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Sample records for invasive pneumococcal infections

  1. Diagnostic value of serum pneumococcal DNA load during invasive pneumococcal infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.J.H.; Hagen, F.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Ferwerda, G.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of pneumococcal DNA in blood could be a fast alternative for blood culture in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). In this study we compared the diagnostic value of the serum pneumococcal DNA load between different clinical syndromes in adults with bacteremic pneumococcal infections, also

  2. Invasive pneumococcal infection despite 7-valent conjugated vaccine

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    Sebastien Joye

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite good cover with 7-valent vaccination, invasive pneumococcal infections may still be misdiagnosed and may lead to lifethreatening situations or death in young children. New serotypes are emerging and, therefore, clinicians must keep a high level of suspicion in young children regardless of their vaccination status. We report three cases of invasive pneumococcal infection due to new serotypes not covered by the 7-valent conjugated vaccine, two of which led children to death.

  3. Seasonal invasive pneumococcal disease in children: role of preceding respiratory viral infection.

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    Ampofo, Krow; Bender, Jeffrey; Sheng, Xiaoming; Korgenski, Kent; Daly, Judy; Pavia, Andrew T; Byington, Carrie L

    2008-08-01

    Our objective was to demonstrate correlations between invasive pneumococcal disease in children and circulating respiratory viruses. This retrospective study included 6 winter respiratory viral seasons (2001-2007) in Intermountain Healthcare, an integrated health system in the Intermountain West, including Primary Children's Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. Children <18 years of age who were hospitalized with either invasive pneumococcal disease in any Intermountain Healthcare facility or culture-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease at Primary Children's Medical Center were included. We analyzed the correlation between invasive pneumococcal disease and circulating respiratory viruses. A total of 435 children with invasive pneumococcal disease and 203 with culture-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease were hospitalized in an Intermountain Healthcare facility or Primary Children's Medical Center during the study period. During the same period, 6963 children with respiratory syncytial virus, 1860 with influenza virus, 1459 with parainfluenza virus, and 818 with adenoviruses were evaluated at Primary Children's Medical Center. A total of 253 children with human metapneumovirus were identified during the last 5 months of the study. There were correlations between invasive pneumococcal disease and seasonal respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and human metapneumovirus activity. The correlation with invasive pneumococcal disease was strong up to 4 weeks after respiratory syncytial virus activity. For influenza virus and human metapneumovirus, the correlations were strong at 2 weeks after activity of these viruses. Pneumonia was the most common clinical disease associated with culture-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease, mostly attributable to serotypes 1, 19A, 3, and 7F. In the post-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era, seasonal increases in respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and human metapneumovirus infections in children were

  4. A Case of Invasive Pneumococcal Infection with Septic Shock and Rare Complications

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    John R. Woytanowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcus is a serious illness with potentially devastating outcomes. A 64-year-old female with a medical history of psoriatic arthritis and diabetes was transferred from an outside hospital for ventilator dependent respiratory failure and altered mental status. She initially presented with worsening back pain and was found to have leukocytosis with bandemia and acute renal failure but she was in septic shock upon arrival to our tertiary care center. Her blood cultures grew Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRI of the brain revealed pus within the posterior lateral ventricles and multiple infarcts. MRI of the spine revealed a psoas abscess. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed mitral valve vegetation and her right eye developed endogenous endophthalmitis. She was treated with intravenous and intravitreal antibiotics and underwent drainage of the abscess with no improvement in mental status. Repeat imaging revealed multiple new thalamic, basal ganglia, and parietal lobe infarcts likely from septic emboli. After a protracted ICU stay, the patient’s family opted for comfort care. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections has declined rapidly since the advent of antibiotics and vaccines. With the growing incidence of antibiotic resistance as well as the emergence of new immunomodulating drugs for various pathologies, there is a concern that invasive infections will reemerge. Ventriculitis and endogenous endophthalmitis are very rare complications of pneumococcal bacteremia.

  5. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  6. Trends in mortality and antibiotic resistance among HIV-infected patients with invasive pneumococcal disease.

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    Grau, I; Ardanuy, C; Liñares, J; Podzamczer, D; Schulze, M H; Pallares, Roman

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe trends and risk factors for mortality and changes in antibiotic resistance, serotypes and clones among HIV-infected patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). A prospective study of 199 episodes of IPD occurring in a cohort of 4011 HIV-infected patients was carried out. Predictors of mortality included clinical and microbiological data. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) for children was introduced in late 2001. Time periods were classified for mortality studies as pre- (1986-1996), early (1997-2001) and late (2002-2007) highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, and for serotype studies as pre-PCV7 (1986-2001) and PCV7 (2002-2007) era. Of 199 IPD episodes, 71 (36%) occurred in HIV-infected patients with associated comorbidities (mainly liver cirrhosis; 52 of 71), which increased in recent years. The incidence of IPD decreased from the pre-HAART era to the early HAART era and then remained stable in the late HAART era (24.1, 8.4 and 7.4 episodes per 1000 patient-years, respectively). Rates of 30-day mortality have risen over the three periods (8, 19 and 25%, respectively; P = 0.017). In multiple logistic regression analysis, predictors of mortality were shock at presentation [odds ratio (OR) 7.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.05-23.87] and associated comorbidities (OR 4.27; 95% CI 1.53-11.92). In the PCV7 era, IPD caused by non-PCV7 serotypes increased, and resistance to betalactams decreased. The most frequent genotypes were Spain(9V)-ST156, Spain(23F)-ST81, ST88(19F), Sweden(1)-ST304 and Spain(6B)-ST90. In the late HAART era, the incidence of IPD has not significantly decreased. Mortality from IPD has risen in association with an increase in comorbidities such as liver cirrhosis. New vaccination strategies are needed to diminish the burden of IPD in the HIV-infected population.

  7. HIV Infection and the Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD in South African Adults and Older Children Prior to the Introduction of a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV.

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    Susan Meiring

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the commonest cause of bacteremic pneumonia among HIV-infected persons. As more countries with high HIV prevalence are implementing infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV programs, we aimed to describe the baseline clinical characteristics of adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in the pre-PCV era in South Africa in order to interpret potential indirect effects following vaccine use.National, active, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD was conducted in South Africa from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2008. At 25 enhanced surveillance (ES hospital sites, clinical data, including HIV serostatus, were collected from IPD patients ≥ 5 years of age. We compared the clinical characteristics of individuals with IPD in those HIV-infected and -uninfected using multivariable analysis. PCV was introduced into the routine South African Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI in 2009.In South Africa, from 2003-2008, 17 604 cases of IPD occurred amongst persons ≥ 5 years of age, with an average incidence of 7 cases per 100 000 person-years. Against a national HIV-prevalence of 18%, 89% (4190/4734 of IPD patients from ES sites were HIV-infected. IPD incidence in HIV-infected individuals is 43 times higher than in HIV-uninfected persons (52 per 100 000 vs. 1.2 per 100 000, with a peak in the HIV-infected elderly population of 237 per 100 000 persons. Most HIV-infected individuals presented with bacteremia (74%, 3 091/4 190. HIV-uninfected individuals were older; and had more chronic conditions (excluding HIV than HIV-infected persons (39% (210/544 vs. 19% (790/4190, p<0.001. During the pre-PCV immunization era in South Africa, 71% of serotypes amongst HIV-infected persons were covered by PCV13 vs. 73% amongst HIV-uninfected persons, p = 0.4, OR 0.9 (CI 0.7-1.1.Seventy to eighty-five percent of adult IPD in the pre-PCV era were vaccine serotypes and 93% of cases had recognized risk factors (including HIV-infection for

  8. Treatment and prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease.

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    Domínguez-Alegría, A R; Pintado, V; Barbolla, I

    2018-02-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a severe infection that mainly affects patients with associated comorbidity. The paediatric conjugate vaccination has resulted in a change in the adult vaccination strategy. The antibiotic resistance of pneumococcus is not currently a severe problem. Nevertheless, the World Health Organisation has included pneumococcus among the bacteria whose treatment requires the introduction of new drugs, such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole. Although the scientific evidence is still limited, the combination of beta-lactams and macrolides is recommended as empiric therapy for bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  9. A Case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen Syndrome Resulting from an Invasive Pneumococcal Infection in a Patient with a Hypoplastic Spleen

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    Kazumasa Emori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with complaints of pain and numbness in both legs. At arrival, purple spots were evident on his neck and face. Examination of the vital sign indicated septic shock. Laboratory data and blood gas analysis revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiple organ failure, and metabolic acidosis. Peripheral blood smears revealed Howell-Jolly bodies, indicating decreased splenic function. A rapid urinary pneumococcal antigen test was also found to be positive. After admission to the intensive care unit, extensive treatment, including polymyxin-B direct hemoperfusion and administration of methylprednisolone and broad spectrum antibiotics was immediately initiated. Despite of our efforts to save his life, the patient died six hours after the arrival. The following day, blood cultures revealed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae. An autopsy revealed a hypoplastic spleen and a bilateral adrenal hemorrhage, indicating acute adrenal insufficiency caused by sepsis. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Although severe infection may be seen in the splenectomized patients, it should be noted that patients with a hypoplastic spleen may have acute severe infections. We, therefore, report a case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome resulting from an invasive pneumococcal infection in a patient with a hypoplastic spleen.

  10. A Case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen Syndrome Resulting from an Invasive Pneumococcal Infection in a Patient with a Hypoplastic Spleen.

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    Emori, Kazumasa; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Soneda, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with complaints of pain and numbness in both legs. At arrival, purple spots were evident on his neck and face. Examination of the vital sign indicated septic shock. Laboratory data and blood gas analysis revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiple organ failure, and metabolic acidosis. Peripheral blood smears revealed Howell-Jolly bodies, indicating decreased splenic function. A rapid urinary pneumococcal antigen test was also found to be positive. After admission to the intensive care unit, extensive treatment, including polymyxin-B direct hemoperfusion and administration of methylprednisolone and broad spectrum antibiotics was immediately initiated. Despite of our efforts to save his life, the patient died six hours after the arrival. The following day, blood cultures revealed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae. An autopsy revealed a hypoplastic spleen and a bilateral adrenal hemorrhage, indicating acute adrenal insufficiency caused by sepsis. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Although severe infection may be seen in the splenectomized patients, it should be noted that patients with a hypoplastic spleen may have acute severe infections. We, therefore, report a case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome resulting from an invasive pneumococcal infection in a patient with a hypoplastic spleen.

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  16. Invasive pneumococcal infections among persons with and without underlying medical conditions: Implications for prevention strategies

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    Ollgren Jukka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23 is recommended for persons aged Methods Population-based data on all episodes of IPD (positive blood or cerebrospinal fluid culture reported by Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories during 1995–2002 were linked to data in national health care registries and vital statistics to obtain information on the patient's preceding hospitalisations, co-morbidities, and outcome of illness. Results Overall, 4357 first episodes of IPD were identified in all age groups (average annual incidence, 10.6/100,000. Patients aged 18–49 and 50–64 years accounted for 1282 (29% and 934 (21% of IPD cases, of which 372 (29% and 427 (46% had a current PPV23 indication, respectively. Overall, 536 (12% IPD patients died within one month of first positive culture. Persons aged 18–64 years accounted for 254 (47% of all deaths (case-fatality proportion, 12%. Of those who died 117 (46% did not have a vaccine indication. In a survival model, patients with alcohol-related diseases, non-haematological malignancies, and those aged 50–64 years were most likely to die. Conclusion In the general population of non-elderly adults, almost two-thirds of IPD and half of fatal cases occurred in persons without a recognised PPV23 indication. Policymakers should consider additional prevention strategies such as lowering the age of universal PPV23 vaccination and introducing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate immunisation which could provide substantial health benefits to this population through indirect vaccine effects.

  17. Incidence and risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected individuals before and after the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Larsen, Mette; Ladelund, Steen

    2014-01-01

    with an increased risk of IPD. Detectable viral loads (RR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.79-1.98]) and a relative fall in CD4 T-cell counts were also associated with an increased risk (≥500 to 350-500 CD4 T cells/µL: RR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.21-1.37] and risk of IPD declined over time......BACKGROUND: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is an important cause of morbidity among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We described incidence and risk factors for IPD in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. METHODS: Nationwide population-based cohort study of HIV......-infected adults treated at all Danish HIV treatment centers during 1995-2012. Nineteen population-matched controls per HIV-infected individual were retrieved. The risk of IPD was assessed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: The incidence of IPD was 304.7 cases per 100 000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) in HIV...

  18. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: Potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Bos; H.C. Rüumke (Hans); K. Welte (Karl); L. Spanjaard (Lodewijk); L. van Alphen (Loek); M.J. Postma (Maarten)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the

  19. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jasper M.; Rümke, Hans C.; Welte, Robert; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van Alphen, Loek; Postma, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases occur in

  20. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections - Potential epidemiological and economic impact in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.M.; Rumke, H.C.; Welte, R.; Spanjaard, L.; van Alphen, L.; Postma, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases

  1. Population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults in Toronto.

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    Plevneshi, Agron; Svoboda, Tomislav; Armstrong, Irene; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Miranda, Anna; Green, Karen; Low, Donald; McGeer, Allison

    2009-09-29

    Identification of high-risk populations for serious infection due to S. pneumoniae will permit appropriately targeted prevention programs. We conducted prospective, population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease and laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in homeless adults in Toronto, a Canadian city with a total population of 2.5 M, from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006. We identified 69 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease and 27 cases of laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in an estimated population of 5050 homeless adults. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults was 273 infections per 100,000 persons per year, compared to 9 per 100,000 persons per year in the general adult population. Homeless persons with invasive pneumococcal disease were younger than other adults (median age 46 years vs 67 years, Pdrugs (42% vs 4%, Phomeless than other adults (7/58, 12% vs. 24/943, 2.5%, Phomeless adults, 28 (32%) of pneumococcal isolates were of serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine, 42 (48%) of serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine, and 72 (83%) of serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine. Although no outbreaks of disease were identified in shelters, there was evidence of clustering of serotypes suggestive of transmission of pathogenic strains within the homeless population. Homeless persons are at high risk of serious pneumococcal infection. Vaccination, physical structure changes or other program to reduce transmission in shelters, harm reduction programs to reduce rates of smoking, alcohol abuse and infection with bloodborne pathogens, and improved treatment programs for HIV infection may all be effective in reducing the risk.

  2. Serotype-Specific Changes in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease after Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction: A Pooled Analysis of Multiple Surveillance Sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Kagucia, Eunice W.; Loo, Jennifer D.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Puhan, Milo A.; Cherian, Thomas; Levine, Orin S.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Moore, Matthew R.; Adegbola, Claire A.; Agocs, Mary; Ampofo, Krow; Andrews, Nick; Barton, Theresa; Benito, Javier; Broome, Claire V.; Bruce, Michael G.; Bulkow, Lisa R.; Byington, Carrie L.; Camou, Teresa; Cook, Heather; Cotter, Suzanne; Dagan, Ron; de Wals, Philippe; Deceuninck, Geneviève; Denham, Barbara; Edwards, Giles; Eskola, Juhani; Fitzgerald, Margaret; Galanakis, Emmanouil; Garcia-Gabarrot, Gabriela; Garcia-Garcia, Juan J.; Gene, Amadeu; Gomez, Borja; Heffernan, Helen; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Heuberger, Sigrid; Hilty, Markus; Ingels, Helene; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Kellner, James D.; Klein, Nicola P.; Kormann-Klement, Andrea; Kozakova, Jana; Krause, Vicki; Kriz, Paula; Lambertsen, Lotte; Lepoutre, Agnès; Lipsitch, Marc; Lopez-Vega, Mariana; Lovgren, Marguerite; Maraki, Sofia; Mason, Edward O.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Menzies, Robert; Messina, Allison; Miller, Elizabeth; Mintegi, Santiago; Motlova, Jitka; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Murdoch, David R.; Park, Daniel E.; Reingold, Arthur L.; Sa-Leao, Raquel; Sanyal, Abanti; Smith, Peter G.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Thompson, Richard E.; Thoon, Koh C.; Tyrrell, Gregory J.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; van der Ende, Arie; Vanderkooi, Otto G.; van der Linden, Mark P. G.; Varon, Emmanuelle; Verhaegen, Jan; Vestrheim, Didrik F.; Vickers, Imelda; von Gottberg, Anne; von Kries, Rüdiger; Waight, Pauline; Weatherholtz, Robert; Weiss, Susanne; Yee, Arnold; Zaidi, Anita K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vaccine-serotype (VT) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) rates declined substantially following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into national immunization programs. Increases in non-vaccineserotype (NVT) IPD rates occurred in some sites, presumably

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  10. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  11. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION — IN THE CENTRE OF ATTENTION AGAIN

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    S.V. Sidorenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article present a general review on pneumococcal infection, its prevalence, clinic types in children in Russia and worldwide. Description of S. pneumoniae serotypes' distribution and its influence at clinical manifestation of pneumococcal infection and vaccination effectiveness is provided. Author evaluates perspectives of pneumococcal infection prevention by vaccination with pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine in Russia.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination, pneumococcal conjugated 7 valent vaccine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(3:82-87

  12. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease in Senegal.

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    Ba, I D; Ba, A; Faye, P M; Thiongane, A; Attiyé Kane, M; Sonko, A; Diop, A; Deme Ly, I; Diouf, F N; Ndiaye, O; Leye, M M M; Cissé, M F; Ba, M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the clinical, epidemiological, and outcome characteristics of IPD case patients hospitalized at the Albert-Royer National Children's Hospital (French acronym CHNEAR) to evaluate the disease burden of IPDs in a pediatric hospital of Dakar (Senegal). All children aged 0-15 years hospitalized at the CHNEAR between January 1st, 2008 and December 31st, 2013 for a documented IPD were included in the study. Medical history, risk factors, clinical, bacteriological, and outcome data was collected. Data was then analyzed using the SPSS software, version 16 (Pearson's Chi(2) test: a P-valueSenegal. Infants<2 years of age are particularly affected. The very high case fatality (17%) was significantly associated with meningeal infection sites hence the need for better access to pneumococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults in Toronto.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agron Plevneshi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of high-risk populations for serious infection due to S. pneumoniae will permit appropriately targeted prevention programs. METHODS: We conducted prospective, population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease and laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in homeless adults in Toronto, a Canadian city with a total population of 2.5 M, from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006. RESULTS: We identified 69 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease and 27 cases of laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in an estimated population of 5050 homeless adults. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults was 273 infections per 100,000 persons per year, compared to 9 per 100,000 persons per year in the general adult population. Homeless persons with invasive pneumococcal disease were younger than other adults (median age 46 years vs 67 years, P<.001, and more likely than other adults to be smokers (95% vs. 31%, P<.001, to abuse alcohol (62% vs 15%, P<.001, and to use intravenous drugs (42% vs 4%, P<.001. Relative to age matched controls, they were more likely to have underlying lung disease (12/69, 17% vs 17/272, 6%, P = .006, but not more likely to be HIV infected (17/69, 25% vs 58/282, 21%, P = .73. The proportion of patients with recurrent disease was five fold higher for homeless than other adults (7/58, 12% vs. 24/943, 2.5%, P<.001. In homeless adults, 28 (32% of pneumococcal isolates were of serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine, 42 (48% of serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine, and 72 (83% of serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine. Although no outbreaks of disease were identified in shelters, there was evidence of clustering of serotypes suggestive of transmission of pathogenic strains within the homeless population. CONCLUSIONS: Homeless persons are at high risk of serious pneumococcal infection. Vaccination, physical structure changes

  14. Type I interferon protects against pneumococcal invasive disease by inhibiting bacterial transmigration across the lung.

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    Kim S LeMessurier

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Type I interferon (IFN-I, whose contribution to antiviral and intracellular bacterial immunity is well established, is also elicited during pneumococcal infection, yet its functional significance is not well defined. Here, we show that IFN-I plays an important role in the host defense against pneumococci by counteracting the transmigration of bacteria from the lung to the blood. Mice that lack the type I interferon receptor (Ifnar1 (-/- or mice that were treated with a neutralizing antibody against the type I interferon receptor, exhibited enhanced development of bacteremia following intranasal pneumococcal infection, while maintaining comparable bacterial numbers in the lung. In turn, treatment of mice with IFNβ or IFN-I-inducing synthetic double stranded RNA (poly(I:C, dramatically reduced the development of bacteremia following intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. IFNβ treatment led to upregulation of tight junction proteins and downregulation of the pneumococcal uptake receptor, platelet activating factor receptor (PAF receptor. In accordance with these findings, IFN-I reduced pneumococcal cell invasion and transmigration across epithelial and endothelial layers, and Ifnar1 (-/- mice showed overall enhanced lung permeability. As such, our data identify IFN-I as an important component of the host immune defense that regulates two possible mechanisms involved in pneumococcal invasion, i.e. PAF receptor-mediated transcytosis and tight junction-dependent pericellular migration, ultimately limiting progression from a site-restricted lung infection to invasive, lethal disease.

  15. Pneumococcal Disease: Types of Infection

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    ... World Health Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis Types of Infection Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria, or pneumococcus, can cause many types of illnesses. Some of these illnesses ...

  16. Minimum incidence of adult invasive pneumococcal disease in Blantyre, Malawi an urban african setting: a hospital based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Mtunthama, Neema; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old) population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 53.7, 62.7) per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7) mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5) per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9). We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population level indirect

  17. Minimum incidence of adult invasive pneumococcal disease in Blantyre, Malawi an urban african setting: a hospital based prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naor Bar-Zeev

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI: 53.7, 62.7 per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7 mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5 per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9. We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population

  18. Recurrent Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Serotype 12F in a Vaccinated Splenectomized Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Anne Katrine; Schumacher, Anna Holst; Kantsø, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    This is the first case report of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), specifically, due to serotype 12F. The patient described here was vaccinated with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) due to previous splenectomy, and an anti-pneumococcal IgG test concluded...

  19. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Lambertsen, Lotte; Harboe, Zitta B

    2014-01-01

    %, and 78% of the cases would have been covered by the 7-, 10-, and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, respectively. Conclusions: Of children with an IPD episode, 2.4% experienced rIPD, and an underlying disease was documented in 66% of these children. Investigation of underlying conditions...... laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in children aged 0-15 y were identified from the Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark for the period 1980-2013. rIPD was defined as isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from any normally sterile site ≥ 30 days after an initial...... positive culture. Clinical data were obtained for all children with rIPD. Results: Of all children with IPD, 2.4% (59/2418) experienced at least 1 episode of rIPD, and an underlying condition was documented in 39 (66%). Immune deficiency due to transplantation (n = 9) was the most common disease; however...

  20. Bacterial Invasion of the Inner Ear in Association With Pneumococcal Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the pathways of bacterial invasion and subsequent spreading in the inner ear during pneumococcal meningitis. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was used. METHODS: Thirty rats were inoculated intrathecally with S. pneumoniae...... spreading were found within the inner ear. Bacterial elimination was evidenced by engulfment by macrophages within the inner ear. CONCLUSION: From the meninges, pneumococci invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct during the first days of infection, whereas hematogenous invasion via the spiral...

  1. Estimated effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease and associated mortality, Denmark 2000-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Benfield, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide an estimation of the direct and indirect benefits of pneumococcal vaccination with three protein-conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (PCV) we described the epidemiology and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Denmark between 2000 and 2005. Approximately 1080 cases......% to 91% depending on the PCV used. The mean mortality proportion after IPD was 18%, with approximately 190 deaths annually. One to two deaths among children younger than 5 years and approximately 50 deaths related to IPD caused by vaccine serotypes among older age groups could be prevented annually...

  2. Recurrent severe invasive pneumococcal disease in an adult with previously unknown hyposplenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe C; Schejbel, Lone; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of life-threatening and invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria is increased in patients with hyposplenia or asplenia. We report a case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal meningitis in a woman with previous unknown hyposplenia. She was vaccinated after the first episode...... was found. Despite immunization against S. pneumoniae and measurement of what was interpreted as protective levels of serotype-specific IgG antibodies after vaccination, the patient suffered from a third episode of IPD. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with predisposing medical conditions or a history of severe...... infections with encapsulated bacteria should be screened for spleen dysfunction. If splenic function is impaired, prevention against severe invasive infection with encapsulated bacteria are a major priority....

  3. Immunogenicity of a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and impact on carriage in Venezuelan children at risk of invasive pneumococcal diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera-Olivero, I.A.; Nogal, B. del; Fuentes, M.; Cortez, R.; Bogaert, D.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Waard, J.H. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We evaluated the immunogenicity of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), and its impact on pneumococcal carriage in Venezuelan children at high risk for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). METHODS: 82 children (age 2-59 months) with sickle cell anemia (n=22),

  4. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  5. Clinical and bacteriological characteristics of invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine implementation in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Regis Leite

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease is a relevant public health problem in Brazil, especially among children and the elderly. In July/2010 a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was introduced to the immunization schedule of Brazilian children under two years of age. Between July/2010 and December/2013 we conducted a case-series study on invasive pneumococcal disease in Salvador, Brazil to describe the clinical and bacteriological profile of invasive pneumococcal disease cases during the post-implementation period. Eighty-two cases were eligible. Mean age was 31 years (interquartile range, 3–42; 17.1% and 30.5% were under 2 years and 5 years, respectively. Pneumococcal meningitis (n = 64, 78.1%, bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (n = 12, 14.6% and bacteraemia (n = 6, 7.3% were the clinical syndromes identified. Thirty-three different serotypes were found. Of these, serotype 14 (n = 12, 14.6% was the most common, followed by 23F (n = 10, 12.2%, 12F (n = 8, 9.8%, 18 C (n = 5, 6.1% and 6B (n = 5, 6.1%. Investigations conducted in Salvador in the pre-vaccine period did not identify serotype 12F as one of the most prevalent serotypes. Increase of serotype 12F was observed in different regions of Brazil, in the post-vaccine period. Among children under two years of age, the target group for 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, 11 (78.6% of the 14 isolated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae belonged to vaccine serotypes; at least 50% of these children were not vaccinated. The relatively recent implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Brazil reinforces the need to maintain an active surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease cases, considering the possible increase of invasive pneumococcal disease cases related to non-vaccine serotypes and the changes on the clinical presentation of the disease.

