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Sample records for invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy

  1. Radioguided parathyroidectomy for tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

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    Somnay, Yash R; Weinlander, Eric; Alfhefdi, Amal; Schneider, David; Sippel, Rebecca S; Chen, Herbert

    2015-05-15

    Tertiary hyperparathyroidism (3HPT) is defined as the persistent hyperproduction of parathyroid hormone and resulting hypercalcemia after renal transplantation. Here, we examine the utility of radioguided parathyroidectomy (RGP) in patients with 3HPT. We reviewed a prospective surgery database containing 80 3HPT patients who underwent RGP from January 2001-July 2014 at our institution. We evaluated patient demographics, operative management, radioguided neoprobe utilization, and operative outcomes. Data are reported as mean ± standard error of the mean. The mean age of the patients was 52 ± 1 y, and 46% were male. A total of 69 patients had hyperplasia and received subtotal parathyroidectomy, whereas 5 patients had double adenomas and 6 patients had single adenomas. The average calcium level among 3HPT patients was 10.8 ± 0.1 mg/dL preoperatively and 8.7 ± 0.1 mg/dL postoperatively. In vivo radioguided counts normalized to background counts averaged 145 ± 4%, whereas ex vivo counts normalized to background counts averaged 69 ± 5%. All but one ex vivo count was >20%. Ectopically located glands were successfully localized in 38 patients using the gamma probe. Ex vivo percentage did not correlate with parathyroid gland weight, preoperative parathyroid hormone, or preoperative calcium. Our radioguided approach achieved normocalcemia in 96% of 3HPT patients undergoing RGP; two patients developed recurrent disease. In this series, all enlarged parathyroid glands were localized and resected using the gamma probe. Thus, RGP reliably localizes adenomatous, hyperplastic, and ectopically located glands in patients with 3HPT, resulting in high cure rate after resection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimally Invasive Parathyroidectomy

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    Lee F. Starker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP is an operative approach for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT. Currently, routine use of improved preoperative localization studies, cervical block anesthesia in the conscious patient, and intraoperative parathyroid hormone analyses aid in guiding surgical therapy. MIP requires less surgical dissection causing decreased trauma to tissues, can be performed safely in the ambulatory setting, and is at least as effective as standard cervical exploration. This paper reviews advances in preoperative localization, anesthetic techniques, and intraoperative management of patients undergoing MIP for the treatment of pHPT.

  3. Potential role of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera in performing minimally invasive parathyroidectomy

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    Ortega, Joaquin; Lledo, Salvador [University of Valencia, Clinic University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Valencia (Spain); Ferrer-Rebolleda, Jose [Clinic University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Valencia (Spain); Cassinello, Norberto [Clinic University Hospital, Unit of Endocrinologic and Bariatric Surgery, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    Sestamibi scans have increased the use of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) to treat primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) when caused by a parathyroid single adenoma. The greatest concern for surgeons remains the proper identification of pathological glands in a limited surgical field. We have studied the usefulness of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera (MGC) when used intraoperatively to locate parathyroid adenomas. To our knowledge this is the first report published on this subject in the scientific literature. Five patients with PHPT secondary to a single adenoma, positively diagnosed by preoperative sestamibi scans, underwent a MIP. A gamma probe for radioguided surgery and the new hand-held MGC were used consecutively to locate the pathological glands. This new MGC has a module composed of a high-resolution interchangeable collimator and a CsI(Na) scintillating crystal. It has dimensions of around 15 cm x 8 cm x 9 cm and weighs 1 kg. The intraoperative assay of PTH (ioPTH) was used to confirm the complete resection of pathological tissue. All cases were operated on successfully by a MIP. The ioPTH confirmed the excision of all pathological tissues. The MGC proved its usefulness in all patients, even in a difficult case in which the first attempt with the gamma probe failed. In all cases it offered real-time accurate intraoperative images. The hand-held MGC is a useful instrument in MIP for PHPT. It may be used to complement the standard tools used to date, or may even replace them, at least in selected cases of single adenomas. (orig.)

  4. Potential role of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera in performing minimally invasive parathyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Joaquin; Lledo, Salvador; Ferrer-Rebolleda, Jose; Cassinello, Norberto

    2007-01-01

    Sestamibi scans have increased the use of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) to treat primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) when caused by a parathyroid single adenoma. The greatest concern for surgeons remains the proper identification of pathological glands in a limited surgical field. We have studied the usefulness of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera (MGC) when used intraoperatively to locate parathyroid adenomas. To our knowledge this is the first report published on this subject in the scientific literature. Five patients with PHPT secondary to a single adenoma, positively diagnosed by preoperative sestamibi scans, underwent a MIP. A gamma probe for radioguided surgery and the new hand-held MGC were used consecutively to locate the pathological glands. This new MGC has a module composed of a high-resolution interchangeable collimator and a CsI(Na) scintillating crystal. It has dimensions of around 15 cm x 8 cm x 9 cm and weighs 1 kg. The intraoperative assay of PTH (ioPTH) was used to confirm the complete resection of pathological tissue. All cases were operated on successfully by a MIP. The ioPTH confirmed the excision of all pathological tissues. The MGC proved its usefulness in all patients, even in a difficult case in which the first attempt with the gamma probe failed. In all cases it offered real-time accurate intraoperative images. The hand-held MGC is a useful instrument in MIP for PHPT. It may be used to complement the standard tools used to date, or may even replace them, at least in selected cases of single adenomas. (orig.)

  5. 99mTc-MIBI radio-guided minimally invasive parathyroidectomy: experience with patients with normal thyroids and nodular goiters.

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    Casara, Dario; Rubello, Domenico; Cauzzo, Cristina; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa

    2002-01-01

    The surgical approach to primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is changing. In patients with a high probability to be affected by a solitary parathyroid adenoma (PA), a unilateral neck exploration (UNE) or a minimally invasive radio-guided surgery (MIRS) using the intraoperative gamma probe (IGP) technique have recently been proposed. We investigated the role of IGP in a group of 84 patients with primary HPT who were homogeneously evaluated before surgery by a single-day imaging protocol including 99mTcO4/MIBI subtraction scan and neck ultrasound (US) and then operated on by the same surgical team. Quick parathyroid hormone (QPTH) was intraoperatively measured in all cases to confirm successful parathyroidectomy. In 70 patients with scan/US evidence of a single enlarged parathyroid gland (EPG) and with a normal thyroid gland, MIRS was planned. In the other 14 patients, the IGP technique was utilized during a standard bilateral neck exploration (BNE) because of the presence of concomitant nodular goiter (11 cases) or multiglandular disease (MGD) (3 cases). The IGP technique consisted of the following: (1) in the operating room, a low 99mTc-MIBI dose (37 MBq) was injected intravenously during anesthesia induction; (2) subsequently, the patient's neck was scanned with the probe by the surgeon to localize the cutaneous projection of the EPG; (3) in patients who underwent MIRS, the EPG was detected intraoperatively with the probe and removed through a small, 2 to 2.5 cm skin incision; (4) radioactivity was measured on the EPG both in vivo and ex vivo, the thyroid, the background and the parathyroid bed after EPG removal. In patients with concomitant nodular goiter, the radioactivity was also measured on the thyroid nodules. Surgical and pathologic findings were consistent with a single PA in 78 patients, parathyroid carcinoma in 2, and MGD in 4. MIRS was successfully performed in 67 of the 70 patients (97.7%) in whom this approach was planned. It must be pointed out that

  6. Use of {sup 99m}Tc 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile in minimally invasive radioguided surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism: A narrative review of the current literature

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    Denmeade, Kristie A [Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound Department, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Bankstown, New South Wales (Australia); Constable, Chris [Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Reed, Warren M [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound Department, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Bankstown, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-06-15

    The use of technetium-99m 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile ({sup 99m}Tc MIBI) for assistance in minimally invasive radioguided surgery (MIRS) is growing in popularity as a safe, effective, and proficient technique used for parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) treatment. Previously, the preferred treatment for PHPT was bilateral neck exploration (BNE), a very invasive, costly, and lengthy procedure. However, as a large majority (80–85% of cases of PHPT) are attributed to a single parathyroid adenoma (PA), a simpler more direct technique such as MIRS is a far better option. The following article is an exploration of the current literature concerning varied protocols utilizing {sup 99m}Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS for patients undergoing treatment of PHPT. This technique boasts many advantageous outcomes for patients suffering from PHPT. These include a reduction in cost, operating time, and patient recovery; less evidence of post-surgical hypocalcaemia, less pain, and complications; superior cosmetic results; same-day discharge; and the possibility of local anaesthesia which is particularly beneficial in elderly patients. Better outcomes for patients with deep or ectopic PAs, reduced intra-operative complications, and improved cosmetic outcomes for patients who have previously undergone thyroid and/or parathyroid surgery are also advantageous. Of the literature reviewed it was also found that no patients suffered any major surgical complications such as laryngeal nerve palsy or permanent hypoparathyroidism using {sup 99m}Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS.

  7. Radioguided surgery of primary hyperparathyroidism in a population with a high prevalence of thyroid pathology

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    Garcia-Talavera, Paloma [University Hospital of Valladolid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Valladolid (Spain); Gonzalez, Carmen; Gomez, Alberto [University Hospital of Salamanca, Department of Surgery, Salamanca (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, Jose Ramon; Martin, Esther; Martin, Mariano [University Hospital of Salamanca, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Salamanca (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Patients with concomitant thyroid pathology are usually excluded from minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP). We assessed the value in these patients of the gamma probe, alone or in combination with other techniques, in MIRP and unilateral or bilateral approaches. We evaluated its performance in association with intraoperative determination of intact parathyroid hormone (ioPTHi) and preoperative {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI dual phase scintigraphy. Included in the study were 87 patients with a diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism who underwent radioguided surgery. They were divided into two groups depending on the presence of concomitant thyroid pathology (TP group, 33 patients) or absence of concomitant thyroid pathology (NTP group, 54 patients). In the TP group, ioPTHi achieved the highest accuracy (90.9%), followed by the gamma probe (81.8%) and scintigraphy (69.7%). In the NTP group, the probe (94.4%) performed better than ioPTH and scintigraphy (both 85.2%). In the TP group, scintigraphy in combination with the gamma probe had a success rate of 90.9%, and 94% in combination with ioPTHi. The three techniques are applied together had a success rate of 97%. For all patients undergoing MIRP, the probe alone worked well, irrespective of the presence or absence of concomitant thyroid pathology. Patients with concomitant thyroid pathology should not be a priori excluded from a MIRP, as long as other adjuvant techniques (scintigraphy or ioPTHi) are used in conjunction with the gamma probe. In these patients, the probe can also be helpful in unilateral or bilateral surgery. (orig.)

  8. Radioguided surgery of primary hyperparathyroidism in a population with a high prevalence of thyroid pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Talavera, Paloma; Gonzalez, Carmen; Gomez, Alberto; Garcia-Talavera, Jose Ramon; Martin, Esther; Martin, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Patients with concomitant thyroid pathology are usually excluded from minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP). We assessed the value in these patients of the gamma probe, alone or in combination with other techniques, in MIRP and unilateral or bilateral approaches. We evaluated its performance in association with intraoperative determination of intact parathyroid hormone (ioPTHi) and preoperative 99m Tc-MIBI dual phase scintigraphy. Included in the study were 87 patients with a diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism who underwent radioguided surgery. They were divided into two groups depending on the presence of concomitant thyroid pathology (TP group, 33 patients) or absence of concomitant thyroid pathology (NTP group, 54 patients). In the TP group, ioPTHi achieved the highest accuracy (90.9%), followed by the gamma probe (81.8%) and scintigraphy (69.7%). In the NTP group, the probe (94.4%) performed better than ioPTH and scintigraphy (both 85.2%). In the TP group, scintigraphy in combination with the gamma probe had a success rate of 90.9%, and 94% in combination with ioPTHi. The three techniques are applied together had a success rate of 97%. For all patients undergoing MIRP, the probe alone worked well, irrespective of the presence or absence of concomitant thyroid pathology. Patients with concomitant thyroid pathology should not be a priori excluded from a MIRP, as long as other adjuvant techniques (scintigraphy or ioPTHi) are used in conjunction with the gamma probe. In these patients, the probe can also be helpful in unilateral or bilateral surgery. (orig.)

  9. 18F-Fluorocholine PET–CT enables minimal invasive parathyroidectomy in patients with negative sestamibi SPECT–CT and ultrasound: A case report

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    Wouter P. Kluijfhout

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: 18F-Fluorocholine PET–CT is a promising new imaging modality for localizing parathyroid adenomas and enabling minimal invasive parathyroidectomy when conventional imaging fails to do. Clinicians should consider its use as a second line modality for optimal patient care.

  10. Palpation thyroiditis following subtotal parathyroidectomy for hyperparathyroidism

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    Elizabeth M Madill

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thyrotoxicosis is an under-recognised but clinically important complication of parathyroidectomy. We report a case of a 37-year-old man with tertiary hyperparathyroidism who initially developed unexplained anxiety, diaphoresis, tachycardia, tremor and hyperreflexia one day after subtotal parathyroidectomy. Thyroid biochemistry revealed suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone and elevated serum free T4 and free T3 levels. Technetium-99m scintigraphy scan confirmed diffusely decreased radiotracer uptake consistent with thyroiditis. The patient was diagnosed with thyrotoxicosis resulting from palpation thyroiditis. Administration of oral beta-adrenergic antagonists alleviated his symptoms and there was biochemical evidence of resolution fourteen days later. This case illustrates the need to counsel patients about thyroiditis as one of the potential risks of parathyroid surgery. It also emphasises the need for biochemical surveillance in patients with unexplained symptoms in the post-operative period and may help to minimise further invasive investigations for diagnostic clarification.

  11. Primary hyperparathyroidism surgical management since the introduction of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy: Mayo Clinic experience.

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    Grant, Clive S; Thompson, Geoffrey; Farley, David; van Heerden, Jon

    2005-05-01

    Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) for primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) has equal cure and recurrence rates as standard cervical exploration. Changes in the management of primary HPT have occurred since introducing MIP including localization, anesthesia, intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring, and indications for parathyroidectomy. Cohort analysis of 1361 consecutive patients with primary HPT operated on at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, from June 1998 through March 2004. Mean follow-up, 25 months. Tertiary referral center. One thousand three hundred sixty-one patients operated on for primary HPT, excluding 160 patients who were reoperated on. Standard cervical exploration MIP. Cure, recurrence, localization, anesthesia, hospitalization, intraoperative parathyroid hormone level monitoring, contraindications to MIP, surgical indications, assessment of osteoporosis and osteopenia, postoperative patient assessment of general patient health, and operative satisfaction. Cure of primary HPT for both conventional exploration and MIP was 97%; only 1 patient who underwent MIP had a potential recurrence. Imaging sensitivity and positive predictive values were as follows: sestamibi scintigraphy, 86% and 93%; ultrasonography, 61% and 87%, respectively. Usage of general vs local anesthesia with intravenous sedation was 46% and 49%, respectively, in patients w ho underwent MIP; 46% were dismissed as outpatients, 49% had single-night stays. The accuracy of intraoperative parathyroid hormone level monitoring was as follows: 98% (8% had true-negative results); the frequency of multiple gland disease was 13%. Accounting for causes precluding MIP, an estimated 60% to 70% of all patients would be eligible for MIP. By preoperative assessment, 79% had osteoporosis-osteopenia; 58% with postoperative bone mineral density measurements were improved. More than 85% were satisfied with the results of their operation. With high-quality localization and intraoperative

  12. Incremental value of combined 99MTc tetrofosmin parathyroid scintigraphy, rapid intra operative PTH assays and minimally invasive radio-guided surgery (MIRS) in optimizing parathyroidectomies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma, S.; Kumar, S.; Babu, T.; Kumar, H.; Nair, V.; Nair, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Aim of our study was to evaluate incremental diagnostic value of 99mTc Tetrofosmin parathyroid SPECT (TPSPECT), rapid intra operative quick parathyroid hormone measurement (QPTH) combined with radio guidance provided by scintillation probe (Minimally Invasive Radio guided Surgery MIRS) in parathyroid surgeries. While TPSPECT is an established investigation in preoperative workup of hyperparathyroidism patients , MIRS is a relatively new concept in Indian subcontinent. Methods: 29 pts (M: F = 18: 11), age range 16- 65 yrs (mean 41+ 9 yrs) having clinical and biochemical hyperparathyroidism underwent TPSPECT between Jan 02 -04, using 20 mci IV 99mTc Tetrofosmin. Pts with familial hyperparathyroidism , previous nodular goiters and previous neck irradiation were excluded from study. Scintigraphy comprised of immediate, delayed planar and SPECT imaging of neck and chest. Imagewise abnormal, persistent tracer uptake was considered positive for adenoma and diffuse uptake for hyperplasia. 26 pts underwent exploration (22 adenomas and 4 hyperplasias).18 pts had benefit of intraoperative QPTH. A select group (after Dec 2003) i.e. 9 pts got the assistance of radioguided probing. Peroperatively NM physician used cordless handheld gamma probe (Gamma Finder, World of Medicine, Germany) in neck and mediastinum to detect parathyroid adenoma / hyperplasias. A five fold increase in radioactive counts perceived by probe when compared to background was considered positive for parathyroid adenoma / hyperplasia. If PTH levels fell from baseline by at least 50%, the surgery was concluded as complete. Results: In all 22 pts suspected to have primary hyperparathyroidism TPSPECT identified adenomas (100 % sensitivity). While planar imaging had a sensitivity of 90.1% (20/22 pts), SPECT identified the adenoma in all pts. Interestingly only 3/22 pts had ectopic glands while 5 had more than one adenomas. The most commonly involved gland was left inferior. In secondary

  13. Outcome measures and scar aesthetics in minimally invasive video-assisted parathyroidectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casserly, Paula

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the scar outcome of video-assisted parathyroidectomy (VAP) with traditional bilateral cervical exploration (BCE) using previously validated scar assessment scales, and to examine the feasibility of introducing VAP into a general otolaryngology-head and neck practice. DESIGN: A retrospective review of medical records from a prospectively obtained database of patients and long-term follow-up of scar analysis. PATIENTS: The records of 60 patients undergoing parathyroidectomy were reviewed: 29 patients underwent VAP and 31 patients underwent an open procedure with BCE. The groups were matched for age and sex. A total of 46 patients were followed up to assess scar outcome. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was a comparison of patient and observer scar satisfaction between VAP and traditional BCE using validated scar assessment tools: the Patient Scar Assessment Scale and the Manchester Scar Scale. The secondary outcomes were to retrospectively evaluate our results with VAP and to assess the suitability of introducing this technique into a general otolaryngology-head and neck practice. RESULTS: The average scar length in the VAP group was 1.7 cm, and the average scar length in the BCE group was 4.3 cm. The patients in the BCE group scored higher than the patients in the VAP group on the Manchester Scar Scale (P < .01) and on the Patient and Observer Scar Scales (P = .02), indicating a worse scar outcome. The mean operative time in the VAP group was 41 minutes compared with 115 minutes in the open procedure BCE group. There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of postoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS: Video-assisted parathyroidectomy is a safe and feasible procedure in the setting of a general otolaryngology-head and neck practice, with outcomes and complication rates that are comparable to those of traditional bilateral neck exploration. Both patient and observer analysis demonstrated that VAP was associated with a more

  14. Impact of post-kidney transplant parathyroidectomy on allograft function

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    Parikh, Samir; Nagaraja, Haikady; Agarwal, Anil; Samavedi, Srinivas; Von Visger, Jon; Nori, Uday; Andreoni, Kenneth; Pesavento, Todd; Singh, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of parathyroidectomy on allograft function in kidney transplant patients is unclear. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational study of all kidney transplant recipients from 1988 to 2008 who underwent parathyroidectomy for uncontrolled hyperparathyroidism (n = 32). Post-parathyroidectomy, changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and graft loss were recorded. Cross-sectional associations at baseline between eGFR and serum calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and associations between their changes within subjects during the first two months post-parathyroidectomy were assessed. Results Post-parathyroidectomy, the mean eGFR declined from 51.19 mL/min/1.73 m2 at parathyroidectomy to 44.78 mL/min/1.73 m2 at two months (p < 0.0001). Subsequently, graft function improved, and by 12 months, mean eGFR recovered to 49.76 mL/min/1.73 m2 (p = 0.035). Decrease in serum PTH was accompanied by a decrease in eGFR (p = 0.0127) in the first two months post-parathyroidectomy. Patients whose eGFR declined by ≥ 20% (group 1) in the first two months post-parathyroidectomy were distinguished from the patients whose eGFR declined by <20% (group 2). The two groups were similar except that group 1 had a higher baseline mean serum PTH compared with group 2, although not significant (1046.7 ± 1034.2 vs. 476.6 ± 444.9, p = 0.14). In group 1, eGFR declined at an average rate of 32% (p < 0.0001) during the first month post-parathyroidectomy compared with 7% (p = 0.1399) in group 2, and the difference between these two groups was significant (p = 0.0003). The graft function recovered in both groups by one yr. During median follow-up of 66.00 ± 49.45 months, 6 (18%) patients lost their graft with a mean time to graft loss from parathyroidectomy of 37.2 ± 21.6 months. The causes of graft loss were rejection (n = 2), pyelonephritis (n = 1) and chronic allograft nephropathy (n = 3). No graft loss occurred during the first-year post

  15. Robotic parathyroidectomy.

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    Okoh, Alexis Kofi; Sound, Sara; Berber, Eren

    2015-09-01

    Robotic parathyroidectomy has recently been described. Although the procedure eliminates the neck scar, it is technically more demanding than the conventional approaches. This report is a review of the patients' selection criteria, technique, and outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Incidental Parathyroidectomy during Total Thyroidectomy: Risk Factors and Consequences

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    Dimitrios K. Manatakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the incidence of accidental parathyroidectomy in our series of total thyroidectomies, to investigate its clinical and biochemical consequences, and to identify potential risk factors. Methods. Patients who underwent total thyroidectomy between January 2006 and December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Pathology reports were reviewed to identify those cases who had an incidental parathyroidectomy and these were compared to patients with no parathyroidectomy, in terms of clinical (age, sex, and symptoms of hypocalcemia, pathological (thyroid specimen weight, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and malignancy, and biochemical (serum calcium and phosphate levels factors. Results. 281 patients underwent total thyroidectomy during the study period. Incidental parathyroidectomy was noticed in 24.9% of cases, with 44.3% of parathyroid glands found in an intrathyroidal location. Evidence of postoperative biochemical hypocalcemia was noticed in 28.6% of patients with parathyroidectomy, compared with 13.3% in the no-parathyroidectomy group (p=0.003. Symptomatic hypocalcemia was observed in 5.7% and 3.8%, respectively (p=0.49. Age, sex, thyroid specimen weight, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and malignancy did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions. Our study found an association of incidental parathyroidectomy with transient postoperative biochemical hypocalcemia, but not with clinically symptomatic disease. Age, sex, thyroid gland weight, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and malignancy were not identified as risk factors.

  17. Parathyroidectomy is Underutilized in Patients with Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism after Renal Transplantation

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    Lou, Irene; Schneider, David F; Leverson, Glen; Foley, David; Sippel, Rebecca; Chen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Background Parathyroidectomy is the only curative treatment for tertiary hyperparathyroidism (3HPT). With the introduction of calcimimetics (cinacalcet), parathyroidectomy can sometimes be delayed or avoided. The purpose of this study was to determine the current incidence of utilization of parathyroidectomy in patients with post-transplant 3HPT with the advent of cinacalcet. Method We evaluated renal transplant patients between 1/1/2004-6/30/2012 with a minimum of 24 months follow-up who had persistent allograft function. Patients with an increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH) one year after successful renal transplantation with normocalcemia or hypercalcemia were defined as having 3HPT. A multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to determine factors associated with undergoing parathyroidectomy. Results We identified 618 patients with 3HPT, only 41 (6.6%) of whom underwent parathyroidectomy. Patients with higher levels of serum calcium (p<0.001) and PTH (p=0.002) post-transplant were more likely to be referred for parathyroidectomy. Importantly, those who underwent parathyroidectomy had serum calcium and PTH values distributed more closely to the normal range on most recent follow-up. Parathyroidectomy was not associated with rejection (p=0.400) or with worsened allograft function (p=0.163). Conclusion Parathyroidectomy appears to be underutilized in patients with 3HPT at our institution. Parathyroidectomy is associated with high cure rates, improved serum calcium and PTH levels, and is not associated with rejection. PMID:26603850

  18. Declining Rates of Inpatient Parathyroidectomy for Primary Hyperparathyroidism in the US

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    Kim, Sun Moon; Shu, Aimee D.; Long, Jin; Montez-Rath, Maria E.; Leonard, Mary B.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroidectomy is the only curative therapy for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. However, the incidence, correlates and consequences of parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism across the entire US population are unknown. We evaluated temporal trends in rates of inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism, and associated in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and costs. We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2002–2011. Parathyroidectomies for primary hyperparathyroidism were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Unadjusted and age- and sex- adjusted rates of inpatient parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism were derived from the NIS and the annual US Census. We estimated 109,583 parathyroidectomies for primary hyperparathyroidism between 2002 and 2011. More than half (55.4%) of patients were younger than age 65, and more than three-quarters (76.8%) were female. The overall rate of inpatient parathyroidectomy was 32.3 cases per million person-years. The adjusted rate decreased from 2004 (48.3 cases/million person-years) to 2007 (31.7 cases/million person-years) and was sustained thereafter. Although inpatient parathyroidectomy rates declined over time across all geographic regions, a steeper decline was observed in the South compared to other regions. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were 0.08%: 0.02% in patients younger than 65 years and 0.14% in patients 65 years and older. Inpatient parathyroidectomy rates for primary hyperparathyroidism have declined in recent years. PMID:27529699

  19. Outcomes of Total Parathyroidectomy with Autotransplantation versus Subtotal Parathyroidectomy with Routine Addition of Thymectomy to both Groups: Single Center Experience of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

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    Cem Kaan Parsak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common acquired disorder seen in chronic renal failure. It may result in potentially serious complications including metabolic bone diseases, severe atherosclerosis and undesirable cardiovascular events. Parathyroidectomy is required in about 20% of patients after 3-10 years of dialysis and in up to 40% after 20 years. Aims: The aim of the current study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism who had undergone total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation and thymectomy or subtotal parathyroidectomy with thymectomy by the same surgical team during the study period. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Clinical data of 50 patients who underwent parathyroid surgery for secondary hyperparathyroidism between 2003 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two subgroups of total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation or subtotal parathyroidectomy. Thymectomy was routinely performed for both groups. Short term outcome parameters included intact parathyroid hormone, ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase levels. Bone pain, bone fractures, persistent or recurrent disease were included in long term outcome parameters. Results: The mean duration of dialysis was eight years. The mean ionized calcium levels dropped significantly in the total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation group (p=0.016. No serious postoperative complications were observed. Postoperative intravenous calcium supplementation was required in four patients in the total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation group (total PTX+AT and in three patients in the subtotal parathyroidectomy group (subtotal PTX. Postoperatively, all patients received oral calcium carbonate and calcitriol. The length of average hospital stay was 5 (3-10 days. Including nine patients who underwent successful renal transplantation pre-operative bone

  20. Refractory tertiary hyperparathyroidism after calcimimetics and delayed parathyroidectomy in a kidney transplant recipient

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    Ekamol Tantisattamo

    2012-06-01

    Normally, parathyroidectomy is performed 1 year posttransplantion unless severe bone disease, refractory hypercalcemia, or difficulty controlling phosphate wasting occurs. Phosphate wasting from hyperparathyroidism in our patient indicated parathyroidectomy; however, the surgery was delayed for 3 years while cinacalcet had been used. Post parathyroidectomy, hyperparathyroidism still persisted. Both cinacalcet and parathyroidectomy are imperfect to reverse hyperparathyroidism. Timely parathyroidectomy may determine the reversal of electrolyte and metabolic bone diseases; however, a delayed procedure may not have the same benefit. Since hyperparathyroidism is associated with higher incidence of kidney allograft dysfunction and postoperative mortality, should there be a level where pretransplant parathyroidectomy is performed?

  1. Effect of parathyroidectomy on bone growth and composition in the young rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, L. C.; Prinz, J. A.; Evans, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    In an effort to determine the influence of the parathyroids on bone growth and composition, 28-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed 28, 56, and 84 days after parathyroidectomy or sham parathyroidectomy. Body growth as well as femur growth were retarded following parathyroidectomy. Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia occurred in all parathyroidectomized rats; no alterations in plasma magnesium levels were noted. Femur magnesium was increased by 22-30% in the parathyroidectomized rats whereas femur calcium remained unchanged. Bone phosphorus was increased 56 and 84 days following parathyroidectomy. Results of this study indicate that parathyroidectomy retards growth while increasing bone magnesium and phosphorus content.

  2. PLEIOTROPIC EFFECTS OF PARATHYROIDECTOMY AND AGONIST CALCIUM-SENSITIVE RECEPTOR, CINACALCET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Egshatyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the effect of parathyroidectomy and cinacalcet on anemia, lipid profile and blood pressure (BP in uremic hyperparathyroidism.Material and methods. Uremic patients (n=39 treated with hemodialysis and having secondary hyperparathyroidism were included into the study. Radical parathyroidectomy was performed in 21 patients, 18 patients were treated with cinacalcet. BP measurement, determination of blood levels of albumin, total calcium, phosphorus, total cholesterol (TC, low (LDL and high density lipoproteins, triglycerides, intact parathyroid hormone, and hemoglobin were performed in all patients initially and during treatment. Doses of antihypertensive and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents were also assessed.Results. Calcium-phosphorus metabolism indices improved after 6 months of cinacalcet therapy and parathyroidectomy (p<0.05. BP reduction not requiring antihypertensive drugs dose adjustment was found in patients treated with cinacalcet. Significant BP reduction (p<0.05 was observed after parathyroidectomy and it required antihypertensive drugs cancellation or dose lowering. Cinacalcet therapy and parathyroidectomy led to increase in hemoglobin level by 2.02% (p=0.143 and 7.6% (p=0.029, respectively, as well as reduction in weekly dose of erythropoiesis-stimulating drugs by 2.7% (p=0.875 and 8.9% (p=0.751, respectively. Significant (p<0.05 decrease in LDL (5.6%, and triglycerides (23.7% levels was found in patients treated with cinacalcet. Reduction (p<0.05 in total cholesterol (1.4% and LDL (4.3% levels was observed after parathyroidectomy.Conclusion. The pleiotropic effects (reduction in BP and atherogenic lipids levels, as well as decrease in anemia resistant to the action of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents were found after parathyroidectomy and cinacalcet therapy additionally to calcium-phosphorus metabolism improvement.

  3. Hyperparathyroidism caused by distant pulmonary lesions and parathyromatosis after ethanol injection/parathyroidectomy for secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Michio; Tanaka, Kiho; Fujii, Takeshi

    2017-07-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) treatment includes parathyroidectomy and percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT), which are invasive procedures. The condition in which benign hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue is distributed throughout the neck and mediastinum is termed parathyromatosis. Here, we present the case of a 51-year-old woman who began hemodialysis in 1986 due to chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology and developed SHPT in 1999. She underwent 6 rounds of PEIT followed by total a parathyroidectomy with partial forearm autotransplantation. Between 2011 and 2013, surgeons removed several nodules from her pulmonary and cervical regions and the transplanted masses from her forearm; all showed hyperplasia but exhibited no histological evidence of malignancy. Damage to the parathyroid capsule after repeated PEITs may cause local cervical recurrence and pulmonary lesions, although distant lesions are extremely rare in SHPT. This case is of interest due to the possible association between PEIT and parathyromatosis and distal lesions. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  4. Applicability of transoral endoscopic parathyroidectomy through vestibular route for primary sporadic hyperparathyroidism: A South Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargav, P R K; Sabaretnam, M; Amar, V; Devi, N Vimala

    2018-05-04

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is one of the most common endocrine disorders requiring surgical parathyroidectomy for its definitive treatment. Surgical exploration is traditionally performed through conventional open neck approach. A wide range of minimal access and minimally invasive endoscopic techniques (gas less and with gas) have been attempted in the past two decades. In this context, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of an innovative transoral endoscopic parathyroidectomy (EP) technique, which represents a paradigm shift in transluminal endocrine surgery. This is a prospective study conducted at a tertiary care Endocrine Surgery Department in South India between May 2016 and August 2017. We employed a novel transoral, lower vestibular route for EP. All the clinical, investigative, operative, pathological and post-operative data were collected from our prospectively filled database. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 20.0 version. Under inhalational general anaesthesia, access to the neck was obtained with 3 ports (central frenulotomy and two lateral port sites), dissected in subplatysmal plane and insufflated with 6 mm Hg CO 2 for working space. Rest of surgical steps is similar to conventional open parathyroidectomy. Out of the 38 hyperparathyroidism cases operated during the study, 12 (32%) were operated by this technique. Mean operative time was 112 ± 15 min (95-160). The post-operative course was uneventful with no major morbidity, hypocalcemia or recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Cure and diagnosis were confirmed by> 50% fall in intraoperative parathyroid hormone levels and histopathology (all were benign solitary adenomas). Through this study, we opine that this novel transoral vestibular route parathyroidectomy is a feasibly applicable approach for primary sporadic hyperparathyroidism, especially with solitary benign adenomas.

  5. Radioguided Surgery for Localization of Nonpalpable Breast Lesions A Mini-Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhans, Linnea; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg

    2016-01-01

    by ultrasound a small titanium seed containing typically 1-10 MBq of radioactive iodine-125 is placed in the centre of the nonpalpable breast lesion. During the operation the seed is located with a hand-held gamma probe. To date, only few cohort studies exist on the feasibility of RSL, and the method has only...... of patients with insufficient resection margin. These patients require a reoperation. New methods in the field of radioguided surgery (RGS) have been developed including radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) and radioactive seed localization (RSL). Especially RSL is a very promising technique. Guided...

  6. Subtotal parathyroidectomy for secondary renal hyperparathyroidism: a 20-year surgical outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, Aleksander; Barczyński, Marcin; Stopa, Małgorzata; Nowak, Wojciech

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of surgery for patients with secondary renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT). This is a retrospective cohort study. Our institutional database was searched for eligible patients treated in 1995-2014. The inclusion criterion was initial parathyroidectomy for rHPT. Clinical and follow-up data were analyzed to estimate the cure rate (primary outcome), and morbidity (secondary outcome). The study group comprised 297 patients (154 females, age 44.5 ± 13.7 years, follow-up 24.6 ± 10.5 months), including 268 (90.2 %) patients who had underwent subtotal parathyroidectomy, and 29 (9.8 %) who had had incomplete parathyroidectomy. Intraoperative iPTH assay was utilized in 207 (69.7 %) explorations. Persistent rHPT occurred in 12/268 (4.5 %) patients after subtotal parathyroidectomy and 5/29 (17.2 %) subjects after incomplete parathyroidectomy (p = 0.005). The patients operated on with intraoperative iPTH assay had a higher cure rate than non-monitored individuals, 201/207 (97.1 %) vs. 79/90 (87.8 %), respectively (p = 0.001). In-hospital mortality occurred in 1/297 (0.3 %) patient. The hungry bone syndrome occurred in 84/268 (31.3 %) patients after subtotal parathyroidectomy and 2/29 (6.9 %) subjects after incomplete parathyroidectomy (p = 0.006). Transient recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis occurred in 14/594 (2.4 %) and permanent in 5/594 (0.8 %) nerves at risk. Subtotal parathyroidectomy is a safe and efficacious treatment for patients with rHPT. Utilization of intraoperative iPTH assay can guide surgical exploration and improve the cure rate.

  7. Evaluation of Parathyroidectomy for Secondary and Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism by the Parathyroid Surgeons' Society of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Takatoshi; Yasunaga, Chikao; Nakamura, Michio; Kadokura, Yoshiyuki; Tahara, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) remains a serious complication in patients with chronic kidney disease, and some patients require parathyroidectomy. The Parathyroid Surgeons' Society of Japan (PSSJ) evaluated parathyroidectomy for SHPT and tertiary hyperparathyroidism (THPT) in Japan. The annual numbers of parathyroidectomies between 2004 and 2013 were evaluated using questionnaires. Since 2010, the PSSJ has registered the patients. In total, 826 patients from 42 institutions were registered. The annual number of parathyroidectomies for SHPT and THPT in Japan increased from 2004 to 2007 and then decreased markedly after 2007, with 296 operations performed in 2013. The number of women and men was almost equal (397/427). Median (interquartile range) age of these patients was 59.0 (24-87) years, the duration of hemodialysis before parathyroidectomy was 10.83 (0.0-38.7) years, and diabetic nephropathy was 87/826 (10.5%). Of these patients 59.6% were treated with cinacalcet at undergoing parathyroidectomy. In 75.3% of patients, a total parathyroidectomy with forearm autograft was performed. In 77.7% of patients, four or more parathyroid glands were removed during the initial operation. The incidences of husky voice and wound hemorrhage were 2.9% and 1.1%, respectively. The number of parathyroidectomies for SHPT in Japan decreased markedly after the introduction of cinacalcet. Based on the evaluation of registered patients, parathyroidectomies have been successfully performed at the institutions participating in the PSSJ. © 2016 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  8. Radioguided breast surgery for occult lesion localization – correlation between two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutfilen Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of sub-clinical breast lesions has increased with screening mammography. Biopsy techniques can offer precision and agility in its execution, as well as patient comfort. This trial compares radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL and wire-guided localization (WL of breast lesions. We investigate if a procedure at the ambulatorial level (ROLL could lead to a better aesthetic result and less postoperative pain. In addition, we intend to demonstrate the efficacy of radioguided localization and removal of occult breast lesions using radiopharmaceuticals injected directly into the lesions and correlate radiological and histopathological findings. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were randomized into two groups (59 WL and 61 ROLL. The patients were requested to score the cosmetic appearance of their breast after surgery, and a numerical rating scale was used to measure pain on the first postoperative day. Clearance margins were considered at ≥ 10 mm for invasive cancer, ≥ 5 mm for ductal carcinoma in situ, and ≥ 1 mm for benign disease. Patients were subsequently treated according to the definitive histological result. When appropriate, different statistical tests were used in order to test the significance between the two groups, considering a P value Results WL and ROLL located all the occult breast lesions successfully. In the ROLL group, the specimen volume was smaller and there were more cases with clear margins (P Conclusion ROLL is an effective method for the excision of non-palpable breast lesions. It enables more careful planning of the cutaneous incision, leading to better aesthetic results, less postoperative symptoms, and smaller volumes of excised tissue.

  9. Radioguided surgery with MIBI in brain tumors: on the subject of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín Escuela, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Many efforts are directed towards better intraoperative detection and delimitation of brain tumors, in order to achieve better resection. A recent technique, implemented is radioguided surgery in which the tumor tissue is marked with a radiotracer (MIBI) and through the use of a probe and / or gamma camera to differentiate it from healthy brain tissue, in vivo, in the surgery room. : Evaluate the feasibility of radioguided surgery and optimize the procedures with the purpose of developing a clinical protocol for the reception of brain tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A patient with a high grade glioma was submitted to MIBI, confirming that gamma camera facilitated the intraoperative detection of the tumor and indicated a small piece of residual tumor that was subsequently resected, Achieving total resection of the lesion. Conclusion: Radio-guided surgery with MIBI, showed, in this case, that it is a safe and reliable technique, not only for the detection and delimitation of brain tumors, but also for confirmation of presence or absence of residual tumor, facilitating total resection of the lesion.

  10. Apport de la biopsie radioguidée dans le diagnostic histopathologique des tumeurs de l'enfant: expérience de l'Hôpital d'Enfant de Rabat

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ochi, Mohamed Réda; Bellarbi, Salma; Rouas, Lamiae; Lamalmi, Najat; Malihy, Abderrahmane; Alhamany, Zaitouna; Cherradi, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    La biopsie radioguidée constitue une alternative à la biopsie chirurgicale invasive et à la cytologie pour le diagnostic des tumeurs pédiatriques. L'intérêt de notre étude est d’évaluer la valeur diagnostique des biopsies radioguidées examinées au laboratoire d'anatomopathologie de l'hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat (HER). L’étude a porté sur 78 biopsies radioguidées recueillies dans notre laboratoire entre janvier 2008 et décembre 2011. l’âge moyen des patients était de 5 ans et 10 mois avec une prédominance masculine (65,4%). La tumeur était abdominale dans 80% des cas, thoracique dans 15% cas, thoracique et abdominale dans 2,5% et sacrée dans 1,2%. Les biopsies étaient écho-guidées dans 90% des cas et scannoguidées dans 10% des cas. Le diagnostic histopathologique était posé dans 89% des cas. L'immuno-histochimie a été indiquée dans 35% des cas. Les diagnostics les plus fréquents étaient: tumeurs neuroblastiques (42 cas), lymphomes non hodgkiniens (10 cas), rhabdomyosarcomes (6 cas), autres (sarcome d'Ewing, néphroblastomes, tumeur myofibroblastique inflammatoire, maladies de Hodgkin, leucémie aiguë, hépatoblastome et ostéosarcome). Dans notre série, la biopsie radioguidée a permis un diagnostic histopathologique certain dans 89% des cas. Elle nécessite une étroite collaboration entre clinicien, radiologue et anatomopathologiste pour discuter son indication, afin de diminuer le nombre de biopsies peu ou non représentatives. PMID:26587165

  11. Rates and Outcomes of Parathyroidectomy for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Moon; Long, Jin; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Leonard, Mary B; Norton, Jeffrey A; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-07-07

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is common among patients with ESRD. Although medical therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism has changed dramatically over the last decade, rates of parathyroidectomy for secondary hyperparathyroidism across the United States population are unknown. We examined temporal trends in rates of parathyroidectomy, in-hospital mortality, length of hospital stay, and costs of hospitalization. Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a representative national database on hospital stay regardless of age and payer in the United States, we identified parathyroidectomies for secondary hyperparathyroidism from 2002 to 2011. Data from the US Renal Data System reports were used to calculate the rate of parathyroidectomy. We identified 32,971 parathyroidectomies for secondary hyperparathyroidism between 2002 and 2011. The overall rate of parathyroidectomy was approximately 5.4/1000 patients (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.0/1000 to 6.0/1000). The rate decreased from 2003 (7.9/1000 patients; 95% CI, 6.2/1000 to 9.6/1000), reached a nadir in 2005 (3.3/1000 patients; 95% CI, 2.6/1000 to 4.0/1000), increased again through 2006 (5.4/1000 patients; 95% CI, 4.4/1000 to 6.4/1000), and remained stable since that time. Rates of in-hospital mortality decreased from 1.7% (95% CI, 0.8% to 2.6%) in 2002 to 0.8% (95% CI, 0.1% to 1.6%) in 2011 (P for trend secondary hyperparathyroidism have not declined in recent years. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Cinacalcet versus Parathyroidectomy in the Treatment of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Post Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Amin R; Maamoun, Hoda A; Soliman, Mahmoud A; Darwish, Hatem; Elbanna, Esam

    2016-09-01

    Persistent hyperparathyroidism (HPT) with hypercalcemia is prevalent after transplant and is considered a risk factor for progressive bone loss and fractures and vascular calcification, as well as the development of tubulointerstitial calcifications of renal allografts and graft dysfunction. The subtotal parathyroidectomy is the standard treatment, although currently it has been replaced by the calcimimetic cinacalcet. The hypothesis of this study is that subtotal parathyroidectomy is superior to cinacalcet for treatment of persistent secondary parathyroidectomy post renal transplant, with minimal morbidity and significantly it reduces the cost of treatment after transplantation. We report our long-term clinical experience with either cinacalcet or parathyroidectomy in 59 kidney transplant recipients with hyperparathyroidism. Group one included medical treatment with cinacalcet and had 45 patients while parathyroidectomy patients (group 2) were 16 patients with two of them excluded because of surgical failure. No difference was found between groups for any parameter. A greater short-term change of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis obtained by surgery than by cinacalcet, and in long term change, no significant difference between the two groups. The main findings of this study are that correction of severe hyperparathyroidism was similar in both surgical and cinacalcet groups with the absence of a difference of long-term serum iPTH 1-84 levels between the two groups.

  13. Surgery with radioguided location of a liver metastasis of melanoma choroid: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Marcelo; Miranda, Mario Henrique Furlanetto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The use of radioguided occult lesion localization prior to surgical excision is increasing, mainly due to the development of new probes and the use of PET-CT. Case report: A 70-year-old male who presented with a metastatic lesion in his liver from a choroidal melanoma. This was located using PET-CT and subsequently located with a low-energy intraoperative gamma probe during the laparotomy. Conclusion: The present case shows that it is possible to excise a hepatic metastasis utilizing the principles of radioguided surgery, even in centers without access to high energy probes. (author)

  14. Enabling minimal invasive parathyroidectomy for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism using Tc-99m-sestamibi SPECT–CT, ultrasound and first results of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET–CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluijfhout, Wouter P., E-mail: WPKluijfhout@gmail.com [Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vorselaars, Wessel M.C.M., E-mail: W.M.Vorselaars@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vriens, Menno R., E-mail: mvriens@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Borel Rinkes, Inne H.M., E-mail: I.H.M.BorelRinkes@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Valk, Gerlof D., E-mail: G.D.Valk@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keizer, Bart de, E-mail: B.deKeizer@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We examined an optimal pre-operative imaging strategy. • Goal was to perform minimal invasive parathyroidectomy. • Ultrasound significantly decreased the PPV when added to SPECT–CT. • {sup 18}F-fluorocholine was positive in 4/5 cases with negative conventional imaging. - Abstract: Objective: Assessment of the diagnostic value of ultrasound (US), single photon-emission computed tomography–computed tomography (SPECT–CT) and {sup 18}F-fluorocholine (FCH) PET–CT for preoperative localization of hyper-functioning parathyroid(s) in order to create a more efficient diagnostic pathway and enable minimal invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) in patients with biochemical proven non-familial primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Methods: A single-institution retrospective study of 63 consecutive patients with a biochemical diagnosis of non-familial pHPT who received a Tc-99m-sestamibi SPECT–CT and neck ultrasound. Surgical findings were used in calculating the sensitivity and the positive predictive value (PPV) of both imaging modalities. Furthermore we present 5 cases who received additional FCH PET–CT. Results: A total of 42 (66.7%) patients underwent MIP. The PPV and sensitivity of SPECT–CT, 93.0% and 80.3%, were significantly higher than those of US with 78.3% and 63.2%, respectively. Adding US to SPECT–CT for initial pre-operative localization did not significantly increase sensitivity but did significantly decrease PPV. Performance of US was significantly better when performed after SPECT–CT. {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET–CT localized the hyper-functioning parathyroid gland in 4/5 cases with discordant conventional imaging, enabling MIP. Conclusion: SPECT–CT is the imaging modality of choice for initial pre-operative localization of hyper-functioning parathyroid gland(s) in patients with biochemical pHPT. Ultrasound should be performed after SPECT–CT for confirmation of positive SPECT–CT findings and for pre-operative marking

  15. Comparison of consumer information on the internet to the current evidence base for minimally invasive parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Timothy; Delbridge, Leigh

    2010-06-01

    The Internet is increasingly used as a source of health information by patients. Under these circumstances, the opportunity exists for Internet sites ostensibly providing patient information to act to promote surgical referrals based on exaggerated claims. This study aims to assess quantitatively and qualitatively the Internet-based consumer health information for minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) techniques. This is a prospective analysis of Internet web sites. Descriptive information about specific published claims on each of the web sites was documented and compared to the published evidence base. Web sites were then rated using a validated composite score (CS) tool and an MIP score tool developed specifically for the study. The search yielded 308 web sites, which, after assessment by the inclusion criteria left 44 unique web sites suitable for analysis. "Exaggerated," "misleading," or "false" claims were present in 27.3% of the web sites analyzed. The false claims category had a high negative item-total correlation with the overall score, and accuracy was found to have a statistically significant (p < 0.05) negative correlation with quality. However, analysis performed for country of origin and the organization responsible for the web site found no significant difference. Web sites offering information in relation to MIP have a surprisingly high rate of claims that are not in accord with the evidence. Such claims may be posted to attract surgical referrals. It is difficult for consumers to differentiate quality consumer health web sites from poor ones as there are no hard and fast rules to differentiate them.

  16. Radio-guided thoracoscopic surgery (RGTS) of small pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogi, Marcello Carlo; Melfi, Franca; Zirafa, Carmelina; Lucchi, Marco; De Liperi, Annalisa; Mariani, Giuliano; Fanucchi, Olivia; Mussi, Alfredo

    2012-04-01

    The demand for adequate tissue sampling to determine individual tumor behavior is increasing the number of lung nodule resections, even when the diagnosis is already recognized. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is the procedure of choice for diagnosis and treatment of small pulmonary nodules. Difficulties in localizing smaller and deeper nodules have been approached with different techniques. Herein we report our 13-years' experience with radio-guided thoracoscopic resection. Patients with pulmonary nodules smaller than 1 cm and/or deeper than 1 cm, below the visceral pleura, underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided injection of a solution, composed of 0.2 ml (99)Tc-labeled human serum albumin microspheres and 0.1 ml nonionic contrast, into the nodule. During the VATS procedure, an 11-mm-diameter collimated probe connected to a gamma ray detector was introduced to scan the lung surface. The area of major radioactivity, which matched with the area of the nodule, was resected. From 1997 to 2009, 573 patients underwent thoracoscopic resection of small pulmonary nodules, 211 with the radio-guided technique. There were 159 men and 52 women, with an average age of 60.6 years (range = 12-83). The mean duration of the surgical procedure was 41 min (range = 20-100). The procedure was successful in 208/211 cases. Three patients (0.5%) required conversion to a minithoracotomy. The mean length of pleural drainage and hospital stay was 2.3 and 3.7 days, respectively. Histological examination showed 98 benign lesions and 113 malignant lesions (61 metastases and 52 primary lung cancers). This study confirms that radio-guided localization of small pulmonary nodules is a feasible, safe, and quick procedure, with a high rate of success. The spread of the sentinel lymph node technique has increased the availability of technology required for RGTS.

  17. Contribution of the Technetium-99m-sestamibi (MIBI) scintigraphy in primary hyperparathyroidism to determination of parathyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Takuro; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Koh, Toshikiyo; Hida, Shuichi

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed retrospectively the 12 patients who underwent parathyroidectomy because of hyperparathyroidism and judged to what degree the Technetium-99m-sestamibi (MIBI) scintigraphy contributed to determination of parathyroidectomy. From the view point that weather parathyroidectomy could be decided without the MIBI scintigraphy, we classified the cases into three groups; great, fair, and poor contribution. We judged 4 cases as great contribution, 5 cases as fair contribution and 3 cases as poor contribution. We concluded that if the MIBI scintigraphy is positive in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, parathyroidectomy is strongly recommended, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy for detection of parathyroid adenomas and because there were no false-positive cases with the MIBI scintigraphy. (author)

  18. Minimally invasive videoscopic parathyroidectomy: a feasibility study in dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, J; Albrink, M H

    1997-10-01

    With increasing experience using preoperative sestamibi nuclear scanning, several reports have shown that selective unilateral neck exploration is sufficient in most patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. The current study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of videoscopic parathyroidectomy as a means to decrease scar size while allowing adequate exposure for the identification of normal parathyroid glands and removal of those glands that are enlarged. Eight mongrel dogs underwent removal of all parathyroid glands and both lobes of the thyroid using videoscopic techniques. Once the technical aspects of the operation were established, four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism underwent sestamibi-directed unilateral videoscopic neck exploration with attempted parathyroid removal. All thyroid and parathyroid tissues were removed from each dog without complications. Maintenance of an adequate working space proved to be the major difficulty that necessitated placement of a small mechanical retractor. This problem was even more severe in humans, which prevented the identification of one of four adenomas and three of four normal glands. Although videoscopic surgery is possible within the loose connective tissues of the canine neck, the inability to establish an adequate working space within the neck of humans and the location of parathyroid glands behind the thyroid precludes the use of this technique for patients with hyperparathyroidism.

  19. Deliberate total parathyroidectomy: a potentially novel therapy for tumor-induced hypophosphatemic osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadada, Sanjay K; Palnitkar, Saroj; Qiu, Shijing; Parikh, Nayana; Talpos, Gary B; Rao, Sudhaker D

    2013-11-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an acquired hypophosphatemic metabolic bone disorder that can be cured by removing or ablating the offending tumor. However, when the tumor cannot be localized, lifelong therapy with oral phosphate and calcitriol or cinacalcet with close monitoring is required. A 56-year-old man was diagnosed with TIO in 1990. Initial therapy consisted of oral phosphate and calcitriol with symptomatic and biochemical improvement and healing of osteomalacia. Eight years later, hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism developed, requiring subtotal parathyroidectomy with a transient increase in serum phosphate and normalization of serum calcium and PTH. Recurrent hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism developed after 10 years of medical therapy. A deliberate total parathyroidectomy produced a prompt rise in serum phosphate into the normal range > 3.0 mg/dL and remained normal during the next 4 years of follow-up, despite continued very high serum fibroblast growth factor-23 levels throughout the 23-year follow-up. We report an unusual case of a TIO patient with long-term follow-up who developed recurrent hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism on long-term oral phosphate therapy. Deliberate total parathyroidectomy normalized serum phosphate despite persistently elevated fibroblast growth factor-23 levels. Total parathyroidectomy offers a potentially novel therapy in some patients with TIO in whom medical therapy is not feasible or the tumor is unresectable.

  20. Radioguided Parathyroidectomy with Portable Mini Gamma-Camera for the Treatment of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Casella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A proper localisation of pathological parathyroid glands is essential for a minimally invasive approach in the surgical treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP. The recent introduction of portable mini gamma-cameras (pMGCs enabled intraoperative scintigraphic scanning. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of this new method and compare it with the preoperative localisation surveys. Methods. 20 patients were studied; they were evaluated preoperatively by neck ultrasound and Tc-sestaMIBI-scintigraphy and intraoperatively with the pMGC IP Guardian 2. The results obtained from the three evaluations were compared. Results. The pMGC presented a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 98.89%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 98.18%, which were higher than those of preoperative ultrasound (sensitivity 55%; specificity 95%; diagnostic accuracy 87% and scintigraphy with Tc-sestaMIBI (sensitivity 73.68%; specificity 96.05%; diagnostic accuracy 91.58%. Conclusions. The pMGC can be used effectively as an intraoperative method to find the correct location of the pathological parathyroid glands. The pMGC is more reliable than the currently used preoperative and intraoperative localisation techniques.

  1. Sentinel lymph node detection through radioguided surgery in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Benedita Andrade Leal de; Santos, Adriana de Morais; Soares, Livia de Almeida; Santos, Antonio Ricardo dos; Barros, Idna de Carvalho; Abreu, Everardo Leal de; Cruz Filho, Alexandre Jorge Gomes da; Abreu, Joao Batista de; Vieira, Sabas Carlos [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Piaui (CEFET-PI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Faculdade Sao Gabriel, PI (Brazil); Hospital Sao Marcos, PI (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Biopsy of the sentinel lymphnode (SLNB), the first lymphnode to receive lymphatic drainage from the primary tumor, accurately predicts the axillary lymph node status and, when negative, obviates the need for axillary lymphadenectomy (AL). The aim of this study was, to verify the SLN localization in breast cancer through preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma-probe, as well as to demonstrate the benefits of such techniques in preventing complications of AL. Medical records of 228 patients with breast carcinoma, who were underwent SLN localization and, radioguided surgery, from March 2005 to December 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. Data regarding age, tumor characteristic, breast involved, type of surgery, radiopharmaceutical drainage pattern, axillary assessment (SLNB or AL) and number of lymph nodes dissected were collected. It was ascertained that radioguided surgery is a selective method of axillary assessment in breast cancer, which makes this technique a safe alternative to radical assessment of total dissection of axillary lymph nodes and its subsequent complications. (author)

  2. Sentinel lymph node detection through radioguided surgery in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Benedita Andrade Leal de; Santos, Adriana de Morais; Soares, Livia de Almeida; Santos, Antonio Ricardo dos; Barros, Idna de Carvalho; Abreu, Everardo Leal de; Cruz Filho, Alexandre Jorge Gomes da; Abreu, Joao Batista de; Vieira, Sabas Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Biopsy of the sentinel lymphnode (SLNB), the first lymphnode to receive lymphatic drainage from the primary tumor, accurately predicts the axillary lymph node status and, when negative, obviates the need for axillary lymphadenectomy (AL). The aim of this study was, to verify the SLN localization in breast cancer through preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma-probe, as well as to demonstrate the benefits of such techniques in preventing complications of AL. Medical records of 228 patients with breast carcinoma, who were underwent SLN localization and, radioguided surgery, from March 2005 to December 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. Data regarding age, tumor characteristic, breast involved, type of surgery, radiopharmaceutical drainage pattern, axillary assessment (SLNB or AL) and number of lymph nodes dissected were collected. It was ascertained that radioguided surgery is a selective method of axillary assessment in breast cancer, which makes this technique a safe alternative to radical assessment of total dissection of axillary lymph nodes and its subsequent complications. (author)

  3. Radio-guided surgery in differentiated thyroid cancer: report of four cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallel, F.; Hamza, F.; Charfeddine, S.; Guermazi, F.; Ghorbel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Radio-guided surgery is a technique using the ability of a tumour tissue to uptake a radiopharmaceutical, in order, to facilitate its location with an intraoperative gamma probe. This technique was first used in the detection of recurrent thyroid cancer. We present our experience in this indication in four cases which were followed in our department. (authors)

  4. Calciphylaxis after Parathyroidectomy in Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahab Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man, who was maintained on hemodialysis for more than 9 years, was diagnosed to have secondary hyperparathyroidism with a nodule in a parathyroid gland revealed with ultrasound and CT scan. He underwent parathyroidectomy and presented with bilateral lower limb painful ulcers two months later. Skin biopsy from these ulcers was consistent with calciphylaxis.

  5. The GOSTT concept and hybrid mixed/virtual/augmented reality environment radioguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Van Leeuwen, F. W. B.; Vidal-Sicart, S.; Giammarile, F.; Zaknun, J. J.; Mariani, G.

