. In

  2. Proteomic analysis of urine in rats chronically exposed to fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Claudia Ayumi Nakai; Leite, Aline de Lima; da Silva, Thelma Lopes; dos Santos, Lucilene Delazari; Nogueira, Fábio César Sousa; Santos, Keity Souza; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Palma, Mario Sérgio; Domont, Gilberto Barbosa; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2011-01-01

    Urine is an ideal source of materials to search for potential disease-related biomarkers as it is produced by the affected tissues and can be easily obtained by noninvasive methods. 2-DE-based proteomic approach was used to better understand the molecular mechanisms of injury induced by fluoride (F(-)) and define potential biomarkers of dental fluorosis. Three groups of weanling male Wistar rats were treated with drinking water containing 0 (control), 5, or 50 ppm F(-) for 60 days (n = 15/group). During the experimental period, the animals were kept individually in metabolic cages, to analyze the water and food consumption, as well as fecal and urinary F(-) excretion. Urinary proteome profiles were examined using 2-DE and Colloidal Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining. A dose-response regarding F(-) intake and excretion was detected. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 8, 11, and 8 significantly altered proteins between control vs. 5 ppm F(-), control vs. 50 ppm F(-) and 5 ppm F(-) vs. 50 ppm F(-) groups, respectively. Two proteins regulated by androgens (androgen-regulated 20-KDa protein and α-2μ-globulin) and one related to detoxification (aflatoxin-B1-aldehyde-reductase) were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS/MS. Thus, proteomic analysis can help to better understand the mechanisms underlying F(-) toxicity, even in low doses. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Urine cytokine and chemokine levels predict urinary tract infection severity independent of uropathogen, urine bacterial burden, host genetics, and host age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Smith, Sara N; Mody, Lona; Mobley, Harry L T

    2018-06-11

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infections worldwide. Diagnosing UTIs in older adults poses a significant challenge as asymptomatic colonization is common. Identification of a non-invasive profile that predicts likelihood of progressing from urine colonization to severe disease would provide a significant advantage in clinical practice. We monitored colonization susceptibility, disease severity, and immune response to two uropathogens in two mouse strains across three age groups to identify predictors of infection outcome. Proteus mirabilis caused more severe disease than Escherichia coli, regardless of mouse strain or age, and was associated with differences in IL-1β, IFN-β, CXCL5 (LIX), CCL5 (RANTES), and CCL2 (MCP-1). In comparing the response to infection across age groups, mature adult mice were better able to control colonization and prevent progression to kidney colonization and bacteremia than young or aged mice, regardless of mouse strain or bacterial species, and this was associated with differences in IL-23, CXCL1, and CCL5. A bimodal distribution was noted for urine colonization, which was strongly associated with bladder CFUs and the magnitude of the immune response but independent of age or disease severity. To determine the value of urine cytokine and chemokine levels for predicting severe disease, all infection datasets were combined and subjected to a series of logistic regressions. A multivariate model incorporating IL-1β, CXCL1, and CCL2 had strong predictive value for identifying mice that did not develop kidney colonization or bacteremia, regardless of mouse genetic background, age, infecting bacterial species, or urine bacterial burden. In conclusion, urine cytokine profiles could potentially serve as a non-invasive decision-support tool in clinical practice and contribute to antimicrobial stewardship. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  5. amphibian_biomarker_data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Amphibian metabolite data used in Snyder, M.N., Henderson, W.M., Glinski, D.G., Purucker, S. T., 2017. Biomarker analysis of american toad (Anaxyrus americanus) and...

  6. Assessments of urine cofilin-1 in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units with acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Jang; Chao, Cheng-Han; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien

    2013-02-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family has been reported to be associated with ischemia induced renal disorders. Here we examine if cofilin-1 is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). We exploited a 96-well based fiber-optic biosensor that uses conjugated gold nanoparticles and a sandwich immunoassay to detect the urine cofilin-1 level of AKI patients. The mean urine cofilin-1 level of the AKI patients was two-fold higher than that of healthy adults. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that cofilin-1 is a potential biomarker for discriminating AKI patients from healthy adults for intensive care patients.

  7. Validation of New Cancer Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, Michael J; Sturgeon, Catherine M; Söletormos, Georg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers are playing increasingly important roles in the detection and management of patients with cancer. Despite an enormous number of publications on cancer biomarkers, few of these biomarkers are in widespread clinical use. CONTENT: In this review, we discuss the key steps...... in advancing a newly discovered cancer candidate biomarker from pilot studies to clinical application. Four main steps are necessary for a biomarker to reach the clinic: analytical validation of the biomarker assay, clinical validation of the biomarker test, demonstration of clinical value from performance...... of the biomarker test, and regulatory approval. In addition to these 4 steps, all biomarker studies should be reported in a detailed and transparent manner, using previously published checklists and guidelines. Finally, all biomarker studies relating to demonstration of clinical value should be registered before...

  8. Urinary Proteomics Pilot Study for Biomarker Discovery and Diagnosis in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Kasper; Bosselmann, Helle Skovmand; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    and Results Urine samples were analyzed by on-line capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization micro time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-MS) to generate individual urinary proteome profiles. In an initial biomarker discovery cohort, analysis of urinary proteome profiles from 33 HFr......Background Biomarker discovery and new insights into the pathophysiology of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) may emerge from recent advances in high-throughput urinary proteomics. This could lead to improved diagnosis, risk stratification and management of HFrEF. Methods.......6%) in individuals with diastolic left ventricular dysfunction (N = 176). The HFrEF-related peptide biomarkers mainly included fragments of fibrillar type I and III collagen but also, e.g., of fibrinogen beta and alpha-1-antitrypsin. Conclusion CE-MS based urine proteome analysis served as a sensitive tool...

  9. Epigenetic suppression of neprilysin regulates breast cancer invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, H M; Khoury, R J; Majmudar, P R; Blaylock, T; Hawkins, K; Salama, M S; Scott, M D; Cosminsky, B; Utreja, N K; Britt, J; Conway, R E

    2016-03-07

    In women, invasive breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, identifying novel regulators of breast cancer invasion could lead to additional biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Neprilysin, a cell-surface enzyme that cleaves and inactivates a number of substrates including endothelin-1 (ET1), has been implicated in breast cancer, but whether neprilysin promotes or inhibits breast cancer cell progression and metastasis is unclear. Here, we asked whether neprilysin expression predicts and functionally regulates breast cancer cell invasion. RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines revealed decreased neprilysin expression compared with normal epithelial cells. Expression was also suppressed in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared with normal tissue. In addition, in vtro invasion assays demonstrated that neprilysin overexpression decreased breast cancer cell invasion, whereas neprilysin suppression augmented invasion. Furthermore, inhibiting neprilysin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells increased ET1 levels significantly, whereas overexpressing neprilysin decreased extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) activation, indicating that neprilysin negatively regulates ET1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. To determine whether neprilysin was epigenetically suppressed in breast cancer, we performed bisulfite conversion analysis of breast cancer cells and clinical tumor samples. We found that the neprilysin promoter was hypermethylated in breast cancer; chemical reversal of methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells reactivated neprilysin expression and inhibited cancer cell invasion. Analysis of cancer databases revealed that neprilysin methylation significantly associates with survival in stage I IDC and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results demonstrate that neprilysin negatively regulates the ET axis in breast cancer

  10. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Getting a Urine Test (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a Urine Test (Video) Print en español Obtención de un análisis de orina (video) It ...

  11. Odors from evaporation of acidified pig urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willers, H.C.; Hobbs, P.J.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the Dutch Hercules project feces and urine from pigs are collected separately underneath the slatted floor in a pig house and treated in two processes. Feces are composted and urine is concentrated by water evaporation in a packed bed. Exhaust air from the pig house is used for the evaporation in

  12. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Getting a Urine Test (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a Urine Test ( ...

  13. The determination of 210Po in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, W.F.; Helmkamp, R.W.; Hrynyszyn, V.; Contreras, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    To measure 210 Po present in normal human urine a technique was developed in which a 4.5 x 11cm silver foil was shaken at room temperature for 48-hr periods in each of two successive volumes of 1.7 l. of urine acidified to 0.5N with HCl. Alpha rays were counted with an ionization chamber, coupled to a vibrating reed electrometer, and capable of measuring α-ray pulses originating on both sides of the silver foil serving as a central electrode. The background α-count was less than 2/hr. Analyses of human urine spiked with 0.29 to 0.58pCi of 210 Po, together with studies of urine from dogs carrying significant body burdens of 210 Pb, indicated that the average recovery of added 210 Po from 1.7 l. volumes of spiked human urine was 72%. If it is assumed that the same percentage of 210 Po is extracted from non-spiked urine, then the average 210 Po concentration found in 13 analyses of 2 x 1.7 l. samples from 26 different pools of fresh human urine was 0.023pCi/l. Substantial additional 210 Po was generated on short aging of the urine through radioactive decay of excreted 210 Bi. (author)

  14. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Español Getting a Urine Test (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a Urine Test (Video) Print en español ...

  15. Identifying Urinary and Serum Exosome Biomarkers for Radiation Exposure Using a Data Dependent Acquisition and SWATH-MS Combined Workflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, Shilpa; Koller, Antonius; Mani, Kartik M.; Wen, Ruofeng; Alfieri, Alan; Saha, Subhrajit; Wang, Jian; Patel, Purvi; Bandeira, Nuno; Guha, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Early and accurate assessment of radiation injury by radiation-responsive biomarkers is critical for triage and early intervention. Biofluids such as urine and serum are convenient for such analysis. Recent research has also suggested that exosomes are a reliable source of biomarkers in disease progression. In the present study, we analyzed total urine proteome and exosomes isolated from urine or serum for potential biomarkers of acute and persistent radiation injury in mice exposed to lethal whole body irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: For feasibility studies, the mice were irradiated at 10.4 Gy WBI, and urine and serum samples were collected 24 and 72 hours after irradiation. Exosomes were isolated and analyzed using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry-based workflow for radiation exposure signatures. A data dependent acquisition and SWATH-MS combined workflow approach was used to identify significantly exosome biomarkers indicative of acute or persistent radiation-induced responses. For the validation studies, mice were exposed to 3, 6, 8, or 10 Gy WBI, and samples were analyzed for comparison. Results: A comparison between total urine proteomics and urine exosome proteomics demonstrated that exosome proteomic analysis was superior in identifying radiation signatures. Feasibility studies identified 23 biomarkers from urine and 24 biomarkers from serum exosomes after WBI. Urinary exosome signatures identified different physiological parameters than the ones obtained in serum exosomes. Exosome signatures from urine indicated injury to the liver, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts. In contrast, serum showed vascular injuries and acute inflammation in response to radiation. Selected urinary exosomal biomarkers also showed changes at lower radiation doses in validation studies. Conclusions: Exosome proteomics revealed radiation- and time-dependent protein signatures after WBI. A total of 47 differentially secreted

  16. Identifying Urinary and Serum Exosome Biomarkers for Radiation Exposure Using a Data Dependent Acquisition and SWATH-MS Combined Workflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Shilpa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Koller, Antonius [Proteomics Center, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York (United States); Proteomics Shared Resource, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mani, Kartik M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Wen, Ruofeng [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (United States); Alfieri, Alan; Saha, Subhrajit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Wang, Jian [Center for Computational Mass Spectrometry, University of California, San Diego, California (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California (United States); Patel, Purvi [Proteomics Shared Resource, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pharmacological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (United States); Bandeira, Nuno [Center for Computational Mass Spectrometry, University of California, San Diego, California (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California (United States); Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, California (United States); Guha, Chandan, E-mail: cguha@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); and others