  6. [Pneumococcal invasive disease in newborns before and after 7-valent and 13-valent universal pneumococcal vaccination in Uruguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assandri, Elizabeth; Amorín, Belén; Gesuele, Juan P; Algorta, Gabriela; Pírez, María Catalina

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are not frequent in neonates, but presents high morbidity and mortality. In 2008, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced in the childhood vaccination schedule and then replaced by 13-valent PCV in 2010. First dose is given at 2 months of age. Protection of neonates is expected with universal vaccination. To describe the clinical presentation, microbiology and outcome of neonates with pneumococcal invasive infections (PII) detected in two hospitals in Uruguay in 2001-2007 (pre-vaccination), 2008 (intervention) and 2009-2013 (post-vaccination). A descriptive, retrospective study was done at Pereira Rossell Hospital and Paysandú Hospital. All isolates of S. pneumoniae obtained from normally sterile fluids were included. Data were obtained from the clinical records and the microbiology laboratory. A statistical analysis with absolute frequencies, relative, rates and relative risk was performed. 25 neonates were enrolled with diagnosis of: sepsis (n = 13), meningitis (n = 9), bacteremia (n = 1), pneumonia with empyema (n = 1) and pneumonia (n = 1). The incidence of PII in the prevaccination period was 19/25, with a rate of 0.30/1,000 births, compared to post-vaccination rate of 0.04/1,000. The relative risk was 5.9. 6/20 (30%) cases of death were reported (meningitis n = 3; sepsis n = 2; empyema n = 1). Most common serotypes were 5 and 1 (14/25) and 24/25 strains were susceptible to penicillin. The symptoms were indistinguishable to infections caused by other pathogens. PII cases decreased and no deaths occurred in the post-vaccination period. No increase in non-vaccine serotypes was observed.

  7. Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Netherlands : Syndromes, outcome and potential vaccine benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G. S. C.; Rodenburg, Gerwin D.; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Hak, Eelko; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Schouls, Leo M.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Ende, Arie

    2009-01-01

    With a retrospective study of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance data representative for similar to 25% of the Dutch population (1275 hospitalized cases) over the period June 2004-June 2006 prior to the implementation of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), the aim was

  8. Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Netherlands: Syndromes, outcome and potential vaccine benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G. S. C.; Rodenburg, Gerwin D.; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Hak, Eelko; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Schouls, Leo M.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Ende, Arie

    2009-01-01

    With a retrospective study of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance data representative for approximately 25% of the Dutch population (1275 hospitalized cases) over the period June 2004-June 2006 prior to the implementation of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), the aim

  9. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children: underlying clinical conditions, and immunological and microbiological characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Alsina

    Full Text Available Clinical, immunological and microbiological characteristics of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in children were evaluated, differentiating relapse from reinfection, in order to identify specific risk factors for both conditions.All patients <18 years-old with recurrent IPD admitted to a tertiary-care pediatric center from January 2004 to December 2011 were evaluated. An episode of IPD was defined as the presence of clinical findings of infection together with isolation and/or pneumococcal DNA detection by Real-Time PCR in any sterile body fluid. Recurrent IPD was defined as 2 or more episodes in the same individual at least 1 month apart. Among recurrent IPD, we differentiated relapse (same pneumococcal isolate from reinfection.593 patients were diagnosed with IPD and 10 patients died. Among survivors, 23 episodes of recurrent IPD were identified in 10 patients (1.7%. Meningitis was the most frequent form of recurrent IPD (10 episodes/4 children followed by recurrent empyema (8 episodes/4 children. Three patients with recurrent empyema caused by the same pneumococcal clone ST306 were considered relapses and showed high bacterial load in their first episode. In contrast, all other episodes of recurrent IPD were considered reinfections. Overall, the rate of relapse of IPD was 0.5% and the rate of reinfection 1.2%. Five out of 7 patients with reinfection had an underlying risk factor: cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 3, chemotherapy treatment (n = 1 and a homozygous mutation in MyD88 gene (n = 1. No predisposing risk factors were found in the remainder.recurrent IPD in children is a rare condition associated with an identifiable risk factor in case of reinfection in almost 80% of cases. In contrast, recurrent IPD with pleuropneumonia is usually a relapse of infection.

  10. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde N; Kristensen, Tim D; Kaltoft, Margit S

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to document the epidemiology, microbiology and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children vaccine (PCV7) into the Danish routine...... children vaccination....... immunization programme October 2007. Methods: Clinical and microbiological records on cases of IPD in children children

  11. Immunodeficiency among children with recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Schejbel, Lone; Lundstedt, A C

    2015-01-01

    examined. RESULTS: In total, rIPD were observed in 54 children (68 cases of rIPD of 2192 IPD cases). Children with classical risk factors for IPD were excluded, and among the remaining 22 children, 15 were eligible for analysis. Of these 6 (40%) were complement C2-deficient. Impaired vaccination response......BACKGROUND: Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (rIPD) occurs mostly in children with an underlying disease, but some cases remain unexplained. Immunodeficiency has been described in children with rIPD, but the prevalence is unknown. We used a nationwide registry of all laboratory......-confirmed cases of rIPD to identify cases of unexplained rIPD and examine them for immunodeficiency. METHODS: Cases of rIPD in children 0-15 years of age from 1980 to 2008 were identified. Children without an obvious underlying disease were screened for complement function, T-cell, B-cell, natural killer...

  12. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of unusual manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Adrian; Pérez-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa; Nodar, Andrés; Martínez-Lamas, Lucía; Vasallo, Francisco Jose; Álvarez-Fernández, Maximiliano; Crespo, Manuel

    2017-06-22

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically presents as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia. However, Streptococcus pneumoniae can produce infection at any level of the body (endocarditis, arthritis, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc.), which is also known as unusual IPD (uIPD). There are very limited data available about the clinical and microbiological profile of these uncommon manifestations of pneumococcal disease. Our aim was to analyse clinical forms, microbiological profile, epidemiology and prognosis of a cohort of patients with unusual invasive pneumococcal disease (uIPD). We present a retrospective study of 389 patients (all adult and paediatric patients diagnosed during the period) diagnosed with IPD at our hospital (Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo) between 1992 and 2014. We performed an analysis of clinical, microbiological and demographical characteristics of patients comparing the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) period with the post-vaccination phase. IPD and uIPD were defined as follows; IPD: infection confirmed by the isolation of S. pneumoniae from a normally sterile site, which classically presented as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia; uIPD: any case of IPD excluding pneumonia, meningitis, otitis media, rhinosinusitis or primary bacteraemia. A total of 22 patients (6%) met the criteria of uIPD. A Charlson index >2 was more prevalent in uIPD patients than IPD patients (45% vs 24%; p=0.08). The most common clinical presentation of uIPD was osteoarticular infection (8 patients, 36%), followed by gastrointestinal disease (4 patients, 18%). Infection with serotypes included in PCV-13 was significantly higher in IPD patients (65%) than in patients with uIPD, 35% (p=0.018). Conversely, infection with multidrug-resistant strains was higher among patient with uIPD (27% vs 9%; p=0.014). The all-cause mortality rate was 15%, 13% in the IPD group and 32% among patients with uIPD (p=0

  13. Dynamic models of pneumococcal carriage and the impact of the Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmunds W John

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has been introduced in national immunisation programmes of most industrialised countries and recently in two African GAVI eligible countries (Rwanda and The Gambia. However the long term effects of PCV are still unclear, as beneficial direct and herd immunity effects might be countered by serotype replacement. Method A dynamic, age-structured, compartmental model of Streptococcus pneumoniae transmission was developed to predict the potential impact of PCV7 on the incidence of invasive disease accounting for both herd immunity and serotype replacement effects. The model was parameterised using epidemiological data from England and Wales and pre and post-vaccination surveillance data from the US. Results Model projections showed that serotype replacement plays a crucial role in determining the overall effect of a PCV7 vaccination programme and could reduce, negate or outweigh its beneficial impact. However, using the estimate of the competition parameter derived from the US post-vaccination experience, an infant vaccination programme would prevent 39,000 IPD cases in the 20 years after PCV7 introduction in the UK. Adding a catch-up campaign for under 2 or under 5 year olds would provide a further reduction of 1,200 or 3,300 IPD cases respectively, mostly in the first few years of the programme. Conclusions This analysis suggests that a PCV vaccination programme would eradicate vaccine serotypes from circulation. However, the increase in carriage of non-vaccine serotypes, and the consequent increase in invasive disease, could reduce, negate or outweigh the benefit. These results are sensitive to changes in the protective effect of the vaccine, and, most importantly, to the level of competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types. The techniques developed here can be used to assess the introduction of vaccination programmes in developing countries and provide the basis for cost

  14. Estimated effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease and associated mortality, Denmark 2000-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Z.B.; Valentiner-Branth, P.; Benfield, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide an estimation of the direct and indirect benefits of pneumococcal vaccination with three protein-conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (PCV) we described the epidemiology and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Denmark between 2000 and 2005. Approximately 1080 cases......% to 91% depending on the PCV used. The mean mortality proportion after IPD was 18%, with approximately 190 deaths annually. One to two deaths among children younger than 5 years and approximately 50 deaths related to IPD caused by vaccine serotypes among older age groups could be prevented annually...... were registered annually during the period. The overall incidence of IPD increased significantly, from 15.4 cases per 100,000 population in 2000 to 20.7 cases per 100,000 in 2005 (pcases. The serotype coverage in children under 5 years varied from 64...

  15. Estimated effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease and associated mortality, Denmark 2000-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Z.B.; Valentiner-Branth, P.; Benfield, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    % to 91% depending on the PCV used. The mean mortality proportion after IPD was 18%, with approximately 190 deaths annually. One to two deaths among children younger than 5 years and approximately 50 deaths related to IPD caused by vaccine serotypes among older age groups could be prevented annually......In order to provide an estimation of the direct and indirect benefits of pneumococcal vaccination with three protein-conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (PCV) we described the epidemiology and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Denmark between 2000 and 2005. Approximately 1080 cases...... were registered annually during the period. The overall incidence of IPD increased significantly, from 15.4 cases per 100,000 population in 2000 to 20.7 cases per 100,000 in 2005 (pchildren under 5 years varied from 64...

  16. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quesne Gilles

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case.

  17. Mathematical modelling long-term effects of replacing Prevnar7 with Prevnar13 on invasive pneumococcal diseases in England and Wales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hong Choi

    Full Text Available England and Wales recently replaced the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 with its 13-valent equivalent (PCV13, partly based on projections from mathematical models of the long-term impact of such a switch compared to ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether.A compartmental deterministic model was used to estimate parameters governing transmission of infection and competition between different groups of pneumococcal serotypes prior to the introduction of PCV13. The best-fitting parameters were used in an individual based model to describe pneumococcal transmission dynamics and effects of various options for the vaccination programme change in England and Wales. A number of scenarios were conducted using (i different assumptions about the number of invasive pneumococcal disease cases adjusted for the increasing trend in disease incidence prior to PCV7 introduction in England and Wales, and (ii a range of values representing serotype replacement induced by vaccination of the additional six serotypes in PCV13.Most of the scenarios considered suggest that ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use would cause an increase in invasive pneumococcal disease incidence, while replacing PCV7 with PCV13 would cause an overall decrease. However, the size of this reduction largely depends on the level of competition induced by the additional serotypes in PCV13. The model estimates that over 20 years of PCV13 vaccination, around 5000-62000 IPD cases could be prevented compared to stopping pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether.Despite inevitable uncertainty around serotype replacement effects following introduction of PCV13, the model suggests a reduction in overall invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in all cases. Our results provide useful evidence on the benefits of PCV13 to countries replacing or considering replacing PCV7 with PCV13, as well as data that can be used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of such a switch.

  18. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION: MODERN VIEW ON THE ISSUE AND PREVENTION

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    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococci are spread everywhere and they are very often a component of the microflora of the upper respiratory tracts. The level of the pneumococcus carriage is correlated with age. Among children the highest frequency is observed at the age of 4,5 years (up to 90% of cases, among adults it is 5–10%. According to international and Russian data, pneumococcal infection causes up to 76% of all the aetiologically deciphered cases of community cacquired pneumonia among adults and up to 94% (aggravated cases among children. The most frequent clinical forms of pneumococcal infection among children are acute otitis media (over 30%, pneumonia and meningitis (about 5–20% of all purulent bacterial meningitis, among adults — meningitis and sepsis. In 1998, in Russia was registered the first and still the only vaccine for the prevention of pneumococcal infection — Pneumo 23 (Sanofi Pasteur. The vaccine consists of 23 antic gens of the most dangerous pneumococcus serotypes and is used for the prevention of all the forms of pneumococcal infection. The composition of Pneumo 23 corresponds to 85% of pneumococcus serotypes circulating across Europe and to 90% serotypes resistant to penicillin. According to Russian data Pneumo 23 consists of about 80% of pneumococcus serotypes isolated in healthy carriers and ill with acute respiratory diseases and of 92% of serotypes in those suffering from acute bronchitis and pneumonia. The results of the clinical studies allow us to recommend the use of the given vaccine in a complex therapy of children, suffering from latent TB infection, often recurrent episodes of bronchopulmonary pathologies, ENT diseases, bronchial asthma and other chronic diseases.Key words: therapy, pediatrics, pneumonia, bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive lungs disease, prevention, treatment, pneumococcal infection.

  19. Invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with haematological malignancies before routine use of conjugate vaccines in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Vesa; Aittoniemi, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Klemets, Peter; Ollgren, Jukka; Silvennoinen, Raija; Nuorti, J Pekka; Sinisalo, Marjatta

    2016-01-01

    The baseline national invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence rate, serotype distribution and serotype coverage of pneumococcal vaccines were evaluated in patients with Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, myeloma and leukaemia within 1 year after haematological diagnosis during 1995-2002, before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Pneumococcal serotype distribution among these patients was different from serotypes causing IPD in the general population. The serotype coverages of PCV13 and PPSV23 were 57% and 64%, respectively, lower than in the general population. This reflects a higher predisposition to IPD in vaccinated patients with haematological malignancies and possibly less benefit of herd immunity gained with the wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in the general population. This data will be useful as a baseline for determining the future role of adult PCV vaccination in these patient groups.

  20. Genetic diversity of pneumococcal surface protein A in invasive pneumococcal isolates from Korean children, 1991-2016.

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    Ki Wook Yun

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is an important virulence factor of pneumococci and has been investigated as a primary component of a capsular serotype-independent pneumococcal vaccine. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic diversity of PspA to explore its potential as a vaccine candidate. Among the 190 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected from Korean children between 1991 and 2016, two (1.1% isolates were found to have no pspA by multiple polymerase chain reactions. The full length pspA genes from 185 pneumococcal isolates were sequenced. The length of pspA varied, ranging from 1,719 to 2,301 base pairs with 55.7-100% nucleotide identity. Based on the sequences of the clade-defining regions, 68.7% and 49.7% were in PspA family 2 and clade 3/family 2, respectively. PspA clade types were correlated with genotypes using multilocus sequence typing and divided into several subclades based on diversity analysis of the N-terminal α-helical regions, which showed nucleotide sequence identities of 45.7-100% and amino acid sequence identities of 23.1-100%. Putative antigenicity plots were also diverse among individual clades and subclades. The differences in antigenicity patterns were concentrated within the N-terminal 120 amino acids. In conclusion, the N-terminal α-helical domain, which is known to be the major immunogenic portion of PspA, is genetically variable and should be further evaluated for antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between various PspA types from pneumococcal isolates.

  1. Genetic diversity of pneumococcal surface protein A in invasive pneumococcal isolates from Korean children, 1991-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ki Wook; Choi, Eun Hwa; Lee, Hoan Jong

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is an important virulence factor of pneumococci and has been investigated as a primary component of a capsular serotype-independent pneumococcal vaccine. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic diversity of PspA to explore its potential as a vaccine candidate. Among the 190 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected from Korean children between 1991 and 2016, two (1.1%) isolates were found to have no pspA by multiple polymerase chain reactions. The full length pspA genes from 185 pneumococcal isolates were sequenced. The length of pspA varied, ranging from 1,719 to 2,301 base pairs with 55.7-100% nucleotide identity. Based on the sequences of the clade-defining regions, 68.7% and 49.7% were in PspA family 2 and clade 3/family 2, respectively. PspA clade types were correlated with genotypes using multilocus sequence typing and divided into several subclades based on diversity analysis of the N-terminal α-helical regions, which showed nucleotide sequence identities of 45.7-100% and amino acid sequence identities of 23.1-100%. Putative antigenicity plots were also diverse among individual clades and subclades. The differences in antigenicity patterns were concentrated within the N-terminal 120 amino acids. In conclusion, the N-terminal α-helical domain, which is known to be the major immunogenic portion of PspA, is genetically variable and should be further evaluated for antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between various PspA types from pneumococcal isolates.

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Are at Increased Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Simonsen, Jacob; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic diseases characterized by an inappropriate immune response, which may also increase the risk of infections. We investigated the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) before and after...... to a constant level, which for CD was significantly increased (approximately twofold, HR, 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.59-2.49) and for UC non-significantly just above 1. IBD medication use including tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists had limited impact on the risk of IPD, although having ever...... the risk according to ever use of specific IBD medications. Next, using conditional logistic regression, we evaluated the odds of IPD prior to IBD diagnosis. RESULTS: The HRs for IPD within the first 6 months after IBD diagnosis were significantly and more than threefold increased and then decreased...

  3. Invasive pneumococcal disease and the potential for prevention by vaccination in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, H K; Metcalf, S C; Tomlin, K; Read, R C; Dockrell, D H

    2007-05-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is associated with a high mortality despite antimicrobial therapy, but may be preventable by pneumococcal vaccination. The extent of previous exposure to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccination prior to an episode of IPD in hospitalised adults in the United Kingdom is unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in adults with IPD admitted to either of two teaching hospitals in Sheffield, United Kingdom during 1992-2000. Receipt of pneumococcal vaccination, risk factors for IPD, death and disability were determined. The number of cases of IPD was 552 and 187/230 patient records from one site were reviewed. According to UK pneumococcal vaccination guidelines 59% of patients should have received the vaccine and 76% of patients if updated guidelines, which include age>65 years as an indication, are applied. In patients with known risk factors, excluding age, only 8% had been vaccinated. The mortality from IPD was 21% and an additional 6% suffered major complications. In patients hospitalised with IPD there is a high rate of pre-existing risk factors and a low rate of administration of pneumococcal vaccination. IPD incurs significant mortality, morbidity and economic cost and there is potential for reducing this by improved uptake of pneumococcal vaccination.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-2 childhood meningitis in Bangladesh: a newly recognized pneumococcal infection threat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir K Saha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of meningitis in countries where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV targeting commonly occurring serotypes are not routinely used. However, effectiveness of PCV would be jeopardized by emergence of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD caused by serotypes which are not included in PCV. Systematic hospital based surveillance in Bangladesh was established and progressively improved to determine the pathogens causing childhood sepsis and meningitis. This also provided the foundation for determining the spectrum of serotypes causing IPD. This article reports an unprecedented upsurge of serotype 2, an uncommon pneumococcal serotype, without any known intervention. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cases with suspected IPD had blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF collected from the beginning of 2001 till 2009. Pneumococcal serotypes were determined by capsular swelling of isolates or PCR of culture-negative CSF specimens. Multicenter national surveillance, expanded from 2004, identified 45,437 patients with suspected bacteremia who were blood cultured and 10,618 suspected meningitis cases who had a lumber puncture. Pneumococcus accounted for 230 culture positive cases of meningitis in children <5 years. Serotype-2 was the leading cause of pneumococcal meningitis, accounting for 20.4% (45/221; 95% CI 15%-26% of cases. Ninety eight percent (45/46 of these serotype-2 strains were isolated from meningitis cases, yielding the highest serotype-specific odds ratio for meningitis (29.6; 95% CI 3.4-256.3. The serotype-2 strains had three closely related pulsed field gel electrophoresis types. CONCLUSIONS: S. pneumoniae serotype-2 was found to possess an unusually high potential for causing meningitis and was the leading serotype-specific cause of childhood meningitis in Bangladesh over the past decade. Persisting disease occurrence or progressive spread would represent a major potential infection threat since serotype-2

  5. SHOULD WE PROTECT THE CHILDREN AGAINST PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by streptococcus are a serious issue for the health care worldwide mostly due to wide spread, high lethal risk in the event of the severe run, increasing resistance of pneumococcus to antibacterial therapy, troubles with high efficiency of vaccines as pertaining to the special structure of the pathogen. Every year 1,6 mln people die of the diseases caused by pneumococcus worldwide, 50-70% of whom are children under 5 years. The highest morbidity falls onto the infants under 2 and younger and the elderly people. HIV infection and other immunodeficiency states increase the chance to get infected with pneumococcus caused diseases. There is a wide variety of pneumococci (about 90 serotypes which have different degrees of virulence and pathogenesis. It is evident that on the one hand vaccines offered for the struggle against this dangerous infection should protect against the most widely spread and harmful serotypes and on the other hand should have a high degree of efficiency and safety for the one to be vaccinated. Today healthcare services make use of 7-valent conjugate polysaccharide-baleuronic vaccine (PCVB7 and nonconjugate polysaccharide vaccine against 23 serotypes. 23-valent vaccines are designed for the adolescent and elderly people, yet it is not licensed for the application among patients aged under2 who are the primary target group for the vaccination. PCVB7 incorporated serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal diseases among children in 60-85% of cases. The vaccine is well tolerated and deemed to be safe. It forms an express immune response (cellular, humoral, mucosal and also reduces the nasopharyngeal bacteria carrying. This vaccine is highly immunogenic across all the age groups yet it is not licensed for the application among children under 5, including infants (under 12 months. Acknowledging high importance of diseases caused by pneumococci among infants, high efficiency and safety of PCVB7 in the given age group who

  6. PROPHYLAXIS OF PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN HAS POSITIVE EFFECT ON ALL POPULATION

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    M.V. Fedoseenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern data of effectiveness prophylaxis of pneumococcal infection in children younger 1 year old with vaccine is presented in this article. Including of 7 - valency pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV-7 in immunization program of some countries resulted in decrease of morbidity as in vaccinated group, as in all population. It was marked that vaccination with PCV-7 plays important pathogenetic role in termination of hidden forms of disease and prevention of spreading of pneumococcal infection, including the most severe types, hardly treated with antibiotics.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination.

  7. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Incidence and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Dalby, Tine; Weinberger, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    or expected as a part of natural, cyclical variations. METHODS: This was a Danish nationwide population-based cohort study based on the linkage of laboratory surveillance data and the Danish Civil Registration System. Changes in IPD incidence and mortality during baseline (2000-2007), 7-valent pneumococcal...... from natural cyclical patterns. Serotype 19A significantly increased following PCV7's introduction, but the incidence declined toward baseline in 2012. CONCLUSIONS: PCV13 has brought greater benefits than we had expected in our setting. We observed a further decline on IPD incidence shortly after...... the shift from PCV7 to PCV13 in the national immunization program. This decline was accompanied by a substantial population-level decline in pneumococcal-related mortality of nearly 30% among nonvaccinated persons....

  8. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonian elderly people, 2002-2009: serotype coverage for different anti-pneumococcal vaccine formulations at the beginning of the new conjugate vaccines era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Corcoles, Angel; Ochoa-Gondar, Olga; Gomez-Bertomeu, Frederic; Raga-Luria, Xavier

    2011-10-06

    Population-based surveillance study conducted among persons 65 years or older from the region of Tarragona (Southern Catalonia, Spain) during 2002-2009. All cases with isolation of pneumococcus from normally sterile bodily fluids were included. Incidence rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and prevalence of infections caused by serotypes included in different pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) and the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) were calculated. Overall, 176 IPD cases were observed, which means an incidence of 48 episodes per 100,000 person-year throughout the study period. The most dominant serotypes were 7F (10.1%), 14 (9.4%), 19A (9.4%), 3 (8.6%), 6A (7.9%) and 1 (7.2%). IPD cases due to PCV-7 types (from 37.2% to 14.6%; p=0.003) and PCV-10 types (from 60.5% to 32.3%; p=0.002) considerably decreased between 2002-2005 and 2006-2009 periods. Percentage of cases due to PCV-13 types (76.7% vs 62.5%; p=0.099) and PPV-23 types (81.4% vs 68.8%; p=0.122) did not significantly change between both periods. As main conclusion, in our setting, the PCV-13 has almost similar serotype coverage to the PPV-23 in preventing IPD among the elderly population, which suggests a possible future use of the conjugate vaccine in all age groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Protects Mice Against Lethal Postinfluenza Pneumococcal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kazuma; Ishii, Makoto; Namkoong, Ho; Fujii, Hideki; Asami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Shoji; Asakura, Takanori; Mizoguchi, Kosuke; Kamo, Tetsuro; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Iwata, Satoshi; Kunkel, Steven L; Hasegawa, Naoki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia following influenza virus infection is associated with high mortality, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Epigenetic gene regulation appears to play key roles in innate and adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that histone acetylation, a major epigenetic mechanism associated with transcriptionally active chromatin, might contribute to the poor outcome of postinfluenza pneumonia. Prospective experimental study. University research laboratory. C57BL/6 male mice. Mice were infected intranasally with 1.0 × 10 colony-forming units of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 7 days after intranasal inoculation with five plaque-forming units of influenza virus A/H1N1/PR8/34. The mice were intraperitoneally injected with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (1 mg/kg) or vehicle once a day from 1 hour after pneumococcal infection throughout the course of the experiment. The primary outcome was survival rate. Trichostatin A significantly suppressed histone deacetylase activity and significantly improved the survival rate of mice (56.3%) after postinfluenza pneumococcal infection when compared with vehicle-treated mice (20.0%), which was associated with a significant decrease in the total cell count of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The interleukin-1β level in the serum and the number of natural killer cells in the lungs were significantly lower in the trichostatin A-treated group. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A protects mice against postinfluenza pneumonia possibly through multiple factors, including decreasing local cell recruitment into the lungs and suppressing systemic inflammation.

  10. Characterization of Pneumococcal Genes Involved in Bloodstream Invasion in a Mouse Model.

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    Layla K Mahdi

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, as well as less serious infections such as sinusitis, conjunctivitis and otitis media. Current polysaccharide vaccines are strictly serotype-specific and also drive the emergence of non-vaccine serotype strains. In this study, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns of either serotype 4 or serotype 6A pneumococci in the nasopharynx and blood of mice, as a model to identify genes involved in invasion of blood in the context of occult bacteremia in humans. In this manner, we identified 26 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the nasopharynx and 36 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the blood that were common to both strains. Gene Ontology classification revealed that transporter and DNA binding (transcription factor activities constitute the significantly different molecular functional categories for genes up-regulated in the nasopharynx and blood. Targeted mutagenesis of selected genes from both niches and subsequent virulence and pathogenesis studies identified the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA as most likely to be essential for colonization, and the cell wall-associated serine protease (PrtA as important for invasion of blood. This work extends our previous analyses and suggests that both PrtA and SodA warrant examination in future studies aimed at prevention and/or control of pneumococcal disease.