    2014-01-01

    The popularity gained by the sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure in the last two decades did increase the interest of the surgical disciplines for other applications of radioguided surgery. An example is the gamma-probe guided localization of occult or difficult to locate neoplastic lesions. Such guidance can be achieved by intralesional delivery (ultrasound, stereotaxis or CT) of a radiolabelled agent that remains accumulated at the site of the injection. Another possibility rested on the use of systemic administration of a tumour-seeking radiopharmaceutical with favourable tumour accumulation and retention. On the other hand, new intraoperative imaging devices for radioguided surgery in complex anatomical areas became available. All this a few years ago led to the delineation of the concept Guided intraOperative Scintigraphic Tumour Targeting (GOSTT) to include the whole spectrum of basic and advanced nuclear medicine procedures required for providing a roadmap that would optimise surgery. The introduction of allied signatures using, e.g. hybrid tracers for simultaneous detection of the radioactive and fluorescent signals did amply the GOSTT concept. It was now possible to combine perioperative nuclear medicine imaging with the superior resolution of additional optical guidance in the operating room. This hybrid approach is currently in progress and probably will become an important model to follow in the coming years. A cornerstone in the GOSTT concept is constituted by diagnostic imaging technologies like SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT was introduced halfway the past decade and was immediately incorporated into the SLN procedure. Important reasons attributing to the success of SPECT/CT were its combination with lymphoscintigraphy, and the ability to display SLNs in an anatomical environment. This latter aspect has significantly been improved in the new generation of SPECT/CT cameras and provides the base for the novel mixed reality protocols of image-guided surgery. In

  6. The GOSTT concept and hybrid mixed/virtual/augmented reality environment radioguided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Olmos, R A; Vidal-Sicart, S; Giammarile, F; Zaknun, J J; Van Leeuwen, F W; Mariani, G

    2014-06-01

    The popularity gained by the sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure in the last two decades did increase the interest of the surgical disciplines for other applications of radioguided surgery. An example is the gamma-probe guided localization of occult or difficult to locate neoplastic lesions. Such guidance can be achieved by intralesional delivery (ultrasound, stereotaxis or CT) of a radiolabelled agent that remains accumulated at the site of the injection. Another possibility rested on the use of systemic administration of a tumour-seeking radiopharmaceutical with favourable tumour accumulation and retention. On the other hand, new intraoperative imaging devices for radioguided surgery in complex anatomical areas became available. All this a few years ago led to the delineation of the concept Guided intraOperative Scintigraphic Tumour Targeting (GOSTT) to include the whole spectrum of basic and advanced nuclear medicine procedures required for providing a roadmap that would optimise surgery. The introduction of allied signatures using, e.g. hybrid tracers for simultaneous detection of the radioactive and fluorescent signals did amply the GOSTT concept. It was now possible to combine perioperative nuclear medicine imaging with the superior resolution of additional optical guidance in the operating room. This hybrid approach is currently in progress and probably will become an important model to follow in the coming years. A cornerstone in the GOSTT concept is constituted by diagnostic imaging technologies like SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT was introduced halfway the past decade and was immediately incorporated into the SLN procedure. Important reasons attributing to the success of SPECT/CT were its combination with lymphoscintigraphy, and the ability to display SLNs in an anatomical environment. This latter aspect has significantly been improved in the new generation of SPECT/CT cameras and provides the base for the novel mixed reality protocols of image-guided surgery. In

  7. A pilot study investigating the effect of parathyroidectomy on arterial stiffness and coronary artery calcification in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Cem; Okoh, Alexis Kofi; Seicean, Andreea; Yigitbas, Hakan; Thomas, George; Yazici, Pinar; Shoenhagen, Paul; Doshi, Krupa; Halliburton, Sandra; Berber, Eren

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness (AS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) are predictors of cardiovascular risk and can be measured noninvasively. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of parathyroidectomy on AS and CAC in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP). This prospective, institutional review board-approved study included 21 patients with PHP, who underwent parathyroidectomy. Before and 6 months after parathyroidectomy, AS was assessed by measuring central systolic pressure (CSP), central pulse pressure, augmentation pressure (AP), and augmentation index (AIx); the CAC score (Agatston) was calculated on noncontrast computed tomography. AS parameters were compared with unaffected controls from donor nephrectomy database. Preoperative CSP and AIx parameters in PHP patients were higher than those in donor nephrectomy patients (P = .004 and P = .039, respectively). Preoperative total CAC score was zero in 15 patients (65%) and ranged from the 72nd to the 99th percentile in 6 patients (26%). Although there were no changes in CAC or AS after parathyroidectomy on average, there was variability in individual patient responses on AS. This pilot study demonstrates that CAC is not altered in PHP patients at short-term follow-up after parathyroidectomy. The heterogeneous changes in AS after parathyroidectomy warrant further investigation in a larger study with longer follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical applications of gamma-detection probes - radioguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneebaum, S.; Stadler, J.; Skornick, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Radioguided surgery (RGS) is a surgical technique that enables the surgeon to identify tissue ''marked'' by a radionuclide before surgery, based on the tissue characteristics, the radioactive tracer and its carrying molecule, or the affinity of both. Thus, yet another tool has been added to the inspection and palpation traditionally used by the surgeon. Current clinical applications of radioguided surgery are: radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) for colon cancer, sentinel-node mapping for malignant melanoma (which has become state-of-the-art), sentinel-node mapping for breast, vulvar and penile cancer, and detection of parathyroid adenoma and bone tumour (such as osteid osteoma). Although the same gamma-detecting probe (GDP) may be used for all these applications, the carrier substance and the radionuclide differ. MoAb and peptides are used for RIGS, sulphur colloid for sentinel-node mapping, iodine-125 for RIGS, technetium-99m for sentinel node, parathyroid and bone. The mode of injection also differs, but there are some common principles of gamma-guided surgery. RIGS enables the surgeon to corroborate tumour existence, find occult metastases, and assess the margins of resection; this may result in a change on the surgical plan. Sentinel lymph-node (SLN) scintigraphy for melanoma guides the surgeon to find the involved lymph nodes for lymph-node dissection. SLN for breast cancer is being investigated with promising results. This procedure has also changed the outlook of lymph-node pathology by giving the pathologist designated tissue samples for more comprehensive examination. Gamma-guided surgery will result in more accurate and less unnecessary surgery, better pathology and, hopefully, in better patient survival. (orig.)

  9. Role of 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT in accurate selection of primary hyperparathyroid patients for minimally invasive radio-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubello, Domenico; Massaro, Arianna; Cittadin, Silvia; Rampin, Lucia; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Boni, Giuseppe; Mariani, Giuliano; Pelizzo, Maria R.

    2006-01-01

    A prerequisite for optimum minimally invasive radio-guided surgery (MIRS) for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is the demonstration of significant uptake of 99m Tc-sestamibi in a parathyroid adenoma (PA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical role or 99m Tc-sestamibi SPECT in selecting patients for this procedure. Fifty-four consecutive PHPT patients were evaluated by single-session 99m Tc-pertechnetate/ 99m Tc-sestamibi planar subtraction scintigraphy, followed by 99m Tc-sestamibi SPECT acquisition to localise hyperfunctioning PAs and assist in planning the surgical approach. Scintigraphy showed the presence of a solitary PA in 47/54 patients (87%) and two or more PAs in four patients (7.4%); it was negative in the remaining three patients (5.6%). The overall sensitivity of 99m Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy was 94.6%. In 7/54 patients, the PA was located deep in the para-oesophageal/paratracheal space. So far, 22 patients with scintigraphic evidence of a solitary PA (in four of whom the PA was located deep in the neck) have undergone successful MIRS using the low 37 MBq (1 mCi) 99m Tc-sestamibi dose protocol. Intraoperative quick parathyroid hormone (QPTH) assay demonstrated a fall in all 22 patients, thus confirming successful removal of the hyperfunctioning PA. No major surgical complications were observed. After a period of follow-up ranging between 6 and 27 months (median 13 months), no case of persistent/recurrent PHPT was recorded. When comparing the parathyroid to background (P/B) ratio measured at planar and SPECT preoperative scintigraphy with that measured intraoperatively with the gamma probe, a good linear correlation was found between the SPECT and the intraoperative gamma probe measurements (r=0.89; p 99m Tc-sestamibi SPECT is more accurate in predicting the intraoperative measurements with the gamma probe. In this respect, a preoperative 99m Tc-sestamibi SPECT acquisition should be recommended for better selection of PHPT patients in whom

  10. Association of Parathyroid Gland Biopsy Excision Technique With Ex Vivo Radiation Counts During Radioguided Parathyroid Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Andrew M; Lawson, Bradley R; Franco, Aime T; Stack, Brendan C

    2017-06-01

    Parathyroid biopsy represents a means for normal and hyperfunctional glands to be distinguished intraoperatively. However, no data exist to guide surgeons regarding how much of a parathyroid gland must be biopsied to satisfy the 20% rule. To quantify the relative proportion of a hyperfunctional parathyroid gland that must be evaluated with the gamma probe to satisfy the 20% rule. A retrospective review of surgical data for 24 consecutive patients (16 women, 18 men; mean [SD] age, 66.6 [10] years; range, 51-83 years) who underwent surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism between May and October, 2015, in a tertieary academic medical center. Extirpated parathyroid glands were sectioned into parallel or pie-shaped biopsies and evaluated ex vivo with a gamma probe to determine what percentage of a hyperfunctional gland must be sampled to meet the Norman 20% rule. The hypothesis was formulated during data collection. In total, 253 ex vivo biopsy specimens were obtained from 33 surgically removed parathyroid glands. Parathyroid biopsies satisfied the 20% rule with an accuracy that depended on the relative proportion of the parent gland represented: half or more (96.6%; 95% CI, 91.7%-100.0%), a quarter to one-half (87.0%; 95% CI, 79.3%-94.7%), less than a quarter (63.6%; 95% CI, 54.5%-72.8%). When less than a quarter of the gland was removed, pie-shaped biopsies were more likely to satisfy the 20% rule compared with parallel biopsies of the same weight (78.4% vs 56.2%; absolute difference, 22.2%; 95% CI, 4.7%-39.7%). Unless half of a parathyroid gland is biopsied during radioguided parathyroidectomy, the 20% rule cannot reliably rule out the presence of a hyperfunctional parathyroid lesion. Pie-shaped biopsies originating from the center of the gland are associated with a lower rate of false-negative results compared with peripheral biopsies of similar size. Pie-shaped biopsies and biopsy of half or more of each nonexcised parathyroid gland for ex vivo counts may increase

  11. Effectiveness of cinacalcet in patients with recurrent/persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism following parathyroidectomy: results of the ECHO study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zitt, Emanuel; Rix, Marianne; Ureña Torres, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Progressive secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) is characterized by parathyroid gland hyperplasia which may ultimately require parathyroidectomy (PTX). Although PTX is generally a successful treatment for those patients subjected to surgery, a significant proportion develops recurrent sHPT follo......Progressive secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) is characterized by parathyroid gland hyperplasia which may ultimately require parathyroidectomy (PTX). Although PTX is generally a successful treatment for those patients subjected to surgery, a significant proportion develops recurrent s...

  12. Parathyroidectomy Ameliorates Glucose and Blood Pressure Control in a Patient with Primary Hyperparathyroidism, Type 2 Diabetes, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of parathyroidectomy on glucose control and hypertension is controversial. Here, we report a case of a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension in whom parathyroidectomy ameliorated both glucose control and blood pressure. Once high serum calcium levels were noticed, ultrasonography of neck confirmed a well-defined oval hypoechoic mass posterior to the right lobe of the thyroid, confirmed by scintiscan. Parathyroidectomy resulted in improvement of blood pressure and blood glucose. We could stop insulin and antihypertensive medications. We conclude that in patients with type 2 diabetes with vague complaints like fatigue, body ache, and refractory hypertension, as a part of the diagnostic workup, clinicians should also check serum calcium levels and parathyroid hormone to rule out hyperparathyroidism. Correction of hyperparathyroidism may result in improvement of hypertension and glucose control.

  13. A γ detecting probe developed for radioguided surgery and its primary using for animal experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Haipeng, Lin Yingwu; Gong Peirong; Yang Zhirong; Qiu Shi

    2003-01-01

    A new γ detecting probe device was described, which was used in radioguided surgery (RGS) for detecting tumor and its micrometastasis. The concrete scheme for this system was given in this paper and its performance was also evaluate. The animal experimental results showed that the γ detecting probe has excellent location resolution, and its collimator is practical

  14. Surgical approach in patients with hyperparathyroidism in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: total versus partial parathyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tonelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, primary hyperparathyroidism is the first endocrinopathy to be diagnosed in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, and is also the most common one. The timing of the surgery and strategy in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1/hyperparathyroidism are still under debate. The aims of surgery are to: 1 correct hypercalcemia, thus preventing persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism; 2 avoid persistent hypoparathyroidism; and 3 facilitate the surgical treatment of possible recurrences. Currently, two types of surgical approach are indicated: 1 subtotal parathyroidectomy with removal of at least 3-3 K glands; and 2 total parathyroidectomy with grafting of autologous parathyroid tissue. Transcervical thymectomy must be performed with both of these procedures. Unsuccessful surgical treatment of hyperparathyroidism is more frequently observed in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 than in sporadic hyperparathyroidism. The recurrence rate is strongly influenced by: 1 the lack of a pre-operative multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 diagnosis; 2 the surgeon's experience; 3 the timing of surgery; 4 the possibility of performing intra-operative confirmation (histologic examination, rapid parathyroid hormone assay of the curative potential of the surgical procedure; and, 5 the surgical strategy. Persistent hyperparathyroidism seems to be more frequent after subtotal parathyroidectomy than after total parathyroidectomy with autologous graft of parathyroid tissue. Conversely, recurrent hyperparathyroidism has a similar frequency in the two surgical strategies. To plan further operations, it is very helpful to know all the available data about previous surgery and to undertake accurate identification of the site of recurrence.

  15. Comparative assessment of the clinical and X-ray picture of urenic osteodystrophy before and after parathyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratobyl'skij, G.V.; Suslov, V.P.; Ivanov, I.A.; Loseva, T.V.

    1992-01-01

    The results of clinical, X-ray, and biochemical studies carried out in 51 patients with uremic osterodystrophy, treated with hemodialysis, before and after parathyroidectomy are presented. The patients were divided into 4 groups with various patterns of X-ray symptoms. Analysis of the clinical and X-ray data before and after parathyroidectomy has brought to a conclusion that such an intervention was effective only in cases with manifest clinical and X-ray symptoms of fibrous osteodystrophy. Surgical treatment is containdicated to patients in whom X-ray signs of osteomalacia predominate over fibrous osteodystrophy; it may result in a rap[id progress of osteomalacia

  16. Development of voltage sensitivity preamplifier to application in radioguided surgical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Fabio Eduardo da; Rela, Paulo Roberto; Hamada, Margarida Mizue

    2005-01-01

    The methods of nuclear medicine are increasing used to complement standard diagnostic examinations. Some of these are radioguided detection of the sentinel lymph node (SN) and the radioguided localization of occult lesions. The SN technique is used in a small-size breast carcinoma and involves the identification, removal and immediate histological examination. Specifically, particles of colloidal human serum albumin are labelled with low activities of 99m Tc and are inoculated into the breast lesion or close in the case of SN biopsy. Subsequently, a hand-held gamma-ray detecting probe with reduced dimensions is used to locate the lesion or the SN as a hot spot and guide its surgical removal. Many techniques can be used for gamma-ray probes development. Gamma photons can be either directly detected via high atomic numbers semiconductors detectors or indirect detection, as scintillator crystal converts gamma photons into light photons. In all of them, the preamplifier is used as close as possible to the detector for obtaining a good energy resolution and due to the necessary small probe dimension, the preamplifier must have reduced size. The commercial preamplifiers are not small enough to be assembled inside the probe. It was developed a not usually preamplifier configuration for high-resolution spectroscopy energy, adequate in size to be set up in gamma-ray probes. This tension preamplifier can be split between the gamma-ray probe and the read out unit. Due to this configuration the effective size required inside the probe was reduced. The results and the probe assembling are showed in this work. (author)

  17. [Management of secondary hyperparathyroidism-current impact of parathyroidectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitt, Emanuel; Lhotta, Karl

    2016-05-01

    Parathyroidectomy still presents an adequate and efficient therapeutic option for the management of refractory secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT). Dependent on the selected surgical technique it allows the highest rate of "laboratory cure" of sHPT. The question remains as to whether these improvements translate into clinical long-term benefits regarding the sHPT-associated vascular calcification and the increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as overall mortality. Recent large observational studies point in this direction but definite evidence through prospective randomized controlled trials is still lacking.

  18. Risk factors and clinical course of hungry bone syndrome after total parathyroidectomy in dialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lo-Yi; Wong, Ping-Nam; Sin, Ho-Kwan; Wong, Yuk-Yi; Lo, Kwok-Chi; Chan, Shuk-Fan; Lo, Man-Wai; Lo, Kin-Yee; Mak, Siu-Ka; Wong, Andrew Kui-Man

    2017-01-10

    Hungry bone syndrome (HBS) is an important postoperative complication after parathyroidectomy for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). There is, however, little data in the literature on its detailed clinical course, and the associated risk factors remain controversial. We did a single-center retrospective study on 62 consecutive dialysis patients who underwent total parathyroidectomy for SHPT to examine the risk factors, clinical course and outcome. Data on demographic characteristics, perioperative laboratory parameters including serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and parathyroid hormone (PTH), drug treatment for SHPT and operative details of parathyroidectomy were collected. Seventeen (27.4%) patients developed severe postoperative hypocalcemia with HBS. The serum calcium dropped progressively while serum ALP rose after operation until 2 weeks later when serum calcium reached the trough and serum ALP peaked. Serum phosphate also fell but stabilized between 4 and 14 days. The total postoperative calcium and vitamin D supplementation was significantly larger, and hospital stay was significantly longer in the group with HBS as compared with those without HBS. Young age, high body weight, high preoperative ALP level, and low preoperative calcium level independently predicted the development of HBS while preoperative PTH and use of cinacalcet or paricalcitol did not. HBS was common after total parathyroidectomy in patients with SHPT, and it is important to closely monitor the postoperative serum calcium, phosphate and ALP levels in the following 2 weeks, especially for those at risk. The implications of our findings on perioperative management are discussed.

  19. Clinical value of detection of intrathoracic metastatic lymph nodes with radioguided technique in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ming; Hu Yongxiao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible clinical feasibility of intraoperative detection of metastatic lymph node with radioguided technique after labeling with 99m Tc-MIBI in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma. Methods: Gamma-detecting probe was used intra-operatively to examine the radioactivity of lungs, regional and mediastinal nodes in 30 patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma after intravenous injection of 99m Tc-MIBI (740MBq) 30 minutes before operation for radio-labeling of the nodes. Postoperatively, the radiologically positive but conventionally pathologically negative as well as all the other nodes judged to be negative with conventional standard (altogether 201 groups) were all meticulously examined with serial sections and immunohistologic staining for detection of the presence of micro-metastasis. Results: Altogether 41 groups of nodes specimens were radiologically positive (over twofolds of normal radio-activity measured with γ probe), of which conventional pathological examination revealed metastasis in 32 groups. The remaining 9 groups of specimens were examined further with serial sections and IHC studies and micro-metastasis was found in 3 of them. Thus, the sensitivity of the radioguided technique was 100%, specificity 96.9% and accuracy rate 97.42%. In the remaining 192 radiologically negative groups of lymph nodes studied, no false negative cases (i. e. micrometastasis positive) were demonstrated. Conclusion: The radio-guided technique is very sensitive (100%), highly specific and accurate (98.9%), and 97.4% respectively), without false negativity demonstrated. Its practical clinical application seems to be feasible. (authors)

  20. Role of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT in accurate selection of primary hyperparathyroid patients for minimally invasive radio-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubello, Domenico; Massaro, Arianna; Cittadin, Silvia; Rampin, Lucia [Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV), Nuclear Medicine Service - PET Unit, ' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Al-Nahhas, Adil [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Boni, Giuseppe; Mariani, Giuliano [University of Pisa Medical School, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Pelizzo, Maria R. [University of Padova Medical School, Department of Special Surgery, Padova (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    A prerequisite for optimum minimally invasive radio-guided surgery (MIRS) for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is the demonstration of significant uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi in a parathyroid adenoma (PA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical role or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT in selecting patients for this procedure. Fifty-four consecutive PHPT patients were evaluated by single-session {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate/{sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi planar subtraction scintigraphy, followed by {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT acquisition to localise hyperfunctioning PAs and assist in planning the surgical approach. Scintigraphy showed the presence of a solitary PA in 47/54 patients (87%) and two or more PAs in four patients (7.4%); it was negative in the remaining three patients (5.6%). The overall sensitivity of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy was 94.6%. In 7/54 patients, the PA was located deep in the para-oesophageal/paratracheal space. So far, 22 patients with scintigraphic evidence of a solitary PA (in four of whom the PA was located deep in the neck) have undergone successful MIRS using the low 37 MBq (1 mCi) {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi dose protocol. Intraoperative quick parathyroid hormone (QPTH) assay demonstrated a fall in all 22 patients, thus confirming successful removal of the hyperfunctioning PA. No major surgical complications were observed. After a period of follow-up ranging between 6 and 27 months (median 13 months), no case of persistent/recurrent PHPT was recorded. When comparing the parathyroid to background (P/B) ratio measured at planar and SPECT preoperative scintigraphy with that measured intraoperatively with the gamma probe, a good linear correlation was found between the SPECT and the intraoperative gamma probe measurements (r=0.89; p<0.01) but no correlation was found with planar scintigraphic data. Our preliminary data suggest that measurement of the P/B ratio by means of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT is more accurate in predicting the

  1. Comprehensive evaluation of occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel from 18F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Sarikaya, Ismet; Hall, Nathan C.; Knopp, Michael V.; White, William C.; Marsh, Steven G.; Hinkle, George H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to comprehensively evaluate occupational radiation exposure to all intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in radioguided surgical procedures utilizing 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Radiation exposure to surgeon, anesthetist, scrub technologist, circulating nurse, preoperative nurse, and postoperative nurse, using aluminum oxide dosimeters read by optically stimulated luminescence technology, was evaluated during ten actual radioguided surgical procedures involving administration of 18 F-FDG. Mean patient dosage of 18 F-FDG was 699 ± 181 MBq (range 451-984). Mean time from 18 F-FDG injection to initial exposure of personnel to the patient was shortest for the preoperative nurse (75 ± 63 min, range 0-182) followed by the circulating nurse, anesthetist, scrub technologist, surgeon, and postoperative nurse. Mean total time of exposure of the personnel to the patient was longest for the anesthetist (250 ± 128 min, range 69-492) followed by the circulating nurse, scrub technologist, surgeon, postoperative nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per case was received by the surgeon (164 ± 135 μSv, range 10-580) followed by the anesthetist, scrub technologist, postoperative nurse, circulating nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per hour of exposure was received by the preoperative nurse (83 ± 134 μSv/h, range 0-400) followed by the surgeon, anesthetist, postoperative nurse, scrub technologist, and circulating nurse. On a per case basis, occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in 18 F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures is relatively small. Development of guidelines for monitoring occupational radiation exposure in 18 F-FDG cases will provide reassurance and afford a safe work environment for such personnel. (orig.)

  2. Factors affecting postoperative hypocalcemia after thyroid surgery: Importance of incidental parathyroidectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ozemir, Ibrahim Ali; Buldanli, Mehmet Zeki; Yener, Oktay; Leblebici, Metin; Eren, Tunc; Baysal, Hakan; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study evaluated effects of incidental parathyroidectomy, surgical technique, and presence of thyroiditis or hyperthyroidism on occurrence of postoperative persistent or transient hypocalcemia. METHODS: Patients who underwent thyroidectomy at ?stanbul Medeniyet University between 2013 and 2015 were included in the study. Patient information, postoperative serum calcium levels, and pathology reports were investigated retrospectively. Group 1 was made up of patients who we...

  3. Should vitamin D deficiency be corrected before parathyroidectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randle, Reese W; Balentine, Courtney J; Wendt, Elizabeth; Schneider, David F; Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with hyperparathyroidism, but the importance of replacement before surgery is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the impact of vitamin D deficiency on the extent of resection and risk of postoperative hypocalcemia for patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism. We identified patients with primary hyperparathyroidism undergoing parathyroid surgery between 2000 and 2015 using a prospectively maintained database. Patients with normal (≥30 ng/mL) vitamin D were compared to those with levels less than 30 ng/mL. There were 1015 (54%) patients with normal vitamin D and 872 (46%) patients with vitamin D deficiency undergoing parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism. Vitamin D deficiency was associated with higher preoperative parathyroid hormone (median 90 versus 77 pg/mL, P vitamin D. To achieve similar cure rates, patients with vitamin D deficiency were less likely to require removal of more than one gland (20% versus 30%, P vitamin D. Patients with vitamin D deficiency had similar rates of persistent (1.5% versus 2.0%, P = 0.43) and recurrent (1.7% versus 2.6%, P = 0.21) hyperparathyroidism. Postoperatively, both groups had equivalent rates of transient (2.3% versus 2.3%, P = 0.97) and permanent (0.2% versus 0.4%, P = 0.52) hypocalcemia. Restoring vitamin D in deficient patients should not delay the appropriate surgical treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism. Deficient patients are more likely to be cured with the excision of a single adenoma and no more likely to suffer persistence, recurrence, or hypocalcemia than patients with normal vitamin D. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgery with radioguided location of a liver metastasis of melanoma choroid: case report; Cirurgia com localizacao radioguiada de uma metastase hepatica de melanoma de coroide: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Marcelo; Miranda, Mario Henrique Furlanetto, E-mail: mmoreno@unochapeco.edu.br, E-mail: mirandamario@unochapeco.edu.br [Universidade Comunitaria da Regiao de Chapeco (UNOCHAPECO), SC (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Introduction: The use of radioguided occult lesion localization prior to surgical excision is increasing, mainly due to the development of new probes and the use of PET-CT. Case report: A 70-year-old male who presented with a metastatic lesion in his liver from a choroidal melanoma. This was located using PET-CT and subsequently located with a low-energy intraoperative gamma probe during the laparotomy. Conclusion: The present case shows that it is possible to excise a hepatic metastasis utilizing the principles of radioguided surgery, even in centers without access to high energy probes. (author)

  5. Five to 10 years follow-up after total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation of parathyroid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, L; Brandi, L; Daugaard, H

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the long-term function of autotransplanted parathyroid tissue in patients with chronic renal disease. We examined the medical records of a consecutive series of 21 patients with chronic renal failure, who had undergone total parathyroidectomy with autotr...

  6. A novel surgical strategy for secondary hyperparathyroidism: Purge parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Cheng-Xiang; Qiu, Nian-Cun; Zha, Si-Luo; Liu, Miao-E; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Pei-Pei; Du, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Chun-Yan; Qiu, Ming; Zhang, Wei

    2017-07-01

    This study was intended to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of purge parathyroidectomy (PPTX) for patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). The "seed, environment, and soil" medical hypothesis was first raised, following review of the literatures, to demonstrate the possible causes of persistence or recurrence of SHPT after parathyroidectomy. Subsequently, the novel surgical strategy of PPTX was proposed, which involves comprehensive resection of the fibro-fatty tissues, including visible or invisible parathyroid, within the region surrounded by the thyroid cartilage, bilateral carotid artery sheath, and the brachiocephalic artery. The perioperative information and clinical outcomes of patients who underwent PPTX from June 2016 to December 2016 were analyzed. In total, PPTX was performed safely in nine patients with SHPT from June 2016 to December 2016. The operative time for PPTX ranged from 95 to 135 min, and blood loss ranged from 20 to 40 mL. No patients with perioperative death, bleeding, convulsions, or recurrent laryngeal nerve injury were reported. The preoperative concentration of PTH ranged from 1062 to 2879 pg/mL, and from 12.35 to 72.69 pg/mL on the first day after surgery. In total, 37 parathyroid glands were resected. The postoperative pathologic examination showed that supernumerary or ectopic parathyroid tissues were found within the "non-parathyroid" tissues in three patients. No cases encountered persistence or recurrence of SHPT, or severe hypocalcemia during the follow-up period. PPTX involves comprehensive resection of supernumerary and ectopic parathyroid tissues, which may provide a more permanent means of reducing PTH levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Quadriplegia after parathyroidectomy in a hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Ho-Tien; Hu, Jenkin-S; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2011-03-01

    We present a case of post-operative iatrogenic quadriplegia, which occurred after subtotal parathyroidectomy. This patient was on long-term hemodialysis for 7 years. The need of prolonged neck extension for this procedure was probably the main risk factor for the spinal cord injury. Systemic hypotension which contributed to the injury in this case, should be anticipated and promptly treated to prevent further damage. Spinal deformities associated with end-stage renal disease may make such patients more susceptible. Since appropriate precautions against potential neurologic damage can be undertaken, we suggest that evaluating carefully for the pre-existing spinal stenosis before a procedure requiring prominent and prolonged hyper-extension of the neck, especially in long-term hemodialysis patients is of paramount importance. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Preoperative Thyroid Ultrasound Is Indicated in Patients Undergoing Parathyroidectomy for Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cletus A. Arciero, Zita S. Shiue, Jeremy D. Gates, George E. Peoples, Alan P. B. Dackiw, Ralph P. Tufano, Steven K. Libutti, Martha A. Zeiger, Alexander Stojadinovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary hyperaparathyroidism (pHPT is often accompanied by underlying thyroid pathology that can confound preoperative parathyroid localization studies and complicate intra-operative decision making. The aim of this study was to examine the utility of preoperative thyroid ultrasonography (US in patients prior to undergoing parathyroidectomy for pHPT.Methods: An Institutional Review Board approved prospective study was undertaken from January 2005 through July 2008. All patients with pHPT meeting inclusion criteria (n=94 underwent preoperative thyroid ultrasound in addition to standard 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy for parathyroid localization. Demographics, operative management and final pathology were examined in all cases.Results: Fifty-four of the 94 patients (57% were noted to have a thyroid nodule on preoperative US, of which 30 (56% underwent further examination with fine needle aspiration biopsy. Alteration of the operative plan attributable to underlying thyroid pathology occurred in 16 patients (17%, with patients undergoing either total thyroidectomy (n=9 or thyroid lobectomy (n=7. Thyroid cancer was noted in 33% of patients undergoing thyroid resection, and 6% of all patients with HPT.Conclusions: The routine utilization of preoperative thyroid ultrasound in patients prior to undergoing parathyroid surgery for pHPT is indicated. The added information from this non-invasive modality facilitates timely management of co-incidental, and sometimes malignant, thyroid pathology.

  9. No recurrence of sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism when cure is established 6 months after parathyroidectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Janneke E.; Kievit, Job; Morreau, Hans; Romijn, Johannes A.; Hamdy, Neveen A. T.

    2010-01-01

    Cure rate for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is reported to be 94-100% 1 year after surgery, but recent data suggest recurrence in 4% of the patients 1-5 years post-operatively. The aim of our study was to establish the cure rate and its maintenance in the long-term after parathyroidectomy (PTx)

  10. Effectiveness of cinacalcet in patients with recurrent/persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism following parathyroidectomy: results of the ECHO study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zitt, Emanuel; Rix, Marianne; Ureña Torres, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Background. Progressive secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) is characterized by parathyroid gland hyperplasia which may ultimately require parathyroidectomy (PTX). Although PTX is generally a successful treatment for those patients subjected to surgery, a significant proportion develops recurrent...

  11. Effects of parathyroidectomy versus observation on the development of vertebral fractures in mild primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstam, Karolina; Heck, Ansgar; Mollerup, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mild primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common disease especially in middle-aged and elderly women. The diagnosis is frequently made incidentally and treatment strategies are widely discussed. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of parathyroidectomy (PTX) compared with observation (OBS...... compartments (P treatment effect of surgery compared to observation (P

  12. Outcome of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation as treatment of secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism in children and adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, A.J.; Tinnemans, J.G.; Idu, M.M.; Groothoff, J.W.; Surachno, S.; Aronson, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment safety and effectiveness of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation for secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism have been extensively proven in adults; the evidence for children, however, is scarce. Children and adolescents cannot simply be seen as young adults in

  13. Outcome of Total Parathyroidectomy and Autotransplantation as Treatment of Secondary and Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism in Children and Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, A. J.; Tinnemans, J. G. M.; Idu, M. M.; Groothoff, J. W.; Surachno, S.; Aronson, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment safety and effectiveness of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation for secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism have been extensively proven in adults; the evidence for children, however, is scarce. Children and adolescents cannot simply be seen as young adults in the case of

  14. Impact of parathyroidectomy on cardiovascular outcomes and survival in chronic hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. A retrospective study of 50 cases prior to the calcimimetics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzo, Giovanni; Perna, Alessandra F; Savica, Vincenzo; Palazzo, Antonietta; Della Pietra, Cristina; Ingrosso, Diego; Satta, Ersilia; Capasso, Giovambattista; Santini, Luigi; Docimo, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    In chronic hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, pathological modifications of bone and mineral metabolism increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Parathyroidectomy, reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events, may improve outcomes; however, its effects on long-term survival are still subject of active research. From January 2004 to December 2006, 30 hemodialysis patients, affected by severe and unresponsive secondary hyperparathyroidism, underwent parathyroidectomy - 15 total parathyroidectomy and 15 total parathyroidectomy + subcutaneous autoimplantation. During a 5-year follow-up, patients did not receive a renal transplantation and were evaluated for biochemical modifications and major cardiovascular events - death, cardiovascular accidents, myocardial infarction and peripheral vascular disease. Results were compared with those obtained in a control group of 20 hemodialysis patients, affected by secondary hyperparathyroidism, and refusing surgical treatment, and following medical treatment only. The groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, dialysis vintage, and comorbidities. Postoperative cardiovascular events were observed in 18/30 - 54% - surgical patients and in 4/20 - 20%- medical patients, with a mortality rate respectively of 23.3% in the surgical group vs. 15% in the control group. Parathyroidectomy was not associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular morbidity and survival rate was unaffected by surgical treatment. In secondary hyperparathyroidism hemodialysis patients affected by severe cardiovascular disease, surgery did not modify cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. Therefore, in secondary hyperparathyroidism hemodialysis patients, resistant to medical treatment, only an early indication to calcimimetics, or surgery, in the initial stage of chronic kidney disease - mineral bone disorders, may offer a higher long-term survival. Further studies will be useful to clarify the role of

  15. Hypercalcaemic Crisis: Immediate Parathyroidectomy and Intraoperative Intravenous Calcium Infusion Improves Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjit Kaur

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The hypercalcaemic crisis of hyperparathyroidism is an endocrine emergency that is invariably fatal if untreated. Despite emergency parathyroidectomies to treat hypercalcaemic crisis, mortality rates remain high. The rapid decline of serum calcium levels after removal of an adenoma and its adverse effect on the heart contributes to the development of postoperative complications and death. The cornerstone of surgical treatment for hypercalcaemic crisis is to begin infusion of high doses of calcium immediately after successful removal of parathyroid adenomas to allow gradual and well-controlled decline of serum calcium to avoid fatal myocardial complications.

  16. Radio-guided surgery for removal of a giant parathyroid cyst related to hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Valdes, Edelberto; Escarpanter Gonzalez, Julio C; Lopez Diaz, Adlin; Alfonso Trujillo, Yiovanni; Infante Amoros, Adalberto; Dominguez lvarez, Carlos A; Palau San Pedro, Aley

    2009-01-01

    Among present advances of surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism is the preoperative localization of hyper-functioning glands by preoperative and intraoperative scan, this later one by a special gamma probe. By the other hand, parathyroid cysts are rare; may be of functioning type or not, as well as the findings of 99mTc-MIBI, and the intraoperative use of gamma probe to assess all the possible sites where could be hyperproductive glands of parathyroid hormone. We describe features of management, safety, and administration of radiological agent during the immediate preoperative period, as well as use of gamma probe during intervention. Evolution over follow-up is reported. This case represents the third patient operated on from hyperthyroidism by radio-guided surgery in our center, which introduced this technique in our country. (Author)

  17. Long-term effectiveness of localization studies and intraoperative parathormone monitoring in patients undergoing reoperative parathyroidectomy for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Punam P; Farra, Josefina C; Allan, Bassan J; Lew, John I

    2015-07-01

    Reoperative parathyroidectomy (RPTX) for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism is associated with a high rate of operative failure. The long-term effectiveness of RPTX using localization studies and intraoperative parathormone monitoring (IPM) was examined. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from patients undergoing targeted RPTX with IPM for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism was performed. Persistent hyperparathyroidism was defined as elevated calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels above normal range less than 6 months after parathyroidectomy. Recurrent hyperparathyroidism was defined as elevated calcium and PTH levels greater than 6 months after successful parathyroidectomy. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) for sestamibi, surgeon-performed ultrasound, intraoperative PTH dynamics, and surgical outcomes were evaluated. Of the 1,064 patients, 69 patients underwent 72 RPTXs with localizing studies and IPM. Sestamibi (n = 69) had a sensitivity of 74% and a PPV of 83%, whereas surgeon-performed ultrasound (n = 38) had a sensitivity of 55% and a PPV of 76%. IPM had a sensitivity of 100% and a PPV of 98%. An intraoperative PTH drop greater than or equal to 50% was predictive of operative success (P < .01). Overall, operative success and recurrence were 94% and 1.4%, with a mean patient follow-up of 59 ± 12.8 months. RPTX can be performed in a targeted approach using preoperative localization studies and IPM, leading to a low rate of complications and a high rate of long-term operative success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) in breast cancer using Tc-99m macro-aggregated albumin and distilled water control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philadelpho Arantes Pereira, Fernanda; Martins, Gabriela; Gregorio Calas, Maria Julia; Fonseca Torres de Oliveira, Maria Veronica; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian

    2013-09-18

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided wire localization presents several challenges apart from the technical difficulties. An alternative to this conventional localization method using a wire is the radio-guided occult lesion localization (ROLL), more related to safe surgical margins and reductions in excision volume. The purpose of this study was to establish a safe and reliable magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (MRI-ROLL) technique and to report our initial experience with the localization of nonpalpable breast lesions only observed on MRI. Sixteen women (mean age 53.2 years) with 17 occult breast lesions underwent radio-guided localization in a 1.5-T MR system using a grid-localizing system. All patients had a diagnostic MRI performed prior to the procedure. An intralesional injection of Technetium-99m macro-aggregated albumin followed by distilled water was performed. After the procedure, scintigraphy was obtained. Surgical resection was performed with the help of a gamma detector probe. The lesion histopathology and imaging concordance; the procedure's positive predictive value (PPV), duration time, complications, and accuracy; and the rate of exactly excised lesions evaluated with MRI six months after the surgery were assessed. One lesion in one patient had to be excluded because the radioactive substance came back after the injection, requiring a wire placement. Of the remaining cases, there were four malignant lesions, nine benign lesions, and three high-risk lesions. Surgical histopathology and imaging findings were considered concordant in all benign and high-risk cases. The PPV of MRI-ROLL was greater if the indication for the initial MR examination was active breast cancer. The median procedure duration time was 26 minutes, and all included procedures were defined as accurate. The exact and complete lesion removal was confirmed in all (100%) patients who underwent six-month postoperative MRI (50%). MRI-ROLL offers a

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) in breast cancer using Tc-99m macro-aggregated albumin and distilled water control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philadelpho Arantes Pereira, Fernanda; Martins, Gabriela; Gregorio Calas, Maria Julia; Fonseca Torres de Oliveira, Maria Veronica; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided wire localization presents several challenges apart from the technical difficulties. An alternative to this conventional localization method using a wire is the radio-guided occult lesion localization (ROLL), more related to safe surgical margins and reductions in excision volume. The purpose of this study was to establish a safe and reliable magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (MRI-ROLL) technique and to report our initial experience with the localization of nonpalpable breast lesions only observed on MRI. Sixteen women (mean age 53.2 years) with 17 occult breast lesions underwent radio-guided localization in a 1.5-T MR system using a grid-localizing system. All patients had a diagnostic MRI performed prior to the procedure. An intralesional injection of Technetium-99m macro-aggregated albumin followed by distilled water was performed. After the procedure, scintigraphy was obtained. Surgical resection was performed with the help of a gamma detector probe. The lesion histopathology and imaging concordance; the procedure’s positive predictive value (PPV), duration time, complications, and accuracy; and the rate of exactly excised lesions evaluated with MRI six months after the surgery were assessed. One lesion in one patient had to be excluded because the radioactive substance came back after the injection, requiring a wire placement. Of the remaining cases, there were four malignant lesions, nine benign lesions, and three high-risk lesions. Surgical histopathology and imaging findings were considered concordant in all benign and high-risk cases. The PPV of MRI-ROLL was greater if the indication for the initial MR examination was active breast cancer. The median procedure duration time was 26 minutes, and all included procedures were defined as accurate. The exact and complete lesion removal was confirmed in all (100%) patients who underwent six-month postoperative MRI (50%). MRI-ROLL offers a

  20. Correlations between biochemical testing, anthology findings and preoperative sestamibi scans: a retrospective study of the minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stawicki, S.; El Chaar, M.; Baillie, D.; Jaik, N.; Estrada, F.

    2007-01-01

    Sestamibi imaging is the most widely used preoperative localization study for patients with hyperparathyroidism. Previous reports examine the relationship between the weight and volume of excised parathyroid glands and preoperative serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels.The aim of this study was to examine whether these variables correlate with the results of preoperative Sestamibi scans. A retrospective review of 150 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative sestamibi imaging for primary hyperparathyroidism between 1998 and 2007 was performed. Variables studied included patient demographics, diagnostic test (sestamibi) results, operative/pathology findings and surgical outcome (normocalcaemia vs. persistent hypercalcaemia). Sestamibi scans were designated as either 'negative' (NSS) or 'positive' (PSS), where PSS correctly localized abnormal gland(s) enabling a focused neck exploration. The results of sestamibi imaging were correlated with calcium/PTH levels, weight/volume of excised glands and patient outcomes and demographics. Total excised gland weight/volume and preoperative serum calcium levels were significantly higher with PSS (all, p ≤ 0.04). Higher preoperative serum calcium levels and greater total gland weight/volume were significantly associated with successful operative outcome (presence of postoperative normocalcaemia; all, p ≤ 0.01). Factors associated with operative failure included multi-gland disease (p <≤ 0.01) and NSS (p ≤0.01). Higher diagnostic PTH levels (≥ 150 pg/mL) were associated with greater excised gland mass (p ≤ 0.05) and volume (p ≤ 0.05). Male gender was associated with higher preoperative serum calcium levels (p < 0.02). Of interest, patients with single-gland disease had significantly higher preoperative PTH levels than patients with multi-gland disease (155 vs. 109 pg/mL, p ≤ 0.05). Positive sestamibi scans are associated with heavier/larger parathyroid glands and higher preoperative serum calcium levels. Male gender was associated with higher preoperative serum calcium levels, while single-gland disease was associated with higher preoperative PTH levels. In addition, successful surgical outcome was associated with higher preoperative serum calcium levels and with greater excised parathyroid gland mass/volume. Surgical failure was associated with multi-gland disease and negative sestamibi. (author)

  1. A prototype small CdTe gamma camera for radioguided surgery and other imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Funaki, Minoru; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shirahata, Takashi; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2003-12-01

    Gamma probes have been used for sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma and breast cancer. However, these probes can provide only radioactivity counts and variable pitch audio output based on the intensity of the detected radioactivity. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows visualisation of the size, shape and location of the target tissues. This study is designed to characterise the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for other imaging applications amenable to the smaller format of this prototype imaging system. The detector head had 32 cadmium telluride semiconductor arrays with a total of 1,024 pixels, and with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mmx166 mmx65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mmx44.8 mm. The energy resolution and imaging aspects were tested. Two spherical 5-mm- and 15-mm-diameter technetium-99m radioactive sources that had activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq, respectively, were used to simulate a sentinel lymph node and an injection site. The relative detectability of these foci by the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera was studied. The prototype was also examined in a variety of clinical applications. Energy resolution [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] for a single element at the centre of the field of view was 4.2% at 140 keV (99mTc), and the mean energy resolution of the CdTe detector arrays was approximately 7.8%. The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.56 +/- 0.05 mm. Simulated node foci could be visualised clearly by the SSGC using a 15-s acquisition time. In preliminary clinical tests, the SSGC successfully imaged diseases in a variety of tissues, including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints and sentinel lymph nodes. The SSGC has significant potential for diagnosing diseases and facilitating

  2. A prototype small CdTe gamma camera for radioguided surgery and other imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, The Nippon Dental University School of Dentistry at Niigata, 1-8 Hamaura-cho, 951-8580, Niigata (Japan); Sakahara, Harumi [Department of Radiology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Funaki, Minoru; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shirahata, Takashi [Acrorad Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar [Integrated Detector and Electronics A.S (IDE AS), Hovik (Norway)

    2003-12-01

    Gamma probes have been used for sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma and breast cancer. However, these probes can provide only radioactivity counts and variable pitch audio output based on the intensity of the detected radioactivity. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows visualisation of the size, shape and location of the target tissues. This study is designed to characterise the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for other imaging applications amenable to the smaller format of this prototype imaging system. The detector head had 32 cadmium telluride semiconductor arrays with a total of 1,024 pixels, and with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mm x 166 mm x 65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. The energy resolution and imaging aspects were tested. Two spherical 5-mm- and 15-mm-diameter technetium-99m radioactive sources that had activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq, respectively, were used to simulate a sentinel lymph node and an injection site. The relative detectability of these foci by the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera was studied. The prototype was also examined in a variety of clinical applications. Energy resolution [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] for a single element at the centre of the field of view was 4.2% at 140 keV ({sup 99m}Tc), and the mean energy resolution of the CdTe detector arrays was approximately 7.8%. The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.56{+-}0.05 mm. Simulated node foci could be visualised clearly by the SSGC using a 15-s acquisition time. In preliminary clinical tests, the SSGC successfully imaged diseases in a variety of tissues, including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints and sentinel lymph nodes. The SSGC has significant potential for diagnosing diseases and

  3. A prototype small CdTe gamma camera for radioguided surgery and other imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Sakahara, Harumi; Funaki, Minoru; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shirahata, Takashi; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2003-01-01

    Gamma probes have been used for sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma and breast cancer. However, these probes can provide only radioactivity counts and variable pitch audio output based on the intensity of the detected radioactivity. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows visualisation of the size, shape and location of the target tissues. This study is designed to characterise the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for other imaging applications amenable to the smaller format of this prototype imaging system. The detector head had 32 cadmium telluride semiconductor arrays with a total of 1,024 pixels, and with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mm x 166 mm x 65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. The energy resolution and imaging aspects were tested. Two spherical 5-mm- and 15-mm-diameter technetium-99m radioactive sources that had activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq, respectively, were used to simulate a sentinel lymph node and an injection site. The relative detectability of these foci by the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera was studied. The prototype was also examined in a variety of clinical applications. Energy resolution [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] for a single element at the centre of the field of view was 4.2% at 140 keV ( 99m Tc), and the mean energy resolution of the CdTe detector arrays was approximately 7.8%. The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.56±0.05 mm. Simulated node foci could be visualised clearly by the SSGC using a 15-s acquisition time. In preliminary clinical tests, the SSGC successfully imaged diseases in a variety of tissues, including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints and sentinel lymph nodes. The SSGC has significant potential for diagnosing diseases and facilitating

  4. Persistent hyperparathyroidism as a risk factor for long-term graft failure: the need to discuss indication for parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Maria Júlia Correia Lima Nepomuceno; Ramalho, Janaina Almeida Mota; Elias, Rosilene Motta; Jorgetti, Vanda; Nahas, William; Custodio, Melani; Moysés, Rosa M A; David-Neto, Elias

    2018-01-10

    Although a successful kidney transplant (KTx) improves most of the mineral and bone disorders (MBD) produced by chronic kidney disease (CKD), hyperparathyroidism may persist (pHPT). Current guidelines recommend parathyroidectomy if serum parathormone is persistently elevated 1 year after KTx, because pHPT has been recently associated with poor graft outcomes. However, whether patients with pHPT and adequate renal function are at risk for long-term graft failure is unknown. Longitudinal follow-up of 911 adults submitted to KTx between January 2005 and December 2014, with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 30 mL/min 1 year after surgery. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from electronic database. Graft failure was defined as return to dialysis. Overall, 62% of the patients were classified as having pHPT 1 year after KTx. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months, there were 59 graft failures (49 in pHPT and 10 in non-pHPT group, P = .003). At last follow-up, death-censored graft survival was lower in the pHPT group (P = .009), even after adjustment for age at KTx, donor age, donor type, acute rejection, parathyroidectomy, and eGFR at 1 year after transplantation (odds ratio [OR] 1.99; 1.004-3.971; P = .049). A PTH of 150 pg/mL at 6 months was the best cutoff to predict pHPT at 1 year (specificity = 92.1%). Having pHPT after a successful KTx increases the long-term risk of death-censored graft failure. This result highlights the need for better recognition and management of CKD-MBD before and during the first year after KTx, and opens a discussion on the more appropriate timing to perform parathyroidectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of total parathyroidectomy without autotransplantation and without thymectomy versus total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation and with thymectomy for secondary hyperparathyroidism: TOPAR PILOT-Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Norbert

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT is common in patients with chronic renal failure. Despite the initiation of new therapeutic agents, several patients will require parathyroidectomy (PTX. Total PTX with autotransplantation of parathyroid tissue (TPTX+AT and subtotal parathyroidectomy (SPTX are currently considered as standard surgical procedures in the treatment of sHPT. Recurrencerates after TPTX+AT or SPTX are between 10% and 12% (median follow up: 36 months. Recent retrospective studies demonstrated a lower rate of recurrent sHPT of 0–4% after PTX without autotransplantation and thymectomy (TPTX with no higher morbidity when compared to the standard procedures. The observed superiority of TPTX is flawed due to different definitions of outcomes, varying follow up periods and different surgical treatment strategies (with and without thymectomy. Methods/Design Patients with sHPT (intact parathyroid hormone > 10 times above the upper limit of normal on long term dialysis (>12 months will be randomized either to TPTX or TPTX+AT and followed for 36 months. Outcome parameters are recurrence rates of sHPT, frequencies of reoperations due to refractory hypoparathyroidism or recurrent/persistent hyperparathyroidism, postoperative morbidity and mortality and quality of life. 50 patients per group will be randomized in order to obtain relevant frequencies of outcome parameters that will form the basis for a large scale confirmatory multicentred randomized controlled trial. Discussion sHPT is a disease with a high incidence in patients with chronic renal failure. Even a small difference in outcomes will be of clinical relevance. To assess sufficient data about the rate of recurrent sHPT after both methods, a multicentred, randomized controlled trial (MRCT under standardized conditions is mandatory. Due to the existing uncertainties the calculated number of patients necessary in each treatment arm (n > 4000 makes it impossible to

  6. Superior Thyroid Artery Lesion After US-Guided Chemical Parathyroidectomy: Angiographic Diagnosis and Treatment by Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, Franco; Barile, Antonio; Oliveri, Michele; Quadri, Piergiorgio; Ferro, Carlo

    1999-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with a life-threatening thyroid hemorrhage after US-guided chemical parathyroidectomy. The diagnosis was made by angiography followed by immediate embolization of a pseudoaneurysm of the left superior thyroid artery. Embolization controlled the hemorrhage, obviating the need for surgery. The patient made a full recovery with no evidence of further hemorrhage. Pseudoaneurysm of the superior thyroid artery is a rare cause of hemorrhage and percutaneous embolization is an effective method of treatment

  7. Prolonged hypophosphatemia following parathyroidectomy in chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Altun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT is a common problem in patients with end-stage renal disease. In cases with severe and resistant SHPT, surgical parathyroidectomy (PTX is recommended. Hungry bone syndrome (HBS following surgical PTX is most often associated with hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia. The mechanisms for the HBS are not clear, and a method for its prevention has not been established. We present three hemodialysis patients with persistant hypophosphatemia after PTX. In our parathyroidectomized patients, hypocalcemia could be corrected with calcium and vitamin D treatment, but hypophosphatemia continued for eight months in one patient and in two other patients until the last visit (10 and 2 months, respectively. Predisposing factors such as old age, diabetes mellitus and parathyroid adenoma were not found in our patients. All three patients were younger (<35 years old and anuric. Hemodialysis durations were seven, three and two years. In summary, HBS presented with hypocalcemia, and especially hypophosphatemia cannot be developed uncommonly and may persist for a long time following PTX in HD patients.

  8. Impact of radioguided occult lesion localization on the correct excision of malignant breast lesions. Effect of histology and tumor size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, J.P.P.; Garcia Vicente, A.M.; Gonzalez Garcia, B.; Delgado Portela, M.; Cordero Garcia, J.M.; Pardo Garcia, R.; Molino Trinidad, C.; Soriano Castrejon, A.M.; Cortes Romera, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) in the correct location and excision of malignant breast lesions, and analyze if these results are affected by the histology and tumor size. A total of 105 patients with occult breast lesions were studied. The mean age was 55 years. An intralesional dose of 18.5 MBq of 99mTc-labeled macroaggregated human albumin (AMA) was administered using stereotaxic mammography or ultrasound. Surgical resection was carried out with the help of a gammadetector probe. In the histological study, disease-free margin was defined by a distance between the tumor lesion and the surgical margin of more than 1 mm. The possible influence of tumor histology and lesion diameter with respect to free/affected margins was analyzed. Correct radiotracer placement was achieved in 100/105 of the cases (95.2%). In the remaining 5 cases (4.8%), radiotracer placement was incorrect, with 2 of them being malignant lesions that were found by macroscopic inspection, and the other 3 having benign pathology. Among the malignant lesions (44 cases), correct placement of the radiotracer was achieved in 42 cases (95.5%). Of these 42 malignant lesions, in which the ROLL was correctly performed, free surgical margins were obtained in 24 cases (57.1%), while the other 18 (42.9%) had infiltrated surgical margins. The most common histological type among the malignant lesions was invasive ductal carcinoma (71.4%). The histological types with an increased frequency of infiltration of surgical margins were invasive and microinvasive cancer (94.4%). All the affected margins were in lesions greater than 10 mm, and the highest incidence was in those between 20 and 30 mm (55.5%). In our experience, the advantages of the ROLL technique are a precise localization of malignant breast lesions (95.5%) and an increased probability of a complete excision with free margins in more than one half of them. Nevertheless, special

  9. Effect of parathyroidectomy and cinacalcet on quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease-related hyperparathyroidism : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, Willemijn Y.; Dulfer, Roderick R.; Engelsman, Anton F.; Vogt, Liffert; de Borst, Martin H.; van Ginhoven, Tessa M.; Kruijff, Schelto

    2017-01-01

    Background. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a decreased quality of life (QoL), which is attributable in part to ESRD-related hyperparathyroidism (HPT). Both cinacalcet and parathyroidectomy (PTx) are treatments for advanced HPT, but their effects on QoL are unclear. We performed a

  10. Effect of parathyroidectomy and cinacalcet on quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease-related hyperparathyroidism: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, Willemijn Y.; Dulfer, Roderick R.; Engelsman, Anton F.; Vogt, Liffert; de Borst, Martin H.; van Ginhoven, Tessa M.; Kruijff, Schelto

    2017-01-01

    Background. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a decreased quality of life (QoL), which is attributable in part to ESRD-related hyperparathyroidism (HPT). Both cinacalcet and parathyroidectomy (PTx) are treatments for advanced HPT, but their effects on QoL are unclear. We performed a

  11. Amelioration of Sickle Cell Pain after Parathyroidectomy in Two Patients with Concurrent Hyperparathyroidism: An Interesting Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Muthu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with sickle cell disease have high morbidity and healthcare utilization due to repeated painful crises. Some coexisting conditions which cause pain similar to sickle cell disease may go undiagnosed in these patients. We report two adults with concurrent hyperparathyroidism who experienced significant improvement in sickle cell pain following parathyroidectomy thereby pointing to hyperparathyroidism as the principal causative factor for their pain. Meticulous evaluation for parathyroid disorders can be rewarding in sickle cell disease.

  12. Persistent Primary Hyperparathyroidism, Severe Vitamin D Deficiency, and Multiple Pathological Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Mendoza-Zubieta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT refers to the sustained hypercalcemia state detected within the first six months following parathyroidectomy. When it coexists with severe vitamin D deficiency, the effects on bone can be devastating. We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who was sent to this center because of persistent hyperparathyroidism. Her disease had over 3 years of evolution with nephrolithiasis and hip fracture. Parathyroidectomy was performed in her local unit; however, she continued with hypercalcemia, bone pain, and pathological fractures. On admission, the patient was bedridden with multiple deformations by fractures in thoracic and pelvic members. Blood pressure was 100/80, heart rate was 86 per minute, and body mass index was 19 kg/m2. Calcium was 14 mg/dL, parathormone 1648 pg/mL, phosphorus 2.3 mg/dL, creatinine 2.4 mg/dL, urea 59 mg/dL, alkaline phosphatase 1580 U/L, and vitamin D 4 ng/mL. She received parenteral treatment of hypercalcemia and replenishment of vitamin D. The second surgical exploration was radioguided by gamma probe. A retroesophageal adenoma of 4 cm was resected. Conclusion. Persistent hyperparathyroidism with severe vitamin D deficiency can cause catastrophic skeletal bone softening and fractures.

  13. The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons Guidelines for Definitive Management of Primary Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Scott M; Wang, Tracy S; Ruan, Daniel T; Lee, James A; Asa, Sylvia L; Duh, Quan-Yang; Doherty, Gerard M; Herrera, Miguel F; Pasieka, Janice L; Perrier, Nancy D; Silverberg, Shonni J; Solórzano, Carmen C; Sturgeon, Cord; Tublin, Mitchell E; Udelsman, Robert; Carty, Sally E

    2016-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is a common clinical problem for which the only definitive management is surgery. Surgical management has evolved considerably during the last several decades. To develop evidence-based guidelines to enhance the appropriate, safe, and effective practice of parathyroidectomy. A multidisciplinary panel used PubMed to review the medical literature from January 1, 1985, to July 1, 2015. Levels of evidence were determined using the American College of Physicians grading system, and recommendations were discussed until consensus. Initial evaluation should include 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurement, 24-hour urine calcium measurement, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and supplementation for vitamin D deficiency. Parathyroidectomy is indicated for all symptomatic patients, should be considered for most asymptomatic patients, and is more cost-effective than observation or pharmacologic therapy. Cervical ultrasonography or other high-resolution imaging is recommended for operative planning. Patients with nonlocalizing imaging remain surgical candidates. Preoperative parathyroid biopsy should be avoided. Surgeons who perform a high volume of operations have better outcomes. The possibility of multigland disease should be routinely considered. Both focused, image-guided surgery (minimally invasive parathyroidectomy) and bilateral exploration are appropriate operations that achieve high cure rates. For minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring via a reliable protocol is recommended. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is not routinely recommended for known or suspected multigland disease. Ex vivo aspiration of resected parathyroid tissue may be used to confirm parathyroid tissue intraoperatively. Clinically relevant thyroid disease should be assessed preoperatively and managed during parathyroidectomy. Devascularized normal parathyroid tissue should be autotransplanted. Patients should be observed

  14. Comparison of two threshold detection criteria methodologies for determination of probe positivity for intraoperative in situ identification of presumed abnormal 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Gregg J; Povoski, Stephen P; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Lee, Robert; Martin, Edward W

    2014-09-13

    Intraoperative in situ identification of (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery remains a significant challenge for surgeons. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method versus the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method for determination of gamma detection probe positivity for intraoperative in situ identification of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites in a manner that was independent of the specific type of gamma detection probe used. From among 52 patients undergoing appropriate in situ evaluation of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during (18)F-FDG-directed surgery using 6 available gamma detection probe systems, a total of 401 intraoperative gamma detection probe measurement sets of in situ counts per second measurements were cumulatively taken. For the 401 intraoperative gamma detection probe measurement sets, probe positivity was successfully met by the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method in 150/401 instances (37.4%) and by the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method in 259/401 instances (64.6%) (P < 0.001). Likewise, the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method detected true positive results at target-to-background ratios much lower than the 1.5-to-1 target-to-background ratio of the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method. The three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method was significantly better than the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method for determination of gamma detection probe positivity for intraoperative in situ detection of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery. This finding may be extremely important for reshaping the ongoing and future research and development of gamma detection probe systems that are necessary for optimizing the in situ detection of radioisotopes of higher-energy gamma photon emissions used during radioguided oncologic surgery.

  15. Intraoperative probe detecting β{sup −} decays in brain tumour radio-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E., E-mail: elena.solfaroli@roma1.infn.it [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Bocci, V.; Chiodi, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Collamati, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dip. Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); Donnarumma, R.; Faccini, R.; Mancini Terracciano, C. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ‘E. Fermi’, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I.; Muraro, S. [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); Recchia, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Rucinski, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dip. Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); Russomando, A. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); Toppi, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Traini, G. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Morganti, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    Radio-guided surgery (RGS) is a technique to intraoperatively detect tumour remnants, favouring a radical resection. Exploiting β{sup −} emitting tracers provides a higher signal to background ratio compared to the established technique with γ radiation, allowing the extension of the RGS applicability range. We developed and tested a detector based on para-terphenyl scintillator with high sensitivity to low energy electrons and almost transparent to γs to be used as intraoperative probe for RGS with β{sup −} emitting tracer. Portable read out electronics was customised to match the surgeon needs. This probe was used for preclinical test on specific phantoms and a test on “ex vivo” specimens from patients affected by meningioma showing very promising results for the application of this new technique on brain tumours. In this paper, the prototype of the intraoperative probe and the tests are discussed; then, the results on meningioma are used to make predictions on the performance of the probe detecting residuals of a more challenging and more interesting brain tumour: the glioma.