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Early and accurate assessment of radiation injury by radiation-responsive biomarkers is critical for triage and early intervention. Biofluids such as urine and serum are convenient for such analysis. Recent research has also suggested that exosomes are a reliable source of biomarkers in disease progression. In the present study, we analyzed total urine proteome and exosomes isolated from urine or serum for potential biomarkers of acute and persistent radiation injury in mice exposed to lethal whole body irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: For feasibility studies, the mice were irradiated at 10.4 Gy WBI, and urine and serum samples were collected 24 and 72 hours after irradiation. Exosomes were isolated and analyzed using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry-based workflow for radiation exposure signatures. A data dependent acquisition and SWATH-MS combined workflow approach was used to identify significantly exosome biomarkers indicative of acute or persistent radiation-induced responses. For the validation studies, mice were exposed to 3, 6, 8, or 10 Gy WBI, and samples were analyzed for comparison. Results: A comparison between total urine proteomics and urine exosome proteomics demonstrated that exosome proteomic analysis was superior in identifying radiation signatures. Feasibility studies identified 23 biomarkers from urine and 24 biomarkers from serum exosomes after WBI. Urinary exosome signatures identified different physiological parameters than the ones obtained in serum exosomes. Exosome signatures from urine indicated injury to the liver, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts. In contrast, serum showed vascular injuries and acute inflammation in response to radiation. Selected urinary exosomal biomarkers also showed changes at lower radiation doses in validation studies. Conclusions: Exosome proteomics revealed radiation- and time-dependent protein signatures after WBI. A total of 47 differentially secreted

  17. Long-term Stability of Urinary Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Meredith P; Nehus, Edward; Ma, Qing; Haffner, Christopher; Bennett, Michael; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses support the utility of urinary biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of acute kidney injury. It is critical to establish optimal sample handling conditions for short-term processing and long-term urinary storage prior to widespread clinical deployment and meaningful use in prospective clinical trials. Prospective study. 80 children (median age, 1.1 [IQR, 0.5-4.2] years) undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our center. 50% of patients had acute kidney injury (defined as ≥50% increase in serum creatinine from baseline). We tested the effect on biomarker concentrations of short-term urine storage in ambient, refrigerator, and freezer conditions. We also tested the effects of multiple freeze-thaw cycles, as well as prolonged storage for 5 years. Urine concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), and interleukin 18 (IL-18). All biomarkers were measured using commercially available kits. All 3 biomarkers were stable in urine stored at 4°C for 24 hours, but showed significant degradation (5.6%-10.1% from baseline) when stored at 25°C. All 3 biomarkers showed only a small although significant decrease in concentration (0.77%-2.9% from baseline) after 3 freeze-thaw cycles. Similarly, all 3 biomarkers displayed only a small but significant decrease in concentration (0.84%-3.2%) after storage for 5 years. Only the 3 most widely studied biomarkers were tested. Protease inhibitors were not evaluated. Short-term storage of urine samples for measurement of NGAL, KIM-1, and IL-18 may be performed at 4°C for up to 24 hours, but not at room temperature. These urinary biomarkers are stable at -80°C for up to 5 years of storage. Our results are reassuring for the deployment of these assays as biomarkers in clinical practice, as well as in prospective clinical studies requiring long-term urine storage. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier

  18. Artificial Urine for Teaching Urinalysis Concepts and Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in the Medical Microbiology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Latifa B; Read, Hannah M; Ritchie, Stephen R; Proft, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Dipstick urinalysis is an informative, quick, cost-effective and non-invasive diagnostic tool that is useful in clinical practice for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs), kidney diseases, and diabetes. We used dipstick urinalysis as a hands-on microbiology laboratory exercise to reinforce student learning about UTIs with a particular focus on cystitis, which is a common bacterial infection. To avoid exposure to potentially contaminated human urine samples, we prepared artificial urine using easily acquired and affordable ingredients, which allowed less-experienced students to perform urinalysis without the risk of exposure to pathogenic organisms and ensured reliable availability of the urine samples. This practical class taught medical students how to use urinalysis data in conjunction with medical history to diagnose diseases from urine samples and to determine a treatment plan for clinical scenarios.

  19. Biomarkers to monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baronas, Elizabeth Tengstrand; Lee, Ju-Whei; Alden, Carl; Hsieh, Frank Y.

    2007-01-01

    Di-docosahexaenoyl (C22:6)-bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) was identified as a promising phospholipidosis (PL) biomarker in rats treated with either amiodarone, gentamicin, or azithromycin. Sprague-Dawley rats received either amiodarone (150 mg/kg), gentamicin (100 mg/kg) or azithromycin (30 mg/kg) once daily for ten consecutive days. Histopathological examination of tissues by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated different degrees of accumulation of phospholipidosis in liver, lung, mesenteric lymph node, and kidney of drug-treated rats but not controls. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to identify levels of endogenous biochemical profiles in rat urine. Urinary levels of di-docosahexaenoyl (C22:6)-bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) correlated with induction of phospholipidosis for amiodarone, gentamicin and azithromycin. Rats treated with gentamicin also had increased urinary levels of several phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) species

  20. The analysis of common metabolites of organophosphorus pesticides in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Soo; Pyo, Hee Soo; Lee, Kang Jin; Park, Song Ja; Park, Taek Kyu

    1998-01-01

    Most organophosphorus pesticides may be metabolized to yield some common phosphates in human or in animals, and these metabolites may be used as the exposure biomarkers to pesticides. In this study, we developed the extraction method of four phosphate metabolites from the spiked human urine in high recovery by the solid phase extraction with a reverse-phase cartridge (cyclohexyl silica) followed by the elution with methanol. The extracted urinary metabolites were derivatized with hexamethyldisilazane/trimethyl-chlorosilane/pyridine (2:1:10, v/v/v) and identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Calibration curve obtained from each metabolite standard using by GC/MS/SIM has shown good linearity and detection limits of metabolites were the range of 0.05-0.1 μg/ml in urine. Phenthoate, one of the organophosphorus pesticides, was orally administrated to rats. Four metabolites were detected in the rat urine. The results of this study may be applied to development of exposure biomarkers for monitoring of environmental pollutants

  1. Polyphenol levels in human urine after intake of six different polyphenol-rich beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hideyuki; Gonthier, Marie-Paule; Manach, Claudine; Morand, Christine; Mennen, Louise; Rémésy, Christian; Scalbert, Augustin

    2005-10-01

    Dietary polyphenols are suggested to participate in the prevention of CVD and cancer. It is essential for epidemiological studies to be able to compare intake of the main dietary polyphenols in populations. The present paper describes a fast method suitable for the analysis of polyphenols in urine, selected as potential biomarkers of intake. This method is applied to the estimation of polyphenol recovery after ingestion of six different polyphenol-rich beverages. Fifteen polyphenols including mammalian lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone), several phenolic acids (chlorogenic, caffeic, m-coumaric, gallic, and 4-O-methylgallic acids), phloretin and various flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, isorhamnetin, kaempferol, hesperetin, and naringenin) were simultaneously quantified in human urine by HPLC coupled with electrospray ionisation mass-MS (HPLC-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry) with a run time of 6 min per sample. The method has been validated with regard to linearity, precision, and accuracy in intra- and inter-day assays. It was applied to urine samples collected from nine volunteers in the 24 h following consumption of either green tea, a grape-skin extract, cocoa beverage, coffee, grapefruit juice or orange juice. Levels of urinary excretion suggest that chlorogenic acid, gallic acid, epicatechin, naringenin or hesperetin could be used as specific biomarkers to evaluate the consumption of coffee, wine, tea or cocoa, and citrus juices respectively.

  2. Protein in Urine: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/proteininurine.html Protein in Urine To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Protein in Urine Test? A protein in urine test ...

  3. Ethanol Induced Urine Acidification is Related with Early Acetaldehyde Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Kil Kwon

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, urine acidification after ethanol ingestion is related with serum acetaldehyde concentration. Early elevation of acetaldhyde could induce urine acidification, but the urine pH was elevated after a few hours, that might make prolonged acidemia.

  4. Leukocyte counts in urine reflect the risk of concomitant sepsis in bacteriuric infants: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsu, Bema K; Harper, Marvin B

    2007-06-13

    When urine infections are missed in febrile young infants with normal urinalysis, clinicians may worry about the risk--hitherto unverified--of concomitant invasion of blood and cerebrospinal fluid by uropathogens. In this study, we determine the extent of this risk. In a retrospective cohort study of febrile 0-89 day old infants evaluated for sepsis in an urban academic pediatric emergency department (1993-1999), we estimated rates of bacteriuric sepsis (urinary tract infections complicated by sepsis) after stratifying infants by urine leukocyte counts higher, or lower than 10 cells/hpf. We compared the global accuracy of leukocytes in urine, leukocytes in peripheral blood, body temperature, and age for predicting bacteruric sepsis. The global accuracy of each test was estimated by calculating the area under its receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Chi-square and Fisher exact tests compared count data. Medians for data not normally distributed were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Two thousand two hundred forty-nine young infants had a normal screening dipstick. None of these developed bacteremia or meningitis despite positive urine culture in 41 (1.8%). Of 1516 additional urine specimens sent for formal urinalysis, 1279 had 0-9 leukocytes/hpf. Urine pathogens were isolated less commonly (6% vs. 76%) and at lower concentrations in infants with few, compared to many urine leukocytes. Urine leukocytes (AUC: 0.94) were the most accurate predictors of bacteruric sepsis. Infants with urinary leukocytes urinary tract infections complicated by bacteremia (N = 11) or bacterial meningitis (N = 1)--relative risk, 0 (CI:0-0.06) [RR, 0 (CI: 0-0.02), when including infants with negative dipstick]. Bands in peripheral blood had modest value for detecting bacteriuric sepsis (AUC: 0.78). Cases of sepsis without concomitant bacteriuria were comparatively rare (0.8%) and equally common in febrile young infants with low and high concentrations of urine leukocytes. In

  5. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer in ex vivo urine cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, C. Y.; Ng, B. K.; Razul, S. Gulam; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Tan, P. H.; Chin, William

    2006-02-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth common malignant disease worldwide, accounting for 4% of all cancer cases. In Singapore, it is the ninth most common form of cancer. The high mortality rate can be reduced by early treatment following precancerous screening. Currently, the gold standard for screening bladder tumors is histological examination of biopsy specimen, which is both invasive and time-consuming. In this study ex vivo urine fluorescence cytology is investigated to offer a timely and biopsy-free means for detecting bladder cancers. Sediments in patients' urine samples were extracted and incubated with a novel photosensitizer, hypericin. Laser confocal microscopy was used to capture the fluorescence images at an excitation wavelength of 488 nm. Images were subsequently processed to single out the exfoliated bladder cells from the other cells based on the cellular size. Intensity histogram of each targeted cell was plotted and feature vectors, derived from the histogram moments, were used to represent each sample. A difference in the distribution of the feature vectors of normal and low-grade cancerous bladder cells was observed. Diagnostic algorithm for discriminating between normal and low-grade cancerous cells is elucidated in this paper. This study suggests that the fluorescence intensity profiles of hypericin in bladder cells can potentially provide an automated quantitative means of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  6. Biofilm antifungal susceptibility of Candida urine isolated from ambulatory patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora da Luz Becker

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: the association between the biofilm formations an antifungal resistance has been suggested to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of several Candida species. Besides, studies have included invasive candidiasis from hospitalized patients; however there are few studies that evaluated the species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and biofilm formation of Candida species isolated from ambulatory patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether biofilm producing contributes to antifungal resistance in Candida isolates from urine sample obtained from ambulatory patients. Methods: During one year, 25 urine samples positive for yeast were collected, stored and plated on agar supplemented with chloramphenicol and Sabouread left at room temperature for 5 days for subsequent: 52% (13/25 were C. albicans, 36% (9/25 C. tropicalis, 8% (2/25 C. krusei and 4% (1/25 C. parapsilosis. Results: The ability to form biofilm was detected in 23 (92% of the yeast studied and 15.4% (2/13 of C. albicans were fluconazole (FLU and ketoconazole (KET resistant, while 11.1% (1/9 of C. tropicalis were ketoconazole resistant and were anidulafungin (ANI non-susceptible. Conclusion: our results showed the high capacity for biofilm formation among Candida isolates from ambulatory patients.