  11. A reflection on invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal conjugate vaccination coverage in children in Southern Europe (2009-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Marta; Castro, Olga; Palmieri, Melissa; Efklidou, Sofia; Castagna, Stefano; Hoet, Bernard

    2017-06-03

    Higher-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) were licensed from 2009 in Europe; similar worldwide clinical effectiveness was observed for PCVs in routine use. Despite a proven medical need, PCV vaccination in Southern Europe remained suboptimal until 2015/16. We searched PubMed for manuscripts published between 2009 and mid-2016. Included manuscripts had to contain data about invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence, or vaccination coverage with higher-valent PCVs. This review represents the first analysis of vaccination coverage and impact of higher-valent PCVs on overall IPD in Southern European countries (Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece, Cyprus). Vaccination coverage in the Portuguese private market peaked around 2008 at 75% (children ≤ 2 years) but declined to 63% in 2012. In Madrid, coverage was 95% (2007-2012) but dropped to 67% (2013/14; children ≤ 2 years) after funding termination in May 2012. PCVs were recently introduced in the national immunisation program (NIP) of Portugal (2015) and Spain (2015/16). In Italy, coverage for the complete PCV schedule (children ≤ 2 years) was 88% in 2013, although highly variable between regions (45-99%). In Greece, in 2013, 82.3% had received 3 PCV doses by 12 months, while 62.3% received the fourth dose by 24 months. Overall IPD (net benefit: effect on vaccine types, vaccine-related types, and non-vaccine types) has decreased; in Greece, pneumococcal meningitis incidence remained stable. Continued IPD surveillance or national registers using ICD-10 codes of clinically suspected IPD are necessary, with timely publicly available reports and adequate national vaccination registers to assess trends in vaccination coverage, allowing evaluation of PCVs in NIPs.

  12. Early effectiveness of heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease after the introduction in the Danish Childhood Immunization Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Benfield, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) 1 year after PCV7's introduction in the childhood immunization programme through a nationwide cohort study based on laboratory surveillance data. There was a decline...... in the overall incidence of IPD from 19.4 to 17.1 cases per 100,000 population (incidence rate ratios (IRR) 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.81-0.96]), and of meningitis from 1.56 to 1.16 (IRR 0.74; 95% CI [0.57-0.97]) comparing pre-PCV7 (years 2000-2007) and PCV7 (year 2008) periods. In children ..., the incidence decreased from 54 to 23 cases per 100,000 (IRR 0.43; 95% CI [0.29-0.62]) and for vaccine-serotypes from 36.7 to 7.7 (IRR 0.20; 95% CI [0.09-0.38]). The incidence of IPD declined approximately 10% (IRR 0.90; 95% CI [0.84-0.97]) in patients aged >or=2 years. The case fatality was 17% in both periods...

  13. Effects of Infant Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination on Serotype Distribution in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease among Children and Adults in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Mark; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Perniciaro, Stephanie; Imöhl, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the effects of the introduction of universal infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in 2006 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children and adults in Germany with a focus on the dynamics of serotype distribution in vaccinated and non-vaccinated age groups. Over a period of 22 years (1992-2014), microbiological diagnostic laboratories from all over Germany have been sending isolates of IPD cases to the German National Reference Center for Streptococci on a voluntary basis. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were serotyped using Neufeld's Quellung method. Among children vaccination (1997-2006) to 23.5% in the early vaccination period (2007-2010; p = 1.30E-72) and sank further to 5.2% in the late vaccination period (2010-2014; p = 4.59E-25). Similar reductions were seen for the separate age groups vaccination period (1992-2006) to 24.7% (p = 3.78E-88) in the early vaccination period and 8.2% (p = 5.97E-161) in the late vaccination period. Both among children and among adults, the non-PCV7 serotypes 1, 3, 7F and 19A significantly increased in the early vaccination period. After the switch from PCV7 to PVC10/PCV13 for infant vaccination in 2010, serotypes 1, 6A and 7F significantly decreased. A decrease in serotype 19A was only observed in 2013-2014, as compared to 2010-2011 (children p = 4.16E-04, adults p = 6.98E-06). Among adults, serotype 3, which strongly increased in the early vaccination period (p = 4.44E-15), remained at a constant proportion in the late vaccination period. The proportion of non-PCV13 vaccine serotypes increased over the whole vaccination period, with serotypes 10A, 12F, 23B, 24F and 38 most significantly increasing among children and serotypes 6C, 12F, 15A, 22F and 23B increasing among adults. Eight years of childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination have had a strong effect on the pneumococcal population in Germany, both among the target group for vaccination as well as among older children and adults.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance among isolates causing invasive pneumococcal disease before and after licensure of heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Theodore Karnezis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7 on antibiotic resistance among pneumococcal strains causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has varied in different locales in the United States. We assessed trends in IPD including trends for IPD caused by penicillin non-susceptible strains before and after licensure of PCV-7 and the impact of the 2008 susceptibility breakpoints for penicillin on the epidemiology of resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a retrospective review of IPD cases at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York-Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center. Subjects were < or = 18 years of age with Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from sterile body sites from January 1995-December 2006. The rate of IPD from 1995-1999 versus 2002-2006 significantly decreased from 4.1 (CI(95 3.4, 4.8 to 1.7 (CI(95 1.3, 2.2 per 1,000 admissions. Using the breakpoints in place during the study period, the proportion of penicillin non-susceptible strains increased from 27% to 49% in the pre- vs. post-PCV-7 era, respectively (p = 0.001, although the rate of IPD caused by non-susceptible strains did not change from 1995-1999 (1.1 per 1,000 admissions, CI(95 0.8, 1.5 when compared with 2002-2006 (0.8 per 1,000 admissions, CI(95 0.6, 1.2. In the multivariate logistic regression model controlling for the effects of age, strains causing IPD in the post-PCV-7 era were significantly more likely to be penicillin non-susceptible compared with strains in the pre-PCV-7 era (OR 2.46, CI(95 1.37, 4.40. However, using the 2008 breakpoints for penicillin, only 8% of strains were non-susceptible in the post-PCV-7 era. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To date, there are few reports that document an increase in the relative proportion of penicillin non-susceptible strains of pneumococci causing IPD following the introduction of PCV-7. Active surveillance of pneumococcal serotypes and antibiotic resistance using the new

  15. Molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal carriage among children with upper respiratory tract infections in Hanoi, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bogaert (Debby); N.T. Ha; M. Sluijter (Marcel); N. Lemmens; R. de Groot (Ronald); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo investigate the molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage in Hanoi, Vietnam, we studied 84 pneumococcal strains retrieved from children with upper respiratory tract infections. Serotypes 23F (32%), 19F (21%), 6B (13%), and 14 (10%) were found

  16. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Still Lots to Learn and a Need for Standardized Data Collection Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Marrie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Large studies of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD are frequently lacking detailed clinical information. Methods. A population-based 15-year study of IPD in Northern Alberta. Results. 2435 patients with a mean age of 54.2 years formed the study group. Males outnumbered females and Aboriginal and homeless persons were overrepresented. High rates of smoking, excessive alcohol use, and illicit drug use were seen. Almost all (87% had a major comorbidity and 15% had functional limitations prior to admission. Bacteremia, pneumonia, and meningitis were the most common major manifestations of IPD. Almost half of the patients had alteration of mental status at the time of admission and 22% required mechanical ventilation. Myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and new onset stroke occurred in 1.7, 1.3, and 1.1% of the patients, respectively; of those who had echocardiograms, 35% had impaired ventricular function. The overall in-hospital mortality was 15.6%. Conclusions. IPD remains a serious infection in adults. In addition to immunization, preventative measures need to consider the sociodemographic features more carefully. A standard set of data need to be collected so that comparisons can be made from study to study. Future investigations should target cardiac function and pulmonary embolism prevention in this population.

  17. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Still Lots to Learn and a Need for Standardized Data Collection Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, T J; Tyrrell, G J; Majumdar, Sumit R; Eurich, Dean T

    2017-01-01

    Background. Large studies of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are frequently lacking detailed clinical information. Methods. A population-based 15-year study of IPD in Northern Alberta. Results. 2435 patients with a mean age of 54.2 years formed the study group. Males outnumbered females and Aboriginal and homeless persons were overrepresented. High rates of smoking, excessive alcohol use, and illicit drug use were seen. Almost all (87%) had a major comorbidity and 15% had functional limitations prior to admission. Bacteremia, pneumonia, and meningitis were the most common major manifestations of IPD. Almost half of the patients had alteration of mental status at the time of admission and 22% required mechanical ventilation. Myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and new onset stroke occurred in 1.7, 1.3, and 1.1% of the patients, respectively; of those who had echocardiograms, 35% had impaired ventricular function. The overall in-hospital mortality was 15.6%. Conclusions. IPD remains a serious infection in adults. In addition to immunization, preventative measures need to consider the sociodemographic features more carefully. A standard set of data need to be collected so that comparisons can be made from study to study. Future investigations should target cardiac function and pulmonary embolism prevention in this population.

  18. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  19. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. Objective ...

  20. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Still Lots to Learn and a Need for Standardized Data Collection Instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Marrie, T. J.; Tyrrell, G. J.; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Eurich, Dean T.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Large studies of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are frequently lacking detailed clinical information. Methods. A population-based 15-year study of IPD in Northern Alberta. Results. 2435 patients with a mean age of 54.2 years formed the study group. Males outnumbered females and Aboriginal and homeless persons were overrepresented. High rates of smoking, excessive alcohol use, and illicit drug use were seen. Almost all (87%) had a major comorbidity and 15% had functional limit...

  1. Rates of, and risk factors for, septic arthritis in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Majumdar, Sumit R; Eurich, Dean T

    2017-10-12

    There are many case reports of septic arthritis complicating invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD); however, no study has compared patients with IPD with septic arthritis to those who didn't develop septic arthritis Thus, we aimed to determine the rates of, and risk factors for, septic arthritis in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Socio-demographic, clinical, and serological data were captured on all patients with IPD in Northern Alberta, Canada from 2000 to 2014. Septic arthritis was identified by attending physicians. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses were used to compare characteristics of those with septic arthritis and IPD to those who did not. Septic arthritis developed in 51 of 3251 (1.6%) of patients with IPD. Inability to walk independently, male sex, and underlying joint disease were risk factors for developing septic arthritis in patients with IPD. Capsular serotypes 22 and 12F were more common in patients with septic arthritis than those without. In patients with IPD, septic arthritis is uncommon. Certain risk factors such as walking with or without assistance and underlying joint disease make biological sense as damaged joints are more likely to be infected in the presence of bacteremia. Not applicable.

  2. Celiac Disease and Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Malorie; Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Risech-Neyman, Yesenia; Moss, Steven F; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with hyposplenism, and multiple case reports link celiac disease and pneumococcal infections; however, increased risk of pneumococcal infection in celiac disease has not been confirmed. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the risk of pneumococcal infections in celiac disease. Relevant studies were identified using electronic bibliographic searches of PubMed, OVID, Medline, and EMBASE (1980 to February 2017) and reviewing abstracts from major conferences in gastroenterology. Using number of events in celiac patients and referent patients, we calculated a summary relative risk of pneumococcal infections. All analyses were conducted in Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software using random-effects assumptions. Of a total of 156 articles, 3, representing 3 large databases (the Swedish National Inpatient Register; the Oxford Record Linkage Study; and the English National Hospital Episode Statistics) were included. Each compared patients with celiac disease and confirmed pneumococcal infection to a specific reference group: inpatients and/or the general population. Overall, the odds of pneumococcal infection were higher among hospitalized celiac patients compared with controls (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.92). There was no evidence of heterogeneity (Q[1] = 1.17, P = .56, I 2  = 0%). Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal infection. Preventive pneumococcal vaccination should be considered for those with celiac disease, with special attention to those aged 15-64 years who have not received the scheduled pneumococcal vaccination series as a child. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in a patient with IgG-κ smoldering multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Masahiro; Oshimi, Kazuo; Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Okada, Kouhei; Miyagishima, Takuto

    A 68-year-old female with smoldering multiple myeloma (IgG-κ type) was admitted to the hospital owing to general fatigue, fever, and pain in the right leg. On the day following admission, she developed shock, and a blood culture revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was diagnosed with septic shock and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). She received antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin and improved after several days. She had a history of recurrent IPD and had received the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23 (PPSV23) 2 years earlier. Therefore, we inquired with the National Institute of Infectious Diseases if the pneumococcal serotype isolated from her present IPD contained PPSV23. The results showed that her serotype was 19F, a serotype present in PPSV23. We administered pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 (PCV13) ; however, she was unable to mount high enough opsonophagocytic assay titers against some serotypes, including 19F. We think she was unable to mount effective humoral immune responses to PPSV23 or PCV13 owing to her underlying disease, smoldering myeloma. It should be considered how IPD can be effectively prevented in patients with multiple myeloma.

  4. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David

    2015-01-01

    to at least 1 protein compared to 51% of non-IPD controls. HIV IPD cases responded to more proteins than non-IPD controls (8.6 ± 8.4 vs 4.2 ± 7.6 proteins; P = .01), and had a significantly higher probability of yielding an antibody response to the proteins PiaA, PsaA, and PcpA. Twenty-two percent of HIV......-infected individuals with IPD had a serotype-specific antibody response. Younger age at the time of IPD was the only predictor of a serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody response, whereas we did not identify predictors of a protein-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses occurred more frequently...

  5. Changes in the Nature and Severity of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children Before and After the Seven-valent and Thirteen-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Programs in Calgary, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketson, Leah J; Conradi, Nicholas G; Vanderkooi, Otto G; Kellner, James D

    2018-01-01

    Since the introduction of childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence has decreased in children and the predominant serotypes causing disease have changed. This study describes changes in the clinical features of IPD in children (vaccine introduction. The Calgary Area Streptococcus pneumoniae Epidemiology Research study collects information on all IPD cases in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Descriptive and regression analyses were used to compare IPD in the pre-vaccine (January 2000 to August 2002), post-7-valent protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (September 2002 to June 2010) and post-13-valent protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (PCV13) (July 2010 to December 2015) periods; intensive care unit and inpatient admissions were outcome measures. The incidence of IPD in children (children presenting with IPD shifted from 2.0 years (interquartile range: 2.5) in the pre-vaccine period to 3.9 years (interquartile range: 6.2) in the post-PCV13 period. The proportion of children with a comorbidity that is an indication for pneumococcal vaccination did not change. Invasive disease with focus (meningitis, pneumonia, empyema, peritonitis) compared with invasive disease with bacteremia only increased from 44.6% in pre-vaccine to 64.0% and 61.4% in the post-7-valent protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine and post-PCV13 periods, respectively (P = 0.017). Having IPD in the post-PCV13 period compared with the pre-vaccine period was associated with an increased odds of hospitalization [Odds ratio (OR): 2.9; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.4-6.2]. Clinical features of IPD have changed since pneumococcal conjugate vaccines were introduced, with a shift toward more focal infections requiring hospitalization. Although overall IPD cases have declined, disease that does occur appears to be more severe.

  6. Serotype 5 pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease outbreaks in Barcelona, Spain (1997 to 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolo, Dora; Fenoll, Asunción; Fontanals, Dionísia; Larrosa, Nieves; Giménez, Montserrat; Grau, Immaculada; Pallarés, Román; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the clinical and molecular epidemiology of invasive serotype 5 (Ser5) pneumococcal isolates in four teaching hospitals in the Barcelona, Spain, area (from 1997 to 2011). Among 5,093 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected, 134 (2.6%) Ser5 isolates were detected. Although the overall incidence of Ser5-related invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was low (0.25 cases/100,000 inhabitants), three incidence peaks were detected: 0.63/100,000 in 1999, 1.15/100,000 in 2005, and 0.37/100,000 in 2009. The rates of Ser5 IPD were higher among young adults (18 to 64 years old) and older adults (>64 years old) in the first two peaks, whereas they were higher among children in 2009. The majority (88.8%) of the patients presented with pneumonia. Comorbid conditions were present in young adults (47.6%) and older adults (78.7%), the most common comorbid conditions being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (20.6% and 38.3%, respectively) and cardiovascular diseases (11.1% and 38.3%, respectively). The mortality rates were higher among older adults (8.5%). All Ser5 pneumococci tested were fully susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance rates were 48.5% for co-trimoxazole, 6.7% for chloramphenicol, and 6% for tetracycline. Two major related sequence types (STs), ST1223 (n = 65) and ST289 (n = 61), were detected. The Colombia(5)-ST289 clone was responsible for all the cases in the Ser5 outbreak in 1999, whereas the ST1223 clone accounted for 73.8% and 61.5% of the isolates in 2005 and 2009, respectively. Ser5 pneumococci are a frequent cause of IPD outbreaks in the community and involve children and adults with or without comorbidities. The implementation of the new pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV10 and PCV13) might prevent such outbreaks.

  7. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION AND ASSOCIATED DISEASES — A SERIOUS PROBLEM OF MODERN HEALTH CARE

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    A.A. Baranov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal infection is one of the most widespread reasons for the development of infections of the respiratory passages (otitis, sinusitis in children. At the same time, it may act as an etiological factor of severe urgent conditions, such as pneumococcal meningitis and pneumococcal pneumonia, especially in children under 2 years old. A reliable method for preventing this infection is specific immunological prophylaxis. The article covers in detail the issue of vaccination in Russia and in other countries. The necessity of vaccination of all infants is demonstrated, as well as the necessity of participation in resolving this issue not only of pediatricians but governmental institutions as well in order to enhance safety and efficiency of vaccination and include this vaccine into the national calendar.Key words: pneumococcal infection, forms, complications, vaccination, national vaccination calendar, risk groups, children.

  8. Effect of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease in England and Wales 4 years after its introduction: an observational cohort study.

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    Waight, Pauline A; Andrews, Nicholas J; Ladhani, Shamez N; Sheppard, Carmen L; Slack, Mary P E; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) protects against key serotypes that increased after routine immunisation with the seven-valent vaccine (PCV7), but its potential for herd protection and serotype replacement is uncertain. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease in England and Wales 4 years after its introduction. We used a national dataset of electronically reported and serotyped invasive pneumococcal disease cases in England and Wales to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for vaccine and non-vaccine type invasive pneumococcal disease between July, 2013, and June, 2014, versus the pre-PCV13 and pre-PCV7 baseline. Incidence rates were corrected for missing serotype data and changes in surveillance sensitivity over time. An over-dispersed Poisson model was used to estimate IRRs and confidence intervals. Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the epidemiological year 2013/14 decreased by 32% compared with the pre-PCV13 baseline (incidence 10·14 per 100,000 in 2008-10 vs 6·85 per 100,000 in 2013/14; IRR 0·68, 95% CI 0·64-0·72). This was due to an 86% reduction of the serotypes covered by PCV7 (1·46 vs 0·20 per 100,000; IRR 0·14, 0·10-0·18) and a 69% reduction of the additional six serotypes covered by PCV13 (4·48 vs 1·40 per 100,000; IRR 0·31, 0·28-0·35). When compared with the pre-PCV7 baseline, there was a 56% overall reduction in invasive pneumococcal disease (15·63 vs 6·85 per 100,000; IRR 0·44, 95% CI 0·43-0·47). Compared with the pre-PCV13 baseline, the incidence of non-PCV13 serotypes increased (incidence all ages 4·19 vs 5·25 per 100,000; IRR 1·25, 95% CI 1·17-1·35) due to increases across a broad range of serotypes in children younger than 5 years and in people aged 45 years or more. In children younger than 5 years, incidence of non-PCV13 serotypes in 2013/14 was higher than in 2012/13 (age Wales has reduced the

  9. Serotype distribution of pneumococci isolated from pediatric patients with acute otitis media and invasive infections, and potential coverage of pneumococcal conjugated vaccines Distribución de serotipos de neumococos aislados de pacientes pediátricos con otitis media aguda e infecciones invasivas y su cobertura potencial a través de vacunas conjugadas

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    Vanesa Reijtman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 16-month prospective, descriptive study was conducted on pneumococcal serotype distribution isolated from children with acute otitis media (AÜM and invasive infections (INV. Eighty-nine children with pneumococcal INV and 324 with a first episode of AOM were included. Bacterial pathogens (N = 326 were isolated from the middle-ear fluid of 250 patients. A total of 30 pneumococcal serotypes were identified. Prevalent serotypes were 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F, and 18C in AOM and 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B, and 18C in INV. Potential coverage with PCV10 vaccine would be 46.5 % and 60.7 % for pneumococci involved in AOM and INV, respectively; it would be 71.7 % and 73 % with PCV13. PCV10, conjugated with a Haemophilus protein, would have an immunologic coverage of 39.9 % for AOM vs. 18.5 % with PCV13. However, differences in the prevention of INV were crucial for the decision to include the 13-valent vaccine in the national calendar for children less than two years old in Argentina.Se realizó un estudio prospectivo descriptivo sobre la distribución de serotipos de neumococos aislados de niños con otitis media aguda (OMA y con infecciones invasivas (INV en un período de 16 meses. Se incluyeron 89 niños con INV neumocócicas y 324 con un primer episodio de OMA. Trescientos cuarenta y seis patógenos se aislaron de las secreciones de oído medio obtenidas de 250 pacientes. Se identificaron 30 serotipos y los más prevalentes fueron el 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F y 18C en OMA y el 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B y 18C en INV. La cobertura potencial con la vacuna PCV10 sería de 46,5 % y 60,7 % para neumococos involucrados en OMA y en INV, respectivamente; con la PCV13, esta sería de 71,7 % y 73 %. La PCV10 conjugada con una proteína de Haemophilus tendría una cobertura inmunológica del 39,9 % para OMA, contra una cobertura del 18,5 % de la PCV13. Sin embargo, las diferencias en la prevención de INV fueron determinantes a la hora de considerar

  10. Long-term impact of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease among children in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Palmu, Arto A; Auranen, Kari; Nuorti, J Pekka; Toropainen, Maija; Siira, Lotta; Virtanen, Mikko J; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka

    2018-04-05

    The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Programme (NVP) in September 2010. The impact of PCV10 vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in vaccine-eligible children has been high. We evaluated the long-term impact of PCV10 vaccination against IPD in vaccine-eligible and older, unvaccinated children six years after PCV10 introduction with a special focus on cross-protection against PCV10-related serotypes (serotypes in the same serogroups as the PCV10 types). We used data on IPD from the national, population-based surveillance. A target cohort of vaccine-eligible children (born June 2010 or later) was followed from 3 months of age until the end of 2016. For the indirect effect, another cohort of older PCV10-ineligible children was followed from 2012 through 2016. IPD rates were compared with those of season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. Among vaccine-eligible children, the incidence of all IPD decreased by 79% (95% CI 74-83%). There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of 6A IPD, but for 19A, the reduction was non-significant and the incidence of 19A increased towards the end of the study period in the older vaccine-eligible children. The increase in non-PCV10 related serotypes was non-significant. In the unvaccinated older children, the incidence of all IPD decreased by 33% (95% CI 8-52%) compared to the reference cohort, and there was no impact on serotype 6A or 19A IPD. Overall, the impact of PCV10 vaccination on IPD was high in vaccine-eligible children, with a major reduction in vaccine-type disease, and without notable replacement by other serotype groups. Our data suggest that PCV10 results in long-lasting direct cross-protection against 6A IPD. For 19A, no net reduction was observed six years after NVP introduction in the vaccine-eligible cohort. The indirect impact on IPD in unvaccinated children sustained. Copyright

  11. Serotype-specific changes in invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction: a pooled analysis of multiple surveillance sites.

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    Daniel R Feikin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccine-serotype (VT invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD rates declined substantially following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 into national immunization programs. Increases in non-vaccine-serotype (NVT IPD rates occurred in some sites, presumably representing serotype replacement. We used a standardized approach to describe serotype-specific IPD changes among multiple sites after PCV7 introduction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Of 32 IPD surveillance datasets received, we identified 21 eligible databases with rate data ≥ 2 years before and ≥ 1 year after PCV7 introduction. Expected annual rates of IPD absent PCV7 introduction were estimated by extrapolation using either Poisson regression modeling of pre-PCV7 rates or averaging pre-PCV7 rates. To estimate whether changes in rates had occurred following PCV7 introduction, we calculated site specific rate ratios by dividing observed by expected IPD rates for each post-PCV7 year. We calculated summary rate ratios (RRs using random effects meta-analysis. For children <5 years old, overall IPD decreased by year 1 post-PCV7 (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.46-0.65 and remained relatively stable through year 7 (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.35-0.68. Point estimates for VT IPD decreased annually through year 7 (RR 0.03, 95% CI 0.01-0.10, while NVT IPD increased (year 7 RR 2.81, 95% CI 2.12-3.71. Among adults, decreases in overall IPD also occurred but were smaller and more variable by site than among children. At year 7 after introduction, significant reductions were observed (18-49 year-olds [RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29-0.91], 50-64 year-olds [RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.93], and ≥ 65 year-olds [RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.95]. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent and significant decreases in both overall and VT IPD in children occurred quickly and were sustained for 7 years after PCV7 introduction, supporting use of PCVs. Increases in NVT IPD occurred in most sites, with variable magnitude. These findings may not

  12. [Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccination in Children and Adolescents at High Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais-Almeida, Marta; Ferreira-Magalhães, Manuel; Alves, Inês; Tavares, Margarida; Azevedo, Inês

    2015-01-01

    In Portugal, pneumococcal vaccination is free of charge and recommended by the Directorate-General of Health for the pediatric population at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease. Our main aim was to describe the vaccination uptake in a pediatric population attending a hospital outpatient clinic. Cross-sectional observational survey of a pediatric population attending a referral hospital outpatient clinic, from July to December 2014. Data was collected from clinical records, Individual Health Bulletin or the registry from Plataforma de Dados da Saúde®. Of the 122 participants, 95.9% had, at least, one shot of pneumococcal vaccine, but only 64.8% of these completed the age recommended vaccination scheme. Uptake was higher in children 5 years old had a higher uptake of 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine than the 2 to 5-years old ones (74.5% vs 40.5%; p < 0.001). Most of our pediatric population at high risk of IPD was vaccinated; nevertheless, only two-thirds had completed the scheme for their age. The main failure was on the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine administration. Although these results are better than those reported in other European countries with similar recommendations, it is essential to explore the causes for the observed flaws in order to optimize vaccination rates.