  16. The deceptive concept of hypoparathyroidism and recurrence after parathyroidectomy in dialysis patients: are we offering a Procrustean bed to some patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Fabio Luiz DE Menezes; Brescia, Marilia D'Elboux Guimaraes; Nascimento, Climério Pereira; Massoni, Ledo Mazzei; Arap, Sérgio Samir; Santos, Stênio Roberto Castro Lima; Goldenstein, Patrícia Taschner; Bueno, Rodrigo Oliveira; Custodio, Melani Ribeiro; Jorgetti, Vanda; Moyses, Rosa Maria Affonso

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the frequency of hypoparathyroidism and of its recurrence after parathyroidectomy in dialysis patients according to different existing classifications. we conducted a retrospective study of 107 consecutive dialysis patients undergoing total parathyroidectomy with immediate autograft in a tertiary hospital from 2006 to 2010. We studied the changes in PTH levels in the postoperative period over time. Were grouped patients according to different PTH levels targets recommended according to the dosage method and by the American and Japanese Nephrology Societies, and by an International Experts Consortium. after parathyroidectomy, there was sustained reduction in serum calcium and phosphatemia. The median value of PTH decreased from 1904pg/ml to 55pg/ml in 12 months. Depending on the considered target level, the proportion of patients below the target ranged between 17% and 87%. On the other hand, the proportion of patients with levels above the target ranged from 3% to 37%. the application of different recommendations for PTH levels after parathyroidectomy in dialysis patients may lead to incorrect classifications of hypoparathyroidism or recurrent hyperparathyroidism and resultin discordant therapeutic conducts. analisar as frequências de hipoparatireoidismo e de recidiva do hiperparatireoidismo após paratireoidectomia em pacientes dialíticos de acordo com diferentes classificações existentes. estudo retrospectivo de 107 pacientes dialíticos consecutivamente submetidos à paratireoidectomia total com autoenxerto imediato em um hospital terciário no período de 2006 a 2010. A variação dos níveis de PTH no pós-operatório foi estudada ao longo do tempo. Os pacientes foram agrupados de acordo com diferentes metas de níveis de PTH recomendados de acordo com o método de dosagem e pelas sociedades de nefrologia americana, japonesa e de um consórcio internacional de especialistas. após a paratireoidectomia, houve redução sustentada da calcemia e

  17. Radio-guided localization of clinically occult breast lesions (ROLL): a DGH experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thind, C.R.; Desmond, S.; Harris, O.; Nadeem, R.; Chagla, L.S.; Audisio, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Wire-guided localization (WGL) of clinically occult breast lesions is a well established technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate radio-guided localization (ROLL) within the breast screening service of a district general hospital. METHOD: The study group comprised 70 women who underwent ROLL under US and stereotaxis. This required an injection of Technetium-labelled colloidal albumen into the impalpable breast lesion. The women then proceeded to theatre, where localization was achieved with the use of a gamma probe. The lesion was identified by the presence of a high signal, caused by the injected isotope. The results of 70 consecutive cases in which a breast lesion was localized using ROLL were compared with the results of the latest 70 WGLs. RESULTS: All 140 lesions were successfully localized. However, the change in technique from WGL to ROLL offered significant benefits to patients. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that ROLL is a practical and reliable localization technique. It can be implemented in hospital units without using valuable gamma camera time. The cost compares well with WGL. There is an improved cosmetic outcome for patients, and the very small quantity of radioactivity used is safe for both patients and staff

  18. Subtotal parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism. Long-term results in 292 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloyan, E.; Lawrence, A.M.; Oslapas, R.; Shah, K.H.; Ernst, K.; Hofmann, C.

    1983-01-01

    Subtotal parathyroidectomy was performed in a consecutive series of 292 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. We evaluated the long-term postoperative results during a period of 16 years. Patients ranged in age from 14 to 83 years and included 176 women and 116 men. Of these, 16% had a history of exposure to radiation in childhood or adolescence, while thyroid disease requiring some form of thyroidectomy coexisted in 91 (31%) of the patients. Histologic information on three or more parathyroid glands was obtained in 73% of the cases. We considered 285 patients (97.6%) cured after their first operation. The remaining seven patients (2.4%) had persistent hyperparathyroidism. However, five were cured after a sternum-splitting mediastinal exploration and one after a second neck exploration. The seventh remains hypercalcemic despite a subsequent mediastinal exploration. Temporary postoperative hypoparathyroidism occurred in 10% of our cases and permanent hypoparathyroidism in 1%. There have been no instances of recurrent hyperparathyroidism

  19. The changes of bone mineralization after parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przedlacki, J.; Nawrot, I.; Chudzinski, W.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the changes of bone demineralization in the patient after parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism. Bone mineralization was evaluated by Lunar DPX-L equipment in lumbar spine, femoral neck, radius and total skeleton area in 3 months intervals during 18 months period. Because of transient after surgical hypocalcemia she has received active metabolite of vitamin D - Alfacalcidolum during one year. After removal of parathyroid adenoma there was disappearance of clinical and biochemical signs of primary hyperparathyroidism. At the same time there was total normalization of bone mineral density in lumbar spine, femoral neck, ultradistal site of radius and total area. There was partial normalization of bone mineralization in radius shaft. The surgery of adenoma in primary hyperparathyroidism with transient treatment with active metabolite of vitamin D is successful therapy of bone demineralization in this disease. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs

  20. Rapid intraoperative parathyroid hormone assay--more than just a comfort measure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanif, F

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) has been embraced as an acceptable therapeutic approach to primary hyperparathyroidism. Preoperative sestamibi scanning has facilitated this technique. Here we evaluate the addition of a rapid intraoperative parathyroid hormone (iPTH) assay for patients undergoing MIRP. METHODS: A series of 51 patients underwent sestamibi localization of parathyroid glands followed by MIRP for primary hyperparathyroidism. Using peripheral venous samples, iPTH levels were measured prior to gland excision, as well as post-excision at 5, 10, and 15 minutes, taking a 50% reduction in iPTH level as indicative of complete excision. Next, changes in serum iPTH were compared with preoperative and postoperative changes in serum calcium, as well as levels of intraoperative ex-vivo radiation counts taken by hand-held gamma probe. RESULTS: In this series, a drop of greater than 50% in iPTH levels was observed in 94% of patients (n=48). Moreover, a significant drop in iPTH occurred within 10 minutes of excision in the majority (n=42) of cases (P<0.004). Changes in iPTH were comparable with the therapeutic reduction in calcium levels, as well as with the change in intraoperative ex-vivo gamma counts. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that the addition of an iPTH assay to MIRP provides a quick and reliable intraoperative diagnostic modality in confirming correct adenoma removal. Moreover, it precludes the requirement of frozen section.

  1. Parathyroidectomy in chronic kidney disease patients in Argentina: pre surgical studies, types of surgery, recurrence and persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Peñalba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parathyroidectomy (PTx is the selecte treatment for patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, refractory to medical treatment. There is not enough information about this procedure in Argentina, that is the reason why we performed this study. Methods: 255 patients with PTx were included from the year 2003 to 2007 on a voluntary register. Studies of pre-surgical localization, phosphocalcic metabolism laboratories before and after surgery were evaluated, and the type of surgical technique used. The persistence and recurrence of post-surgical hyperparathyroidism was analyzed. Results: The PTx rate was 2,7/1000 patients year. 83% of the patients had neck echography and 59% Sestamibi scans with Tc 99. There was a positive correlation (p<0,001 between the number of detected glands by echography and Sestamibi. The parathyroidectomy performed was: subtotal in 77%, total with self-implant in 14% and total without self-implant in 9%. There were significant falls of Ca and P, Alkaline Phosphatase and PTH (1744±788 pg/ml to 247±450 pg/ml; p<0.0001 post-surgical. 2.4 ±2,5 months after the PTx, 72% of patients had PTH <2 50 pg/ml, 19,8% had persistence and 8,3% had recurrence. According to the type of surgery, the persistence and recurrence were for subtotal PTx 22% and 8,3%, total PTx with implant 11% and 11%, and total PTx without selfimplant 13% and 4% respectively. The performance of the Sestamibi scan did not affect the PTx results. No noticeable differences were observed among the centers for persistence and recurrence. Conclusions: The PTx rate was very low, echography was the preferred method of pre-surgical localization, and subtotal PTx was the most used surgical technique. PTx was successful in most of the patients, and persistence and recurrence were not related to the technique.

  2. Exploring the Effect of Parathyroidectomy for Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism After Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Emad; Florman, Sandy; Alabbas, Haythem; Abdullah, Obai; McGee, Jennifer; Noureldine, Salem; Slakey, Douglas; Zhang, Rubin

    2010-01-01

    Tertiary hyperparathyroidism (tHPT) usually regresses after renal transplantation. Persistent tHPT after successful renal transplantation may require parathyroidectomy (PTX). PTX has been reported to be associated with deterioration of renal function and graft survival. We retrospectively analyzed 794 kidney transplants performed at our center with at least 3 years of follow-up to examine the effect of PTX on the renal function and graft survival. Forty-nine of the 794 renal transplant recipients were diagnosed with hyperparathyroidism (HPT) before transplant. Nineteen of 49 patients had persistent tHPT and underwent PTX after kidney transplants. Patients with HPT and non-HPT had similar 3-year graft survival (88% versus 84%, P = 0.51). PTX was associated with a decreased glomerular filtration rate at 3 years (44.7 ± 20.0 versus 57.7 ± 23.7 mL/min, P = 0.04); however, there was no statistical difference in the 3-year graft survival (71% versus 88%, P = 0.06). PTX in renal transplant recipients seems to be a safe and effective therapy for persistent tHPT. PTX may be associated with worsening glomerular filtration rate, but it may not be associated with significantly decreased long-term graft survival. PMID:20234299

  3. Clinical study of bone changes after parathyroidectomy among patients maintained by hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manita, Kyouichi; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Mataga, Izumi; Kato, Joji

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen patients maintained by hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism were mainly studied using Tc 99m-MDP bone scintigraphy and lamina dura index (LDI) which was judged by dental films. After parathyroidectomy (PTX), the most prominent change appeared on the calvaria, maxilla, and mandible in scintigrams. Intensity of Tc 99m-MDP accumulation was represented by using a quantitative method of bone-to-soft tissue uptake ratio (4 hr-B/St ratio). 4 hr-B/St ratio gradually decreased and became normal within one and a half years after PTX. The accumulation of Tc 99m-MDP on the calvaria may reveal the status of bone metabolism in the patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Also, LDIes gradually decreased during 4 through 6 months after PTX. However it was considered that these indexes might need a long term to return to normal range. We couldn't differenciate which method was superior in the diagnostic value for detecting early skeletal changes between roentogenograms and bone scintigraphy as a indicator of post-PTX bone improvement. However, bone scintigraphy should be added to conventional examinations for following the courses of patients that underwent PTX because this procedure has many other advantages. (author)

  4. Acute hypocalcemia following kidney transplantation may depend on the type of remote parathyroidectomy: a retrospective cohort study
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Malorie; Bautista, Josef; Occhiogrosso, Rachel; Scott-Sheldon, Lori Aj; Gohh, Reginald

    2017-06-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common complication of chronic kidney disease. When medical management fails, parathyroidectomy (PTX) is a treatment option. The two most common types are subtotal PTX and total PTX with autotransplantation (AT). To date, there is no consensus as to which procedure is preferable, especially in patients who are candidates for future kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to identify if the type of PTX is a risk factor for acute postrenal transplant (postRTX) hypocalcemia and a concern for problems with long-term calcium homeostasis. Renal transplant recipients at Rhode Island Hospital from 2005 to 2014 were screened for prior PTX. Out of 297 participants, 11 patients met the criteria. They were further divided into subtotal PTX (n = 5) vs. total PTX+AT (n = 6). Immediate postoperative (14 days) and long-term (1 year) calcium levels were followed and analyzed. Linear growth models were used to determine the effects of type of parathyroidectomy (subtotal PTX, total PTX+AT) alone on hypocalcemia over time. In these models, pretransplant levels of calcium and PTH were included as covariates. Baseline characteristics showed that prerenal transplant (preRTX) parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were lower in total PTX+AT vs. subtotal PTX (3.5 vs. 247.2 mg/dL, p Figure 1) but not at 1 year postRTX (β = 0.035, SE = 0.075, p = 0.640). This study suggests that total PTX+AT increases the risk for acute postRTX hypocalcemia but has no effect on long-term calcium homeostasis. We speculate that the acuity of the hypocalcemia may be compounded by high-dose glucocorticoids required for induction, in addition to the preoperative undetectable PTH. Thus, prior to RTX, physicians should take into account the type of remote PTX. If a patient had a total PTX+AT, then postRTX hypocalcemia is likely to occur.
.

  5. Severe hyperparathyroidism in patient with right thyroid hemiagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Mustafa; Ozkul, Faruk; Barutcu, Ebru Cakan; Arik, Kasim; Adam, Gurhan; Bilen, Yildiz; Ukinc, Kubilay; Asik, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Thyroid hemiagenesis is an infrequent congenital disorder which is rarely associated with hyperparathyroidism. We present a case of an adult woman who presented with hyperparathyroidism and ipsilateral thyroid hemiagenesis. Parathyroid adenoma was excised by minimal invasive parathyroidectomy.

  6. Near total parathyroidectomy is effective therapy for tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewberry, Lindel Krige; Weber, Collin; Sharma, Jyotirmay

    2014-07-01

    Tertiary hyperparathyroidism (3°HPT) is defined as persistent hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcemia after renal transplantation. Near total parathyroidectomy (NTPTX) is the current standard for surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to identify outcomes of NTPTX. A retrospective review was conducted of surgeries performed between 1994 and 2013. NTPTX resulted in resolution of 96.9 per cent of patients' hypercalcemia at a median follow-up of three years (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to 8). However, 3.1 per cent of patients remained hypercalcemic with a mean calcium of 10.5 ± 0.2 mg/dL. A total of 78.4 per cent of patients had parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels below 250 pg/mL at a median follow-up of two years (IQR, 2 to 8). The remaining 21.6 per cent had a median PTH of 535 (IQR, 345 to 857). PTH levels dropped from a median of 745 (IQR, 285.75 to 1594.25) pg/mL to 97 (IQR, 60 to 285) pg/mL one month post-NTPTX (P < 0.01). The most frequent complication was transient hypocalcemia in 27.1 per cent of patients, but no patients became permanently hypocalcemic. In the 1-month postoperative period, only one patient had a cardiac complication, and there was 0 per cent all-cause mortality. Glomerular filtration rate fell from 57.9 ± 28.3 mL/min pre-NTPTX to 53.2 ± 27.5 mL/min at 1-year post-NTPTX (P < 0.01). NTPTX effectively treats hypercalcemia in 3°HPT. However, PTH remains elevated (greater than 250) in 21.6 per cent of patients.

  7. Surgeon-Performed Ultrasound as Preoperative Localization Study in Patients with Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginhoven, T. M.; Morks, A. N.; Schepers, T.; de Graaf, P. W.; Smit, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for single-gland primary hyperparathyroidism. However, the exact location of the abnormal gland has to be established. Sestamibi scintigraphy, computed tomography and ultrasound (US) are commonly used modalities. We describe

  8. Parathyroidectomy is underused in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Irene; Schneider, David F; Leverson, Glen; Foley, David; Sippel, Rebecca; Chen, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is the only curative treatment for tertiary hyperparathyroidism (3HPT). With the introduction of calcimimetics (cinacalcet), PTX can sometimes be delayed or avoided. The purpose of this study was to determine the current incidence of utilization of PTX in patients with posttransplant 3HPT with the advent of cinacalcet. We evaluated renal transplant patients between January 1, 2004, and June 30, 2012, with a minimum of 24 months follow-up who had persistent allograft function. Patients with an increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH) at 1 year after successful renal transplantation with normocalcemia or hypercalcemia were defined as having 3HPT. A multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to determine factors associated with undergoing PTX. We identified 618 patients with 3HPT, only 41 (6.6%) of whom underwent PTX. Patients with higher levels of serum calcium (P < .001) and PTH (P = .002) posttransplant were more likely to be referred for PTX. Importantly, those who underwent PTX had serum calcium and PTH values distributed more closely to the normal range on most recent follow-up. PTX was not associated with rejection (P = .400) or with worsened allograft function (P = .163). PTX seems to be underused in patients with 3HPT at our institution. PTX is associated with high cure rates, improved serum calcium and PTH levels, and is not associated with rejection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  10. The effect of parathyroidectomy on patient survival in secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Kerstin M; Akaberi, Shahriar; Isaksson, Elin; Reihnér, Eva; Rylance, Rebecca; Prütz, Karl-Göran; Clyne, Naomi; Almquist, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common condition in patients with end-stage renal disease and is associated with osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Despite improved medical treatment, parathyroidectomy (PTX) is still necessary for many patients on renal replacement therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PTX on patient survival. A nested index-referent study was performed within the Swedish Renal Registry (SRR). Patients on maintenance dialysis and transplantation at the time of PTX were analysed separately. The PTX patients in each of these strata were matched for age, sex and underlying renal diseases with up to five referent patients who had not undergone PTX. To calculate survival time and hazard ratios, indexes and referents were assigned the calendar date (d) of the PTX of the index patient. The risk of death after PTX was calculated using crude and adjusted Cox proportional hazards regressions. There were 20 056 patients in the SRR between 1991 and 2009. Of these, 579 (423 on dialysis and 156 with a renal transplant at d) incident patients with PTX were matched with 1234/892 non-PTX patients. The adjusted relative risk of death was a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65-0.99] for dialysis patients at d who had undergone PTX compared with matched patients who had not. Corresponding results for the patients with a renal allograft at d were an HR of 1.10 (95% CI 0.71-1.70). PTX was associated with improved survival in patients on maintenance dialysis but not in patients with renal allograft. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and intraoperative gamma probe detection in the localisation and treatment of pancreatic insulinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, Nelson K.; Macdonald, William B.; Dunne, Marina L.; Rao, Sudhakar

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Aims: We report a case of insulinoma that was successfully enucleated under radio-guidance after an initial unsuccessful laparotomy. This case highlights the utility of Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy (SRS) and gamma probe in the localisation and treatment of neuroendocrine tumours. Methods: The patient presented with recurrent hypoglycaemia. An abdominal CT scan identified a lesion in the uncinate process of the pancreas, however, laparotomy with use of intraoperative ultrasound failed to localise the lesion. SRS with SPECTICT was then requested by the surgical team with a view to radio-guided surgery. Results: SRS demonstrated an octreotide-avid tumour in the posterior uncinate process of the pancreas, and confirmed suitability for radio-guided surgery. At re-exploration, the surgeon was again unable to palpate the lesion or localise it with intraoperative ultrasound, however, the lesion was successfully detected and removed with the use of a gamma probe. A postoperative SRS confirmed complete excision and histopathology was diagnostic of insulinoma. Conclusion: This case highlights the utility of SRS in the intraoperative localisation and surgical excision of neuroendocrine tumours. The lesion was unable to be localised clinically or with intraoperative ultrasound but was successfully detected with scintigraphic techniques. The surgical team acknowledge that the use of a gamma probe enabled enucleation of the insulinoma, which obviated the need for an invasive Whipple's procedure.

  12. Novel technology of molecular radio-guidance for lymph node dissection in recurrent prostate cancer by PSMA-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Isabel; Horn, Thomas; Eiber, Matthias; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Maurer, Tobias

    2018-04-01

    Recently, prostate-specific membrane antigen-radioguided surgery (PSMA-RGS) has been introduced as a promising new and individual treatment concept in patients with localised recurrent prostate cancer (PC). In the following, we want to review our experience with PSMA-RGS in patients with localised biochemical recurrent PC. A non-systematic review of the literature was carried out with focus on technical and logistical aspects of PSMA-RGS. Furthermore, published data on intraoperative detection of metastatic lesions compared to preoperative PSMA-PET and postoperative histopathology, postoperative complications as well as oncological follow-up data are summarized. Finally, relevant aspects on prerequisites for PSMA-RGS, patient selection, and the potential benefit of additional salvage radiotherapy or potential future applications of robotic PSMA-RGS with drop-in γ-probes are discussed. First results show that PSMA-RGS is very sensitive and specific in tracking suspicious lesions intraoperatively. Prerequisite for patient selection and localisation of tumour recurrence is a positive Ga-HBED-CC PSMA positron-emission tomography (PET) scan with preferably only singular soft tissue or lymph node recurrence after primary treatment. Furthermore, PSMA-RGS has the potential to positively influence oncological outcome. PSMA-RGS seems to be of high value in patients with localised PC recurrence for exact localisation and resection of oftentimes small metastatic lesions using intraoperative and ex vivo γ-probe measurements. However, patient identification on the basis of Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET imaging as well as clinical parameters is crucial to obtain satisfactory results.

  13. Survival after parathyroidectomy in chronic hemodialysis patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Diana; Racasan, Simona; Kacso, Ina Maria; Rusu, Crina; Potra, Alina; Bondor, Cosmina; Patiu, Ioan Mihai; Gherman-Căprioară, Mirela

    2015-11-01

    The life for end-stage renal disease patients has remarkably improved in the last years. Although mineral and bone disorders remain as unsolved complication, in severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT), the ultimate treatment is parathyroidectomy (PTX). It is an old treatment, but there are still insufficient data regarding survival after PTX. The study goals were to compare 2-year mortality and morbidity after PTX in surgically versus medically treated sHPT and to compare the efficacy and safety in subtotal versus total PTX in a cohort of patients receiving hemodialysis (HD). This prospective, longitudinal study was carried out on a cohort of chronic HD patients with severe sHPT (iPTH over 700 pg/ml). Among the overall HD population, 26 patients underwent PTX. This group was compared to a control group treated with specific drugs. Laboratory parameters, specific symptoms and mortality were registered after 24 months of follow-up for each group. The subgroups of subtotal and total PTX patients were also compared. All average values of mineral markers were significantly reduced after PTX, as a proof that surgical treatment was effective. The reduction in mineral markers and the improvement in symptoms and mortality rates were similar after total and subtotal PTX. Bone pain was significantly lower in patients after PTX than in those drug treated (p = 0.0005), but not muscle weakness and itching. Survival at 2 years was better in patients surgically treated (PTX) despite significantly higher mean baseline values of iPTH, Ca and ALP compared to patients medically treated (p = 0.03). We compared clinical and laboratory outcomes in HD patients with severe sHPT. Mortality, bone pain and mineral markers were improved by PTX. Total and subtotal PTX had similar clinical outcomes.

  14. Radioguided occult lesion localization versus wire-guided localization for non-palpable breast lesions: randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocal, Koray; Dag, Ahmet; Turkmenoglu, Ozgur; Yucel, Erdem; Gunay, Emel Ceylan; Duce, Meltem Nass

    2011-01-01

    Aim: this prospective randomized clinical study was conducted to compare radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) with wire-guided localization to evaluate optimum localization techniques for non-palpable breast lesions. Methods: a total of 108 patients who were undergoing an excisional biopsy for non-palpable breast lesions requiring pathologic diagnosis were randomly assigned to the ROLL group (n 56) and wire-guided localization group (n 52). In the study, patients' characteristics, radiological abnormalities, radiological technique of localization, localization time, operation time, weight of the excised specimen, clearance margins, pathological diagnosis and perioperative complications were assessed. Results: there were no differences between the two groups in terms of age, radiological abnormalities and localization technique (p = non-significant for all). ROLL techniques resulted in 100% retrieval of the lesions; for the wire-guided localization technique, 98%. Both localization time and operation time were significantly reduced with the ROLL technique (p = significant for all). The weight of the specimen was significantly lower in the ROLL group than in the wire-guided localization group (p = significant). The overall complication rate and pathological diagnosis were similar for both groups (p = non-significant for all). Clear margins were achieved in 91% of ROLL patients and in 53% of wire-guided localization patients, and the difference was significant. Conclusions: the present study indicated that the ROLL technique is as effective as wire-guided localization for the excision of non-palpable breast lesions. In addition, ROLL improved the outcomes by reducing localization and operation time, preventing healthy tissue excision and achieving clearer margins. (author)

  15. Radioguided occult lesion localization versus wire-guided localization for non-palpable breast lesions: randomized controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocal, Koray; Dag, Ahmet; Turkmenoglu, Ozgur; Yucel, Erdem [Mersin University (Turkey). Medical Faculty. Dept. of General Surgery; Gunay, Emel Ceylan [Mersin University (Turkey). Medical Faculty. Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Duce, Meltem Nass [Mersin University (Turkey). Medical Faculty. Dept. of Radiology

    2011-07-01

    Aim: this prospective randomized clinical study was conducted to compare radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) with wire-guided localization to evaluate optimum localization techniques for non-palpable breast lesions. Methods: a total of 108 patients who were undergoing an excisional biopsy for non-palpable breast lesions requiring pathologic diagnosis were randomly assigned to the ROLL group (n 56) and wire-guided localization group (n 52). In the study, patients' characteristics, radiological abnormalities, radiological technique of localization, localization time, operation time, weight of the excised specimen, clearance margins, pathological diagnosis and perioperative complications were assessed. Results: there were no differences between the two groups in terms of age, radiological abnormalities and localization technique (p = non-significant for all). ROLL techniques resulted in 100% retrieval of the lesions; for the wire-guided localization technique, 98%. Both localization time and operation time were significantly reduced with the ROLL technique (p = significant for all). The weight of the specimen was significantly lower in the ROLL group than in the wire-guided localization group (p = significant). The overall complication rate and pathological diagnosis were similar for both groups (p = non-significant for all). Clear margins were achieved in 91% of ROLL patients and in 53% of wire-guided localization patients, and the difference was significant. Conclusions: the present study indicated that the ROLL technique is as effective as wire-guided localization for the excision of non-palpable breast lesions. In addition, ROLL improved the outcomes by reducing localization and operation time, preventing healthy tissue excision and achieving clearer margins. (author)

  16. A hand-held imaging probe for radio-guided surgery: physical performance and preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitre, S.; Menard, L.; Charon, Y.; Solal, M.; Garbay, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in the specificity of radiopharmaceutical compounds have been paralleled by an upsurge of interest in developing small detectors to assist surgeons in localizing tumour tissue during surgery. This study reports the main technical features and physical characteristics of a new hand-held gamma camera dedicated to accurate and real-time intra-operative imaging. First clinical experience is also reported. The POCI (Per-operative Compact Imager) camera consists of a head module composed of a high-resolution interchangeable lead collimator and a CsI(Na) crystal plate optically coupled to an intensified position-sensitive diode. The current prototype has a 40-mm diameter field of view, an outer diameter of 9.5 cm, a length of 9 cm and a weight of 1.2 kg. Overall detector imaging characteristics were evaluated by technetium-99m phantom measurements. Three patients with breast cancer previously scheduled to undergo sentinel lymph node detection were selected for the preliminary clinical experience. Preoperative images of the lymphatic basin obtained using the POCI camera were compared with conventional transcutaneous explorations using a non-imaging gamma probe. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) spatial resolution was investigated in both air and scattering medium; when the phantom was placed in contact with the collimator, the POCI camera exhibited a 3.2 mm FWHM. The corresponding sensitivity was 290 cps/MBq. The preliminary clinical results showed that POCI was able to predict the number and location of all SLNs. In one case, two deep radioactive nodes missed by the gamma probe were detected on the intra-operative images. This very initial experience demonstrates that the physical performance of the POCI camera is adequate for radio-guided surgery. These results are sufficiently encouraging to prompt further evaluation studies designed to determine the specific and optimal clinical role of intra-operative imaging devices

  17. Intraoperative radioguidance with a portable gamma camera: a novel technique for laparoscopic sentinel node localisation in urological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, L.; Valdes Olmos, R.A.; Vogel, W.V.; Sivro, F.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Meinhardt, W.; Bex, A.; Poel, H.G. van der; Horenblas, S.

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the feasibility of intraoperative radioguidance with a portable gamma camera during laparoscopic sentinel node (SN) procedures in urological malignancies. We evaluated the use of the intraoperative portable gamma camera in 20 patients: 16 patients with prostate carcinoma (PCC), 2 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RC) and 2 patients with testicular cancer (TC). Intra/peritumoural injection of 99m Tc-nanocolloid ( 99m Tc) was followed by planar lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT/CT and marking of SN levels. Before laparoscopy a 125 I seed was fixed on the laparoscopic gamma probe as a pointer of SN seeking. The portable gamma camera was set to display the 99m Tc signal for SN localisation and the 125 I signal for SN seeking. Matching of these signals on screen indicated exact SN localisation, and consequently this SN was removed. The mean injected dose was 218 MBq in PCC, 228 MBq in RC and 88 MBq in TC. Pelvic SN were visualised in all PCC patients, with uncommonly located SN in seven patients. SN metastases were found in seven patients (one in a uncommonly located SN). Both RC patients and TC patients had para-aortic SN, which were all tumour free. A total of 59 SN were removed. The portable gamma camera enabled real-time SN display/identification in 18 patients (90%). The use of a portable gamma camera in combination with a laparoscopic gamma probe incorporates intraoperative real-time imaging with improved SN identification in urological malignancies. This procedure might also be useful for SN identification of other deep draining malignancies. (orig.)

  18. New applications of radio guided surgery in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Pinto, Paula Nicole Vieira; Martins, Eduardo Bruno Lobato; Chojniak, Rubens [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Image], e-mail: almirgvb@yahoo.com.br; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    Objective: To report oncological cases (excluding those related to breast cancer) for which radioguided surgery has been used in combination with the Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique. Introduction: Radioguided surgery enables a surgeon to identify lesions or tissues that have been preoperatively marked with radioactive substances. The Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique has been widely used to identify the sentinel lymph node and occult lesions in patients with breast cancer. However, few studies have reported the use of this technique for non-breast cancer pathologies. Methodology: In all cases, injection of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid was performed, directly inside or near by the suspicious lesion, guided by ultrasound or computed tomography, up to 36 hours prior to the surgical procedure. Intraoperative lesion detection was carried out using a gamma-probe. Results: We report five oncology cases in which preoperative markings of the lesions were carried out using the Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique. The patients presented with the following: recurrence of renal cell carcinoma, cervical recurrence of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, recurrence of retroperitoneal sarcoma, lesions of the popliteal fossa, and recurrence of rhabdomyosarcoma of a thigh. In each case, the lesions that were marked preoperatively were ultimately successfully excised. Conclusions: Radioguided surgery has proven to be a safe and effective alternative for the management of oncology patients. The Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique can be useful in selected cases where suspect lesions may be difficult to identify intraoperatively, due to their dimensions or anatomical location. The procedure allows for more conservative excisions and reduces the surgery-related morbidity. (author)

  19. iROLL: does 3-D radioguided occult lesion localization improve surgical management in early-stage breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemel, Christina; Kajdi, Georg W.; Schmid, Jan; Buck, Andreas K.; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Cramer, Andreas; Grossmann, Christoph; Grimminger, Hanns-Joerg [Missionsaerztliches Klinikum Wuerzburg, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Malzahn, Uwe [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Biometry, Wuerzburg (Germany); Lamp, Nora [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Langen, Heinz-Jakob [Missionsaerztliches Klinikum Wuerzburg, Department of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of 3-D radioguided occult lesion localization (iROLL) and to compare iROLL with wire-guided localization (WGL) in patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). WGL (standard procedure) and iROLL in combination with SLNB were performed in 31 women (mean age 65.1 ± 11.2 years) with early-stage breast cancer and clinically negative axillae. Patient comfort in respect of both methods was assessed using a ten point scale. SLNB and iROLL were guided by freehand SPECT (fhSPECT). The results of the novel 3-D image-based method were compared with those of WGL, ultrasound-based lesion localization, and histopathology. iROLL successfully detected the malignant primary and at least one sentinel lymph node in 97 % of patients. In a single patient (3 %), only iROLL, and not WGL, enabled lesion localization. The variability between fhSPECT and ultrasound-based depth localization of breast lesions was low (1.2 ± 1.4 mm). Clear margins were achieved in 81 % of the patients; however, precise prediction of clear histopathological surgical margins was not feasible using iROLL. Patients rated iROLL as less painful than WGL with a pain score 0.8 ± 1.2 points (p < 0.01) lower than the score for iROLL. iROLL is a well-tolerated and feasible technique for localizing early-stage breast cancer in the course of breast-conserving surgery, and is a suitable replacement for WGL. As a single image-based procedure for localization of breast lesions and sentinel nodes, iROLL may improve the entire surgical procedure. However, no advantages of the image-guided procedure were found with regard to prediction of complete tumour resection. (orig.)

  20. iROLL: does 3-D radioguided occult lesion localization improve surgical management in early-stage breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, Christina; Cramer, Andreas; Grossmann, Christoph; Kajdi, Georg W; Malzahn, Uwe; Lamp, Nora; Langen, Heinz-Jakob; Schmid, Jan; Buck, Andreas K; Grimminger, Hanns-Jörg; Herrmann, Ken

    2015-10-01

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of 3-D radioguided occult lesion localization (iROLL) and to compare iROLL with wire-guided localization (WGL) in patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). WGL (standard procedure) and iROLL in combination with SLNB were performed in 31 women (mean age 65.1 ± 11.2 years) with early-stage breast cancer and clinically negative axillae. Patient comfort in respect of both methods was assessed using a ten point scale. SLNB and iROLL were guided by freehand SPECT (fhSPECT). The results of the novel 3-D image-based method were compared with those of WGL, ultrasound-based lesion localization, and histopathology. iROLL successfully detected the malignant primary and at least one sentinel lymph node in 97% of patients. In a single patient (3%), only iROLL, and not WGL, enabled lesion localization. The variability between fhSPECT and ultrasound-based depth localization of breast lesions was low (1.2 ± 1.4 mm). Clear margins were achieved in 81% of the patients; however, precise prediction of clear histopathological surgical margins was not feasible using iROLL. Patients rated iROLL as less painful than WGL with a pain score 0.8 ± 1.2 points (p localizing early-stage breast cancer in the course of breast-conserving surgery, and is a suitable replacement for WGL. As a single image-based procedure for localization of breast lesions and sentinel nodes, iROLL may improve the entire surgical procedure. However, no advantages of the image-guided procedure were found with regard to prediction of complete tumour resection.

  1. Intraoperative radioguidance with a portable gamma camera: a novel technique for laparoscopic sentinel node localisation in urological malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeeren, L.; Valdes Olmos, R.A.; Vogel, W.V.; Sivro, F.; Hoefnagel, C.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meinhardt, W.; Bex, A.; Poel, H.G. van der; Horenblas, S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    Our aim was to assess the feasibility of intraoperative radioguidance with a portable gamma camera during laparoscopic sentinel node (SN) procedures in urological malignancies. We evaluated the use of the intraoperative portable gamma camera in 20 patients: 16 patients with prostate carcinoma (PCC), 2 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RC) and 2 patients with testicular cancer (TC). Intra/peritumoural injection of {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid ({sup 99m}Tc) was followed by planar lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT/CT and marking of SN levels. Before laparoscopy a {sup 125}I seed was fixed on the laparoscopic gamma probe as a pointer of SN seeking. The portable gamma camera was set to display the {sup 99m}Tc signal for SN localisation and the {sup 125}I signal for SN seeking. Matching of these signals on screen indicated exact SN localisation, and consequently this SN was removed. The mean injected dose was 218 MBq in PCC, 228 MBq in RC and 88 MBq in TC. Pelvic SN were visualised in all PCC patients, with uncommonly located SN in seven patients. SN metastases were found in seven patients (one in a uncommonly located SN). Both RC patients and TC patients had para-aortic SN, which were all tumour free. A total of 59 SN were removed. The portable gamma camera enabled real-time SN display/identification in 18 patients (90%). The use of a portable gamma camera in combination with a laparoscopic gamma probe incorporates intraoperative real-time imaging with improved SN identification in urological malignancies. This procedure might also be useful for SN identification of other deep draining malignancies. (orig.)

  2. Autotransplant tissue selection criteria with or without stereomicroscopy in parathyroidectomy for treatment of renal hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Nakayama Ohe

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several methods have been proposed to improve operative success in renal hyperparathyroidism. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate stereomicroscopy in parathyroid tissue selection for total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation in secondary (SHPT/tertiary (THPT hyperparathyroidism. METHODS: 118 renal patients underwent surgery from April of 2000 to October 2009. They were divided into two groups: G1, 66 patients operated from April of 2000 to May of 2005, with tissue selection based on macroscopic observation; G2, 52 patients operated from March of 2008 to October 2009 with stereomicroscopy for tissue selection searching for the presence of adipose cells. All surgeries were performed by the same surgeon. Patients presented SHPT (dialysis treatment or THPT (renal-grafted. Follow-up was 12-36 months. Intra-operative parathyroid hormone (PTH was measured in 100/118 (84.7% patients. RESULTS: Data are presented as means. G1 included 66 patients (38 SHPT, 24 females/14 males; 40.0 years of age; 28 THPT, 14 females/14 males; 44 years of age. G2 included 52 patients (29 SHPT, 11 females/18 males; 50.7 years of age; 23 THPT, 13 females/10 males, 44.4 years of age. SHPT patients from G2 presented preoperative serum calcium higher than those of SHPT patients in G1 (p < 0.05, suggesting a more severe disease. Definitive hypoparathyroidism was found in seven of 118 patients (5.9%. Graft-dependent recurrence occurred in four patients, two in each group. All occurred in dialysis patients. CONCLUSION: Stereomicroscopy in SHPT/THPT surgical treatment may be a useful tool to standardize parathyroid tissue selection.

  3. Applying preoperative dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy for preventing cardiac mortality and complications for patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing parathyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-min Yin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: To evaluate the value of preoperative dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy for reducing cardiovascular complication in secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPTH patients. Methods: Thallium scintigraphy was arranged for all dialysis patients who underwent parathyroidectomy from Jan 2011 to July 2015. Management of defects on thallium scintigraphy included cardiac catheterization and ultrasonography. Analysis includes 30-day mortality, morbidity and the predicting factors for thallium scintigraphy defect. Results: Of 249 patients with SHPTH, 19 (7.6% had defects on thallium scintigraphy, 15 (88% of whom had coronary artery disease on angiography. History of acute coronary syndrome (ACS, p < 0.001, diabetes mellitus (DM, p = 0.03, male sex (p = 0.03, and higher body mass index (BMI, p = 0.001 were significant predictors of positive thallium scintigraphy results. History of ACS was the most significant predictor after adjustment in the multivariate logistic analysis (odds ratio, 22.56; 95% confidence interval, 7.02–72.53. All the patients survived the 30-day postoperative period, with minimal cardiovascular morbidity. Conclusion: Preoperative dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy is useful for SHPTH patients to minimized surgical mortality and morbidity. Keywords: Secondary hyperparathyroidism, Dialysis, Coronary artery disease (CAD, Dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy

  4. Long-term mortality after parathyroidectomy among chronic kidney disease patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Wang, Kongbo; Yu, Shanlan; Lai, Liping; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yuan, Jingjing; Duan, Weifeng

    2016-08-01

    Parathyroidectomy (PTx) and medical treatments are both recommended for reducing serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and curing secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but their therapeutic effects on long-term mortality are not well-known. Thus, we aim to assess such therapeutic effect of PTx. Electronic literatures published on Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in any language until 27 November 2015 were systematically searched. All literatures that compared outcomes (survival rate or mortality rate) between PTx-treated and medically-treated CKD patients with sHPT were included. Finally, 13 cohort studies involving 22053 patients were included. Data were extracted from all included literatures in a standard form. The outcomes of all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities were assessed using DerSimonian and Laird's random effects model. We find PTx-treated versus medically-treated patients had a 28% reduction in all-cause mortality and a 37% reduction in cardiovascular mortality. Thus, PTx versus medical treatments might reduce the risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities in CKD patients with sHPT. Further studies with prospective and large-sample clinical trials are needed to find out the real effect of PTx and to assess whether mortality rates differ among patterns of PTx.

  5. Surgical treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in elderly patients: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polistena, Andrea; Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Lucchini, Roberta; Galasse, Segio; Avenia, Stefano; Monacelli, Massimo; Johnson, Louis Banka; Jeppsson, Bengt; Avenia, Nicola

    2017-02-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism in elderly fragile patients presents clinical difficulties due to severity of symptoms and related comorbidity. The optimal surgical approach for this group of patients is still debated. The aim of the study was to define the optimal technique of parathyroidectomy in elderly patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Retrospective analysis in a series of 253 patients including 35 elderly individuals at a single institution was carried out. Postoperative parathyroid hormone decrease, surgical complications and symptoms control were analyzed for all patients in relation to the types of parathyroidectomy performed. In elderly patients, total parathyroidectomy was the most used approach. Subtotal parathyroidectomy was mostly reserved for younger patients suitable for kidney transplantation. No elderly patients treated with total parathyroidectomy were autotransplanted. No significant difference in surgical complications was observed between younger and elderly patients and considering the different procedures. Adequate symptom control after surgery was achieved in almost 90% of patients. A limited rate of recurrence requiring repeat surgery was observed only after subtotal parathyroidectomy. Considering the features of all types of parathyroidectomy, very low recurrence rate, contained postoperative hypocalcemia and limited complications following total parathyroidectomy, might represent specific advantages for elderly patients. Total parathyroidectomy without parathyroid transplantation is safe for elderly patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism and a good alternative to the well-established total parathyroidectomy with autografting.

  6. Radioguided sentinel node biopsy with 99mTc colloidal (Re) sulphide: Our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lago, G.; Alonso, O.; Aizen, B.; Juri, C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: It has been demonstrated that nodal metastases from different solid tumors are not random events. Tumour spread within the regional draining basin has been shown to progress in an orderly fashion with first draining basin (sentinel node) most likely to have metastatic involvement. Thus, the sentinel node examination accurately reflects the histology of the remainder of the lymphatic basin. Sentinel node biopsy (SLB) with previous lymphatic mapping by means of radiocolloid lymphoscintraphy has been proposed by many authors as a routine method for staging the regional lymph nodes in patients with cutaneous melanoma and breast cancer. A positive SLB is found to carry high prognostic significance and identifies those patients who might benefit from early therapeutic lymph node dissection and adjuvant treatment. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our experience with radioguided SLB in patients with different tumours. We studied 154 patients between 1998-2003, with clinically localized breast cancer (n=45), melanoma (n=82), cervix carcinoma (n=22) and penis carcinoma (n=5). Lymphoscintigraphy was performed 6-18 hours before surgery using a LFOV gamma camera equipped with a LEHR collimator. A dose of 111-185 MBq of 99mTc colloidal sulphide (Nanocis, Cis bio international, Gif-Sur-Yvette, France) was injected around the primary lesion (melanoma, breast cancer, and penis carcinoma) and into the four quadrants of the cervix (cervix carcinoma). All basins identified by lymphoscintigraphy were explored through incisions directed by the use of a gamma probe. Radioactivity (counts /sec) of the sentinel node(s) and the adjacent tissues was measured in-vivo and verified ex-vivo after removal. A signal to background ratio higher than 2 to 3 in-vivo and higher than 10 ex-vivo was considered significant. Blue dye mapping was performed in all cases of breast cancer but left at discretion of the surgeon for the remaining tumours. Serial sections of the

  7. Plant invasions: Merging the concepts of species invasiveness and community invasibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richardson, D. M.; Pyšek, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2006), s. 409-431 ISSN 0309-1333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : plant invasions * species invasiveness * community invasibility Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.278, year: 2006

  8. The efficacy of low and high dose (99m)Tc-MIBI protocols for intraoperative identification of hyperplastic parathyroid glands in secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencoglu, Esra Arzu; Aktas, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of low- and high-dose (99m)Tc-MIBI protocols for intraoperative identification of hyperplastic parathyroid glands via gamma probe in secondary hyperparathyroidism. This retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database of 59 patients who had undergone radioguided subtotal parathyroidectomy between 2004-2012. The patients were studied in 2 groups. Group 1 (n=31) received 37 MBq (99m)Tc-MIBI intravenously in the surgical room approximately 10 min before the beginning of the intervention and surgery was performed under gamma probe guidance. Group 2 (n=28) received 555 MBq (99m)Tc- MIBI intravenously 2h before surgery, which was also performed under gamma probe guidance. Intraoperative gamma probe findings, laboratory findings, and histopathological findings were evaluated together. Using acceptance of the histopathological findings as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative gamma probe for identifying hyperplastic parathyroid glands was 98% and 100%, respectively, in both groups. In the light of these findings, it is concluded that the low-dose (99m)Tc-MIBI protocol might be preferable for intraoperative identification of hyperplastic parathyroid glands in secondary hyperparathyroidism patients because it was observed to be as effective as the high-dose (99m)Tc-MIBI protocol. Furthermore, the low-dose protocol does not have the disadvantages that are associated with the high-dose protocol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical management of hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, M.N.; Aslam, T.; Maher, M.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of focused parathyroidectomy for adenoma and total parathyroidectomy with forearm autotransplantation for hyperplasia in maintaining serum calcium levels. Sixteen patients were admitted in this time period. Eleven of these patients had primary hyperparathyroidism and 4 had secondary hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal failure. Pre-operative localization was done with Sestamibi scan and ultrasound of neck while methylene blue was used for intra-operative localization. All patients with primary hyperparathyroidism had single gland disease and were treated with focused parathyroidectomy. In 4 patients with parathyroid hyperplasia, total parathyroidectomy with forearm autotransplantation was done. In the postoperative period, 3 patients developed hypocalcemia but they were managed on oral calcium and vitamin-D supplements. All of the remaining patients became normocalcaemic and there were no major complications. Mean hospital stay was 7-days. Focused parathyroidectomy for single gland disease and total parathyroidectomy with forearm auto-transplantation for hyperplasia was a satisfactory treatment for patients in this series. (author)

  10. The impact of parathyroidectomy on serum ADAMTS1, ADAMTS4 levels, insulin resistance, and subclinical cardiovascular disease in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakose, Melia; Caliskan, Mustafa; Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Demirci, Taner; Karakose, Suleyman; Cakal, Erman

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism has been associated with increased incidence of morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular system. The etiopathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association are still not completely clear. Accumulating evidence suggested that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin-like motifs (ADAMTS) has a role in the development of inflammation and atherosclerosis. In this study, we aimed to determine whether there is a change in serum levels of ADAMTS1, ADAMTS4, carotid intima-media thickness, and cardiovascular risk score after the surgery and also whether there is a relationship between ADAMTS levels and cardiovascular risk score in hypercalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism patients. The study included the 48 consecutive newly diagnosed patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. The patients were evaluated before and six months after parathyroidectomy. The Framingham score is used to calculate cardiovascular risk. Serum ADAMTS levels were determined by a human enzyme-linked immunoassay in all subjects. The fasting glucose, fasting insulin levels and HOMA values were decreased significantly in all patients after surgery compared to the pretreatment values (p hyperparathyroidism compared to the preoperative values (p  0.05). There were statistically significant relationship between cardiovascular risk score and waist/hip ratio, calcium, LDL-cholesterol, carotid intima-media thickness, ADAMTS4 values. Based on the results of the present study, fasting glucose, fasting insulin levels, ADAMTS1, ADAMTS4, and carotid intima-media thickness might be an additional parameters during the management of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, since these factors might improve after surgery.

  11. Effectiveness of Intraoperative Parathyroid Monitoring (ioPTH) in predicting a multiglandular or malignant parathyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrinja, C; Santandrea, G; Giacca, M; Stenner, Elisabetta; Ruscio, Maurizio; de Manzini, Nicolò

    2017-05-01

    The main goal of our study was to confirm the usefulness of intra-operative parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring (ioPTH) when using minimally invasive techniques for treatment of sporadic Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHTP). Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate if ioPTH monitoring may help to predict the etiology of primary hyperparathyroidism, especially in malignant or multiglandular parathyroid disease. A retrospective review of 125 consecutive patients with pHPT who underwent parathyroidectomy between 2001 and 2016 at the Department of General Surgery was performed. For each patient, the specific preoperative work-up consisted of: high-resolution US of the neck by a skilled sonographer, sestamibi parathyroid scan, laryngoscopy, and serum measurement of PTH, serum calcium levels, and serum 25(OH)D levels. The study included 125 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for pHPT. At the histological examination, we registered 113 patients with simple adenomatous pathology (90,4%), 5 atypical adenomas (4%), 3 cases of parathyroid carcinoma (2,4%),, , and 4 histological exams of different nature (3,2%). Overall, 6 cases (4,8%) of multiglandular disease were found. We reported 10 cases (8%) of recurrent/persistent hyperparathyroidism: 1/10 in a patient affected by atypical adenoma, 9/10 in patients with benign pathology. Regarding these 10 cases, in three (30%) patients, ioPTH wasn't dosed (only frozen section (FS) exam was taken), in 5 cases (50%) ioPTH dropped more than 50% compared to basal value (false negative results), and in 2 (20%) cases, ioPTH did not drop >50% from the first samples taken, the extemporary exam had confirmed the presence of adenoma and the probable second hyperfunctioning adenoma was not found. IoPTH determinations ensure operative success of surgical resection in almost all hyperfunctioning tissue; in particular it is very important during minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, as it allows avoiding bilateral neck exploration. The use of io

  12. Radioguided localisation of impalpable breast lesions using 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin: Lessons learnt during introduction of a new technique to guide preoperative localisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, Joanne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Kulawansa, Sagarika [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); McCarthy, Michael; Troedson, Russell [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Phillips, Michael [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Tinning, Jill [The Multidisciplinary Breast Service, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Taylor, Donna, E-mail: Donna.Taylor@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative wire-guided localisation (WGL) of impalpable breast lesions is widely used but can be technically difficult. Risks include wire migration, inaccurate placement, and inadequate surgical margins. Research shows that radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) is quicker, easier, and can improve surgical and cosmetic outcomes. An audited introduction of ROLL was conducted to validate the technique as a feasible alternative to WGL. Fifty patients with single impalpable lesions and biopsy proven malignancy or indeterminate histology underwent WGL followed by intralesional radiopharmaceutical injection of 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin. Postprocedural mammography was performed to demonstrate wire position, and scintigraphy to evaluate radiopharmaceutical migration. Lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative sentinel node biopsy were performed if indicated, followed by lesion localisation and excision using a gamma probe. Specimen imaging was performed, with immediate reexcision for visibly inadequate margins. Accurate localisation was achieved in 86% of patients with ROLL compared to 72% with WGL. All lesions were successfully removed, with clear margins in 71.8% of malignant lesions. Reexcision and intraoperative sentinel node localisation rates were equivalent to preaudit figures for WGL. ROLL was easy to perform and problems were infrequent. Inaccurate radiopharmaceutical placement necessitating WGL occurred in four patients. Minor radiopharmaceutical migration was common, but precluded using ROLL in only two cases. ROLL is effective, simple, inexpensive, and easily learnt; however, preoperative confirmation of correct radiopharmaceutical placement using mammography and the gamma probe is important to help ensure successful lesion removal. Insertion of a backup hookwire is recommended during the initial introduction of ROLL.

  13. Impact of Different Levels of iPTH on All-Cause Mortality in Dialysis Patients with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism after Parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Qiu Ping; Xie, Xi Sheng; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, Yue Fei; Jin, Cheng Gang; Li, Yan Bo; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Xiao Xuan; Du, Shu Tong

    2017-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) usually required parathyroidectomy (PTX) when drugs treatment is invalid. Analysis was done on the impact of different intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) after the PTX on all-cause mortality. An open, retrospective, multicenter cohort design was conducted. The sample included 525 dialysis patients with SHPT who had undergone PTX. 404 patients conformed to the standard, with 36 (8.91%) deaths during the 11 years of follow-up. One week postoperatively, different levels of serum iPTH were divided into four groups: A: ≤20 pg/mL; B: 21-150 pg/mL; C: 151-600 pg/mL; and D: >600 pg/mL. All-cause mortality in groups with different iPTH levels appeared as follows: A (8.29%), B (3.54%), C (10.91%), and D (29.03%). The all-cause mortality of B was the lowest, with D the highest. We used group A as reference (hazard ratio (HR) = 1) compared with the other groups, and HRs on groups B, C, and D appeared as 0.57, 1.43, and 3.45, respectively. The all-cause mortality was associated with different levels of iPTH after the PTX. We found that iPTH > 600 pg/mL appeared as a factor which increased the risk of all-cause mortality. When iPTH levels were positively and effectively reducing, the risk of all-cause mortality also decreased. The most appropriate level of postoperative iPTH seemed to be 21-150 pg/mL.

  14. Advantages of hybrid SPECT-CT imaging in preoperative localization of parathyroid glands in a patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytawa, Wojciech; Teodorczyk, Jacek; Lass, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a frequent complication of chronic renal failure. Patients resistant to pharmacotherapy are candidates for parathyroidectomy. Invasiveness of surgical treatment can be minimized by precise preoperative localization of parathyroid glands. Imaging modalities routinely used for this purpose are ultrasonography and MIBI-Tc99m scintigraphy. Our case report shows advantages of co-registered computer tomography and conventional SPECT imaging (SPECT/CT) in a patient with advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism successfully treated with surgery. Hybrid SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging enables better surgical planning and is superior to conventional scintigraphy

  15. What is the link between nonlocalizing sestamibi scans, multigland disease, and persistent hypercalcemia? A study of 401 consecutive patients undergoing parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bill; Sturgeon, Cord; Angelos, Peter

    2006-09-01

    We hypothesized that nonlocalizing sestamibi scans would correlate with multigland disease and persistent primary hyperparathyroidism. We reviewed records for 401 consecutive patients who underwent parathyroidectomy from 1999 to 2004. Gender, age, preoperative imaging, surgical findings, gland weight and volume, and 6-month calcium levels (Ca) were examined. We identified 289 women and 112 men, 297 of whom had a preoperative sestamibi scan localized to a single gland (localized group; LG). Ninety-six percent of the LG were found to have single-gland disease, and 4% had multigland disease (MGD). In the nonlocalized group (NLG), 76% had single-gland disease and 24% MGD. Mean gland weight was greater in the LG than in the NLG (1128 mg vs 699 mg; P localizing sestamibi scan had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 96% and a likelihood ratio of 2.29 for predicting "curative" intraoperative parathyroid hormone drop after removal of a single abnormal gland. Patients were stratified into normocalcemic (NCa) and hypercalcemic (HCa) groups based on 6-month postoperative serum calcium data (n = 328). HCa incidence at 6 months did not differ significantly between the LG (5%) and NLG (3%). A localizing scan had a PPV of 95% for normocalcemia at 6 months. A nonlocalizing scan had a PPV of 21% for HCa at 6 months. Nonlocalizing sestamibi scans were more common in primary hyperparathyroidism with MGD and were associated with smaller-volume abnormal glands found at operation. Preoperative sestamibi scan-results did not predict HCa at 6 months.

  16. Presence of small parathyroid glands in renal transplant patients supports less-than-total parathyroidectomy to treat hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Mark D; Emmanouilidis, Nikos; Jackobs, Steffan; Kespohl, Holger; Hett, Julian; Musatkin, Denis; Tränkenschuh, Wolfgang; Schrem, Harald; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Scheumann, Georg F W

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid glands (PG) are rarely analyzed in renal transplant (RTX) patients. This study analyzes comparatively PG of RTX and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The clinical part of the study evaluates if total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation (TPT+AT) treats appropriately hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism in RTX patients. TPT+AT was performed in 15 of 23 RTX and 21 of 27 ESRD patients. Remaining patients underwent less-than-total PT. Volume and stage of hyperplasia were determined from 86 PG of RTX and 109 PG of ESRD patients. Patients were categorized according to the presence of small PG (volume hyperparathyroidism were evaluated 2 years after PT in RTX patients. PG of RTX patients were significantly smaller, but similar hyperplastic in comparison to PG of ESRD patients. Small PG were more frequent in RTX than in ESRD patients (19% vs 6%) and mainly graded normal or diffuse hyperplastic (94%). Forty-seven percent of RTX, but only 14% of ESRD, patients receiving a total PT possessed ≥1 small PG (P hyperparathyroidism. However, TPT+AT caused permanent hypocalcemia in 50% of RTX patients without small PG and even in 83% of RTX patients with small PG. All RTX patients receiving less-than-total PT were normocalcemic at 2-year follow-up. Logistic regression revealed a 10.7 times greater risk of permanent hypocalcemia in RTX patients with small PG receiving TPT+AT compared with RTX patients without small PG receiving TPT+AT or RTX patients undergoing less-than-total PT. Surgeons performing PT should be aware of the high frequency of small and less diseased PG in RTX patients. In this context, TPT+AT might overtreat hypercalcemic hyperparathyroidism in RTX patients, especially when small PG are present. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  18. Radio-guided surgery with the use of [99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate in intra-operative detection of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A; Kulig, J; Szybinski, P; Mikolajczak, R; Pach, D; Sowa-Staszczak, A; Fröss-Baron, K; Huszno, B

    2007-10-01

    Radio-guided surgery (RGS) is an intra-operative localising technique which enables identification of tissue "marked" by a specific radiotracer injected before surgery. It is mainly used for sentinel node mapping and for detection of parathyroid adenomas and other tumours, including neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract (GEP-NET). The aim of this study was to determine whether intra-operative radio-detection with the use of [(99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate, a new somatostatin analogue, is able to reveal an unknown primary and secondary sites, thereby improving surgical treatment and the final outcome of GEP-NET. The study group included nine patients with suspected GEP-NET (four carcinoids, five pancreatic NET) localised with somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (with [(99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate), who had negative results on other pre-operative imaging tests. At surgery, suspected tumours were measured in situ and ex vivo and precise exploration of the abdominal cavity was performed with the intra-operative scintillation detector (Navigator). Intra-operative gamma counting localised three carcinoids. In one patient SRS was false positive (owing to inflammatory infiltration). Compared with SRS, RGS revealed additional lymph node metastases in one case. RGS resulted in successful localisation of all pancreatic NET (the smallest lesion was 8 mm in diameter). [(99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate SRS followed by RGS is a promising technique to improve the rate of detection and efficacy of treatment of GEP-NET, especially in the presence of occult endocrine tumours. The imaging properties of [(99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate and the 1-day imaging protocol offer opportunities for more widespread application of this tracer followed by RGS in oncology.

  19. Radio-guided surgery with the use of [99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate in intra-operative detection of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A.; Kulig, J.; Szybinski, P.; Mikolajczak, R.; Pach, D.; Sowa-Staszczak, A.; Froess-Baron, K.; Huszno, B.

    2007-01-01

    Radio-guided surgery (RGS) is an intra-operative localising technique which enables identification of tissue ''marked'' by a specific radiotracer injected before surgery. It is mainly used for sentinel node mapping and for detection of parathyroid adenomas and other tumours, including neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract (GEP-NET). The aim of this study was to determine whether intra-operative radio-detection with the use of [ 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate, a new somatostatin analogue, is able to reveal an unknown primary and secondary sites, thereby improving surgical treatment and the final outcome of GEP-NET. The study group included nine patients with suspected GEP-NET (four carcinoids, five pancreatic NET) localised with somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (with [ 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate), who had negative results on other pre-operative imaging tests. At surgery, suspected tumours were measured in situ and ex vivo and precise exploration of the abdominal cavity was performed with the intra-operative scintillation detector (Navigator). Intra-operative gamma counting localised three carcinoids. In one patient SRS was false positive (owing to inflammatory infiltration). Compared with SRS, RGS revealed additional lymph node metastases in one case. RGS resulted in successful localisation of all pancreatic NET (the smallest lesion was 8 mm in diameter). [ 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate SRS followed by RGS is a promising technique to improve the rate of detection and efficacy of treatment of GEP-NET, especially in the presence of occult endocrine tumours. The imaging properties of [ 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate and the 1-day imaging protocol offer opportunities for more widespread application of this tracer followed by RGS in oncology. (orig.)

  20. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with 201 TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO 4+ , and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment

  1. Serum Bone Resorption Markers after Parathyroidectomy for Renal Hyperparathyroidism: Correlation Analyses for the Cross-Linked N-telopeptide of Collagen I and Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chin Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients on long-term dialysis may develop secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT with increased serum concentrations of bone resorption markers such as the cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX and type-5b tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP. When SHPT proves refractory to treatment, parathyroidectomy (PTX may be needed. Renal patients on maintenance HD who received PTX for refractory SHPT (n=23 or who did not develop refractory SHPT (control subjects; n=25 were followed prospectively for 4 weeks. Serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, NTX, TRAP, and bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP concentrations were measured serially and correlation analyses were performed. iPTH values decreased rapidly and dramatically. BAP values increased progressively with peak increases observed at 2 weeks after surgery. NTX and TRAP values decreased concurrently and progressively through 4 weeks following PTX. A significant correlation between TRAP and NTX values was observed before PTX but not at 4 weeks after PTX. Additionally, the fractional changes in serum TRAP were larger than those in serum NTX at all times examined after PTX. Serum iPTH, TRAP, and NTX values declined rapidly following PTX for SHPT. Serum TRAP values declined to greater degrees than serum NTX values throughout the 4-week period following PTX.

  2. Sentinel node detection in pre-operative axillary staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifirò, Giuseppe; Viale, Giuseppe; Gentilini, Oreste; Travaini, Laura Lavinia; Paganelli, Giovanni

    2004-06-01

    The concept of sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer surgery is based on the fact that the tumour drains in a logical way via the lymphatic system, from the first to upper levels. Since axillary node dissection does not improve the prognosis of patients with breast cancer, sentinel lymph node biopsy might replace complete axillary dissection for staging of the axilla in clinically N0 patients. Sentinel lymph node biopsy would represent a significant advantage as a minimally invasive procedure, considering that about 70% of patients are found to be free from metastatic disease, yet axillary node dissection can lead to significant morbidity. Subdermal or peritumoural injection of small aliquots (and very low activity) of radiotracer is preferred to intratumoural administration, and (99m)Tc-labelled colloids with most of the particles in the 100-200 nm size range would be ideal for radioguided sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer. The success rate of radioguidance in localising the sentinel lymph node in breast cancer surgery is about 97% in institutions where a high number of procedures are performed, and the success rate of lymphoscintigraphy in sentinel node detection is about 100%. The sentinel lymph node should be processed for intraoperative frozen section examination in its entirety, based on conventional histopathology and, when necessary, immune staining with anti-cytokeratin antibody. Nowadays, lymphoscintigraphy is a useful procedure in patients with different clinical evidence of breast cancer.