  7. Early urinary biomarkers of acute kidney injury in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mina; Brophy, Patrick D; Giannone, Peter J; Joshi, Mandar S; Bauer, John A; RamachandraRao, Satish

    2016-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the neonatal intensive care setting is multifactorial and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This study evaluates the utility of novel urinary biomarkers to predict the development and/or severity AKI in preterm infants. We performed a case-control study on a prospective cohort of preterm infants (<32 wk), to compare seven urine biomarkers between 25 infants with AKI and 20 infants without AKI. Infants with AKI had significantly higher neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) (median, control (CTRL) vs. AKI; 0.598 vs. 4.24 µg/ml; P < 0.0001). In contrast, urinary epidermal growth factor (EGF) levels were significantly lower in infants who developed AKI compared to controls (median, CTRL vs. AKI; 0.016 vs. 0.006 µg/ml; P < 0.001). The area under the curve (AUC) for NGAL for prediction of stage I AKI on the day prior to AKI diagnosis (day-1) was 0.91, and for the prediction of stage II/III, AKI was 0.92. Similarly, urine EGF was a predictor of renal injury on day -1 (AUC: 0.97 for stage I and 0.86 for stage II/III AKI). Urinary biomarkers may be useful to predict AKI development prior to changes in serum creatinine (SCr) in preterm infants.

  8. Addressing the Challenge of Defining Valid Proteomic Biomarkers and Classifiers

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dakna, Mohammed

    2010-12-10

    Abstract Background The purpose of this manuscript is to provide, based on an extensive analysis of a proteomic data set, suggestions for proper statistical analysis for the discovery of sets of clinically relevant biomarkers. As tractable example we define the measurable proteomic differences between apparently healthy adult males and females. We choose urine as body-fluid of interest and CE-MS, a thoroughly validated platform technology, allowing for routine analysis of a large number of samples. The second urine of the morning was collected from apparently healthy male and female volunteers (aged 21-40) in the course of the routine medical check-up before recruitment at the Hannover Medical School. Results We found that the Wilcoxon-test is best suited for the definition of potential biomarkers. Adjustment for multiple testing is necessary. Sample size estimation can be performed based on a small number of observations via resampling from pilot data. Machine learning algorithms appear ideally suited to generate classifiers. Assessment of any results in an independent test-set is essential. Conclusions Valid proteomic biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis only can be defined by applying proper statistical data mining procedures. In particular, a justification of the sample size should be part of the study design.

  9. Urine: Waste product or biologically active tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Historically, urine has been viewed primarily as a waste product with little biological role in the overall health of an individual. Increasingly, data suggest that urine plays a role in human health beyond waste excretion. For example, urine might act as an irritant and contribute to symptoms through interaction with-and potential compromise of-the urothelium. To explore the concept that urine may be a vehicle for agents with potential or occult bioactivity and to discuss existing evidence and novel research questions that may yield insight into such a role, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease invited experts in the fields of comparative evolutionary physiology, basic science, nephrology, urology, pediatrics, metabolomics, and proteomics (among others) to a Urinology Think Tank meeting on February 9, 2015. This report reflects ideas that evolved from this meeting and current literature, including the concept of urine quality, the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of urine, including the microbiota, cells, exosomes, pH, metabolites, proteins, and specific gravity (among others). Additionally, the manuscript presents speculative, and hopefully testable, ideas about the functional roles of urine constituents in health and disease. Moving forward, there are several questions that need further understanding and pursuit. There were suggestions to consider actively using various animal models and their biological specimens to elaborate on basic mechanistic information regarding human bladder dysfunction. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Hydrophobic Sand Is a Non-Toxic Method of Urine Collection, Appropriate for Urinary Metal Analysis in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F. Hoffman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobic sand is a relatively new method of urine collection in the rodent, comparable to the established method using a metabolic cage. Urine samples are often used in rodent research, especially for biomarkers of health changes after internal contamination from embedded metals, such as in a model of a military shrapnel wound. However, little research has been done on the potential interference of hydrophobic sand with urine metal concentrations either by contamination from the sand particulate, or adsorption of metals from the urine. We compare urine collected from rats using the metabolic cage method and the hydrophobic sand method for differences in metal concentration of common urinary metals, and examine physical properties of the sand material for potential sources of contamination. We found minimal risk of internal contamination of the rat by hydrophobic sand, and no interference of the sand with several common metals of interest (cobalt, strontium, copper, and manganese, although we advise caution in studies of aluminum in urine.

  11. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method for Future Exploration Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A nonhazardous urine pretreatment system prototype is proposed that will stabilize urine against biological growth or chemical instabilities without using hazardous...

  12. Biomarkers of sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is an unusual systemic reaction to what is sometimes an otherwise ordinary infection, and it probably represents a pattern of response by the immune system to injury. A hyper-inflammatory response is followed by an immunosuppressive phase during which multiple organ dysfunction is present and the patient is susceptible to nosocomial infection. Biomarkers to diagnose sepsis may allow early intervention which, although primarily supportive, can reduce the risk of death. Although lactate is currently the most commonly used biomarker to identify sepsis, other biomarkers may help to enhance lactate’s effectiveness; these include markers of the hyper-inflammatory phase of sepsis, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; proteins such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin which are synthesized in response to infection and inflammation; and markers of neutrophil and monocyte activation. Recently, markers of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis, such as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and alterations of the cell surface markers of monocytes and lymphocytes have been examined. Combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in a multi-marker panel may help identify patients who are developing severe sepsis before organ dysfunction has advanced too far. Combined with innovative approaches to treatment that target the immunosuppressive phase, these biomarkers may help to reduce the mortality rate associated with severe sepsis which, despite advances in supportive measures, remains high. PMID:23480440

  13. Feline urine metabolomic signature: characterization of low-molecular-weight substances in urine from domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Vélez, Sol-Maiam; Villarino, Nicolas F

    2018-02-01

    Objectives This aim of this study was to characterize the composition and content of the feline urine metabolome. Methods Eight healthy domestic cats were acclimated at least 10 days before starting the study. Urine samples (~2 ml) were collected by ultrasound-guided cystocentesis. Samples were centrifuged at 1000 × g for 8 mins, and the supernatant was analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometery. The urine metabolome was characterized using an untargeted metabolomics approach. Results Three hundred and eighteen metabolites were detected in the urine of the eight cats. These molecules are key components of at least 100 metabolic pathways. Feline urine appears to be dominated by carbohydrates, carbohydrate conjugates, organic acid and derivatives, and amino acids and analogs. The five most abundant molecules were phenaceturic acid, hippuric acid, pseudouridine phosphate and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid. Conclusions and relevance This study is the first to characterize the feline urine metabolome. The results of this study revealed the presence of multiple low-molecular-weight substances that were not known to be present in feline urine. As expected, the origin of the metabolites detected in urine was diverse, including endogenous compounds and molecules biosynthesized by microbes. Also, the diet seemed to have had a relevant role on the urine metabolome. Further exploration of the urine metabolic phenotype will open a window for discovering unknown, or poorly understood, metabolic pathways. In turn, this will advance our understanding of feline biology and lead to new insights in feline physiology, nutrition and medicine.

  14. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  15. [Development of automatic urine monitoring system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Li, Yongqin; Chen, Bihua

    2014-03-01

    An automatic urine monitoring system is presented to replace manual operation. The system is composed of the flow sensor, MSP430f149 single chip microcomputer, human-computer interaction module, LCD module, clock module and memory module. The signal of urine volume is captured when the urine flows through the flow sensor and then displayed on the LCD after data processing. The experiment results suggest that the design of the monitor provides a high stability, accurate measurement and good real-time, and meets the demand of the clinical application.

  16. Invasive Aspergillosis in Hematological Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is still one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hematological patients, although its outcome has been improving. Prolonged and profound neutropenia in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute leukemia and stem cell transplantation is a major risk factor for IA. Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients with graft-versus-host disease and corticosteroid use are also at high risk. Management in a protective environment with high efficiency particular air (HEPA) filter is generally recommended to prevent aspergillosis in patients with prolonged and profound neutropenia. Antifungal prophylaxis against Aspergillus species should be considered in patients with past history of aspergillosis or colonization of Aspergillus species, at facilities with high incidence of IA and those without a protective environment. Early diagnosis and prompt antifungal treatment is important to improve outcome. Imaging studies such as computed tomography and biomarkers such as galactomannan antigen and β-D-glucan are useful for early diagnosis. Empirical antifungal treatment based on persistent or recurrent fever during neutropenia despite broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is generally recommended in high-risk patients. Alternatively, a preemptive treatment strategy has recently been proposed in the context of progress in the early diagnosis of IA based on the results of imaging studies and biomarkers. Voriconazole is recommended for initial therapy for IA. Liposomal amphotericin B is considered as alternative initial therapy. Combination antifungal therapy of echinocandin with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B could be a choice for refractory cases.

  17. Biomarkers of the Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomarker studies on dementia are summarized here. CSF Aβ40, Aβ42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and prediction of onset of AD from mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD, MCI, and preclinical AD were proposed by National Institute of Aging (NIA and Alzheimer's Association in August 2010. In these new criteria, progress in biomarker identification and amyloid imaging studies in the past 10 years have added critical information. Huge contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential therapy for cure of AD is urgently expected.

  18. Inflammatory biomarkers and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann; Schultz, Martin; Gaardsting, Anne

    2017-01-01

    and previous cancer diagnoses compared to patients who were not diagnosed with cancer. Previous cancer, C-reactive protein (CRP) and suPAR were significantly associated with newly diagnosed cancer during follow-up in multiple logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex and CRP. Neither any of the PRRs......In Denmark, patients with serious nonspecific symptoms and signs of cancer (NSSC) are referred to the diagnostic outpatient clinics (DOCs) where an accelerated cancer diagnostic program is initiated. Various immunological and inflammatory biomarkers have been associated with cancer, including...... soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) pentraxin-3, mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-1, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3. We aimed to evaluate these biomarkers and compare their diagnostic ability to classical biomarkers for diagnosing cancer...

  19. Quantification of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in the urine of Swedish adults and children following exposure to sunlight

    OpenAIRE

    Liljendahl, Tove Sandberg; Kotova, Natalia; Segerbäck, Dan

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage following exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is important in skin cancer development. The predominant photoproduct, cyclobutane thymine dimer (T=T), is repaired and excreted in the urine, where it provides a biomarker of exposure. To quantify urinary T=T levels after recreational sunlight exposure in adults and children. Average UVR doses were measured with personal dosimeters. Urinary T=T was analysed with (32)P-postlabelling. ResuLTS: Background levels of T=T increased...