  13. Invasive pneumococcal disease : Clinical outcomes and patient characteristics 2-6 years after introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to the pre-vaccine period, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H J; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Elberse, Karin E.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Implementation of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the Dutch national immunization program for infants led to a shift from vaccine to non-vaccine serotypes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in all age groups. We studied the impact of the serotype shift on clinical

  14. Pharmacoeconomic aspects of vaccination against Pneumococcal Infection in Russia

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    A. V. Rudakova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal infection prevention in children of the first 5 years of life in Russia is of high importance due to high morbidity and mortality. The goal of the study is pharmacoeconomic assessment of first year of life infants vaccination program by 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13 for both routine vaccination by 3 doses and for selected vaccination of premature (born before 32 week of pregnancy children by 4 doses. Modeling based on clinical trials and epidemiology data results has been established. The costs of Medical care have been obtained from the 2011 State Insurance tariff in St.Petersburg. Analysis has been done from the position of the Health Care system (only direct medical costs and from the social perspective (analysis of direct medical and indirect costs with 10 and 20 years horizon and for the full length of life. In routine vaccination scenario and in case of investing to the Health Care system for 10 years cost effectiveness of PCV13 in general population of children including herd effect is 44,2K rubles/1 additional life year gained for direct medical costs only. In direct and indirect costs estimating vaccination is dominating – so, not only decreasing the incidence and morbidity but cost-saving for 2,1K rubles per patient. Study horizon extension (prolongation of the period when the State is ready to wait for the return of investment is leading to the vaccination cost-effectiveness increase: without herd effect the cost/effectiveness is 505,1K rubles per 1 additional life year gained in 10 years horizon and 100,6K rubles in analysis for the full length of life. Selected vaccination of premature children is also cost effective as these children are at real high risk for Pneumococcal Infection – efficiency in 10 years horizon for direct medical costs is 131,2K rubles per 1 additional life year gained and for indirect and direct costs is 48,3K rubles per 1 additional

  15. Risk factors for pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization before and after pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in persons with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Søgaard, Ole S; Harboe, Zitta B

    HIV-infected individuals have excess rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. We investigated risk factors for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization at baseline and after 9 months in 96 HIV patients immunized twice with 7- valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine ±1mg CPG 7909. In total, 22 patients...... (23%) were colonized, 11 at baseline only, four at both baseline and 9 months, and seven at 9 months only. Compared to non-colonized patients, more colonized patients were smokers, had lower CD4+ nadir and had an AIDS-diagnosis. Immunization, antiretroviral treatment and the CPG adjuvant had no impact...... on colonization. These results suggest preventive strategies in addition to pneumococcal immunization....

  16. PCR deduction of invasive and colonizing pneumococcal serotypes from Venezuela: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Gonzalez, Teresita; Rivera-Olivero, Ismar Alejandra; Sisco, María Carolina; Spadola, Enza; Hermans, Peter W; de Waard, Jacobus H

    2014-04-15

    Serotype surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae is indispensable for evaluating the potential impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Serotyping by the standard Quellung reaction is technically demanding, time consuming, and expensive. A simple and economical strategy is multiplex PCR-based serotyping. We evaluated the cost effectiveness of a modified serial multiplex PCR (mPCR), resolving 24 serotypes in four PCR reactions and optimally targeting the most prevalent invasive and colonizing pneumococcal serotypes found in Venezuela. A total of 223 pneumococcal isolates, 140 invasive and 83 carriage isolates, previously serotyped by the Quellung reaction and representing the 18 most common serotypes/groups identified in Venezuela, were serotyped with the adapted mPCR. The mPCR serotyped 76% of all the strains in the first two PCR reactions and 91% after four reactions, correctly identifying 17 serotypes/groups. An isolate could be serotyped with mPCR in less than 2 minutes versus 15 minutes for the Quellung reaction, considerably lowering labor costs. A restrictive weakness of mPCR was found for the detection of 19F strains. Most Venezuelan 19F strains were not typeable using the mPCR, and two 19F cps serotype variants were identified. The mPCR assay is an accurate, rapid, and economical method for the identification of the vast majority of the serotypes from Venezuela and can be used in place of the standard Quellung reaction. An exception is the identification of serotype 19F. In this setting, most 19F strains were not detectable with mPCR, demonstrating a need of serology-based quality control for PCR-based serotyping.

  17. Pneumococcal colonisation density: a new marker for disease severity in HIV-infected adults with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrich, Werner C; Madhi, Shabir A; Adrian, Peter V; van Niekerk, Nadia; Telles, Jean-Noel; Ebrahim, N; Messaoudi, Melina; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Giersdorf, Sven; Vernet, Guy; Mueller, Beat; Klugman, Keith P

    2014-08-11

    A high genomic load of Pneumococcus from blood or cerebrospinal fluid has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to analyse whether nasopharyngeal colonisation density in HIV-infected patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with markers of disease severity or poor outcome. Quantitative lytA real-time PCR was performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in HIV-infected South African adults hospitalised for acute CAP at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa. Pneumonia aetiology was considered pneumococcal if any sputum culture or Gram stain, urinary pneumococcal C-polysaccharide-based antigen, blood culture or whole blood lytA real-time PCR revealed pneumococci. There was a moderate correlation between the mean nasopharyngeal colonisation densities and increasing CURB65 scores among all-cause patients with pneumonia (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.15, p=0.06) or with the Pitt bacteraemia score among patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia (p=0.63). In patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonisation density was higher among non-survivors than survivors (7.7 vs 6.1 log10 copies/mL, respectively, p=0.02) and among those who had pneumococci identified from blood cultures and/or by whole blood lytA real-time PCR than those with non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (6.6 vs 5.6 log10 copies/mL, p=0.03). Nasopharyngeal colonisation density correlated positively with the biomarkers procalcitonin (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.37, pmarker for pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected adults. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in children

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    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most children are transiently colonized with Streptococcus pneumoniae, but very few develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Host genetic variation of innate immunity may predispose to IPD. We investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2......, on susceptibility and disease severity of IPD in previously healthy children aged

  19. Impacto da vacina conjugada contra Streptococcus pneumoniae em doenças invasivas Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on the prevention of invasive pneumococcal diseases

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    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Rever os estudos que avaliam o impacto da vacina conjugada 7-valente na incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo e analisar o possível impacto dessa vacina no Brasil. FONTE DE DADOS:Foram pesquisadas as bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews (janeiro de 2000 a janeiro de 2006, selecionando-se para análise os artigos contendo as seguintes palavras-chave: Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococo, vacina conjugada, resistência, antibióticos e meningite. Também foi realizada busca de informações sobre o tema nos sites do Centers for Disease Control, Ministério da Saúde e Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A vacina conjugada 7-valente reduziu a incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo, número de consultas por doenças respiratórias de vias aéreas superiores e inferiores, consumo de antibióticos e incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo por cepas resistentes a antibióticos não apenas nas crianças vacinadas, como em adultos e idosos. No Brasil, os coeficientes de incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo em crianças menores de 5 anos são elevados, a taxa de letalidade de meningites pneumocócicas é alta e as taxas de resistência parcial e plena à penicilina aumentaram substancialmente nos últimos 5 anos. CONCLUSÕES:Devido aos benefícios diretos e indiretos do uso em larga escala da vacina conjugada 7-valente, essa vacina deve ser incluída no calendário básico de imunização do Brasil.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in invasive pneumococcal diseases in the United States, and to analyze the potential impact of this vaccine in Brazil. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews, as well as the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Brazilian Ministry of Health and Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo from

  20. Factors associated with penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal infections in Brazil

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    A.S. Levin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a worldwide, growing problem. Studies of factors associated with resistance to penicillin have not been conducted in Brazil. The objective of the present study was to evaluate factors associated with infection by S. pneumoniae not susceptible to penicillin. A prevalence study was conducted including all patients with a positive culture for S. pneumoniae in a hospital from July 1991 to December 1992 and the year 1994. Of 165 patients identified, 139 were considered to have clinically relevant infections and 88% of them had invasive infections. All infections were community acquired and consisted of pneumonia (44% and of central nervous system (19%, pelvic or abdominal (12%, upper airway or ocular (12%, primary bloodstream (9% and skin and soft tissue (5% infections. Mortality was 25%. Susceptibility to penicillin was present in 77.6% of the isolates; 21.8% were relatively resistant, and one isolate was resistant (minimal inhibitory concentration = 4 µg/ml. Multivariate analysis showed that age below 4 years (odds ratio (OR: 3.53, 95% confidence interval (95%CI: 1.39-8.96 and renal failure (OR: 5.50, 95%CI: 1.07-28.36 were associated with lack of susceptibility to penicillin. Bacteremia occurred significantly less frequently in penicillin-nonsusceptible infections (OR: 0.34, 95%CI: 0.14-0.84, possibly suggesting that lack of penicillin susceptibility is associated with lower virulence in S. pneumoniae.

  1. [Increase in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by serotype 19A prior to the implementation of the expanded pneumococcal vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, F; Saavedra Lozano, J; Navarro Gómez, M L; Santos Sebastián, M M; Rodríguez Fernández, R; González Sánchez, M; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T

    2013-11-01

    To describe the epidemiology, clinical syndromes and microbiological characteristics of serotype 19A as the main cause of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Spain. A retrospective (1998-2004) and prospective (2005-2009) study was conducted on children with IPD produced by serotype 19A. The study was divided into three periods (P): P1 (1998-2001) when PCV7 had not been commercialized; P2 (2002-2005) with 40% vaccine coverage among children; and P3 (2006-2009) when the vaccine was added to the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Madrid. A total of 155 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) producing IPD were analysed, with 21 of them being serotype 19A (14%). An increased prevalence of serotype 19A was found: 2/45 cases (4.4%) in P1, 3/41 cases (7.3%) in P2 and 16/69 cases (23.2%) in P3. It occurred mostly in children younger than 2 years (16/21; 76%). This serotype was the main cause of meningitis (5/20; 25%), pleural empyema (3/22; 14%) and bacteraemic mastoiditis (2/4; 50%). Thirteen isolates (61.5%) had an MIC ≥ 0.12μ/ml for penicillin in extra-meningeal infections, and 3 of the 5 isolates causing meningitis (60%) had an MIC ≥ 1μ/ml for cefotaxime. Serotype 19A was the main causal agent of IPD in the PCV7 era (P3), with high antibiotic resistance rates. This serotype was responsible for all types of IPD, being the main cause of meningitis. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. [Emergence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes in the era of the 7-valent conjugate vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, F; Navarro Gómez, M L; Saavedra Lozano, J; Santos Sebastián, M M; Rodríguez Fernández, R; González Sanchéz, M; Cercenado Mansilla, E; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T

    2014-03-01

    There has been an increased incidence in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) produced by non-vaccine serotype (NVS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae after the introduction of PCV7. Our objective was to describe the epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics of IPD caused by NVS in a tertiary hospital in Madrid. Retrospective (1998-2004) and prospective (2005-2009) study evaluating IPD caused by NVS in children. The study was divided into three periods: P1 (1998-2001) when PCV7 was not commercialized; P2 (2002-2005) with 40% vaccine coverage among children; and P3 (2006-2009) when the vaccine was added to the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Madrid. We analyzed 155 cases of IPD. One hundred and fifty of these isolates were serotyped (100 were NVS). There was an increase in the prevalence of IPD from P1 (31%) to P2 (54%) and P3 (91%). The most relevant emerging serotypes were 19A, 7F, 1, 5, 3 and 15C. The most significant clinical syndromes produced by some specific serotypes were as follows: lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) by serotypes 1, 3, 5 and 15C; LRTI, primary bacteremia and meningitis by serotype 19A; and primary bacteremia by serotype 7F (66%). The large majority (83.8%) of NVS were sensitive to penicillin. There has been an increased prevalence of IPD caused by NVS since the introduction of PCV7. These changes should prompt the introduction of new pneumococcal vaccines, which include most of the NVS, in the childhood immunization calendar to prevent IPD in children. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in the Canadian North from 1999 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Helferty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . The International Circumpolar Surveillance network is a population-based surveillance system that collects data on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in Northern Canada. A 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was first introduced in some regions of Northern Canada in 2002, followed by 10-valent (2009 and 13-valent (PCV-13 vaccines (2010. A 23-valent polysaccharide (PPV-23 vaccine was first introduced in 1988 for special populations and adults aged 65 years and older. To describe the epidemiology in the context of pneumococcal vaccination programs, we analysed surveillance data from Northern Canada from 1999 to 2010. Methods . A standardized case report form capturing demographic and clinical information was completed for all IPD cases in Northern Canada meeting the national case definition. Isolates were sent to a reference laboratory for confirmation, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance testing. Both laboratory and epidemiological data were sent to the Public Health Agency of Canada for analysis. Population denominators were obtained from Statistics Canada. Results . From 1999 to 2010, 433 IPD cases were reported (average 36 cases per year. Incidence was greatest among infants aged <2 years and among those aged 65 years and older, with an average annual incidence of 133 and 67 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. After a peak in incidence in 2008, rates among infants have declined. Incidence rates varied from 2 to 16 times greater, depending on the year, among Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. Hospitalization was reported in 89% of all cases and the case fatality ratio was 6.0%. Clinical manifestations varied, with some patients reporting >1 manifestation. Pneumonia was the most common (70%, followed by bacteremia/septicaemia (30% and meningitis (8%. Approximately, 42% of cases aged <2 years in 2009 and 2010 had serotypes covered by the PCV-13. In addition, the majority (89% of serotypes isolated in cases

  4. Time-resolved dual RNA-seq reveals extensive rewiring of lung epithelial and pneumococcal transcriptomes during early infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprianto, Rieza; Slager, Jelle; Holsappel, Siger; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, the pneumococcus, is the main etiological agent of pneumonia. Pneumococcal infection is initiated by bacterial adherence to lung epithelial cells. The exact transcriptional changes occurring in both host and microbe during infection are unknown. Here, we

  5. Which individuals are at increased risk of pneumococcal disease and why? Impact of COPD, asthma, smoking, diabetes, and/or chronic heart disease on community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Blasi, Francesco; Dartois, Nathalie; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal disease (including community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease) poses a burden to the community all year round, especially in those with chronic underlying conditions. Individuals with COPD, asthma or who smoke, and those with chronic heart disease or diabetes mellitus have been shown to be at increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with those without these risk factors. These conditions, and smoking, can also adversely affect patient outcomes, including short-term and long-term mortality rates, following pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia, and in particular pneumococcal pneumonia, is associated with a significant economic burden, especially in those who are hospitalised, and also has an impact on a patient's quality of life. Therefore, physicians should target individuals with COPD, asthma, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and those who smoke, for pneumococcal vaccination at the earliest opportunity at any time of the year. PMID:26219979

  6. Conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines do not improve initial response of the polysaccharide vaccine in HIV-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, Maria; Payeras, Antoni; Cambra, Ana; Mila, Joan; Riera, Melcior

    2010-05-15

    This is a randomized trial to compare the immunoglobulin G response and the antibody avidity after two pneumococcal vaccinations, conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (CPV) and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) 4 weeks after vs. PPV alone in 202 HIV-infected adults. There were no differences in the two strategies, either in the percentage of immunoglobulin G two-fold increase for the CPV included serotypes or immunoglobulin G two-fold increase, reaching the level of 1 microg/ml except for serotype 23F (26% responded after conjugated pneumococcal vaccine + PPV vs. 14% after PPV). No avidity increases were seen in any strategy.

  7. The role of pneumococcal infection in development of exacerbations in children with bronchial asthma and obstructive bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Kukhtinova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal infection remains the key cause of severe diseases of lower airways and deaths in children. The objective: to study the role of pneumococcal infection in pathogenesis of exacerbations of recurrent obstructive pulmonary diseases. Methods: etiological structure of lower airways infections was evaluated in 125 patients 1–15 years old with bronchial asthma or recurrent bronchitis. Results: etiologic role of Streptococcus pneumoniae in development of low airways infections was detected in 48% of patients with atopic asthma, 85% — with asthma without atopy, 97% — with recurrent bronchitis. Repeated microbiological examination confirmed chronic carriage of S. рneumoniae in nasopharinx in 31% of patients. Conclusion: early active prophylaxis with vaccine against pneumococcal infection including conjugated vaccines is able to prevent further progression of a disease.Key words: children, bronchial asthma, obstructive bronchitis, exacerbation, pneumococcal infection.

  8. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Used in Children on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children and Adults in the United States: Analysis of Multisite, Population-based Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Matthew R.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Schaffner, William; Lynfield, Ruth; Lexau, Catherine; Bennett, Nancy M.; Petit, Susan; Zansky, Shelley M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Reingold, Arthur; Miller, Lisa; Scherzinger, Karen; Thomas, Ann; Farley, Monica M.; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Taylor, Thomas H.; Pondo, Tracy; Rodgers, Loren; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Jorgensen, James H.; Whitney, Cynthia G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In 2000, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the U.S. and resulted in dramatic reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and modest increases in non-PCV7-type IPD. In 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced PCV7 in the U.S. immunization schedule. We evaluated the effect of PCV13 use in children on IPD in children and adults in the U.S. Methods We used laboratory- and population-based data on incidence of IPD from CDC’s Emerging Infections Program / Active Bacterial Core surveillance in a time-series model to estimate the impact of vaccination. Cases of IPD during July 2004–June 2013 were classified as being caused by the PCV13 serotypes against which PCV7 has no effect (PCV13/nonPCV7). Findings Compared with incidence expected among children <5 years old if PCV7 alone had been continued, incidence of IPD overall and IPD caused by PCV13/nonPCV7 serotypes declined by 64% (95% interval estimate [IE] 59–68 %) and 93% (95%IE 91–94), respectively, by July 2012–June 2013. Among adults, incidence of IPD overall and PCV13/nonPCV7-type IPD also declined by 12–32% and 58–72%, respectively, depending on age. In all age groups, reductions were driven principally by changes in incidence of serotypes 19A and 7F. We estimate that over 30,000 cases of IPD and 3,000 deaths were averted in the first 3 years following PCV13 introduction. Interpretation PCV13 has reduced IPD among all ages when used routinely in children in the U.S. Serotypes 19A and 7F, which emerged after PCV7 introduction, have been effectively controlled. PMID:25656600

  9. PavA of Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Adherence, Invasion, and Meningeal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Pracht, Daniela; Elm, Christine; Gerber, Joachim; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Seiler, Marleen; Kim, Kwang S.; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Nau, Roland; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Pneumococcal adherence and virulence factor A (PavA) is displayed to the cell outer surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae and mediates pneumococcal binding to immobilized fibronectin. PavA, which lacks a typical gram-positive signal sequence and cell surface anchorage motif, is essential for pneumococcal virulence in a mouse infection model of septicemia. In this report the impact of PavA on pneumococcal adhesion to and invasion of eukaryotic cells and on experimental pneumococcal meningitis wa...

  10. Invasive pneumococcal diseases in children in Hokkaido, Japan from April 2000, to March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) became commercially available as a voluntary vaccine in March 2010. It was included in the routine immunization schedule in April 2013 and was replaced by PCV-13 in November 2013. We evaluated 146 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in 142 children (2 developed the disease twice, and 1 developed it three times) treated in the northern district of Hokkaido, Japan from April 2000 to March 2015, before and after the introduction of PCV-7. The incidence rate per 100,000 people aged March 2010, and reached 87.5 per 100,000 people per year between April 2009 and March 2010, which was immediately before the introduction of PCV-7. Subsequently, the incidence rate started to show a decreasing trend and reached as low as 9.5 per 100,000 people per year between April 2013 and March 2014. However, the incidence rate showed an increasing trend again between April 2014 and March 2015, reaching 33.4 per 100,000 people per year. Serotyping was performed for the 77 strains collected between April 2000 and March 2010. The most frequently isolated serotype was 6B (31.2%), followed by 23F (14.3%) and 19F (13.0%). Among them, 55 strains were covered by PCV-7 (71.4%), and 64 strains were covered by PCV-13 (83.1%). Of the 33 strains collected between April 2010 and March 2015, 14 were covered by PCV-7 (42.4%) and 16 were covered by PCV-13 (48.4%), showing a significant decrease (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Host Factors and Biomarkers Associated with Poor Outcomes in Adults with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Hanada

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD causes considerable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify host factors and biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in adult patients with IPD in Japan, which has a rapidly-aging population.In a large-scale surveillance study of 506 Japanese adults with IPD, we investigated the role of host factors, disease severity, biomarkers based on clinical laboratory data, treatment regimens, and bacterial factors on 28-day mortality.Overall mortality was 24.1%, and the mortality rate increased from 10.0% in patients aged ˂50 years to 33.1% in patients aged ≥80 years. Disease severity also increased 28-day mortality, from 12.5% among patients with bacteraemia without sepsis to 35.0% in patients with severe sepsis and 56.9% with septic shock. The death rate within 48 hours after admission was high at 54.9%. Risk factors for mortality identified by multivariate analysis were as follows: white blood cell (WBC count <4000 cells/μL (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-12.8, p < .001; age ≥80 years (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.0-21.6, p = .002; serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.5-8.1, p < .001; underlying liver disease (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6-7.8, p = .002; mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.6, p < .001; and lactate dehydrogenase ≥300 IU/L (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.0, p = .001. Pneumococcal serotype and drug resistance were not associated with poor outcomes.Host factors, disease severity, and biomarkers, especially WBC counts and serum creatinine, were more important determinants of mortality than bacterial factors.

  12. A functional variant in TIRAP, also known as MAL, and protection against invasive pneumococcal disease, bacteraemia, malaria and tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Khor, Chiea C.; Chapman, Stephen J.; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Dunne, Aisling; Murphy, Caroline; Ling, Edmund Y; Frodsham, Angela J.; Walley, Andrew J; Kyrieleis, Otto; Khan, Amir; Aucan, Christophe; Segal, Shelley; Moore, Catrin E.; Knox, Kyle; Campbell, Sarah J.

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and members of their signalling pathway play an important role in the initiation of the innate immune response to a wide variety of pathogens1,2,3. The adaptor protein TIRAP mediates downstream signalling of TLR-2 and -44,5,6. We report a case-control genetic association study of 6106 individuals from Gambia, Kenya, United Kingdom, and Vietnam, with invasive pneumococcal disease, bacteraemia, malaria and tuberculosis. Thirty-three SNPs were genotyped, including TIRA...

  13. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 nasal administration improves recovery of T-cell mediated immunity against pneumococcal infection in malnourished mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, N; Herrera, M; Salva, S; Villena, J; Alvarez, S

    2017-05-30

    Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria have become an interesting alternative for the prevention of respiratory infections. Previously, we demonstrated that the nasal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505, during repletion of malnourished mice, resulted in diminished susceptibility to the challenge with the respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Considering the known alterations induced by malnutrition on T lymphocytes and the importance of this cell population on the protection against respiratory pathogens, we aimed to study the effect of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 nasal administration on the recovery of T cell-mediated defences against pneumococcal infection in malnourished mice under nutritional recovery. Malnourished mice received a balanced conventional diet (BCD) for seven days or BCD for seven days with nasal L. rhamnosus CRL1505 supplementation during last two days of the treatment. After the treatments mice were infected with S. pneumoniae. Flow cytometry studies were carried out in bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lung to study T cells, and Th 1 /Th 2 cytokine profiles were determined in broncho-alveolar lavages and serum. The administration of CRL1505 strain to malnourished mice under recovery reduced quantitative and qualitative alterations of CD4 + T cells in the bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lung induced by malnutrition. In addition, CRL1505 treatment augmented Th 2 -cytokines (interleukin 10 and 4) in respiratory and systemic compartments after pneumococcal infection. These results show that modulation of CD4 + T lymphocytes induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 has an important role in the beneficial effect induced by this strain on the recovery of malnourished mice. These data also indicate that nasally administered L. rhamnosus CRL1505 may represent a non-invasive alternative to modulate and improve the T cell-mediated immunity against respiratory pathogens in immunocompromised malnourished hosts.

  15. Zinc metalloproteinase ZmpC suppresses experimental pneumococcal meningitis by inhibiting bacterial invasion of central nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumioka, Ryuichi; Hirose, Yujiro; Wada, Satoshi; Akeda, Yukihiro; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-11-17

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Here, we investigated whether pneumococcal paralogous zinc metalloproteases contribute to meningitis onset. Findings of codon-based phylogenetic analyses indicated 3 major clusters in the Zmp family; ZmpA, ZmpC, and ZmpB, with ZmpD as a subgroup. In vitro invasion assays of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) showed that deletion of the zmpC gene in S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4 significantly increased bacterial invasion into hBMECs, whereas deletion of either zmpA or zmpB had no effect. In a mouse meningitis model, the zmpC deletion mutant exhibited increased invasion of the brain and was associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 in plasma and mortality as compared with the wild type. We concluded that ZmpC suppresses pneumococcal virulence by inhibiting bacterial invasion of the central nervous system. Furthermore, ZmpC illustrates the evolutional theory stating that gene duplication leads to acquisition of novel function to suppress excessive mortality.

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Are at Increased Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: A Nationwide Danish Cohort Study 1977-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Simonsen, Jacob; Hoffmann, Steen; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Jess, Tine

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic diseases characterized by an inappropriate immune response, which may also increase the risk of infections. We investigated the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) before and after diagnosis of IBD in a population-based cohort study. In a cohort of 74,156 IBD patients and 1,482,363 non-IBD controls included and followed during 1977-2013, hazard rate ratios (HRs) for IPD in IBD patients vs. controls were calculated by Cox regression. Within the IBD group, we also calculated the risk according to ever use of specific IBD medications. Next, using conditional logistic regression, we evaluated the odds of IPD prior to IBD diagnosis. The HRs for IPD within the first 6 months after IBD diagnosis were significantly and more than threefold increased and then decreased to a constant level, which for CD was significantly increased (approximately twofold, HR, 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.59-2.49) and for UC non-significantly just above 1. IBD medication use including tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists had limited impact on the risk of IPD, although having ever used azathioprine increased the risk of IPD in patients with UC (HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.00-5.67). Up to 4 years prior to IBD diagnosis, the odds ratio for IPD was significantly increased (UC HR, 1.51, 95% CI, 1.05-2.17; CD HR, 1.79, 95% CI, 1.05-3.03). The risk of IPD is significantly increased both before and after diagnosis of IBD, with limited impact of IBD medications. This suggests that the risk of IPD in patients with IBD is related to the underlying altered immune response in these patients.