  3. Radio frequency energy for non-invasive and minimally invasive skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, R Stephen

    2011-07-01

    This article reviews the non-invasive and minimally invasive options for skin tightening, focusing on peer-reviewed articles and presentations and those technologies with the most proven or promising RF non-excisional skin-tightening results for excisional surgeons. RF has been the mainstay of non-invasive skin tightening and has emerged as the "cutting edge" technology in the minimally invasive skin-tightening field. Because these RF skin-tightening technologies are capital equipment purchases with a significant cost associated, this article also discusses some business issues and models that have proven to work in the plastic surgeon's office for non-invasive and minimally invasive skin-tightening technologies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The risk of establishment of aquatic invasive species: joining invasibility and propagule pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Brian; Mandrak, Nicholas E

    2007-10-22

    Invasive species are increasingly becoming a policy priority. This has spurred researchers and managers to try to estimate the risk of invasion. Conceptually, invasions are dependent both on the receiving environment (invasibility) and on the ability to reach these new areas (propagule pressure). However, analyses of risk typically examine only one or the other. Here, we develop and apply a joint model of invasion risk that simultaneously incorporates invasibility and propagule pressure. We present arguments that the behaviour of these two elements of risk differs substantially--propagule pressure is a function of time, whereas invasibility is not--and therefore have different management implications. Further, we use the well-studied zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) to contrast predictions made using the joint model to those made by separate invasibility and propagule pressure models. We show that predictions of invasion progress as well as of the long-term invasion pattern are strongly affected by using a joint model.

  5. Comparative anatomy of invasive and non-invasive species in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The foliar and stem micromorphological study of the invasive and non-invasive species were undertaken using Light Microscope (LM). The occurrence of vessels in the pillar of the abundant sclerenchyma tissues are important component of the skeletal system in the invasive species. The prominent tiles of parenchymatous ...

  6. A meta-analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive plant species

    OpenAIRE

    van Kleunen, Mark; Weber, Ewald; Fischer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A major aim in ecology is identifying determinants of invasiveness. We performed a meta-analysis of 117 field or experimental-garden studies that measured pair-wise trait differences of a total of 125 invasive and 196 non-invasive plant species in the invasive range of the invasive species. We tested whether invasiveness is associated with performance-related traits (physiology, leaf-area allocation, shoot allocation, growth rate, size and fitness), and whether such associations depend on typ...

  7. Efficacy and its predictor in microwave ablation for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Zongli; Liu, Xu; Qian, Linxue; Liu, Jing; Liu, Sha; Liu, Wenhu

    2016-09-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) can be used to treat severe secondary hyperparathyroidism; however, its efficacy and the predictor of its efficacy are unclear. In this retrospective study we determined the predictor of efficacy of MWA and compared the efficacy of MWA and parathyroidectomy. Patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism who had received MWA or parathyroidectomy were enrolled in the study. Participants with MWA were divided into response and no response groups based on efficacy. Possible predictors were analysed using logistic regression to determine efficacy predictors. The participants were divided into MWA and parathyroidectomy groups, and the efficacy (including rates of achieving recommended goals for intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium, and phosphorus levels) were compared between the two groups. Thirty-one participants were enrolled for predictor analysis. Only baseline iPTH level predicted efficacy (OR 0.997, P = 0.018). The optimal threshold value of iPTH for predicting efficacy was 1493.5 pg/mL. To compare efficacy, 30 patients were enrolled in MWA (18/30) and parathyroidectomy (12/30) groups. The rates of achieving recommended goals for iPTH levels varied between 0 and 60%; a significant difference was found between the groups at 5 months (P = 0.01). However, in the parathyroidectomy group, the iPTH level and rate of iPTH secondary hyperparathyroidism; parathyroidectomy is more effective for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism than MWA.

  8. Terrestrial animals as invasive species and as species at risk from invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Dean Pearson; Joseph Wunderle; Wayne Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Including terrestrial animal species in the invasive species strategy plan is an important step in invasive species management. Invasions by nonindigenous species threaten nearly 50 percent of imperiled native species in the United States and are the Nation's second leading cause of species endangerment. Invasion and conversion of native habitats by exotic species...

  9. Invasive Species Science Branch: research and management tools for controlling invasive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert N.; Walters, Katie D.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive, nonnative species of plants, animals, and disease organisms adversely affect the ecosystems they enter. Like “biological wildfires,” they can quickly spread and affect nearly all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Invasive species have become one of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century in economic, environmental, and human health costs, with an estimated effect in the United States of more than $120 billion per year. Managers of the Department of the Interior and other public and private lands often rank invasive species as their top resource management problem. The Invasive Species Science Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center provides research and technical assistance relating to management concerns for invasive species, including understanding how these species are introduced, identifying areas vulnerable to invasion, forecasting invasions, and developing control methods. To disseminate this information, branch scientists are developing platforms to share invasive species information with DOI cooperators, other agency partners, and the public. From these and other data, branch scientists are constructing models to understand and predict invasive species distributions for more effective management. The branch also has extensive herpetological and population biology expertise that is applied to harmful reptile invaders such as the Brown Treesnake on Guam and Burmese Python in Florida.

  10. Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Invasive Candidiasis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Global Emergence ... antifungal drugs. Learn more about C. auris Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a ...

  11. Intraspecies differenes in phenotypic plasticity: Invasive versus non-invasive populations of Ceratophyllum demersum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Benita; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    High phenotypic plasticity has been hypothesized to affect the invasiveness of plants, as high plasticity may enlarge the breath of environments in which the plants can survive and reproduce. Here we compare the phenotypic plasticity of invasive and non-invasive populations of the same species...... hypothesized that the phenotypic plasticity in fitness-related traits like growth and photosynthesis were higher in the invasive than in the non-invasive population. The invasive population acclimated to elevated temperatures through increased rates of photosynthesis (range: Pamb: 8–452 mol O2 g−1 DM h−1......-harvesting complex. Hence, the invasive population of C. demersum from New Zealand had higher phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature than the non-invasive Danish population. This might be the result of genetic evolution since its introduction to New Zealand five decades ago, but further studies are needed...

  12. Limitations of Tc99m-MIBI-SPECT imaging scans in persistent primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteveen, Janneke E; Kievit, Job; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Morreau, Hans; Romijn, Johannes A; Hamdy, Neveen A T

    2011-01-01

    In primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) the predictive value of technetium 99m sestamibi single emission computed tomography (Tc99m-MIBI-SPECT) for localizing pathological parathyroid glands before a first parathyroidectomy (PTx) is 83-100%. Data are scarce in patients undergoing reoperative parathyroidectomy for persistent hyperparathyroidism. The aim of the present study was to determine the value of Tc99m-MIBI-SPECT in localizing residual hyperactive parathyroid tissue in patients with persistent primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) after initial excision of one or more pathological glands. We retrospectively evaluated the localizing accuracy of Tc99m-MIBI-SPECT scans in 19 consecutive patients with persistent PHPT who had a scan before reoperative parathyroidectomy. We used as controls 23 patients with sporadic PHPT who had a scan before initial surgery. In patients with persistent PHPT, Tc99m-MIBI-SPECT accurately localized a pathological parathyroid gland in 33% of cases before reoperative parathyroidectomy, compared to 61% before first PTx for sporadic PHPT. The Tc99m-MIBI-SPECT scan accurately localized intra-thyroidal glands in 2 of 7 cases and a mediastinal gland in 1 of 3 cases either before initial or reoperative parathyroidectomy. Our data suggest that the accuracy of Tc99m-MIBI-SPECT in localizing residual hyperactive glands is significantly lower before reoperative parathyroidectomy for persistent PHPT than before initial surgery for sporadic PHPT. These findings should be taken in consideration in the preoperative workup of patients with persistent primary hyperparathyroidism.

  13. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  14. Surgical management of a giant parathyroid adenoma through minimal invasive parathyroidectomy. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Sahsamanis

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Clinicians must be alerted of hyperparathyroidism in patients presenting with calcium associated symptomatology. Diagnosis is straightforward through laboratory exams, while surgery offers the only permanent treatment option.

  15. Micafungin in the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Wiederhold

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nathan P Wiederhold1, Jason M Cota2, Christopher R Frei11University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, Texas, USA; 2University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of Pharmacy, San Antonio, Texas, USAAbstract: Micafungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent available for clinical use in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Through inhibition of β-1,3-glucan production, an essential component of the fungal cell wall, micafungin exhibits potent antifungal activity against key pathogenic fungi, including Candida and Aspergillus species, while contributing minimal toxicity to mammalian cells. This activity is maintained against polyene and azole-resistant isolates. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated linear kinetics both in adults and children with concentration-dependent activity observed both in vitro and in vivo. Dosage escalation studies have also demonstrated that doses much higher than those currently recommended may be administered without serious adverse effects. Clinically, micafungin has been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Furthermore, the clinical effectiveness of micafungin against these infections occurs without the drug interactions that occur with the azoles and the nephrotoxicity observed with amphotericin B formulations. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical microbiology, mechanisms of resistance, safety, and clinical efficacy of micafungin in the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis.Keywords: micafungin, echinocandin, Candida, Aspergillus, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis

  16. A comparison of non-invasive versus invasive methods of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Puneet Khanna

    for Hb estimation from the laboratory [total haemoglobin mass (tHb)] and arterial blood gas (ABG) machine (aHb), using ... A comparison of non-invasive versus invasive methods of haemoglobin estimation in patients undergoing intracranial surgery. 161 .... making decisions for blood transfusions based on these results.

  17. Alien invasive birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier, B; Vangeluwe, D; van den Berg, T

    2010-08-01

    A bird species is regarded as alien invasive if it has been introduced, intentionally or accidentally, to a location where it did not previously occur naturally, becomes capable of establishing a breeding population without further intervention by humans, spreads and becomes a pest affecting the environment, the local biodiversity, the economy and/or society, including human health. European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) and Red-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer) have been included on the list of '100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species', a subset of the Global Invasive Species Database. The 'Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe' project has selected Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), Rose-ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri) and Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) as among 100 of the worst invasive species in Europe. For each of these alien bird species, the geographic range (native and introduced range), the introduction pathway, the general impacts and the management methods are presented.

  18. Minimally invasive orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Kaban, Leonard B; Troulis, Maria J

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is defined as the discipline in which operative procedures are performed in novel ways to diminish the sequelae of standard surgical dissections. The goals of minimally invasive surgery are to reduce tissue trauma and to minimize bleeding, edema, and injury, thereby improving the rate and quality of healing. In orthognathic surgery, there are two minimally invasive techniques that can be used separately or in combination: (1) endoscopic exposure and (2) distraction osteogenesis. This article describes the historical developments of the fields of orthognathic surgery and minimally invasive surgery, as well as the integration of the two disciplines. Indications, techniques, and the most current outcome data for specific minimally invasive orthognathic surgical procedures are presented.

  19. Plant invasions in China: an emerging hot topic in invasion science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available China has shown a rapid economic development in recent decades, and several drivers of this change are known to enhance biological invasions, a major cause of biodiversity loss. Here we review the current state of research on plant invasions in China by analyzing papers referenced in the ISI Web of Knowledge. Since 2001, the number of papers has increased exponentially, indicating that plant invasions in China are an emerging hot topic in invasion science. The analyzed papers cover a broad range of methodological approaches and research topics. While more that 250 invasive plant species with negative impacts have been reported from China, only a few species have been considered in more than a handful of papers (in order of decreasing number of references: Spartina alterniflora, Ageratina adenophora, Mikania micrantha, Alternanthera philoxeroides, Solidago canadensis, Eichhornia crassipes. Yet this selection might rather reflect the location of research teams than the most invasive plant species in China. Considering the previous achievements in China found in our analysis research in plant invasions could be expanded by (1 compiling comprehensive lists of non-native plant species at the provincial and national scales and to include species that are native to one part of China but non-native to others in these lists; (2 strengthening pathways studies (primary introduction to the country, secondary releases within the country to enhance prevention and management; and (3 assessing impacts of invasive species at different spatial scales (habitats, regions and in relation to conservation resources.

  20. Soil modification by invasive plants: Effects on native and invasive species of mixed-grass prairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, N.R.; Larson, D.L.; Huerd, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive plants are capable of modifying attributes of soil to facilitate further invasion by conspecifics and other invasive species. We assessed this capability in three important plant invaders of grasslands in the Great Plains region of North America: leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum). In a glasshouse, these three invasives or a group of native species were grown separately through three cycles of growth and soil conditioning in both steam-pasteurized and non-pasteurized soils, after which we assessed seedling growth in these soils. Two of the three invasive species, Bromus and Agropyron, exhibited significant self-facilitation via soil modification. Bromus and Agropyron also had significant facilitative effects on other invasives via soil modification, while Euphorbia had significant antagonistic effects on the other invasives. Both Agropyron and Euphorbia consistently suppressed growth of two of three native forbs, while three native grasses were generally less affected. Almost all intra- and interspecific effects of invasive soil conditioning were dependent upon presence of soil biota from field sites where these species were successful invaders. Overall, these results suggest that that invasive modification of soil microbiota can facilitate plant invasion directly or via 'cross-facilitation' of other invasive species, and moreover has potential to impede restoration of native communities after removal of an invasive species. However, certain native species that are relatively insensitive to altered soil biota (as we observed in the case of the forb Linum lewisii and the native grasses), may be valuable as 'nurse'species in restoration efforts. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. Genomic comparison of invasive and rare non-invasive strains reveals Porphyromonas gingivalis genetic polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Dolgilevich

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are shown to invade human cells in vitro with different invasion efficiencies, varying by up to three orders of magnitude.We tested the hypothesis that invasion-associated interstrain genomic polymorphisms are present in P. gingivalis and that putative invasion-associated genes can contribute to P. gingivalis invasion.Using an invasive (W83 and the only available non-invasive P. gingivalis strain (AJW4 and whole genome microarrays followed by two separate software tools, we carried out comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis.We identified 68 annotated and 51 hypothetical open reading frames (ORFs that are polymorphic between these strains. Among these are surface proteins, lipoproteins, capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis enzymes, regulatory and immunoreactive proteins, integrases, and transposases often with abnormal GC content and clustered on the chromosome. Amplification of selected ORFs was used to validate the approach and the selection. Eleven clinical strains were investigated for the presence of selected ORFs. The putative invasion-associated ORFs were present in 10 of the isolates. The invasion ability of three isogenic mutants, carrying deletions in PG0185, PG0186, and PG0982 was tested. The PG0185 (ragA and PG0186 (ragB mutants had 5.1×103-fold and 3.6×103-fold decreased in vitro invasion ability, respectively.The annotation of divergent ORFs suggests deficiency in multiple genes as a basis for P. gingivalis non-invasive phenotype. Access the supplementary material to this article: Supplement, table (see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  2. Updated Scar Management Practical Guidelines: Non-invasive and invasive measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monstrey, S.; Middelkoop, E.; Vranckx, J.J.; Bassetto, F.; Ziegler, U.E.; Meaume, S.; Teot, L.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical

  3. CT evaluation of gastric cancer. Depth of tumor invasion and pancreas invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banba, Yoshihisa; Kanazawa, Tadayoshi; Seto, Hikaru

    1998-01-01

    To compare the internal structure of tumor and the contiguous organ configuration on computed tomography (CT) with the depth of tumor invasion on the pathological specimen. Sixty-four gastric cancers depicted on incremental dynamic CT were classified according to the internal structure of the tumor, and correlated with the depth of tumor invasion. In addition, the cancers were classified according to the contiguous pancreatic configuration, and correlated with the degree of pancreatic invasion. Eleven tumors with thickened gastric wall consisting of both a thick inner layer of high attenuation and a thin outer layer of low attenuation (two-layered tumor with a thin outer layer) did not invade the serosa: mucosa (n=5) and submucosa (n=6). Of 59 gastric cancers with a regular margin to the contiguous pancreas, pancreatic invasion was absent in 58 and present in one. Pancreatic invasion was present in all of five gastric cancers with an irregular margin. Our results indicate that two-layered gastric tumors with a thin outer layer never invade the serosa. Furthermore, pancreatic invasion is predicted only when the margin of the contiguous pancreas is irregular. (author)

  4. Impact of surgical parathyroidectomy on chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugurel Apetrii

    Full Text Available For more than 6 decades, many patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD have undergone surgical parathyroidectomy (sPTX for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT mainly based historical clinical practice patterns, but not on evidence of outcome.We aimed in this meta-analysis to evaluate the benefits and harms of sPTX in patients with SHPT. We searched MEDLINE (inception to October 2016, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (through Issue 10 of 12, October 2016 and website clinicaltrials.gov (October 2016 without language restriction. Eligible studies evaluated patients reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR, below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (CKD 3-5 stages with hyperparathyroidism who underwent sPTX. Reviewers working independently and in duplicate extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The final analysis included 15 cohort studies, comprising 24,048 participants. Compared with standard treatment, sPTX significantly decreased all-cause mortality (RR 0.74 [95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83] in End Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD patients with biochemical and / or clinical evidence of SHPT. sPTX was also associated with decreased cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.59 [95% CI, 0.46 to 0.76] in 6 observational studies that included almost 10,000 patients. The available evidence, mostly observational, is at moderate risk of bias, and limited by indirect comparisons and inconsistency in reporting for some outcomes (eg. short term adverse events, including documented voice change or episodes of severe hypocalcaemia needing admission or long-term adverse events, including undetectable PTH levels, risk of fractures etc.. Taken together, the results of this meta-analysis would suggest a clinically significant beneficial effect of sPTX on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients with SHPT. However, given the observational nature of the included studies, the case for a properly conducted, independent randomised controlled trial comparing surgery with medical

  5. Radioguided surgery: First experiences with surgical gamma probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereb, M.; Bakala, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-operation of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic - International and Public Relations Division, sentinel lymph node detection has been introduced in one of the regional hospitals in Slovakia. Surgical Gamma Probe, the equipment needed for this has been made available. IAEA first of all helped in organizing a workshop on Scintimammography, Sentinel Lymph Node Detection and Intra-Operative Surgical Probe in Breast Cancer, in April 2002. Education of specialists - surgeons, oncologists, and pathologists and of course radiologists helped them to better understand the subject visa-vis nuclear medicine techniques. We also started the sentinel node detection following the two-days protocol. A 57 years old female with newly detected breast carcinoma in right breast, with positive mammography was investigated. Axillary lymph nodes were not palpable. Tc-99m Nanocoll, with particles size ranging 4-100 nm, was administered, 75 MBq peritumorally + 75 MBq subdermally and a dynamic lymphoscintigraphy was acquired which showed migration of the radiotracer. Static views (after 120 min.) demonstrated 4 sentinel lymph nodes in the right axilla. No lymph node was seen in the internal mammary or left axillary region. Next day before operation about 2 ml of patten blue dye was injected around the tumor and breast was compressed for about 10 min. Identification of sentinel lymph node was done with the help of surgical gamma probe and blue tinting. We found 6 nodes, first two were not really sentinel, but they were blue. A breast conservation surgery with standard axillary lymphadenectomy was performed. Pathology revealed invasive ductal carcinoma. We understand the need to establish an algorithm of examination and treatment of patients with newly diagnosed breast carcinoma. This technology requires teamwork of surgeon, nuclear medicine physician and pathologist. Regarding radiation exposure which every

  6. Deeply invasive candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Rex, J.H.; Bennett, J.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of invasive candidiasis is on the rise because of increasing numbers of immunocompromised hosts and more invasive medical technology. Recovery of Candida spp from several body sites in a critically ill or immunocompromised patient should raise the question of disseminated disease.

  7. Positive feedback between mycorrhizal fungi and plants influences plant invasion success and resistance to invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Ruyi; Tang, Jianjun; Yang, Haishui; Hu, Shuijin; Chen, Xin

    2010-08-24

    Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum) that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

  8. Positive feedback between mycorrhizal fungi and plants influences plant invasion success and resistance to invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb. Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

  9. Differentiating invasive and pre-invasive lung cancer by quantitative analysis of histopathologic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Sun, Hongliu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Kazerooni, Ella

    2018-02-01

    We are developing automated radiopathomics method for diagnosis of lung nodule subtypes. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using quantitative methods to analyze the tumor nuclei and cytoplasm in pathologic wholeslide images for the classification of pathologic subtypes of invasive nodules and pre-invasive nodules. We developed a multiscale blob detection method with watershed transform (MBD-WT) to segment the tumor cells. Pathomic features were extracted to characterize the size, morphology, sharpness, and gray level variation in each segmented nucleus and the heterogeneity patterns of tumor nuclei and cytoplasm. With permission of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) project, a data set containing 90 digital haematoxylin and eosin (HE) whole-slide images from 48 cases was used in this study. The 48 cases contain 77 regions of invasive subtypes and 43 regions of pre-invasive subtypes outlined by a pathologist on the HE images using the pathological tumor region description provided by NLST as reference. A logistic regression model (LRM) was built using leave-one-case-out resampling and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for classification of invasive and pre-invasive subtypes. With 11 selected features, the LRM achieved a test area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.91+/-0.03. The results demonstrated that the pathologic invasiveness of lung adenocarcinomas could be categorized with high accuracy using pathomics analysis.

  10. MicroRNA and protein profiles in invasive versus non-invasive oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korvala, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.korvala@oulu.fi [Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, University of Oulu, The Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5A, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Jee, Kowan [Department of Pathology, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Porkola, Emmi [Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, University of Oulu, The Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5A, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Almangush, Alhadi [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Mosakhani, Neda [Department of Pathology, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Bitu, Carolina [Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, University of Oulu, The Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5A, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Cervigne, Nilva K. [Department of Oral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Av. Limeira, 901 – Bairro Areião, CEP: 13414-903 Piracicaba, São Paulo (Brazil); Department of Clinical and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai - FMJ, Jundiai, SP (Brazil); Zandonadi, Flávia S.; Meirelles, Gabriela V.; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes [Laboratório Nacional de Biociências, LNBio, CNPEM, Rua Giuseppe Máximo Scolfaro, 10.000, Polo II de Alta Tecnologia de Campinas, Campinas/SP, P.O.Box 6192, CEP 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Coletta, Ricardo D. [Department of Oral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Av. Limeira, 901 – Bairro Areião, CEP: 13414-903 Piracicaba, São Paulo (Brazil); and others

    2017-01-01

    Complex molecular pathways regulate cancer invasion. This study overviewed proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) invasion. The human highly aggressive OTSCC cell line HSC-3 was examined in a 3D organotypic human leiomyoma model. Non-invasive and invasive cells were laser-captured and protein expression was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and miRNA expression by microarray. In functional studies the 3D invasion assay was replicated after silencing candidate miRNAs, miR-498 and miR-940, in invasive OTSCC cell lines (HSC-3 and SCC-15). Cell migration, proliferation and viability were also studied in the silenced cells. In HSC-3 cells, 67 proteins and 53 miRNAs showed significant fold-changes between non-invasive vs. invasive cells. Pathway enrichment analyses allocated “Focal adhesion” and “ECM-receptor interaction” as most important for invasion. Significantly, in HSC-3 cells, miR-498 silencing decreased the invasion area and miR-940 silencing reduced invasion area and depth. Viability, proliferation and migration weren’t significantly affected. In SCC-15 cells, down-regulation of miR-498 significantly reduced invasion and migration. This study shows HSC-3 specific miRNA and protein expression in invasion, and suggests that miR-498 and miR-940 affect invasion in vitro, the process being more influenced by mir-940 silencing in aggressive HSC-3 cells than in the less invasive SCC-15.

  11. Fluid challenge: tracking changes in cardiac output with blood pressure monitoring (invasive or non-invasive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Karim; Ehrmann, Stephan; Perrotin, Dominique; Wolff, Michel; Boulain, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    To assess whether invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (BP) monitoring allows the identification of patients who have responded to a fluid challenge, i.e., who have increased their cardiac output (CO). Patients with signs of circulatory failure were prospectively included. Before and after a fluid challenge, CO and the mean of four intra-arterial and oscillometric brachial cuff BP measurements were collected. Fluid responsiveness was defined by an increase in CO ≥10 or ≥15% in case of regular rhythm or arrhythmia, respectively. In 130 patients, the correlation between a fluid-induced increase in pulse pressure (Δ500mlPP) and fluid-induced increase in CO was weak and was similar for invasive and non-invasive measurements of BP: r² = 0.31 and r² = 0.29, respectively (both p area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.82 (0.74-0.88), similar (p = 0.80) to that of non-invasive Δ500mlPP [AUC of 0.81 (0.73-0.87)]. Outside large gray zones of inconclusive values (5-23% for invasive Δ500mlPP and 4-35% for non-invasive Δ500mlPP, involving 35 and 48% of patients, respectively), the detection of responsiveness or unresponsiveness to fluid was reliable. Cardiac arrhythmia did not impair the performance of invasive or non-invasive Δ500mlPP. Other BP-derived indices did not outperform Δ500mlPP. As evidenced by large gray zones, BP-derived indices poorly reflected fluid responsiveness. However, in our deeply sedated population, a high increase in invasive pulse pressure (>23%) or even in non-invasive pulse pressure (>35%) reliably detected a response to fluid. In the absence of a marked increase in pulse pressure (<4-5%), a response to fluid was unlikely.

  12. Quantifying the invasiveness of species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Colautti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The success of invasive species has been explained by two contrasting but non-exclusive views: (i intrinsic factors make some species inherently good invaders; (ii species become invasive as a result of extrinsic ecological and genetic influences such as release from natural enemies, hybridization or other novel ecological and evolutionary interactions. These viewpoints are rarely distinguished but hinge on distinct mechanisms leading to different management scenarios. To improve tests of these hypotheses of invasion success we introduce a simple mathematical framework to quantify the invasiveness of species along two axes: (i interspecific differences in performance among native and introduced species within a region, and (ii intraspecific differences between populations of a species in its native and introduced ranges. Applying these equations to a sample dataset of occurrences of 1,416 plant species across Europe, Argentina, and South Africa, we found that many species are common in their native range but become rare following introduction; only a few introduced species become more common. Biogeographical factors limiting spread (e.g. biotic resistance, time of invasion therefore appear more common than those promoting invasion (e.g. enemy release. Invasiveness, as measured by occurrence data, is better explained by inter-specific variation in invasion potential than biogeographical changes in performance. We discuss how applying these comparisons to more detailed performance data would improve hypothesis testing in invasion biology and potentially lead to more efficient management strategies.

  13. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p < 0.001) and to have marked intensity than were ILC foci (63% IDC vs 32% ILC; p < 0.001). Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging correctly revealed all pathology-proven foci of invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p < 0.0001). Overall, direct-conversion molecular breast imaging showed all known invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular

  14. 3D-CRT, Proton, or Brachytherapy APBI in Treating Patients With Invasive and Non-invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-29

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Grade 1 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Grade 2 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Grade 3 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal and Lobular Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  15. TGFβ loss activates ADAMTS-1-mediated EGF-dependent invasion in a model of esophageal cell invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bras, Grégoire F.; Taylor, Chase; Koumangoye, Rainelli B. [Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Revetta, Frank [Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Loomans, Holli A. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Andl, Claudia D., E-mail: claudia.andl@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is essential to epithelial homeostasis and is often inhibited during progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Recently, an important role for TGFβ signaling has been described in the crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating squamous tumor cell invasion in mouse models of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Loss of TGFβ signaling, in either compartment, leads to HNSCC however, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Using organotypic reconstruct cultures (OTC) to model the interaction between epithelial and stromal cells that occur in dysplastic lesions, we show that loss of TGFβ signaling promotes an invasive phenotype in both fibroblast and epithelial compartments. Employing immortalized esophageal keratinocytes established to reproduce common mutations of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, we show that treatment of OTC with inhibitors of TGFβ signaling (A83-01 or SB431542) enhances invasion of epithelial cells into a fibroblast-embedded Matrigel/collagen I matrix. Invasion induced by A83-01 is independent of proliferation but relies on protease activity and expression of ADAMTS-1 and can be altered by matrix density. This invasion was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1 and EGFR ligands HB-EGF and TGFα. Altering EGF signaling prevented or induced epithelial cell invasion in this model. Loss of expression of the TGFβ target gene ROBO1 suggested that chemorepulsion may regulate keratinocyte invasion. Taken together, our data show increased invasion through inhibition of TGFβ signaling altered epithelial-fibroblasts interactions, repressing markers of activated fibroblasts, and altering integrin-fibronectin interactions. These results suggest that inhibition of TGFβ signaling modulates an array of pathways that combined promote multiple aspects of tumor invasion. - Highlights: • Chemical inhibition of TGFβ signaling advances collective invasion

  16. Insights into invasion and restoration ecology: Time to collaborate towards a holistic approach to tackle biological invasions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirijam Gaertner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study is to provide an integrated framework for the management of alien plant invasions, combining insights and experiences from the fields of invasion and restoration ecology to enable more effective management of invasive species. To determine linkages between the scientific outputs of the two disciplines we used an existing data base on restoration studies between 2000 and 2008 and did a bibliometric analysis. We identified the type of restoration applied, determined by the aim of the study, and conducted a content analysis on 208 selected studies with a link to biological invasions (invasion-restoration studies. We found a total of 1075 articles on ecosystem restoration, with only eight percent of the studiesthe main objective to control alien invasions. The content analysis of 208 invasion-restoration studies showed that the majority of the studies focused on causes of degradation other than alien invasions. If invaders were referred to as the main driver of degradation, the prevalent cause for degradation was invaders outcompeting and replacing native species. Mechanical control of alien plant invasions was by far the most common control method used. Measures that went beyond the removal of alien plants were implemented in sixty-five percent of the studies.Although invasion control was not as common as other types of restoration, a closer look at the sub-group of invasion-restoration studies shows a clear link between restoration and invasion ecology. Concerns, as identified in the literature review, are firstly that restoration activities mostly focus on controlling the invader while other underlying causes for degradation are neglected, and secondly that the current approach of dealing with alien invasions lacks a combination of theoretical and practical aspects. We suggest that closer collaboration between invasion and restoration ecologists can help to improve the management of alien plant invasions. We conclude with a

  17. Surgical Management of Renal Hyperparathyroidism: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Neagoe Radu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT occurs most commonly in the setting of chronic renal failure (CRF being frequently referred to as “renal” hyperparathyroidism The “classical” medical treatment with oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation is generally sufficient to lower parathyroid hormone levels in the majority of these patients. However, we frequently encounter cases of severe refractory sHPT, a state in which even recently available therapeutic agents, i.e. calcimimetics, new phosphate binders, vitamin D analogues, remain inefficient, thus parathyroidectomy and/or renal transplant becoming necessary. Three types of surgeries have been proposed in sHPT: two of them are grouped as remnant-conserving techniques, i.e. subtotal parathyroidectomy (sPtx and total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation (tPtx+AT, the third one being total parathyroidectomy without autotransplantation (tPtx. There was a continuous debate concerning the best surgical approach in renal hyperparathyroidism, starting very soon after those techniques were described; without pretending to solve these controversies, this paper aims to review the surgical treatment options in sHPT, based on our 5-year experience in dealing with the disease.

  18. A first step in understanding an invasive weed through its genes: an EST analysis of invasive Centaurea maculosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broz, Amanda K; Broeckling, Corey D; He, Ji; Dai, Xinbin; Zhao, Patrick X; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2007-05-24

    The economic and biological implications of plant invasion are overwhelming; however, the processes by which plants become successful invaders are not well understood. Limited genetic resources are available for most invasive and weedy species, making it difficult to study molecular and genetic aspects that may be associated with invasion. As an initial step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms by which plants become invasive, we have generated a normalized Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) library comprising seven invasive populations of Centaurea maculosa, an invasive aster in North America. Seventy-seven percent of the 4423 unique transcripts showed significant similarity to existing proteins in the NCBI database and could be grouped based on gene ontology assignments. The C. maculosa EST library represents an initial step towards looking at gene-specific expression in this species, and will pave the way for creation of other resources such as microarray chips that can help provide a view of global gene expression in invasive C. maculosa and its native counterparts. To our knowledge, this is the first published set of ESTs derived from an invasive weed that will be targeted to study invasive behavior. Understanding the genetic basis of evolution for increased invasiveness in exotic plants is critical to understanding the mechanisms through which exotic invasions occur.

  19. The relation between invasive and non-invasive tear break-up time ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tear stability normal to Nigerians with consideration of gender and age has not been reported. Tear stability in young adults was measured using invasive and non-invasive tear break-up time (TBUT and NIBUT). Forty –five subjects aged 20 to 30 years were selected from among the students of University of. Benin, Edo ...

  20. Invasive species information networks: Collaboration at multiple scales for prevention, early detection, and rapid response to invasive alien species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Annie; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Madsen, John; Westbrooks, Randy G.; Fournier, Christine; Mehrhoff, Les; Browne, Michael; Graham, Jim; Sellers, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate analysis of present distributions and effective modeling of future distributions of invasive alien species (IAS) are both highly dependent on the availability and accessibility of occurrence data and natural history information about the species. Invasive alien species monitoring and detection networks (such as the Invasive Plant Atlas of New England and the Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth) generate occurrence data at local and regional levels within the United States, which are shared through the US National Institute of Invasive Species Science. The Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network's Invasives Information Network (I3N), facilitates cooperation on sharing invasive species occurrence data throughout the Western Hemisphere. The I3N and other national and regional networks expose their data globally via the Global Invasive Species Information Network (GISIN). International and interdisciplinary cooperation on data sharing strengthens cooperation on strategies and responses to invasions. However, limitations to effective collaboration among invasive species networks leading to successful early detection and rapid response to invasive species include: lack of interoperability; data accessibility; funding; and technical expertise. This paper proposes various solutions to these obstacles at different geographic levels and briefly describes success stories from the invasive species information networks mentioned above. Using biological informatics to facilitate global information sharing is especially critical in invasive species science, as research has shown that one of the best indicators of the invasiveness of a species is whether it has been invasive elsewhere. Data must also be shared across disciplines because natural history information (e.g. diet, predators, habitat requirements, etc.) about a species in its native range is vital for effective prevention, detection, and rapid response to an invasion. Finally, it has been our

  1. Responses of the soil fungal communities to the co-invasion of two invasive species with different cover classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Zhou, J; Liu, J; Jiang, K; Xiao, H; Du, D

    2018-01-01

    Soil fungal communities play an important role in the successful invasion of non-native species. It is common for two or more invasive plant species to co-occur in invaded ecosystems. This study aimed to determine the effects of co-invasion of two invasive species (Erigeron annuus and Solidago canadensis) with different cover classes on soil fungal communities using high-throughput sequencing. Invasion of E. annuus and/or S. canadensis had positive effects on the sequence number, operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness, Shannon diversity, abundance-based cover estimator (ACE index) and Chao1 index of soil fungal communities, but negative effects on the Simpson index. Thus, invasion of E. annuus and/or S. canadensis could increase diversity and richness of soil fungal communities but decrease dominance of some members of these communities, in part to facilitate plant further invasion, because high soil microbial diversity could increase soil functions and plant nutrient acquisition. Some soil fungal species grow well, whereas others tend to extinction after non-native plant invasion with increasing invasion degree and presumably time. The sequence number, OTU richness, Shannon diversity, ACE index and Chao1 index of soil fungal communities were higher under co-invasion of E. annuus and S. canadensis than under independent invasion of either individual species. The co-invasion of the two invasive species had a positive synergistic effect on diversity and abundance of soil fungal communities, partly to build a soil microenvironment to enhance competitiveness of the invaders. The changed diversity and community under co-invasion could modify resource availability and niche differentiation within the soil fungal communities, mediated by differences in leaf litter quality and quantity, which can support different fungal/microbial species in the soil. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  2. Hypocalcemia development in patients operated for primary hyperparathyroidism: Can it be predicted preoperatively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Cafer; Tam, Abbas Ali; Dirikoç, Ahmet; Kılıçyazgan, Aylin; Kılıç, Mehmet; Türkölmez, Şeyda; Ersoy, Reyhan; Çakır, Bekir

    2016-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is a common endocrine disease, and its most effective treatment is surgery. Postoperative hypocalcemia is a morbidity of parathyroid surgeries, and it may extend hospitalization durations. The purpose of this study is to determine the predictive factors related to the development of hypocalcemia and hungry bone syndrome (HBS) in patients who underwent parathyroidectomy for PHP. Laboratory data comprising parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, phosphate, 25-OHD, albumin, magnesium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of the patients were recorded preoperatively, on the 1st and 4th days postoperatively, and in the 6th postoperative month, and their neck ultrasound (US) and bone densitometry data were also recorded. Hypocalcemia was seen in 63 patients (38.4%) on the 1st day after parathyroidectomy. Ten patients (6.1%) had permanent hypocalcemia in the 6th month after surgery. Out of the patients who underwent parathyroidectomy for PHP, 22 (13.4%) had HBS. The incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia was higher in patients who underwent parathyroidectomy for PHP, who had parathyroid hyperplasia, and who had osteoporosis. Preoperative PTH, ALP, and BUN values were higher in those patients who developed HBS. Furthermore, HBS was more common in patients who had osteoporosis, who had parathyroid hyperplasia, and who underwent thyroidectomy simultaneously with parathyroidectomy. As a result, patients who have the risk factors for development of hypocalcemia and HBS should be monitored more attentively during the perioperative period.

  3. Short-term efficacy of surgical treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y; Sun, Y; Ren, L; Qi, X-W; Li, Y; Zhang, F

    2015-10-01

    We wished to explore short-term efficacy of surgical treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with the end-stage renal disease. The treatment methods were subtotal or total parathyroidectomy, or total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation. 63 patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism were randomly divided into three groups which were respectively treated with subtotal parathyroidectomy (SPTX group), total parathyroidectomy (TPTX group), or total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation (TPTX+AT group). The surgical outcomes included operating time, transoperative bleeding volume, length of stay, and cost of hospitalization. In addition, complication (e.g., postoperative wound infection, hematoma, hypocalcemia in perioperative period) rates were compared among groups. Blood levels of calcium and parathyroid hormone were assessed before the surgery, and 1 day, 1 months, 3 months and 6 months after the surgery. The follow-up period comprised 6 months. Surgical outcomes were the lowest in SPTX group and the highest in in TPTX+AT group. There were no significant differences among groups in treatment efficacy. Complication rates were also comparable among the three groups. The occurrence of hypocalcemia was the lowest in SPTX group (p < 0.05 vs. other groups). However, postoperative relapse rate was the highest in this group (p < 0.05 vs. other groups). There were no correlations between the levels of blood calcium and PTH preoperatively and postoperatively. Appropriate surgical treatment is selected in accordance with the patient's condition and willingness, with the attention paid to the prevention of hypocalcemia.

  4. Worldwide Alien Invasion: A Methodological Approach to Forecast the Potential Spread of a Highly Invasive Pollinator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L Acosta

    Full Text Available The ecological impacts of alien species invasion are a major threat to global biodiversity. The increasing number of invasion events by alien species and the high cost and difficulty of eradicating invasive species once established require the development of new methods and tools for predicting the most susceptible areas to invasion. Invasive pollinators pose serious threats to biodiversity and human activity due to their close relationship with many plants (including crop species and high potential competitiveness for resources with native pollinators. Although at an early stage of expansion, the bumblebee species Bombus terrestris is becoming a representative case of pollinator invasion at a global scale, particularly given its high velocity of invasive spread and the increasing number of reports of its impacts on native bees and crops in many countries. We present here a methodological framework of habitat suitability modeling that integrates new approaches for detecting habitats that are susceptible to Bombus terrestris invasion at a global scale. Our approach did not include reported invaded locations in the modeling procedure; instead, those locations were used exclusively to evaluate the accuracy of the models in predicting suitability over regions already invaded. Moreover, a new and more intuitive approach was developed to select the models and evaluate different algorithms based on their performance and predictive convergence. Finally, we present a comprehensive global map of susceptibility to Bombus terrestris invasion that highlights priority areas for monitoring.

  5. A first step in understanding an invasive weed through its genes: an EST analysis of invasive Centaurea maculosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ji

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The economic and biological implications of plant invasion are overwhelming; however, the processes by which plants become successful invaders are not well understood. Limited genetic resources are available for most invasive and weedy species, making it difficult to study molecular and genetic aspects that may be associated with invasion. Results As an initial step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms by which plants become invasive, we have generated a normalized Expressed Sequence Tag (EST library comprising seven invasive populations of Centaurea maculosa, an invasive aster in North America. Seventy-seven percent of the 4423 unique transcripts showed significant similarity to existing proteins in the NCBI database and could be grouped based on gene ontology assignments. Conclusion The C. maculosa EST library represents an initial step towards looking at gene-specific expression in this species, and will pave the way for creation of other resources such as microarray chips that can help provide a view of global gene expression in invasive C. maculosa and its native counterparts. To our knowledge, this is the first published set of ESTs derived from an invasive weed that will be targeted to study invasive behavior. Understanding the genetic basis of evolution for increased invasiveness in exotic plants is critical to understanding the mechanisms through which exotic invasions occur.

  6. Invasion of a mined landscape: what habitat characteristics are influencing the occurrence of invasive plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Lemke; I.A. Tazisong; Y. Wang; J.A. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the world, the invasion of alien plants is an increasing threat to native biodiversity. Invasion is especially prevalent in areas affected by land transformation and anthropogenic disturbance. Surface mines are a major disturbance, and thus may promote the establishment and expansion of invasive plant communities. Environmental and habitat factors that may...

  7. Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Tim S; Glen, Alistair S; Nimmo, Dale G; Ritchie, Euan G; Dickman, Chris R

    2016-10-04

    Invasive species threaten biodiversity globally, and invasive mammalian predators are particularly damaging, having contributed to considerable species decline and extinction. We provide a global metaanalysis of these impacts and reveal their full extent. Invasive predators are implicated in 87 bird, 45 mammal, and 10 reptile species extinctions-58% of these groups' contemporary extinctions worldwide. These figures are likely underestimated because 23 critically endangered species that we assessed are classed as "possibly extinct." Invasive mammalian predators endanger a further 596 species at risk of extinction, with cats, rodents, dogs, and pigs threatening the most species overall. Species most at risk from predators have high evolutionary distinctiveness and inhabit insular environments. Invasive mammalian predators are therefore important drivers of irreversible loss of phylogenetic diversity worldwide. That most impacted species are insular indicates that management of invasive predators on islands should be a global conservation priority. Understanding and mitigating the impact of invasive mammalian predators is essential for reducing the rate of global biodiversity loss.

  8. Invasive Paget Disease of the Vulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Chiara; Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Scaffa, Cono; Perotto, Stefania; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Recalcati, Dario; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Extramammary Paget disease of the vulva (EPDV) is a rare occurrence with an indolent and relapsing course. Progression to invasion occurs in 4% to 19% of cases. The aim of this study is to report clinical-pathological features and outcomes of patients treated for invasive EPDV. Data of consecutive patients treated between 2000 and 2017 for invasive EPDV were reviewed. Among 79 patients with EPDV, 10 (12.7%) presented a microinvasive or invasive form at first diagnosis or during follow-up. All of them underwent upfront radical surgery; 7 (70%) received subsequent radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. The mortality rate was 40%. The recurrence rate after treatment for invasive forms was 60%, with a mean time to first recurrence of 20 (range, 5-36) months. Our study confirms that invasive EPDV remains a rare gynecological neoplasm with a poor prognosis. Multicentre trials or well-organized prospective data collection could improve the knowledge about the management of invasive EPDV.

  9. A Mena invasion isoform potentiates EGF-induced carcinoma cell invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippar, Ulrike; Roussos, Evanthia T; Oser, Matthew; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Kim, Hyung-Do; Giampieri, Silvia; Wang, Yarong; Goswami, Sumanta; Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John S; Gertler, Frank B

    2008-12-01

    The spread of cancer during metastatic disease requires that tumor cells subvert normal regulatory networks governing cell motility to invade surrounding tissues and migrate toward blood and lymphatic vessels. Enabled (Ena)/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) proteins regulate cell motility by controlling the geometry of assembling actin networks. Mena, an Ena/VASP protein, is upregulated in the invasive subpopulation of breast cancer cells. In addition, Mena is alternately spliced to produce an invasion isoform, Mena(INV). Here we show that Mena and Mena(INV) promote carcinoma cell motility and invasiveness in vivo and in vitro, and increase lung metastasis. Mena and Mena(INV) potentiate epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced membrane protrusion and increase the matrix degradation activity of tumor cells. Interestingly, Mena(INV) is significantly more effective than Mena in driving metastases and sensitizing cells to EGF-dependent invasion and protrusion. Upregulation of Mena(INV) could therefore enable tumor cells to invade in response to otherwise benign EGF stimulus levels.

  10. Invasive versus Non Invasive Methods Applied to Mummy Research: Will This Controversy Ever Be Solved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jasmine; Bianucci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the application of non invasive techniques to mummified remains have shed new light on past diseases. The virtual inspection of a corpse, which has almost completely replaced classical autopsy, has proven to be important especially when dealing with valuable museum specimens. In spite of some very rewarding results, there are still many open questions. Non invasive techniques provide information on hard and soft tissue pathologies and allow information to be gleaned concerning mummification practices (e.g., ancient Egyptian artificial mummification). Nevertheless, there are other fields of mummy studies in which the results provided by non invasive techniques are not always self-explanatory. Reliance exclusively upon virtual diagnoses can sometimes lead to inconclusive and misleading interpretations. On the other hand, several types of investigation (e.g., histology, paleomicrobiology, and biochemistry), although minimally invasive, require direct contact with the bodies and, for this reason, are often avoided, particularly by museum curators. Here we present an overview of the non invasive and invasive techniques currently used in mummy studies and propose an approach that might solve these conflicts. PMID:26345295

  11. From mini-invasive to non-invasive treatment using monopolar radiofrequency: the next orthopaedic frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Terry L

    2009-10-01

    Tendinopathy arises from a failed tendon healing process. Current non-invasive therapeutic alternatives are anti-inflammatory in nature, and outcomes are unpredictable. The benefit of invasive alternatives resides in the induction of the healing response. A new technology that uses non-invasive monopolar capacitive coupled radiofrequency has demonstrated the ability to raise temperatures in tendons and ligaments above 50 degrees C, the threshold for collagen modulation, tissue shrinkage and recruitment of macrophages, fibroblasts, and heat shock protein factors, without damaging the overlying structures, resulting in activation of the wound healing response. Monopolar capacitive-coupled radiofrequency offers a new non-invasive choice for tendinopathies and sprained ligaments. It does not interfere with subsequent surgical procedures should they become necessary.

  12. E-commerce trade in invasive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humair, Franziska; Humair, Luc; Kuhn, Fabian; Kueffer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Biological invasions are a major concern in conservation, especially because global transport of species is still increasing rapidly. Conservationists hope to anticipate and thus prevent future invasions by identifying and regulating potentially invasive species through species risk assessments and international trade regulations. Among many introduction pathways of non-native species, horticulture is a particularly important driver of plant invasions. In recent decades, the horticultural industry expanded globally and changed structurally through the emergence of new distribution channels, including internet trade (e-commerce). Using an automated search algorithm, we surveyed, on a daily basis, e-commerce trade on 10 major online auction sites (including eBay) of approximately three-fifths of the world's spermatophyte flora. Many recognized invasive plant species (>500 species) (i.e., species associated with ecological or socio-economic problems) were traded daily worldwide on the internet. A markedly higher proportion of invasive than non-invasive species were available online. Typically, for a particular plant family, 30-80% of recognized invasive species were detected on an auction site, but only a few percentages of all species in the plant family were detected on a site. Families that were more traded had a higher proportion of invasive species than families that were less traded. For woody species, there was a significant positive relationship between the number of regions where a species was sold and the number of regions where it was invasive. Our results indicate that biosecurity is not effectively regulating online plant trade. In the future, automated monitoring of e-commerce may help prevent the spread of invasive species, provide information on emerging trade connectivity across national borders, and be used in horizon scanning exercises for early detection of new species and their geographic source areas in international trade. © 2015 Society for

  13. Unconventional gas development facilitates plant invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Kathryn M; Mortensen, David A; Drohan, Patrick J; Averill, Kristine M

    2017-11-01

    Vegetation removal and soil disturbance from natural resource development, combined with invasive plant propagule pressure, can increase vulnerability to plant invasions. Unconventional oil and gas development produces surface disturbance by way of well pad, road, and pipeline construction, and increased traffic. Little is known about the resulting impacts on plant community assembly, including the spread of invasive plants. Our work was conducted in Pennsylvania forests that overlay the Marcellus and Utica shale formations to determine if invasive plants have spread to edge habitat created by unconventional gas development and to investigate factors associated with their presence. A piecewise structural equation model was used to determine the direct and indirect factors associated with invasive plant establishment on well pads. The model included the following measured or calculated variables: current propagule pressure on local access roads, the spatial extent of the pre-development road network (potential source of invasive propagules), the number of wells per pad (indicator of traffic density), and pad age. Sixty-one percent of the 127 well pads surveyed had at least one invasive plant species present. Invasive plant presence on well pads was positively correlated with local propagule pressure on access roads and indirectly with road density pre-development, the number of wells, and age of the well pad. The vast reserves of unconventional oil and gas are in the early stages of development in the US. Continued development of this underground resource must be paired with careful monitoring and management of surface ecological impacts, including the spread of invasive plants. Prioritizing invasive plant monitoring in unconventional oil and gas development areas with existing roads and multi-well pads could improve early detection and control of invasive plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of resource use and costs associated with parathyroidectomy for secondary hyperparathyroidism in end stage renal disease in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockett, Rhys D; Cevro, Emir; Chamberlain, George; Scott-Coombes, David; Baboolal, Kesh

    2014-03-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a major complication of end stage renal disease (ESRD). For the National Health Service (NHS) to make appropriate choices between medical and surgical management, it needs to understand the cost implications of each. A recent pilot study suggested that the current NHS healthcare resource group tariff for parathyroidectomy (PTX) (£2071 and £1859 in patients with and without complications, respectively) is not representative of the true costs of surgery in patients with SHPT. This study aims to provide an estimate of healthcare resources used to manage patients and estimate the cost of PTX in a UK tertiary care centre. Resource use was identified by combining data from the Proton renal database and routine hospital data for adults undergoing PTX for SHPT at the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, from 2000-2008. Data were supplemented by a questionnaire, completed by clinicians in six centres across the UK. Costs were obtained from NHS reference costs, British National Formulary and published literature. Costs were applied for the pre-surgical, surgical, peri-surgical, and post-surgical periods so as to calculate the total cost associated with PTX. One hundred and twenty-four patients (mean age=51.0 years) were identified in the database and 79 from the questionnaires. The main costs identified in the database were the surgical stay (mean=£4066, SD=£,130), the first month post-discharge (£465, SD=£176), and 3 months prior to surgery (£399, SD=£188); the average total cost was £4932 (SD=£4129). From the questionnaires the total cost was £5459 (SD=£943). It is possible that the study was limited due to missing data within the database, as well as the possibility of recall bias associated with the clinicians completing the questionnaires. This analysis suggests that the costs associated with PTX in SHPT exceed the current NHS tariffs for PTX. The cost implications associated with PTX need to be considered in the

  15. Quantitative CT analysis of pulmonary ground-glass opacity nodules for distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma: the added value of using iodine mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji Ye; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Han, Joungho; Jeong, Ji Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether quantitative analysis of iodine-enhanced images generated from dual-energy CT (DECT) have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) showing ground-glass nodule (GGN). Thirty-four patients with 39 GGNs were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent DECT followed by complete tumour resection. Various quantitative imaging parameters were assessed, including virtual non-contrast (VNC) imaging and iodine-enhanced imaging. Of all 39 GGNs, four were adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) (10 %), nine were MIA (23 %), and 26 were invasive adenocarcinoma (67 %). When assessing only VNC imaging, multivariate analysis revealed that mass, uniformity, and size-zone variability were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (odds ratio [OR] = 19.92, P = 0.02; OR = 0.70, P = 0.01; OR = 16.16, P = 0.04, respectively). After assessing iodine-enhanced imaging with VNC imaging, both mass on the VNC imaging and uniformity on the iodine-enhanced imaging were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (OR = 5.51, P = 0.04 and OR = 0.67, P VNC imaging alone, from 0.888 to 0.959, respectively (P = 0.029). Quantitative analysis using iodine-enhanced imaging metrics versus VNC imaging metrics alone generated from DECT have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from AIS or MIA. Quantitative analysis using DECT was used to distinguish invasive adenocarcinoma. Tumour mass and uniformity were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma. Diagnostic performance was improved after adding iodine parameters to VNC parameters.

  16. DNA barcoding of invasive plants in China: A resource for identifying invasive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song-Zhi; Li, Zhen-Yu; Jin, Xiao-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Invasive plants have aroused attention globally for causing ecological damage and having a negative impact on the economy and human health. However, it can be extremely challenging to rapidly and accurately identify invasive plants based on morphology because they are an assemblage of many different families and many plant materials lack sufficient diagnostic characteristics during border inspections. It is therefore urgent to evaluate candidate loci and build a reliable genetic library to prevent invasive plants from entering China. In this study, five common single markers (ITS, ITS2, matK, rbcL and trnH-psbA) were evaluated using 634 species (including 469 invasive plant species in China, 10 new records to China, 16 potentially invasive plant species around the world but not introduced into China yet and 139 plant species native to China) based on three different methods. Our results indicated that ITS2 displayed largest intra- and interspecific divergence (1.72% and 91.46%). Based on NJ tree method, ITS2, ITS, matK, rbcL and trnH-psbA provided 76.84%, 76.5%, 63.21%, 52.86% and 50.68% discrimination rates, respectively. The combination of ITS + matK performed best and provided 91.03% discriminatory power, followed by ITS2 + matK (85.78%). For identifying unknown individuals, ITS + matK had 100% correct identification rate based on our database, followed by ITS/ITS2 (both 93.33%) and ITS2 + matK (91.67%). Thus, we propose ITS/ITS2 + matK as the most suitable barcode for invasive plants in China. This study also demonstrated that DNA barcoding is an efficient tool for identifying invasive species. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Do native parasitic plants cause more damage to exotic invasive hosts than native non-invasive hosts? An implication for biocontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Jin, Zexin; Song, Wenjing

    2012-01-01

    Field studies have shown that native, parasitic plants grow vigorously on invasive plants and can cause more damage to invasive plants than native plants. However, no empirical test has been conducted and the mechanism is still unknown. We conducted a completely randomized greenhouse experiment using 3 congeneric pairs of exotic, invasive and native, non-invasive herbaceous plant species to quantify the damage caused by parasitic plants to hosts and its correlation with the hosts' growth rate and resource use efficiency. The biomass of the parasitic plants on exotic, invasive hosts was significantly higher than on congeneric native, non-invasive hosts. Parasites caused more damage to exotic, invasive hosts than to congeneric, native, non-invasive hosts. The damage caused by parasites to hosts was significantly positively correlated with the biomass of parasitic plants. The damage of parasites to hosts was significantly positively correlated with the relative growth rate and the resource use efficiency of its host plants. It may be the mechanism by which parasitic plants grow more vigorously on invasive hosts and cause more damage to exotic, invasive hosts than to native, non-invasive hosts. These results suggest a potential biological control effect of native, parasitic plants on invasive species by reducing the dominance of invasive species in the invaded community.

  18. RADIONUCLIDE INDICATION OF SENTINEL LYMPH NODES IN LARYNX AND LARYNGOPHARYNX CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Sinilkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to determine the possibility of radionuclide methods in the identification of "sentinel" lymph node (SLN in larynx and laryngopharynx cancer patients.Material and methods: 17 patients with larynx and laryngopharynx cancer were included in research. In all patients for SLN visualization nanocolloid radiopharmaceutical was injection around tumor into mucous coat with the subsequent SPECT and radioguided study.Results: Sensitivity and specificity of SPECT and radioguided study for SLN identification were 100%. We found 22 SLN in 17 patients (from 1 to 2 per patient, on average 1.3. Most often SLN were located in the III level of a neck (lymph nodes around of carotid arteries – 12 SLN (54.5% and IIA level (under lower jaw lymph nodes – 6 (27.2%. One SLN (4.5% was localized in IV level and 3 nodes (13.6% in VI level. In 2 patients (11.8% metastasis in SLN were found. In these patients within 2 years cancer progressing was revealed. Fifteen patients (88.2% had no metastatic in SLN and had no progressing of a cancer.Conclusions: Sensitivity and specificity of SPECT and radioguided study for SLN identification are 100%. In patients with metastatic SLN radical surgery with lymph node dissection is helpful.

  19. Invasive tightly coupled processor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    LARI, VAHID

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces new massively parallel computer (MPSoC) architectures called invasive tightly coupled processor arrays. It proposes strategies, architecture designs, and programming interfaces for invasive TCPAs that allow invading and subsequently executing loop programs with strict requirements or guarantees of non-functional execution qualities such as performance, power consumption, and reliability. For the first time, such a configurable processor array architecture consisting of locally interconnected VLIW processing elements can be claimed by programs, either in full or in part, using the principle of invasive computing. Invasive TCPAs provide unprecedented energy efficiency for the parallel execution of nested loop programs by avoiding any global memory access such as GPUs and may even support loops with complex dependencies such as loop-carried dependencies that are not amenable to parallel execution on GPUs. For this purpose, the book proposes different invasion strategies for claiming a desire...

  20. Integrating invasive species policies across ornamental horticulture supply chains to prevent plant invasions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulme, Philip E.; Brundu, Giuseppe; Carboni, Marta; Dehnen-schmutz, Katharina; Dullinger, Stefan; Early, Regan; Essl, Franz; González-moreno, Pablo; Groom, Quentin J.; Kueffer, Christoph; Kühn, Ingolf; Maurel, Noëlie; Novoa, Ana; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Seebens, Hanno; Tanner, Rob; Touza, Julia M.; Van Kleunen, Mark; Verbrugge, Laura Nicoline Halley

    2017-01-01

    1.Ornamental horticulture is the primary pathway for invasive alien plant introductions. We critically appraise published evidence on the effectiveness of four policy instruments that tackle invasions along the horticulture supply chain: pre-border import restrictions, post-border bans, industry

  1. Invasive Candidiasis: An Overview from Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Yuan Ruan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive candidiasis has emerged as an important nosocomial infection, especially in critically ill patients. We review the epidemiology of invasive candidiasis with an emphasis on data from Taiwan. An increasing incidence of candidemia became apparent from 1980 to the end of the 1990s, followed by relative stability. Crude mortality rates of patients with candidemia were in the range of 35% to 60%. Candida albicans remains the predominant cause of invasive candidiasis in Taiwan and accounts for more than 50% of all cases. Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis are the three most common nonalbicansCandida species that cause invasive candidiasis. The above four Candida species account for more than 90% of invasive candidiasis in Taiwan. Overall, invasive Candida isolates have remained highly susceptible to fluconazole (> 90% susceptibility over the past two decades. However, periodic surveillance is needed to monitor antifungal resistance because reduced fluconazole susceptibility in non-albicans Candida is not an uncommon trend. Voriconazole and echinocandins continue to exhibit excellent in vitro activity against invasive Candida isolates.

  2. Invasion ecology meets parasitology: Advances and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Poulin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological invasions threaten the diversity and functioning of native ecosystems, and the rate at which species are being introduced to new areas shows no sign of slowing down. Parasites play roles in biological invasions, for instance when native parasites interact with exotic hosts, or when parasites themselves are introduced to new areas. However, publication trends show clearly that research on parasitism in the context of biological invasions is lagging far behind research on biological invasions in general. The different articles in this special issue of International Journal for Parasitology–Parasites and Wildlife on ‘Invasions’ address various aspects of the interface between parasitology and invasion biology, including how invasive free-living species lose or gain parasites on the invasion front as they move away from their site of introduction, how these invasive species affect the dynamics of native parasites, and how exotic parasites become established and impact native hosts. Together, they highlight the challenges facing researchers in this area, and set the agenda for the next few years of research. Keywords: alien species, Biological invasions, Enemy release, Non-natives, Parasites

  3. Synchronous lobular carcinoma in situ and invasive lobular cancer: marker or precursor for invasive lobular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A S; Xiang, D; Hockman, L; Arya, M; Jeffress, J; Wang, Z; Dale, P S

    2014-10-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is a known risk factor for invasive breast carcinoma, but there is increasing data indicating a possible precursor relationship. This study investigates the incidence of lobular carcinoma in situ that occurs with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). Women diagnosed with ILC or LCIS from 2000 to 2010 were retrospectively identified and reviewed after institutional review board approval. This group was divided into two cohorts: ILC alone, and LCIS and ILC (ILC/LCIS). Patient demographics, disease characteristics, and treatment modalities were captured. p invasive ductal carcinoma at ∼40%. The association of pre-invasive and invasive lobular lesions should be further studied in a large scale prospective study to assess for a precursor relationship. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative CT analysis of pulmonary ground-glass opacity nodules for distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma: the added value of using iodine mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ji Ye; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, 81 Irwon-Ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joungho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ji Yun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, O.J. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Respiratory and Critical Medicine of the Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Young Mog [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, 81 Irwon-Ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To determine whether quantitative analysis of iodine-enhanced images generated from dual-energy CT (DECT) have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) showing ground-glass nodule (GGN). Thirty-four patients with 39 GGNs were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent DECT followed by complete tumour resection. Various quantitative imaging parameters were assessed, including virtual non-contrast (VNC) imaging and iodine-enhanced imaging. Of all 39 GGNs, four were adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) (10 %), nine were MIA (23 %), and 26 were invasive adenocarcinoma (67 %). When assessing only VNC imaging, multivariate analysis revealed that mass, uniformity, and size-zone variability were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (odds ratio [OR] = 19.92, P = 0.02; OR = 0.70, P = 0.01; OR = 16.16, P = 0.04, respectively). After assessing iodine-enhanced imaging with VNC imaging, both mass on the VNC imaging and uniformity on the iodine-enhanced imaging were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (OR = 5.51, P = 0.04 and OR = 0.67, P < 0.01). The power of diagnosing invasive adenocarcinoma was improved after adding the iodine-enhanced imaging parameters versus VNC imaging alone, from 0.888 to 0.959, respectively (P = 0.029). Quantitative analysis using iodine-enhanced imaging metrics versus VNC imaging metrics alone generated from DECT have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from AIS or MIA. (orig.)