  20. Bio-monitoring of mycotoxin exposure in Cameroon using a urinary multi-biomarker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Wilfred A; Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Tchana, Angele; Njobeh, Patrick B; Turner, Paul C; Kouanfack, Charles; Eyongetah, Mbu; Dutton, Mike; Moundipa, Paul F

    2013-12-01

    Bio-monitoring of human exposure to mycotoxin has mostly been limited to a few individually measured mycotoxin biomarkers. This study aimed to determine the frequency and level of exposure to multiple mycotoxins in human urine from Cameroonian adults. 175 Urine samples (83% from HIV-positive individuals) and food frequency questionnaire responses were collected from consenting Cameroonians, and analyzed for 15 mycotoxins and relevant metabolites using LC-ESI-MS/MS. In total, eleven analytes were detected individually or in combinations in 110/175 (63%) samples including the biomarkers aflatoxin M1, fumonisin B1, ochratoxin A and total deoxynivalenol. Additionally, important mycotoxins and metabolites thereof, such as fumonisin B2, nivalenol and zearalenone, were determined, some for the first time in urine following dietary exposures. Multi-mycotoxin contamination was common with one HIV-positive individual exposed to five mycotoxins, a severe case of co-exposure that has never been reported in adults before. For the first time in Africa or elsewhere, this study quantified eleven mycotoxin biomarkers and bio-measures in urine from adults. For several mycotoxins estimates indicate that the tolerable daily intake is being exceeded in this study population. Given that many mycotoxins adversely affect the immune system, future studies will examine whether combinations of mycotoxins negatively impact Cameroonian population particularly immune-suppressed individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of Urine Albumin by New Simple High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapkova, Eva; Fortova, Magdalena; Prusa, Richard; Moravcova, Libuse; Kotaska, Karel

    2016-11-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of albumin in patients' urine samples without coeluting proteins and was compared with the immunoturbidimetric determination of albumin. Urine albumin is important biomarker in diabetic patients, but part of it is immuno-nonreactive. Albumin was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), UV detection at 280 nm, Zorbax 300SB-C3 column. Immunoturbidimetric analysis was performed using commercial kit on automatic biochemistry analyzer COBAS INTEGRA ® 400, Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Manheim, Germany. The HLPC method was fully validated. No significant interference with other proteins (transferrin, α-1-acid glycoprotein, α-1-antichymotrypsin, antitrypsin, hemopexin) was found. The results from 301 urine samples were compared with immunochemical determination. We found a statistically significant difference between these methods (P = 0.0001, Mann-Whitney test). New simple HPLC method was developed for the determination of urine albumin without coeluting proteins. Our data indicate that the HPLC method is highly specific and more sensitive than immunoturbidimetry. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in the urine of reservoir hosts of leptospirosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarlath E Nally

    Full Text Available Rattus norvegicus is a natural reservoir host for pathogenic species of Leptospira. Experimentally infected rats remain clinically normal, yet persistently excrete large numbers of leptospires from colonized renal tubules via urine, despite a specific host immune response. Whilst persistent renal colonization and shedding is facilitated in part by differential antigen expression by leptospires to evade host immune responses, there is limited understanding of kidney and urinary proteins expressed by the host that facilitates such biological equilibrium. Urine pellets were collected from experimentally infected rats shedding leptospires and compared to urine from non-infected controls spiked with in vitro cultivated leptospires for analysis by 2-D DIGE. Differentially expressed host proteins include membrane metallo endopeptidase, napsin A aspartic peptidase, vacuolar H+ATPase, kidney aminopeptidase and immunoglobulin G and A. Loa22, a virulence factor of Leptospira, as well as the GroEL, were increased in leptospires excreted in urine compared to in vitro cultivated leptospires. Urinary IgG from infected rats was specific for leptospires. Results confirm differential protein expression by both host and pathogen during chronic disease and include markers of kidney function and immunoglobulin which are potential biomarkers of infection.

  3. Evaluation of mass spectrometry of urinary proteins and peptides as biomarkers for cats at risk of developing azotemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Rosanne E; Coulton, Gary R; Cowan, Matthew L; Markwell, Peter; Syme, Harriet M; Elliott, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate proteomic delineation of feline urine by mass spectrometry as a method for identifying biomarkers in cats at risk of developing azotemia. Urine samples from geriatric cats (> 9 years old) with chronic kidney disease and nonazotemic cats that either remained nonazotemic (n = 10) or developed azotemia (10) within 1 year. Optimization studies with pooled urine were performed to facilitate the use of surface enhanced laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) for analysis of the urinary proteome of cats. Urine samples from nonazotemic cats at entry to the study were analyzed via SELDI-TOF-MS with weak cation exchange and strong anion exchange arrays. Spectral data were compared to identify biomarkers for development of azotemia. Low protein concentration in feline urine precluded direct application to array surfaces, and a buffer exchange and concentration step was required prior to SELDI-TOF-MS analysis. Three preparation conditions by use of weak cation and strong anion exchange arrays were selected on the basis of optimization studies for detection of biomarkers. Eight potential biomarkers with an m/z of 2,822, 9,886, 10,033, 10,151, 10,234, 11,653, 4,421, and 9,505 were delineated. SELDI-TOF-MS can be used to detect urinary low-molecular weight peptides and proteins that may represent biomarkers for early detection of renal damage. Further study is required to purify and identify potential biomarkers before their use in a clinical setting.

  4. Comparison of uncertainties related to standardization of urine samples with volume and creatinine concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Ase Marie; Kristiansen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    When measuring biomarkers in urine, volume (and time) or concentration of creatinine are both accepted methods of standardization for diuresis. Both types of standardization contribute uncertainty to the final result. The aim of the present paper was to compare the uncertainty introduced when usi...... increase in convenience for the participants, when collecting small volumes rather than complete 24 h samples....... the two types of standardization on 24 h samples from healthy individuals. Estimates of uncertainties were based on results from the literature supplemented with data from our own studies. Only the difference in uncertainty related to the two standardization methods was evaluated. It was found...... that the uncertainty associated with creatinine standardization (19-35%) was higher than the uncertainty related to volume standardization (up to 10%, when not correcting for deviations from 24 h) for 24 h urine samples. However, volume standardization introduced an average bias of 4% due to missed volumes...

  5. Voltammetric Determination of Thiodiglycolic Acid in Urine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlasková, Z.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Heyrovský, Michael; Pelclová, D.; Novotný, Ladislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 375, - (2003), s. 164-168 ISSN 1618-2642 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : urine * thioglycolic acid * voltammetry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.715, year: 2003

  6. Murine Automated Urine Sampler (MAUS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines planned development for a low-power, low-mass automated urine sample collection and preservation system for small mammals, capable of...

  7. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it used? The urine albumin test or albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) is used to screen people with chronic conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure ( hypertension ) that put them at an ...

  8. On-Demand Urine Analyzer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research program will develop a novel surface-enhanced Raman (SER) sensor that will perform real-time chemical analysis of urine. It...

  9. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term frozen storage of urine samples: a trouble to get PCR results in Schistosoma spp. DNA detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Velasco Tirado, Virginia; Carranza Rodríguez, Cristina; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Muro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis remains a serious worldwide public health problem. At present, a sensitive and specific assay for routine diagnosis of schistosome infection is not yet available. The potential for detecting schistosome-derived DNA by PCR-based methods in human clinical samples is currently being investigated as a diagnostic tool with potential application in routine schistosomiasis diagnosis. Collection of diagnostic samples such as stool or blood is usually difficult in some populations. However, urine is a biological sample that can be collected in a non-invasive method, easy to get from people of all ages and easy in management, but as a sample for PCR diagnosis is still not widely used. This could be due to the high variability in the reported efficiency of detection as a result of the high variation in urine samples' storage or conditions for handling and DNA preservation and extraction methods. We evaluate different commercial DNA extraction methods from a series of long-term frozen storage human urine samples from patients with parasitological confirmed schistosomiasis in order to assess the PCR effectiveness for Schistosoma spp. detection. Patients urine samples were frozen for 18 months up to 7 years until use. Results were compared with those obtained in PCR assays using fresh healthy human urine artificially contaminated with Schistosoma mansoni DNA and urine samples from mice experimentally infected with S. mansoni cercariae stored frozen for at least 12 months before use. PCR results in fresh human artificial urine samples using different DNA based extraction methods were much more effective than those obtained when long-term frozen human urine samples were used as the source of DNA template. Long-term frozen human urine samples are probably not a good source for DNA extraction for use as a template in PCR detection of Schistosoma spp., regardless of the DNA method of extraction used.

  11. Long-term frozen storage of urine samples: a trouble to get PCR results in Schistosoma spp. DNA detection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernández-Soto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human schistosomiasis remains a serious worldwide public health problem. At present, a sensitive and specific assay for routine diagnosis of schistosome infection is not yet available. The potential for detecting schistosome-derived DNA by PCR-based methods in human clinical samples is currently being investigated as a diagnostic tool with potential application in routine schistosomiasis diagnosis. Collection of diagnostic samples such as stool or blood is usually difficult in some populations. However, urine is a biological sample that can be collected in a non-invasive method, easy to get from people of all ages and easy in management, but as a sample for PCR diagnosis is still not widely used. This could be due to the high variability in the reported efficiency of detection as a result of the high variation in urine samples' storage or conditions for handling and DNA preservation and extraction methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluate different commercial DNA extraction methods from a series of long-term frozen storage human urine samples from patients with parasitological confirmed schistosomiasis in order to assess the PCR effectiveness for Schistosoma spp. detection. Patients urine samples were frozen for 18 months up to 7 years until use. Results were compared with those obtained in PCR assays using fresh healthy human urine artificially contaminated with Schistosoma mansoni DNA and urine samples from mice experimentally infected with S. mansoni cercariae stored frozen for at least 12 months before use. PCR results in fresh human artificial urine samples using different DNA based extraction methods were much more effective than those obtained when long-term frozen human urine samples were used as the source of DNA template. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Long-term frozen human urine samples are probably not a good source for DNA extraction for use as a template in PCR detection of Schistosoma spp., regardless of the DNA

  12. Biomarkers of mercury exposure in two eastern Ukraine cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, H.; Haver, C.; Kozlov, K.; Centeno, J.A.; Jurgenson, V.; Kolker, A.; Conko, K.M.; Landa, E.R.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates biomarkers of mercury exposure among residents of Horlivka, a city in eastern Ukraine located in an area with geologic and industrial sources of environmental mercury, and residents of Artemivsk, a nearby comparison city outside the mercury-enriched area. Samples of urine, blood, hair, and nails were collected from study participants, and a questionnaire was administered to obtain data on age, gender, occupational history, smoking, alcohol consumption, fish consumption, tattoos, dental amalgams, home heating system, education, source of drinking water, and family employment in mines. Median biomarker mercury concentrations in Artemivsk were 0.26 ??g/g-Cr (urine), 0.92 ??g/L (blood), 0.42 ??g/g (hair), 0.11 ??g/g (toenails), and 0.09 ??g/g (fingernails); median concentrations in Horlivka were 0.15 ??g/g-Cr (urine), 1.01 ??g/L (blood), 0.14 ??g/g (hair), 0.31 ??g/g (toenails), and 0.31 ??g/g (fingernails). Biomarkers of mercury exposure for study participants from Horlivka and Artemivsk are low in comparison with occupationally exposed workers at a mercury recycling facility in Horlivka and in comparison with exposures known to be associated with clinical effects. Blood and urinary mercury did not suggest a higher mercury exposure among Horlivka residents as compared with Artemivsk; however, three individuals living in the immediate vicinity of the mercury mines had elevated blood and urinary mercury, relative to overall results for either city. For a limited number of residents from Horlivka (N = 7) and Artemivsk (N = 4), environmental samples (vacuum cleaner dust, dust wipes, soil) were collected from their residences. Mercury concentrations in vacuum cleaner dust and soil were good predictors of blood and urinary mercury. Copyright ?? 2011 JOEH, LLC.