  17. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease at a tertiary children's hospital through the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era: a case for continuous surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Chris, Stockmann; Hersh, Adam L; Bender, Jeffrey M; Blaschke, Anne J; Weng, Hsin Yi Cindy; Korgenski, Kent E; Daly, Judy; Mason, Edward O; Byington, Carrie L

    2012-03-01

    In 2000, a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed for use among US children. Many sites have since reported changes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We recognized an opportunity to describe the changes in epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution during a 14-year period including 4 years before vaccine introduction and spanning the entire PCV7 era. Cases were defined as children <18 years of age who were cared for at Primary Children's Medical Center for culture-confirmed IPD. We defined the prevaccine period as the time frame spanning from 1997 to 2000 and the postvaccine period from 2001 to 2010. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were collected through electronic query and chart review. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotyping was performed using the capsular swelling method. The median age of children with IPD increased from 19 months during the prevaccine period to 27 months during postvaccine period (P = 0.02), with a larger proportion of IPD among children older than 5 years. The proportion of IPD associated with pneumonia increased substantially from 29% to 50% (P < 0.001). This increase was primarily attributable to an increase in complicated pneumonia (17% to 33%, P < 0.001). Nonvaccine serotypes 7F, 19A, 22F, and 3 emerged as the dominant serotypes in the postvaccine period. In children with IPD who were younger than 5 years, for whom vaccine is recommended, 67% of the cases were caused by serotypes in 13-valent PCV during 2005 to 2010. After PCV7 was introduced, significant changes in IPD were noted. One-third of IPD occurred in children older than 5 years, who were outside the age-group for which PCV is recommended. Continued surveillance is warranted to identify further evolution of the epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae after 13-valent PCV licensure.

  18. Impact of ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease in Finnish children--a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Jukka; Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Siira, Lotta; Palmu, Arto A; Virtanen, Mikko J; Nohynek, Hanna; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni; Toropainen, Maija; Nuorti, J Pekka

    2015-01-01

    The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Program (NVP) in September 2010 with a 2+1 schedule (3, 5, 12 months) without catch-up vaccinations. We evaluated the direct and indirect effects of PCV10 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children ≤5 years of age during the first three years after NVP introduction. We conducted a population-based, observational follow-up study. The cohort of vaccine-eligible children (all children born June 1, 2010 or later) was followed from 3 months of age until the end of 2013. For the indirect effect, another cohort of older children ineligible for PCV10 vaccination was followed from 2011 through 2013. Both cohorts were compared with season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. National, population-based laboratory surveillance data were used to compare culture-confirmed serotype-specific IPD rates in the vaccine target and reference cohorts by using Poisson regression models. The overall IPD rate among vaccine-eligible children was reduced by 80% (95%CI 72 to 85); the reduction in vaccine-type IPD was 92% (95%CI 86 to 95). However, a non-significant increase in non-vaccine type IPD was observed. During 2012-2013, we also observed a 48% (95%CI 18 to 69) reduction in IPD among unvaccinated children 2 to 5 years of age, which was mostly attributable to the ten vaccine serotypes. This is the first population-based study investigating the impact of PCV10 introduction without prior PCV7 use. A substantial decrease in IPD rates among vaccine-eligible children was observed. A smaller and temporally delayed reduction among older, unvaccinated children suggests that PCV10 also provides indirect protection against vaccine-type IPD. Changes in serotype distribution warrant continuous monitoring of potential increases in non-vaccine serotypes.

  19. Impact of ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease in Finnish children--a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Jokinen

    Full Text Available The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Program (NVP in September 2010 with a 2+1 schedule (3, 5, 12 months without catch-up vaccinations. We evaluated the direct and indirect effects of PCV10 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD among children ≤5 years of age during the first three years after NVP introduction.We conducted a population-based, observational follow-up study. The cohort of vaccine-eligible children (all children born June 1, 2010 or later was followed from 3 months of age until the end of 2013. For the indirect effect, another cohort of older children ineligible for PCV10 vaccination was followed from 2011 through 2013. Both cohorts were compared with season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. National, population-based laboratory surveillance data were used to compare culture-confirmed serotype-specific IPD rates in the vaccine target and reference cohorts by using Poisson regression models.The overall IPD rate among vaccine-eligible children was reduced by 80% (95%CI 72 to 85; the reduction in vaccine-type IPD was 92% (95%CI 86 to 95. However, a non-significant increase in non-vaccine type IPD was observed. During 2012-2013, we also observed a 48% (95%CI 18 to 69 reduction in IPD among unvaccinated children 2 to 5 years of age, which was mostly attributable to the ten vaccine serotypes.This is the first population-based study investigating the impact of PCV10 introduction without prior PCV7 use. A substantial decrease in IPD rates among vaccine-eligible children was observed. A smaller and temporally delayed reduction among older, unvaccinated children suggests that PCV10 also provides indirect protection against vaccine-type IPD. Changes in serotype distribution warrant continuous monitoring of potential increases in non-vaccine serotypes.

  20. Previous antibiotic exposure and antimicrobial resistance in invasive pneumococcal disease: results from prospective surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Stefan P; Rudnick, Wallis; Shigayeva, Altynay; Green, Karen; Baqi, Mahin; Gold, Wayne L; Lovinsky, Reena; Muller, Matthew P; Powis, Jeff E; Rau, Neil; Simor, Andrew E; Walmsley, Sharon L; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison

    2014-10-01

    Estimating the risk of antibiotic resistance is important in selecting empiric antibiotics. We asked how the timing, number of courses, and duration of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months affected antibiotic resistance in isolates causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We conducted prospective surveillance for IPD in Toronto, Canada, from 2002 to 2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility was measured by broth microdilution. Clinical information, including prior antibiotic use, was collected by chart review and interview with patients and prescribers. Clinical information and antimicrobial susceptibility were available for 4062 (90%) episodes; 1193 (29%) of episodes were associated with receipt of 1782 antibiotic courses in the prior 3 months. Selection for antibiotic resistance was class specific. Time elapsed since most recent antibiotic was inversely associated with resistance (cephalosporins: adjusted odds ratio [OR] per day, 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], .96-1.00; P = .02; macrolides: OR, 0.98; 95% CI, .96-.99; P = .005; penicillins: OR [log(days)], 0.62; 95% CI, .44-.89; P = .009; fluoroquinolones: profile penalized-likelihood OR [log(days)], 0.62; 95% CI, .39-1.04; P = .07). Risk of resistance after exposure declined most rapidly for fluoroquinolones and penicillins and reached baseline in 2-3 months. The decline in resistance was slowest for macrolides, and in particular for azithromycin. There was no significant association between duration of therapy and resistance for any antibiotic class. Too few patients received multiple courses of the same antibiotic class to assess the significance of repeat courses. Time elapsed since last exposure to a class of antibiotics is the most important factor predicting antimicrobial resistance in pneumococci. The duration of effect is longer for macrolides than other classes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved

  1. [Characterization of patients who died of invasive pneumococcal disease in the child population of Bogota, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Juan Pablo; Leal, Aura Lucia; Patiño, Jaime; Montañez, Anita; Camacho, Germán; Beltrán, Sandra; Bonilla, Carolina; Barrero, Rocio; Mariño, Cristina; Ramos, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), also known as pneumococcus, is one of the main bacteria associated with mortality in children under 2 years of age, with a morbidity and mortality incidence that varies according to demographics and exposure to risk, or protective factors. To describe the child mortality due to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) between 2008 -2014 (6 years), in 8 Medical Centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Descriptive observational case series of patients who died of IPD, aged 28 days to 18 years, in 8 tertiary care institutions in Bogota, Colombia. The study period was from 1 January 2008 to 15 January 2014. 239 patients. A total of 239 registered cases of IPD were reviewed, showing a mortality of 8% (n 18). The mean age of patients that died was 43.7 months, with an age range from 2 to 176 months (14 years), with 66% of the cases being male. Serotypes were identified in 8 patients, finding: 6A, 6B, 10A, 14, 18C, 23B, 23F, and 35B. The most common clinical presentation of the cases was meningitis with mortality of 33% (6 cases), followed by bacteraemia without focus in 28% (5 cases), and pneumonia with 27% (5 cases). Combined clinical situations were presented, such as pneumonia and meningitis in 11% (2 cases). Two of the patients had clearly documented risk factors for IPD (asplenia and chronic respiratory disease). IPD mortality is particularly high in children under 2 years in male patients, especially when presented with a meningeal focus (44%). Serotyping was not possible in all patients who died, since no strain isolated was sent to the National Institute of Health. Continuous and systematic vigilance is required to evaluate the impact of vaccination and possible changes in the pattern of presentation of disease. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental studies of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christian T

    2010-01-01

    This thesis summarizes experimental meningitis research conducted at Statens Serum Institut in collaboration with the Copenhagen HIV programme and the Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance between 2001 and 2007. Previous experimental studies had shown that the host inflammatory response in invasive infections contributed significantly to an extremely poor outcome despite initiation of efficient antimicrobial chemotherapy. Consequently, we aimed to investigate and clarify how the course of disease in pneumococcal meningitis was modulated by local meningeal inflammation and concomitant systemic infection and inflammation. Experimental studies were based on the development of a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis, refined and optimized to closely resemble the human disease, mimicking disease severity, outcome, focal- and global brain injury and brain pathophysiology. These endpoints were evaluated by the development of a clinical score system, definition of outcomes and measurement of hearing loss by otoacoustic emission. The investigation of in-vitro and in-vivo brain pathology with histology and MRI revealed an injury pattern similar to that found clinically. Additionally, MRI enabled the study of parameters closely related to the cerebral pathophysiology of meningitis (brain oedema, blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, focal brain injury and hydrocephalus). Modulation of the inflammatory host response was achieved by initiation of treatment prior to infection: 1) G-CSF treatment increased the peripheral availability of leukocytes, 2) Selectin blocker fucoidin attenuated meningeal leukocyte accumulation and 3) A serotype specific Ab augmented systemic pneumococcal phagocytosis. The studies revealed a dual role of the inflammatory response in pneumococcal meningitis. Whilst focal brain injury appeared to result from local meningeal infectious processes, clinical disease severity and outcome appeared determined by systemic infection. Furthermore systemic

  3. Invasive pneumococcal disease among children younger than 5 years of age before and after introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Casablanca, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diawara, Idrissa; Zerouali, Khalid; Katfy, Khalid; Zaki, Bahija; Belabbes, Houria; Najib, Jillali; Elmdaghri, Naima

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence rate of invasive pneumococcal disease, the rates of antibiotic resistance and serotype distribution among children ≤5 years old before and after PCVs introduction in Casablanca, Morocco. This study was conducted at the Ibn Rochd University Hospital Centre of Casablanca during two periods encompassing pre-and post-implementation of PCVs, respectively from January 2007 to October 2010 and from January 2011 to December 2014. All the non-duplicate invasive S. pneumoniae isolates recovered during the study periods were included. There were 136 cases of IPD, 91 before and 45 after PCVs introduction. The greatest decrease in incidence rate of IPD occurred in children ≤ 2 years of age declining from 34.6 to 13.5 per 100,000 populations (p<0.0001) before and after vaccination, respectively. The incidence rate of PCV-7, PCV-10 non-PCV-7 and PCV-13 non-PCV-10 serotypes decrease significantly from 18.0 to 4.6, from 5.7 to 1.3 and from 5.7 to 0.8/100,000 population (p<0.001) in the same age, respectively. Shifts in the distribution of IPD serotypes and reductions in the incidence rate of disease suggest an effective reduction of the burden of IPD in children, but continued high quality surveillance is critical to assess the changes in serotype distributions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankine-Mullings, Angela E; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley

    2017-10-10

    Persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) are particularly susceptible to infection. Infants and very young children are especially vulnerable. The 'Co-operative Study of Sickle Cell Disease' observed an incidence rate for pneumococcal septicaemia of 10 per 100 person years in children under the age of three years. Vaccines, including customary pneumococcal vaccines, may be of limited use in this age group. Therefore, prophylactic penicillin regimens may be advisable for this population. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and previously updated, most recently in 2014. To assess the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis against pneumococcus in children with SCD in relation to:1. incidence of infection;2. mortality;3. drug-related adverse events (as reported in the included studies) to the individual and the community;4. the impact of discontinuing at various ages on incidence of infection and mortality. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and also two clinical trials registries: ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Registry Platform. Additionally, we carried out handsearching of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 19 December 2016. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic antibiotics to prevent pneumococcal infection in children with SCD with placebo, no treatment or a comparator drug. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. The authors used the GRADE criteria to assess the quality of the evidence. Five trials were identified by the searches, of which three trials (880 children randomised) met the inclusion criteria. All of the included trials showed a reduced incidence of infection in children with SCD (SS or Sβ0Thal) receiving prophylactic penicillin

  5. Pneumococcal infections in humans are associated with increased apoptosis and trafficking of type 1 cytokine-producing T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Skinhøj, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , little is known regarding the T-cell response during in vivo infections in humans. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that activated T cells producing type 1 cytokines were engaged in the host response to pneumococcal infections. The phenotype and function of T cells were studied in 22...

  6. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, S. G. B.; Brouwer, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; Hensen, E. F.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 849855 Abstract We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in

  7. [Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Community of Valencia. Six years of surveillance (2007-2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancotti Oliver, Lucía Rosa; Huertas Zarco, Isabel; Pérez Pérez, Elvira; Carmona Martí, Esther; Carbó Malonda, Rosa; Gil Bru, Ana; González Moran, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of conjugated anti-pneumonia vaccines has led to a change in the epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD). The aim of this study is to describe the trends in IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012. A retrospective, descriptive and longitudinal study was conducted on IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012, The information sources used were the Epidemiological Surveillance Analysis (Análisis de la Vigilancia Epidemiológica (AVE)) and the Valencian Microbiology Network (Red Microbiológica Valenciana (RedMIVA)) of the Valencia Health Department. The incidence of IPD decreased between 2007 and 2012 in all age groups, mainly in the under 5 year-olds, dropping from 30.5 cases to 12.3 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). Pneumonia was the principal presentation of the disease, with a decrease in its rates from 6.9 to 4.1 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). A gradual, non-significant, reduction from 26% to 12% (p=.23) was observed in the proportion of cases due to the serotypes contained in the heptavalent vaccine (PCV7), mainly in the under 5 year-olds. The cases due to additional serotypes in 13-valent conjugated vaccine (1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F and 19A) also showed a decreasing trend, mainly in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (52.6% vs 14.3%; p=.03), while the cases due to non-vaccine serotypes significantly increased from 42.3% to 56.7% in the general population (p=.002), and from 47.4% to 78.6% in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (p=.08). The results of this study show a reduction in the incidence of IPD, with a decrease in the proportion of cases produced by vaccine serotypes, and an increase in the proportion of those not vaccinated. Epidemiological Surveillance is necessary to monitor the trends in the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection w...... pneumococcal disease. The limitations of the current polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine warrant the development of alternative vaccines. We suggest that the virulence of pneumococcal serotypes should be considered in the design of novel vaccines....

  9. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-12-02

    The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project's Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620% (95% CI 176%-1777%) for the website

  10. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  11. B-cell development and pneumococcal immunity in vertically acquired HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Sarah; Hayden, Clare; Young, Carmel J; Gilson, Richard; Jungmann, Eva; Jacobsen, Marianne C; Poulsom, Hannah; Goldblatt, David; Klein, Nigel J; Baxendale, Helen E

    2016-07-31

    Many children with HIV infection now survive into adulthood. This study explored the impact of vertically acquired HIV in the era of antiretroviral therapy on the development of humoral immunity. Natural and vaccine-related immunity to pneumococcus and B-cell phenotype was characterized and compared in three groups of young adults: those with vertically-acquired infection, those with horizontally acquired infection and healthy controls. Serotype-specific pneumococcal (Pnc) immunoglobulin M and G concentrations before and up to 1 year post-Pnc polysaccharide (Pneumovax) immunization were determined, and opsonophagocytic activity was analysed. B-cell subpopulations and dynamic markers of B-cell signalling, turnover and susceptibility to apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. HIV-infected patients showed impaired natural Pnc immunity and reduced humoral responses to immunization with Pneumovax; this was greatest in those viraemic at time of the study. Early-life viral control before the age of 10 years diminished these changes. Expanded populations of abnormally activated and immature B-cells were seen in both HIV-infected cohorts. Vertically infected patients were particularly vulnerable to reductions in marginal zone and switched memory populations. These aberrations were reduced in patients with early-life viral control. In children with HIV, damage to B-cell memory populations and impaired natural and vaccine immunity to pneumococcus is evident in early adult life. Sustained viral control from early childhood may help to limit this effect and optimize humoral immunity in adult life.

  12. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal meningitis; Pneumococcus - meningitis ... Pneumococcal meningitis is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria (also called pneumococcus, or S pneumoniae ). This type of bacteria is the ...

  13. The lectin pathway of complement activation is a critical component of the innate immune response to pneumococcal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Youssif M; Lynch, Nicholas J; Haleem, Kashif S

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host defense against pneumococcal infection. Three different pathways, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways, mediate complement activation. While there is limited information available on the roles of the classical and the alternative activation...... pathways of complement in fighting streptococcal infection, little is known about the role of the lectin pathway, mainly due to the lack of appropriate experimental models of lectin pathway deficiency. We have recently established a mouse strain deficient of the lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan...... to pneumococcal infection and fail to opsonize Streptococcus pneumoniae in the none-immune host. This defect in complement opsonisation severely compromises pathogen clearance in the lectin pathway deficient host. Using sera from mice and humans with defined complement deficiencies, we demonstrate that mouse...

  14. Cost-effectiveness of stockpiling 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine to prevent secondary pneumococcal infections among a high-risk population in the United States during an influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhankhar, Praveen; Grabenstein, John D; O'Brien, Megan A; Dasbach, Erik J

    2010-08-01

    Secondary bacterial infections (especially pneumococcal infections) were a major cause of death during prior influenza pandemics. One strategy to prevent pneumococcal infections in adults during a future pandemic is to stockpile 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). Stockpiling a pneumococcal vaccine can ensure that it is available when needed most-that is, at the onset of a pandemic. The purpose of this article was to project the health and economic impact of stockpiling PPSV23 to prevent secondary pneumococcal infections among high-risk adults aged 18 to 64 years during an influenza pandemic within the United States. A cost-effectiveness model was developed to evaluate the health and economic effects of stockpiling PPSV23 versus not stockpiling this vaccine for preventing secondary pneumococcal infections among 20 million high-risk US adults aged 18 to 64 years during an influenza pandemic. The model was used to project the number of pneumococcal cases, hospitalizations, deaths, and days of work loss averted. Three health outcomes (deaths, hospitalizations, and outpatient care) were estimated from secondary pneumococcal infections. To assess the overall effectiveness of the different strategies, the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) was used as a measure of these 3 health outcomes. The results are presented for 3 scenarios based on the pandemic severity and anticipated prepandemic influenza vaccine availability: base case, more-severe case, and less-severe case. In the base-case scenario, vaccinating 20 million high-risk adults with PPSV23 avoided 2858 deaths, 878 hospitalizations, 41,881 pneumococcal pneumonia cases, and 232,891 days of work loss during a pandemic. Under the more-severe case scenario, vaccination avoided 21,921 deaths, 10,280 hospitalizations, 70,345 pneumococcal cases, and approximately 1.12 million days of work loss. Under the less-severe case scenario, pneumococcal vaccination avoided 715 deaths, 219 hospitalizations, 10

  15. The Changing Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease at a Tertiary Children’s Hospital through the PCV7 Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMPOFO, KROW; PAVIA, ANDREW T.; STOCKMANN, CHRIS; HERSH, ADAM L.; BENDER, JEFFERY M.; BLASCHKE, ANNE J.; WENG, HSIN YI CINDY; KORGENSKI, KENT E.; DALY, JUDY; MASON, EDWARD O.; BYINGTON, CARRIE L.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2000, a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed for use among U.S. children. Many sites have since reported changes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We recognized an opportunity to describe the changes in epidemiology, clinical syndromes and serotype distribution over a 14 year period including 4 years before vaccine introduction and spanning the entire PCV7 era. Methods Cases were defined as children <18 years of age who were cared for at Primary Children’s Medical Center for culture-confirmed IPD. We defined the pre-vaccine period as the timeframe spanning 1997–2000 and the post-vaccine period from 2001–2010. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were collected through electronic query and chart review. S. pneumoniae serotyping was performed using the capsular swelling method. Results The median age of children with IPD increased from 19 months during the pre-vaccine period to 27 months during post-vaccine period (P = 0.02) with a larger proportion of IPD among children older than 5 years. The proportion of IPD associated with pneumonia increased substantially from 29% to 50% (P < 0.001). This increase was primarily attributable to an increase in complicated pneumonia (17% to 33%; P < 0.001). Non-vaccine serotypes 7F, 19A, 22F and 3 emerged as the dominant serotypes in the post-vaccine period. Of S. pneumoniae isolates collected from children <5 years of age, for which vaccine is recommended, 67% of IPD was due to serotypes in PCV13 during 2005–2010. Conclusions After PCV7 was introduced, significant changes in IPD were noted. One third of IPD occurred in children older than 5 years, who were outside the age group for which PCV is recommended. Continued surveillance is warranted to identify further evolution of the epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae following PCV13 licensure. PMID:22330164

  16. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedibone M Ndlangisa

    Full Text Available We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60% from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ≥5 years was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%], some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]. In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively. Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12 and 64% (9/14 of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction.

  17. The Czech Surveillance System for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, 2008-2013: A Follow-Up Assessment and Sensitivity Estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Katharina Stock

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and mostly presents as pneumonia, sepsis or meningitis. A notable portion of IPD cases is vaccine preventable and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV was introduced into the routine childhood immunization programs in many countries during the last decades.Before PCV introduction in the Czech Republic in 2010, a national surveillance system for IPD was implemented in 2008 and further improved in 2011. In this study, we describe the new surveillance system for the first time and measure its sensitivity between 2010 and 2013 using the capture-recapture method. Furthermore, we describe the recent epidemiological trend of IPD, taking sensitivity estimates into account.Between 2010 and 2013 the estimated sensitivity of the overall IPD surveillance increased from 81% to 99%. The sensitivity of individual reporting sources increased from 72% to 87% for the laboratory system and from 31% to 89% for the epidemiological notification system. Crucial for this improvement was the introduction of quarterly report reminders in 2011. Due to positive source dependency, the presented sensitivity estimates are most probably overestimated and reflect the upper limit of reporting completeness. Stratification showed variation in sensitivity of reporting particularly according to region. An effect of the PVC vaccination in the Czech Republic is visible in the incidence of IPD in target age groups (<5 y. This influence was not evident in the total IPD incidence and may interfere with increasing sensitivity of reporting. In 2013, an increase in the IPD incidence was observed. This finding requires further observation and a detailed vaccine impact analysis is needed to assess the current immunization strategy.

  18. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine serotypes following the introduction of conjugate vaccination in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Ingels, Helene

    2013-01-01

    A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the Danish childhood immunization program (2+1 schedule) in October 2007, followed by PCV13 starting from April 2010. The nationwide incidence of IPD among children younger than 5 years nearly halved after the introduction...... of children suspected to present with a vaccine failure. The period between April 19 and December 31, 2010 was considered a PCV7/PCV13 transitional period, where both vaccines were offered. We identified 45 episodes of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype (23% of the total number) and 105 (55%) caused by one...... of the 6 additional serotypes in PCV13. Ten children had received at least one PCV7 dose before the onset of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype. Seven children were considered to be incompletely vaccinated before IPD, but only three cases fulfilled the criteria of vaccine failure (caused by serotypes 14, 19F...

  19. Evolution of pneumococcal infections in adult patients during a four-year period after vaccination of a pediatric population with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Payeras

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Although a reduction in infections due to vaccine serotypes was observed, close to half of infections in adult patients were caused by PCV-13 serotypes. Even after pediatric vaccination with PCV-13, vaccine serotypes were still responsible for most pneumonia and invasive disease, underscoring the importance of implementing current guidelines and extending vaccination to other risk groups.

  20. Pneumococcal Meningitis in an Adolescent with Fever and Foot Ache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement.

  1. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-13

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Chris Van Beneden discusses the dangers of group A strep infections.  Created: 6/13/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/13/2011.

  2. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine serotypes following the introduction of conjugate vaccination in Denmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitta B Harboe

    Full Text Available A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced in the Danish childhood immunization program (2+1 schedule in October 2007, followed by PCV13 starting from April 2010. The nationwide incidence of IPD among children younger than 5 years nearly halved after the introduction of PCV7 in the program, mainly due to a decline in IPD caused by PCV7-serotypes. We report the results from a nationwide population-based cohort study of laboratory confirmed IPD cases in children younger than 5 years during October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010 and describe the characteristics of children suspected to present with a vaccine failure. The period between April 19 and December 31, 2010 was considered a PCV7/PCV13 transitional period, where both vaccines were offered. We identified 45 episodes of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype (23% of the total number and 105 (55% caused by one of the 6 additional serotypes in PCV13. Ten children had received at least one PCV7 dose before the onset of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype. Seven children were considered to be incompletely vaccinated before IPD, but only three cases fulfilled the criteria of vaccine failure (caused by serotypes 14, 19F and 23F. One case of vaccine failure was observed in a severely immunosuppressed child following three PCV7 doses, and two cases were observed in immunocompetent children following two infant doses before they were eligible for their booster. None of the IPD cases caused by the additional PCV13 serotypes had been vaccinated by PCV13 and there were therefore no PCV13-vaccine failures in the first 8-months after PCV13 introduction in Denmark.

  3. Pneumococcal infections in humans are associated with increased apoptosis and trafficking of type 1 cytokine-producing T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Skinhøj, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , little is known regarding the T-cell response during in vivo infections in humans. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that activated T cells producing type 1 cytokines were engaged in the host response to pneumococcal infections. The phenotype and function of T cells were studied in 22...... tissues and/or apoptosis. In fact, increased activation-induced apoptosis in the remaining peripheral lymphocytes and elevated levels of soluble Fas ligand were detected at admission to the hospital. In conclusion, these data suggest that activated T lymphocytes with a type 1 cytokine profile are highly...

  4. [Invasive yeast infections in neutropenic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts still play an important role in the morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies. Although the overall incidence of invasive candidiasis has decreased due to widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis, the incidence of non-Candida albicans Candida species is increasing compared with that of C.albicans, and mortality of invasive candidiasis continues to be high. In addition, there has been an increase in invasive infections caused by an array of uncommon yeasts, including species of the genus Malassezia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saprochaete, characterised by their resistance to echinocandins and poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    hemoglobin level of 6.5g/dL, 38,000 platelets/mm³, blood urea nitrogen of 79mg/dL and creatinine of 1.64mg/dL. On the first day, patient developed oliguria and hypervolemia and needed hemodiafiltration. Multiple organs dysfunction syndrome was followed by death on the seventh day. Necropsy showed extensive renal cortical and tubular necrosis with fibrin deposits on arterioles. COMMENTS: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease has high morbidity and mortality rates. Children with pneumococcal infection and severe hematologic or renal abnormalities should be investigated. The usefulness of early recognition of T-antigen activation on diagnosis and therapeutics, the role of complement factor H in the pathology, the ideal renal replacement method and the definition of long term outcome are issues to be investigated.