  6. Quantitative CT analysis of pulmonary ground-glass opacity nodules for distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma: the added value of using iodine mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ji Ye; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Jeong, Ji Yun; Kwon, O.J.; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether quantitative analysis of iodine-enhanced images generated from dual-energy CT (DECT) have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) showing ground-glass nodule (GGN). Thirty-four patients with 39 GGNs were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent DECT followed by complete tumour resection. Various quantitative imaging parameters were assessed, including virtual non-contrast (VNC) imaging and iodine-enhanced imaging. Of all 39 GGNs, four were adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) (10 %), nine were MIA (23 %), and 26 were invasive adenocarcinoma (67 %). When assessing only VNC imaging, multivariate analysis revealed that mass, uniformity, and size-zone variability were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (odds ratio [OR] = 19.92, P = 0.02; OR = 0.70, P = 0.01; OR = 16.16, P = 0.04, respectively). After assessing iodine-enhanced imaging with VNC imaging, both mass on the VNC imaging and uniformity on the iodine-enhanced imaging were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (OR = 5.51, P = 0.04 and OR = 0.67, P < 0.01). The power of diagnosing invasive adenocarcinoma was improved after adding the iodine-enhanced imaging parameters versus VNC imaging alone, from 0.888 to 0.959, respectively (P = 0.029). Quantitative analysis using iodine-enhanced imaging metrics versus VNC imaging metrics alone generated from DECT have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from AIS or MIA. (orig.)

  7. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, A.-K.; Buschbaum, C.; Gergs, R.; Jung, A.; Luttikhuizen, P.C.; Van der Meer, J.; Troost, K.; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and

  8. CONSERVATION PROGRAMS THAT PROMOTE INVASIVE SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive plant species are degrading the structure and function of ecosystems throughout the world. Although most state and federal conservation agencies in the U.S. attempt to reduce the impact of invasive species, some agency activities can contribute to the spread of invasive...

  9. Factors influencing plant invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette Ortega; Dean Pearson

    2009-01-01

    Invasiveness of spotted knapweed and biological control agents. Dean and Yvette are examining the influence of drought on the invasiveness of spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) and its susceptibility to herbivory by biological control agents. In collaboration with the University of Montana and Forest Health Protection, researchers have constructed 150...

  10. Introduced and invasive cactus species: a global review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Robertson, Mark P.; Wilson, John R.U.; Richardson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which species are introduced and become invasive, and why, are central questions in invasion science. Comparative studies on model taxa have provided important insights, but much more needs to be done to unravel the context dependencies of these findings. The cactus family (Cactaceae), one of the most popular horticultural plant groups, is an interesting case study. Hundreds of cactus species have been introduced outside their native ranges; a few of them are among the most damaging invasive plant species in the world. We reviewed the drivers of introductions and invasions in the family and seek insights that can be used to minimize future risks. We compiled a list of species in the family and determined which have been recorded as invasive. We also mapped current global distributions and modelled the potential global distributions based on distribution data of known invasive taxa. Finally, we identified whether invasiveness is phylogenetically clustered for cacti and whether particular traits are correlated with invasiveness. Only 57 of the 1922 cactus species recognized in this treatment have been recorded as invasive. There are three invasion hotspots: South Africa (35 invasive species recorded), Australia (26 species) and Spain (24 species). However, there are large areas of the world with climates suitable for cacti that are at risk of future invasion—in particular, parts of China, eastern Asia and central Africa. The invasive taxa represent an interesting subset of the total species pool. There is a significant phylogenetic signal: invasive species occur in 2 of the 3 major phylogenetic clades and in 13 of the 130 genera. This phylogenetic signal is not driven by human preference, i.e. horticultural trade, but all invasive species are from 5 of the 12 cactus growth forms. Finally, invasive species tend to have significantly larger native ranges than non-invasive species, and none of the invasive species are of conservation concern in their

  11. Stress in biological invasions: Introduced invasive grey squirrels increase physiological stress in native Eurasian red squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santicchia, Francesca; Dantzer, Ben; van Kesteren, Freya; Palme, Rupert; Martinoli, Adriano; Ferrari, Nicola; Wauters, Lucas Armand

    2018-05-23

    Invasive alien species can cause extinction of native species through processes including predation, interspecific competition for resources or disease-mediated competition. Increases in stress hormones in vertebrates may be associated with these processes and contribute to the decline in survival or reproduction of the native species. Eurasian red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) have gone extinct across much of the British Isles and parts of Northern Italy following the introduction of North American invasive grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis). We extracted glucocorticoid metabolites from faecal samples to measure whether the presence of the invasive species causes an increase in physiological stress in individuals of the native species. We show that native red squirrels in seven sites where they co-occurred with invasive grey squirrels had glucocorticoid concentrations that were three times higher than those in five sites without the invasive species. Moreover, in a longitudinal study, stress hormones in native red squirrels increased after colonisation by grey squirrels. When we experimentally reduced the abundance of the invasive grey squirrels, the concentration of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in co-occurring red squirrels decreased significantly between pre- and postremoval periods. Hence, we found that the invasive species acts as a stressor which significantly increases the concentrations of glucocorticoids in the native species. Given that sustained elevations in glucocorticoids could reduce body growth and reproductive rate, our results are consistent with previous studies where the co-occurrence of the invasive grey squirrel was associated with smaller size and lower reproductive output in red squirrels. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2018 British Ecological Society.

  12. Cryptic invasions: a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morais, Pedro Miguel; Reichard, Martin

    613-614, February (2018), s. 1438-1448 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-05872S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Conspecific invader * Biological invasions * Bibliometric * Invasiveness Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  13. Biological invasions, ecological resilience and adaptive governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Brian C; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Angeler, David G; Herrmann, Dustin L; Stow, Craig A; Nyström, Magnus; Sendzimir, Jan; Hopton, Matthew E; Kolasa, Jurek; Allen, Craig R

    2016-12-01

    In a world of increasing interconnections in global trade as well as rapid change in climate and land cover, the accelerating introduction and spread of invasive species is a critical concern due to associated negative social and ecological impacts, both real and perceived. Much of the societal response to invasive species to date has been associated with negative economic consequences of invasions. This response has shaped a war-like approach to addressing invasions, one with an agenda of eradications and intense ecological restoration efforts towards prior or more desirable ecological regimes. This trajectory often ignores the concept of ecological resilience and associated approaches of resilience-based governance. We argue that the relationship between ecological resilience and invasive species has been understudied to the detriment of attempts to govern invasions, and that most management actions fail, primarily because they do not incorporate adaptive, learning-based approaches. Invasive species can decrease resilience by reducing the biodiversity that underpins ecological functions and processes, making ecosystems more prone to regime shifts. However, invasions do not always result in a shift to an alternative regime; invasions can also increase resilience by introducing novelty, replacing lost ecological functions or adding redundancy that strengthens already existing structures and processes in an ecosystem. This paper examines the potential impacts of species invasions on the resilience of ecosystems and suggests that resilience-based approaches can inform policy by linking the governance of biological invasions to the negotiation of tradeoffs between ecosystem services. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Cavernous sinus invasion by pituitary adenomas. Relationship between magnetic resonance imaging findings and histologically verified dural invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daita, Go; Yonemasu, Yukichi; Nakai, Hirofumi; Takei, Hidetoshi; Ogawa, Katsuhiro [Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings and histologically verified invasion of the cavernous sinus by tumor cells was studied in 26 patients treated surgically for pituitary adenoma. Dural invasion of the sellar floor by tumor cells was found in 10 cases (38%). All patients were classified according to MR imaging findings into three types. Type I showed a gadolinium-enhanced stripe medial to the carotid artery (5 patients), none of which showed dural invasion. Type II showed no enhanced stripe (17 patients), six of which showed dural invasion. Within this type, tumor size and dural invasion showed no correlation. Type III showed displacement or encasement of the carotid artery by the tumor with or without extracranial extension (4 patients), all of which showed massive infiltration of the tumor cells into the dura mater. This study shows that preoperative MR imaging can provide information for assessment of invasion into the cavernous sinus in patients with pituitary adenoma. (author).

  15.  Invasibility of three major non-native invasive shrubs and associated factors in Upper Midwest U.S. forest lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Zhaofei Fan; Mark H. Hansen; Michael K. Crosby; Shirley X. Fan

    2016-01-01

    We used non-native invasive plant data from the US Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program, spatial statistical methods, and the space (cover class)-for-time approach to quantify the invasion potential and success ("invasibility") of three major invasive shrubs (multiflora rose, non-native bush honeysuckles, and common buckthorn...

  16. Ancestral origins and invasion pathways in a globally invasive bird correlate with climate and influences from bird trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Hazel; Strubbe, Diederik; Tollington, Simon; Prys-Jones, Robert; Matthysen, Erik; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-08-01

    Invasive species present a major threat to global biodiversity. Understanding genetic patterns and evolutionary processes that reinforce successful establishment is paramount for elucidating mechanisms underlying biological invasions. Among birds, the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri) is one of the most successful invasive species, established in over 35 countries. However, little is known about the evolutionary genetic origins of this species and what population genetic signatures tell us about patterns of invasion. We reveal the ancestral origins of populations across the invasive range and explore the potential influence of climate and propagule pressure from the pet trade on observed genetic patterns. Ring-necked parakeet samples representing the ancestral native range (n = 96) were collected from museum specimens, and modern samples from the invasive range (n = 855) were gathered from across Europe, Mauritius and Seychelles, and sequenced for two mitochondrial DNA markers comprising 868 bp of cytochrome b and control region, and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci. Invasive populations comprise birds that originate predominantly from Pakistan and northern areas of India. Haplotypes associated with more northerly distribution limits in the ancestral native range were more prevalent in invasive populations in Europe, and the predominance of Asian haplotypes in Europe is consistent with the higher number of Asian birds transported by the pet trade outside the native range. Successful establishment of invasive species is likely to be underpinned by a combination of environmental and anthropogenic influences. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The mathematics behind biological invasions

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Mark A; Potts, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    This book investigates the mathematical analysis of biological invasions. Unlike purely qualitative treatments of ecology, it draws on mathematical theory and methods, equipping the reader with sharp tools and rigorous methodology. Subjects include invasion dynamics, species interactions, population spread, long-distance dispersal, stochastic effects, risk analysis, and optimal responses to invaders. While based on the theory of dynamical systems, including partial differential equations and integrodifference equations, the book also draws on information theory, machine learning, Monte Carlo methods, optimal control, statistics, and stochastic processes. Applications to real biological invasions are included throughout. Ultimately, the book imparts a powerful principle: that by bringing ecology and mathematics together, researchers can uncover new understanding of, and effective response strategies to, biological invasions. It is suitable for graduate students and established researchers in mathematical ecolo...

  18. Modelling Hotspots for Invasive Alien Plants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Dibyendu; Tiwary, Raghuvar; Barik, Saroj Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Identification of invasion hotspots that support multiple invasive alien species (IAS) is a pre-requisite for control and management of invasion. However, till recently it remained a methodological challenge to precisely determine such invasive hotspots. We identified the hotspots of alien species invasion in India through Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) using species occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). The predicted area of invasion for selected species were classified into 4 categories based on number of model agreements for a region i.e. high, medium, low and very low. About 49% of the total geographical area of India was predicted to be prone to invasion at moderate to high levels of climatic suitability. The intersection of anthropogenic biomes and ecoregions with the regions of 'high' climatic suitability was classified as hotspot of alien plant invasion. Nineteen of 47 ecoregions of India, harboured such hotspots. Most ecologically sensitive regions of India, including the 'biodiversity hotspots' and coastal regions coincide with invasion hotspots, indicating their vulnerability to alien plant invasion. Besides demonstrating the usefulness of ENM and open source data for IAS management, the present study provides a knowledge base for guiding the formulation of an effective policy and management strategy for controlling the invasive alien species.

  19. Multidetector CT of Locally Invasive Advanced Gastric Cancer: Value of Oblique Coronal Reconstructed Images for the Assessment of Local Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Hee; Kim, Ah Yong; Kim, Hye Jin; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Yu, Eun Sil; Jang, Yoon Jin; Park, Seong Ho; Shin, Yong Moon; Ha, Hyun Kwon [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of oblique coronal reconstructed CT images to determine the local invasion of advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Thirty-four consecutive patients, who were suspected to have locally invasive advanced gastric cancer (more than T3 stage) on a preoperative MDCT scan and underwent a diagnostic or curative laparotomy, were enrolled in this study. Two reviewers performed an independent blind review of three series of MDCT images in random order; axial (AXI), conventional coronal (CCI), and oblique coronal (OCI) (parallel to long axis of gastric body and pancreas) images. In assessing the local invasion, the reader's confidence for the local invasion of AGC was graded using a five point scale (1 = definitely negative, 5 = definitely positive: T4). With surgical findings and histopathological proofs as reference standards, the diagnostic performance of the three different plans of CT images was employed for the verification of local invasion of AGC on a preoperative CT scan using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. Agreements between the two reviewers were analyzed using weighted kappa statistics. Results: In 19 out of 34 patients, local invasion was confirmed surgically or histopathologically (13 pancreas invasion, 6 liver invasion, 4 major vascular invasion, 3 colon and mesocolon invasion, and 2 spleen invasion). The diagnostic performance of OCI was superior to AXI or CCI in the local invasion of AGC. The differences in the area under the curve of AXI (0.770 {+-} 0.087, 0.700 {+-} 0.094), CCI (0.884 {+-} 0.058, 0.958 {+-} 0.038), and OCI (0.954 {+-} 0.050, 0.956 {+-} 0.049), were statistically significant for both reviewers. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for OCI ({kappa}= .973), which was greater than CCI (({kappa}= .839), and AXI (({kappa}= .763). On a CT scan, OCI might be a useful imaging technique in evaluating locally invasive advanced gastric cancer.

  20. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega; Jack Butler

    2014-01-01

    Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), which is a core group of scientists who volunteer to coordinate...

  1. Microparasites and Placental Invasiveness in Eutherian Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Capellini

    Full Text Available Placental invasiveness-the number of maternal tissue layers separating fetal tissues from maternal blood-is variable across mammalian species. Although this diversity is likely to be functionally important, variation in placental invasiveness remains unexplained. Here we test the hypothesis that increased risk of transplacental transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus promotes the evolution of non-invasive placentation, the most likely derived condition in eutherian mammals. Specifically, we predict that non-invasive placentation is associated with increased microparasite species richness relative to more invasive placental types, based on the assumption that higher numbers of microparasites in a population reflects greater risk of transplacental transmission to fetuses. As predicted, higher bacteria species richness is associated with non-invasive placentation. Protozoa species richness, however, shows the opposite pattern. Because invasive placentae facilitate the transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus, we propose that the ancestral condition of invasive placentation is retained under selection for protection of newborns from higher risk of postnatal protozoan infection. Hence, our findings suggest that a tradeoff exists between protection against bacterial infection prenatally and protozoan infection postnatally. Future studies are needed to investigate how maternal prevalence of infection and the relative pre- versus postnatal risk of fetal infection by different microparasite groups vary among mammalian hosts in relation to placental invasiveness.

  2. State-of-the-art sensor technology in Spain: invasive and non-invasive techniques for monitoring respiratory variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Christian; Blanch, Lluis; Murias, Gaston; Luján, Manel

    2010-01-01

    The interest in measuring physiological parameters (especially arterial blood gases) has grown progressively in parallel to the development of new technologies. Physiological parameters were first measured invasively and at discrete time points; however, it was clearly desirable to measure them continuously and non-invasively. The development of intensive care units promoted the use of ventilators via oral intubation ventilators via oral intubation and mechanical respiratory variables were progressively studied. Later, the knowledge gained in the hospital was applied to out-of-hospital management. In the present paper we review the invasive and non-invasive techniques for monitoring respiratory variables.

  3. Invasive acacias experience higher ant seed removal rates at the invasion edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Montesinos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Seed dispersal is a key process for the invasion of new areas by exotic species. Introduced plants often take advantage of native generalist dispersers. Australian acacias are primarily dispersed by ants in their native range and produce seeds bearing a protein and lipid rich reward for ant mutualists (elaiosome. Nevertheless, the role of myrmecochory in the expansion of Australian acacias in European invaded areas is still not clear. We selected one European population of Acacia dealbata and another of A. longifolia and offered elaiosome-bearing and elaiosome-removed seeds to local ant communities. For each species, seeds were offered both in high-density acacia stands and in low-density invasion edges. For both acacia species, seed removal was significantly higher at the low-density edges. For A. longifolia, manual elimination of elaiosomes reduced the chance of seed removal by 80% in the low-density edges, whereas it made no difference on the high-density stands. For A. dealbata, the absence of elaiosome reduced seed removal rate by 52%, independently of the acacia density. Our data suggests that invasive acacias have found effective ant seed dispersers in Europe and that the importance of such dispersers is higher at the invasion edges.

  4. The clinical pathologic research of invasive pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lingchuan; Zheng Yushuang; Wang Shouli; Hui Guozhen; Li Xiangdong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathological morphologic characteristics of invasive pituitary tumor and the affect of vascularization to the tumor's invasion. Methods: One hundred and thirty cases of pituitary adenoma patients were divided into two groups, including invasive pituitary adenomas and non-invasive pituitary adenomas, and the clinical data of two groups were analysed and compared. Results : The difference was statistically significant between the invasive group and the non-invasive group in the incidence rate of pathological morphologic characteristics such as high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, cell pleomorphism, nuclear atypia and nucleoli appearance (P<0.05); there were nuclear atypia and nucleolus margination in the invasive group through electron microscopy. And there was statistical significant difference in rate of MVD expression which was higher in the invasive group than that of noninvasive group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The pathological morphologic characteristics of pituitary tumor and the high expression of MVD are significantly reference valuable in tumor aggression diagnosis, which provides valuable indicators for early clinical diagnosis of tumor invasion. (authors)

  5. Postoperative Calcium Management in Same-Day Discharge Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kurt L; Hinson, Andrew M; Lawson, Bradley R; Middleton, Derek; Bodenner, Donald L; Stack, Brendan C

    2016-05-01

    To describe a safe and effective postoperative prophylactic calcium regimen for same-day discharge thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Case series with chart review. Tertiary referral academic institution. In total, 162 adult patients who underwent total thyroidectomy, completion thyroidectomy, unilateral parathyroidectomy, parathyroidectomy with bilateral neck exploration, or revision parathyroidectomy were identified preoperatively to be candidates for same-day discharge. All patients in this study were successfully discharged the same day on our standard prophylactic calcium regimen. Less than 1% (1/162) of patients re-presented to the hospital within 30 days of surgery, and that patient was successfully discharged from the emergency department after negative workup for hypocalcemia. There was no significant difference between preoperative and postoperative calcium levels in the total/completion thyroidectomy groups (9.3 vs 9.2 mg/dL, respectively; P = .14). The average postoperative calcium level in the parathyroid group was well within normal limits (9.5 mg/dL), and the difference in postoperative calcium levels between revision and primary parathyroidectomy cases was not significantly different (P = .34). The reported calcium regimen demonstrates a safe, effective, and objective means of postoperative calcium management in outpatient thyroid and parathyroid surgery in appropriately selected patients. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  6. Cirugía radioguiada para la extirpación de un quiste paratiroideo gigante con hiperparatiroidismo Radio-guided surgery for removal of a giant parathyroid cyst related to hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelberto Fuentes Valdés

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Entre los avances actuales del tratamiento quirúrgico del hiperparatiroidismo se encuentra la localización preoperatoria de la(s glándula(s hiperfuncionante(s mediante gammagrafía preoperatoria e intraoperatoria, esta última a través de una sonda gamma especial. Por otro lado, los quistes paratiroideos son raros; pueden ser funcionantes o no. Se describe un nuevo caso de quiste paratiroideo hiperfuncionante, así como los hallazgos de la gammagrafía con 99mTc-MIBI y el uso intraoperatorio de la sonda gamma para evaluar todos los sitios probables donde pudieran existir glándulas hiperproductoras de hormona paratiroidea. Se describen aspectos de la manipulación, seguridad y administración del radiofármaco en el período preoperatorio inmediato, así como la utilización de la sonda gamma durante la intervención. Se informa la evolución durante el seguimiento. Este caso representa el tercer paciente intervenido por hiperparatiroidismo mediante cirugía radioguiada en nuestro centro, institución en la que se introdujo esta técnica en el paísAmong present advances of surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism is the preoperative localization of hyper-functioning glands by preoperative and intraoperative scan, this later one by a special gamma probe. By the other hand, parathyroid cysts are rare; may be of functioning type or not, as well as the findings of 99mTc-MIBI, and the intraoperative use of gamma probe to assess all the possible sites where could be hyperproductive glands of parathyroid hormone. We describe features of management, safety, and administration of radiological agent during the immediate preoperative period, as well as use of gamma probe during intervention. Evolution over follow-up is reported. This case represents the third patient operated on from hyperthyroidism by radio-guided surgery in our center, which introduced this technique in our country.

  7. Differentiating pre- and minimally invasive from invasive adenocarcinoma using CT-features in persistent pulmonary part-solid nodules in Caucasian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Julien G.; Reymond, Emilie; Lederlin, Mathieu; Medici, Maud; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Laurent, François; Arbib, François; Jankowski, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •We analyzed CT-features of part-solid ground glass nodules in Caucasians. •These CT-features were compared to pathology on full resection specimen. •Several CT-features can help differentiating invasive adenocarcinoma. •A solid component larger than 5 mm had 100% sensitivity for invasive adenocarcinoma. -- Abstract: Objective: To retrospectively investigate the diagnostic value of pre-operative CT-features between pre/minimally invasive and invasive lesions in part-solid persistent pulmonary ground glass nodules in a Caucasian population. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of two pre-operative CTs for 31 nodules in 30 patients. There were 10 adenocarcinomas in situ, 1 minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, 20 invasive adenocarcinomas. We analyzed the correlation between histopathology and the following CT-features: maximal axial diameter, maximal orthogonal axial diameter, height, density, size of solid component, air bronchogram, pleural retraction, nodule mass, disappearance rate and their evolution during follow-up. Results: In univariate analysis, invasive adenocarcinomas had a higher maximal height, density, solid component size, mass, a lower disappearance rate and presented more often with pleural retraction (p < 0.05). After logistic regression performed with the uncorrelated parameters using a method of selection of variables, only the size of solid component remained significant, with 100% sensitivity for invasive adenocarcinoma when larger than 5 mm. Conclusion: Preoperative CT-features can help differentiating in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinomas from invasive adenocarcinomas in Caucasian patients. A solid component larger than 5 mm in diameter had 100% sensitivity for the diagnosis of invasive adenocarcinoma

  8. Differentiating pre- and minimally invasive from invasive adenocarcinoma using CT-features in persistent pulmonary part-solid nodules in Caucasian patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Julien G., E-mail: JCohen@chu-grenoble.fr [Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (CURIM), Université Joseph Fourier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, CS 10217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Reymond, Emilie [Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (CURIM), Université Joseph Fourier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, CS 10217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Lederlin, Mathieu [Service de Radiologie, Université Segalen Bordeaux, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, 12 rue Dubernat, 33404 Bordeaux Cedex (France); Medici, Maud [Centre d’Investigation Clinique – Innovation Technologique (CIC-IT), Pavillon Taillefer, 38706 La Tronche Cedex (France); Lantuejoul, Sylvie [Departement d’Anatomie et Cytologie Pathologique (DACP), Université Joseph Fourier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, CS 10217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laurent, François [Service de Radiologie, Université Segalen Bordeaux, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, 12 rue Dubernat, 33404 Bordeaux Cedex (France); Arbib, François [Departement de Pneumologie, Université Joseph Fourier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, CS 10217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Jankowski, Adrien [Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (CURIM), Université Joseph Fourier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, CS 10217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); and others

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We analyzed CT-features of part-solid ground glass nodules in Caucasians. •These CT-features were compared to pathology on full resection specimen. •Several CT-features can help differentiating invasive adenocarcinoma. •A solid component larger than 5 mm had 100% sensitivity for invasive adenocarcinoma. -- Abstract: Objective: To retrospectively investigate the diagnostic value of pre-operative CT-features between pre/minimally invasive and invasive lesions in part-solid persistent pulmonary ground glass nodules in a Caucasian population. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of two pre-operative CTs for 31 nodules in 30 patients. There were 10 adenocarcinomas in situ, 1 minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, 20 invasive adenocarcinomas. We analyzed the correlation between histopathology and the following CT-features: maximal axial diameter, maximal orthogonal axial diameter, height, density, size of solid component, air bronchogram, pleural retraction, nodule mass, disappearance rate and their evolution during follow-up. Results: In univariate analysis, invasive adenocarcinomas had a higher maximal height, density, solid component size, mass, a lower disappearance rate and presented more often with pleural retraction (p < 0.05). After logistic regression performed with the uncorrelated parameters using a method of selection of variables, only the size of solid component remained significant, with 100% sensitivity for invasive adenocarcinoma when larger than 5 mm. Conclusion: Preoperative CT-features can help differentiating in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinomas from invasive adenocarcinomas in Caucasian patients. A solid component larger than 5 mm in diameter had 100% sensitivity for the diagnosis of invasive adenocarcinoma.

  9. Invasion and predation in aquatic ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith S. WEIS

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews biological invasions in which predation (or its absence plays a major role in the success of the invader. Examples are described in which the invader out-competes native species for the same food, and cases in which the invader consumes valued native species. In many instances, better predator avoidance by the invasive species or the absence of predators in the new habitat contributes to the success of the invaders; in other cases native or introduced predators appear to be able to keep the invasive species in check. A relatively new management approach in the US is the idea of adding another trophic level – to have humans act as the predators and consume the invasive species. This approach is being utilized in Florida and throughout the Caribbean against the lionfish, but could be extended to other fishes, as well as to various invasive crustaceans and mollusks. This idea is controversial, and current regulations prohibiting the possession of individuals of the invasive species (e.g., mitten crabs or snakefish would preclude the development of a fishery for them [Current Zoology 57 (5: 613–624, 2011].

  10. [Minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Sun, Taicun; Huang, Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the recent minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The recent literature at home and abroad concerning minimally invasive approach for CSR was reviewed and summarized. There were two techniques of minimally invasive approach for CSR at present: percutaneous puncture techniques and endoscopic techniques. The degenerate intervertebral disc was resected or nucleolysis by percutaneous puncture technique if CSR was caused by mild or moderate intervertebral disc herniations. The cervical microendoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy was an effective minimally invasive approach which could provide a clear view. The endoscopy techniques were suitable to treat CSR caused by foraminal osteophytes, lateral disc herniations, local ligamentum flavum thickening and spondylotic foraminal stenosis. The minimally invasive procedure has the advantages of simple handling, minimally invasive and low incidence of complications. But the scope of indications is relatively narrow at present.

  11. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin Runyon

    2018-01-01

    In this issue, we cover new research on wide-ranging topics from the longterm effects of drought on competition between native and invasive plant species, to the effects of drought on pollinator visitation to invasive plants, to a novel use of insect pheromones to improve biocontrol of invasive saltcedar. There’s also big news to report in weed biocontrol: two new...

  12. Invasive Plants on Rangelands: a Global Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive plant species are spreading and invading rangelands at an unprecedented rate costing ranchers billions of dollars to control invasive plants each year. In its simplest form, the invasion process has four primary stages, including introduction, establishment, spread and colonization. Th...

  13. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from South America use an atypical red blood cell invasion pathway associated with invasion ligand polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lopez-Perez

    Full Text Available Studies of Plasmodium falciparum invasion pathways in field isolates have been limited. Red blood cell (RBC invasion is a complex process involving two invasion protein families; Erythrocyte Binding-Like (EBL and the Reticulocyte Binding-Like (PfRh proteins, which are polymorphic and not fully characterized in field isolates. To determine the various P. falciparum invasion pathways used by parasite isolates from South America, we studied the invasion phenotypes in three regions: Colombia, Peru and Brazil. Additionally, polymorphisms in three members of the EBL (EBA-181, EBA-175 and EBL-1 and five members of the PfRh (PfRh1, PfRh2a, PfRh2b, PfRh4, PfRh5 families were determined. We found that most P. falciparum field isolates from Colombia and Peru invade RBCs through an atypical invasion pathway phenotypically characterized as resistant to all enzyme treatments (NrTrCr. Moreover, the invasion pathways and the ligand polymorphisms differed substantially among the Colombian and Brazilian isolates while the Peruvian isolates represent an amalgam of those present in the Colombian and Brazilian field isolates. The NrTrCr invasion profile was associated with the presence of the PfRh2a pepC variant, the PfRh5 variant 1 and EBA-181 RVNKN variant. The ebl and Pfrh expression levels in a field isolate displaying the NrTrCr profile also pointed to PfRh2a, PfRh5 and EBA-181 as being possibly the major players in this invasion pathway. Notably, our studies demonstrate the uniqueness of the Peruvian P. falciparum field isolates in terms of their invasion profiles and ligand polymorphisms, and present a unique opportunity for studying the ability of P. falciparum parasites to expand their invasion repertoire after being reintroduced to human populations. The present study is directly relevant to asexual blood stage vaccine design focused on invasion pathway proteins, suggesting that regional invasion variants and global geographical variation are likely to

  14. Five potential consequences of climate change for invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Jessica J; Byers, James E; Bierwagen, Britta G; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2008-06-01

    Scientific and societal unknowns make it difficult to predict how global environmental changes such as climate change and biological invasions will affect ecological systems. In the long term, these changes may have interacting effects and compound the uncertainty associated with each individual driver. Nonetheless, invasive species are likely to respond in ways that should be qualitatively predictable, and some of these responses will be distinct from those of native counterparts. We used the stages of invasion known as the "invasion pathway" to identify 5 nonexclusive consequences of climate change for invasive species: (1) altered transport and introduction mechanisms, (2) establishment of new invasive species, (3) altered impact of existing invasive species, (4) altered distribution of existing invasive species, and (5) altered effectiveness of control strategies. We then used these consequences to identify testable hypotheses about the responses of invasive species to climate change and provide suggestions for invasive-species management plans. The 5 consequences also emphasize the need for enhanced environmental monitoring and expanded coordination among entities involved in invasive-species management.

  15. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Oliveira Tiago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Methods Syndecan-2 (SDC-2 expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. Results SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and - further downstream - phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. Conclusion SDC-2 is a novel (perineural invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  16. Invasive crayfish in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Christopher A.; McCreary, Brome; Adams, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species directly threaten freshwater biodiversity, particularly in regions of high aquatic richness like the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Crayfish are among the most impactful of aquatic invasive species. Invasive crayfish are considered ecosystem engineers due to their ability to alter basic wetland properties, such as reducing vegetation and bank integrity and increasing turbidity. In areas where invasion is advanced, crayfish pose major economic and ecological problems. Crayfish have been widely introduced for aquaculture and can become established in a wide range of habitat conditions. They also may be spread by anglers who use them as bait. Several non-native crayfish are established in the PNW, but the extent of their invasion is not well known. At least two groups are known from scattered sites in the PNW, and both have proven problematic for native species in other parts of the world: Red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and several members of the genus Orconectes. Both groups are native to areas of the eastern United States. Both are identified globally as invasives of high concern and appear on the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's "10 Most Unwanted" and the U.S. Forest Service's "Primary Species of Concern" lists for stream systems in the PNW. Despite the presence of introduced crayfish in the PNW and their high potential for negative effects, the scope of their invasion and effects on aquatic systems are not well known. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), along with local groups and state agencies, is working to clarify crayfish distribution and to outline which basins may not yet be invaded. Other goals are to improve understanding of habitat associations of invasive crayfish and their potential effects on native crayfish.

  17. Effects of invasive plants on arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Andrea R; Cord, Erin E; Fulbright, Timothy E; Schuster, Greta L

    2014-12-01

    Non-native plants have invaded nearly all ecosystems and represent a major component of global ecological change. Plant invasions frequently change the composition and structure of vegetation communities, which can alter animal communities and ecosystem processes. We reviewed 87 articles published in the peer-reviewed literature to evaluate responses of arthropod communities and functional groups to non-native invasive plants. Total abundance of arthropods decreased in 62% of studies and increased in 15%. Taxonomic richness decreased in 48% of studies and increased in 13%. Herbivorous arthropods decreased in response to plant invasions in 48% of studies and increased in 17%, likely due to direct effects of decreased plant diversity. Predaceous arthropods decreased in response to invasive plants in 44% of studies, which may reflect indirect effects due to reductions in prey. Twenty-two percent of studies documented increases in predators, which may reflect changes in vegetation structure that improved mobility, survival, or web-building for these species. Detritivores increased in 67% of studies, likely in response to increased litter and decaying vegetation; no studies documented decreased abundance in this functional group. Although many researchers have examined effects of plant invasions on arthropods, sizeable information gaps remain, specifically regarding how invasive plants influence habitat and dietary requirements. Beyond this, the ability to predict changes in arthropod populations and communities associated with plant invasions could be improved by adopting a more functional and mechanistic approach. Understanding responses of arthropods to invasive plants will critically inform conservation of virtually all biodiversity and ecological processes because so many organisms depend on arthropods as prey or for their functional roles, including pollination, seed dispersal, and decomposition. Given their short generation times and ability to respond rapidly to

  18. Efficient distinction of invasive aquatic plant species from non-invasive related species using DNA barcoding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghahramanzadeh, R.; Esselink, G.; Kodde, L.P.; Duistermaat, H.; Valkenburg, van J.L.C.H.; Marashi, S.H.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are regarded as threats to global biodiversity. Among invasive aliens, a number of plant species belonging to the genera Myriophyllum, Ludwigia and Cabomba, and to the Hydrocharitaceae family pose a particular ecological threat to water bodies. Therefore, one would try to

  19. Granivory of invasive, naturalized, and native plants in communities differentially susceptible to invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, B M; Pearson, D E; Mack, R N

    2014-07-01

    Seed predation is an important biotic filter that can influence abundance and spatial distributions of native species through differential effects on recruitment. This filter may also influence the relative abundance of nonnative plants within habitats and the communities' susceptibility to invasion via differences in granivore identity, abundance, and food preference. We evaluated the effect of postdispersal seed predators on the establishment of invasive, naturalized, and native species within and between adjacent forest and steppe communities of eastern Washington, USA that differ in severity of plant invasion. Seed removal from trays placed within guild-specific exclosures revealed that small mammals were the dominant seed predators in both forest and steppe. Seeds of invasive species (Bromus tectorum, Cirsium arvense) were removed significantly less than the seeds of native (Pseudoroegneria spicata, Balsamorhiza sagittata) and naturalized (Secale cereale, Centaurea cyanus) species. Seed predation limited seedling emergence and establishment in both communities in the absence of competition in a pattern reflecting natural plant abundance: S. cereale was most suppressed, B. tectorum was least suppressed, and P. spicata was suppressed at an intermediate level. Furthermore, seed predation reduced the residual seed bank for all species. Seed mass correlated with seed removal rates in the forest and their subsequent effects on plant recruitment; larger seeds were removed at higher rates than smaller seeds. Our vegetation surveys indicate higher densities and canopy cover of nonnative species occur in the steppe compared with the forest understory, suggesting the steppe may be more susceptible to invasion. Seed predation alone, however, did not result in significant differences in establishment for any species between these communities, presumably due to similar total small-mammal abundance between communities. Consequently, preferential seed predation by small

  20. Efficient distinction of invasive aquatic plant species from non-invasive related species using DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanzadeh, R; Esselink, G; Kodde, L P; Duistermaat, H; van Valkenburg, J L C H; Marashi, S H; Smulders, M J M; van de Wiel, C C M

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are regarded as threats to global biodiversity. Among invasive aliens, a number of plant species belonging to the genera Myriophyllum, Ludwigia and Cabomba, and to the Hydrocharitaceae family pose a particular ecological threat to water bodies. Therefore, one would try to prevent them from entering a country. However, many related species are commercially traded, and distinguishing invasive from non-invasive species based on morphology alone is often difficult for plants in a vegetative stage. In this regard, DNA barcoding could become a good alternative. In this study, 242 samples belonging to 26 species from 10 genera of aquatic plants were assessed using the chloroplast loci trnH-psbA, matK and rbcL. Despite testing a large number of primer sets and several PCR protocols, the matK locus could not be amplified or sequenced reliably and therefore was left out of the analysis. Using the other two loci, eight invasive species could be distinguished from their respective related species, a ninth one failed to produce sequences of sufficient quality. Based on the criteria of universal application, high sequence divergence and level of species discrimination, the trnH-psbA noncoding spacer was the best performing barcode in the aquatic plant species studied. Thus, DNA barcoding may be helpful with enforcing a ban on trade of such invasive species, such as is already in place in the Netherlands. This will become even more so once DNA barcoding would be turned into machinery routinely operable by a nonspecialist in botany and molecular genetics. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Microbial ecology of biological invasions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Putten, W.H.; Klironomos, J.N.; Wardle, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Invasive microbes, plants and animals are a major threat to the composition and functioning of ecosystems; however, the mechanistic basis of why exotic species can be so abundant and disruptive is not well understood. Most studies have focused on invasive plants and animals, although few have

  2. Synergistic impacts by an invasive amphipod and an invasive fish explain native gammarid extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggel, S; Brandner, J; Cerwenka, A F; Geist, J

    2016-07-14

    Worldwide freshwater ecosystems are increasingly affected by invasive alien species. In particular, Ponto-Caspian gobiid fishes and amphipods are suspected to have pronounced effects on aquatic food webs. However, there is a lack of systematic studies mechanistically testing the potential synergistic effects of invasive species on native fauna. In this study we investigated the interrelations between the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus and the invasive fish species Neogobius melanostomus in their effects on the native amphipod Gammarus pulex. We hypothesized selective predation by the fish as a driver for displacement of native species resulting in potential extinction of G. pulex. The survival of G. pulex in the presence of N. melanostomus in relation to the presence of D. villosus and availability of shelter was analyzed in the context of behavioural differences between the amphipod species. Gammarus pulex had a significantly higher susceptibility to predation by N. melanostomus compared to D. villosus in all experiments, suggesting preferential predation by this fish on native gammarids. Furthermore, the presence of D. villosus significantly increased the vulnerability of G. pulex to fish predation. Habitat structure was an important factor for swimming activity of amphipods and their mortality, resulting in a threefold decrease in amphipods consumed with shelter habitat structures provided. Behavioral differences in swimming activity were additionally responsible for higher predation rates on G. pulex. Intraguild predation could be neglected within short experimental durations. The results of this study provide evidence for synergistic effects of the two invasive Ponto-Caspian species on the native amphipod as an underlying process of species displacements during invasion processes. Prey behaviour and monotonous habitat structures additionally contribute to the decline of the native gammarid fauna in the upper Danube River and elsewhere.

  3. Do invasive plant species alter soil health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species may alter soil characteristics or interact with the soil microbial community to yield a competitive advantage. Our objectives were to determine: if invasive plant species alter soil properties important to soil health; and the long-term effects of invasive plant species on soil pro...

  4. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  5. Biological Invasion Influences the Outcome of Plant-Soil Feedback in the Invasive Plant Species from the Brazilian Semi-arid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tancredo Augusto Feitosa; de Andrade, Leonaldo Alves; Freitas, Helena; da Silva Sandim, Aline

    2017-05-30

    Plant-soil feedback is recognized as the mutual interaction between plants and soil microorganisms, but its role on the biological invasion of the Brazilian tropical seasonal dry forest by invasive plants still remains unclear. Here, we analyzed and compared the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities and soil characteristics from the root zone of invasive and native plants, and tested how these AMF communities affect the development of four invasive plant species (Cryptostegia madagascariensis, Parkinsonia aculeata, Prosopis juliflora, and Sesbania virgata). Our field sampling revealed that AMF diversity and frequency of the Order Diversisporales were positively correlated with the root zone of the native plants, whereas AMF dominance and frequency of the Order Glomerales were positively correlated with the root zone of invasive plants. We grew the invasive plants in soil inoculated with AMF species from the root zone of invasive (I changed ) and native (I unaltered ) plant species. We also performed a third treatment with sterilized soil inoculum (control). We examined the effects of these three AMF inoculums on plant dry biomass, root colonization, plant phosphorous concentration, and plant responsiveness to mycorrhizas. We found that I unaltered and I changed promoted the growth of all invasive plants and led to a higher plant dry biomass, mycorrhizal colonization, and P uptake than control, but I changed showed better results on these variables than I unaltered . For plant responsiveness to mycorrhizas and fungal inoculum effect on plant P concentration, we found positive feedback between changed-AMF community (I changed ) and three of the studied invasive plants: C. madagascariensis, P. aculeata, and S. virgata.

  6. Dietary Flexibility Aids Asian Earthworm Invasion in North American Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    On a local scale, invasiveness of introduced species and invasibility of habitats together determine invasion success. A key issue in invasion ecology has been how to quantify the contribution of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately. Conventional approaches, s...

  7. Epigenetic suppression of neprilysin regulates breast cancer invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, H M; Khoury, R J; Majmudar, P R; Blaylock, T; Hawkins, K; Salama, M S; Scott, M D; Cosminsky, B; Utreja, N K; Britt, J; Conway, R E

    2016-03-07

    In women, invasive breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, identifying novel regulators of breast cancer invasion could lead to additional biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Neprilysin, a cell-surface enzyme that cleaves and inactivates a number of substrates including endothelin-1 (ET1), has been implicated in breast cancer, but whether neprilysin promotes or inhibits breast cancer cell progression and metastasis is unclear. Here, we asked whether neprilysin expression predicts and functionally regulates breast cancer cell invasion. RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines revealed decreased neprilysin expression compared with normal epithelial cells. Expression was also suppressed in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared with normal tissue. In addition, in vtro invasion assays demonstrated that neprilysin overexpression decreased breast cancer cell invasion, whereas neprilysin suppression augmented invasion. Furthermore, inhibiting neprilysin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells increased ET1 levels significantly, whereas overexpressing neprilysin decreased extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) activation, indicating that neprilysin negatively regulates ET1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. To determine whether neprilysin was epigenetically suppressed in breast cancer, we performed bisulfite conversion analysis of breast cancer cells and clinical tumor samples. We found that the neprilysin promoter was hypermethylated in breast cancer; chemical reversal of methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells reactivated neprilysin expression and inhibited cancer cell invasion. Analysis of cancer databases revealed that neprilysin methylation significantly associates with survival in stage I IDC and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results demonstrate that neprilysin negatively regulates the ET axis in breast cancer

  8. 75 FR 29359 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Council is co-chaired by the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Agriculture, and the Secretary of... of the most invaded marine/coastal environments in the world, with over 50 invasive species that... development of state invasive species councils. DATES: Meeting of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee...

  9. CT differentiation of invasive thymoma and thymic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Seong Min; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Shin, Mi Jung; Kim, Jung Sik; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1998-01-01

    In order to determine the differential points between them, we analyzed the CT findings of invasive thymoma and thymic carcinoma. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 14 patients with invasive thymoma and 15 with thymic carcinoma, confirmed by surgery(n=3D19) or percutaneous needle aspiration(n=3D10) between 1988 and 1996. CT findings were evaluated in each group for intrathoracic spread(posterior, direct posterior, and anterolateral), obliteration of the fat plane between the mass and vascular structures, vessel encasement, invasion of adjacent mediastinal structures, pleural implants, mediastinal nodes and distant metastasis. Direct posterior spread was more common in thymic carcinoma than invasive thymoma;it was seen in one case (7%) of invasive thymoma and 12(80%) of thymic carcinoma(p=3D0.00). Posterior spread was seen in six cases (43%) of in vasive thymoma and nine (60%) of thymic carcinoma. Anterolateral spread was seen only in two cases (13%) of thymic carcinoma. Obliteration of the fat plane was seen in nine cases (64%) of invasive thymoma and 14 (93%) of thymic carcinoma, while vessel encasement was seen in two cases (14%) of invasive thymoma and 13(87%) of thymic carcinoma(p=3D0.00). Invasion of adjacent structures was seen in two cases (14%) of invasive thymoma and eight (53%) of thymic carcinoma. Pleural implants were more common in invasive thymoma than thymic carcinoma, being seen in six cases (43%) of the former and one (7%) of the latter(p=3D0.04). Mediastinal lymphadenopathy was seen in three cases (21%) of invasive thymoma and ten (67%) of thymic carcinoma. Distant metastases were observed only in six cases (40%) of thymic carcinoma(p=3D0.02). Although differentiation between invasive thymoma and thymic carcinoma is difficult on the basis of CT findings, there are certain differential points. Thymic carcinomas showed a higher rate of direct posterior intrathoracic spread, vessel encasement, mediastinal nodes and distant metastases than

  10. A systematic review of context bias in invasion biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Warren

    Full Text Available The language that scientists use to frame biological invasions may reveal inherent bias-including how data are interpreted. A frequent critique of invasion biology is the use of value-laden language that may indicate context bias. Here we use a systematic study of language and interpretation in papers drawn from invasion biology to evaluate whether there is a link between the framing of papers and the interpretation of results. We also examine any trends in context bias in biological invasion research. We examined 651 peer-reviewed invasive species competition studies and implemented a rigorous systematic review to examine bias in the presentation and interpretation of native and invasive competition in invasion biology. We predicted that bias in the presentation of invasive species is increasing, as suggested by several authors, and that bias against invasive species would result in misinterpreting their competitive dominance in correlational observational studies compared to causative experimental studies. We indeed found evidence of bias in the presentation and interpretation of invasive species research; authors often introduced research with invasive species in a negative context and study results were interpreted against invasive species more in correlational studies. However, we also found a distinct decrease in those biases since the mid-2000s. Given that there have been several waves of criticism from scientists both inside and outside invasion biology, our evidence suggests that the subdiscipline has somewhat self-corrected apparent biases.

  11. A systematic review of context bias in invasion biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Robert J; King, Joshua R; Tarsa, Charlene; Haas, Brian; Henderson, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    The language that scientists use to frame biological invasions may reveal inherent bias-including how data are interpreted. A frequent critique of invasion biology is the use of value-laden language that may indicate context bias. Here we use a systematic study of language and interpretation in papers drawn from invasion biology to evaluate whether there is a link between the framing of papers and the interpretation of results. We also examine any trends in context bias in biological invasion research. We examined 651 peer-reviewed invasive species competition studies and implemented a rigorous systematic review to examine bias in the presentation and interpretation of native and invasive competition in invasion biology. We predicted that bias in the presentation of invasive species is increasing, as suggested by several authors, and that bias against invasive species would result in misinterpreting their competitive dominance in correlational observational studies compared to causative experimental studies. We indeed found evidence of bias in the presentation and interpretation of invasive species research; authors often introduced research with invasive species in a negative context and study results were interpreted against invasive species more in correlational studies. However, we also found a distinct decrease in those biases since the mid-2000s. Given that there have been several waves of criticism from scientists both inside and outside invasion biology, our evidence suggests that the subdiscipline has somewhat self-corrected apparent biases.

  12. Study of melanoma invasion by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Sulé-Suso, J.; Sockalingum, G. D.

    2008-02-01

    Compared to other forms of skin cancer, a malignant melanoma has a high risk of spreading to other parts of the body. Melanoma invasion is a complex process involving changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and cell-cell interactions. To fully understand the factors which control the invasion process, a human skin model system was reconstructed. HBL (a commercially available cell line) melanoma cells were seeded on a skin model with and without the presence of keratinocytes and/or fibroblasts. After 14 days culture, the skin specimens were fixed, parafin embedded and cut into 7 µm sections. The de-parafinised sections were investigated by synchrotron Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to study skin cell invasion behaviour. The advantage of using FTIR is its ability to obtain the fingerprint information of the invading cells in terms of protein secondary structure in comparison to non-invading cells and the concentration of the enzyme (matrix-metalloproteinase) which digests protein matrix, near the invading cells. With aid of the spectral mapping images, it is possible to pinpoint the cells in non-invasion and invasion area and analyse the respective spectra. It has been observed that the protein bands in cells and matrix shifted between non-invasive and invasive cells in the reconstructed skin model. We hypothesise that by careful analysis of the FTIR data and validation by other models, FTIR studies can reveal information on which type of cells and proteins are involved in melanoma invasion. Thus, it is possible to trace the cell invasion path by mapping the spectra along the interface of cell layer and matrix body by FTIR spectroscopy.

  13. A conceptual framework for invasion in microbial communities

    KAUST Repository

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Proctor, Caitlin; Hammes, Frederik; Johnson, David; Quintela-Baluja, Marcos; Graham, David; Daffonchio, Daniele; Fodelianakis, Stylianos; Hahn, Nicole; Boon, Nico; Smets, Barth F

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in controlling-promoting or avoiding-the invasion of microbial communities by new community members. Resource availability and community structure have been reported as determinants of invasion success. However, most invasion studies do not adhere to a coherent and consistent terminology nor always include rigorous interpretations of the processes behind invasion. Therefore, we suggest that a consistent set of definitions and a rigorous conceptual framework are needed. We define invasion in a microbial community as the establishment of an alien microbial type in a resident community and argue how simple criteria to define aliens, residents, and alien establishment can be applied for a wide variety of communities. In addition, we suggest an adoption of the community ecology framework advanced by Vellend (2010) to clarify potential determinants of invasion. This framework identifies four fundamental processes that control community dynamics: dispersal, selection, drift and diversification. While selection has received ample attention in microbial community invasion research, the three other processes are often overlooked. Here, we elaborate on the relevance of all four processes and conclude that invasion experiments should be designed to elucidate the role of dispersal, drift and diversification, in order to obtain a complete picture of invasion as a community process.

  14. A conceptual framework for invasion in microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Proctor, Caitlin; Hammes, Frederik; Johnson, David; Quintela-Baluja, Marcos; Graham, David; Daffonchio, Daniele; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Hahn, Nicole; Boon, Nico; Smets, Barth F

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in controlling—promoting or avoiding—the invasion of microbial communities by new community members. Resource availability and community structure have been reported as determinants of invasion success. However, most invasion studies do not adhere to a coherent and consistent terminology nor always include rigorous interpretations of the processes behind invasion. Therefore, we suggest that a consistent set of definitions and a rigorous conceptual framework are needed. We define invasion in a microbial community as the establishment of an alien microbial type in a resident community and argue how simple criteria to define aliens, residents, and alien establishment can be applied for a wide variety of communities. In addition, we suggest an adoption of the community ecology framework advanced by Vellend (2010) to clarify potential determinants of invasion. This framework identifies four fundamental processes that control community dynamics: dispersal, selection, drift and diversification. While selection has received ample attention in microbial community invasion research, the three other processes are often overlooked. Here, we elaborate on the relevance of all four processes and conclude that invasion experiments should be designed to elucidate the role of dispersal, drift and diversification, in order to obtain a complete picture of invasion as a community process. PMID:27137125

  15. A conceptual framework for invasion in microbial communities

    KAUST Repository

    Kinnunen, Marta

    2016-05-03

    There is a growing interest in controlling-promoting or avoiding-the invasion of microbial communities by new community members. Resource availability and community structure have been reported as determinants of invasion success. However, most invasion studies do not adhere to a coherent and consistent terminology nor always include rigorous interpretations of the processes behind invasion. Therefore, we suggest that a consistent set of definitions and a rigorous conceptual framework are needed. We define invasion in a microbial community as the establishment of an alien microbial type in a resident community and argue how simple criteria to define aliens, residents, and alien establishment can be applied for a wide variety of communities. In addition, we suggest an adoption of the community ecology framework advanced by Vellend (2010) to clarify potential determinants of invasion. This framework identifies four fundamental processes that control community dynamics: dispersal, selection, drift and diversification. While selection has received ample attention in microbial community invasion research, the three other processes are often overlooked. Here, we elaborate on the relevance of all four processes and conclude that invasion experiments should be designed to elucidate the role of dispersal, drift and diversification, in order to obtain a complete picture of invasion as a community process.

  16. Review of invasive urodynamics and progress towards non-invasive measurements in the assessment of bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C J Griffiths

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article defines the need for objective measurements to help diagnose the cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. It describes the conventional techniques available, mainly invasive, and then summarizes the emerging range of non-invasive measurement techniques. Methods: This is a narrative review derived form the clinical and scientific knowledge of the authors together with consideration of selected literature. Results: Consideration of measured bladder pressure urinary flow rate during voiding in an invasive pressure flow study is considered the gold standard for categorization of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. The diagnosis is currently made by plotting the detrusor pressure at maximum flow (p detQmax and maximum flow rate (Q max on the nomogram approved by the International Continence Society. This plot will categorize the void as obstructed, equivocal or unobstructed. The invasive and relatively complex nature of this investigation has led to a number of inventive techniques to categorize BOO either by measuring bladder pressure non-invasively or by providing a proxy measure such as bladder weight. Conclusion: Non-invasive methods of diagnosing BOO show great promise and a few have reached the stage of being commercially available. Further studies are however needed to validate the measurement technique and assess their worth in the assessment of men with LUTS.

  17. [Invasive yeast infections in neutropenic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts still play an important role in the morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies. Although the overall incidence of invasive candidiasis has decreased due to widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis, the incidence of non-Candida albicans Candida species is increasing compared with that of C.albicans, and mortality of invasive candidiasis continues to be high. In addition, there has been an increase in invasive infections caused by an array of uncommon yeasts, including species of the genus Malassezia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saprochaete, characterised by their resistance to echinocandins and poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Two non-invasive diagnostic tools for invasive aspergilosis: (1-3)-beta-D-glucan and the galactomannan assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelaher, Amy

    2006-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. Prompt and non-invasive methods for diagnosing IA are needed to improve the management of this life-threatening infection in patients with hematological disorders. In summary, this retrospective review of studies performed on the two assays finds that both assays have high sensitivity and specificity but are more useful when used together as a diagnostic strategy for patients with invasive aspergillosis.

  19. A review of invasive and non-invasive sensory feedback in upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Pamela; Wijk, Ulrika; Björkman, Anders; Antfolk, Christian

    2017-06-01

    The constant challenge to restore sensory feedback in prosthetic hands has provided several research solutions, but virtually none has reached clinical fruition. A prosthetic hand with sensory feedback that closely imitates an intact hand and provides a natural feeling may induce the prosthetic hand to be included in the body image and also reinforces the control of the prosthesis. Areas covered: This review presents non-invasive sensory feedback systems such as mechanotactile, vibrotactile, electrotactile and combinational systems which combine the modalities; multi-haptic feedback. Invasive sensory feedback has been tried less, because of the inherent risk, but it has successfully shown to restore some afferent channels. In this review, invasive methods are also discussed, both extraneural and intraneural electrodes, such as cuff electrodes and transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrodes. The focus of the review is on non-invasive methods of providing sensory feedback to upper-limb amputees. Expert commentary: Invoking embodiment has shown to be of importance for the control of prosthesis and acceptance by the prosthetic wearers. It is a challenge to provide conscious feedback to cover the lost sensibility of a hand, not be overwhelming and confusing for the user, and to integrate technology within the constraint of a wearable prosthesis.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from South America use an atypical red blood cell invasion pathway associated with invasion ligand polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Perez, Mary; Villasis, Elizabeth; Machado, Ricardo L D

    2012-01-01

    Studies of Plasmodium falciparum invasion pathways in field isolates have been limited. Red blood cell (RBC) invasion is a complex process involving two invasion protein families; Erythrocyte Binding-Like (EBL) and the Reticulocyte Binding-Like (PfRh) proteins, which are polymorphic and not fully...... characterized in field isolates. To determine the various P. falciparum invasion pathways used by parasite isolates from South America, we studied the invasion phenotypes in three regions: Colombia, Peru and Brazil. Additionally, polymorphisms in three members of the EBL (EBA-181, EBA-175 and EBL-1) and five...... pathways and the ligand polymorphisms differed substantially among the Colombian and Brazilian isolates while the Peruvian isolates represent an amalgam of those present in the Colombian and Brazilian field isolates. The NrTrCr invasion profile was associated with the presence of the PfRh2a pepC variant...

  1. Invasion Success by Plant Breeding Evolutionary Changes as a Critical Factor for the Invasion of the Ornamental Plant Mahonia aquifolium

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Christel Anne

    2009-01-01

    Invasive species are a major threat to global biodiversity and cause significant economic costs. Studying biological invasions is both essential for preventing future invasions and is also useful in order to understand basic ecological processes. Christel Ross investigates whether evolutionary changes by plant breeding are a relevant factor for the invasion success of Mahonia aquifolium in Germany. Her findings show that invasive populations differ from native populations in quantitative-genetic traits and molecular markers, whereas their genetic diversity is similar. She postulates that these evolutionary changes are rather a result of plant breeding, which includes interspecific hybridisation, than the result of a genetic bottleneck or the releases from specialist herbivores.

  2. Biological invasions: recommendations for U.S. policy and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, David M; Williams, Susan; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Hayes, Keith R; Leung, Brian; Reichard, Sarah; Mack, Richard N; Moyle, Peter B; Smith, Maggie; Andow, David A; Carlton, James T; McMichael, Anthony

    2006-12-01

    The Ecological Society of America has evaluated current U.S. national policies and practices on biological invasions in light of current scientific knowledge. Invasions by harmful nonnative species are increasing in number and area affected; the damages to ecosystems, economic activity, and human welfare are accumulating. Without improved strategies based on recent scientific advances and increased investments to counter invasions, harm from invasive species is likely to accelerate. Federal leadership, with the cooperation of state and local governments, is required to increase the effectiveness of prevention of invasions, detect and respond quickly to new potentially harmful invasions, control and slow the spread of existing invasions, and provide a national center to ensure that these efforts are coordinated and cost effective. Specifically, the Ecological Society of America recommends that the federal government take the following six actions: (1) Use new information and practices to better manage commercial and other pathways to reduce the transport and release of potentially harmful species; (2) Adopt more quantitative procedures for risk analysis and apply them to every species proposed for importation into the country; (3) Use new cost-effective diagnostic technologies to increase active surveillance and sharing of information about invasive species so that responses to new invasions can be more rapid and effective; (4) Create new legal authority and provide emergency funding to support rapid responses to emerging invasions; (5) Provide funding and incentives for cost-effective programs to slow the spread of existing invasive species in order to protect still uninvaded ecosystems, social and industrial infrastructure, and human welfare; and (6) Establish a National Center for Invasive Species Management (under the existing National Invasive Species Council) to coordinate and lead improvements in federal, state, and international policies on invasive species

  3. Epstein-Barr virus infection is equally distributed across the invasive ductal and invasive lobular forms of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Ashley James

    2015-12-01

    The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of breast cancer is still unclear, although a growing body of evidence supports a link. The aim of this study was to investigate if EBV infection was more prevalent in invasive ductal carcinoma or invasive lobular carcinoma. An immunohistochemical marker for EBV (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) clone E1-2.5) was applied to a tissue micro array section. The tissue micro array contained 80 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma, and 80 cases of invasive lobular carcinoma. Each case was scored as positive or negative for nuclear expression of EBNA1 in tumor cells using standard light microscopy. EBNA1 staining was evident in the tumor cells of 63 cases (39.4% of tumor cases). By tumor type (ductal/lobular) EBV infection was noted in 34 (42.5%) cases of invasive ductal carcinoma and 29 (36.2%) cases of invasive lobular carcinoma, this difference was not found to be significant (P=0.518). This study indicates that EBV infection is equally distributed across the ductal and lobular tumor types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Invasive plant species in hardwood tree plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle R. Beasley; Paula M. Pijut

    2010-01-01

    Invasive plants are species that can grow and spread aggressively, mature quickly, and invade an ecosystem causing economic and environmental damage. Invasive plants usually invade disturbed areas, but can also colonize small areas quickly, and may spread and dominate large areas in a few short years. Invasive plant species displace native or desirable forest...