  13. Skin carotenoids as biomarker for vegetable and fruit intake: Validation of the reflection-spectroscopy based “Veggie Meter”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin is a relatively stable storage medium for carotenoids; non-invasive optical measurements of carotenoids in this tissue via Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) serve as a non-invasive biomarker for fruit and vegetable (F/V) intake. The RRS method has been validated with HPLC-based measurements of...

  14. Occurrence of riboflavinyl glucoside in rat urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Ohishi, Nobuko; Yagi, Kunio

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the metabolism of riboflavin, [2- 14 C]-riboflavin was administered orally to a rat. The urine pooled for 24 h after administration was fractionated by paper and silica gel thin layer chromatographies using various solvent systems. Among the radioactive metabolites, riboflavinyl glucoside was found along with 7-carboxy lumichrome and 8-carboxy lumichrome. The radioactivity of riboflavinyl glucoside comprised about 6 % of the total radioactivity excreted in the urine during 24 h. (author)

  15. Detection of low frequency FGFR3 mutations in the urine of bladder cancer patients using next-generation deep sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millholl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available John M Millholland, Shuqiang Li, Cecilia A Fernandez, Anthony P ShuberPredictive Biosciences Inc, Lexington, MA, USAAbstract: Biological fluid-based noninvasive biomarker assays for monitoring and diagnosing disease are clinically powerful. A major technical hurdle for developing these assays is the requirement of high analytical sensitivity so that biomarkers present at very low levels can be consistently detected. In the case of biological fluid-based cancer diagnostic assays, sensitivities similar to those of tissue-based assays are difficult to achieve with DNA markers due to the high abundance of normal DNA background present in the sample. Here we describe a new urine-based assay that uses ultradeep sequencing technology to detect single mutant molecules of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 DNA that are indicative of bladder cancer. Detection of FGFR3 mutations in urine would provide clinicians with a noninvasive means of diagnosing early-stage bladder cancer. The single-molecule assay detects FGFR3 mutant DNA when present at as low as 0.02% of total urine DNA and results in 91% concordance with the frequency that FGFR3 mutations are detected in bladder cancer tumors, significantly improving diagnostic performance. To our knowledge, this is the first practical application of next-generation sequencing technology for noninvasive cancer diagnostics.Keywords: FGFR3, mutation, urine, single molecule, sequencing, bladder cancer

  16. Occupational exposure to HDI: progress and challenges in biomarker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, Sheila L; Ball, Louise M; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2010-10-01

    1,6-Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) is extensively used in the automotive repair industry and is a commonly reported cause of occupational asthma in industrialized populations. However, the exact pathological mechanism remains uncertain. Characterization and quantification of biomarkers resulting from HDI exposure can fill important knowledge gaps between exposure, susceptibility, and the rise of immunological reactions and sensitization leading to asthma. Here, we discuss existing challenges in HDI biomarker analysis including the quantification of N-acetyl-1,6-hexamethylene diamine (monoacetyl-HDA) and N,N'-diacetyl-1,6-hexamethylene diamine (diacetyl-HDA) in urine samples based on previously established methods for HDA analysis. In addition, we describe the optimization of reaction conditions for the synthesis of monoacetyl-HDA and diacetyl-HDA, and utilize these standards for the quantification of these metabolites in the urine of three occupationally exposed workers. Diacetyl-HDA was present in untreated urine at 0.015-0.060 μg/l. Using base hydrolysis, the concentration range of monoacetyl-HDA in urine was 0.19-2.2 μg/l, 60-fold higher than in the untreated samples on average. HDA was detected only in one sample after base hydrolysis (0.026 μg/l). In contrast, acid hydrolysis yielded HDA concentrations ranging from 0.36 to 10.1 μg/l in these three samples. These findings demonstrate HDI metabolism via N-acetylation metabolic pathway and protein adduct formation resulting from occupational exposure to HDI. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical Method of Urine Volume Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrack, P.

    1967-01-01

    A system has been developed and qualified as flight hardware for the measurement of micturition volumes voided by crewmen during Gemini missions. This Chemical Urine Volume Measurement System (CUVMS) is used for obtaining samples of each micturition for post-flight volume determination and laboratory analysis for chemical constituents of physiological interest. The system is versatile with respect to volumes measured, with a capacity beyond the largest micturition expected to be encountered, and with respect to mission duration of inherently indefinite length. The urine sample is used for the measurement of total micturition volume by a tracer dilution technique, in which a fixed, predetermined amount of tritiated water is introduced and mixed into the voided urine, and the resulting concentration of the tracer in the sample is determined with a liquid scintillation spectrometer. The tracer employed does not interfere with the analysis for the chemical constituents of the urine. The CUVMS hardware consists of a four-way selector valve in which an automatically operated tracer metering pump is incorporated, a collection/mixing bag, and tracer storage accumulators. The assembled system interfaces with a urine receiver at the selector valve inlet, sample bags which connect to the side of the selector valve, and a flexible hose which carries the excess urine to the overboard drain connection. Results of testing have demonstrated system volume measurement accuracy within the specification limits of +/-5%, and operating reliability suitable for system use aboard the GT-7 mission, in which it was first used.

  18. Preventing Precipitation in the ISS Urine Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Dean; Carter, Layne; Williamson, Jill; Chambers, Antja

    2017-01-01

    The ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) was initially designed to achieve 85% recovery of water from pretreated urine on ISS. Pretreated urine is comprised of crew urine treated with flush water, an oxidant (chromium trioxide), and an inorganic acid (sulfuric acid) to control microbial growth and inhibit precipitation. Unfortunately, initial operation of the UPA on ISS resulted in the precipitation of calcium sulfate at 85% recovery. This occurred because the calcium concentration in the crew urine was elevated in microgravity due to bone loss. The higher calcium concentration precipitated with sulfate from the pretreatment acid, resulting in a failure of the UPA due to the accumulation of solids in the Distillation Assembly. Since this failure, the UPA has been limited to a reduced recovery of water from urine to prevent calcium sulfate from reaching the solubility limit. NASA personnel have worked to identify a solution that would allow the UPA to return to a nominal recovery rate of 85%. This effort has culminated with the development of a pretreatment based on phosphoric acid instead of sulfuric acid. By eliminating the sulfate associated with the pretreatment, the brine can be concentrated to a much higher concentration before calcium sulfate reach the solubility limit. This paper summarizes the development of this pretreatment and the testing performed to verify its implementation on ISS.

  19. An update on purple urine bag syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadano Y

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiro Hadano,1 Taro Shimizu,2 Shimon Takada,3 Toshiya Inoue,4 Sumire Sorano51Department of General Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto, Japan; 2Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Department of General Internal Medicine, Osaka City General Hospital, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka, Japan; 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Urasoe General Hospital, Urasoe-city, Okinawa, Japan; 5Kobe University School of Medicine, Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe, JapanAbstract: Purple urine bag syndrome is characterized by the urinary drainage bag turning purple in patients on prolonged urinary catheterization, especially those in the bedridden state. It is associated with bacterial urinary tract infections caused by indigo-producing and indirubin-producing bacteria, usually affects women, and is associated with alkaline urine, constipation, and a high bacterial load in the urine. Almost all patients with purple urine bag syndrome are catheterized due to significant disability, and the urinary pH is 7.0 or more. In general, intensive treatment with antibiotics is not recommended. Purple urine bag syndrome per se almost always appears to be asymptomatic and harmless. However, caution is needed, because some cases have been reported to show progression to severe disease states, so further research into the morbidity and mortality of this infection is warranted.Keywords: purple urine, urinary catheterization, geriatrics, urinary tract infection

  20. Mutagens in urine of carbon electrode workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, R; Monarca, S; Sforzolini, G S; Conti, R; Fagioli, F

    1982-01-01

    Following previous work carried out in an Italian factory producing carbon electrodes and evaluating the occupational mutagenic-carcinogenic hazards, the authors studied the presence of mutagen metabolites in the urine of workers in the same factory who were exposed to petroleum coke and pitch and in the urine of a control group of unexposed workers. The urine samples were concentrated by absorption on XAD-2 columns and were tested using the Salmonella/microsome assay (strain TA98, TA100, TA1535, TA1538) with and without the addition of beta-glucuronidase and metabolizing system. The collection of urine samples was carried out twice, with an interval of 2 months; 'before working time', 'after working time', and also during Sunday. The results showed that urine samples collected 'before' occupational exposure (upon waking) or on Sunday revealed no mutagenic activity in either worker groups and that the urine samples collected after or during occupational exposure revealed high mutagenic activity in the exposed workers, with a statistically significant difference between the mean of the revertants/plate values for exposed and unexposed workers. On the basis of the previous and the present research, the authors suggest that application of the Salmonella/microsome test to work environments could offer useful and suitable tool for evaluating the health hazards due to mutagenic/carcinogenic substances from occupational exposure.

  1. The endothelial lipase protein is promising urinary biomarker for diagnosis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xueyan; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Guoqing; Ni, Zhaohui; Suo, Jian; Cui, Juan; Cui, Ai; Yang, Qing; Xu, Ying; Li, Fan

    2013-03-19

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world. Finding effective diagnostic biomarkers in urine or serum would represent the most ideal solution to detecting gastric cancer during annual physical examination. This study was to evaluate the potential of endothelial lipase (EL) as a urinary biomarker for diagnosis of gastric cancer. The expression levels of EL was measured using Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining experiments on (tissue, serum, and urine) samples of gastric cancer patients versus healthy people. We also checked the EL levels in the urine samples of other cancer types (lung, colon and rectum cancers) and benign lesions (gastritis and gastric leiomyoma) to check if EL was specific to gastric cancer. We observed a clear separation between the EL expression levels in the urine samples of 90 gastric cancer patients and of 57 healthy volunteers. It was approximately 9.9 fold average decrease of the EL expression levels in the urine samples of gastric cancer compared to the healthy controls (P cancer. Interestingly, the expression levels of EL in tissue and serum samples were not nearly as discriminative as in urine samples (P = 0.90 and P = 0.79). In immunohistochemical experiments, positive expression of the EL protein was found in 67% (8/12) of gastric adjacent noncancerous and in 58% (7/12) of gastric cancer samples. There was no significant statistical in the expression levels of this protein between the gastric cancer and the matching noncancerous tissues (P =0.67). The urinary EL as a highly accurate gastric cancer biomarker that is potentially applicable to the general screening with high sensitivity and specificity. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4527331618757552.

  2. Urine 1,6-hexamethylene diamine (HDA) levels among workers exposed to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Linda G T; Fent, Kenneth W; Flack, Sheila L; Thomasen, Jennifer M; Ball, Louise M; Richardson, David B; Ding, Kai; Whittaker, Stephen G; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2010-08-01

    Urinary 1,6-hexamethylene diamine (HDA) may serve as a biomarker for systemic exposure to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) in occupationally exposed populations. However, the quantitative relationships between dermal and inhalation exposure to HDI and urine HDA levels have not been established. We measured acid-hydrolyzed urine HDA levels along with dermal and breathing-zone levels of HDI in 48 automotive spray painters. These measurements were conducted over the course of an entire workday for up to three separate workdays that were spaced approximately 1 month apart. One urine sample was collected before the start of work with HDI-containing paints and subsequent samples were collected during the workday. HDA levels varied throughout the day and ranged from nondetectable to 65.9 microg l(-1) with a geometric mean and geometric standard deviation of 0.10 microg l(-1) +/- 6.68. Dermal exposure and inhalation exposure levels, adjusted for the type of respirator worn, were both significant predictors of urine HDA levels in the linear mixed models. Creatinine was a significant covariate when used as an independent variable along with dermal and respirator-adjusted inhalation exposure. Consequently, exposure assessment models must account for the water content of a urine sample. These findings indicate that HDA exhibits a biphasic elimination pattern, with a half-life of 2.9 h for the fast elimination phase. Our results also indicate that urine HDA level is significantly associated with systemic HDI exposure through both the skin and the lungs. We conclude that urinary HDA may be used as a biomarker of exposure to HDI, but biological monitoring should be tailored to reliably capture the intermittent exposure pattern typical in this industry.