  6. Risk factors and comorbidities for invasive pneumococcal disease in Western Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye Janice Lim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Australian Aboriginal people have among the highest rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD worldwide. We investigated clinical diagnosis, risk factors, comorbidities and vaccine coverage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal IPD cases. Using enhanced surveillance, we identified IPD cases in Western Australia, Australia, between 1997 and 2007. We calculated the proportion with risk factors and comorbidities in children (<5 years and adults (≥15 years, as well as adults living in metropolitan and non-metropolitan regions. We then calculated the proportion of cases eligible for vaccination who were vaccinated before contracting IPD. Of the 1,792 IPD cases that were reported, 355 (20% were Aboriginal and 1,155 (65% were adults. Pneumonia was the most common diagnosis (61% of non-Aboriginal and 49% of Aboriginal adult IPD cases in 2001-2007. Congenital abnormality was the most frequent comorbidity in non-Aboriginal children (11%. In Aboriginal children, preterm delivery was most common (14%. Ninety-one percent of non-Aboriginal and 96% of Aboriginal adults had one or more risk factors or comorbidities. In non-Aboriginal adults, cardiovascular disease (34% was the predominant comorbidity whilst excessive alcohol use (66% was the most commonly reported risk factor in Aboriginal adults. In adults, comorbidities were more frequently reported among those in metropolitan regions than those in non-metropolitan regions. Vaccination status was unknown for 637 of 1,082 cases post-July 2001. Forty-one percent of non-Aboriginal and 60% of Aboriginal children were eligible for vaccination but were not vaccinated. Among adults with risk factors who were eligible for vaccination and with known vaccination status, 75% Aboriginal and 94% non-Aboriginal were not vaccinated. An all-of-life immunisation register is needed to evaluate vaccine coverage and effectiveness in preventing IPD in adults.

  7. Mucosal immunization with PspA (Pneumococcal surface protein A-adsorbed nanoparticles targeting the lungs for protection against pneumococcal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasson C Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Burden of pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae remains high despite the availability of conjugate vaccines. Mucosal immunization targeting the lungs is an attractive alternative for the induction of local immune responses to improve protection against pneumonia. Our group had previously described the development of poly(glycerol adipate-co-ω-pentadecalactone (PGA-co-PDL polymeric nanoparticles (NPs adsorbed with Pneumococcal surface protein A from clade 4 (PspA4Pro within L-leucine microcarriers (nanocomposite microparticles-NCMPs for mucosal delivery targeting the lungs (NP/NCMP PspA4Pro. NP/NCMP PspA4Pro was now used for immunization of mice. Inoculation of this formulation induced anti-PspA4Pro IgG antibodies in serum and lungs. Analysis of binding of serum IgG to intact bacteria showed efficient binding to bacteria expressing PspA from clades 3, 4 and 5 (family 2, but no binding to bacteria expressing PspA from clades 1 and 2 (family 1 was observed. Both mucosal immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro and subcutaneous injection of the protein elicited partial protection against intranasal lethal pneumococcal challenge with a serotype 3 strain expressing PspA from clade 5 (PspA5. Although similar survival levels were observed for mucosal immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro and subcutaneous immunization with purified protein, NP/NCMP PspA4Pro induced earlier control of the infection. Conversely, neither immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro nor subcutaneous immunization with purified protein reduced bacterial burden in the lungs after challenge with a serotype 19F strain expressing PspA from clade 1 (PspA1. Mucosal immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro targeting the lungs is thus able to induce local and systemic antibodies, conferring protection only against a strain expressing PspA from the homologous family 2.

  8. The lectin pathway of complement activation is a critical component of the innate immune response to pneumococcal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssif M Ali

    Full Text Available The complement system plays a key role in host defense against pneumococcal infection. Three different pathways, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways, mediate complement activation. While there is limited information available on the roles of the classical and the alternative activation pathways of complement in fighting streptococcal infection, little is known about the role of the lectin pathway, mainly due to the lack of appropriate experimental models of lectin pathway deficiency. We have recently established a mouse strain deficient of the lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2 and shown that this mouse strain is unable to form the lectin pathway specific C3 and C5 convertases. Here we report that MASP-2 deficient mice (which can still activate complement via the classical pathway and the alternative pathway are highly susceptible to pneumococcal infection and fail to opsonize Streptococcus pneumoniae in the none-immune host. This defect in complement opsonisation severely compromises pathogen clearance in the lectin pathway deficient host. Using sera from mice and humans with defined complement deficiencies, we demonstrate that mouse ficolin A, human L-ficolin, and collectin 11 in both species, but not mannan-binding lectin (MBL, are the pattern recognition molecules that drive lectin pathway activation on the surface of S. pneumoniae. We further show that pneumococcal opsonisation via the lectin pathway can proceed in the absence of C4. This study corroborates the essential function of MASP-2 in the lectin pathway and highlights the importance of MBL-independent lectin pathway activation in the host defense against pneumococci.

  9. Deletion of the complement C5a receptor alleviates the severity of acute pneumococcal otitis media following influenza A virus infection in mice.

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    Hua Hua Tong

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that influenza A virus (IAV promotes adherence, colonization, and superinfection by S. pneumoniae (Spn and contributes to the pathogenesis of otitis media (OM. The complement system is a critical innate immune defense against both pathogens. To assess the role of the complement system in the host defense and the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection, we employed a well-established transtympanically-induced mouse model of acute pneumococcal OM. We found that antecedent IAV infection enhanced the severity of acute pneumococcal OM. Mice deficient in complement C1qa (C1qa-/- or factor B (Bf -/- exhibited delayed viral and bacterial clearance from the middle ear and developed significant mucosal damage in the eustachian tube and middle ear. This indicates that both the classical and alternative complement pathways are critical for the oto-immune defense against acute pneumococcal OM following influenza infection. We also found that Spn increased complement activation following IAV infection. This was characterized by sustained increased levels of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a in serum and middle ear lavage samples. In contrast, mice deficient in the complement C5a receptor (C5aR demonstrated enhanced bacterial clearance and reduced severity of OM. Our data support the concept that C5a-C5aR interactions play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection. It is possible that targeting the C5a-C5aR axis might prove useful in attenuating acute pneumococcal OM in patients with influenza infection.

  10. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae among HIV-infected and -uninfected children <5 years of age before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Mozambique.

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    Jennifer R Verani

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carriage is a precursor for pneumococcal disease and can be useful for evaluating pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV impact. We studied pre-PCV pneumococcal carriage among HIV-infected and -uninfected children in Mozambique. Between October 2012 and March 2013, we enrolled HIV-infected children age <5 years presenting for routine care at seven HIV clinics in 3 sites, including Maputo (urban-south, Nampula (urban-north, and Manhiça (rural-south. We also enrolled a random sample of HIV-uninfected children <5 years old from a demographic surveillance site in Manhiça. A single nasopharyngeal swab was obtained and cultured following enrichment in Todd Hewitt broth with yeast extract and rabbit serum. Pneumococcal isolates were serotyped by Quellung reaction and multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Factors associated with pneumococcal carriage were examined using logistic regression. Overall pneumococcal carriage prevalence was 80.5% (585/727, with similar prevalences among HIV-infected (81.5%, 339/416 and HIV-uninfected (79.1%, 246/311 children, and across age strata. Among HIV-infected, after adjusting for recent antibiotic use and hospitalization, there was no significant association between study site and colonization: Maputo (74.8%, 92/123, Nampula (83.7%, 82/98, Manhiça (84.6%, 165/195. Among HIV-uninfected, report of having been born to an HIV-infected mother was not associated with colonization. Among 601 pneumococcal isolates from 585 children, serotypes 19F (13.5%, 23F (13.1%, 6A (9.2%, 6B (6.2% and 19A (5.2% were most common. The proportion of serotypes included in the 10- and 13-valent vaccines was 44.9% and 61.7%, respectively, with no significant differences by HIV status or age group. Overall 36.9% (n = 268 of children were colonized with a PCV10 serotype and 49.7% (n = 361 with a PCV13 serotype. Pneumococcal carriage was common, with little variation by geographic region, age, or HIV status. PCV10 was introduced in

  11. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena; Murdjeva, Marianna; Stancheva, Iglika; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Sredkova, Maria; Stoeva, Temenuga; Yoneva, Magda; Kurchatova, Anna; Mitov, Ivan

    The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011-2016 from patients with invasive (IPD) and non-invasive (NIPD) pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%), 19F (4.0%), and 7F (3.0%). A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs) from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each), and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%), 19A, and 6C (4.0% each). VTs decreased significantly (16.3%) among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%). Two non-VTs (19A and 6C) have increased significantly more (pantibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin - 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole - 45.4%, erythromycin - 43.9%, tetracycline - 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR) was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to aid in determining the long-term effectiveness of PCV10 interventions. Copyright © 2017

  12. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV in Bulgaria

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    Lena Setchanova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011–2016 from patients with invasive (IPD and non-invasive (NIPD pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%, 19F (4.0%, and 7F (3.0%. A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each, and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%, 19A, and 6C (4.0% each. VTs decreased significantly (16.3% among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%. Two non-VTs (19A and 6C have increased significantly more (p < 0.05 in vaccinated children than in unvaccinated patients. The rates of antibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin – 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole – 45.4%, erythromycin – 43.9%, tetracycline – 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pneumococcal vaccination of adults and elderly persons in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graeve, D; Lombaert, G; Goossens, H

    2000-06-01

    To analyse the direct medical costs and effectiveness of vaccinating adults aged between 18 and 64 years and elderly persons > or = 65 years of age with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. This was a decision-analytic modelling study from the societal perspective in Belgium. The analysis compared 'vaccination' with 'no vaccination and treatment'. Calculations were based on the assumption that vaccination is as effective against all pneumococcal infections as it is against invasive pneumococcal disease. Data on the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia and meningitis, frequency of hospitalisation, mortality rates and vaccine effectiveness were derived from the international literature. Costs were derived from analysis of historical data for cases of pneumococcal infection in Belgium. Vaccinating 1000 adults between the ages of 18 and 64 years gains approximately 2 life-years in comparison with the no vaccination option. However, to realise these additional health benefits requires additional costs of 11,800 European Currency Units (ECU; 1995 values) per life-year saved. Vaccinating 1000 elderly people (> or = 65 years) leads to > 9 life-years gained as well as a small monetary benefit of ECU1250. An extensive sensitivity analysis did not greatly affect the results for the elderly population: vaccination in this age group always remained favourable, and thus it is clearly indicated from an economic point of view. A crucial assumption for both age groups is that the effectiveness of the vaccine holds for all pneumococcal pneumonia. It is clear that the results will become less favourable if this assumption is dropped. Preventing pneumococcal infections by vaccination clearly benefits people's health. Reimbursement can be recommended for the elderly group; however, more accurate epidemiological data are still needed to make decisions concerning routine pneumococcal vaccination in adults issue of whether the effectiveness of the vaccine holds for all

  14. Mycoviruses : future therapeutic agents of invasive fungal infections in humans?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Sande, W. W. J.; Lo-Ten-Foe, J. R.; van Belkum, A.; Netea, M. G.; Kullberg, B. J.; Vonk, A. G.

    Invasive fungal infections are relatively common opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients and are still associated with a high mortality rate. Furthermore, these infections are often complicated by resistance or refractoriness to current antimicrobial agents. Therefore, an urgent need

  15. Let the sun shine in: effects of ultraviolet radiation on invasive pneumococcal disease risk in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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    Johnson Caroline C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of community acquired pneumonia and bacteremia. Excess wintertime mortality related to pneumonia has been noted for over a century, but the seasonality of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has been described relatively recently and is poorly understood. Improved understanding of environmental influence on disease seasonality has taken on new urgency due to global climate change. Methods We evaluated 602 cases of IPD reported in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, from 2002 to 2007. Poisson regression models incorporating seasonal smoothers were used to identify associations between weekly weather patterns and case counts. Associations between acute (day-to-day environmental fluctuations and IPD occurrence were evaluated using a case-crossover approach. Effect modification across age and sex strata was explored, and meta-regression models were created using stratum-specific estimates for effect. Results IPD incidence was greatest in the wintertime, and spectral decomposition revealed a peak at 51.0 weeks, consistent with annual periodicity. After adjustment for seasonality, yearly increases in reporting, and temperature, weekly incidence was found to be associated with clear-sky UV index (IRR per unit increase in index: 0.70 [95% CI 0.54-0.91]. The effect of UV index was highest among young strata and decreased with age. At shorter time scales, only an association with increases in ambient sulphur oxides was linked to disease risk (OR for highest tertile of exposure 0.75, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.93. Conclusion We confirmed the wintertime predominance of IPD in a major urban center. The major predictor of IPD in Philadelphia is extended periods of low UV radiation, which may explain observed wintertime seasonality. The mechanism of action of diminished light exposure on disease occurrence may be due to direct effects on pathogen survival or host immune function via altered 1,25-(OH2-vitamin

  16. Effects of influenza plus pneumococcal conjugate vaccination versus influenza vaccination alone in preventing respiratory tract infections in children : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Hoes, Arno W; van Loon, Anton M; Hak, Eelko

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of influenza vaccination with or without heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children. STUDY DESIGN: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprising 579 children age 18 to 72 months with

  17. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, S.; Brouwer, M.; van den Ende, A.; Hensen, E.F.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 849-855 We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in two

  19. Pneumococcal vaccines: the impact of conjugate vaccine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mäkelä, P. Helena; Siber, George R; Klugman, Keith P

    2008-01-01

    ... of Streptococcus pneumoniae with Complement Proteins 83 Margaret K. Hostetter III. Clinical Disease and Epidemiology 8 Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Serious Pneumococcal Infections in Chi...

  20. Outbreak of Pneumonia in the Setting of Fatal Pneumococcal Meningitis among US Army Trainees: Potential Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection

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    Mitchell Stephanie L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to the civilian population, military trainees are often at increased risk for respiratory infections. We investigated an outbreak of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia that was recognized after 2 fatal cases of serotype 7F pneumococcal meningitis were reported in a 303-person military trainee company (Alpha Company. Methods We reviewed surveillance data on pneumonia and febrile respiratory illness at the training facility; conducted chart reviews for cases of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; and administered surveys and collected nasopharyngeal swabs from trainees in the outbreak battalion (Alpha and Hotel Companies, associated training staff, and trainees newly joining the battalion. Results Among Alpha and Hotel Company trainees, the average weekly attack rates of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia were 1.4% and 1.2% (most other companies at FLW: 0-0.4%. The pneumococcal carriage rate among all Alpha Company trainees was 15% with a predominance of serotypes 7F and 3. Chlamydia pneumoniae was identified from 31% of specimens collected from Alpha Company trainees with respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Although the etiology of the outbreak remains unclear, the identification of both S. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae among trainees suggests that both pathogens may have contributed either independently or as cofactors to the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in the outbreak battalion and should be considered as possible etiologies in outbreaks of pneumonia in the military population.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae Attenuated Strain SPY1 with an Artificial Mineral Shell Induces Humoral and Th17 Cellular Immunity and Protects Mice against Pneumococcal Infection

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    Xinyuan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen leading to substantial morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent S. pneumoniae infection. SPY1 is a pneumococcal vaccine candidate strain obtained in our previous study. To improve its stability and immunogencity, in this study, we constructed the SPY1ΔlytA strain that lacks autolysin activity and was coated with an artificial exterior surface calcium phosphate shell by in situ mineralization. The resulting strain SPY1ΔlytACaPi displayed enhanced thermal stability enabling storage at 37°C for 1 week. Furthermore, mucosal and subcutaneous immunization with the SPY1ΔlytACaPi strain induced better protective effects than SPY1ΔlytA in anti-colonization after challenging with 19F and anti-invasion by D39 in mice. Subcutaneous immunization with SPY1ΔlytACaPi elicited higher IgG level while mucosal immunization primarily elicited an immune response which is supposed to be related to Th17 cells. Taken together, the mineralized strain may be a promising candidate for an attenuated S. pneumoniae vaccine.

  2. Changes in invasive pneumococcal disease serotypes in a regional area of Australia following three years of 7vPCV introduction

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    Fakhrul Islam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD is a serious bacterial disease. Vaccination can prevent disease for many of the current serotypes. The aim of this investigation was to describe the notification rates of IPD in a regional area of Australia, explore changes in rates since the introduction of the population vaccine programmes in 2005 and to describe changes in the distribution of serotypes in relation to the available vaccines after three years.Methods: Annualized IPD notification rates were calculated for residents of a regional area in northern New South Wales. Rates were analysed according to serotypes covered by available vaccines. Changes in serotypes were compared for the periods 2002–2004 and 2008–2010.Results: The annualized notification rate of IPD in all ages for the period 2002–2004 was 13.7 per 100 000 population and 8.3 per 100 000 population for the period 2008–2010 (rate ratio [RR], 0.61, confidence interval [CI]: 0.51–0.72. The largest decline was observed in 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV types across all age groups (RR, 0.17, CI: 0.12–0.24 and in the zero to four year age group (RR, 0.03, CI: 0.01–0.11. The six serotypes included in the new 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, but not in the 7vPCV, accounted for 40.6% of IPD cases in the zero to four year age group during the period of 2008–2010.Discussion: The introduction of 7vPCV significantly reduced the overall notification rate of IPD caused by the serotypes contained in this vaccine. This decline in IPD rates in children can be directly attributed to the use of 7vPCV, and in adults it is most likely an indirect effect of the 7vPCV programme in children.

  3. [Streptococcus pyogenes infection in paediatrics: from pharyngotonsillitis to invasive infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espadas Maciá, David; Flor Macián, Eva María; Borrás, Rafael; Poujois Gisbert, Sandrine; Muñoz Bonet, Juan Ignacio

    2018-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes or Group A Streptococci (GAS) cause many infections in infancy. Changes in its epidemiology have been described in recent years, including an increase in invasive infections (iGAS). A retrospective-descriptive study was conducted on children less than 15 years old, with GAS infections, in particular iGAS, and their complications from February 2004-April 2014. A total of 2,192 positive cultures were obtained of which 92.7% were pharyngeal cultures. Twenty-nine patients were admitted to hospital: 4 with suppurative complications, 7 post-infective, 14 iGAS, and 4 probable iGAS cases. There were no differences in the frequency of GAS isolations/year. Non-invasive isolates were more frequent in winter and spring (P<.001), and 68.3% were in patients younger than 5 years. The incidence of iGAS was 2.1/100,000 children/year. There was no seasonality, and it was more frequent in younger children (P=.039). The most common diagnosis was pneumonia (6/14). Eight patients required intensive care. They were treated empirically with second or third-generation cephalosporin or with intravenous penicillin, and pneumonia required longer treatment times (P=.016). All GAS isolates were sensitive to penicillin, and 10.6% were resistant to erythromycin. The time spent in hospital was longer for iGAS than other cases (P=.028). No patients died. Pharyngotonsillitis caused by GAS is common in childhood, and its incidence is increasing in children younger than 5 years. At the moment, post-infectious complications are rare. Invasive infections are the most severe forms of presentation, and are more common in younger children. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Prevention of pneumococcal diseases in the post-seven valent vaccine era: A European perspective

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    Weil-Olivier Catherine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of invasive pneumococcal disease in young children decreased dramatically following introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7. The epidemiology of S. pneumoniae now reflects infections caused by serotypes not included in PCV7. Recently introduced higher valency pneumococcal vaccines target the residual burden of invasive and non-invasive infections, including those caused by serotypes not included in PCV7. This review is based on presentations made at the European Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases in June 2011. Discussion Surveillance data show increased circulation of the non-PCV7 vaccine serotypes 1, 3, 6A, 6C, 7 F and 19A in countries with routine vaccination. Preliminary evidence suggests that broadened serotype coverage offered by higher valency vaccines may be having an effect on invasive disease caused by some of those serotypes, including 19A, 7 F and 6C. Aetiology of community acquired pneumonia remains a difficult clinical diagnosis. However, recent reports indicate that pneumococcal vaccination has reduced hospitalisations of children for vaccine serotype pneumonia. Variations in serotype circulation and occurrence of complicated and non-complicated pneumonia caused by non-PCV7 serotypes highlight the potential of higher valency vaccines to decrease the remaining burden. PCVs reduce nasopharyngeal carriage and acute otitis media (AOM caused by vaccine serotypes. Recent investigations of the interaction between S. pneumoniae and non-typeable H. influenzae suggest that considerable reduction in severe, complicated AOM infections may be achieved by prevention of early pneumococcal carriage and AOM infections. Extension of the vaccine serotype spectrum beyond PCV7 may provide additional benefit in preventing the evolution of AOM. The direct and indirect costs associated with pneumococcal disease are high, thus herd protection and infections caused by non-vaccine serotypes

  6. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensitive to light) Confusion In babies, meningitis may cause poor eating and drinking, low alertness, and vomiting. Pneumococcal bacteremia is a blood infection. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Sepsis is a complication caused by the body’s overwhelming ...

  7. The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in British Columbia following implementation of an infant immunization program: increases in herd immunity and replacement disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vanita; Naus, Monika; Hoang, Linda; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Martin, Irene; Patrick, David M

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, British Columbia (BC) introduced a universal heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) program for infants, and in 2007 revised the recommended schedule from four doses to three doses. We describe trends in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in association with these program changes. All confirmed cases are reported to the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) using a standardized data collection process; isolates are forwarded to the BCCDC Public Health and Reference Microbiology Laboratory for serotyping and to the National Reference Laboratory for confirmation. Upon implementation of the reduced dose program in 2007, additional epidemiological data, including immunization history, were collected for children 16 years of age, herd immunity is evident and decreasing trends of PCV-7 serotypes continued even after the dose reduction program was introduced. However, gains in disease reduction were offset by increases in replacement serotypes, particularly among the over-65 age group. This has resulted in no net change in adult IPD rates. The implementation of the PCV-7 program has changed the epidemiology of IPD in BC through direct effects of the vaccine, herd immunity and serotype replacement. The introduction of a three-dose schedule was not associated with an excess of vaccine failures.

  8. Cepas invasivas de pneumococo isoladas de crianças e adolescentes em Salvador Invasive pneumococcal strains isolated from children and adolescents in Salvador

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    Cristiana M. Nascimento-Carvalho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever resistência antimicrobiana e sorotipos de cepas de pneumococo. MÉTODOS: durante 57 meses, foi conduzida uma vigilância de cepas invasivas de pneumococo de pacientes com idade OBJECTIVE: describe the antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of pneumococcal strains. METHODS: in a 57-month period, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal strains from patients aged < 20 years was conducted. Pneumococcus was identified by means of tests for solubility in bile and optochin. Pneumococcal resistance to penicillin was screened by 1µg oxacillin disc and minimal inhibitory concentration was determined for the strains not susceptible to penicillin. Disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods were used for surveillance of resistance to other antimicrobials. Pneumococci were serotyped by means of the Neufeld-Quellung reactions. RESULTS: of 70 patients, 57.1% were males. The mean age was 1.92 yrs (mean 3.19 + 3.66 yrs, range 1 month to 19.5 yrs; 52.9% and 81.4% were < 2 yrs and < 5 yrs, respectively. The strains were isolated from blood (91.4%, CSF (2.9%, pleural (2.9%, peritoneal (1.4% and abscess (1.4% fluids from patients with pneumonia (77.1%, fever without localizing signs (10.0%, meningitis (4.3%, others (8.6%. Resistance was detected to penicillin (20.0%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (65.7%, tetracycline (21.4%, ofloxacin (6.3%, erythromycin (5.7%, clindamycin (2.9%. All tested strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and vancomycin. Among penicillin-resistant strains, high resistance was detected in one, the same that showed intermediate resistance to cefotaxime. The most frequent serotypes were: 14 (22.9%, 5 and 6A (10.0% each, 6B and 19F (8.6% each, 9V, 18C and 23F (5.7% each. Resistance to penicillin was detected in serotypes 14 (71.4%, 6B and 19F (14.3% each. CONCLUSIONS: of 70 strains, 67.2% were classified as serotypes included in the heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine as well as

  9. Hydroxyurea therapy of a murine model of sickle cell anemia inhibits the progression of pneumococcal disease by down-modulating E-selectin

    OpenAIRE

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D.; Howard, Thad; Hu, Yunming; Pestina, Tamara I.; Gao, Geli; Johnson, Melissa; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Ware, Russell E.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Persons, Derek A.; Rosch, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is characterized by chronic hemolysis coupled with extensive vascular inflammation. This inflammatory state also mechanistically promotes a high risk of lethal, invasive pneumococcal infection. Current treatments to reduce vaso-occlusive complications include chronic hydroxyurea therapy to induce fetal hemoglobin. Because hydroxyurea also reduces leukocytosis, an understanding of the impact of this treatment on pneumococcal pathogenesis is needed. Using a sickle cell mouse ...

  10. [New ideas on the therapeutic effect of a combination of vaccines against pneumococcal, Haemophilus influenzae type b infection, and influenza in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinov, M P; Zhestkov, A V; Protasov, A D; Magarshak, O O; Kostinova, T A

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the indicators of the therapeutic effect of combination vaccination against pneumococcal, Haemophilus influenzae type b infection, and influenza in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Clinical, bacteriological, and immunological studies, by determining the quality of life (QL), were conducted in COPD patients during a year after combination vaccination against pneumococcal, Haemophilus influenza type b infection, and influenza. One year after the vaccination, there were reductions in the number of COPD exacerbations by 3.7 times, in that of antibiotic therapy cycles by 3.4 times, in the levels of inflammatory mediators of interleukins 2 and 8 and interferon-γ, and in the synthesis of IgG antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and influenza virus strains as compared to the baseline values. Combination vaccination against bacterial and viral infections substantially improves the major clinical parameters of COPD, positively affecting LQ indicators that generally characterize the therapeutic effect of immunization.