  5. An Evolutionary Modelling Approach To Understanding The Factors Behind Plant Invasiveness And Community Susceptibility To Invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, John; Topping, Christopher John; James, Penri

    2011-01-01

    Ecologists have had limited success in understanding which introduced species may become invasive. An evolutionary model is used to investigate which traits are associated with invasiveness. Translocation experiments were simulated in which species were moved into similar but evolutionary younger...

  6. The evolution of invasiveness in garden ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Cremer

    Full Text Available It is unclear why some species become successful invaders whilst others fail, and whether invasive success depends on pre-adaptations already present in the native range or on characters evolving de-novo after introduction. Ants are among the worst invasive pests, with Lasius neglectus and its rapid spread through Europe and Asia as the most recent example of a pest ant that may become a global problem. Here, we present the first integrated study on behavior, morphology, population genetics, chemical recognition and parasite load of L. neglectus and its non-invasive sister species L. turcicus. We find that L. neglectus expresses the same supercolonial syndrome as other invasive ants, a social system that is characterized by mating without dispersal and large networks of cooperating nests rather than smaller mutually hostile colonies. We conclude that the invasive success of L. neglectus relies on a combination of parasite-release following introduction and pre-adaptations in mating system, body-size, queen number and recognition efficiency that evolved long before introduction. Our results challenge the notion that supercolonial organization is an inevitable consequence of low genetic variation for chemical recognition cues in small invasive founder populations. We infer that low variation and limited volatility in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles already existed in the native range in combination with low dispersal and a highly viscous population structure. Human transport to relatively disturbed urban areas thus became the decisive factor to induce parasite release, a well established general promoter of invasiveness in non-social animals and plants, but understudied in invasive social insects.

  7. The Evolution of Invasiveness in Garden Ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sylvia; Ugelvig, Line V.; Drijfhout, Falko P.; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C.; Steiner, Florian M.; Seifert, Bernhard; Hughes, David P.; Schulz, Andreas; Petersen, Klaus S.; Konrad, Heino; Stauffer, Christian; Kiran, Kadri; Espadaler, Xavier; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Aktaç, Nihat; Eilenberg, Jørgen; Jones, Graeme R.; Nash, David R.; Pedersen, Jes S.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear why some species become successful invaders whilst others fail, and whether invasive success depends on pre-adaptations already present in the native range or on characters evolving de-novo after introduction. Ants are among the worst invasive pests, with Lasius neglectus and its rapid spread through Europe and Asia as the most recent example of a pest ant that may become a global problem. Here, we present the first integrated study on behavior, morphology, population genetics, chemical recognition and parasite load of L. neglectus and its non-invasive sister species L. turcicus. We find that L. neglectus expresses the same supercolonial syndrome as other invasive ants, a social system that is characterized by mating without dispersal and large networks of cooperating nests rather than smaller mutually hostile colonies. We conclude that the invasive success of L. neglectus relies on a combination of parasite-release following introduction and pre-adaptations in mating system, body-size, queen number and recognition efficiency that evolved long before introduction. Our results challenge the notion that supercolonial organization is an inevitable consequence of low genetic variation for chemical recognition cues in small invasive founder populations. We infer that low variation and limited volatility in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles already existed in the native range in combination with low dispersal and a highly viscous population structure. Human transport to relatively disturbed urban areas thus became the decisive factor to induce parasite release, a well established general promoter of invasiveness in non-social animals and plants, but understudied in invasive social insects. PMID:19050762

  8. Chest wall invasion by bronchogenic carcinoma. Evaluation with Cine-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawano, Shigeru; Murakami, Kohji; Ohnuma, Hiroshi; Iwata, Ryoko; Hayashi, Takayuki; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Nagai, Kanji

    1996-01-01

    With the view of examining possible chest wall invasion of bronchogenic carcinoma, Cine-MRI was performed on 22 such cases. These cases were suspected of having above chest wall invasion by CT and their histopathological findings were obtained in surgery. The judgment of the chest wall invasion by Cine-CT was made such that non-moving up and down of the tumor with respiration involves its invasion, moving of the tumor without any up-and-down movement suspects its invasion and moving up and down of the tumor with respiration involves no invasion. The chest wall invasion was observed in 5 of 7 cases of invasion judged by Cine-MRI. For 2 false-positive cases, the histopathological findings presumed that tumor cells disappeared from the chest wall invaded region as the result of preoperative chemotherapy. The above invasion was observed in 1 of 4 cases suspected of possible invasion. Correct diagnosis was formed of 11 cases judged invasion-free by Cine-MRI. The above results suggested Cine-MRI to be useful for diagnosis of chest wall invasion of bronchogenic carcinoma. (author)

  9. High-density native-range species affects the invasive plant Chromolaena odorata more strongly than species from its invasive range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yulong; Liao, Zhiyong

    2017-11-22

    Invasive plant species often form dense mono-dominant stands in areas they have invaded, while having only sparse distribution in their native ranges, and the reasons behind this phenomenon are a key point of research in invasive species biology. Differences in species composition between native and invasive ranges may contribute to the difference in distribution status. In this study, we found that the high-density condition had a more negative effect on C. odorata than the low-density condition when co-grown with neighbor plants from its native range in Mexico, while this pattern was not in evidence when it was grown with neighbors from its invasive range in China. Different competitive ability and coevolutionary history with C. odorata between native-range neighbors and invasive-range neighbors may lead to the inconsistent patterns.

  10. Understanding invasion history and predicting invasive niches using genetic sequencing technology in Australia: case studies from Cucurbitaceae and Boraginaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Razia S; Zhu, Xiaocheng; Clements, David R; Weston, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Part of the challenge in dealing with invasive plant species is that they seldom represent a uniform, static entity. Often, an accurate understanding of the history of plant introduction and knowledge of the real levels of genetic diversity present in species and populations of importance is lacking. Currently, the role of genetic diversity in promoting the successful establishment of invasive plants is not well defined. Genetic profiling of invasive plants should enhance our understanding of the dynamics of colonization in the invaded range. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have greatly facilitated the rapid and complete assessment of plant population genetics. Here, we apply our current understanding of the genetics and ecophysiology of plant invasions to recent work on Australian plant invaders from the Cucurbitaceae and Boraginaceae. The Cucurbitaceae study showed that both prickly paddy melon ( Cucumis myriocarpus ) and camel melon ( Citrullus lanatus ) were represented by only a single genotype in Australia, implying that each was probably introduced as a single introduction event. In contrast, a third invasive melon, Citrullus colocynthis , possessed a moderate level of genetic diversity in Australia and was potentially introduced to the continent at least twice. The Boraginaceae study demonstrated the value of comparing two similar congeneric species; one, Echium plantagineum , is highly invasive and genetically diverse, whereas the other, Echium vulgare , exhibits less genetic diversity and occupies a more limited ecological niche. Sequence analysis provided precise identification of invasive plant species, as well as information on genetic diversity and phylogeographic history. Improved sequencing technologies will continue to allow greater resolution of genetic relationships among invasive plant populations, thereby potentially improving our ability to predict the impact of these relationships upon future spread and better manage invaders

  11. Mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical profile of classic primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) consists of both elevated calcium and parathyroid hormone levels. The standard of care is parathyroidectomy unless prohibited by medical comorbidities. Because more patients are undergoing routine bone density evaluation and neck imaging studies for other purposes, there is a subset of people identified with a biochemically mild form of the pHPT that expresses itself as either elevated calcium or parathyroid hormone levels. These patients often do not fall into the criteria for operation based on the National Institutes of Health consensus guidelines, and they can present a challenge of diagnosis and management. The purpose of this paper is to review the available literature on mild pHPT in an effort to better characterize this patient population and to determine whether patients benefit from parathyroidectomy. Evidence suggests that there are patients with mild pHPT who have overt symptoms that are found to improve after parathyroidectomy. There is also a group of patients with biochemically mild pHPT who are found to progress to classic pHPT over time; however, it is not predictable which group of patients this will be. Early intervention for this group with mild pHPT may prevent progression of bone, psychiatric, and renal complications, and parathyroidectomy has proven safe in appropriately selected patients at high volume centers. PMID:25063228

  12. Secondary invasions of noxious weeds associated with control of invasive Tamarix are frequent, idiosyncratic and persistent

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Eduardo; Sher, Anna A.; Anderson, Robert M.; Bay, Robin F.; Bean, Daniel W.; Bissonnete, Gabriel J.; Cooper, David J.; Dohrenwend, Kara; Eichhorst, Kim D.; El Waer, Hisham; Kennard, Deborah K.; Harms-Weissinger, Rebecca; Henry, Annie L.; Makarick, Lori J.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Reynolds, Lindsay V.; Robinson, W. Wright; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Tabacchi, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Control of invasive species within ecosystems may induce secondary invasions of non-target invaders replacing the first alien. We used four plant species listed as noxious by local authorities in riparian systems to discern whether 1) the severity of these secondary invasions was related to the control method applied to the first alien; and 2) which species that were secondary invaders persisted over time. In a collaborative study by 16 research institutions, we monitored plant species composition following control of non-native Tamarix trees along southwestern U.S. rivers using defoliation by an introduced biocontrol beetle, and three physical removal methods: mechanical using saws, heavy machinery, and burning in 244 treated and 79 untreated sites across six U.S. states. Physical removal favored secondary invasions immediately after Tamarix removal (0–3 yrs.), while in the biocontrol treatment, secondary invasions manifested later (> 5 yrs.). Within this general trend, the response of weeds to control was idiosyncratic; dependent on treatment type and invader. Two annual tumbleweeds that only reproduce by seed (Bassia scoparia and Salsola tragus) peaked immediately after physical Tamarix removal and persisted over time, even after herbicide application. Acroptilon repens, a perennial forb that vigorously reproduces by rhizomes, and Bromus tectorum, a very frequent annual grass before removal that only reproduces by seed, were most successful at biocontrol sites, and progressively spread as the canopy layer opened. These results demonstrate that strategies to control Tamarix affect secondary invasions differently among species and that time since disturbance is an important, generally overlooked, factor affecting response.

  13. Seed bank survival of an invasive species, but not of two native species, declines with invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrock, John L; Christopher, Cory C; Dutra, Humberto P

    2012-04-01

    Soil-borne seed pathogens may play an important role in either hindering or facilitating the spread of invasive exotic plants. We examined whether the invasive shrub Lonicera maackii (Caprifoliaceae) affected fungi-mediated mortality of conspecific and native shrub seeds in a deciduous forest in eastern Missouri. Using a combination of L. maackii removal and fungicide treatments, we found no effect of L. maackii invasion on seed viability of the native Symphoricarpos orbiculatus (Caprifoliaceae) or Cornus drummondii (Cornaceae). In contrast, fungi were significant agents of L. maackii seed mortality in invaded habitats. Losses of L. maackii to soil fungi were also significant in invaded habitats where L. maackii had been removed, although the magnitude of the effect of fungi was lower, suggesting that changes in soil chemistry or microhabitat caused by L. maackii were responsible for affecting fungal seed pathogens. Our work suggests that apparent competition via soil pathogens is not an important factor contributing to impacts of L. maackii on native shrubs. Rather, we found that fungal seed pathogens have density-dependent effects on L. maackii seed survival. Therefore, while fungal pathogens may provide little biotic resistance to early invasion by L. maackii, our study illustrates that more work is needed to understand how changes in fungal pathogens during the course of an invasion contribute to the potential for restoration of invaded systems. More generally, our study suggests that increased rates of fungal pathogen attack may be realized by invasive plants, such as L. maackii, that change the chemical or physical environment of the habitats they invade.

  14. Non-invasive or minimally invasive autopsy compared to conventional autopsy of suspected natural deaths in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokker, Britt M; Wagensveld, Ivo M; Weustink, Annick C; Oosterhuis, J Wolter; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2016-04-01

    Autopsies are used for healthcare quality control and improving medical knowledge. Because autopsy rates are declining worldwide, various non-invasive or minimally invasive autopsy methods are now being developed. To investigate whether these might replace the invasive autopsies conventionally performed in naturally deceased adults, we systematically reviewed original prospective validation studies. We searched six databases. Two reviewers independently selected articles and extracted data. Methods and patient groups were too heterogeneous for meaningful meta-analysis of outcomes. Sixteen of 1538 articles met our inclusion criteria. Eight studies used a blinded comparison; ten included less than 30 appropriate cases. Thirteen studies used radiological imaging (seven dealt solely with non-invasive procedures), two thoracoscopy and laparoscopy, and one sampling without imaging. Combining CT and MR was the best non-invasive method (agreement for cause of death: 70 %, 95%CI: 62.6; 76.4), but minimally invasive methods surpassed non-invasive methods. The highest sensitivity for cause of death (90.9 %, 95%CI: 74.5; 97.6, suspected duplicates excluded) was achieved in recent studies combining CT, CT-angiography and biopsies. Minimally invasive autopsies including biopsies performed best. To establish a feasible alternative to conventional autopsy and to increase consent to post-mortem investigations, further research in larger study groups is needed. • Health care quality control benefits from clinical feedback provided by (alternative) autopsies. • So far, sixteen studies investigated alternative autopsy methods for naturally deceased adults. • Thirteen studies used radiological imaging modalities, eight tissue biopsies, and three CT-angiography. • Combined CT, CT-angiography and biopsies were most sensitive diagnosing cause of death.

  15. Invasive ductal carcinoma with lobular features: a comparison study to invasive ductal and invasive lobular carcinomas of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arps, David P; Healy, Patrick; Zhao, Lili; Kleer, Celina G; Pang, Judy C

    2013-04-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma with lobular features (IDC-L) is not recognized as a distinct subtype of breast cancer, and its clinicopathologic features and outcomes are unknown. In this retrospective study, we focused on characterization of clinicopathologic features and outcomes of IDC-L and compared them to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). 183 cases of IDC-L from 1996 to 2011 were compared with 1,499 cases of IDC and 375 cases of ILC. Available slides of IDC-L (n = 150) were reviewed to quantify the lobular component (≤ 20, 21-50, 51-80, >80 %), defined as small cells individually dispersed, arranged in linear cords, or in loose aggregates without the formation of tubules or cohesive nests. E-cadherin immunostain was performed to confirm ductal origin. Compared to IDC, IDC-L was more likely to have lower histologic grade (p lobular component in IDC-L had no impact on the size, nodal status, stage, or outcome. Our data suggest that although IDC-L may be a variant of IDC, with >90 % of cases being E-cadherin positive, the clinical and biological characteristics are more similar to that of ILC.

  16. Invasive plants in 21st Century landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerie. Rapp

    2005-01-01

    A plant species is defined as invasive if it is nonnative to the ecosystem under consideration, and if it causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. Nonnative plant invasions are generally considered to have reached the Pacific Northwest in the mid-1800s with the arrival of European-American settlers. Invasive species such as...

  17. Globally threatened vertebrates on islands with invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Dena R; Zilliacus, Kelly M; Holmes, Nick D; Butchart, Stuart H M; Genovesi, Piero; Ceballos, Gerardo; Tershy, Bernie R; Croll, Donald A

    2017-10-01

    Global biodiversity loss is disproportionately rapid on islands, where invasive species are a major driver of extinctions. To inform conservation planning aimed at preventing extinctions, we identify the distribution and biogeographic patterns of highly threatened terrestrial vertebrates (classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature) and invasive vertebrates on ~465,000 islands worldwide by conducting a comprehensive literature review and interviews with more than 500 experts. We found that 1189 highly threatened vertebrate species (319 amphibians, 282 reptiles, 296 birds, and 292 mammals) breed on 1288 islands. These taxa represent only 5% of Earth's terrestrial vertebrates and 41% of all highly threatened terrestrial vertebrates, which occur in vertebrates was available for 1030 islands (80% of islands with highly threatened vertebrates). Invasive vertebrates were absent from 24% of these islands, where biosecurity to prevent invasions is a critical management tool. On the 76% of islands where invasive vertebrates were present, management could benefit 39% of Earth's highly threatened vertebrates. Invasive mammals occurred in 97% of these islands, with Rattus sp. as the most common invasive vertebrate (78%; 609 islands). Our results provide an important baseline for identifying islands for invasive species eradication and other island conservation actions that reduce biodiversity loss.

  18. Invasive cervical carcinoma (Stages IB-IIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sironi, S.; Zanello, A.; Rodighiero, M.G.; Vanzulli, A.; Del Maschio, A.; Taccagni, G.L.; Belloni, C.

    1991-01-01

    In the patients with invasive cervical carcinoma, the accurate assessment of parametrial invasion greatly affects the therapeutic choice between surgery and radiation therapy. As a matter of fact, surgery is usually performed only in the patients with carcinoma confined to the cervix, whereas those with parametrial involvement, or more advanced stages, are treated with radiation therapy. This prospective study was aimed at investigating the comparative adequecy of CT and MR imaging in assessing parametrial status in the patients with invasive cervical cancer. Twenty-one consecutive patients, with histologic diagnosis of cervical carcinoma, were investigated. All of them were clinically considered as having invasive cervical cancer (FIGO stage IB-IIB) and subsequently underwent surgery. In all cases, detailed histology of the parametrium was obtained. Pathological data were compared with CT and MR findings in all cases. As for assessing parametrial involvement by cancer, CT had 62% accuracy, 63% sensitivity, and 60% specificity, versus MR imaging 81% accuracy, 69% sensitivity, and 80% specificify. Therefore, MR imaging appears to be superior to CT in assessing the parametrial status of patients with invasive cervical carcinoma; the method yields valuable information for treatment planning

  19. Reproductive characteristics of neophytes in the Czech Republic: traits of invasive and non-invasive species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, Lenka; Pyšek, Petr; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Havlíčková, Vendula; Zákravský, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2010), s. 365-390 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR GA206/09/0563; GA ČR GA206/05/0323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : plant invasions * reproductive traits * invasiveness Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2010

  20. Quantifying the invasiveness of species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Colautti, R. I.; Parker, J. D.; Cadotte, M. W.; Pyšek, Petr; Brown, C. S.; Sax, D. F.; Richardson, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2014), s. 7-27 ISSN 1619-0033 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP505/11/1112; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/1028 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1002 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biological invasions * biogeographical comparison * invasiveness Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  1. Characterizing the landscape dynamics of an invasive plant and risk of invasion using remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Bethany A; Mustard, John F

    2006-06-01

    Improved understanding of the spatial dynamics of invasive plant species may lead to more effective land management and reduced future invasion. Here, we identified the spatial extents of nonnative cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in the north central Great Basin using remotely sensed data from Landsat MSS, TM, and ETM+. We compared cheatgrass extents in 1973 and 2001 to six spatially explicit landscape variables: elevation, aspect, hydrographic channels, cultivation, roads, and power lines. In 2001, Cheatgrass was 10% more likely to be found in elevation ranges from 1400 to 1700 m (although the data suggest a preferential invasion into lower elevations by 2001), 6% more likely on west and northwest facing slopes, and 3% more likely within hydrographic channels. Over this time period, cheatgrass expansion was also closely linked to proximity to land use. In 2001, cheatgrass was 20% more likely to be found within 3 km of cultivation, 13% more likely to be found within 700 m of a road, and 15% more likely to be found within 1 km of a power line. Finally, in 2001 cheatgrass was 26% more likely to be present within 150 m of areas occupied by cheatgrass in 1973. Using these relationships, we created a risk map of future cheatgrass invasion that may aid land management. These results highlight the importance of including land use variables and the extents of current plant invasion in predictions of future risk.

  2. Invasive earthworms interact with abiotic conditions to influence the invasion of common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Alexander M; Whitfeld, Timothy J S; Lodge, Alexandra G; Eisenhauer, Nico; Frelich, Lee E; Reich, Peter B

    2015-05-01

    Common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica L.) is one of the most abundant and ecologically harmful non-native plants in forests of the Upper Midwest United States. At the same time, European earthworms are invading previously glaciated areas in this region, with largely anecdotal evidence suggesting they compound the negative effects of buckthorn and influence the invasibility of these forests. Germination and seedling establishment are important control points for colonization by any species, and manipulation of the conditions influencing these life history stages may provide insight into why invasive species are successful in some environments and not others. Using a greenhouse microcosm experiment, we examined the effects of important biotic and abiotic factors on the germination and seedling establishment of common buckthorn. We manipulated light levels, leaf litter depth and earthworm presence to investigate the independent and interactive effects of these treatments on buckthorn establishment. We found that light and leaf litter depth were significant predictors of buckthorn germination but that the presence of earthworms was the most important factor; earthworms interacted with light and leaf litter to increase the number and biomass of buckthorn across all treatments. Path analysis suggested both direct and moisture-mediated indirect mechanisms controlled these processes. The results suggest that the action of earthworms may provide a pathway through which buckthorn invades forests of the Upper Midwest United States. Hence, researchers and managers should consider co-invasion of plants and earthworms when investigating invasibility and creating preemptive or post-invasion management plans.

  3. Invasion of erythrocytes by Babesia bovis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaffar, Fasila Razzia

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the invasion of erythrocytes taking place during the asexual erythrocytic blood stage of the apicomplexan parasites Babesia bovis parasite. Host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites is a complex process requiring multiple receptor-ligand interactions, involving

  4. Total parathyroidectomy with forearm auto-transplantation improves the quality of life and reduces the recurrence of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Gen; Xiao, Zhang-Sheng; Hu, Xian-Jie; Li, Yun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Song-Ze; Shan, Ai-Qin

    2017-12-01

    Our study aims to explore the effect of total parathyroidectomy (PTX) with forearm autotransplantation (FAT) on the quality of life and recurrence of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in chronic kidney disease patients. A total of 104 chronic kidney disease patients with SHPT were enrolled and divided into the PTX (n = 62) and PTX + FAT (n = 42) groups. The operation efficacy was evaluated by analyzing preoperative and postoperative values, including levels of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), serum phosphorus, serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium-phosphorus product, signs and symptoms, and MOS 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36) scores. Moreover, complications and recurrences were followed up for 12 months after the operation. Binary logistic regression was to present the risk factors for the recurrence of chronic kidney disease patients with SHPT. Compared with the preoperative values, the PTX and PTX + FAT groups showed decrease postoperative levels of iPTH, serum phosphorus, serum calcium, calcium-phosphorus product, bone pain, and skin pruritus at all time periods. The PTX and PTX + FAT groups demonstrated decreased ALP, fracture or deformity, and coronary artery calcification at 1 month, decreased short stature at 3 months after the operation but increased SF-36 score after operation. Compared with the PTX group, the level of iPTH decreased and the levels of serum calcium, calcium-phosphorus product increased at 3, 6, and 12 months after the operation in the PTX + FAT group. The levels of ALP, fracture or deformity, short stature, and SF-36 decreased separately at 1 week and 6 and 12 months after the operation, along with the decrease of coronary artery calcification and the recurrence rate, respectively, at 6 and 12 months after the operation in the PTX + FAT group when compared with those in the PTX group. Logistic regression analysis evidenced that the preoperative iPTH level, SF-36 score, and operation

  5. Stably Integrated luxCDABE for Assessment of Salmonella Invasion Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N. Flentie

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of gastroenteritis in humans and also localizes to neoplastic tumors in animals. Invasion of specific eukaryotic cells is a key mechanism of Salmonella interactions with host tissues. Early stages of gastrointestinal cell invasion are mediated by a Salmonella type III secretion system, powered by the adenosine triphosphatase invC. The aim of this work was to characterize the invC dependence of invasion kinetics into disparate eukaryotic cells traditionally used as models of gut epithelium or neoplasms. Thus, a nondestructive real-time assay was developed to report eukaryotic cell invasion kinetics using lux+ Salmonella that contain chromosomally integrated luxCDABE genes. Bioluminescence-based invasion assays using lux+ Salmonella exhibited inoculum dose-response correlation, distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent Salmonella, and discriminated relative Salmonella invasiveness in accordance with environmental conditions that induce invasion gene expression. In standard gentamicin protection assays, bioluminescence from lux+ Salmonella correlated with recovery of colony-forming units of internalized bacteria and could be visualized by bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, this assay distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent bacteria independent of gentamicin treatment in real time. Bioluminescence reported Salmonella invasion of disparate eukaryotic cell lines, including neoplastic melanoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and glioma cell lines used in animal models of malignancy. In each case, Salmonella invasion of eukaryotic cells was invC dependent.

  6. Acidity generated by the tumor microenvironment drives local invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, Veronica; Chen, Tingan; Lloyd, Mark; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan; Cornnell, Heather H; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Bailey, Kate; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Rothberg, Jennifer M; Sloane, Bonnie F; Johnson, Joseph; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2013-03-01

    The pH of solid tumors is acidic due to increased fermentative metabolism and poor perfusion. It has been hypothesized that acid pH promotes local invasive growth and metastasis. The hypothesis that acid mediates invasion proposes that H(+) diffuses from the proximal tumor microenvironment into adjacent normal tissues where it causes tissue remodeling that permits local invasion. In the current work, tumor invasion and peritumoral pH were monitored over time using intravital microscopy. In every case, the peritumoral pH was acidic and heterogeneous and the regions of highest tumor invasion corresponded to areas of lowest pH. Tumor invasion did not occur into regions with normal or near-normal extracellular pH. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that cells in the invasive edges expressed the glucose transporter-1 and the sodium-hydrogen exchanger-1, both of which were associated with peritumoral acidosis. In support of the functional importance of our findings, oral administration of sodium bicarbonate was sufficient to increase peritumoral pH and inhibit tumor growth and local invasion in a preclinical model, supporting the acid-mediated invasion hypothesis. Cancer Res; 73(5); 1524-35. ©2012 AACR. ©2012 AACR.

  7. The role of hybridization in facilitating tree invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybridization events can generate additional genetic diversity on which natural selection can act and at times enhance invasiveness of the species. Invasive tree species are a growing ecological concern worldwide, and some of these invasions involve hybridization events pre- or post-introduction. Th...

  8. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James; Gordon, Steven M; Houghtaling, Penny L; Tingleff, Jens; Navia, José L; Blackstone, Eugene H; Pettersson, Gösta B

    2018-01-01

    The rarity of invasiveness of right-sided infective endocarditis (IE) compared with left-sided has not been well recognized and evaluated. Thus, we compared invasiveness of right- versus left-sided IE in surgically treated patients. From January 2002 to January 2015, 1292 patients underwent surgery for active IE, 138 right-sided and 1224 left-sided. Among patients with right-sided IE, 131 had tricuspid and 7 pulmonary valve IE; 12% had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Endocarditis-related invasiveness was based on echocardiographic and operative findings. Invasive disease was rare on the right side, occurring in 1 patient (0.72%; 95% confidence interval 0.02%-4.0%); rather, it was limited to valve cusps/leaflets or was superficial. In contrast, IE was invasive in 408 of 633 patients with aortic valve (AV) IE (65%), 113 of 369 with mitral valve (MV) IE (31%), and 148 of 222 with AV and MV IE (67%). Staphylococcus aureus was a more predominant organism in right-sided than left-sided IE (right 40%, AV 19%, MV 29%), yet invasion was observed almost exclusively on the left side of the heart, which was more common and more severe with AV than MV IE and more common with prosthetic valve endocarditis than native valve IE. Rarity of right-sided invasion even when caused by S aureus suggests that invasion and development of cavities/"abscesses" in patients with IE may be driven more by chamber pressure than organism, along with other reported host-microbial interactions. The lesser invasiveness of MV compared with AV IE suggests a similar mechanism: decompression of MV annulus invasion site(s) toward the left atrium. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling plant invasion pathways in protected areas under climate change: implication for invasion management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-J. Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change may enable invasive plant species (IPS to invade protected areas (PAs, but plant invasion on a global scale has not yet been explicitly addressed. Here, we mapped the potential invasion pathways for IPS in PAs across the globe and explored potential factors determining the pathways of plant invasion under climate change. We used species distribution modelling to estimate the suitable habitats of 386 IPS and applied a corridor analysis to compute the potential pathways of IPS in PAs under climate change. Subsequently, we analysed the potential factors affecting the pathways in PAs. According to our results, the main potential pathways of IPS in PAs are in Europe, eastern Australia, New Zealand, southern Africa, and eastern regions of South America and are strongly influenced by changes in temperature and precipitation. Protected areas can play an important role in preventing and controlling the spread of IPS under climate change. This is due to the fact that measures are taken to monitor climate change in detail, to provide effective management near or inside PAs, and to control the introduction of IPS with a high capacity for natural dispersal. A review of conservation policies in PAs is urgently needed.

  10. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Promise of new technologies in understanding pre-invasive breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Pollack, Jonathan R

    2003-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization, RNA expression profiling, and proteomic analyses are new molecular technologies used to study breast cancer. Invasive breast cancers were originally evaluated because they provided ample quantities of DNA, RNA, and protein. The application of these technologies to pre-invasive breast lesions is discussed, including methods that facilitate their implementation. Data indicate that atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ are precursor lesions molecularly similar to adjacent invasive breast cancer. It is expected that molecular technologies will identify breast tissue at risk for the development of unfavorable subtypes of invasive breast cancer and reveal strategies for targeted chemoprevention or eradication

  11. Impact of the invasive parasitic copepod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Bedolfe; Drent, J.; van der Meer, J.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2018-01-01

    Invasive species can indirectly affect native species by modifying parasite–host dynamics and disease occurrence. This scenario applies to European coastal waters where the invasive Pacific oyster (Magallana gigas) co-introduced the parasitic copepod Mytilicola orientalis that spills

  12. Dynamic models in research and management of biological invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchadas, Ana; Vaz, Ana Sofia; Honrado, João P; Alagador, Diogo; Bastos, Rita; Cabral, João A; Santos, Mário; Vicente, Joana R

    2017-07-01

    Invasive species are increasing in number, extent and impact worldwide. Effective invasion management has thus become a core socio-ecological challenge. To tackle this challenge, integrating spatial-temporal dynamics of invasion processes with modelling approaches is a promising approach. The inclusion of dynamic processes in such modelling frameworks (i.e. dynamic or hybrid models, here defined as models that integrate both dynamic and static approaches) adds an explicit temporal dimension to the study and management of invasions, enabling the prediction of invasions and optimisation of multi-scale management and governance. However, the extent to which dynamic approaches have been used for that purpose is under-investigated. Based on a literature review, we examined the extent to which dynamic modelling has been used to address invasions worldwide. We then evaluated how the use of dynamic modelling has evolved through time in the scope of invasive species management. The results suggest that modelling, in particular dynamic modelling, has been increasingly applied to biological invasions, especially to support management decisions at local scales. Also, the combination of dynamic and static modelling approaches (hybrid models with a spatially explicit output) can be especially effective, not only to support management at early invasion stages (from prevention to early detection), but also to improve the monitoring of invasion processes and impact assessment. Further development and testing of such hybrid models may well be regarded as a priority for future research aiming to improve the management of invasions across scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity.

  14. Conspecific plasticity and invasion: invasive populations of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) have performance advantage over native populations only in low soil salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leiyi; Tiu, Candice J; Peng, Shaolin; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change may increase biological invasions in part because invasive species may have greater phenotypic plasticity than native species. This may be especially important for abiotic stresses such as salt inundation related to increased hurricane activity or sea level rise. If invasive species indeed have greater plasticity, this may reflect genetic differences between populations in the native and introduced ranges. Here, we examined plasticity of functional and fitness-related traits of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) populations from the introduced and native ranges that were grown along a gradient of soil salinity (control: 0 ppt; Low: 5 ppt; Medium: 10 ppt; High: 15 ppt) in a greenhouse. We used both norm reaction and plasticity index (PIv) to estimate the conspecific phenotypic plasticity variation between invasive and native populations. Overall, invasive populations had higher phenotypic plasticity of height growth rate (HGR), aboveground biomass, stem biomass and specific leaf area (SLA). The plasticity Index (PIv) of height growth rate (HGR) and SLA each were higher for plants from invasive populations. Absolute performance was always comparable or greater for plants from invasive populations versus native populations with the greatest differences at low stress levels. Our results were consistent with the "Master-of-some" pattern for invasive plants in which the fitness of introduced populations was greater in more benign conditions. This suggests that the greater conspecific phenotypic plasticity of invasive populations compared to native populations may increase invasion success in benign conditions but would not provide a potential interspecific competitive advantage in higher salinity soils that may occur with global climate change in coastal areas.

  15. Response of native insect communities to invasive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezemer, T Martijn; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Cronin, James T

    2014-01-01

    Invasive plants can disrupt a range of trophic interactions in native communities. As a novel resource they can affect the performance of native insect herbivores and their natural enemies such as parasitoids and predators, and this can lead to host shifts of these herbivores and natural enemies. Through the release of volatile compounds, and by changing the chemical complexity of the habitat, invasive plants can also affect the behavior of native insects such as herbivores, parasitoids, and pollinators. Studies that compare insects on related native and invasive plants in invaded habitats show that the abundance of insect herbivores is often lower on invasive plants, but that damage levels are similar. The impact of invasive plants on the population dynamics of resident insect species has been rarely examined, but invasive plants can influence the spatial and temporal dynamics of native insect (meta)populations and communities, ultimately leading to changes at the landscape level.

  16. Gastric Metastasis of Triple Negative Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geredeli, Caglayan; Dogru, Osman; Omeroglu, Ethem; Yilmaz, Farise; Cicekci, Faruk

    2015-05-05

    Invasive lobular carcinomas are the second most common type (5% to 15%) of invasive breast carcinomas. The most frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis are the local and distant lymph nodes, brain, lung, liver, and bones; metastasis to the gastrointestinal system, especially to the stomach, is rare. When a mass is detected in an unusual place in a patient with invasive lobular carcinoma, it should be kept in mind that such a mass may be either a second primary carcinoma or the metastasis of an invasive lobular carcinoma. In this report, we present a case of gastric metastasis from triple-negative invasive lobular breast cancer. It is important to make an accurate diagnosis by distinguishing gastric metastasis from breast cancer in order to select the best initial treatment for systemic diseases of breast cancer. Considering our case, healthcare professionals should take into account that cases with invasive lobular breast cancer may experience unusual metastases.

  17. Alien invasive species and international trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emergency control measures for invasive species often rely on use of pesticides and other destructive practices. Public concern about pesticide contamination of the ground water and the environment has lead to increased restrictions on the use of pesticides for control of many destructive invasive ...

  18. [Second operation more frequent following breast-conserving treatment for invasive lobular than for invasive non-lobular carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuw, S. de; Wildenberg, F.; Strobbe, L.; Wobbes, T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the frequency of re-excision or mastectomy in women who had breast-conserving treatment for invasive lobular mammary carcinoma. DESIGN: Retrospective. METHOD: Data on the number of patients with invasive carcinoma from 1998-2006 were obtained from the national pathology

  19. Towards Arctic Resource Governance of Marine Invasive Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kourantidou, Melina; Kaiser, Brooks; Fernandez, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Scientific and policy-oriented publications highlighting the magnitude of uncertainty in the changing Arctic and the possibilities for effective regional governance are proliferating, yet it remains a challenging task to examine Arctic marine biodiversity. Limited scientific data are currently...... available. Through analysis of marine invasions in the Arctic, we work to identify and assess patterns in the knowledge gaps regarding invasive species in the Arctic that affect the ability to generate improved governance outcomes. These patterns are expected to depend on multiple aspects of scientific...... research into invasive species threats in the Arctic, including the ways in which known marine invasions are related to different stakeholder groups and existing disparate national and international experiences with invasive species. Stakeholdergroups include dominant industries (fishing, shipping, tourism...

  20. Invasion ecology meets parasitology: Advances and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Poulin

    2017-01-01

    Biological invasions threaten the diversity and functioning of native ecosystems, and the rate at which species are being introduced to new areas shows no sign of slowing down. Parasites play roles in biological invasions, for instance when native parasites interact with exotic hosts, or when parasites themselves are introduced to new areas. However, publication trends show clearly that research on parasitism in the context of biological invasions is lagging far behind research on biological ...

  1. Soil seed banks in plant invasions: promoting species invasiveness and long-term impakt on plant community dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gioria, M.; Pyšek, Petr; Moravcová, Lenka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 2 (2012), s. 327-350 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0563 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : soil seed bank * plant invasions * species invasive ness Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2012

  2. The potential role of podoplanin in tumour invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, A; Christofori, G

    2006-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small mucin-like transmembrane protein, widely expressed in various specialised cell types throughout the body. Here, we revisit the mechanism of podoplanin-mediated tumour invasion. We compare molecular pathways leading to single and collective cell invasion and discuss novel distinct concepts of tumour cell invasion. PMID:17179989

  3. Conspecific plasticity and invasion: invasive populations of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera have performance advantage over native populations only in low soil salinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiyi Chen

    Full Text Available Global climate change may increase biological invasions in part because invasive species may have greater phenotypic plasticity than native species. This may be especially important for abiotic stresses such as salt inundation related to increased hurricane activity or sea level rise. If invasive species indeed have greater plasticity, this may reflect genetic differences between populations in the native and introduced ranges. Here, we examined plasticity of functional and fitness-related traits of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera populations from the introduced and native ranges that were grown along a gradient of soil salinity (control: 0 ppt; Low: 5 ppt; Medium: 10 ppt; High: 15 ppt in a greenhouse. We used both norm reaction and plasticity index (PIv to estimate the conspecific phenotypic plasticity variation between invasive and native populations. Overall, invasive populations had higher phenotypic plasticity of height growth rate (HGR, aboveground biomass, stem biomass and specific leaf area (SLA. The plasticity Index (PIv of height growth rate (HGR and SLA each were higher for plants from invasive populations. Absolute performance was always comparable or greater for plants from invasive populations versus native populations with the greatest differences at low stress levels. Our results were consistent with the "Master-of-some" pattern for invasive plants in which the fitness of introduced populations was greater in more benign conditions. This suggests that the greater conspecific phenotypic plasticity of invasive populations compared to native populations may increase invasion success in benign conditions but would not provide a potential interspecific competitive advantage in higher salinity soils that may occur with global climate change in coastal areas.

  4. Earthworm invasion in North America: Food resource competition affects native millipede survival and invasive earthworm reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce Snyder; Mac Callaham; Christopher Lowe; Paul Hendrix

    2013-01-01

    The invasive non-native earthworm Amynthas agrestis (Goto and Hatai, 1899) has recently been documented invading forests of the Appalachian Mountains in the southeastern United States. This epigeic earthworm decreases the depth of organic soil horizons, and this may play a role in the decrease of millipede richness and abundance associated with A. agrestis invasion. To...

  5. 76 FR 68776 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... broad array of issues related to preventing the introduction of invasive species and providing for their...-2012 Invasive Species National Management Plan. The meeting is open to the public. An orientation...

  6. 77 FR 23740 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... broad array of issues related to preventing the introduction of invasive species and providing for their... both ecological and management contexts, will center on topics that: (1) Pertain to invasive species...

  7. Animal ecosystem engineers modulate the diversity-invasibility relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Eisenhauer

    Full Text Available Invasions of natural communities by non-indigenous species are currently rated as one of the most important global-scale threats to biodiversity. Biodiversity itself is known to reduce invasions and increase stability. Disturbances by ecosystem engineers affect the distribution, establishment, and abundance of species but this has been ignored in studies on diversity-invasibility relationships.We determined natural plant invasion into 46 plots varying in the number of plant species (1, 4, and 16 and plant functional groups (1, 2, 3, and 4 for three years beginning two years after the establishment of the Jena Experiment. We sampled subplots where earthworms were artificially added and others where earthworm abundance was reduced. We also performed a seed-dummy experiment to investigate the role of earthworms as secondary seed dispersers along a plant diversity gradient. Horizontal dispersal and burial of seed dummies were significantly reduced in subplots where earthworms were reduced in abundance. Seed dispersal by earthworms decreased with increasing plant species richness and presence of grasses but increased in presence of small herbs. These results suggest that dense vegetation inhibits the surface activity of earthworms. Further, there was a positive relationship between the number of earthworms and the number and diversity of invasive plants. Hence, earthworms decreased the stability of grassland communities against plant invasion.Invasibility decreased and stability increased with increasing plant diversity and, most remarkably, earthworms modulated the diversity-invasibility relationship. While the impacts of earthworms were unimportant in low diverse (low earthworm densities and high diverse (high floral structural complexity plant communities, earthworms decreased the stability of intermediate diverse plant communities against plant invasion. Overall, the results document that fundamental processes in plant communities like plant seed

  8. Invasion of Ureaplasma diversum in Hep-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga Antonio

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding mollicutes is challenging due to their variety and relationship with host cells. Invasion has explained issues related to their opportunistic role. Few studies have been done on the Ureaplasma diversum mollicute, which is detected in healthy or diseased bovine. The invasion in Hep-2 cells of four clinical isolates and two reference strains of their ureaplasma was studied by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and gentamicin invasion assay. Results The isolates and strains used were detected inside the cells after infection of one minute without difference in the arrangement for adhesion and invasion. The adhesion was scattered throughout the cells, and after three hours, the invasion of the ureaplasmas surrounded the nuclear region but were not observed inside the nuclei. The gentamicin invasion assay detected that 1% of the ATCC strains were inside the infected Hep-2 cells in contrast to 10% to the clinical isolates. A high level of phospholipase C activity was also detected in all studied ureaplasma. Conclusions The results presented herein will help better understand U. diversum infections, aswell as cellular attachment and virulence.

  9. On the relative merits of invasive and non-invasive pre-surgical brain mapping: New tools in ablative epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Andrew C; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Narayana, Shalini; Choudhri, Asim F; Abbas-Babajani-Feremi; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W

    2018-05-01

    Cortical Stimulation Mapping (CSM) and the Wada procedure have long been considered the gold standard for localizing motor and language-related cortical areas and for determining the language and memory-dominant hemisphere, respectively. In recent years, however, non-invasive methods such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have emerged as promising alternatives to the aforementioned procedures, particularly in cases where the invasive localization of eloquent cortex has proven to be challenging. To illustrate this point, we will first introduce the evidence of the compatibility of invasive and non-invasive methods and subsequently outline the rationale and the conditions where the latter methods are applicable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. CT Accuracy of Extrinsic Tongue Muscle Invasion in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, J C; Baugnon, K L; Lacayo, E A; Hudgins, P A; Patel, M R; Magliocca, K R; Corey, A S; El-Deiry, M; Wadsworth, J T; Beitler, J J; Saba, N F; Liu, Y; Aiken, A H

    2017-02-01

    Extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in oral cavity cancer upstages the primary tumor to a T4a. Despite this American Joint Committee on Cancer staging criterion, no studies have investigated the accuracy or prognostic importance of radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion, the feasibility of standardizing extrinsic tongue muscle invasion reporting, or the degree of agreement across different disciplines: radiology, surgery, and pathology. The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement among radiology, surgery, and pathology for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion and to determine the imaging features most predictive of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion with surgical/pathologic confirmation. Thirty-three patients with untreated primary oral cavity cancer were included. Two head and neck radiologists, 3 otolaryngologists, and 1 pathologist prospectively evaluated extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Fourteen of 33 patients had radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion; however, only 8 extrinsic tongue muscle invasions were confirmed intraoperatively. Pathologists were unable to determine extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in post-formalin-fixed samples. Radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion had 100% sensitivity, 76% specificity, 57% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value with concurrent surgical-pathologic evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion as the criterion standard. On further evaluation, the imaging characteristic most consistent with surgical-pathologic evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion was masslike enhancement. Evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion is a subjective finding for all 3 disciplines. For radiology, masslike enhancement of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion most consistently corresponded to concurrent surgery/pathology evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Intraoperative surgical and pathologic evaluation should be encouraged to verify radiologic extrinsic tongue

  11. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  12. Book review: Encyclopedia of biological invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo

    2011-01-01

    Species introductions and consequent biotic invasions and homogenization are major components of global change that are drawing increasing concern and various levels of actions and reactions around the world. Invasion ecology has advanced rapidly during the last few decades, and the discipline is now increasingly integrated with the social and economic sciences. A...

  13. The Invasive Plant Species Education Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kevin; James, Krista; Carlson, Kitrina; D'Angelo, Jean

    2010-01-01

    To help high school students gain a solid understanding of invasive plant species, university faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) and a local high school teacher worked together to develop the Invasive Plant Species (IPS) Education Guide. The IPS Education Guide includes nine lessons that give students an…

  14. Invasive aspergillosis in near drowning nonneutropenic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munta, Kartik; Gopal, Palepu B N; Vigg, Ajit

    2015-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis in immunosuppressed people has been well documented, but to diagnose and treat in an immunocompetent individual after near drowning, it requires early suspicion and proper empirical treatment. We report a case diagnosed to have invasive aspergillosis with systemic dissemination of the infection to the brain, gluteal muscles, and kidneys after a fall in a chemical tank of a paper manufacturing company. He was ventilated for acute respiratory distress syndrome and managed with antibiotics and vasopressors. Due to nonresolving pneumonia and positive serum galactomannan, trans-tracheal biopsy was performed which confirmed invasive aspergillosis and was treated with antifungals. With the availability of galactomannan assay and better radiological investigative modalities, occurrence of such invasive fungal infections in cases of drowning patients should be considered early in such patients and treated with appropriate antifungals.

  15. Multiple mechanisms enable invasive species to suppress native species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alison E; Thomsen, Meredith; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2011-07-01

    Invasive plants represent a significant threat to ecosystem biodiversity. To decrease the impacts of invasive species, a major scientific undertaking of the last few decades has been aimed at understanding the mechanisms that drive invasive plant success. Most studies and theories have focused on a single mechanism for predicting the success of invasive plants and therefore cannot provide insight as to the relative importance of multiple interactions in predicting invasive species' success. We examine four mechanisms that potentially contribute to the success of invasive velvetgrass Holcus lanatus: direct competition, indirect competition mediated by mammalian herbivores, interference competition via allelopathy, and indirect competition mediated by changes in the soil community. Using a combination of field and greenhouse approaches, we focus on the effects of H. lanatus on a common species in California coastal prairies, Erigeron glaucus, where the invasion is most intense. We found that H. lanatus had the strongest effects on E. glaucus via direct competition, but it also influenced the soil community in ways that feed back to negatively influence E. glaucus and other native species after H. lanatus removal. This approach provided evidence for multiple mechanisms contributing to negative effects of invasive species, and it identified when particular strategies were most likely to be important. These mechanisms can be applied to eradication of H. lanatus and conservation of California coastal prairie systems, and they illustrate the utility of an integrated set of experiments for determining the potential mechanisms of invasive species' success.

  16. Dietary flexibility aids Asian earthworm invasion in North American forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixin; Hendrix, Paul F; Snyder, Bruce A; Molina, Marirosa; Li, Jianxiong; Rao, Xingquan; Siemann, Evan; Fu, Shenglei

    2010-07-01

    On a local scale, invasiveness of introduced species and invasibility of habitats together determine invasion success. A key issue in invasion ecology has been how to quantify the contribution of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately. Conventional approaches, such as comparing the differences in traits and/or impacts of species between native and/or invaded ranges, do not determine the extent to which the performance of invaders is due to either the effects of species traits or habitat characteristics. Here we explore the interaction between two of the most widespread earthworm invaders in the world (Asian Amynthas agrestis and European Lumbricus rubellus) and study the effects of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately through an alternative approach of "third habitat" in Tennessee, USA. We propose that feeding behaviors of earthworms will be critical to invasion success because trophic ecology of invasive animals plays a key role in the invasion process. We found that (1) the biomass and isotopic abundances (delta13C and delta15N) of A. agrestis were not impacted by either direct effects of L. rubellus competition or indirect effects of L. rubellus-preconditioned habitat; (2) A. agrestis disrupted the relationship between L. rubellus and soil microorganisms and consequently hindered litter consumption by L. rubellus; and (3) compared to L. rubellus, A. agrestis shifted its diet more readily to consume more litter, more soil gram-positive (G+) bacteria (which may be important for litter digestion), and more non-microbial soil fauna when soil microorganisms were depleted. In conclusion, A. agrestis showed strong invasiveness through its dietary flexibility through diet shifting and superior feeding behavior and its indirectly negative effect of habitat invasibility on L. rubellus via changes in the soil microorganism community. In such context, our results expand on the resource fluctuation hypothesis and support the superior

  17. HPV genotypes in invasive cervical cancer in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Junge, Jette; Holl, Katsiaryna

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancers may differ by geographic region. The primary objective of this study was to estimate HPV-genotype distribution in Danish women with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer.......Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancers may differ by geographic region. The primary objective of this study was to estimate HPV-genotype distribution in Danish women with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer....

  18. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species.

  19. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species. PMID

  20. Invasion patterns of ground-dwelling arthropods in Canarian laurel forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Erik; Perner, Jörg

    2008-09-01

    Patterns of invasive species in four different functional groups of ground-dwelling arthropods (Carnivorous ground dwelling beetles; Chilopoda; Diplopoda; Oniscoidea) were examined in laurel forests of the Canary Islands. The following hypotheses were tested: (A) increasing species richness is connected with decreasing invasibility as predicted by the Diversity-invasibility hypothesis (DIH); (B) disturbed or anthropogenically influenced habitats are more sensitive for invasions than natural and undisturbed habitats; and (C) climatic differences between laurel forest sites do not affect the rate of invasibility. A large proportion of invasives (species and abundances) was observed in most of the studied arthropod groups. However, we did not find any support for the DIH based on the examined arthropod groups. Regarding the impact of the extrinsic factors 'disturbance' and 'climate' on invasion patterns, we found considerable differences between the studied functional groups. Whereas the 'disturbance parameters' played a minor role and only affected the relative abundances of invasive centipedes (positively) and millipedes (negatively), the 'climate parameters' were significantly linked with the pattern of invasive detritivores. Interactions between native and invading species have not been observed thus far, but cannot completely be excluded.

  1. Applying remote sensing to invasive species science—A tamarisk example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisette, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    The Invasive Species Science Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center provides research and technical assistance relating to management concerns for invasive species, including understanding how these species are introduced, identifying areas vulnerable to invasion, forecasting invasions, and developing control methods. This fact sheet considers the invasive plant species tamarisk (Tamarix spp), addressing three fundamental questions: *Where is it now? *What are the potential or realized ecological impacts of invasion? *Where can it survive and thrive if introduced? It provides peer-review examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey, working with other federal agencies and university partners, are applying remote-sensing technologies to address these key questions.

  2. Invasive aspergillosis in paediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Z; Ibrahim, H; Abdulrahman, E J; Menon, B S; Zahari, Z; Zaleha, A M; Talib, A

    2008-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis predominantly occurs in immunocompromised patients and is often resistant to different therapeutically strategies. However, mortality significantly increases if the central nervous system is affected. In this report we describe two cases of invasive aspergilosis, one with kidney involvement with a successful treatment while the other with pulmonary and cerebral involvement with a grave outcome.

  3. Minimal Invasive Urologic Surgery and Postoperative Ileus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative ileus (POI is the most common cause of prolonged length of hospital stays (LOS and associated healthcare costs. The advent of minimal invasive technique was a major breakthrough in the urologic landscape with great potential to progress in the future. In the field of gastrointestinal surgery, several studies had reported lower incidence rates for POI following minimal invasive surgery compared to conventional open procedures. In contrast, little is known about the effect of minimal invasive approach on the recovery of bowel motility after urologic surgery. We performed an overview of the potential benefit of minimal invasive approach on POI for urologic procedures. The mechanisms and risk factors responsible for the onset of POI are discussed with emphasis on the advantages of minimal invasive approach. In the urologic field, POI is the main complication following radical cystectomy but it is rarely of clinical significance for other minimal invasive interventions. Laparoscopy or robotic assisted laparoscopic techniques when studied individually may reduce to their own the duration and prevent the onset of POI in a subset of procedures. The potential influence of age and urinary diversion type on postoperative ileus is contradictory in the literature. There is some evidence suggesting that BMI, blood loss, urinary extravasation, existence of a major complication, bowel resection, operative time and transperitoneal approach are independent risk factors for POI. Treatment of POI remains elusive. One of the most important and effective management strategies for patients undergoing radical cystectomy has been the development and use of enhanced recovery programs. An optimal rational strategy to shorten the duration of POI should incorporate minimal invasive approach when appropriate into multimodal fast track programs designed to reduce POI and shorten LOS.

  4. Overlooking the smallest matter: viruses impact biological invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faillace, Cara A; Lorusso, Nicholas S; Duffy, Siobain

    2017-04-01

    Parasites and pathogens have recently received considerable attention for their ability to affect biological invasions, however, researchers have largely overlooked the distinct role of viruses afforded by their unique ability to rapidly mutate and adapt to new hosts. With high mutation and genomic substitution rates, RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses may be important constituents of invaded ecosystems, and could potentially behave quite differently from other pathogens. We review evidence suggesting that rapidly evolving viruses impact invasion dynamics in three key ways: (1) Rapidly evolving viruses may prevent exotic species from establishing self-sustaining populations. (2) Viruses can cause population collapses of exotic species in the introduced range. (3) Viruses can alter the consequences of biological invasions by causing population collapses and extinctions of native species. The ubiquity and frequent host shifting of viruses make their ability to influence invasion events likely. Eludicating the viral ecology of biological invasions will lead to an improved understanding of the causes and consequences of invasions, particularly as regards establishment success and changes to community structure that cannot be explained by direct interspecific interactions among native and exotic species. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  5. Invasive Plant Species in the National Parks of Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard Dell; Pham Quang Thu; Dang Thanh Tan

    2012-01-01

    The impact of invasive plant species in national parks and forests in Vietnam is undocumented and management plans have yet to be developed. Ten national parks, ranging from uncut to degraded forests located throughout Vietnam, were surveyed for invasive plant species. Transects were set up along roads, trails where local people access park areas, and also tracks through natural forest. Of 134 exotic weeds, 25 were classified as invasive species and the number of invasive species ranged from ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) Approaches to Thoracolumbar Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Ian David; Passias, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques offer promising improvements in the management of thoracolumbar trauma. Recent advances in MIS techniques and instrumentation for degenerative conditions have heralded a growing interest in employing these techniques for thoracolumbar trauma. Specifically, surgeons have applied these techniques to help manage flexion- and extension-distraction injuries, neurologically intact burst fractures, and cases of damage control. Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer a means to decrease blood loss, shorten operative time, reduce infection risk, and shorten hospital stays. Herein, we review thoracolumbar minimally invasive surgery with an emphasis on thoracolumbar trauma classification, minimally invasive spinal stabilization, surgical indications, patient outcomes, technical considerations, and potential complications.

  7. Expression of cancer-associated fibroblast-related proteins differs between invasive lobular carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol Keun; Jung, Woo Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-08-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are classified into various functional subtypes such as fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α), fibroblast specific protein-1 (FSP-1), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFR-α), and PDGFR-β. In this study, we compared the expression of CAF-related proteins in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) with those in invasive carcinoma of no special type (NST) and assessed the implications of the differences observed. Using tissue microarrays of 104 ILC and 524 invasive carcinoma (NST) cases, immunohistochemistry for CAF-related proteins [podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, FAP-α, FSP-1/S100A4, PDGFR-α, PDGFR-β, and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (NG2)] was conducted. In invasive carcinoma (NST), tumor cells expressed a high level of PDGFR-α, whereas ILC tumor cells expressed high levels of podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, FAP-α, and FSP-1/S100A4. In stromal cells of invasive carcinoma (NST), high expression levels of prolyl 4-hydroxylase, PDGFR-α, and NG2 were observed, whereas ILC stromal cells expressed high levels of FAP-α, FSP-1/S100A4, and PDGFR-β. In ILC, tumoral FSP-1/S100A4 positivity was associated with higher Ki-67 labeling index (p = 0.010) and non-luminal A type cancer (p = 0.014). Stromal PDGFR-α positivity was associated with lymph node metastasis (p = 0.011). On survival analysis of entire cases, tumoral FSP-1/S100A4 positivity (p = 0.002), stromal podoplanin positivity (p = 0.041), and stromal FSP-1/S100A4 negativity (p = 0.041) were associated with shorter disease-free survival; only tumoral FSP-1/S100A4 positivity (p = 0.044) was associated with shorter overall survival. In ILC, the expression of FAP-α and FSP-1/S100A4 was higher in both tumor and stromal cells than that observed in invasive carcinoma (NST). These results indicate that CAFs are a potential target in ILC treatment.

  8. Techniques for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Arterial Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. Meidert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since both, hypotension and hypertension, can potentially impair the function of vital organs such as heart, brain, or kidneys, monitoring of arterial blood pressure (BP is a mainstay of hemodynamic monitoring in acutely or critically ill patients. Arterial BP can either be obtained invasively via an arterial catheter or non-invasively. Non-invasive BP measurement provides either intermittent or continuous readings. Most commonly, an occluding upper arm cuff is used for intermittent non-invasive monitoring. BP values are then obtained either manually (by auscultation of Korotkoff sounds or palpation or automatically (e.g., by oscillometry. For continuous non-invasive BP monitoring, the volume clamp method or arterial applanation tonometry can be used. Both techniques enable the arterial waveform and BP values to be obtained continuously. This article describes the different techniques for non-invasive BP measurement, their advantages and limitations, and their clinical applicability.

  9. Cell signaling during Trypanosoma cruzi invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Yukio Maeda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling is an essential requirement for mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi. Depending on the parasite strain and the parasite developmental form, distinct signaling pathways may be induced. In this short review, we focus on the data coming from studies with metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT generated in vitro and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCT, used as counterparts of insect-borne and bloodstream parasites respectively. During invasion of host cells by MT or TCT, intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and host cell lysosomal exocytosis are triggered. Invasion mediated by MT surface molecule gp82 requires the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and protein kinase C (PKC in the host cell, associated with Ca2+-dependent disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. In MT, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK, PI3K, phospholipase C (PLC and PKC appear to be activated. TCT invasion, on the other hand, does not rely on mTOR activation, rather on target cell PI3K, and may involve the host cell autophagy for parasite internalization. Enzymes, such oligopeptidase B and the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase cruzipain, have been shown to generate molecules that induce target cell Ca2+ signal. In addition, TCT may trigger host cell responses mediated by TGF-β receptor or integrin family member. Further investigations are needed for a more complete and detailed picture of T. cruzi invasion.

  10. Fort Collins Science Center: Invasive Species Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Invasive, non-native species of plants, animals, and disease organisms adversely affect the ecosystems they enter. Like "biological wildfires," they can quickly spread, and they affect nearly all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Invasive species have become the greatest environmental challenge of the 21st century in terms of economic, environmental, and human health costs, with an estimated impact in the U.S. of over $138 billion per year. Managers of Department of the Interior and other public and private lands and waters rank invasive species as their top resource management problem.

  11. Predicting invasive fungal pathogens using invasive pest assemblages: testing model predictions in a virtual world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean R Paini

    Full Text Available Predicting future species invasions presents significant challenges to researchers and government agencies. Simply considering the vast number of potential species that could invade an area can be insurmountable. One method, recently suggested, which can analyse large datasets of invasive species simultaneously is that of a self organising map (SOM, a form of artificial neural network which can rank species by establishment likelihood. We used this method to analyse the worldwide distribution of 486 fungal pathogens and then validated the method by creating a virtual world of invasive species in which to test the SOM. This novel validation method allowed us to test SOM's ability to rank those species that can establish above those that can't. Overall, we found the SOM highly effective, having on average, a 96-98% success rate (depending on the virtual world parameters. We also found that regions with fewer species present (i.e. 1-10 species were more difficult for the SOM to generate an accurately ranked list, with success rates varying from 100% correct down to 0% correct. However, we were able to combine the numbers of species present in a region with clustering patterns in the SOM, to further refine confidence in lists generated from these sparsely populated regions. We then used the results from the virtual world to determine confidences for lists generated from the fungal pathogen dataset. Specifically, for lists generated for Australia and its states and territories, the reliability scores were between 84-98%. We conclude that a SOM analysis is a reliable method for analysing a large dataset of potential invasive species and could be used by biosecurity agencies around the world resulting in a better overall assessment of invasion risk.