  3. Urine liver fatty acid binding protein and chronic kidney disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatir, Dinah S; Bendtsen, Mette D; Birn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , regarding progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a prospective study design a cohort of 74 stage 3-4 CKD patients (age 61 ± 13 years) were included. Glomerular filtration ratio (GFR, 51Cr-EDTA-clearance), 24-hour ambulatory BP, 24-hour urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UAC) and urinary L......Excretion of the tubular protein liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is a potential novel biomarker of renal dysfunction. We examined whether urine L-FABP excretion adds prognostic information to the well-established risk markers, blood pressure (BP), albumin excretion and baseline GFR...

  4. Biomarkers for anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgren, Jan Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers for anorexia nervosa (AN) which reflect the pathophysiology and relate to the aetiology of the disease, are warranted and could bring us one step closer to targeted treatment of AN. Some leads may be found in the biochemistry which often is found disturbed in AN, although normalization...

  5. Brain Oscillations in Sport: Toward EEG Biomarkers of Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Cheron, Guy; Petit, Géraldine; Cheron, Julian; Leroy, Axelle; Cebolla, Anita; Cevallos, Carlos; Petieau, Mathieu; Hoellinger, Thomas; Zarka, David; Clarinval, Anne-Marie; Dan, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Brain dynamics is at the basis of top performance accomplishment in sports. The search for neural biomarkers of performance remains a challenge in movement science and sport psychology. The non-invasive nature of high-density electroencephalography (EEG) recording has made it a most promising avenue for providing quantitative feedback to practitioners and coaches. Here, we review the current relevance of the main types of EEG oscillations in order to trace a perspective for future practical a...

  6. Validation of biomarkers for the study of environmental carcinogens: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, Valentina; Khan, Aneire; Gonzales, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for validation of biomarkers. Our aim is to review published work on the validation of selected biomarkers: bulky DNA adducts, N-nitroso compounds, 1-hydroxypyrene, and oxidative damage to DNA. A systematic literature search in PubMed was performed. Information on the variability...... and reliability of the laboratory tests used for biomarkers measurements was collected. For the evaluation of the evidence on validation we referred to the ACCE criteria. Little is known about intraindividual variation of DNA adduct measurements, but measurements have a good repeatability irrespective...... of the technique used for their identification; reproducibility improved after the correction for a laboratory factor. A high-sensitivity method is available for the measurement of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine. There is consensus on validation of biomarkers of oxidative damage DNA based on the comet assay...

  7. Measuring biomarkers in wastewater as a new source of epidemiological information: Current state and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gracia-Lor, Emma; Castiglioni, Sara; Bade, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The information obtained from the chemical analysis of specific human excretion products (biomarkers) in urban wastewater can be used to estimate the exposure or consumption of the population under investigation to a defined substance. A proper biomarker can provide relevant information about...... lifestyle habits, health and wellbeing, but its selection is not an easy task as it should fulfil several specific requirements in order to be successfully employed. This paper aims to summarize the current knowledge related to the most relevant biomarkers used so far. In addition, some potential wastewater...... in the environment and food, (iii) those that have the potential to provide information about public health and illness and (iv) those used to estimate the population size. To facilitate the evaluation of the eligibility of a compound as a biomarker, information, when available, on stability in urine and wastewater...

  8. PAH biomarkers in common eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) from Danish waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tairova, Zhanna; Strand, Jakob; Chevalier, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Eelpouts (Zoarces viviparus) sampled at surveillance stations during the fall of 2007 and spring 2008 in different Danish coastal areas, were studied for biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposure and effects. Two analytical techniques, synchronous fluorescence spectrometry (SFS......) and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/F), were applied for detecting PAH metabolites in bile and urine. CYP1A activity, in this study regarded as potential biomarker of effect, was measured as 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in liver of eelpouts from...... different stations. Biliary PAH metabolite measurements were used for monitoring the environmental PAH load at the surveillance stations. There was found significant difference in biliary PAH metabolite content between sexes with male fish containing higher concentrations of PAH metabolites than females...

  9. Role of proteomics in the discovery of autism biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayadhi, L. A.; Halepoto, D. M. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Physiology

    2013-02-15

    The epidemiology of autism is continuously increasing all over the world with social, behavioural and economical burdens. Autism is considered as a multi-factorial disorder, influenced by genetic, neurological, environmental and immunological aspects. Autism is still believed to be incurable disorder with little information about the role of proteins patterns in the diagnosis of the disease. Knowing the applications of proteomic tools, it is possible to identify quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in a wide variety of tissues and body fluids such as blood, urine, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid in order to establish specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the various protocols available for proteomics by using mass spectrometry analysis, discuss reports in which these techniques have been previously applied in biomarker discovery for the diagnosis of autism, and consider the future development of this area of research. (author)

  10. Role of proteomics in the discovery of autism biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayadhi, L.A.; Halepoto, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of autism is continuously increasing all over the world with social, behavioural and economical burdens. Autism is considered as a multi-factorial disorder, influenced by genetic, neurological, environmental and immunological aspects. Autism is still believed to be incurable disorder with little information about the role of proteins patterns in the diagnosis of the disease. Knowing the applications of proteomic tools, it is possible to identify quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in a wide variety of tissues and body fluids such as blood, urine, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid in order to establish specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the various protocols available for proteomics by using mass spectrometry analysis, discuss reports in which these techniques have been previously applied in biomarker discovery for the diagnosis of autism, and consider the future development of this area of research. (author)

  11. Correlation of the levels of glycosaminoglycans between urine and dried urine in filter paper samples and their stability over time under different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, Ana Carolina; Cé, Jaqueline; Coelho, Janice Carneiro

    2014-06-10

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) are a group of lysosomal storage diseases caused by the deficiency/absence of enzymes which catalyze the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The use of biological samples dried on filter paper has been increasing because it makes it easy to ship them to reference laboratories. Urinary GAGs are the main biomarkers of MPS and, thus, we studied the correlations of determinations to GAGs and creatinine, as well as compared the GAGs' profile on electrophoresis, between urine and dried urine in filter paper (DUFP) samples. We also assessed the GAG stability over time under different storage temperatures. We quantified the GAG concentration in both sample types and compared the results by Pearson correlation. The results were very similar, with r=0.97 for creatinine and with r=0.94 and r=0.98 for GAGs for controls and patients, respectively, with similar electrophoretic profiles. The GAG stability in DUFP was up to 30days at -20, 4, and 25°C and up to 21days at 37°C. Our proposal assessed urinary GAGs in DUFP and concluded that these samples can be used in the investigation of MPS, replacing urine samples in neonatal screening and monitoring of therapies, due to ease of transportation and storage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hair Manganese as an Exposure Biomarker among Welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Boris; Simpson, Christopher D; Baker, Marissa G; Stover, Bert; Sheppard, Lianne; Seixas, Noah S

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying exposure and dose to manganese (Mn) containing airborne particles in welding fume presents many challenges. Common biological markers such as Mn in blood or Mn in urine have not proven to be practical biomarkers even in studies where positive associations were observed. However, hair Mn (MnH) as a biomarker has the advantage over blood and urine that it is less influenced by short-term variability of Mn exposure levels because of its slow growth rate. The objective of this study was to determine whether hair can be used as a biomarker for welders exposed to manganese. Hair samples (1cm) were collected from 47 welding school students and individual air Mn (MnA) exposures were measured for each subject. MnA levels for all days were estimated with a linear mixed model using welding type as a predictor. A 30-day time-weighted average MnA (MnA30d) exposure level was calculated for each hair sample. The association between MnH and MnA30d levels was then assessed. A linear relationship was observed between log-transformed MnA30d and log-transformed MnH. Doubling MnA30d exposure levels yields a 20% (95% confidence interval: 11-29%) increase in MnH. The association was similar for hair washed following two different wash procedures designed to remove external contamination. Hair shows promise as a biomarker for inhaled Mn exposure given the presence of a significant linear association between MnH and MnA30d levels. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative determination of human biomarkers by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, C.; Bratu, A. M.; Matei, C.; Cernat, R.; Popescu, A.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2011-07-01

    The hypothesis that blood, urine and other body fluids and tissues can be sampled and analyzed to produce clinical information for disease diagnosis or therapy monitoring is the basis of modern clinical diagnosis and medical practice. The analysis of breath air has major advantages because it is a non-invasive method, represents minimal risk to personnel collecting the samples and can be often sampled. Breath air samples from the human subjects were collected using aluminized bags from QuinTron and analyzed using the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) technique. LPAS is used to detect traces of ethylene in breath air resulting from lipid peroxidation in lung epithelium following the radiotherapy and also traces of ammonia from patients subjected to hemodialysis for treatment of renal failure. In the case of patients affected by cancer and treated by external radiotherapy, all measurements were done at 10P(14) CO2 laser line, where the ethylene absorption coefficient has the largest value (30.4 cm-1 atm-1), whereas for patients affected by renal failure and treated by standard dialysis, all measurements were performed at 9R(30) CO2 laser line, where the ammonia absorption coefficient has the maximum value of 57 cm-1 atm-1. The levels of ethylene and ammonia in exhaled air, from patients with cancer and renal failure, respectively, were measured and compared with breath air contents from healthy humans. Human gas biomarkers were measured at sub-ppb (parts per billion) concentration sensitivities. It has been demonstrated that LPAS technique will play an important role in the future of exhaled breath air analysis. The key attributes of this technique are sensitivity, selectivity, fast and real time response, as well as its simplicity.

  14. Voided urine versus bladder washing cytology for detection of urothelial carcinoma: which is better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Anna Krarup; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2017-08-01

    Cytology is recommended as part of the follow-up of high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, currently there are no solid guideline recommendations regarding the use of voided urine versus bladder washing for cytology as part of the diagnosis or follow-up of NMIBC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cytological outcome was equal regarding the two techniques. The authors reviewed all outpatient flexible cystoscopies carried out in their department in 2013. Patient records in the registry of pathology were examined and those with simultaneous urine and bladder washing cytology were included. Previous urothelial disease and positive histology within 3 months after the cystoscopy were registered. A total of 1458 patients had both voided urine and bladder washing cytology and were included in the study, of whom 643 (44%) had a history of urothelial disease. An equal outcome of urine and bladder washing cytology was found in 1447 patients (99.2%). For the remaining 11 patients, only four patients underwent further examinations based on cytology findings in addition to what had already been planned after cystoscopy. Of the included patients, 100 (6.9%) had a positive histological outcome within 3 months. In most patients, no relevant difference between voided urine and bladder washing cytology was observed. Therefore, if cytology is indicated, it is recommended to use the test that is most readily available locally. The additional gain in using both urine and bladder wash is minimal, and can therefore be discarded.