  11. Invasive Fungal Infections Secondary to Traumatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Kronen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare but serious complication of traumatic injury. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, natural history, mycology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes associated with post-traumatic IFI in military and civilian populations. The epidemiology of post-traumatic IFI is poorly characterized, but incidence appears to be rising. Patients often suffer from severe injuries and require extensive medical interventions. Fungi belonging to the order Mucorales are responsible for most post-traumatic IFI in both civilian and military populations. Risk factors differ between these cohorts but include specific injury patterns and comorbidities. Diagnosis of post-traumatic IFI typically follows positive laboratory results in the appropriate clinical context. The gold standard of treatment is surgical debridement in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Patients with post-traumatic IFI may be at greater risk of amputation, delays in wound healing, hospital complications, and death as compared to trauma patients who do not develop IFI. More research is needed to understand the factors surrounding the development and management of post-traumatic IFI to reduce the significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  12. The herd effects of infant PCV7/PCV13 sequential implementation on adult invasive pneumococcal disease, six years post implementation; a nationwide study in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Yochay, Gili; Katzir, Michal; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Rahav, Galia; Finn, Talya; Miron, Dan; Maor, Yasmin; Chazan, Bibiana; Schindler, Yehudith; Dagan, Ron

    2017-04-25

    Introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has nearly eliminated vaccine-type (VT) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children, yet the reported resulting reduction of adult IPD is variable. We present the indirect impact of sequential PCV7/PCV13 implementation in Israel on adult IPD. An ongoing nationwide active surveillance was initiated on July 2009 when PCV7 was implemented (with Catch-up). PCV7 was gradually replaced by PCV13 since November 2010. Comorbidity and outcome data were collected from medical files. Incidence rates were calculated for overall and vaccine-type IPD. A total of 2579 IPD cases were diagnosed among a population of 5.0-5.5 million adults >18y (2009-2015). Incidence rates were 9.15/100,000 and 10.16/100,000 in the first and second study years, respectively. However, after PCV13 implementation, the rates decreased to 7.19 within four years, and remained stable in the two following years. Within 6years, PCV7-VT-IPD incidence decreased from 2.52 to 0.52 (79%) and PCV13-VT-IPD from 6.15 to 1.81 (71%). Concurrently, non-VT13 incidence increased from 2.99 to 5.25. Approximately 50% of all patients were adults ≥65y, in whom the decrease in PCV13-VT-IPD incidence was smaller and slower (65% vs. >80% decrease in adults adult IPD, six years post-PCV7/13 implementation emphasizes the importance of indirect protection in achieving overall population impact and should be considered when discussing the potential additional benefits of direct adult PCV vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Pneumococcal vaccination: conjugated vaccine induces herd immunity and reduces antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletz, M W; Maus, U; Hohlfeld, J M; Lode, H; Welte, T

    2008-02-01

    Pneumococcal infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis) are common and usually involve toddlers and the elderly. Currently, two pneumococcal vaccines are in clinical use. The older vaccine consists of pure capsular polysaccharides from 23 pneumococcal serotypes and induces only a limited B-cell response because polysaccharides are poor antigens that stimulate mainly B-cells. In 2000, a vaccination program with a novel 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was launched in the U.S. The conjugation of capsular polysaccharides with a highly immunogenic diphtheria toxoid protein induces both a T cell and B cell response that results in specific humoral and mucosal immunity. Since children are the main reservoir of pneumococci, the 7-valent conjugate vaccine seems to eradicate the respective pneumococcal serotypes within the population, as demonstrated by recent US data. Pronounced herd immunity resulted in a decrease in invasive pneumococcal diseases in vaccinees and non-vaccinees as well as in a reduction of antibiotic resistance rates. However, recent data suggest a replacement of vaccine-serotypes by non-vaccine serotypes, which conquer the ecological niche created by the vaccine. In order to encounter this problem a 13-valent conjugated vaccine is currently under development.

  14. Transplant tourism and invasive fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Salmi, I; Metry, A M; Al Ismaili, F; Hola, A; Al Riyami, M; Khamis, F; Al-Abri, S

    2018-04-01

    Deceased and live-related renal transplants (RTXs) are approved procedures that are performed widely throughout the world. In certain regions, commercial RTX has become popular, driven by financial greed. This retrospective, descriptive study was performed at the Royal Hospital from 2013 to 2015. Data were collected from the national kidney transplant registry of Oman. All transplant cases retrieved were divided into two groups: live-related RTX performed in Oman and commercial-unrelated RTX performed abroad. These groups were then divided again into those with and without evidence of fungal infection, either in the wound or renal graft. A total of 198 RTX patients were identified, of whom 162 (81.8%) had undergone a commercial RTX that was done abroad. Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) were diagnosed in 8% of patients who had undergone a commercial RTX; of these patients, 76.9% underwent a nephrectomy and 23.1% continued with a functioning graft. None of the patients with RTXs performed at the Royal Hospital contracted an IFI. The most common fungal isolates were Aspergillus species (including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, and Aspergillus nigricans), followed by Zygomycetes. However, there was no evidence of fungal infection including Aspergillus outside the graft site. Computed tomography (CT) findings showed infarction of the graft, renal artery thrombosis, aneurysmal dilatation of the external iliac artery, fungal ball, or just the presence of a perigraft collection. Of the total patients with IFIs, 23.1% died due to septic shock and 53.8% were alive and on hemodialysis. The remaining 23.1% who did not undergo nephrectomy demonstrated acceptable graft function. This is the largest single-center study on commercial RTX reporting the highest number of patients with IFI acquired over a relatively short period of time. Aspergillus spp were the main culprit fungi, with no Candida spp being isolated. A high index of suspicion might

  15. Rationale and design of the prevention of respiratory infections and management in children (PRIMAKid) study : a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness and costs of combined influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in pre-school children with recurrent respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönbeck, Y; Sanders, E A M; Hoes, A W; Schilder, A G M; Verheij, Th J M; Hak, E

    2005-01-01

    Health and economic burden of recurrent respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in early childhood is considerable. A systematic review of licensed influenza and pneumococcal vaccines showed substantial efficacy in children, but the health-economic impact of such vaccines among pre-school children with

  16. FACTS AND OPINIONS ON USEFULNESS OF PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Kostinov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the problem of pneumococcal infections (pneumonias, meningitis, otitis in children and adults. The modern opportunities of vaccinoprophylaxis and its usefulness in public health service are shown. The perspectives and questions on safety and effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine as the basic method of pneumococcal infections prophylaxis in infants and children from risk groups (with bronchial asthma, sickle-cell anemia, etc. are presented in details.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination, pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(4:79-83

  17. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene F; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N

    2016-01-01

    NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). METHODS: Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified......BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes.......86-1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis....

  18. [Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.D.; Lind, J.W.; Bruun, B.

    2009-01-01

    Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection are presented: a three-week-old boy with meningitis and a 62-year-old woman with arthritis and bacteremia. Since 1993 vaccination against H. influenzae type b (Hib) has been offered to Danish children. The result has been a remarkable...... decrease in invasive Hib disease. However, physicians need to be aware of the existence of non-type b invasive H. influenzae disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/19...

  19. Long-term mortality after IPD and bacteremic versus non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H J; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Short-term mortality after invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumococcal pneumonia is high but data on long-term mortality (including the comparison between bacteremic and non-invasive/non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia) within the first years after diagnosis are scarce. Methods

  20. Long-term mortality after IPD and bacteremic versus non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H. J.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    Short-term mortality after invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumococcal pneumonia is high but data on long-term mortality (including the comparison between bacteremic and non-invasive/non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia) within the first years after diagnosis are scarce. Adult patients

  1. Pneumococcal Neuraminidase A (NanA) Promotes Biofilm Formation and Synergizes with Influenza A Virus in Nasal Colonization and Middle Ear Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, John T; Blevins, Lance K; Pang, Bing; Basu Roy, Ankita; Oliver, Melissa B; Reimche, Jennifer L; Wozniak, Jessie E; Alexander-Miller, Martha A; Swords, W Edward

    2017-04-01

    Even in the vaccine era, Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) remains a leading cause of otitis media, a significant public health burden, in large part because of the high prevalence of nasal colonization with the pneumococcus in children. The primary pneumococcal neuraminidase, NanA, which is a sialidase that catalyzes the cleavage of terminal sialic acids from host glycoconjugates, is involved in both of these processes. Coinfection with influenza A virus, which also expresses a neuraminidase, exacerbates nasal colonization and disease by S. pneumoniae , in part via the synergistic contributions of the viral neuraminidase. The specific role of its pneumococcal counterpart, NanA, in this interaction, however, is less well understood. We demonstrate in a mouse model that NanA-deficient pneumococci are impaired in their ability to cause both nasal colonization and middle ear infection. Coinfection with neuraminidase-expressing influenza virus and S. pneumoniae potentiates both colonization and infection but not to wild-type levels, suggesting an intrinsic role of NanA. Using in vitro models, we show that while NanA contributes to both epithelial adherence and biofilm viability, its effect on the latter is actually independent of its sialidase activity. These data indicate that NanA contributes both enzymatically and nonenzymatically to pneumococcal pathogenesis and, as such, suggest that it is not a redundant bystander during coinfection with influenza A virus. Rather, its expression is required for the full synergism between these two pathogens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Invasive fungal infections in Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Alza, Y; Sánchez-Bautista, J; Fajardo-Rivero, J F; Figueroa, C L

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement. Complications, such as invasive fungal infections usually occur in patients with a greater severity of the disease. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk variables associated with invasive fungal infections in a Colombian systemic lupus erythematosus population. Materials and methods A cross-sectional, retrospective study that evaluated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus for six years. The primary outcome was invasive fungal infection. Descriptive, group comparison and bivariate analysis was performed using Stata 12.0 software. Results Two hundred patients were included in this study; 84.5% of the patients were women and the median age was 36 years; 68% of the subjects had haematological complications; 53.3% had nephropathy; 45% had pneumopathy and 28% had pericardial impairment; 7.5% of patients had invasive fungal infections and the most frequently isolated fungus was Candida albicans. Pericardial disease, cyclophosphamide use, high disease activity, elevated ESR, C3 hypocomplementemia, anaemia and lymphopenia had a significant association with invasive fungal infection ( P lupus erythematosus, which was higher than that reported in other latitudes. In this population the increase in disease activity, the presence of pericardial impairment and laboratory alterations (anaemia, lymphopenia, increased ESR and C3 hypocomplementemia) are associated with a greater possibility of invasive fungal infections. Regarding the use of drugs, unlike other studies, in the Colombian population an association was found only with the previous administration of cyclophosphamide. In addition, patients with invasive fungal infections and systemic lupus erythematosus had a higher prevalence of mortality and hospital readmission compared with patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without invasive fungal infection.

  3. Invasive fungal infections in renal transplant recipients: about 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, H; Néji, S; Sellami, H; Yaich, S; Cheikhrouhou, F; Guidara, R; Charffedine, K; Makni, F; Hachicha, J; Ayadi, A

    2013-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major complication and an important cause of morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant recipients. Their diagnosis is difficult and their prognosis is often pejorative. The aim of this study was to report the cases of invasive fungal infections in renal transplant recipients in Habib Bourguiba Sfax university hospital and to identify the main fungal agents. It is a retrospective study of invasive fungal infections in renal transplant recipient reported in our hospital from January 1995 to February 2013. Invasive fungal infections were diagnosed in 11 cases (3.4%) among 321 renal transplant recipients. These infections included four cases of pneumocystosis, two cases of candidiasis, two cases of aspergillosis, two cases of cryptococcosis and one case of mucormycosis. There were six men and five women. The mean age was 37 years. The infection was late in 63% of cases (>3 months after transplantation). The prolonged corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy were the main risk factors (100%) followed by renal failure (45%), graft rejection (45%), broad spectrum antibiotics (45%), CMV infection (36%), neutropenia (36%) and dialysis (18%). The evolution under treatment was favourable only in two cases (18%). Invasive fungal infections are not common among kidney transplant recipients. However, they remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this group of patients. Prevention, early diagnosis and appropriate management are necessary to improve prognosis and reduce mortality rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Invasive Candida Infections in the ICU: Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankovszky Péter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections have become a serious problem in the critically ill. One of the main reasons is the development of an immunocompromised condition. The most frequently found pathogens are Candida species. In order to provide adequate treatment, understanding this potentially life-threatening infection is mandatory. The aim of this summary is to view Candida infections from a different perspective and to give an overview on epidemiology, the range of pathophysiology from colonization to the invasive infections, and its impact on mortality. New therapeutic options will also be discussed and how these relate to current guidelines. Finally, the key issue of the choice of antifungal agents will be evaluated.

  5. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.J.H.; Mobegi, F.M.; Jonge, M.I. de; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Meis, J.F.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Bentley, S.D.; Zomer, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped

  6. Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Meeting at Manson House, London, 12 December 1996. HIV and pneumococcal infection in Africa. Microbiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J

    1997-01-01

    By the 1930s several studies had shown that Streptococcus pneumoniae was an important pathogen in Nairobi (Kenya) and various risk factors for infection were recognized, including seasonally cold conditions, overcrowding and recent arrival in the city. Research into pneumococcal disease declined with the arrival of penicillin but recently interest has been rekindled by recognition of the pneumococcus as a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated pathogen and by the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The pneumococcus and its association with HIV were studied during the course of the Wellcome Trust/Kenya Medical Research Institute HIV Programme in Nairobi (1988-1993). There were generally high rates of pneumococcal disease. The pneumococcus (with tuberculosis and salmonellosis) was a major HIV-related pathogen. One study showed HIV seropositivity to confer a relative risk of 17.8 for pneumococcal infection. Recurrent infection accounted for a large proportion (25%) of disease episodes in a longitudinally studied cohort of HIV patients. There were higher pneumococcal carriage rates in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative patients (28% vs. 16%, P = 0.003). High rates of resistance were found to penicillin (25%). Molecular characterization of penicillin-resistant strains identified 11 separate clones, showing great genetic diversity in a small sample of isolates, and there was evidence of horizontal spread of penicillin-binding protein genes between separate lineages. Molecular characterization of isolates from patients with recurrent disease suggested that both relapse and reinfection might occur. There was molecular evidence of transfer of capsular genes between clones (serotype switching). The overall spectrum of serotypes resembled those reported elsewhere, most serotypes being included in the 23-valent vaccine. Higher numbered serotypes were associated with respiratory tract source and antibiotic resistance. Various methods were used to show 82% concordance

  7. Cost effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination against acute otitis media in children: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, C.W.; Broos, P.H.; Sanders, E.A.; Schilder, A.G.M.; Rovers, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    While pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have shown to be highly effective against invasive pneumococcal disease, their potential effectiveness against acute otitis media (AOM) might become a major economic driver for implementing these vaccines in national immunization programmes. However, the

  8. Vaccination of risk groups in England using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine : economic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, Mark H.; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Fleming, Douglas; Trotter, Caroline L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Edmunds, W. John

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost effectiveness of vaccinating people with high risk conditions against invasive pneumococcal disease using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Design Economic evaluation using a cohort model from the perspective of healthcare providers. Setting England.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF TOLERABILITY OF PNEUMOCOCCAL CONJUGATE VACCINE AND THE INFLUENCE OF THE VACCINATION ON THE INCIDENCE OF RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN DURING THE FIRST FIVE YEARS OF LIFE IN THE SAKHA REPUBLIC (YAKUTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Savvina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most frequent etiology agent of upper respiratory tract infection is pneumococcus. Most susceptible to this infection are children under 5 years old. It is known that the only effective prevention of pneumococcal infections is a specific immunoprophylaxis. Authors represent their own experience of vaccination for the child population at risk. The analysis of the effectiveness of 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in 596 children under 5 years old is demonstrated. The immunization is revealed low reactogeni city of vaccine and evident clinical effect. Thus, this vaccine may be recommended for inclusion in a regional immunization schedule in Republic of Sakha (Yakutia.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccine prophylaxis.

  10. Rare variants in MYD88, IRAK4 and IKBKG and susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda K Ellis

    Full Text Available Although rare variants within the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway genes have been found to underlie human primary immunodeficiencies associated with selective predisposition to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, the contribution of variants in these genes to IPD susceptibility at the population level remains unknown. Complete re-sequencing of IRAK4, MYD88 and IKBKG genes was undertaken in 164 IPD cases from the UK and 164 geographically-matched population-based controls. 233 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs were identified, of which ten were in coding regions. Four rare coding variants were predicted to be deleterious, two variants in MYD88 and two in IRAK4. The predicted deleterious variants in MYD88 were observed as two heterozygote cases but not seen in controls. Frequencies of predicted deleterious IRAK4 SNVs were the same in cases and controls. Our findings suggest that rare, functional variants in MYD88, IRAK4 or IKBKG do not significantly contribute to IPD susceptibility in adults at the population level.

  11. A decline in the incidence of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella infection in The Gambia temporally associated with a decline in malaria infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Mackenzie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a risk factor for invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS infection in children. In the last 10 years, indices of malaria infection in The Gambia have fallen substantially.We compared temporal trends of childhood malaria and NTS infection in two Gambian locations. In Fajara, on the coast, the incidence of NTS infection at three time points between 1979 and 2005 was compared to the percentage of malaria positive outpatient thick blood films and the percentage of admissions associated with malaria over time. In Basse, in the eastern part of the country, the incidence of NTS infection at three time points between 1989 and 2008 was compared to the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia at four time points between 1992 and 2008.The estimated incidence of NTS infection in Fajara fell from 60 (1979-1984 to 10 (2003-05 cases per 100,000 person years. The proportion of outpatients in Fajara with suspected malaria who were parasitaemic fell from 33% (1999 to 6% (2007 while the proportion of admissions associated with malaria fell from 14.5% (1999 to 5% (2007. In Basse, the estimated incidence of NTS infection fell from 105 (1989-1991 to 29 (2008 cases per 100,000 person years while the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia fell from 45% (1992 to 10% (2008. The incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia in Fajara and Basse did not fall over the study period.These data support an association between malaria and NTS infection. Reductions in malaria infection may be associated with reduced rates of invasive childhood NTS infection.

  12. Invasive carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There are no paediatric reports of invasive infection caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) from Africa. Objectives. To document a series of cases of CRE infections at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, describing the clinical and microbiological findings in these ...

  13. Identifying barriers to adult pneumococcal vaccination: an NFID task force meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Susan J; File, Thomas M; Metersky, Mark; Nichol, Kristin L; Schaffner, William

    2012-05-01

    Pneumococcal infection is common in adults, and invasive disease is associated with a high mortality rate. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine can prevent invasive pneumococcal disease and is recommended for people aged ≥ 65 years and for younger adults with high-risk chronic conditions; however, vaccination rates are suboptimal in all of these groups. A multidisciplinary task force meeting examined ways to increase vaccination rates in the target populations. Barriers to vaccination include lack of awareness of the disease or vaccine among vaccination candidates and health care providers, failure to assume responsibility for vaccination, competing priorities, incomplete or inaccessible documentation of previous vaccines, and health care system delivery challenges. Efforts to address these barriers should use appropriate methods. For example, potential vaccine recipients might be motivated by a message from a community leader, whereas health care providers are more apt to offer a vaccine when reminded that it is a recommended best practice. All health care providers need to accept responsibility for vaccination so that this preventive measure becomes a high priority in the care of patients at risk for serious pneumococcal infection.

  14. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed.

  15. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The rarity of invasiveness of right-sided infective endocarditis (IE) compared with left-sided has not been well recognized and evaluated. Thus, we compared invasiveness of right- versus left-sided IE in surgically treated patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 2002 to January 2015......, 1292 patients underwent surgery for active IE, 138 right-sided and 1224 left-sided. Among patients with right-sided IE, 131 had tricuspid and 7 pulmonary valve IE; 12% had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Endocarditis-related invasiveness was based on echocardiographic and operative findings. RESULTS......-microbial interactions. The lesser invasiveness of MV compared with AV IE suggests a similar mechanism: decompression of MV annulus invasion site(s) toward the left atrium....

  16. A nationwide study on the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertion in Denmark 2000-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howitz, Michael Frantz; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Ingels, Helene

    2017-01-01

    these account for most pneumococcal infections. In this study, we used likely proxies for respiratory infections in children, such as antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertions (VTI), to estimate the impact of the vaccine on a national level. The study was designed as a population-based retrospective...... of antibiotics in the pre-PCV period to a decreasing incidence for all children age 0-15years. The 2.4 DDD per person year in 2014 was at almost the same level of antibiotic use as in 2000 at 2.3 DDD per person year. Similar patterns were observed in the mostly vaccinated age groups below 5years of age. For VTI......Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugated Vaccines (PCV) in national immunization programs have been successful in reducing the number of invasive and lower respiratory pneumococcal infections. The impact of the vaccines on upper respiratory infections caused by pneumococci is less clear although...

  17. Mucosal Infections and Invasive Potential of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Are Enhanced by Oligopeptide Binding Proteins AliC and AliD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Bradshaw

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp is an emerging human pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx and is associated with noninvasive diseases such as otitis media (OM, conjunctivitis, and nonbacteremic pneumonia. Since capsule expression was previously thought to be necessary for establishment of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, serotype-specific polysaccharide capsules are targeted by currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines. Yet, NESp expressing oligopeptide binding proteins AliC and AliD have been isolated during IPD. Thus, we hypothesize AliC and AliD are major NESp virulence determinants that facilitate persistence and development of IPD. Our study reveals that NESp expressing AliC and AliD have intensified virulence compared to isogenic mutants. Specifically, we demonstrate AliC and AliD enhance murine nasopharyngeal colonization and pulmonary infection and are required for OM in a chinchilla model. Furthermore, AliC and AliD increase pneumococcal survival in chinchilla whole blood and aid in resistance to killing by human leukocytes. Comparative proteome analysis revealed significant alterations in protein levels when AliC and AliD were absent. Virulence-associated proteins, including a pneumococcal surface protein C variant (CbpAC, were significantly downregulated, while starvation response indicators were upregulated in the double mutant relative to wild-type levels. We also reveal that differentially expressed CbpAC was essential for NESp adherence to epithelial cells, virulence during OM, reduction of C3b deposition on the NESp surface, and binding to nonspecific IgA. Altogether, the rise in NESp prevalence urges the need to understand how NESp establishes disease and persists in a host. This study highlights the roles of AliC, AliD, and CbpAC in the pathogenesis of NESp.

  18. Incidencia de enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en Cantabria (1995-2001 e implicaciones para el calendario vacunal Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria, Spain, (1995-2001 and implications for the childhood inmunization schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir la incidencia de enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en Cantabria en los años 1995-2001. Método: Consulta de los registros del conjunto mínimo básico de datos (CMBD de los hospitales públicos de Cantabria, así como altas de los hospitales privados, registro de enfermedades de declaración obligatoria (EDO, y diagnósticos microbiológicos e historias clínicas de los niños ingresados en el Servicio de Pediatría del Hospital Cantabria (el hospital de referencia de tercer nivel. Resultados: Se obtuvo una incidencia de meningitis de 5,55, 5,03 y 0,76/100.000 en los niños Objective: To describe the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria (Spain between 1995 and 2001. Method: We reviewed the records of the Minimum Data Set (MDS of public hospitals in Cantabria, discharges from private hospitals and the registry of diseases of mandatory reporting, as well as the microbiologic diagnoses and medical records of children discharged from the Pediatric Service of the Cantabria Hospital (the tertiary care hospital in our autonomous community. Results: We obtained a meningitis incidence of 5.55, 5.03 and 0.76/100,000 in children < 2 years, ≥ 2 and < 5 years, and ≥ 5 years respectively, and an incidence of invasive disease of 11.11, 11.32 and 1.49/100,000 in the same age groups. Conclusions: The incidence of meningitis and invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria is low. We discuss factors that should be taken into account when introducing the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the childhood immunization schedule of Cantabria.

  19. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James; Gordon, Steven M; Houghtaling, Penny L; Tingleff, Jens; Navia, José L; Blackstone, Eugene H; Pettersson, Gösta B

    2018-01-01

    The rarity of invasiveness of right-sided infective endocarditis (IE) compared with left-sided has not been well recognized and evaluated. Thus, we compared invasiveness of right- versus left-sided IE in surgically treated patients. From January 2002 to January 2015, 1292 patients underwent surgery for active IE, 138 right-sided and 1224 left-sided. Among patients with right-sided IE, 131 had tricuspid and 7 pulmonary valve IE; 12% had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Endocarditis-related invasiveness was based on echocardiographic and operative findings. Invasive disease was rare on the right side, occurring in 1 patient (0.72%; 95% confidence interval 0.02%-4.0%); rather, it was limited to valve cusps/leaflets or was superficial. In contrast, IE was invasive in 408 of 633 patients with aortic valve (AV) IE (65%), 113 of 369 with mitral valve (MV) IE (31%), and 148 of 222 with AV and MV IE (67%). Staphylococcus aureus was a more predominant organism in right-sided than left-sided IE (right 40%, AV 19%, MV 29%), yet invasion was observed almost exclusively on the left side of the heart, which was more common and more severe with AV than MV IE and more common with prosthetic valve endocarditis than native valve IE. Rarity of right-sided invasion even when caused by S aureus suggests that invasion and development of cavities/"abscesses" in patients with IE may be driven more by chamber pressure than organism, along with other reported host-microbial interactions. The lesser invasiveness of MV compared with AV IE suggests a similar mechanism: decompression of MV annulus invasion site(s) toward the left atrium. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Low serum mannose-binding lectin level increases the risk of death due to pneumococcal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisen, Damon P; Dean, Melinda M; Boermeester, Marja A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown associations between low mannose-binding lectin (MBL) level or variant MBL2 genotype and sepsis susceptibility. However, MBL deficiency has not been rigorously defined, and associations with sepsis outcomes have not been subjected to multivariable analysis...... interval, 1.30-3.43). In intensive care unit-based studies, there was a trend toward increased risk of death among MBL-deficient patients (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-2.77) after adjustment for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Enquiry II score. The risk of death was increased among...... MBL-deficient patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection (odds ratio, 5.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-24.92) after adjustment for bacteremia, comorbidities, and age. CONCLUSIONS: We defined a serum level for MBL deficiency that can be used with confidence in future studies of MBL disease...

  1. Pneumococcal vaccination and chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froes F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Filipe Froes,1 Nicolas Roche,2 Francesco Blasi3,4 1Chest Department, Hospital Pulido Valente, North Lisbon Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Department of Respiratory and Intensive Care Medicine, Cochin Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France; 3Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, 4Internal Medicine Department, Respiratory Unit and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Patients with COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases are especially vulnerable to viral and bacterial pulmonary infections, which are major causes of exacerbations, hospitalization, disease progression, and mortality in COPD patients. Effective vaccines could reduce the burden of respiratory infections and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, but what is the evidence for this? This article reviews and discusses the existing evidence for pneumococcal vaccination efficacy and its changing role in patients with chronic respiratory diseases, especially COPD. Specifically, the recent Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA showed the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in older adults, many of whom had additional risk factors for pneumococcal disease, including chronic lung diseases. Taken together, the evidence suggests that pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations can prevent community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, while pneumococcal vaccination early in the course of COPD could help maintain stable health status. Despite the need to prevent pulmonary infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and evidence for the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal vaccine coverage and awareness are low and need to be improved. Respiratory physicians need to communicate the benefits of vaccination more effectively to their patients who suffer from chronic respiratory diseases

  2. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in the Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Elisabetta; Melegaro, Alessia; Klok, Rogier; Postma, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a dynamic transmission model for the spread of pneumococci and potential subsequent invasive pneumococcal disease has been adapted to the Dutch setting. Overall, invasive pneumococcal disease cases in ...