  12. Predicting invasive fungal pathogens using invasive pest assemblages: testing model predictions in a virtual world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paini, Dean R; Bianchi, Felix J J A; Northfield, Tobin D; De Barro, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Predicting future species invasions presents significant challenges to researchers and government agencies. Simply considering the vast number of potential species that could invade an area can be insurmountable. One method, recently suggested, which can analyse large datasets of invasive species simultaneously is that of a self organising map (SOM), a form of artificial neural network which can rank species by establishment likelihood. We used this method to analyse the worldwide distribution of 486 fungal pathogens and then validated the method by creating a virtual world of invasive species in which to test the SOM. This novel validation method allowed us to test SOM's ability to rank those species that can establish above those that can't. Overall, we found the SOM highly effective, having on average, a 96-98% success rate (depending on the virtual world parameters). We also found that regions with fewer species present (i.e. 1-10 species) were more difficult for the SOM to generate an accurately ranked list, with success rates varying from 100% correct down to 0% correct. However, we were able to combine the numbers of species present in a region with clustering patterns in the SOM, to further refine confidence in lists generated from these sparsely populated regions. We then used the results from the virtual world to determine confidences for lists generated from the fungal pathogen dataset. Specifically, for lists generated for Australia and its states and territories, the reliability scores were between 84-98%. We conclude that a SOM analysis is a reliable method for analysing a large dataset of potential invasive species and could be used by biosecurity agencies around the world resulting in a better overall assessment of invasion risk.

  13. 49 CFR 801.56 - Unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. 801.56... Unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(6), any personal, medical, or similar... a clearly unwarranted invasion of the person's personal privacy. ...

  14. Doublethink and scale mismatch polarize policies for an invasive tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Caleb P.; Uden, Daniel R.; Allen, Craig R.; Twidwell, Dirac

    2018-01-01

    Mismatches between invasive species management policies and ecological knowledge can lead to profound societal consequences. For this reason, natural resource agencies have adopted the scientifically-based density-impact invasive species curve to guide invasive species management. We use the density-impact model to evaluate how well management policies for a native invader (Juniperus virginiana) match scientific guidelines. Juniperus virginiana invasion is causing a sub-continental regime shift from grasslands to woodlands in central North America, and its impacts span collapses in endemic diversity, heightened wildfire risk, and crashes in grazing land profitability. We (1) use land cover data to identify the stage of Juniperus virginiana invasion for three ecoregions within Nebraska, USA, (2) determine the range of invasion stages at individual land parcel extents within each ecoregion based on the density-impact model, and (3) determine policy alignment and mismatches relative to the density-impact model in order to assess their potential to meet sustainability targets and avoid societal impacts as Juniperus virginiana abundance increases. We found that nearly all policies evidenced doublethink and policy-ecology mismatches, for instance, promoting spread of Juniperus virginiana regardless of invasion stage while simultaneously managing it as a native invader in the same ecoregion. Like other invasive species, theory and literature for this native invader indicate that the consequences of invasion are unlikely to be prevented if policies fail to prioritize management at incipient invasion stages. Theory suggests a more realistic approach would be to align policy with the stage of invasion at local and ecoregion management scales. There is a need for scientists, policy makers, and ecosystem managers to move past ideologies governing native versus non-native invader classification and toward a framework that accounts for the uniqueness of native species invasions

  15. Doublethink and scale mismatch polarize policies for an invasive tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Caleb P.; Uden, Daniel R.; Allen, Craig R.; Twidwell, Dirac

    2018-01-01

    Mismatches between invasive species management policies and ecological knowledge can lead to profound societal consequences. For this reason, natural resource agencies have adopted the scientifically-based density-impact invasive species curve to guide invasive species management. We use the density-impact model to evaluate how well management policies for a native invader (Juniperus virginiana) match scientific guidelines. Juniperus virginiana invasion is causing a sub-continental regime shift from grasslands to woodlands in central North America, and its impacts span collapses in endemic diversity, heightened wildfire risk, and crashes in grazing land profitability. We (1) use land cover data to identify the stage of Juniperus virginiana invasion for three ecoregions within Nebraska, USA, (2) determine the range of invasion stages at individual land parcel extents within each ecoregion based on the density-impact model, and (3) determine policy alignment and mismatches relative to the density-impact model in order to assess their potential to meet sustainability targets and avoid societal impacts as Juniperus virginiana abundance increases. We found that nearly all policies evidenced doublethink and policy-ecology mismatches, for instance, promoting spread of Juniperus virginiana regardless of invasion stage while simultaneously managing it as a native invader in the same ecoregion. Like other invasive species, theory and literature for this native invader indicate that the consequences of invasion are unlikely to be prevented if policies fail to prioritize management at incipient invasion stages. Theory suggests a more realistic approach would be to align policy with the stage of invasion at local and ecoregion management scales. There is a need for scientists, policy makers, and ecosystem managers to move past ideologies governing native versus non-native invader classification and toward a framework that accounts for the uniqueness of native species

  16. Density-dependent growth in invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkwitt, Cassandra E

    2013-01-01

    Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss) were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration) of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion.

  17. Density-dependent growth in invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra E Benkwitt

    Full Text Available Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion.

  18. Placing invasive species management in a spatiotemporal context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher M; Bode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species are a worldwide issue, both ecologically and economically. A large body of work focuses on various aspects of invasive species control, including how to allocate control efforts to eradicate an invasive population as cost effectively as possible: There are a diverse range of invasive species management problems, and past mathematical analyses generally focus on isolated examples, making it hard to identify and understand parallels between the different contexts. In this study, we use a single spatiotemporal model to tackle the problem of allocating control effort for invasive species when suppressing an island invasive species, and for long-term spatial suppression projects. Using feral cat suppression as an illustrative example, we identify the optimal resource allocation for island and mainland suppression projects. Our results demonstrate how using a single model to solve different problems reveals similar characteristics of the solutions in different scenarios. As well as illustrating the insights offered by linking problems through a spatiotemporal model, we also derive novel and practically applicable results for our case studies. For temporal suppression projects on islands, we find that lengthy projects are more cost effective and that rapid control projects are only economically cost effective when population growth rates are high or diminishing returns on control effort are low. When suppressing invasive species around conservation assets (e.g., national parks or exclusion fences), we find that the size of buffer zones should depend on the ratio of the species growth and spread rate.

  19. SNAI2/Slug promotes growth and invasion in human gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hong Wei; Menon, Lata G; Black, Peter M; Carroll, Rona S; Johnson, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    Numerous factors that contribute to malignant glioma invasion have been identified, but the upstream genes coordinating this process are poorly known. To identify genes controlling glioma invasion, we used genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of primary human glioblastomas to develop an expression-based rank ordering of 30 transcription factors that have previously been implicated in the regulation of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Using this approach, we identified the oncogenic transcriptional repressor, SNAI2/Slug, among the upper tenth percentile of invasion-related transcription factors overexpressed in glioblastomas. SNAI2 mRNA expression correlated with histologic grade and invasive phenotype in primary human glioma specimens, and was induced by EGF receptor activation in human glioblastoma cells. Overexpression of SNAI2/Slug increased glioblastoma cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and promoted angiogenesis and glioblastoma growth in vivo. Importantly, knockdown of endogenous SNAI2/Slug in glioblastoma cells decreased invasion and increased survival in a mouse intracranial human glioblastoma transplantation model. This genome-scale approach has thus identified SNAI2/Slug as a regulator of growth and invasion in human gliomas

  20. Cirugía radioguiada para la resección del cáncer no palpable de la mama

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallegos-Hernández, J. Francisco; Tanis, Pieter J.; Nieweg, Omgo E.; Duerloo, E.; Valdés-Olmos, Renato; Rutgers, Emeil J. Th; Kroon, Bin B.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intratumoral injection of nanocolloid for lymphatic mapping enables therapeutic excision of clinically occult breast cancer with the aid of a gamma ray detection probe. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of radioguided tumor excision in addition to a

  1. Transarticular invasion of the sacroiliac joints by malignant pelvic bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwang Woo; Huh, Jin Do; Kim, Seong Min; Cho, Young Duk [College of Medicine, Kosin Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kil Ho [College of Medicine, Yeungnam Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    To describe modes of transarticular invasion, with reference to the size and location of a tumor, the anatomic characteristics of invaded cartilage,and the existence of ankylosis in SI joint. Eleven histologically confirmed malignant pelvic bone tumors involving transarticular invasion of sacroiliac joints, were retrospectively analysed. Transarticular invasion of a joint was defined as involvement of its opposing bones. The anatomic site and size of the tumors were analysed, and invaded sacroiliac joint was divided into upper, middle and lower parts on the basis of the anatomic characteristics of the intervening cartilage: synovial hyaline or fibrous ligamentous. the existence of ankylosis was determined, and transarticular invasion directly across a joint was classified as direct invasion. Extension of tumors around a joint from its periphery to the opposing bone were considered as indirect invasion. All tumors were located near the sacroiliac joint, eight at the ilium and three at the sacrum. Six invasions were indirect and five were direct. Average tumor area was larger in indirect cases than in direct: 191.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 69.6 cm{sup 2}. In all indirect invasions, a huge soft tissue mass abutted onto the peripheral portion of the sacroiliac joint. In five of six cases of indirect transarticular invasion, the upper part of the joint posteriorly located fibrous ligamentous cartilage. In the other, the lower part was invaded, and this involved a detour around the joint space, avoiding the invasion of intervening cartilage. Ankylosis occurred in one of the indirect cases. Among the five cases of direct invasion, there was invasion of the posteriorly located ligamentous fibrous cartilage in three without ankylosis. In the other two cases, involving ankylosis, the synovial hyaline cartilage was invaded directly at the lower part of the joint. Transarticular invasions of sacroiliac joint via fibrous cartilage are most common. Ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint

  2. Transarticular invasion of the sacroiliac joints by malignant pelvic bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwang Woo; Huh, Jin Do; Kim, Seong Min; Cho, Young Duk; Cho, Kil Ho

    2002-01-01

    To describe modes of transarticular invasion, with reference to the size and location of a tumor, the anatomic characteristics of invaded cartilage,and the existence of ankylosis in SI joint. Eleven histologically confirmed malignant pelvic bone tumors involving transarticular invasion of sacroiliac joints, were retrospectively analysed. Transarticular invasion of a joint was defined as involvement of its opposing bones. The anatomic site and size of the tumors were analysed, and invaded sacroiliac joint was divided into upper, middle and lower parts on the basis of the anatomic characteristics of the intervening cartilage: synovial hyaline or fibrous ligamentous. the existence of ankylosis was determined, and transarticular invasion directly across a joint was classified as direct invasion. Extension of tumors around a joint from its periphery to the opposing bone were considered as indirect invasion. All tumors were located near the sacroiliac joint, eight at the ilium and three at the sacrum. Six invasions were indirect and five were direct. Average tumor area was larger in indirect cases than in direct: 191.8 cm 2 vs. 69.6 cm 2 . In all indirect invasions, a huge soft tissue mass abutted onto the peripheral portion of the sacroiliac joint. In five of six cases of indirect transarticular invasion, the upper part of the joint posteriorly located fibrous ligamentous cartilage. In the other, the lower part was invaded, and this involved a detour around the joint space, avoiding the invasion of intervening cartilage. Ankylosis occurred in one of the indirect cases. Among the five cases of direct invasion, there was invasion of the posteriorly located ligamentous fibrous cartilage in three without ankylosis. In the other two cases, involving ankylosis, the synovial hyaline cartilage was invaded directly at the lower part of the joint. Transarticular invasions of sacroiliac joint via fibrous cartilage are most common. Ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint facilitates

  3. F18-choline PET/CT guided surgery in primary hyperparathyroidism when ultrasound and MIBI SPECT/CT are negative or inconclusive: the APACH1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quak, Elske; Blanchard, David; Houdu, Benjamin; Le Roux, Yannick; Ciappuccini, Renaud; Lireux, Barbara; de Raucourt, Dominique; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Licaj, Idlir; Bardet, Stéphane; Reznik, Yves; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Aide, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of F18-choline (FCH) PET/CT for parathyroid adenoma detection prior to surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and negative or inconclusive cervical ultrasound and Tc99m-sestaMIBI SPECT/CT. We conducted a prospective bicentric study (NCT02432599). All patients underwent FCH PET/CT. The result was scored positive, inconclusive or negative. The number of uptakes and their sites were recorded. The FCH PET/CT result guided the surgical procedure (minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, bilateral cervical exploration, or other in case of multiple or ectopic foci). FCH PET/CT results were compared to the surgical and pathological findings and the follow-up. Twenty-five patients were included. Mean calcium and PTH levels prior to surgery were 2.76 ± 0.17 mmol/l and 94.8 ± 37.4 ng/l. Nineteen (76%) FCH PET/CTs were scored positive, 3 (12%) inconclusive and 3 (12%) negative, showing 21 cases of uniglandular disease, including 1 ectopic localization and 1 case of multiglandular (3 foci) disease. Mean lesion size was 13.1 ± 8.6 mm. Twenty-four patients underwent surgery. FCH PET/CT guided surgery in 22 (88%) patients, allowing for 17 minimally invasive parathyroidectomies, 1 bilateral cervical exploration for multifocality and 4 other surgical procedures. Two patients with negative FCH-PET/CT underwent bilateral cervical exploration. When dichotomizing the FCH PET/CT results, thereby classifying the inconclusive FCH PET/CT results as positive, the per lesion and per patient sensitivities were 91.3% (95%CI: 72.0-98.9) and 90.5% (95%CI: 69.6-98.8) and the corresponding positive predictive values were 87.5% (95%CI: 67.6-97.3) and 86.4% (95%CI: 65.1-97.1), respectively. Twenty-one (88%) patients were considered cured after surgery. Their mean calcium level after surgery was 2.36 ± 0.17 mmol/l. Preoperative FCH PET/CT has a high sensitivity and positive predictive value for parathyroid adenoma detection in patients

  4. F18-choline PET/CT guided surgery in primary hyperparathyroidism when ultrasound and MIBI SPECT/CT are negative or inconclusive. The APACH1 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quak, Elske; Lireux, Barbara; Bardet, Stephane [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Thyroid Unit, Caen (France); Blanchard, David; Raucourt, Dominique de [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Caen (France); Houdu, Benjamin [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Le Roux, Yannick [University Hospital, Department of General and Endocrine Surgery, Caen (France); Ciappuccini, Renaud [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Thyroid Unit, Caen (France); Caen University, INSERM 1086 ANTICIPE, Caen (France); Grellard, Jean-Michel; Licaj, Idlir; Clarisse, Benedicte [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Department of Clinical Research, Caen (France); Reznik, Yves [University Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Caen (France); Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Thyroid Unit, Caen (France); University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Caen University, INSERM 1086 ANTICIPE, Caen (France)

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate the sensitivity of F18-choline (FCH) PET/CT for parathyroid adenoma detection prior to surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and negative or inconclusive cervical ultrasound and Tc99m-sestaMIBI SPECT/CT. We conducted a prospective bicentric study (NCT02432599). All patients underwent FCH PET/CT. The result was scored positive, inconclusive or negative. The number of uptakes and their sites were recorded. The FCH PET/CT result guided the surgical procedure (minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, bilateral cervical exploration, or other in case of multiple or ectopic foci). FCH PET/CT results were compared to the surgical and pathological findings and the follow-up. Twenty-five patients were included. Mean calcium and PTH levels prior to surgery were 2.76 ± 0.17 mmol/l and 94.8 ± 37.4 ng/l. Nineteen (76%) FCH PET/CTs were scored positive, 3 (12%) inconclusive and 3 (12%) negative, showing 21 cases of uniglandular disease, including 1 ectopic localization and 1 case of multiglandular (3 foci) disease. Mean lesion size was 13.1 ± 8.6 mm. Twenty-four patients underwent surgery. FCH PET/CT guided surgery in 22 (88%) patients, allowing for 17 minimally invasive parathyroidectomies, 1 bilateral cervical exploration for multifocality and 4 other surgical procedures. Two patients with negative FCH-PET/CT underwent bilateral cervical exploration. When dichotomizing the FCH PET/CT results, thereby classifying the inconclusive FCH PET/CT results as positive, the per lesion and per patient sensitivities were 91.3% (95%CI: 72.0-98.9) and 90.5% (95%CI: 69.6-98.8) and the corresponding positive predictive values were 87.5% (95%CI: 67.6-97.3) and 86.4% (95%CI: 65.1-97.1), respectively. Twenty-one (88%) patients were considered cured after surgery. Their mean calcium level after surgery was 2.36 ± 0.17 mmol/l. Preoperative FCH PET/CT has a high sensitivity and positive predictive value for parathyroid adenoma detection in patients with primary

  5. F18-choline PET/CT guided surgery in primary hyperparathyroidism when ultrasound and MIBI SPECT/CT are negative or inconclusive. The APACH1 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quak, Elske; Lireux, Barbara; Bardet, Stephane; Blanchard, David; Raucourt, Dominique de; Houdu, Benjamin; Le Roux, Yannick; Ciappuccini, Renaud; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Licaj, Idlir; Clarisse, Benedicte; Reznik, Yves; Aide, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of F18-choline (FCH) PET/CT for parathyroid adenoma detection prior to surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and negative or inconclusive cervical ultrasound and Tc99m-sestaMIBI SPECT/CT. We conducted a prospective bicentric study (NCT02432599). All patients underwent FCH PET/CT. The result was scored positive, inconclusive or negative. The number of uptakes and their sites were recorded. The FCH PET/CT result guided the surgical procedure (minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, bilateral cervical exploration, or other in case of multiple or ectopic foci). FCH PET/CT results were compared to the surgical and pathological findings and the follow-up. Twenty-five patients were included. Mean calcium and PTH levels prior to surgery were 2.76 ± 0.17 mmol/l and 94.8 ± 37.4 ng/l. Nineteen (76%) FCH PET/CTs were scored positive, 3 (12%) inconclusive and 3 (12%) negative, showing 21 cases of uniglandular disease, including 1 ectopic localization and 1 case of multiglandular (3 foci) disease. Mean lesion size was 13.1 ± 8.6 mm. Twenty-four patients underwent surgery. FCH PET/CT guided surgery in 22 (88%) patients, allowing for 17 minimally invasive parathyroidectomies, 1 bilateral cervical exploration for multifocality and 4 other surgical procedures. Two patients with negative FCH-PET/CT underwent bilateral cervical exploration. When dichotomizing the FCH PET/CT results, thereby classifying the inconclusive FCH PET/CT results as positive, the per lesion and per patient sensitivities were 91.3% (95%CI: 72.0-98.9) and 90.5% (95%CI: 69.6-98.8) and the corresponding positive predictive values were 87.5% (95%CI: 67.6-97.3) and 86.4% (95%CI: 65.1-97.1), respectively. Twenty-one (88%) patients were considered cured after surgery. Their mean calcium level after surgery was 2.36 ± 0.17 mmol/l. Preoperative FCH PET/CT has a high sensitivity and positive predictive value for parathyroid adenoma detection in patients with primary

  6. Gain-Based Relief for Invasion of Privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirko Harder

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In many common law jurisdictions, some or all instances of invasion of privacy constitute a privacy-specific wrong either at common law (including equity or under statute. A remedy invariably available for such a wrong is compensation for loss. However, the plaintiff may instead seek to claim the profit the defendant has made from the invasion. This article examines when a plaintiff is, and should be, entitled to claim that profit, provided that invasion of privacy is actionable as such. After a brief overview of the relevant law in major common law jurisdictions, the article investigates how invasion of privacy fits into a general concept of what is called ‘restitution for wrongs’. It will be argued that the right to privacy is a right against the whole world and as such forms a proper basis of awarding gain-based relief for the unauthorised use of that right.

  7. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Invasion-Resistant Cells Identifies Laminin α2 as a Host Factor for Bacterial Invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wijk, Xander M.; Döhrmann, Simon; Hallstrom, Bjorn

    2017-01-01

    cells. Whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) uncovered a deletion in the gene encoding the laminin subunit α2 (Lama2) that eliminated much of domain L4a. Silencing of the long Lama2 isoform in wild-type cells strongly reduced bacterial invasion, whereas transfection with human...... LAMA2 cDNA significantly enhanced invasion in pgsA745 cells. The addition of exogenous laminin-α2β1γ1/laminin-α2β2γ1 strongly increased bacterial invasion in CHO cells, as well as in human alveolar basal epithelial and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Thus, the L4a domain in laminin α2...

  8. Invasive plant species in the West Indies: geographical, ecological, and floristic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sandoval, Julissa; Tremblay, Raymond L; Acevedo-Rodríguez, Pedro; Díaz-Soltero, Hilda

    2017-07-01

    The level of invasion (number or proportion of invasive species) in a given area depends on features of the invaded community, propagule pressure, and climate. In this study, we assess the invasive flora of nine islands in the West Indies to identify invasion patterns and evaluate whether invasive species diversity is related to geographical, ecological, and socioeconomic factors. We compiled a database of invasive plant species including information on their taxonomy, origin, pathways of introduction, habitats, and life history. This database was used to evaluate the similarity of invasive floras between islands and to identify invasion patterns at regional (West Indies) and local (island) scales. We found a total of 516 alien plant species that are invasive on at least one of the nine islands studied, with between 24 to 306 invasive species per island. The invasive flora on these islands includes a wide range of taxonomic groups, life forms, and habitats. We detected low similarity in invasive species diversity between islands, with most invasive species (>60%) occurring on a single island and 6% occurring on at least five islands. To assess the importance of different models in predicting patterns of invasive species diversity among islands, we used generalized linear models. Our analyses revealed that invasive species diversity was well predicted by a combination of island area and economic development (gross domestic product per capita and kilometers of paved roadways). Our results provide strong evidence for the roles of geographical, ecological, and socioeconomic factors in determining the distribution and spread of invasive species on these islands. Anthropogenic disturbance and economic development seem to be the major drivers facilitating the spread and predominance of invasive species over native species.

  9. Genetic structure of three invasive gobiid species along the Danube-Rhine invasion corridor: similar distributions, different histories

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janáč, Michal; Bryja, Josef; Ondračková, Markéta; Mendel, Jan; Jurajda, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2017), s. 551-564 ISSN 1798-6540 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP505/11/1768; GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : invasive species * Gobiidae * mitochondrial DNA haplotypes * invasion genetics * microsatellites Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 2.069, year: 2016

  10. Inhibition between invasives: a newly introduced predator moderates the impacts of a previously established invasive predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, Blaine D; Guy, Travis; Buck, Julia C

    2008-01-01

    1. With continued globalization, species are being transported and introduced into novel habitats at an accelerating rate. Interactions between invasive species may provide important mechanisms that moderate their impacts on native species. 2. The European green crab Carcinus maenas is an aggressive predator that was introduced to the east coast of North America in the mid-1800 s and is capable of rapid consumption of bivalve prey. A newer invasive predator, the Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus, was first discovered on the Atlantic coast in the 1980s, and now inhabits many of the same regions as C. maenas within the Gulf of Maine. Using a series of field and laboratory investigations, we examined the consequences of interactions between these predators. 3. Density patterns of these two species at different spatial scales are consistent with negative interactions. As a result of these interactions, C. maenas alters its diet to consume fewer mussels, its preferred prey, in the presence of H. sanguineus. Decreased mussel consumption in turn leads to lower growth rates for C. maenas, with potential detrimental effects on C. maenas populations. 4. Rather than an invasional meltdown, this study demonstrates that, within the Gulf of Maine, this new invasive predator can moderate the impacts of the older invasive predator.

  11. The role of chemical antifouling defence in the invasion success of Sargassum muticum: A comparison of native and invasive brown algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Schwartz

    Full Text Available Competition and fouling defence are important traits that may facilitate invasions by non-indigenous species. The 'novel weapons hypothesis' (NWH predicts that the invasive success of exotic species is closely linked to the possession of chemical defence compounds that the recipient community in the new range is not adapted to. In order to assess whether chemical defence traits contribute to invasion success, anti-bacterial, anti-quorum sensing, anti-diatom, anti-larval and anti-algal properties were investigated for the following algae: a the invasive brown alga Sargassum muticum from both, its native (Japan and invasive (Germany range, b the two non- or weak invasive species Sargassum fusiforme and Sargassum horneri from Japan, and c Fucus vesiculosus, a native brown alga from Germany. Crude and surface extracts and lipid fractions of active extracts were tested against common fouling organisms and zygotes of a dominant competing brown alga. Extracts of the native brown alga F. vesiculosus inhibited more bacterial strains (75% than any of the Sargassum spp. (17 to 29%. However, Sargassum spp. from Japan exhibited the strongest settlement inhibition against the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium, larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina and zygotes of the brown alga F. vesiculosus. Overall, extracts of S. muticum from the invasive range were less active compared to those of the native range suggesting an adaptation to lower fouling pressure and competition in the new range resulting in a shift of resource allocation from costly chemical defence to reproduction and growth. Non-invasive Sargassum spp. from Japan was equally defended against fouling and competitors like S. muticum from Japan indicating a necessity to include these species in European monitoring programs. The variable antifouling activity of surface and crude extracts highlights the importance to use both for an initial screening for antifouling activity.

  12. 76 FR 30955 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Commerce. The duty of the Council is to provide national leadership regarding invasive species issues... broad array of issues related to preventing the introduction of invasive species and providing for their... with Western-based scientists and practitioners on problems and potential solutions, as well as...

  13. Above-belowground interactions govern the course and impact of biological invasions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Mette; Rønn, Regin; Ekelund, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    understand the invasion of focus. Thus, we claim that invasions fall into two broad categories. Some invasions irreversibly change pools and pathways of matter and energy in the invaded system; even if the abundance of the invader is reduced or it is completely removed, the system will not return to its...... former state. We use earthworm invasion in North America as a particular conspicuous example of invasive species that irreversibly change ecosystems. However, invasions may also be reversible, where the exotic organism dominates the system for a period, but in the longer term it either disappears......Introduction of exotic organisms that subsequently become invasive is considered a serious threat to global biodiversity, and both scientists and nature-conservationists attempt to find explanations and means to meet this challenge. This requires a thorough analysis of the invasion phenomenon...

  14. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion

  15. Optimal detection and control strategies for invasive species management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefali V. Mehta; Robert G. Haight; Frances R. Homans; Stephen Polasky; Robert C. Venette

    2007-01-01

    The increasing economic and environmental losses caused by non-native invasive species amplify the value of identifying and implementing optimal management options to prevent, detect, and control invasive species. Previous literature has focused largely on preventing introductions of invasive species and post-detection control activities; few have addressed the role of...

  16. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  17. Disturbance promotes non-indigenous bacterial invasion in soil microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Manqiang; Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund; Rønn, Regin

    2012-01-01

    Invasion-biology is largely based on non-experimental observation of larger organisms. Here, we apply an experimental approach to the subject. By using microbial-based microcosm-experiments, invasion-biology can be placed on firmer experimental, and hence, less anecdotal ground. A better...... understanding of the mechanisms that govern invasion-success of bacteria in soil communities will provide knowledge on the factors that hinder successful establishment of bacteria artificially inoculated into soil, e.g. for remediation purposes. Further, it will yield valuable information on general principles...... of invasion biology in other domains of life....

  18. Rocky Mountain Research Station invasive species visionary white paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. E. Pearson; M. Kim; J. Butler

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species represent one of the single greatest threats to natural ecosystems and the services they provide. Effectively addressing the invasive species problem requires management that is based on sound research. We provide an overview of recent and ongoing invasive species research conducted by Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists in the Intermountain...

  19. The stock of invasive insect species and its economic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlasny, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    Invasions of nonindigenous organisms have long been linked to trade, but the contribution of individual trade pathways remains poorly understood, because species are not observed immediately upon arrival and the number of species arriving annually is unknown. Species interception records may count both new arrivals and species long introduced. Furthermore, the stock of invasive insect species already present is unknown. In this study, a state-space model is used to infer the stock of detected as well as undetected invasive insect species established in the United States. A system of equations is estimated jointly to distinguish the patterns of introduction, identification, and eradication. Introductions of invasive species are modeled as dependent on the volume of trade and arrival of people. Identifications depend on the public efforts at invasive species research, as well as on the established stock of invasive species that remain undetected. Eradications of both detected and undetected invasive species depend on containment and quarantine efforts, as well as on the stock of all established invasive species. These patterns are estimated by fitting the predicted number of invasive species detections to the observed record in the North American Non-Indigenous Arthropod Database. The results indicate that agricultural imports are the most important pathway of introduction, followed by immigration of people. Expenditures by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Agricultural Research Service are found to explain the species identification record well. Between three and 38 invasive insect species are estimated to be established in the United States undetected.

  20. The evolution of invasiveness in garden ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cremer, Sylvia; Ugelvig, Line Vej; Drijfhout, Falko P

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear why some species become successful invaders whilst others fail, and whether invasive success depends on pre-adaptations already present in the native range or on characters evolving de-novo after introduction. Ants are among the worst invasive pests, with Lasius neglectus and its ra...

  1. Allelopathic effects of invasive Eucalyptus camaldulensis on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. (red river gum; Myrtaceae) is an invasive tree in riparian habitats of the Western Cape, South Africa, where it replaces indigenous vegetation and affects ecosystem functioning. These invasions lead to changes in river geomorphology and reduction in stream flow. The mechanisms that ...

  2. Mapping invasive weeds using airborne hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive plant species present a serious problem to the natural environment and have adverse ecological and economic impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems they invade. This article provides a brief overview on the use of remote sensing for mapping invasive plant species in both terrestr...

  3. Principles for ecologically based invasive plant management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy J. James; Brenda S. Smith; Edward A. Vasquez; Roger L. Sheley

    2010-01-01

    Land managers have long identified a critical need for a practical and effective framework for designing restoration strategies, especially where invasive plants dominate. A holistic, ecologically based, invasive plant management (EBIPM) framework that integrates ecosystem health assessment, knowledge of ecological processes, and adaptive management into a successional...

  4. New trends in minimally invasive urological surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Rajan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The perceived benefits of minimally-invasive surgery include less postoperative pain, shorter hospitalization, reduced morbidity and better cosmesis while maintaining diagnostic accuracy and therapeutic outcome. We review the new trends in minimally-invasive urological surgery. Materials and method: We reviewed the English language literature using the National Library of Medicine database to identify the latest technological advances in minimally-invasive surgery with particular reference to urology. Results: Amongst other advances, studies incorporating needlescopic surgery, laparoendoscopic single-site surgery , magnetic anchoring and guidance systems, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery and flexible robots were considered of interest. The results from initial animal and human studies are also outlined. Conclusion: Minimally-invasive surgery continues to evolve to meet the demands of the operators and patients. Many novel technologies are still in the testing phase, whilst others have entered clinical practice. Further evaluation is required to confirm the safety and efficacy of these techniques and validate the published reports.

  5. Stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume in invasive meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1996-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume in bone and brain invasive meningiomas was made. For comparison the nuclear mean volume of benign meningiomas was estimated. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these groups. We found that the nuclear mean...... volume in the bone and brain invasive meningiomas was larger than in the benign tumors. The difference was significant and moreover it was seen that there was no overlap between the two groups. In the bone invasive meningiomas the nuclear mean volume appeared to be larger inside than outside the bone....... No significant difference in nuclear mean volume was found between brain and bone invasive meningiomas. The results demonstrate that invasive meningiomas differ from benign meningiomas by an objective stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume (p

  6. Invasion of vascular cells in vitro by Porphyromonas endodontalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, B R; Harris, L J; Wujick, C T; Vertucci, F J; Progulske-Fox, A

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether laboratory strains and clinical isolates of microorganisms associated with root canal infections can invade primary cultures of cardiovascular cells. Quantitative levels of bacterial invasion of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMC) were measured using a standard antibiotic protection assay. Transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm and visualize internalization within the vascular cells. Of the laboratory and clinical strains tested, only P. endodontalis ATCC 35406 was invasive in an antibiotic protection assay using HCAEC and CASMC. Invasion of P. endodontalis ATCC 35406 was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Certain microorganisms associated with endodontic infections are invasive. If bacterial invasion of the vasculature contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, then microorganisms in the pulp chamber represent potential pathogens.

  7. Environmental Adaptations, Ecological Filtering, and Dispersal Central to Insect Invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, David; Laparie, Mathieu; McCauley, Shannon J; Bonte, Dries

    2018-01-07

    Insect invasions, the establishment and spread of nonnative insects in new regions, can have extensive economic and environmental consequences. Increased global connectivity accelerates rates of introductions, while climate change may decrease the barriers to invader species' spread. We follow an individual-level insect- and arachnid-centered perspective to assess how the process of invasion is influenced by phenotypic heterogeneity associated with dispersal and stress resistance, and their coupling, across the multiple steps of the invasion process. We also provide an overview and synthesis on the importance of environmental filters during the entire invasion process for the facilitation or inhibition of invasive insect population spread. Finally, we highlight important research gaps and the relevance and applicability of ongoing natural range expansions in the context of climate change to gain essential mechanistic insights into insect invasions.

  8. The utility of neck ultrasound and sestamibi scans in patients with secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalili, Eyas; Tasci, Yunus; Aksoy, Erol; Aliyev, Shamil; Soundararajan, Saranya; Taskin, Eren; Siperstein, Allan; Berber, Eren

    2015-03-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) and tertiary hyperparathyroidism (THPT) are disease entities in patients with chronic kidney disease that are caused by parathyroid hyperplasia. The role of preoperative localization studies in patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for these conditions remains poorly defined. To evaluate the utility of surgeon-performed neck ultrasound (US) as well as sestamibi scans in the localization of parathyroid glands in patients with SHPT/THPT. A retrospective analysis of patients with SHPT/THPT who underwent parathyroidectomy at a single institution. Results of preoperative localization studies were compared to intraoperative findings. One hundred and three patients underwent parathyroidectomy for SHPT/THPT. All patients underwent surgeon-performed neck US, while 92 (89%) underwent sestamibi scans. US failed to localize any of the parathyroids in 4 patients (3.8%), while sestamibi was negative in 11 (12%). Forty-seven ectopic glands were identified in 38 patients in whom sestamibi was performed. In five patients (13%), ectopic glands were identified by both modalities, by US only in 6 (16%), by sestamibi only in 8 (21%), and by neither study in 19 patients (50%). US showed new thyroid nodules in 19 patients (18.4 %), leading to lobectomy or thyroidectomy at the time of parathyroidectomy in 16 patients (15.5%). Pathology showed malignancy in 7 patients (6.8%). US and MIBI offer little benefit in localizing ectopic glands and rarely change the conduct of a standard four-gland exploration. Although there was a benefit of US in the assessment of thyroid nodules, in only 8.7% of patients was sestamibi of benefit in identifying ectopic glands.

  9. Re-excision rates of invasive ductal carcinoma with lobular features compared with invasive ductal carcinomas and invasive lobular carcinomas of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arps, David P; Jorns, Julie M; Zhao, Lili; Bensenhaver, Jessica; Kleer, Celina G; Pang, Judy C

    2014-12-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with lobular features (IDC-L) is not recognized as a subtype of breast cancer. We previously showed that IDC-L may be a variant of IDC with clinicopathological characteristics more similar to invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). We sought to determine the re-excision rates of IDC-L compared with ILC and IDC, and the feasibility of diagnosing IDC-L on core biopsies. Surgical procedure, multiple tumor foci, tumor size, and residual invasive carcinoma on re-excision were recorded for IDC-L (n = 178), IDC (n = 636), and ILC (n = 251). Re-excision rates were calculated by excluding mastectomy as first procedure cases and including only re-excisions for invasive carcinoma. Slides of correlating core biopsies for IDC-L cases initially diagnosed as IDC were re-reviewed. For T2 tumors (2.1-5.0 cm), re-excision rates for IDC-L (76 %) and ILC (88 %) were higher than that for IDC (42 %) (p = 0.003). Multiple tumor foci were more common in IDC-L (31 %) and ILC (26 %) than IDC (7 %) (p < 0.0001), which was a significant factor in higher re-excision rates when compared with a single tumor focus (p < 0.001). Ninety-two of 149 patients (62 %) with IDC-L were diagnosed on core biopsies. Of the 44 patients initially diagnosed as IDC, 30 were re-reviewed, of which 24 (80 %) were re-classified as IDC-L. Similar to ILC, re-excision rates for IDC-L are higher than IDC for larger tumors. Patients may need to be counseled about the higher likelihood of additional procedures to achieve negative margins. This underscores the importance of distinguishing IDC-L from IDC on core biopsies.

  10. Vinculin contributes to Cell Invasion by Regulating Contractile Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2008-07-01

    Vinculin is a component of the focal adhesion complex and is described as a mechano-coupling protein connecting the integrin receptor and the actin cytoskeleton. Vinculin knock-out (k.o.) cells (vin-/-) displayed increased migration on a 2-D collagen- or fibronectin-coated substrate compared to wildtype cells, but the role of vinculin in cell migration through a 3-D connective tissue is unknown. We determined the invasiveness of established tumor cell lines using a 3-D collagen invasion assay. Gene expression analysis of 4 invasive and 4 non-invasive tumor cell lines revealed that vinculin expression was significantly increased in invasive tumor cell lines. To analyze the mechanisms by which vinculin increased cell invasion in a 3-D gel, we studied mouse embryonic fibroblasts wildtype and vin-/- cells. Wildtype cells were 3-fold more invasive compared vin-/- cells. We hypothesized that the ability to generate sufficient traction forces is a prerequisite for tumor cell migration in a 3-D connective tissue matrix. Using traction microscopy, we found that wildtype exerted 3-fold higher tractions on fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide gels compared to vin-/- cells. These results show that vinculin controls two fundamental functions that lead to opposite effects on cell migration in a 2-D vs. a 3-D environment: On the one hand, vinculin stabilizes the focal adhesions (mechano-coupling function) and thereby reduces motility in 2-D. On the other hand, vinculin is also a potent activator of traction generation (mechano-regulating function) that is important for cell invasion in a 3-D environment.

  11. Epilepsy surgery in children and non-invasive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Kiyotaka; Sawamura, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsunari; Tsuda, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigeya

    2001-01-01

    The technique of EEG recording using subdural and depth electrodes has became established, and such invasive EEG is available for epilepsy surgery. However, a non-invasive procedure is required for evaluation of surgical indication for epilepsy patients, particular for children. We analyzed the relationship between the results of presurgical evaluation and seizure outcome, and investigated the role of invasive EEG in epilepsy surgery for children. Over the past decade, 22 children under 16 years of age have been admitted to our hospital for evaluation of surgical indication. High-resolution MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, video-EEG monitoring, and ictal and interictal SPECT were used for presurgical evaluation. Organic lesions were found on MR images from 19 patients. Invasive EEG was recorded in only one patient with occipital epilepsy, who had no lesion. Surgical indication was determined in 17 children, and 6 temporal lobe and 11 extratemporal lobe resections were performed under intraoperative electrocorticogram monitoring. The surgical outcome was excellent in 14 patients who had Engel's class I or II. Surgical complications occurred in two children who had visual field defects. The results showed that a good surgical outcome could be obtained using an intraoperative electrocorticogram, without presurgical invasive EEG, for localization-related epilepsy in children. The role of invasive EEG should be reevaluated in such children. (author)

  12. Epilepsy surgery in children and non-invasive evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Kiyotaka; Sawamura, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsunari; Tsuda, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Tatsuya [Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan); Tanaka, Shigeya

    2001-04-01

    The technique of EEG recording using subdural and depth electrodes has became established, and such invasive EEG is available for epilepsy surgery. However, a non-invasive procedure is required for evaluation of surgical indication for epilepsy patients, particular for children. We analyzed the relationship between the results of presurgical evaluation and seizure outcome, and investigated the role of invasive EEG in epilepsy surgery for children. Over the past decade, 22 children under 16 years of age have been admitted to our hospital for evaluation of surgical indication. High-resolution MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, video-EEG monitoring, and ictal and interictal SPECT were used for presurgical evaluation. Organic lesions were found on MR images from 19 patients. Invasive EEG was recorded in only one patient with occipital epilepsy, who had no lesion. Surgical indication was determined in 17 children, and 6 temporal lobe and 11 extratemporal lobe resections were performed under intraoperative electrocorticogram monitoring. The surgical outcome was excellent in 14 patients who had Engel's class I or II. Surgical complications occurred in two children who had visual field defects. The results showed that a good surgical outcome could be obtained using an intraoperative electrocorticogram, without presurgical invasive EEG, for localization-related epilepsy in children. The role of invasive EEG should be reevaluated in such children. (author)

  13. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  14. Use of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) to distinguish vascular and "pseudovascular" invasion in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder with lamina propria invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M P; Steinberg, G D; Brendler, C B; Epstein, J I

    1990-01-01

    We used Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI)-immunoperoxidase staining of endothelium to study the accuracy of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) diagnosis, occurrence, and significance of lymphvascular invasion in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder invading the lamina propria (Stage T1). Original histologic slides from cases (1967 to 1985) with and without vascular invasion were destained and restained with UEAI-immunoperoxidase. Only 5 of 36 biopsies originally diagnosed with lymphvascular invasion had tumor nests within endothelium-lined spaces. The 31 negative biopsies had extensive retraction artifacts lined by connective tissue and fibroblasts around tumor nests. Thirty-five control biopsies remained negative for lymphvascular invasion. Clinical follow-up of the five patients with proven lymphvascular invasion found three without progression of disease 3 to 10 yr postbiopsy, one dead of a local recurrence of TCC 1.67 yr postbiopsy, and one lost to follow-up. Based on this study, we feel that lymphvascular invasion by TCC in Stage T1 tumors is unusual, is frequently misdiagnosed on H&E stain, and does not necessarily portend a poor prognosis.

  15. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  16. Freshwater ecosystems and aquatic insects: a paradox in biological invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoglio, Stefano; Bonada, Núria; Guareschi, Simone; López-Rodríguez, Manuel J; Millán, Andrés; Tierno de Figueroa, J Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Biological invasions have increased significantly in response to global change and constitute one of the major causes of biodiversity loss. Insects make up a large fraction of invasive species, in general, and freshwaters are among the most invaded ecosystems on our planet. However, even though aquatic insects dominate most inland waters, have unparalleled taxonomic diversity and occupy nearly all trophic niches, there are almost no invasive insects in freshwaters. We present some hypotheses regarding why aquatic insects are not common among aquatic invasive organisms, suggesting that it may be the result of a suite of biological, ecological and anthropogenic factors. Such specific knowledge introduces a paradox in the current scientific discussion on invasive species; therefore, a more in-depth understanding could be an invaluable aid to disentangling how and why biological invasions occur. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Crime and Punishment Analysis: Land Invasion "Para-institutions" in Cali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Javier Burbano Valencia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the crime economics of Becker (1968 and Ehrlich (1973, including the impact of the migratory flow, this paper studies the reasons why some individuals choose to strategically, rationally, and contingently become involved in illegal land invasion "para-institutions" in Cali since the 1950s. This will be done by modeling the efficiency of justice in order to discourage invaders through simulations of sentences and arrest likelihood and deterrent punishment under three "para-institutions": invasive dynasty, organized invasion and contingent invasion (endogenous migratory flow. These simulations will be anchored to calibrated actual parameters of the relevant population. This will allow the calibration of the line of indifference (division among individuals with invasive (and incentives to illegality and non-invasive behaviors. Finally, a policy proposal will be devised to help correct the inefficiencies found in the sanctioning mechanisms, if applicable.

  18. MSX2 Induces Trophoblast Invasion in Human Placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liang

    Full Text Available Normal implantation depends on appropriate trophoblast growth and invasion. Inadequate trophoblast invasion results in pregnancy-related disorders, such as early miscarriage and pre-eclampsia, which are dangerous to both the mother and fetus. Msh Homeobox 2 (MSX2, a member of the MSX family of homeobox proteins, plays a significant role in the proliferation and differentiation of various cells and tissues, including ectodermal organs, teeth, and chondrocytes. Recently, MSX2 was found to play important roles in the invasion of cancer cells into adjacent tissues via the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. However, the role of MSX2 in trophoblastic invasion during placental development has yet to be explored. In the present study, we detected MSX2 expression in cytotrophoblast, syncytiotrophoblast, and extravillous cytotrophoblast cells of first or third trimester human placentas via immunohistochemistry analysis. Furthermore, we found that the in vitro invasive ability of HTR8/SVneo cells was enhanced by exogenous overexpression of MSX2, and that this effect was accompanied by increased protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, vimentin, and β-catenin. Conversely, treatment of HTR8/SVneo cells with MSX2-specific siRNAs resulted in decreased protein expression of MMP-2, vimentin, and β-catenin, and reduced invasion levels in a Matrigel invasion test. Notably, however, treatment with the MSX2 overexpression plasmid and the MSX2 siRNAs had no effect on the mRNA expression levels of β-catenin. Meanwhile, overexpression of MSX2 and treatment with the MSX2-specific siRNA resulted in decreased and increased E-cadherin expression, respectively, in JEG-3 cells. Lastly, the protein expression levels of MSX2 were significantly lower in human pre-eclamptic placental villi than in the matched control placentas. Collectively, our results suggest that MSX2 may induce human trophoblast cell invasion, and dysregulation of MSX2 expression may

  19. Invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation for treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Leis, Stefan; Höller, Peter; Thon, Natasha; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Past evidence has shown that invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation may be effective for relieving central pain. To perform a topical review of the literature on brain neurostimulation techniques in patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess the current evidence for their therapeutic efficacy. A MEDLINE search was performed using following terms: "Spinal cord injury", "Neuropathic pain", "Brain stimulation", "Deep brain stimulation" (DBS), "Motor cortex stimulation" (MCS), "Transcranial magnetic stimulation" (TMS), "Transcranial direct current stimulation" (tDCS), "Cranial electrotherapy stimulation" (CES). Invasive neurostimulation therapies, in particular DBS and epidural MCS, have shown promise as treatments for neuropathic and phantom limb pain. However, the long-term efficacy of DBS is low, while MCS has a relatively higher potential with lesser complications that DBS. Among the non-invasive techniques, there is accumulating evidence that repetitive TMS can produce analgesic effects in healthy subjects undergoing laboratory-induced pain and in chronic pain conditions of various etiologies, at least partially and transiently. Another very safe technique of non-invasive brain stimulation - tDCS - applied over the sensory-motor cortex has been reported to decrease pain sensation and increase pain threshold in healthy subjects. CES has also proved to be effective in managing some types of pain, including neuropathic pain in subjects with SCI. A number of studies have begun to use non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques therapeutically to relieve neuropathic pain and phantom phenomena in patients with SCI. However, further studies are warranted to corroborate the early findings and confirm different targets and stimulation paradigms. The utility of these protocols in combination with pharmacological approaches should also be explored.

  20. Current research in perineural invasion of cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xi-Yun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perineural invasion is a common path for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA metastasis, and it is highly correlated with postoperative recurrence and poor prognosis. It is often an early event in a disease that is commonly diagnosed in advanced stages, and thus it could offer a timely therapeutic and diagnostic target if better understood. This article systematically reviews the progress of CCA neural invasion-related molecules. Methods Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed databases for articles from January 1990 to December 2009, using the keywords "cholangiocarcinoma," "perineural invasion," "nerve growth factor"(NGF, "neural cell adhesion molecule" (NCAM, "matrix metalloproteinase"(MMP, "neurotransmitter," "acetylcholine" (Ach, and "transforming growth factor" (TGF." Additional papers and book chapters were identified by a manual search of references from the key articles. Results From above we found that the molecules NGF, NCAM, MMP, Ach and TGF may have prognostic significance in, and offer clues to the mechanism of CCA neural invasion. Conclusions Cholangiocarcinoma's increasing worldwide incidence is especially poignant in view of both the lacking effective therapies, and the fact that it is commonly diagnosed in advanced stages. As CCA neural invasion often appears early, more complete characterization of its molecular pathology could lead to the identification of targets for the diagnosis and therapy of this devastating malignancy.

  1. Optimising invasive fish management in the context of invasive species legislation in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darragh J. Woodford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa hosts a large number of non-native freshwater fishes that were introduced for various industries. Many of these species are now listed under the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (NEM:BA Alien and Invasive Species (A&IS lists and regulations, though the practical options available to conservation agencies to effectively manage these fishes vary greatly among species and regions. Objectives & methods: We assessed the history and status of national legislation pertaining to invasive freshwater fishes, and the practical implications of the legislation for managing different species with contrasting distributions, impacts and utilisation value. Results: The smallmouth bass, despite being a potential conflict-generating species, is fairly straightforward to manage based on current legislation. Two species of trout, which remain absent from the NEM:BA A&IS lists because of ongoing consultation with stakeholders, continue to be managed in regions like the Western Cape province using existing provincial legislation. To maximise the limited capacity for management within conservation agencies, we proposed a decision-support tool that prioritises invasive fish populations that represent high environmental risk and low potential for conflict with stakeholders. Using three case studies, we demonstrated how the tool can be used to set management goals of ‘eradicate’, ‘manage against impacts and further spread’ and ‘continue to monitor population’ as the most pragmatic solutions given the state of an invasion, its socio-economic impact and the capacity of the responsible agency to act. Conclusion: By choosing a pragmatic management strategy, conservation agencies can maximise the effective deployment of limited resources, while minimising avoidable conflicts with stakeholders.

  2. Early detection of invasive plants: principles and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Bradley A.; Geissler, Paul H.; Latham, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Invasive plants infest an estimated 2.6 million acres of the 83 million acres managed by the National Park Service (NPS) in the United States. The consequences of these invasions present a significant challenge for the NPS to manage the agency’s natural resources “unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” More NPS lands are infested daily despite diligent efforts to curtail the problem. Impacts from invasive species have been realized in most parks, resulting in an expressed need to control existing infestations and restore affected ecosystems. There is a growing urgency in the NPS and other resource management organizations to be proactive. The NPS I&M Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Status and Trends Program, compiled this document to provide guidance and insight to parks and other natural areas engaged in developing early-detection monitoring protocols for invasive plants. While several rapid response frameworks exist, there is no consistent or comprehensive guidance informing the active detection of nonnative plants early in the invasion process. Early-detection was selected as a primary focus for invasive-species monitoring because, along with rapid response, it is a key strategy for successful management of invasive species. Eradication efforts are most successful on small infestations (that is less than 1 hectare) and become less successful as infestation size increases, to the point that eradication is unlikely for large (that is greater than 1,000 hectares) populations of invasive plants. This document provides guidance for natural resource managers wishing to detect invasive plants early through an active, directed monitoring program. It has a Quick-Start Guide to direct readers to specific chapters and text relevant to their needs. Decision trees and flow charts assist the reader in deciding what methods to choose and when to use them. This document is written in a modular format to accommodate use of

  3. A conceptual framework for invasion in microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Proctor, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    and consistent terminology nor always include rigorous interpretations of the processes behind invasion. Therefore, we suggest that a consistent set of definitions and a rigorous conceptual framework are needed. We define invasion in a microbial community as the establishment of an alien microbial type...... in a resident community and argue how simple criteria to define aliens, residents, and alien establishment can be applied for a wide variety of communities. In addition, we suggest an adoption of the community ecology framework advanced by Vellend (2010) to clarify potential determinants of invasion....... This framework identifies four fundamental processes that control community dynamics: dispersal, selection, drift and diversification. While selection has received ample attention in microbial community invasion research, the three other processes are often overlooked. Here, we elaborate on the relevance of all...

  4. Minimizing Risks of Invasive Alien Plant Species in Tropical Production Forest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Padmanaba

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Timber production is the most pervasive human impact on tropical forests, but studies of logging impacts have largely focused on timber species and vertebrates. This review focuses on the risk from invasive alien plant species, which has been frequently neglected in production forest management in the tropics. Our literature search resulted in 114 publications with relevant information, including books, book chapters, reports and papers. Examples of both invasions by aliens into tropical production forests and plantation forests as sources of invasions are presented. We discuss species traits and processes affecting spread and invasion, and silvicultural practices that favor invasions. We also highlight potential impacts of invasive plant species and discuss options for managing them in production forests. We suggest that future forestry practices need to reduce the risks of plant invasions by conducting surveillance for invasive species; minimizing canopy opening during harvesting; encouraging rapid canopy closure in plantations; minimizing the width of access roads; and ensuring that vehicles and other equipment are not transporting seeds of invasive species. Potential invasive species should not be planted within dispersal range of production forests. In invasive species management, forewarned is forearmed.

  5. Biogeographical plant-soil relations of invasive medusahead (Elymus caput-medusae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the success of invasive plant species is integral to predicting and ameliorating their negative impacts. Many hypotheses have consequently been proposed to explain invasive behavior. This lack of consensus within invasion ecology can partially be attributed...

  6. Economic Analysis of Biological Invasions in Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas P. Holmes; Julian Aukema; Jeffrey Englin; Robert G. Haight; Kent Kovacs; Brian Leung

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions of native forests by nonnative pests result from complex stochastic processes that are difficult to predict. Although economic optimization models describe efficient controls across the stages of an invasion, the ability to calibrate such models is constrained by lack of information on pest population dynamics and consequent economic damages. Here...

  7. A proposed unified framework for biological invasions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blackburn, T. M.; Pyšek, Petr; Bacher, S.; Carlton, J. T.; Duncan, R. P.; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Wilson, J. R. U.; Richardson, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 7 (2011), s. 333-339 ISSN 0169-5347 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0563; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : biological invasions * invasion process * general framework Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 15.748, year: 2011

  8. The genetic and molecular basis of bacterial invasion of epithelial cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Invasion of epithelial cells was demonstrated to be triggered by invasion plasmid antigens B, C, and D ( IpaB, IpaC and IpaD ) which is accomplished by intracellular spread gene icsA. The invasion of epithelial cells by some individual species of bacteria were also reviewed.Yersinia enterocolitica invasiveness was shown ...

  9. Expression of Lipid Metabolism-Related Proteins Differs between Invasive Lobular Carcinoma and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Yoon Jin; Kim, Hye Min; Koo, Ja Seung

    2017-01-23

    We comparatively investigated the expression and clinical implications of lipid metabolism-related proteins in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. A total of 584 breast cancers (108 ILC and 476 IDC) were subjected to tissue microarray and immunohistochemical analysis for lipid metabolism-related proteins including hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), perilipin A, fatty acid binding protein (FABP)4, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and fatty acid synthetase (FASN). HSL, perilipin A, and FABP4 expression (all p invasive cancers, HSL and FABP4 were highly expressed in luminal A-type ILC ( p cancers, HSL and FABP4 were more highly expressed in ILC ( p < 0.001). Univariate analysis found associations of shorter disease-free survival with CPT-1 positivity ( p = 0.004) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity ( p = 0.032) and of shorter overall survival with acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity ( p = 0.027). In conclusion, ILC and IDC exhibited different immunohistochemical lipid metabolism-related protein expression profiles. Notably, ILC exhibited high HSL and FABP4 and low perilipin A expression.

  10. Orbital invasion routes of non-melanoma skin cancers and survival outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Yusuf; Cannon, Richard; Wiggins, Richard; Monroe, Marcus M; Buchmann, Luke O; Hunt, Jason P

    2018-02-21

    Overall non-melanoma head and neck skin cancer has a good prognosis; however, rarely patients have an aggressive variant which results in orbital invasion via perineural spread or direct extension. Despite these consequences, there are limited published studies defining this clinical entity. The main objectives of the current study are to describe orbital invasion patterns of non-melanoma head and neck skin cancers and their impact on survival. Retrospective case series from a tertiary-care, academic institution performed between 2004 and 2014. Demographic and tumour characteristics are reported as well as patterns of orbital invasion, types of treatments received, and survival outcomes. There were 17 consecutive patients with non-melanoma skin cancer and orbital invasion who met inclusion criteria. Average age at orbital invasion diagnosis was 70.8 years old. 76% were male. Mean follow-up time was 28.5 months. Of these patients, 71% had squamous cell carcinoma and 29% had basal cell carcinoma. Brow (41%) was the most common primary sub-site followed by cheek (23%) and temple (12%). 76% of patients had a history of prior treatment. The lateral orbital wall (41%) was the most common site of invasion, followed by the medial orbital wall (29%) and antero-superior invasion (23%). Age, histology, and location of orbital invasion were associated with disease-specific and overall survival. Orbital invasion for non-melanoma head and neck skin cancers creates a treatment dilemma and the patterns of invasion are described. In addition, the location of orbital invasion is associated with survival outcomes.

  11. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids: most dominant invasive genotype in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybridization can potentially enhance invasiveness. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids appear to be the dominant genotypes in their invasions. Exotic Tamarix are declared invasive in South Africa and the exotic T. chinensis and T. ramosissima are known to hybridize between themselves, and with the nativ...

  12. Gastric metastasis of triple negative invasive lobular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Caglayan Geredeli; Osman Dogru; Ethem Omeroglu; Farise Yilmaz; Faruk Cicekci

    2015-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinomas are the second most common type (5% to 15%) of invasive breast carcinomas. The most frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis are the local and distant lymph nodes, brain, lung, liver, and bones; metastasis to the gastrointestinal system, especially to the stomach, is rare. When a mass is detected in an unusual place in a patient with invasive lobular carcinoma, it should be kept in mind that such a mass may be either a second primary carcinoma or the metastasis o...

  13. Invasive ductal carcinoma within fibroadenoma: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Fibroadenoma is the most common benign tumor of the female breast with the highest incidence before age 30. Fibroadenoma may be associated with fibrocystic changes, proliferative epithelial changes, and extremely rarely, with non-invasive and invasive cancer. Case presentation We present a rare case of a 39 years old female with invasive ductal carcinoma arising within fibroadenoma. Conclusion There is a low percentage of fibroadenomas harboring carcinoma; however, all breast lumps should be seriously managed; extirpation and histological examination is recommended. PMID:19946485

  14. Invasive Plant Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giffen, Neil R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McCracken, Kitty [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Invasive non-native plant species have become one of the greatest ecological threats across the country and around the world. Actively managing incursions of invasive plants is crucial to maintaining ecosystems, protecting natural resources, and ensuring proper function of facilities and their support infrastructures, power lines and other utility rights-of-way (ROWs), communications structures, roadways, and waterways. Invasive plants can threaten cultural resources, public and private properties, forests, wetlands, and other natural areas through increased risks of fire and storm damage, as well as decrease native plant diversity, particularly disrupting vital habitats of threatened and endangered species, both plant and animal. In 2000, the Federal Plant Protection Act came into effect. Under this Act, federal agencies are required to develop and coordinate an undesirable plants management program for control of invasive plants on federal lands under each agency’s respective jurisdiction. The agency must adequately fund the undesirable plants management program using an Integrated Pest Management Plan. Additionally, each agency is required to implement cooperative agreements with local and state agencies, as well as other federal agencies, to manage undesirable plants on federal lands under the agency’s jurisdiction. The US Department of Energy (DOE) takes its responsibility for addressing invasive and undesirable plant issues very seriously. Many DOE sites have programs to control invasive pest plant species. DOE has taken a proactive stance toward invasive plant control, and the Invasive Plant Management Plan— created to meet regulatory requirements of federal laws, executive orders, presidential memos, contracts, and agreements on DOE’s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)—has been in effect since 2004. This document represents the second revision of this plan.

  15. A videoscope for use in minimally invasive periodontal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrel, Stephen K; Wilson, Thomas G; Rivera-Hidalgo, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    Minimally invasive periodontal procedures have been reported to produce excellent clinical results. Visualization during minimally invasive procedures has traditionally been obtained by the use of surgical telescopes, surgical microscopes, glass fibre endoscopes or a combination of these devices. All of these methods for visualization are less than fully satisfactory due to problems with access, magnification and blurred imaging. A videoscope for use with minimally invasive periodontal procedures has been developed to overcome some of the difficulties that exist with current visualization approaches. This videoscope incorporates a gas shielding technology that eliminates the problems of fogging and fouling of the optics of the videoscope that has previously prevented the successful application of endoscopic visualization to periodontal surgery. In addition, as part of the gas shielding technology the videoscope also includes a moveable retractor specifically adapted for minimally invasive surgery. The clinical use of the videoscope during minimally invasive periodontal surgery is demonstrated and discussed. The videoscope with gas shielding alleviates many of the difficulties associated with visualization during minimally invasive periodontal surgery. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Alien invasions in aquatic ecosystems: toward an understanding of brook trout invasions and potential impacts on inland cutthroat trout in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason B. Dunham; Susan B. Adams; Robert E. Schroeter; Douglas C. Novinger

    2002-01-01

    Experience from case studies of biological invasions in aquatic ecosystems has motivated a set of proposed empirical “rules” for understanding patterns of invasion and impacts on native species. Further evidence is needed to better understand these patterns, and perhaps contribute to a useful predictive theory of invasions. We reviewed the case of brook trout (

  17. MR imaging in tumor invasion of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, R.C.; Lang, P.; Schorner, W.; Sander, B.; Weiss, T.; Loddenkemper, R.; Kaiser, D.; Felix, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used MR imaging to study 22 patients who had intrathoracic, pleura-related malignancies and whose CT findings had suggested chest wall invasion. ECG-gated T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences were used in all patients. Additionally, in 10 patients an ungated, multisection, gradient-echo sequence was used, which was repeated after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA in five patients. Surgery confirmed chest wall invasion in 19 patients. CT showed tumor invasion only in 14 of these 19 patients. MR imaging showed high-signal-intensity lesion within chest wall and pleura in T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted images as the typical pattern of chest wall invasion in all 19 patients. Two of the three patients with pleural inflammation and without chest wall invasion had high-signal-intensity pleural lesions, but none of these lesions were within the chest wall

  18. Targeting Src family kinases inhibits bevacizumab-induced glioma cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Huveldt

    Full Text Available Anti-VEGF antibody therapy with bevacizumab provides significant clinical benefit in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Unfortunately, progression on bevacizumab therapy is often associated with a diffuse disease recurrence pattern, which limits subsequent therapeutic options. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand bevacizumab's influence on glioma biology and block it's actions towards cell invasion. To explore the mechanism(s of GBM cell invasion we have examined a panel of serially transplanted human GBM lines grown either in short-term culture, as xenografts in mouse flank, or injected orthotopically in mouse brain. Using an orthotopic xenograft model that exhibits increased invasiveness upon bevacizumab treatment, we also tested the effect of dasatinib, a broad spectrum SFK inhibitor, on bevacizumab-induced invasion.We show that 1 activation of Src family kinases (SFKs is common in GBM, 2 the relative invasiveness of 17 serially transplanted GBM xenografts correlates strongly with p120 catenin phosphorylation at Y228, a Src kinase site, and 3 SFK activation assessed immunohistochemically in orthotopic xenografts, as well as the phosphorylation of downstream substrates occurs specifically at the invasive tumor edge. Further, we show that SFK signaling is markedly elevated at the invasive tumor front upon bevacizumab administration, and that dasatinib treatment effectively blocked the increased invasion induced by bevacizumab.Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the increased invasiveness associated with anti-VEGF therapy is due to increased SFK signaling, and support testing the combination of dasatinib with bevacizumab in the clinic.