  15. Quantitative imaging as cancer biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, David A.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to assay tumor biologic features and the impact of drugs on tumor biology is fundamental to drug development. Advances in our ability to measure genomics, gene expression, protein expression, and cellular biology have led to a host of new targets for anticancer drug therapy. In translating new drugs into clinical trials and clinical practice, these same assays serve to identify patients most likely to benefit from specific anticancer treatments. As cancer therapy becomes more individualized and targeted, there is an increasing need to characterize tumors and identify therapeutic targets to select therapy most likely to be successful in treating the individual patient's cancer. Thus far assays to identify cancer therapeutic targets or anticancer drug pharmacodynamics have been based upon in vitro assay of tissue or blood samples. Advances in molecular imaging, particularly PET, have led to the ability to perform quantitative non-invasive molecular assays. Imaging has traditionally relied on structural and anatomic features to detect cancer and determine its extent. More recently, imaging has expanded to include the ability to image regional biochemistry and molecular biology, often termed molecular imaging. Molecular imaging can be considered an in vivo assay technique, capable of measuring regional tumor biology without perturbing it. This makes molecular imaging a unique tool for cancer drug development, complementary to traditional assay methods, and a potentially powerful method for guiding targeted therapy in clinical trials and clinical practice. The ability to quantify, in absolute measures, regional in vivo biologic parameters strongly supports the use of molecular imaging as a tool to guide therapy. This review summarizes current and future applications of quantitative molecular imaging as a biomarker for cancer therapy, including the use of imaging to (1) identify patients whose tumors express a specific therapeutic target; (2) determine

  16. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in children exposed to low levels of arsenic in utero and during early childhood: Application of salivary and urinary biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinhumpatch, Pantip; Navasumrit, Panida; Chaisatra, Krittinee; Promvijit, Jeerawan; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess arsenic exposure and its effect on oxidative DNA damage and repair in young children exposed in utero and continued to live in arsenic-contaminated areas. To address the need for biological specimens that can be acquired with minimal discomfort to children, we used non-invasive urinary and salivary-based assays for assessing arsenic exposure and early biological effects that have potentially serious health implications. Levels of arsenic in nails showed the greatest magnitude of difference between exposed and control groups, followed by arsenic concentrations in saliva and urine. Arsenic levels in saliva showed significant positive correlations with other biomarkers of arsenic exposure, including arsenic accumulation in nails (r = 0.56, P < 0.001) and arsenic concentration in urine (r = 0.50, P < 0.05). Exposed children had a significant reduction in arsenic methylation capacity indicated by decreased primary methylation index and secondary methylation index in both urine and saliva samples. Levels of salivary 8-OHdG in exposed children were significantly higher (∼ 4-fold, P < 0.01), whereas levels of urinary 8-OHdG excretion and salivary hOGG1 expression were significantly lower in exposed children (∼ 3-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting a defect in hOGG1 that resulted in ineffective cleavage of 8-OHdG. Multiple regression analysis results showed that levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in saliva and urine had a significant positive association with salivary 8-OHdG and a significant negative association with salivary hOGG1 expression. - Highlights: • The effects of arsenic exposure in utero and through early childhood were studied. • Arsenic-exposed children had a reduction in arsenic methylation capacity. • Exposed children had more DNA damage, observed as elevated salivary 8-OHdG. • Lower salivary hOGG1 in exposed children indicated impairment of 8-OHdG repair. • Salivary and urinary 8-OHdG levels were discordant

  17. Biomarker discovery in mass spectrometry-based urinary proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Samuel; Hao, Ling; Ricke, William A; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Urinary proteomics has become one of the most attractive topics in disease biomarker discovery. MS-based proteomic analysis has advanced continuously and emerged as a prominent tool in the field of clinical bioanalysis. However, only few protein biomarkers have made their way to validation and clinical practice. Biomarker discovery is challenged by many clinical and analytical factors including, but not limited to, the complexity of urine and the wide dynamic range of endogenous proteins in the sample. This article highlights promising technologies and strategies in the MS-based biomarker discovery process, including study design, sample preparation, protein quantification, instrumental platforms, and bioinformatics. Different proteomics approaches are discussed, and progresses in maximizing urinary proteome coverage and standardization are emphasized in this review. MS-based urinary proteomics has great potential in the development of noninvasive diagnostic assays in the future, which will require collaborative efforts between analytical scientists, systems biologists, and clinicians. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Spectral pattern of urinary water as a biomarker of estrus in the giant panda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Kodzue; Miyazaki, Mari; Morita, Hiroyuki; Vassileva, Maria; Tang, Chunxiang; Li, Desheng; Ishikawa, Osamu; Kusunoki, Hiroshi; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2012-11-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been successfully used for non-invasive diagnosis of diseases and abnormalities where water spectral patterns are found to play an important role. The present study investigates water absorbance patterns indicative of estrus in the female giant panda. NIR spectra of urine samples were acquired from the same animal on a daily basis over three consecutive putative estrus periods. Characteristic water absorbance patterns based on 12 specific water absorbance bands were discovered, which displayed high urine spectral variation, suggesting that hydrogen-bonded water structures increase with estrus. Regression analysis of urine spectra and spectra of estrone-3-glucuronide standard concentrations at these water bands showed high correlation with estrogen levels. Cluster analysis of urine spectra grouped together estrus samples from different years. These results open a new avenue for using water structure as a molecular mirror for fast estrus detection.

  19. Tracer techniques for urine volume determination and urine collection and sampling back-up system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R. V.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility, functionality, and overall accuracy of the use of lithium were investigated as a chemical tracer in urine for providing a means of indirect determination of total urine volume by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. Experiments were conducted to investigate the parameters of instrumentation, tracer concentration, mixing times, and methods for incorporating the tracer material in the urine collection bag, and to refine and optimize the urine tracer technique to comply with the Skylab scheme and operational parameters of + or - 2% of volume error and + or - 1% accuracy of amount of tracer added to each container. In addition, a back-up method for urine collection and sampling system was developed and evaluated. This back-up method incorporates the tracer technique for volume determination in event of failure of the primary urine collection and preservation system. One chemical preservative was selected and evaluated as a contingency chemical preservative for the storage of urine in event of failure of the urine cooling system.

  20. Reconstructing exposures from biomarkers using exposure-pharmacokinetic modeling--A case study with carbaryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen; Phillips, Martin; Grulke, Christopher; Yoon, Miyoung; Young, Bruce; McDougall, Robin; Leonard, Jeremy; Lu, Jingtao; Lefew, William; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for short half-life chemicals were characterized using computational models that link external exposures to biomarkers. Using carbaryl as an example, an exposure model, the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), was used to generate time-concentration profiles for 500 virtual individuals exposed to carbaryl. These exposure profiles were used as inputs into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict urinary biomarker concentrations. These matching dietary intake levels and biomarker concentrations were used to (1) compare three reverse dosimetry approaches based on their ability to predict the central tendency of the intake dose distribution; and (2) identify parameters necessary for a more accurate exposure reconstruction. This study illustrates the trade-offs between using non-iterative reverse dosimetry methods that are fast, less precise and iterative methods that are slow, more precise. This study also intimates the necessity of including urine flow rate and elapsed time between last dose and urine sampling as part of the biomarker sampling collection for better interpretation of urinary biomarker data of short biological half-life chemicals. Resolution of these critical data gaps can allow exposure reconstruction methods to better predict population-level intake doses from large biomonitoring studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Sputum-Based Molecular Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Lung Cancer: Limitations and Promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Connie E. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Rom, William N., E-mail: william.rom@nyumc.org [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Road, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)

    2011-07-19

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, with an overall survival of 15% at five years. Biomarkers that can sensitively and specifically detect lung cancer at early stage are crucial for improving this poor survival rate. Sputum has been the target for the discovery of non-invasive biomarkers for lung cancer because it contains airway epithelial cells, and molecular alterations identified in sputum are most likely to reflect tumor-associated changes or field cancerization caused by smoking in the lung. Sputum-based molecular biomarkers include morphology, allelic imbalance, promoter hypermethylation, gene mutations and, recently, differential miRNA expression. To improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of sputum-based biomarkers, we recommend standardization of processing protocols, bronchial epithelial cell enrichment, and identification of field cancerization biomarkers.

  2. Some aspects of cancer biomarkers and their clinical application in solid tumors – revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer biomarkers can be used for a variety of purposes related to screening, prediction, stratification, detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment design, and monitoring of a therapeutic response. One of the most important characteristics of a given biomarker includes ease of collection allowing for a non-invasive approach and frequent sampling. Such samples may be obtained from serum or plasma, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, saliva, nipple discharge, pleural, or peritoneal effusions. Validation of different biomarkers is considered a mandatory method for useful evaluation. In this review, we highlight the clinical applicability of some cancer biomarkers, as well as future approaches for their development and collection, which may help guide clinicians and researchers. The role of liquid biopsies will also be summarized. Further studies using liquid biopsies are needed to elucidate the significance of various sources of biomarkers suitable for clinical application.

  3. Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Evaluation of Skin Carotenoids as a Biomarker of Carotenoid Status for Human Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Susan T.; Cartmel, Brenda; Scarmo, Stephanie; Jahns, Lisa; Ermakov, Igor V.; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status has been suggested as a promising biomarker for human studies. This manuscript describes research done relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, and adiposity. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary [e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid fruit and vegetable (F/V)-enriched diet], demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective biomarker of F/V intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater F/V intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of F/V intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes. PMID:23823930

  4. Metabolomic analysis of urine samples by UHPLC-QTOF-MS: Impact of normalization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnebin, Yoric; Tonoli, David; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ponte, Belen; de Seigneux, Sophie; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Schappler, Julie; Boccard, Julien; Rudaz, Serge

    2017-02-22

    Among the various biological matrices used in metabolomics, urine is a biofluid of major interest because of its non-invasive collection and its availability in large quantities. However, significant sources of variability in urine metabolomics based on UHPLC-MS are related to the analytical drift and variation of the sample concentration, thus requiring normalization. A sequential normalization strategy was developed to remove these detrimental effects, including: (i) pre-acquisition sample normalization by individual dilution factors to narrow the concentration range and to standardize the analytical conditions, (ii) post-acquisition data normalization by quality control-based robust LOESS signal correction (QC-RLSC) to correct for potential analytical drift, and (iii) post-acquisition data normalization by MS total useful signal (MSTUS) or probabilistic quotient normalization (PQN) to prevent the impact of concentration variability. This generic strategy was performed with urine samples from healthy individuals and was further implemented in the context of a clinical study to detect alterations in urine metabolomic profiles due to kidney failure. In the case of kidney failure, the relation between creatinine/osmolality and the sample concentration is modified, and relying only on these measurements for normalization could be highly detrimental. The sequential normalization strategy was demonstrated to significantly improve patient stratification by decreasing the unwanted variability and thus enhancing data quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Choice of urine collection methods for the diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young, febrile infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Alan R; Newman, Thomas B; Wasserman, Richard C; Finch, Stacia A; Pantell, Robert H

    2005-10-01

    The optimal method of urine collection in febrile infants is debatable; catheterization, considered more accurate, is technically difficult and invasive. To determine predictors of urethral catheterization in febrile infants and to compare bag and catheterized urine test performance characteristics. Prospective analysis of infants enrolled in the Pediatric Research in Office Settings' Febrile Infant Study. A total of 219 practices from within the Pediatric Research in Office Settings' network, including 44 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. A total of 3066 infants aged 0 to 3 months with temperatures of 38 degrees C or higher. We calculated adjusted odds ratios for predictors of catheterization. Diagnostic test characteristics were compared between bag and catheterization. Urinary tract infection was defined as pure growth of 100 000 CFU/mL or more (bag) and 20 000 CFU/mL or more (catheterization). Seventy percent of urine samples were obtained by catheterization. Predictors of catheterization included female sex, practitioner older than 40 years, Medicaid, Hispanic ethnicity, nighttime evaluation, and severe dehydration. For leukocyte esterase levels, bag specimens demonstrated no difference in sensitivity but somewhat lower specificity (84% [bag] vs 94% [catheterization], PInfection rates were similar in bag and catheterized specimens (8.5% vs 10.8%). Ambiguous cultures were more common in bag specimens (7.4% vs 2.7%, Purinary tract infection. Although both urine cultures and urinalyses are more accurate in catheterized specimens, the magnitude of difference is small but should be factored into clinical decision making.