  19. Benefit from the minimally invasive sinus technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, N; Oakley, R J; Skilbeck, C J; Choudhury, N; Jacob, A

    2009-02-01

    Sinus drainage is impeded by the transition spaces that the anterior paranasal sinuses drain into, not the ostia themselves. Addressing the transition spaces and leaving the ostia intact, using the minimally invasive sinus technique, should reverse chronic rhinosinusitis. To assess patient benefit following use of the minimally invasive sinus technique for chronic rhinosinusitis. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients underwent the minimally invasive sinus technique for chronic rhinosinusitis. Symptoms (i.e. blocked nose, poor sense of smell, rhinorrhoea, post-nasal drip, facial pain and sneezing) were recorded using a visual analogue scale, pre-operatively and at six and 12 weeks post-operatively. Patients were also surveyed using the Glasgow benefit inventory, one and three years post-operatively. We found a significant reduction in all nasal symptom scores at six and 12 weeks post-operatively, and increased total quality of life scores at one and three years post-operatively (25.2 and 14.8, respectively). The patient benefits of treatment with the minimally invasive sinus technique compare with the published patient benefits for functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

  20. Control of invasive weeds with prescribed burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTomaso, Joseph M.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Allen, Edith B.; Minnich, Ralph; Rice, Peter M.; Kyser, Guy B.

    2006-01-01

    Prescribed burning has primarily been used as a tool for the control of invasive late-season annual broadleaf and grass species, particularly yellow starthistle, medusahead, barb goatgrass, and several bromes. However, timely burning of a few invasive biennial broadleaves (e.g., sweetclover and garlic mustard), perennial grasses (e.g., bluegrasses and smooth brome), and woody species (e.g., brooms and Chinese tallow tree) also has been successful. In many cases, the effectiveness of prescribed burning can be enhanced when incorporated into an integrated vegetation management program. Although there are some excellent examples of successful use of prescribed burning for the control of invasive species, a limited number of species have been evaluated. In addition, few studies have measured the impact of prescribed burning on the long-term changes in plant communities, impacts to endangered plant species, effects on wildlife and insect populations, and alterations in soil biology, including nutrition, mycorrhizae, and hydrology. In this review, we evaluate the current state of knowledge on prescribed burning as a tool for invasive weed management.

  1. Invasion rate and population characteristics of the invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus: effects of density and invasion history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azour, Farivar; Deurs, Mikael van; Behrens, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Round goby Neogobius melanostomus is currently one of the most wide-ranging invasive fish species in Europe and North America. The present study demonstrates how the distribution of round goby has expanded from 2008 to 2013 at a rate of about 30 km yr−1 along the Danish coastline in the western B...

  2. Does responsiveness to arbuscular mycorrhizas depend on plant invasive status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Some posit invasive alien plants are less dependent on mycorrhizal associations than native plants, and thus weak mycorrhizal responsiveness may be a general mechanism of plant invasion. 2. Here, we tested whether mycorrhizal responsiveness varies by plant invasive status while controlling for ph...

  3. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  4. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C. [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [University of Rome “La Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Soluri, A., E-mail: alessandro.soluri@ibb.cnr.it [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  5. Liver injury in invasive aspergillus. Echographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero Fernandez, R.; Garcia Revillo, J.; Paez Moreno, J.; Zurera Tendero, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Aspergillus is the second most common mycoses in immuno compromised patients. The invasive form is associated with a mortality of approximately 100%. We present a case of invasive aspergillus in a heart transplant recipient in whom ultrasound disclosed the presence of liver injury which was later confirmed by necropsy. We review the available literature. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells.

  7. Diet Switching by Mammalian Herbivores in Response to Exotic Grass Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bremm

    Full Text Available Invasion by exotic grasses is a severe threat to the integrity of grassland ecosystems all over the world. Because grasslands are typically grazed by livestock and wildlife, the invasion is a community process modulated by herbivory. We hypothesized that the invasion of native South American grasslands by Eragrostis plana Nees, an exotic tussock-forming grass from Africa, could be deterred by grazing if grazers switched dietary preferences and included the invasive grass as a large proportion of their diets. Bos taurus (heifers and Ovis aries (ewes grazed plots with varying degrees of invasion by E. plana in a replicated manipulative experiment. Animal positions and species grazed were observed every minute in 45-min grazing session. Proportion of bites and steps in and out of E. plana tussocks were measured and used to calculate several indices of selectivity. Both heifers and ewes exhibited increasing probability of grazing E. plana as the proportion of area covered by tussocks increased, but they behaved differently. In agreement with expectations based on the allometry of dietary preferences and morphology, ewes consumed a low proportion of E. plana, except in areas that had more than 90% E. plana cover. Heifers consumed proportionally more E. plana than ewes. Contrary to our hypothesis, herbivores did not exhibit dietary switching towards the invasive grass. Moreover, they exhibited avoidance of the invasive grass and preference for short-statured native species, both of which should tend to enhance invasion. Unless invasive plants are highly palatable to livestock, the effect of grazing to deter the invasion is limited, due to the inherent avoidance of the invasive grass by the main grazers in the ecosystem, particularly sheep.

  8. The complexity underlying invasiveness precludes the identification of invasive traits: A comparative study of invasive and noninvasive heterocarpic Atriplex congeners

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doudová, J.; Douda, J.; Mandák, Bohumil

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-16, č. článku e017645. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Atriplex * heterocarpy * invasiveness Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  9. Nerve Invasion by Epithelial Cells in Benign Breast Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jan Chan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve invasion by glandular epithelial cells in a lesion is usually regarded as invasive carcinoma. However, some benign conditions in the pancreas, prostate, breast and other organs may show involvement of nerve bundles by benign epithelial cells. We report an 18-year-old female with nerve invasion in benign breast disease. The lesion in her right breast revealed fibrocystic changes with ductal hyperplasia and stromal sclerosis. Perineural and intraneural involvement by bland-looking small ducts lined by 2 layers of cells including an outer layer of myoepithelial cells were found, suggestive of benign nerve invasion. There was no evidence of malignant cells in any of the sections. The patient remains well after 31 months of follow-up. About 44 cases of nerve invasion in benign breast diseases have been reported in the literature. It is necessary to carefully evaluate nerve involvement in breast lesions to avoid over-diagnosis and inappropriate operation.

  10. Plant invasions in mountains: Global lessons for better management

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, K.L.; Khuroo, A.A.; Loope, L.L.; Parks, C.G.; Pauchard, A.; Reshi, Z.A.; Rushworth, I.; Kueffer, C.

    2011-01-01

    Mountains are one of few ecosystems little affected by plant invasions. However, the threat of invasion is likely to increase because of climate change, greater anthropogenic land use, and continuing novel introductions. Preventive management, therefore, will be crucial but can be difficult to promote when more pressing problems are unresolved and predictions are uncertain. In this essay, we use management case studies from 7 mountain regions to identify common lessons for effective preventive action. The degree of plant invasion in mountains was variable in the 7 regions as was the response to invasion, which ranged from lack of awareness by land managers of the potential impact in Chile and Kashmir to well-organized programs of prevention and containment in the United States (Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest), including prevention at low altitude. In Australia, awareness of the threat grew only after disruptive invasions. In South Africa, the economic benefits of removing alien plants are well recognized and funded in the form of employment programs. In the European Alps, there is little need for active management because no invasive species pose an immediate threat. From these case studies, we identify lessons for management of plant invasions in mountain ecosystems: (i) prevention is especially important in mountains because of their rugged terrain, where invasions can quickly become unmanageable; (ii) networks at local to global levels can assist with awareness raising and better prioritization of management actions; (iii) the economic importance of management should be identified and articulated; (iv) public acceptance of management programs will make them more effective; and (v) climate change needs to be considered. We suggest that comparisons of local case studies, such as those we have presented, have a pivotal place in the proactive solution of global change issues. ?? International Mountain Society.

  11. Imaging the pancreas: from ex vivo to non-invasive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, D; Ahlgren, U

    2008-01-01

    While many recently published reviews have covered non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques, the aim of this review is to focus on current developments in optical imaging technologies for investigating the pancreas. Several of these modalities are being developed into non-invasive, real-time monit......While many recently published reviews have covered non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques, the aim of this review is to focus on current developments in optical imaging technologies for investigating the pancreas. Several of these modalities are being developed into non-invasive, real...

  12. Sonomammographic characteristics of invasive lobular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Damshety O

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Osama R Kombar,1,3 Dalia M Fahmy,1 Mary V Brown,3 Omar Farouk,2 Osama El-Damshety21Diagnostic Radiology Department, 2Surgical Oncology Department, Oncology Center, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt; 3Diagnostic Radiology Department, Al-Amiri Hospital, Safat, KuwaitObjective: The objective of our study was to identify characteristic features of invasive lobular carcinoma on mammography and ultrasound examinationsMaterials and methods: This is a retrospective multicenter study of women with biopsy-proven invasive lobular carcinoma. All patients had undergone diagnostic sonomammography. The imaging findings were identified by experienced breast imagers. Final surgical pathology results were used as the reference standard.Results: Thirty-two women ranging in age from 42 to 63 years old (mean age, 53 years, All had biopsy-proven invasive lobular carcinomas. Common features on mammogram included dense mass followed by architectural distortion; three cases showed breast asymmetry and one case was reported as normal. On ultrasound, common features included solid mass with spiculated margins, posterior shadowing, and perpendicular to the skin.Conclusion: Although no specific features could be linked to invasive lobular carcinoma, care should be directed to subtle signs such as architectural distortion and breast asymmetry in order not to miss any lesions. The combination of mammographic and sonographic helps to decrease the relatively high false negative diagnosis of this type of breast cancer.Keywords: mammography, ultrasound, cancer, breast

  13. Exotic invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  14. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy.

  15. Management of periorbital basal cell carcinoma with orbital invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Albert; Figueira, Edwin; Huilgol, Shyamala; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common eyelid malignancy; however, orbital invasion by periocular BCC is rare, and management remains challenging. Established risk factors for orbital invasion by BCC include male gender, advanced age, medial canthal location, previous recurrences, large tumor size, aggressive histologic subtype and perineural invasion. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach with orbital exenteration remaining the treatment of choice. Globe-sparing treatment may be appropriate in selected patients and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are often used as adjuvant therapies for advanced or inoperable cases, although the evidence remains limited. We aim to summarize the presentation and treatment of BCC with orbital invasion to better guide the management of this complex condition.

  16. Invasion strategies in round goby (Neogobius melanostomus: Is bigger really better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Brandner

    Full Text Available Few studies have systematically investigated mid- or long-term temporal changes of biological characteristics in invasive alien species considering the different phases of an invasion. We studied the invasion performance of one of the most invasive species worldwide, the round goby Neogobius melanostomus, from total absence over first occurrence until establishment from 2010 to 2015 in the upper Danube River. After an upstream movement of the invasion front of about 30 river km within four years, the pattern that round goby pioneering populations significantly differ from longer established ones has been confirmed: Pioneering populations at the invasion front comprised more females than males, and adult specimens with a larger body size compared to those at longer inhabited areas. On the population-level, the proportion of juveniles increased with time since invasion. The results of this study provide support for the previously postulated ´bigger is better´ and ´individual trait utility´ hypotheses explaining invasion success in round goby. Pioneering invaders with their greater exploratory behavior, highly adaptive phenotypic plasticity and increased competitive ability seem to act as prime emperors of new habitats, strongly following and benefiting from man-made river-bank structures.

  17. Pathologic Pattern of Invasive Bladder Carcinoma: Impact of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pathologic pattern of invasive bladder carcinoma in cystectomy specimens in relation to bilharziasis. Patients and Methods: Between April 2002 and October 2006, 148 consecutive patients with invasive bladder cancer were subjected to radical cystectomy and orthotopic sigmoid bladder ...

  18. Non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headache.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronfort, G.; Nilsson, N.; Haas, M.; Evans, R.; Goldsmith, C. H.; Assendelft, W. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive physical treatments are often used to treat common types of chronic/recurrent headache. OBJECTIVES: To quantify and compare the magnitude of short- and long-term effects of non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headaches. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the

  19. Non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headache

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brønfort, Gert; Haas, Mitchell; Evans, Roni L.; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Assendelft, Willem J.J.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive physical treatments are often used to treat common types of chronic/recurrent headache. Objectives: To quantify and compare the magnitude of short- and long-term effects of non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headaches. Search methods: We searched the

  20. Measurement of airway function using invasive and non-invasive methods in mild and severe models for allergic airway inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, Kim A T; Henricks, Paul A J; Redegeld, Frank A.; Garssen, Johan; Folkerts, Gert

    2014-01-01

    In this study a direct comparison was made between non-invasive and non-ventilated unrestrained whole body plethysmography (Penh) (conscious animals) and the invasive ventilated lung resistance (RL) method (anesthetized animals) in both mild and severe allergic airway inflammation models. Mild

  1. Invasion of exotic earthworms into ecosystems inhabited by native earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. F. Hendrix; G. H. Baker; M. A. Callaham Jr; G. A. Damoff; Fragoso C.; G. Gonzalez; S. W. James; S. L. Lachnicht; T. Winsome; X. Zou

    2006-01-01

    The most conspicuous biological invasions in terrestrial ecosystems have been by exotic plants, insects and vertebrates. Invasions by exotic earthworms, although not as well studied, may be increasing with global commerce in agriculture, waste management and bioremediation. A number of cases has documented where invasive earthworms have caused significant changes in...

  2. Skin invasion and prognosis in node negative breast cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horii Rie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of skin invasion in node negative breast cancer is uncertain. Methods We determined the prognosis in 97 node negative breast cancer patients (case group who had tumors with skin invasion. Then we compared these patients with 4500 node negative invasive breast cancer patients treated surgically in the same period. Results Patients with skin invasion tended to be older, had more invasive lobular carcinoma and larger tumor size, and were less likely to have breast conserving surgery than those in the control group. The 5-year disease-free survival rate in the case group was 94.0%. There was no significant difference in the 10-year disease-specific overall survival rates in terms of skin invasion in node negative patients (90.7% in the case group, 92.9% in the control group; p = 0.2032. Conclusion Results suggest that skin invasion has no impact on survival in node negative invasive breast cancer patients. The adjuvant regimens which the individual institute applies for node negative breast cancer should be used regardless of skin invasion.

  3. Global patterns in threats to vertebrates by biological invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellard, C.; Genovesi, P.; Jeschke, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss have recently been challenged. Fundamentally, we must know where species that are threatened by invasive alien species (IAS) live, and the degree to which they are threatened. We report the first study linking 1372 vertebrates threatened by more than 200 IAS from the completely revised Global Invasive Species Database. New maps of the vulnerability of threatened vertebrates to IAS permit assessments of whether IAS have a major influence on biodiversity, and if so, which taxonomic groups are threatened and where they are threatened. We found that centres of IAS-threatened vertebrates are concentrated in the Americas, India, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand. The areas in which IAS-threatened species are located do not fully match the current hotspots of invasions, or the current hotspots of threatened species. The relative importance of biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss clearly varies across regions and taxa, and changes over time, with mammals from India, Indonesia, Australia and Europe are increasingly being threatened by IAS. The chytrid fungus primarily threatens amphibians, whereas invasive mammals primarily threaten other vertebrates. The differences in IAS threats between regions and taxa can help efficiently target IAS, which is essential for achieving the Strategic Plan 2020 of the Convention on Biological Diversity. PMID:26817767

  4. Common mycelial networks impact competition in an invasive grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Rachael E; Cruzan, Mitchell B

    2016-06-01

    Mycorrhizal hyphal complexes can connect multiple host plants to form common mycelial networks (CMNs) that may affect plant competitive outcomes and community composition through differential resource allocation. The impacts of CMN interactions on invasive plants are not well understood and could be crucial to the understanding of invasive plant establishment and success. We grew the invasive grass Brachypodium sylvaticum in intra- and interspecific pairings with native grass Bromus vulgaris in a greenhouse and controlled for the effects of CMN and root interactions by manipulating the belowground separation between competitors. Comparison of plant growth in pots that allowed CMN interactions and excluded root competition and vice versa, or both, allowed us to delineate the effects of network formation and root competition on invasive plant establishment and performance. Brachypodium sylvaticum grown in pots allowing for only hyphal interactions, but no root competition, displayed superior growth compared with conspecifics in other treatments. Invasive performance was poorest when pairs were not separated by a barrier. Shoot nitrogen content in B. sylvaticum was higher in mycorrhizal plants only when connections were allowed between competitors. Our results indicate that the presence of CMN networks can have positive effects on B. sylvaticum establishment and nutrient status, which may affect plant competition and invasion success. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  5. Invasive mold infections: virulence and pathogenesis of mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, Giulia; Borghi, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  6. Invasive insects differ from non-invasive in their thermal requirements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jarošík, Vojtěch; Kenis, M.; Honěk, A.; Skuhrovec, J.; Pyšek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2015), s. 1-11, no.e0131072 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Grant - others:European Comission(XE) FP7-212459; AV ČR(CZ) AP1002 Program:FP7; Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : insects * thermal development * invasiveness Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  7. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  8. Interactive effects of herbivory and competition intensity determine invasive plant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing; Siemann, Evan

    2012-10-01

    Herbivory can reduce plant fitness, and its effects can be increased by competition. Though numerous studies have examined the joint effects of herbivores and competitors on plant performance, these interactive effects are seldom considered in the context of plant invasions. Here, we examined variation in plant performance within a competitive environment in response to both specialist and generalist herbivores using Chinese tallow as a model species. We combined tallow plants from native and invasive populations to form all possible pairwise combinations, and designated invasive populations as stronger neighbours and native populations as weaker neighbours. We found that when no herbivory was imposed, invasive populations always had higher total biomass than natives, regardless of their neighbours, which is consistent with our assumption of increased competitive ability. Defoliation by either generalist or specialist herbivores suppressed plant growth but the effects of specialists were generally stronger for invasive populations. Invasive populations had their lowest biomass when fed upon by specialists while simultaneously competing with stronger neighbours. The root/shoot ratios of invasive populations were lower than those of native populations under almost all conditions, and invasive plants were taller than native plants overall, especially when herbivores were present, suggesting that invasive populations may adopt an "aboveground first" strategy to cope with herbivory and competition. These results suggest that release from herbivores, especially specialists, improves an invader's performance and helps to increase its competitive ability. Therefore, increasing interspecific competition intensity by planting a stronger neighbour while simultaneously releasing a specialist herbivore may be an especially effective method of managing invasive plants.

  9. Propagule pressure governs establishment of an invasive herb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramula, Satu; Jauni, Miia; van Ooik, Tapio

    2015-10-01

    The success of plant invasions may be limited by the availability of propagules and/or of suitable microsites, with microsite availability being affected by, for example, disturbance and interspecific competition. A mechanistic understanding of the contributions of propagule pressure and microsite limitation to plant invasions is therefore required to minimise future invasions. Here, we investigated the relative roles of propagule pressure, the availability of microsites, and their interaction on the establishment of an invasive herb, Lupinus polyphyllus, in two geographic regions representing different climate and growth conditions in Finland (a more productive southern region and a harsher central region). We carried out a field experiment in 14 L. polyphyllus populations, in which we manipulated both propagule pressure and disturbance. In a complementary greenhouse experiment, we manipulated propagule pressure and interspecific competition. Seedling establishment of L. polyphyllus was higher in the more productive southern region than in the harsher central region. The number of L. polyphyllus seedlings increased with increasing propagule pressure regardless of disturbance or interspecific competition. However, the number of L. polyphyllus seedlings per sown seed (relative establishment) tended to decrease with increasing propagule pressure, indicating that the positive effect of propagule pressure on early invasion is partially counteracted by density-dependent mortality at high seed densities. Our results highlight the dominant role of propagule pressure over disturbance and interspecific competition in the establishment of L. polyphyllus, suggesting that the early stage of invasion is limited by the availability of propagules rather than the availability of suitable microsites.

  10. Invasion of Old World Phragmites australis in the New World: precipitation and temperature patterns combined with human influences redesign the invasive niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Yong; Lambertini, Carla; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Meyerson, Laura A; Brix, Hans

    2013-11-01

    After its introduction into North America, Euro-Asian Phragmites australis became an aggressive invasive wetland grass along the Atlantic coast of North America. Its distribution range has since expanded to the middle, south and southwest of North America, where invasive P. australis has replaced millions of hectares of native plants in inland and tidal wetlands. Another P. australis invasion from the Mediterranean region is simultaneously occurring in the Gulf region of the United States and some countries in South America. Here, we analysed the occurrence records of the two Old World invasive lineages of P. australis (Haplotype M and Med) in both their native and introduced ranges using environmental niche models (ENMs) to assess (i) whether a niche shift accompanied the invasions in the New World; (ii) the role of biologically relevant climatic variables and human influence in the process of invasion; and (iii) the current potential distribution of these two lineages. We detected local niche shifts along the East Coast of North America and the Gulf Coast of the United States for Haplotype M and around the Mississippi Delta and Florida of the United States for Med. The new niche of the introduced Haplotype M accounts for temperature fluctuations and increased precipitation. The introduced Med lineage has enlarged its original subtropical niche to the tropics-subtropics, invading regions with a high annual mean temperature (> ca. 10 °C) and high precipitation in the driest period. Human influence is an important factor for both niches. We suggest that an increase in precipitation in the 20th century, global warming and human-made habitats have shaped the invasive niches of the two lineages in the New World. However, as the invasions are ongoing and human and natural disturbances occur concomitantly, the future distribution ranges of the two lineages may diverge from the potential distribution ranges detected in this study. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.D.; Lind, J.W.; Bruun, B.

    2009-01-01

    Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection are presented: a three-week-old boy with meningitis and a 62-year-old woman with arthritis and bacteremia. Since 1993 vaccination against H. influenzae type b (Hib) has been offered to Danish children. The result has been a remarkable...... decrease in invasive Hib disease. However, physicians need to be aware of the existence of non-type b invasive H. influenzae disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/19...

  12. Experimental approaches for evaluating the invasion risk of biofuel crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke Flory, S; Sollenberger, Lynn E; Lorentz, Kimberly A; Gordon, Doria R

    2012-01-01

    There is growing concern that non-native plants cultivated for bioenergy production might escape and result in harmful invasions in natural areas. Literature-derived assessment tools used to evaluate invasion risk are beneficial for screening, but cannot be used to assess novel cultivars or genotypes. Experimental approaches are needed to help quantify invasion risk but protocols for such tools are lacking. We review current methods for evaluating invasion risk and make recommendations for incremental tests from small-scale experiments to widespread, controlled introductions. First, local experiments should be performed to identify conditions that are favorable for germination, survival, and growth of candidate biofuel crops. Subsequently, experimental introductions in semi-natural areas can be used to assess factors important for establishment and performance such as disturbance, founder population size, and timing of introduction across variable habitats. Finally, to fully characterize invasion risk, experimental introductions should be conducted across the expected geographic range of cultivation over multiple years. Any field-based testing should be accompanied by safeguards and monitoring for early detection of spread. Despite the costs of conducting experimental tests of invasion risk, empirical screening will greatly improve our ability to determine if the benefits of a proposed biofuel species outweigh the projected risks of invasions. (letter)

  13. Applicability of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickmilder Marc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With its inclusion under Action 3 in the Environment and Health Action Plan 2004–2010 of the European Commission, human biomonitoring is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention from the scientific community as a tool to better quantify human exposure to, and health effects of, environmental stressors. Despite the policy support, however, there are still several issues that restrict the routine application of human biomonitoring data in environmental health impact assessment. One of the main issues is the obvious need to routinely collect human samples for large-scale surveys. Particularly the collection of invasive samples from susceptible populations may suffer from ethical and practical limitations. Children, pregnant women, elderly, or chronically-ill people are among those that would benefit the most from non-invasive, repeated or routine sampling. Therefore, the use of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring should be promoted as an ethically appropriate, cost-efficient and toxicologically relevant alternative for many biomarkers that are currently determined in invasively collected matrices. This review illustrates that several non-invasively collected matrices are widely used that can be an valuable addition to, or alternative for, invasively collected matrices such as peripheral blood sampling. Moreover, a well-informed choice of matrix can provide an added value for human biomonitoring, as different non-invasively collected matrices can offer opportunities to study additional aspects of exposure to and effects from environmental contaminants, such as repeated sampling, historical overview of exposure, mother-child transfer of substances, or monitoring of substances with short biological half-lives.

  14. Independent Effects of Invasive Shrubs and Deer Herbivory on Plant Community Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Ward

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both invasive species and deer herbivory are recognized as locally important drivers of plant community dynamics. However, few studies have examined whether their effects are synergistic, additive, or antagonistic. At three study areas in southern New England, we examined the interaction of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann herbivory and three levels of invasive shrub control over seven growing seasons on the dynamics of nine herbaceous and shrub guilds. Although evidence of synergistic interactions was minimal, the separate effects of invasive shrub control and deer herbivory on plant community composition and dynamics were profound. Plant communities remained relatively unchanged where invasive shrubs were not treated, regardless if deer herbivory was excluded or not. With increasing intensity of invasive shrub control, native shrubs and forbs became more dominant where deer herbivory was excluded, and native graminoids became progressively more dominant where deer herbivory remained severe. While deer exclusion and intensive invasive shrub control increased native shrubs and forbs, it also increased invasive vines. Restoring native plant communities in areas with both established invasive shrub thickets and severe deer browsing will require an integrated management plan to eliminate recalcitrant invasive shrubs, reduce deer browsing intensity, and quickly treat other opportunistic invasive species.

  15. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The rarity of invasiveness of right-sided infective endocarditis (IE) compared with left-sided has not been well recognized and evaluated. Thus, we compared invasiveness of right- versus left-sided IE in surgically treated patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 2002 to January 20...

  16. Cancer invasion and the microenvironment: plasticity and reciprocity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.H.A.; Alexander, S.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer invasion is a cell- and tissue-driven process for which the physical, cellular, and molecular determinants adapt and react throughout the progression of the disease. Cancer invasion is initiated and maintained by signaling pathways that control cytoskeletal dynamics in tumor cells and the

  17. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mussi, Thais C.; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  18. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  19. Successful biological invasion despite a severe genetic load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro Zayed

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors that influence the success of ecologically and economically damaging biological invasions is of prime importance. Recent studies have shown that invasive populations typically exhibit minimal, if any, reductions in genetic diversity, suggesting that large founding populations and/or multiple introductions are required for the success of biological invasions, consistent with predictions of the propagule pressure hypothesis. Through population genetic analysis of neutral microsatellite markers and a gene experiencing balancing selection, we demonstrate that the solitary bee Lasioglossum leucozonium experienced a single and severe bottleneck during its introduction from Europe. Paradoxically, the success of L. leucozonium in its introduced range occurred despite the severe genetic load caused by single-locus complementary sex-determination that still turns 30% of female-destined eggs into sterile diploid males, thereby substantially limiting the growth potential of the introduced population. Using stochastic modeling, we show that L. leucozonium invaded North America through the introduction of a very small number of propagules, most likely a singly-mated female. Our results suggest that chance events and ecological traits of invaders are more important than propagule pressure in determining invasion success, and that the vigilance required to prevent invasions may be considerably greater than has been previously considered.

  20. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Eo, Hong; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, So-Young; Jeon, Tae Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  1. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyoung Doo, E-mail: kdsong0308@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Hong, E-mail: rtombow@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye, E-mail: jhkate.kim@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, So-Young, E-mail: sy1131.yoo@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Tae Yeon, E-mail: hathor97.jeon@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  2. Penile calcific uremic arteriolopathy occurring postparathyroidectomy in a hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Omar Bashir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA, also known as calciphylaxis, is a rare condition most frequently seen in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The clinical picture is characterized by painful skin lesions and ulcerations. The underlying pathology is medial calcification and intimal proliferation with microthrombi of small arteries. CUA is commonly associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism and high serum calcium and phosphate products. This article reports an atypical case where CUA developed after parathyroidectomy and in the course of treatment of hungry bone syndrome. The patient was on hemodialysis for 14 years. He had developed secondary hyperparathyroidism and severe osteodystrophy. Calcium, Vitamin-D supplements, and calcimimetics failed to control his condition. He underwent parathyroidectomy but developed hungry bone syndrome postoperatively. He was managed with large doses of calcium and active Vitamin-D analogs to maintain his serum calcium. Two weeks later, he developed a painful single lesion on the tip of the penis which was diagnosed as CUA on clinical and radiographic evidence. The patient refused surgical intervention and opted for traditional treatment with honey and herbs with an excellent outcome. The case highlights the risk of CUA complicating the aggressive management of post-parathyroidectomy hungry bone syndrome.

  3. Evolutionary responses of native plant species to invasive plants : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Oduor, Ayub M. O.

    2013-01-01

    Strong competition from invasive plant species often leads to declines in abundances and may,in certain cases, cause localized extinctions of native plant species. Nevertheless, studies have shown that certain populations of native plant species can co-exist with invasive plant species, suggesting the possibility of adaptive evolutionary responses of those populations to the invasive plants. Empirical inference of evolutionary responses of the native plant species to invasive plants has invol...

  4. Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0080 TITLE: Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer . PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER GRANT11489...institutional, NIH-funded study of genetic and epigenetic alterations of pre-invasive DCIS that did or did not progress to invasive breast cancer , with an

  5. Potential problems of removing one invasive species at a time: a meta-analysis of the interactions between invasive vertebrates and unexpected effects of removal programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballari, Sebastián A; Kuebbing, Sara E; Nuñez, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Although the co-occurrence of nonnative vertebrates is a ubiquitous global phenomenon, the study of interactions between invaders is poorly represented in the literature. Limited understanding of the interactions between co-occurring vertebrates can be problematic for predicting how the removal of only one invasive-a common management scenario-will affect native communities. We suggest a trophic food web framework for predicting the effects of single-species management on native biodiversity. We used a literature search and meta-analysis to assess current understanding of how the removal of one invasive vertebrate affects native biodiversity relative to when two invasives are present. The majority of studies focused on the removal of carnivores, mainly within aquatic systems, which highlights a critical knowledge gap in our understanding of co-occurring invasive vertebrates. We found that removal of one invasive vertebrate caused a significant negative effect on native species compared to when two invasive vertebrates were present. These unexpected results could arise because of the positioning and hierarchy of the co-occurring invasives in the food web (e.g., carnivore-carnivore or carnivore-herbivore). We consider that there are important knowledge gaps to determinate the effects of multiple co-existing invaders on native ecosystems, and this information could be precious for management.

  6. Shifts in dynamic regime of an invasive lady beetle are linked to the invasion and insecticidal management of its prey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahlai, C.A.; Werf, van der W.; O'Neal, M.; Hemerik, L.; Landis, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The spread and impact of invasive species may vary over time in relation to changes in the species itself, the biological community of which it is part, or external controls on the system. Here we investigate whether there have been changes in dynamic regimes over the last 20 years of two invasive

  7. Management of invasive species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jesper Sølver; Jensen, Frank

    impact of the establishment of this invasive species is a substantial increase in the number of allergy cases, which we use as a measure of the physical damage. As valuation methods, we use both the cost-of-illness method and the benefit transfer method to quantify the total gross benefits of the two...... policy actions. Based on the idea of an invasion function, we identify the total and average net benefit under both prevention and mitigation. For both policy actions, the total and average net benefits are significantly positive irrespective of the valuation method used; therefore, both prevention...... and mitigation are beneficial policy actions. However, the total and average net benefits under mitigation are larger than the benefits under prevention, implying that the former policy action is more beneficial. Despite this result, we conclude that prevention, not mitigation, shall be used because...

  8. Effects of invasion history on physiological responses to immune system activation in invasive Australian cane toads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Selechnik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The cane toad (Rhinella marina has undergone rapid evolution during its invasion of tropical Australia. Toads from invasion front populations (in Western Australia have been reported to exhibit a stronger baseline phagocytic immune response than do conspecifics from range core populations (in Queensland. To explore this difference, we injected wild-caught toads from both areas with the experimental antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS, to mimic bacterial infection and measured whole-blood phagocytosis. Because the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is stimulated by infection (and may influence immune responses, we measured glucocorticoid response through urinary corticosterone levels. Relative to injection of a control (phosphate-buffered saline, LPS injection increased both phagocytosis and the proportion of neutrophils in the blood. However, responses were similar in toads from both populations. This null result may reflect the ubiquity of bacterial risks across the toad’s invaded range; utilization of this immune pathway may not have altered during the process of invasion. LPS injection also induced a reduction in urinary corticosterone levels, perhaps as a result of chronic stress.

  9. Computed tomography versus invasive coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napp, Adriane E.; Haase, Robert; Laule, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: More than 3.5 million invasive coronary angiographies (ICA) are performed in Europe annually. Approximately 2 million of these invasive procedures might be reduced by noninvasive tests because no coronary intervention is performed. Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate...... angiography (ICA) is the reference standard for detection of CAD.• Noninvasive computed tomography angiography excludes CAD with high sensitivity.• CT may effectively reduce the approximately 2 million negative ICAs in Europe.• DISCHARGE addresses this hypothesis in patients with low-to-intermediate pretest...

  10. Invasion of Langebaan Lagoon, South Africa, by Mytilus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1992 the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis began establishing beds on the centre sandbanks of Langebaan Lagoon. This global invader had previously been restricted to rocky shores along the South African coastline. In order to investigate the effect of the invasion on naturally-occurring communities, ...

  11. CaPTHUS scoring model in primary hyperparathyroidism: can it eliminate the need for ioPTH testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfenbein, Dawn M; Weber, Sara; Schneider, David F; Sippel, Rebecca S; Chen, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    The CaPTHUS model was reported to have a positive predictive value of 100 % to correctly predict single-gland disease in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, thus obviating the need for intraoperative parathyroid hormone (ioPTH) testing. We sought to apply the CaPTHUS scoring model in our patient population and assess its utility in predicting long-term biochemical cure. We retrospective reviewed all parathyroidectomies for primary hyperparathyroidism performed at our university hospital from 2003 to 2012. We routinely perform ioPTH testing. Biochemical cure was defined as a normal calcium level at 6 months. A total of 1,421 patients met the inclusion criteria: 78 % of patients had a single adenoma at the time of surgery, 98 % had a normal serum calcium at 1 week postoperatively, and 96 % had a normal serum calcium level 6 months postoperatively. Using the CaPTHUS scoring model, 307 patients (22.5 %) had a score of ≥ 3, with a positive predictive value of 91 % for single adenoma. A CaPTHUS score of ≥ 3 had a positive predictive value of 98 % for biochemical cure at 1 week as well as at 6 months. In our population, where ioPTH testing is used routinely to guide use of bilateral exploration, patients with a preoperative CaPTHUS score of ≥ 3 had good long-term biochemical cure rates. However, the model only predicted adenoma in 91 % of cases. If minimally invasive parathyroidectomy without ioPTH testing had been done for these patients, the cure rate would have dropped from 98 % to an unacceptable 89 %. Even in these patients with high CaPTHUS scores, multigland disease is present in almost 10 %, and ioPTH testing is necessary.

  12. Invasive Mold Infections: Virulence and Pathogenesis of Mucorales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  13. Invasive plants as potential food resource for native pollinators: A case study with two invasive species and a generalist bumble bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossart, Maxime; Michez, Denis; Vanderplanck, Maryse

    2017-11-24

    It is now well established that invasive plants may induce drifts in the quantity and/or quality of floral resources. They are then often pointed out as a potential driver of bee decline. However, their impact on bee population remains quite unclear and still controversial, as bee responses are highly variable among species. Here, we compared the amino acid composition of pollen from three native and two invasive plant species included in diets of common pollinators in NW Europe. Moreover, the nutritional intake (i.e., pollen and amino acid intakes) of Bombus terrestris colonies and the pollen foraging behaviour of workers (i.e., visiting rate, number of foraging trips, weight of pollen loads) were considered. We found significant differences in pollen nutrients among the studied species according to the plant invasive behaviour. We also found significant differences in pollen foraging behaviour according to the plant species, from few to several foraging trips carrying small or large pollen loads. Such behavioural differences directly impacted the pollen intake but depended more likely on plant morphology rather than on plant invasive behaviour. These results suggest that common generalist bumble bees might not always suffer from plant invasions, depending on their behavioural plasticity and nutritional requirements.

  14. Evolutionary responses of native plant species to invasive plants: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduor, Ayub M O

    2013-12-01

    Strong competition from invasive plant species often leads to declines in abundances and may, in certain cases, cause localized extinctions of native plant species. Nevertheless, studies have shown that certain populations of native plant species can co-exist with invasive plant species,suggesting the possibility of adaptive evolutionary responses of those populations to the invasive plants. Empirical inference of evolutionary responses of the native plant species to invasive plants has involved experiments comparing two conspecific groups of native plants for differences in expression of growth/reproductive traits: populations that have experienced competition from the invasive plant species (i.e. experienced natives) versus populations with no known history of interactions with the invasive plant species (i.e. naıve natives). Here, I employ a meta-analysis to obtain a general pattern of inferred evolutionary responses of native plant species from 53 such studies. In general, the experienced natives had significantly higher growth/reproductive performances than naıve natives, when grown with or without competition from invasive plants.While the current results indicate that certain populations of native plant species could potentially adapt evolutionarily to invasive plant species, the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that probably underlie such evolutionary responses remain unexplored and should be the focus of future studies.

  15. MicroRNA-96 Promotes Tumor Invasion in Colorectal Cancer via RECK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Yasuhito; Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Matsutani, Shinji; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2018-04-01

    miR-96 is reported to inhibit reversion cysteine-rich Kazal motif (RECK), which is associated with tumor invasion, in solid cancer types (e.g. breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, esophageal cancer). The purpose of this study is to clarify whether miR-96 is similarly associated with tumor invasion in colorectal cancer. We performed western blotting to investigate the expression of RECK when miR-96 mimics or inhibitors were transferred into HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells. The RECK mRNA level was assessed by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. An invasion assay was used to evaluate tumor invasion. The expression of RECK was inhibited by the transfection of miR-96 mimics. RECK mRNA level was reduced by miR-96 mimics and increased by miR-96 inhibitor. In the invasion assay, miR-96 mimics were shown to promote tumor invasion. miR-96 may be associated with tumor invasion through inhibition of RECK expression in colorectal cancer. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Incidence and Predictors of Invasive Candidiasis Associated with Candidemia in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festekjian, Ara; Neely, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Risk factors for invasive candidiasis in children with candidemia are poorly defined. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of all children with candidemia at our tertiary children’s hospital from 2000 to 2006. Invasive candidiasis was diagnosed by review of the medical record and standardized EORTC/MSG criteria. A variety of risk factors for invasive candidiasis were explored. Results Of 194 episodes of candidemia in the microbiology laboratory database, 180 clinical records were available. Evaluation for invasive candidiasis consisted of 174 (97%) echocardiograms; 167 (93%) dilated ophthalmologic examinations, 136 (76%) chest CT scans, and 108 (60%) abdominal ultrasounds (complete, hepatosplenic or renal). Of the 180, 15 (8%) patients were identified with invasive candidiasis (4 proven, 1 probable, 10 possible). Prematurity candidiasis. Conclusions Invasive candidiasis, especially proven or probable, in the setting of candidemia was not common in our hospital, but premature infants and immunocompromised children were at significantly higher risk. Based on our findings, extensive imaging and examination by an ophthalmologist was particularly low-yield for invasive candidiasis in immunocompetent children beyond infancy. PMID:19821906

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khouja, Lutfi T; Baron, Eli M; Johnson, J Patrick; Kim, Terrence T; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-06-01

    Medical care has been evolving with the increased influence of a value-based health care system. As a result, more emphasis is being placed on ensuring cost-effectiveness and utility in the services provided to patients. This study looks at this development in respect to minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) costs. A literature review using PubMed, the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Registry, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) was performed. Papers were included in the study if they reported costs associated with minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). If there was no mention of cost, CEA, cost-utility analysis (CUA), quality-adjusted life year (QALY), quality, or outcomes mentioned, then the article was excluded. Fourteen studies reporting costs associated with MISS in 12,425 patients (3675 undergoing minimally invasive procedures and 8750 undergoing open procedures) were identified through PubMed, the CEA Registry, and NHS EED. The percent cost difference between minimally invasive and open approaches ranged from 2.54% to 33.68%-all indicating cost saving with a minimally invasive surgical approach. Average length of stay (LOS) for minimally invasive surgery ranged from 0.93 days to 5.1 days compared with 1.53 days to 12 days for an open approach. All studies reporting EBL reported lower volume loss in an MISS approach (range 10-392.5 ml) than in an open approach (range 55-535.5 ml). There are currently an insufficient number of studies published reporting the costs of MISS. Of the studies published, none have followed a standardized method of reporting and analyzing cost data. Preliminary findings analyzing the 14 studies showed both cost saving and better outcomes in MISS compared with an open approach. However, more Level I CEA/CUA studies including cost/QALY evaluations with specifics of the techniques utilized need to be reported in a standardized manner to make more accurate conclusions on the cost effectiveness of

  18. Invasion of Human Oral Epithelial Cells by Prevotella intermedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Brian R.; Leung, K.-P.; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Invasion of oral epithelial cells by pathogenic oral bacteria may represent an important virulence factor in the progression of periodontal disease. Here we report that a clinical isolate of Prevotella intermedia, strain 17, was found to invade a human oral epithelial cell line (KB), whereas P. intermedia 27, another clinical isolate, and P. intermedia 25611, the type strain, were not found to invade the cell line. Invasion was quantified by the recovery of viable bacteria following a standard antibiotic protection assay and observed by electron microscopy. Cytochalasin D, cycloheximide, monodansylcadaverine, and low temperature (4°C) inhibited the internalization of P. intermedia 17. Antibodies raised against P. intermedia type C fimbriae and against whole cells inhibited invasion, but the anti-type-C-fimbria antibody inhibited invasion to a greater extent than the anti-whole-cell antibody. This work provides evidence that at least one strain of P. intermedia can invade an oral epithelial cell line and that the type C fimbriae and a cytoskeletal rearrangement are required for this invasion. PMID:9826397

  19. A review of impacts by invasive exotic plants on forest ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Devine; Songlin. Fei

    2011-01-01

    Many of our forest ecosystems are at risk due to the invasion of exotic invasive plant species. Invasive plant species pose numerous threats to ecosystems by decreasing biodiversity, deteriorating ecosystem processes, and degrading ecosystem services. Literature on Kentucky's most invasive exotic plant species was examined to understand their potential impacts on...

  20. Invasive species in phytocenosis of Sterlitamak town (Republic of Bashkortostan, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanov, Ya M.; Abramova, L. M.; Petrov, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    There were 69 invasive and potentially invasive species in the flora of Sterlitamak in the Bashkortostan Republic (Russia). Eight are in the most dangerous types of invasive species. The greatest danger is represented by: Acer negundo, Ambrosia trifida, Elodea canadensis and Xanthium albinum. Within the boundaries of Sterlitamak, 21 syntaxa (13 associations and 8 derivated communities) are invasive species. This phytocenosis in an urban environment can be prime targets for plant quarantine actions.

  1. [Minimally invasive coronary artery surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaquett, R; Howard, M; Irarrázaval, M J; Morán, S; Maturana, G; Becker, P; Medel, J; Sacco, C; Lema, G; Canessa, R; Cruz, F

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing interest to perform a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) on a beating heart through a minimally invasive access to the chest cavity. To report the experience with minimally invasive coronary artery surgery. Analysis of 11 patients aged 48 to 79 years old with single vessel disease that, between 1996 and 1997, had a LIMA graft to the LAD performed through a minimally invasive left anterior mediastinotomy, without cardiopulmonary bypass. A 6 to 10 cm left parasternal incision was done. The LIMA to the LAD anastomosis was done after pharmacological heart rate and blood pressure control and a period of ischemic pre conditioning. Graft patency was confirmed intraoperatively by standard Doppler techniques. Patients were followed for a mean of 11.6 months (7-15 months). All patients were extubated in the operating room and transferred out of the intensive care unit on the next morning. Seven patients were discharged on the third postoperative day. Duplex scanning confirmed graft patency in all patients before discharge; in two patients, it was confirmed additionally by arteriography. There was no hospital mortality, no perioperative myocardial infarction and no bleeding problems. After follow up, ten patients were free of angina, in functional class I and pleased with the surgical and cosmetic results. One patient developed atypical angina on the seventh postoperative month and a selective arteriography confirmed stenosis of the anastomosis. A successful angioplasty of the original LAD lesion was carried out. A minimally invasive left anterior mediastinotomy is a good surgical access to perform a successful LIMA to LAD graft without cardiopulmonary bypass, allowing a shorter hospital stay and earlier postoperative recovery. However, a larger experience and a longer follow up is required to define its role in the treatment of coronary artery disease.

  2. 78 FR 9724 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ..., on a broad array of issues related to preventing the introduction of invasive species and providing... outlined in the 2008-2012 National Invasive Species Management Plan. The meeting agenda is now available on... be no committee business conducted during the orientation session, which is closed to the public...

  3. Primary Cilium-Regulated EG-VEGF Signaling Facilitates Trophoblast Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yih; Tsai, Hui-Ling; Syu, Jhih-Siang; Chen, Ting-Yu; Su, Mei-Tsz

    2017-06-01

    Trophoblast invasion is an important event in embryo implantation and placental development. During these processes, endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) is the key regulator mediating the crosstalk at the feto-maternal interface. The primary cilium is a cellular antenna receiving environmental signals and is crucial for proper development. However, little is known regarding the role of the primary cilium in early human pregnancy. Here, we demonstrate that EG-VEGF regulates trophoblast cell invasion via primary cilia. We found that EG-VEGF activated ERK1/2 signaling and subsequent upregulation of MMP2 and MMP9, thereby facilitating cell invasion in human trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells. Inhibition of ERK1/2 alleviated the expression of MMPs and trophoblast cell invasion after EG-VEGF treatment. In addition, primary cilia were observed in all the trophoblast cell lines tested and, more importantly, in human first-trimester placental tissue. The receptor of EG-VEGF, PROKR1, was detected in primary cilia. Depletion of IFT88, the intraflagellar transporter required for ciliogenesis, inhibited primary cilium growth, thereby ameliorating ERK1/2 activation, MMP upregulation, and trophoblast cell invasion promoted by EG-VEGF. These findings demonstrate a novel function of primary cilia in controlling EG-VEGF-regulated trophoblast invasion and reveal the underlying molecular mechanism. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1467-1477, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An invasive slug exploits an ant-seed dispersal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A; Prior, Kirsten M; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-05-01

    Plant-animal mutualisms, such as seed dispersal, are often vulnerable to disruption by invasive species. Here, we show for the first time how a non-ant invasive species negatively affects seed dispersal by ants. We examined the effects of several animal species that co-occur in a temperate deciduous forest-including native and invasive seed-dispersing ants (Aphaenogaster rudis and Myrmica rubra, respectively), an invasive slug (Arion subfuscus), and native rodents-on a native myrmecochorous plant, Asarum canadense. We experimentally manipulated ant, slug, and rodent access to seed depots and measured seed removal. We also video-recorded depots to determine which other taxa interact with seeds. We found that A. rudis was the main disperser of seeds and that A. subfuscus consumed elaiosomes without dispersing seeds. Rodent visitation was rare, and rodent exclusion had no significant effect on seed or elaiosome removal. We then used data obtained from laboratory and field mesocosm experiments to determine how elaiosome robbing by A. subfuscus affects seed dispersal by A. rudis and M. rubra. We found that elaiosome robbing by slugs reduced seed dispersal by ants, especially in mesocosms with A. rudis, which picks up seeds more slowly than M. rubra. Taken together, our results show that elaiosome robbing by an invasive slug reduces seed dispersal by ants, suggesting that invasive slugs can have profound negative effects on seed dispersal mutualisms.

  5. MR imaging assessment of direct hepatic invasion by adjacent tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeser, P.M.; Karstaedt, N.; Wolfman, N.T.; Bechtold, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The proper staging of right renal and adrenal tumors requires accurate prediction of hepatic invasion. The authors retrospectively reviewed MR studies of 35 patients with right renal or adrenal masses to assess the utility of MR imaging in predicting direct hepatic invasion. Twenty-three patients were selected for study on the basis of absence of the fat plane between tumor and liver. Hepatic signal and tumor-liver interface characteristics were used to predict invasion. In 14 patients with renal tumors, absence of abnormal signal from hepatic parenchyma correlated well with absence of invasion, but the presence of abnormal hepatic signal did not necessarily indicate hepatic invasion. Inversion-recovery pulse sequences optimally demonstrated abnormal hepatic signal as well as the tumor-liver interface. The authors are currently reviewing the studies in the nine patients with adrenal masses

  6. Invasion of Old World Phragmites australis in the New World: precipitation and temperature patterns combined with human influences redesign the invasive niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Wen-Yong; Lambertini, Carla; Li, Xiu-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    niches. We suggest that an increase in precipitation in the 20(th) century, global warming and human-made habitats have shaped the invasive niches of the two lineages in the New World. However, as the invasions are on-going and human and natural disturbances occur concomitantly, the future distribution....... australis (Haplotype M and Med) in both their native and introduced ranges using environmental niche models (ENMs) to assess (i) whether a niche shift accompanied the invasions in the New World; (ii) the role of biologically relevant climatic variables and human influence in the process of invasion...... for temperature fluctuations and increased precipitation. The introduced Med lineage has enlarged its original subtropical niche to the tropics-subtropics, invading regions with a high annual mean temperature (> c. 10 °C) and high precipitation in the driest period. Human influence is an important factor for both...

  7. School based assessment module for invasion games category in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School based assessment module for invasion games category in physical education. ... This study identify the level of basic skills of invasion games category when using School Based Assessment Module. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  8. Decisionmaking under risk in invasive species management: risk management theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefali V. Mehta; Robert G. Haight; Frances R. Homans

    2010-01-01

    Invasive species management is closely entwined with the assessment and management of risk that arises from the inherently random nature of the invasion process. The theory and application of risk management for invasive species with an economic perspective is reviewed in this synthesis. Invasive species management can be delineated into three general categories:...

  9. The need for spatially explicit quantification of benefits in invasive-species management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski-Hartley, Stephanie R; Adams, Vanessa M; Hermoso, Virgilio

    2018-04-01

    Worldwide, invasive species are a leading driver of environmental change across terrestrial, marine, and freshwater environments and cost billions of dollars annually in ecological damages and economic losses. Resources limit invasive-species control, and planning processes are needed to identify cost-effective solutions. Thus, studies are increasingly considering spatially variable natural and socioeconomic assets (e.g., species persistence, recreational fishing) when planning the allocation of actions for invasive-species management. There is a need to improve understanding of how such assets are considered in invasive-species management. We reviewed over 1600 studies focused on management of invasive species, including flora and fauna. Eighty-four of these studies were included in our final analysis because they focused on the prioritization of actions for invasive species management. Forty-five percent (n = 38) of these studies were based on spatial optimization methods, and 35% (n = 13) accounted for spatially variable assets. Across all 84 optimization studies considered, 27% (n = 23) explicitly accounted for spatially variable assets. Based on our findings, we further explored the potential costs and benefits to invasive species management when spatially variable assets are explicitly considered or not. To include spatially variable assets in decision-making processes that guide invasive-species management there is a need to quantify environmental responses to invasive species and to enhance understanding of potential impacts of invasive species on different natural or socioeconomic assets. We suggest these gaps could be filled by systematic reviews, quantifying invasive species impacts on native species at different periods, and broadening sources and enhancing sharing of knowledge. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection...... with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Case series and experimental data have shown that the capsular serotype is involved in the pathogenesis and a determinant of disease outcome. METHODS: Retrospective review of 464 cases of invasive disease among adults diagnosed...

  11. Secondary and Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism, State of the Art Surgical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Susan C.; Sippel, Rebecca S.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews the current surgical management of patients with secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism. The focus is on innovative surgical strategies that have improved the care of these patients over the past 10 to 15 years. Modalities such as intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring and radioguided probe utilization are discussed. PMID:19836494

  12. Non-small cell lung cancer: Whole-lesion histogram analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient for assessment of tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Naoko; Doai, Mariko; Usuda, Katsuo; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the diagnostic accuracy of histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for determining non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor grades, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. We studied 60 surgically diagnosed NSCLC patients. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in the axial plane using a navigator-triggered single-shot, echo-planar imaging sequence with prospective acquisition correction. The ADC maps were generated, and we placed a volume-of-interest on the tumor to construct the whole-lesion histogram. Using the histogram, we calculated the mean, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles of ADC, skewness, and kurtosis. Histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. We performed a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to assess the diagnostic performance of histogram parameters for distinguishing different pathologic features. The ADC mean, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles showed significant differences among the tumor grades. The ADC mean, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were significant histogram parameters between high- and low-grade tumors. The ROC analysis between high- and low-grade tumors showed that the 95th percentile ADC achieved the highest area under curve (AUC) at 0.74. Lymphovascular invasion was associated with the ADC mean, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles, skewness, and kurtosis. Kurtosis achieved the highest AUC at 0.809. Pleural invasion was only associated with skewness, with the AUC of 0.648. ADC histogram analyses on the basis of the entire tumor volume are able to stratify NSCLCs' tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion.

  13. Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica invasions in the US: Mechanisms, impacts, and threats to biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Estrada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasions of non-native species can suppress biodiversity and alter ecosystem functions, but for many of the most widespread invasive species the mechanisms underlying their invasive success and effects on native species are poorly understood. Here we evaluated the peer-reviewed literature on causes and impacts of invasion by cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica, one of the most problematic invasive plant species in the southeast US. We assess what is known about why cogongrass is particularly invasive and how it affects native communities and ecosystems, review patterns in research methods employed, and provide a roadmap for future research on cogongrass. Although many studies have focused on the basic biology and management of cogongrass, we found surprisingly few (30 studies that have directly tested mechanisms or impacts of cogongrass invasions. The most commonly tested mechanisms, disturbance and allelopathy, were evaluated 4 and 12 times, respectively, and studies on invasion impacts were limited to five studies total: native plant diversity (2 studies, nitrogen cycling (2, decomposition (1, and fine fuel loads (1. Excluding laboratory studies on allelopathy, 75% (6/8 of impact studies used observational methods, raising questions about cause and effect. Given the paucity of studies on the ecology of cogongrass invasions, and the need to protect conservation areas from invasions, we urge that research efforts focus on: (1 environmental correlates of distribution and performance, (2 the role of propagule pressure in invasion success, (3 enemy release and post-introduction evolution as mechanisms of invasion, and (4 experimental tests of community and ecosystem impacts of invasions.

  14. Impacts of invasive nonnative plant species on the rare forest herb Scutellaria montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Jordan J.; Boyd, Jennifer N.

    2015-11-01

    Invasive plant species and overabundant herbivore populations have the potential to significantly impact rare plant species given their increased risk for local extirpation and extinction. We used interacting invasive species removal and grazer exclusion treatments replicated across two locations in an occurrence of rare Scutellaria montana (large-flowered skullcap) in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, to assess: 1) competition by invasive Ligustrum sinense (Chinese privet) and Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle) and 2) the role of invasive species in mediating Oedocoilus virginianus (white-tailed deer) grazing of S. montana. Contrary to our hypothesis that invasive species presence would suppress S. montana directly via competition, S. montana individuals experienced a seasonal increase in stem height when invasive species were intact but not when invasive species were removed. Marginally significant results indicated that invasive species may afford S. montana protection from grazers, and we suggest that invasive species also could protect S. montana from smaller herbivores and/or positively influence abiotic conditions. In contrast to growth responses, S. montana individuals protected from O. virginianus exhibited a decrease in flowering between seasons relative to unprotected plants, but invasive species did not affect this variable. Although it has been suggested that invasive plant species may negatively influence S. montana growth and fecundity, our findings do not support related concerns. As such, we suggest that invasive species eradication efforts in S. montana habitat could be more detrimental than positive due to associated disturbance. However, the low level of invasion of our study site may not be representative of potential interference in more heavily infested habitat.

  15. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive electromagnetic methods in soil water content estimation of a dike model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preko, Kwasi; Scheuermann, Alexander; Wilhelm, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Water infiltration through a dike model under controlled flooding and drainage conditions was investigated using the gravimetric soil water sampling technique and electromagnetic techniques, in particular ground penetrating radar (GPR) applied in different forms, time domain reflectometry with intelligent microelements (TRIME-TDR) and spatial-time domain reflectometry (S-TDR). The experiments were conducted on the model in two phases. In the first phase, the model was flooded with varying water levels between 0 and 1.25 m above the waterproof base of the model. In the second phase, the characteristics of the temporal water content changes were investigated over a period of 65 days as the flood water drained off from the 1.25 m level. The dike model was constructed with soil of the texture class loamy sand. The aim of the experiment was to investigate whether GPR-based invasive and non-invasive methods were able to quantitatively observe and correctly monitor temporal changes in the volumetric water content (VWC) within embankment dams. The VWC values from the various techniques corresponded very well, especially with low VWC values. A comparison with the VWC of gravimetric soil water sampling showed a satisfactory reproducibility. Characteristic discrepancies were recorded with higher values of the VWC. Under saturated conditions only the invasive methods were able to produce reasonable values of the VWC. After the release of the highest flood level, the drainage phase could be characterized by two invasive methods based on the TDR and GPR techniques

  16. Minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Røsok, Bård I.; de Rooij, Thijs; van Hilst, Jony; Diener, Markus K.; Allen, Peter J.; Vollmer, Charles M.; Kooby, David A.; Shrikhande, Shailesh V.; Asbun, Horacio J.; Barkun, Jeffrey; Besselink, Marc G.; Boggi, Ugo; Conlon, Kevin; Han, Ho Seong; Hansen, Paul; Kendrick, Michael L.; Kooby, David; Montagnini, Andre L.; Palanivelu, Chinnasamy; Wakabayashi, Go; Zeh, Herbert J.

    2017-01-01

    The first International conference on Minimally Invasive Pancreas Resection was arranged in conjunction with the annual meeting of the International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association (IHPBA), in Sao Paulo, Brazil on April 19th 2016. The presented evidence and outcomes resulting from the session

  17. Aggressive venous invasion in the area of carcinoma correlates with liver metastasis as an index of metastasis for invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Yoshifuku

    Invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas (IDCP) predominantly causes death through liver metastasis (LM) and peritoneal dissemination with local recurrence. However, whether its venous invasion is from the enlarged carcinoma accompanied by tumor growth, or from a distinct carcinoma group, for which venous invasion is facilitated by proximity to the origin, is unclear. We analyzed the correlation between LM and venous invasion in patients with small IDCP tumors. Of 388 patients who were diagnosed with IDCP, 20 (5.2%) had tumors with diameters IDPC. Patients in whom ≥60% of veins were invaded by IDCP should be prepared for LM. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Invasive fungal infections in Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Alza, Y; Sánchez-Bautista, J; Fajardo-Rivero, J F; Figueroa, C L

    2018-06-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement. Complications, such as invasive fungal infections usually occur in patients with a greater severity of the disease. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk variables associated with invasive fungal infections in a Colombian systemic lupus erythematosus population. Materials and methods A cross-sectional, retrospective study that evaluated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus for six years. The primary outcome was invasive fungal infection. Descriptive, group comparison and bivariate analysis was performed using Stata 12.0 software. Results Two hundred patients were included in this study; 84.5% of the patients were women and the