  6. Novel biomarkers for sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Frederik Fruergaard; Petersen, J Asger

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a prevalent condition among hospitalized patients that carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Rapid recognition of sepsis as the cause of deterioration is desirable, so effective treatment can be initiated rapidly. Traditionally, diagnosis was based on presence of two...... or more positive SIRS criteria due to infection. However, recently published sepsis-3 criteria put more emphasis on organ dysfunction caused by infection in the definition of sepsis. Regardless of this, no gold standard for diagnosis exist, and clinicians still rely on a number of traditional and novel...... biomarkers to discriminate between patients with and without infection, as the cause of deterioration. METHOD: Narrative review of current literature. RESULTS: A number of the most promising biomarkers for diagnoses and prognostication of sepsis are presented. CONCLUSION: Procalcitonin, presepsin, CD64, su...

  7. Analysis of the variability of human normal urine by 2D-GE reveals a "public" and a "private" proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Laurence; Salvetat, Nicolas; Ameur, Randa Ben; Peres, Sabine; Sommerer, Nicolas; Jarraya, Fayçal; Ayadi, Hammadi; Molina, Franck; Granier, Claude

    2011-12-10

    The characterization of the normal urinary proteome is steadily progressing and represents a major interest in the assessment of clinical urinary biomarkers. To estimate quantitatively the variability of the normal urinary proteome, urines of 20 healthy people were collected. We first evaluated the impact of the sample conservation temperature on urine proteome integrity. Keeping the urine sample at RT or at +4°C until storage at -80°C seems the best way for long-term storage of samples for 2D-GE analysis. The quantitative variability of the normal urinary proteome was estimated on the 20 urines mapped by 2D-GE. The occurrence of the 910 identified spots was analysed throughout the gels and represented in a virtual 2D gel. Sixteen percent of the spots were found to occur in all samples and 23% occurred in at least 90% of urines. About 13% of the protein spots were present only in 10% or less of the samples, thus representing the most variable part of the normal urinary proteome. Twenty proteins corresponding to a fraction of the fully conserved spots were identified by mass spectrometry. In conclusion, a "public" urinary proteome, common to healthy individuals, seems to coexist with a "private" urinary proteome, which is more specific to each individual. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Biomarkers of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, Wojciech; Grela, Agatha; Zyss, Tomasz; Zieba, Andrzej; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most abundant age-related psychiatric disorders. The outcome of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease has both individual (the patients and their families) and socio-economic effects. The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease doubles after the age of 65 years, every 4.5 years. An etiologically heterogenic group of disorders related to aging as well as genetic and environmental interactions probably underlie the impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Those factors cause the degeneration of brain tissue which leads to significant cognitive dysfunction. There are two main hypotheses that are linked to the process of neurodegeneration: (i) amyloid cascade and (ii) the role of secretases and dysfunction of mitochondria. From the therapeutic standpoint it is crucial to get an early diagnosis and start with an adequate treatment. The undeniable progress in the field of biomarker research should lead to a better understanding of the early stages of the disorder. So far, the best recognised and described biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease, which can be detected in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood, are: beta-amyloid, tau-protein and phosphorylated tau-protein (phospho-tau). The article discusses the usefulness of the known biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in early diagnosis.

  9. Determination of uranium isotopes in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lellis, I.R.; Silva, D.V.F.M. Rey; Taddei, M.H.T.

    2017-01-01

    Variable concentrations of uranium occur naturally in waters, plant products and soils. Small amounts of this element are routinely incorporated by man. Occupationally exposed individuals (IOEs) are subject to the incorporation of higher amounts of uranium into their work routines. The effects on human health resulting from the incorporation of uranium in environmental doses are not very well established and are currently recognized as of little relevance. The incorporation resulting from occupational activities, where higher doses can be found, represents a health risk resulting from chemical damages to the kidneys. Considering that uranium is eliminated from the human body through urine and feces, and that the concentration in the urine can be obtained by means of radiochemical analyzes, this can be considered an efficient indirect method to verify the incorporation of this element. In the work the isotopes of 234 U, 235 U and 238 U were analyzed in urine samples of IOEs and the rate of uranium present in them was verified

  10. Measurement of menadione in urine by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rajabi, Ala; Peterson, James; Choi, Sang-Woon; Suttie, John; Barakat, Susan; Booth, Sarah L

    2010-09-15

    Menadione is a metabolite of vitamin K that is excreted in urine. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using a C(30) column, post-column zinc reduction and fluorescence detection was developed to measure urinary menadione. The mobile phase was composed of 95% methanol with 0.55% aqueous solution and 5% DI H(2)O. Menaquinone-2 (MK-2) was used as an internal standard. The standard calibration curve was linear with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.999 for both menadione and MK-2. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.3pmole menadione/mL urine. Sample preparation involved hydrolysis of menadiol conjugates and oxidizing the released menadiol to menadione. Using this method, urinary menadione was shown to increase in response to 3 years of phylloquinone supplementation. This HPLC method is a sensitive and reproducible way to detect menadione in urine. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Volatile organic compounds as biomarkers of bladder cancer: Sensitivity and specificity using trained sniffer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Carolyn M; Britton, Lezlie E; Harris, Rob; Wallace, Joshua; Guest, Claire M

    In a previous canine study, we demonstrated that volatile organic compounds specific to bladder cancer are present in urine headspace, subsequently showing that up to 70% of tumours can be correctly classified using an electronic nose. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity which can be achieved by a group of four trained dogs. In a series of 30 double-blind test runs, each consisting of one bladder cancer urine sample placed alongside six controls, the highest sensitivity achieved by the best performing dog was 73% (95% CI 55-86%), with the group as a whole correctly identifying the cancer samples 64% (95% CI 55-73%) of the time. Specificity of the dogs individually ranged from 92% (95% CI 82-97%) for urine samples obtained from healthy, young volunteers down to 56% (95% CI 42-68%) for those taken from older patients with non-cancerous urological disease. Odds ratio comparisons confirmed a significant decrease in performance as the extent of urine dipstick abnormality and/or pathology amongst the control population increased. Importantly, however, statistical analysis indicated that covariates such as smoking, gender and age, as well as blood, protein and /or leucocytes in the urine did not significantly alter the odds of response to the cancer samples. Our results provide further evidence that volatile biomarkers for bladder cancer exist in urine headspace, and that these have the potential to be exploited for diagnosis.

  12. Urine alkalization facilitates uric acid excretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Increase in the incidence of hyperuricemia associated with gout as well as hypertension, renal diseases and cardiovascular diseases has been a public health concern. We examined the possibility of facilitated excretion of uric acid by change in urine pH by managing food materials. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government's health promotion program, we made recipes which consist of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H+-load (acid diet) and others composed of less protein but vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkali diet). Healthy female students were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+) and anions (Cl-,SO42-,PO4-) necessary for the estimation of acid-base balance were measured. Results Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42-] +organic acid-gut alkai) were linearly related with those of the excretion of acid (titratable acidity+ [NH4+] - [HCO3-]), indicating that H+ in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of food materials. Uric acid and excreted urine pH retained a linear relationship, where uric acid excretion increased from 302 mg/day at pH 5.9 to 413 mg/day at pH 6.5, despite the fact that the alkali diet contained a smaller purine load than the acid diet. Conclusion We conclude that alkalization of urine by eating nutritionally well-designed food is effective for removing uric acid from the body. PMID:20955624

  13. Urine alkalization facilitates uric acid excretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyama Issei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in the incidence of hyperuricemia associated with gout as well as hypertension, renal diseases and cardiovascular diseases has been a public health concern. We examined the possibility of facilitated excretion of uric acid by change in urine pH by managing food materials. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government's health promotion program, we made recipes which consist of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H+-load (acid diet and others composed of less protein but vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkali diet. Healthy female students were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+ and anions (Cl-,SO42-,PO4- necessary for the estimation of acid-base balance were measured. Results Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42-] +organic acid-gut alkai were linearly related with those of the excretion of acid (titratable acidity+ [NH4+] - [HCO3-], indicating that H+ in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of food materials. Uric acid and excreted urine pH retained a linear relationship, where uric acid excretion increased from 302 mg/day at pH 5.9 to 413 mg/day at pH 6.5, despite the fact that the alkali diet contained a smaller purine load than the acid diet. Conclusion We conclude that alkalization of urine by eating nutritionally well-designed food is effective for removing uric acid from the body.

  14. The Urine Proteome Profile Is Different in Neuromyelitis Optica Compared to Multiple Sclerosis: A Clinical Proteome Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle H Nielsen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS comprise a broad spectrum of diseases like neuromyelitis optica (NMO, NMO spectrum disorders (NMO-SD and multiple sclerosis (MS. Despite clear classification criteria, differentiation can be difficult. We hypothesized that the urine proteome may differentiate NMO from MS.The proteins in urine samples from anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4 seropositive NMO/NMO-SD patients (n = 32, patients with MS (n = 46 and healthy subjects (HS, n = 31 were examined by quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS after trypsin digestion and iTRAQ labelling. Immunoglobulins (Ig in the urine were validated by nephelometry in an independent cohort (n = 9-10 pr. groups.The analysis identified a total of 1112 different proteins of which 333 were shared by all 109 subjects. Cluster analysis revealed differences in the urine proteome of NMO/NMO-SD compared to HS and MS. Principal component analysis also suggested that the NMO/NMO-SD proteome profile was useful for classification. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a 3-protein profile for the NMO/NMO-SD versus HS discrimination, a 6-protein profile for NMO/NMO-SD versus MS discrimination and an 11-protein profile for MS versus HS discrimination. All protein panels yielded highly significant ROC curves (AUC in all cases >0.85, p≤0.0002. Nephelometry confirmed the presence of increased Ig-light chains in the urine of patients with NMO/NMO-SD.The urine proteome profile of patients with NMO/NMO-SD is different from MS and HS. This may reflect differences in the pathogenesis of NMO/NMO-SD versus MS and suggests that urine may be a potential source of biomarkers differentiating NMO/NMO-SD from MS.

  15. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J.; Joglekar, Mugdha V.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Keech, Anthony C.; O'Neal, David N.; Januszewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  16. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  17. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reflects metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindel, W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Kugel, H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Wendel, U. [Children`s Hospital, Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Roth, B. [Children`s Hospital, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Benz-Bohm, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Using localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), accumulation of branchedchain amino acids (BCAA) and their corresponding 2-oxo acids (BCOA) could be non-invasively demonstrated in the brain of a 9-year-old girl suffering from classical maple syrup urine disease. During acute metabolic decompensation, the compounds caused a signal at a chemical shift of 0.9 ppm which was assigned by in vitro experiments. The brain tissue concentration of the sum of BCAA and BCOA could be estimated as 0.9 mmol/l. Localized {sup 1}H-MRS of the brain appears to be suitable for examining patients suffering from maple syrup urine disease in different metabolic states. (orig.)