  3. Sustained reduction in vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease despite waning effects of a catch-up campaign in Kilifi, Kenya: A mathematical model based on pre-vaccination data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojal, John; Flasche, Stefan; Hammitt, Laura L; Akech, Donald; Kiti, Moses C; Kamau, Tatu; Adetifa, Ifedayo; Nurhonen, Markku; Scott, J Anthony G; Auranen, Kari

    2017-08-16

    In 2011, Kenya introduced the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine together with a catch-up campaign for children aged vaccination surveillance study based in Kilifi, there was a substantial decline in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). However, given the continued circulation of the vaccine serotypes it is possible that vaccine-serotype disease may re-emerge once the effects of the catch-up campaign wear off. We developed a compartmental, age-structured dynamic model of pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease for three serotype groups: the 10-valent vaccine serotypes and two groups of non-vaccine serotypes based on their susceptibility to mutual competition. The model was calibrated to age- and serotype-specific data on carriage and IPD in the pre-vaccination era and used to predict carriage prevalence and IPD up to ten years post-vaccination in Kilifi. The model was validated against the observed carriage prevalence after vaccine introduction. The model predicts a sustained reduction in vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage prevalence from 33% to 8% in infants and from 30% to 8% in 1-5year olds over the 10-year period following vaccine introduction. The incidence of IPD is predicted to decline across all age groups resulting in an overall reduction of 56% in the population, corresponding to 10.4 cases per 100,000 per year. The vaccine-type IPD incidence is estimated to decline by 83% while non-vaccine-type IPD incidence is predicted to increase by 52%. The model's predictions of carriage prevalence agrees well with the observed data in the first five years post-vaccination. We predict a sustained and substantial decline in IPD through PCV vaccination and that the current regimen is insufficient to fully eliminate vaccine-serotype circulation in the model. We show that the observed impact is likely to be sustained despite waning effects of the catch-up campaign. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Colonization and Impact of a Single Dose of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Indian Children With HIV and Their Unvaccinated Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bikas K; Bhattacharya, Sangeeta Das; Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Ganaie, Feroze; Bhaskar, Arun; Bhattacharyya, Subhasish; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar; Moss, William J; Panda, Samiran; Ravikumar, Kadahalli Lingegowda; Das, Ranjan Saurav; Mandal, Sutapa

    2018-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases risk of invasive disease from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) prevent invasive disease and acquisition of vaccine type (VT) pneumococcus in the nasopharynx. To look at the safety and impact of one dose of PCV13 on acquisition of VT pneumococcal carriage in Indian children with HIV. We conducted a cohort study in families of HIV-infected children (CLH) and families of HIV-uninfected children (HUC) in West Bengal. All children received one dose of PCV13. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from children and parents at baseline and 2 months after vaccination. One hundred and fifteen CLH and 47 HUC received one dose of PCV13. Fifty-eight percent of CLH were on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the median nadir CD4 count was 287. There were no significant adverse events in either group. HUC had more VT colonization than CLH-55% versus 23% of all pneumococcal isolates. HIV infection doubled the risk of nonvaccine serotype colonization (P = 0.03). There was no difference in acquisition of VT isolates in CLH (4.4%) and HUC (4.5%) post-PCV13; however, older CLH (>5 years) had decreased clearance of VT strains. ART made no difference in pneumococcal colonization at baseline or after PCV13; however, CLH with higher nadir CD4 counts before starting ART were less likely to have VT colonization post-PCV13 (prevalence ratio, 0.2; 95% confidence interval: 0.1-0.5). While there was no difference in acquisition of VT nasopharyngeal carriage of pneumococcus in CLH and HUC after one dose of PCV13, earlier access to ART may impact response to PCV13 in CLH.

  5. Pneumococcal Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Khmer (ភាសាខ្មែរ) Korean (한국어) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul- ... Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Tagalog (Wikang Tagalog) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) ...

  6. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Infection in Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Pabbathi, Smitha; Greene, John N

    2017-01-01

    A major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer is infection. Since the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in the United States in the 1990s, invasive H influenzae infection has become less common. We report on 5 patients with cancer and invasive H influenzae infection. A literature review was also performed of the dominant Haemophilus subtype and the clinical features associated with the infection and concomitant cancer. Of the 17 cases found in the literature, had hematological malignancies and 1 case each had thymoma, schwannoma, teratoma, and pancreatic, Merkel cell, pharyngeal, laryngeal, and rectal carcinomas. Two cases occurred with AIDS and Kaposi sarcoma. Pneumonia with bacteremia was seen in 8 cases, whereas pleuritis, neck cellulitis, septic arthritis, meningitis, and mediastinitis were diagnosed in the others. No focus of infection was identified in 2 cases. Nontypable H influenzae (NTHi) occurred in 4 cases, and Hib was isolated in 2 cases; serotyping was not reported in the others. Leukocytosis occurred in 7 cases and lymphopenia in 3; no cases presented with neutropenia. Four isolates were positive for beta-lactamase. Susceptibility data were unavailable in 5 case patients. Among serotyped cases, 67% were of the NTHi strain - a finding consistent with the change in the epidemiology of H influenzae since the introduction of the Hib vaccine.

  7. Delayed cerebral thrombosis complicating pneumococcal meningitis: an autopsy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Background: Delayed cerebral thrombosis (DCT) is a devastating cerebrovascular complication in patients with excellent initial recovery of pneumococcal meningitis. The aetiology is unknown, but direct bacterial invasion, activation of coagulation or post-infectious immunoglobulin deposition has been

  8. Enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en la población infantil de la Comunidad Valenciana Invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the community of Valencia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goicoechea-Sáez

    2003-12-01

    .Objective: Pneumococcal disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The recent authorization of the heptavalent conjugate vaccine has increased interest in this disease. The objective of this study was to identify the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this disease, as well as its outcome in the pediatric population of the Autonomous Community of Valencia. Method: Data were obtained from the medical records of children aged less than 15 years who were positive for pneumococcus isolation on admission to hospital between 1996 and 2000. All the public hospitals of the Autonomous Community of Valencia were included. Changes in incidence were evaluated by comparing rates and outcomes (sequelae and lethality through frequency and age distribution. Results: One hundred twenty-seven cases were registered, giving a mean annual rate of 3.89/105 inhabitants aged less than 15 years. The rate was 20.14 in children aged less than 2 years. A total of 29.1% of the children had previous health problems. The main clinical manifestations included sepsis/bacteremia (38%, pneumonia (31% and meningitis (24%. At discharge sequelae were present in 10 children, 75% of whom were aged less than 2 years. Eight children died (6.3% lethality. Conclusions: In the period and region studied, pneumococcal infection was present mainly in children aged less than 2 years and in those with previous health problems. In the last few years, mortality has increased. Thus, inclusion of pneumococcal disease in the epidemiological surveillance system would be appropriate to achieve more precise estimations of its epidemiological patterns and to determine whether the conjugate vaccine represents a solution to the problems currently associated with this bacteria.

  9. Pneumococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Vrettos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary valve endocarditis is a rare type of infective endocarditis (IE. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogen that is uncommonly associated with IE. A 50 year-old male was referred to us after an incidental echocardiographic finding of a pulmonary valve vegetation. The patient had a recent admission for drainage of a scrotal abscess from which S. pneumoniae was isolated, complicated by hospital acquired pneumonia and pulmonary embolism. Analysis using polymerase chain reaction of the surgically resected mass revealed signs of 16S ribosomal DNA consistent with S. pneumoniae infection. This was an extremely rare case of pneumococcal pulmonary valve IE presenting entirely asymptomatically in the absence of any known risk factors.

  10. Pneumococcal meningitis and endocarditis in an infant: possible improved survival with factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Sitikant; Doulah, Assaf; Brown, Elspeth

    2017-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections continue to remain associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the incidence of invasive meningeal and/or lung disease are not uncommon, Streptococcus pneumoniae endocarditis is rare especially in healthy pediatric population. New studies have suggested a strong association between factor V leiden (FVL) mutation and favorable outcomes in critically ill children. A healthy 10 month old presented with sepsis and meningeal signs, was later confirmed to have Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and endocarditis. She was found to have factor V leiden mutation and made a complete recovery despite initial complications. Presence of factor V leiden mutation in critically ill children with severe septicaemia possibly contributes to better outcomes. What is known: • Mortality and morbidity remain high with invasive pneumococcal disease. • Pneumococcal endocarditis is rare in healthy pediatric population and results in significant morbidity and mortality What is new: • New studies have suggested a strong association between factor V leiden (FVL) mutation and favorable outcomes in critically ill children. • The presence of factor V mutation in children with extensive invasive pneumococcal disease possibly contributes to a better outcome.

  11. Trivalent pneumococcal protein vaccine protects against experimental acute otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in an infant murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingfu; Pryharski, Karin; Pichichero, Michael E

    2017-01-05

    Currently licensed serotype-based pneumococcal vaccines are effective in preventing invasive pneumococcal diseases, but less effective in preventing non-bacteremic pneumonia and acute otitis media (AOM). We previously reported that a trivalent pneumococcal protein recombinant vaccine (PPrV) protected against pneumonia in a murine model. Here we evaluated PPrV protection against AOM in an infant murine model. C57BL/6J mice were intramuscularly vaccinated at 1-3weeks of age with monovalent pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), or pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), or detoxified pneumolysin (PlyD1), or trivalent vaccine, and transtympanically challenged at 7-8weeks of age with 1×10 2 CFU of pneumococcal strain BG7322 (6A) or 1×10 4 CFU of pneumococcal nontypeable strain 0702064MEF. Serum IgG titers were determined by ELISA. At 24 and 48h post infection (hpi), animals were sacrificed and middle ear fluid (MEF) samples were collected to determine pneumococcal CFUs. We found that vaccination of infant mice with monovalent and trivalent pneumococcal proteins elicited significant serum IgG antibody responses to corresponding component proteins. Vaccination with PhtD reduced BG7322 bacterial burdens in MEF at both 24 (p=0.05) and 48hpi (p=0.16). Vaccination with PcpA significantly reduced the bacterial burdens in MEF at both 24 (p=0.02) and 48hpi (p=0.004), and PlyD1 significantly reduced bacterial burden in MEF at 48hpi (p=0.02). Vaccination with trivalent PPrV (PhtD, PcpA and PlyD1) significantly reduced Spn burdens in MEF at both 24 (p=0.001) and 48hpi (panimals were challenged with a non-typeable Spn strain. Vaccinated mice had significantly milder inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-2 and KC) in middle ears at 24hpi (all p values<0.05). Trivalent PPrV confers protection against pneumococcal AOM in an infant murine model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular and Nonmolecular Diagnostic Methods for Invasive Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Marios; Anagnostou, Theodora; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Caliendo, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Invasive fungal infections constitute a serious threat to an ever-growing population of immunocompromised individuals and other individuals at risk. Traditional diagnostic methods, such as histopathology and culture, which are still considered the gold standards, have low sensitivity, which underscores the need for the development of new means of detecting fungal infectious agents. Indeed, novel serologic and molecular techniques have been developed and are currently under clinical evaluation. Tests like the galactomannan antigen test for aspergillosis and the β-glucan test for invasive Candida spp. and molds, as well as other antigen and antibody tests, for Cryptococcus spp., Pneumocystis spp., and dimorphic fungi, have already been established as important diagnostic approaches and are implemented in routine clinical practice. On the other hand, PCR and other molecular approaches, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have proved promising in clinical trials but still need to undergo standardization before their clinical use can become widespread. The purpose of this review is to highlight the different diagnostic approaches that are currently utilized or under development for invasive fungal infections and to identify their performance characteristics and the challenges associated with their use. PMID:24982319

  13. [Anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage for hospitalized risk patients: Assessment and suggestions for improvements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, C; Le Garlantezec, P; Lamand, V; Rasamijao, V; Rapp, C

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause invasive infections. Incidence and severity are linked to patients' risk factors. Due to the resistance to leading antibiotics, the anti-pneumococcal vaccination has become a major public health issue. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage in a population of adults with risk factors. This was a prospective study that included patients with at least one recommendation for pneumococcal vaccination as indicated by the Weekly Epidemiological Bulletin (BEH), to which three further US recommendations were added (diabetes, obesity and age>65years). One hundred and thirty-four patients with an average age of 70 years were included. The physician could only confirm 68 % of the patients' vaccination status. Vaccination coverage as recommended by the BEH board was 30 % (n=54). All HIV patients were vaccinated (n=2) and the vaccination coverage was 75 % (n=8) for patients treated for autoimmune diseases and only 10 % (n=20) for patients treated with chemotherapy. Patients with no vaccination didn't know the existence of the vaccine or didn't know that vaccination was recommended to them. This study has highlighted a deficit in pneumococcal vaccination coverage and a high level of ignorance of the existence of recommended vaccination. In addition to awareness campaign for patients and caregiver training, the expansion of the vaccine e-book utilization could improve the vaccination status. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis with Disseminated Infection in Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Moreno-González

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is a rare pathology with increasing incidence mainly in critical care settings and recently in immunocompetent patients. The mortality of the disease is very high, regardless of an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment. Here, we report a case of a 56 yr old previously healthy woman who was found unconscious at home and admitted to the emergency room with mild respiratory insufficiency. In the first 24 hours she developed an acute respiratory failure with new radiographic infiltrates requiring Intensive Care Unit admission. A severe obstructive pattern with impossibility of ventilation because of bilateral atelectasis was observed, requiring emergent venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenator device insertion. Bronchoscopy revealed occlusion of main bronchi, demonstrating by biopsy an invasive infection by Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus. Despite an aggressive treatment and vital support the patient had a fatal outcome. The forensic study confirms the diagnosis of IPA but also revealed the presence of disseminated aspergillosis.

  15. Serious pneumococcal disease outbreak in men exposed to metal fume - detection, response and future prevention through pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Judith; Patterson, Lynsey; Irvine, Neil; Doherty, Lorraine; Loughrey, Anne; Kidney, Joe; Sheppard, Carmen; Kapatai, Georgia; Fry, Norman K; Ramsay, Mary; Jessop, Lucy

    2017-07-13

    Welders and those exposed to metal fume are known to be at increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Current UK guidance recommends that vaccination against pneumococcus be considered in those at risk of frequent or continuous occupational exposure to metal fume, taking into account the exposure control measures in place. We report an outbreak of serious pneumococcal disease that occurred between April and June 2015 among a multinational workforce exposed to metal fumes while working on the refurbishment of an oil rig in a Belfast shipyard. Four confirmed and five probable cases were identified, which occurred despite the use of environmental control measures and the availability of respiratory protective equipment. To provide direct protection to those at risk of pneumococcal disease and to eradicate carriage of pneumococcus and interrupt transmission, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and antibiotic prophylaxis were offered to 680 individuals identified as potentially exposed to metal fume. Low levels of prior pneumococcal vaccination were reported among this target group (vaccine-preventable strains covered by the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines currently available. We propose that consideration should be given to strengthening implementation around pneumococcal vaccination for those exposed to metal fume through their work, even when other control measures are in place, to reduce the risk of future cases and outbreaks of serious pneumococcal disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae invasive infection: The first reported case in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleb, A; Sebbar, E; Frikh, M; Boubker, S; Moussaoui, A; El Mekkaoui, A; Khannoussi, W; Kharrasse, G; Belefquih, B; Lemnouer, A; Ismaili, Z; Elouennass, M

    2017-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a cosmopolitan yeast, widely used in agro-alimentary and pharmaceutical industry. Its impact in human pathology is rare, but maybe still underestimated compared to the real situation. This yeast is currently considered as an emerging and opportunistic pathogen. Risk factors are immunosuppression and intravascular device carrying. Fungemias are the most frequent clinical forms. We report the first case of S. cerevisiae invasive infection described in Morocco, and to propose a review of the literature cases of S. cerevisiae infections described worldwide. A 77-year-old patient, with no notable medical history, who was hospitalized for a upper gastrointestinal stenosis secondary to impassable metastatic gastric tumor. Its history was marked by the onset of septic shock, with S. cerevisiae in his urine and in his blood, with arguments for confirmation of invasion: the presence of several risk factors in the patient, positive direct microbiological examination, abundant and exclusive culture of S. cerevisiae from clinical samples. Species identification was confirmed by the study of biochemical characteristics of the isolated yeast. Confirmation of S. cerevisiae infection requires a clinical suspicion in patients with risk factors, but also a correct microbiological diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Invasive pneumococcal diseases among hospitalized children in Lima, Peru Enfermedades neumocócicas invasoras en niños hospitalizados en Lima, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa J. Ochoa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and the antibiotic susceptibility and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae in pediatric patients in Lima, Peru. METHODS: A 2-year, multicenter, passive surveillance study conducted from May 2006- April 2008 in 11 public hospitals and five private laboratories in Lima, Peru, in patients less than 16 years of age with sterile site cultures yielding S. pneumoniae. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed by Etest® (AB Biodisk, Solna, Switzerland. Strains were serotyped by the Quellung reaction. RESULTS: In all, 101 IPD episodes were studied, 68.3% of which were among children less than 24 months of age. Diagnoses were: pneumonia (47.5%, meningitis (38.6%, and sepsis (7.9%. The overall case fatality rate was 22.0%; case fatality rate in meningitis was 32.4%. While 80.0% of fatal cases were in those less than 24 months of age, only 50.7% of non-fatal cases (P OBJETIVO: Determinar la epidemiología de la enfermedad neumocócica invasora y la sensibilidad a los antibióticos y la distribución de los serotipos de S. pneumoniae en pacientes pediátricos en Lima, Perú. MÉTODOS: Estudio multicéntrico de vigilancia pasiva durante dos años, entre mayo del 2006 y abril del 2008, en 11 hospitales públicos y 5 consultorios privados de Lima, en pacientes menores de 16 años con cultivos de sitios estériles positivos para S. pneumoniae. Se determinó la sensibilidad a los antibióticos mediante Etest® (AB Biodisk, Solna, Suiza. Se serotipificaron las cepas mediante la reacción de Quellung. RESULTADOS: En total, se estudiaron 101 episodios de enfermedad neumocócica invasora, 68,3% de ellos en niños menores de 24 meses, con los siguientes diagnósticos: neumonía (47,5%, meningitis (38,6% y septicemia (7,9%. La tasa de letalidad general fue de 22,0% y la tasa de letalidad por meningitis de 32,4%. Si bien 80,0% de los casos mortales ocurrió en menores de 24 meses, solo 50

  18. Hospitalizations for pneumonia, invasive diseases and otitis in Tuscany (Italy), 2002-2014: Which was the impact of universal pneumococcal pediatric vaccination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalini, Sara; Varone, Ornella; Chellini, Martina; Pieri, Luca; Sala, Antonino; Berardi, Cesare; Bonanni, Paolo; Bechini, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main causative organism of acute media otitis in children and meningitis and bacterial pneumonia in the community. Since 2008 in Tuscany, central Italy, the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7-valent vaccine, switched to 13-valent vaccine in 2010) was actively offered free of charge to all newborns. Aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of pneumococcal pediatric vaccination in the Tuscan population on hospitalizations potentially caused by S. pneumoniae, during pre-vaccination (PVP, 2002-2007) and vaccination period (VP, 2009-2014). We analyzed hospital discharge records (HDRs) of all hospitals in Tuscany from 2002 to 2014. Hospitalizations potentially due to pneumococcal diseases were 347, 221. The general hospitalization rate was 716/100,000 inhabitants during PVP and 753/100,000 in VP, with a decrease of 29.1% in the age-group 0-9 y ("target" of the vaccination program) and an increase of 75.7% in subjects >64 y of age. During VP, admission days and hospitalization costs increased (6.2% and 24.2%, respectively), especially in patients >64 y (12.9% and 33.8%, respectively); in children vaccination resulted in the decrease of hospitalizations in younger but the expected indirect effect in the elderly was not reported, justifying the Tuscan recommendation to extend the vaccination to subjects > 64 y.

  19. Evaluation of anti-pneumococcal capsular antibodies as adjunctive therapy in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian; Frimodt-Moller, N; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacteraemia concomitant with meningitis has been shown to greatly affect outcome. Consequently, the efficacy of serotype-specific anti-pneumococcal antiserum (APAS) was investigated in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. METHODS: Rats were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae...... serotype 3. All rats received ceftriaxone starting 26 h post-infection. APAS was administered either at the time of infection or 26 h post-infection and effects were compared with rats treated with antibiotics only. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A significant clinical benefit was found when APAS was given...... at the time of infection whereas no effect was found when administered 26 h after infection. This work indicates that the clinical value of using APAS in pneumococcal meningitis may be limited...

  20. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity.

  1. Economic studies applied to vaccines against invasive diseases: An updated budget impact analysis of age-based pneumococcal vaccination strategies in the elderly in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalini, Sara; Bechini, Angela; Gasparini, Roberto; Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bonanni, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Many evaluations have been performed on the economic impact of pneumococcal vaccination in older adults (>64 y of age) in several countries, including Italy. However, these studies did not include the new data on the effectiveness of 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) in the elderly reported by the CAPiTA Study. The aim of the present study was to update our previous budget impact analysis of multi-cohort PCV13 vaccination in adults in Italy by including new scientific evidence. We also compared single-cohort vaccination strategies per year, in order to identify the cohort with the most favorable economic profile, in the event of the multi-cohort approach not being economically sustainable for the National Health System (NHS). The new impact analysis highlights that the vaccination of one, two or three adult cohorts per year in Italy would lead to a considerable reduction in pneumococcal disease and its related costs over 5 y. The strategies proved cost-effective (ICERs ranging from €14,605 to €15,412/QALY), i.e. well below the threshold of €50,000/QALY. The ICERs were slightly lower than those calculated in the first published analysis and vaccination continued to be economically favorable. In the case of a mono-cohort strategy, the vaccination of 65-year-old subjects, albeit more expensive, proved to be more favorable than the vaccination of 70- or 75-year-old cohorts. Finally, after the inclusion of the recent clinical evidence, the age-based PCV13 vaccination of the elderly in Italy continued to be economically justified from the NHS perspective in the short period. Vaccination of the elderly should therefore be strongly recommended nationwide in Italy.

  2. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Universal Routine Vaccination on Pneumococcal Disease in Italian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the effectiveness of pneumococcal universal vaccination in preventing vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in the PCV7/PCV13 shifting period was estimated to be 84.3% (95% CI: 84.0–84.6% in children <5 years. This study aims at corroborating the estimation of both the effectiveness (VE of PCVs and its impact in reducing pneumococcal diseases. A 1 : 3 matched-case-control study was conducted among children <5 years old hospitalized for IPD or pneumococcal pneumonia (PP between 2006 and 2012 in the Puglia region. Moreover, hospitalizations for pneumococcal outcomes in the pre- and postvaccination period and the hospitalization risk ratios (HRRs with 95% CIs were computed in Italy and in the first eight regions that introduced PCVs in 2006. The overall effectiveness of PCVs was 75% (95% CI: 61%–84%; it was 69% (95% CI: 30%–88% against IPD and 77% (95% CI: 61%–87% against PP. PCVs showed a significant impact on IPD and acute otitis media either at a national level or in those regions with a longer vaccination history, with a nearly 40% reduction of hospitalizations for both outcomes. Our findings provide further evidence of the effectiveness of PCVs against pneumococcal diseases and its impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in children <5 years, indicating the importance of maintaining high immunization coverage.

  3. Pneumococcal vaccination rates in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Alecia C; Akuete, Kwei; Leasure Reeves, Sarah; Dombkowski, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) confers an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease, especially among young children. Pneumococcal vaccination decreases this risk, but the completion rate of age-appropriate vaccinations is not well defined in SCD. The goal of this study was to assess whether pneumococcal vaccines are administered to high-risk children with SCD according to recommended vaccine schedules. A case-control design was used to conduct this study. Administrative data were obtained on Michigan Medicaid or Children's Special Health Care Services programs enrollees. In addition, Michigan Newborn Screening and Michigan Care Improvement Registry records were used to confirm diagnosis and vaccine administration. This study compared pneumococcal vaccination rates in a cohort of 179 children with SCD with 537 age-matched non-SCD controls (1:3) enrolled in the Michigan Medicaid Program between 2001 and 2008. Study subjects were born in the state of Michigan between 2001 and 2005. The main outcome measure was the proportion of children defined as up to date for pneumococcal vaccines at defined milestone ages. Children with SCD had significantly higher vaccination rates than controls, yet these values were much lower than state and national immunization survey rates. Barriers to completing age-appropriate recommended pneumococcal immunizations should be identified and addressed to further reduce invasive pneumococcal disease in this high-risk patient population.

  4. Fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from a medical center in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hang Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common pathogens to cause mucosal and invasive infection in humans. Resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQ is associated with clinical failure when treating pneumococcal diseases and increase of mortality. Methods: We collected clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae from January 2011 to July 2015 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Susceptibility to FQ was examined by disk diffusion method. Levofloxacin or moxifloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed by serotyping, multilocus sequence typing, and sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. Results: During the study period, 42 FQ-nonsusceptible pneumococcal isolates were identified. The rate increased from 1.6% of total pneumococcal isolates (2 of 127 in 2011 to 4.6% (13 of 283 in 2014, then decreased to 1.5% (3 of 202 in the first half of 2015. These isolates belonged to 13 serotypes, and serotype 14 (12 of 42, 33.3% was the most prevalent. Most of the isolates belonged to international clones or their variants. After QRDR analysis, there were 19 isolates in five clusters that shared both the same sequence type and QRDR mutation. Conclusions: FQ resistance initially emerged in either vaccine or nonvaccine serotypes. The majority of isolates were international clones or related variants, suggesting that resistance was disseminated through clonal spread. The wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine since 2013 appears to have reduced the spread of FQ-nonsusceptible pneumococci. Keywords: Fluoroquinolone, resistance, Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

  5. Humoral response to conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in paediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Frankie Wai Tsoi; Ip, Margaret; Chu, Yvonne Yuen Ling; Lin, Zheng; Lee, Vincent; Shing, Ming Kong; Leung, Wing Kwan; Yuen, Patrick Man Pan; Li, Chi Kong

    2012-04-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is an effective way to prevent invasive pneumococcal diseases in high risk populations. The efficacy of this vaccine in paediatric oncology patients remains unknown. The authors evaluated the antibody response to seven pneumococcal serotypes in paediatric oncology patients given two doses of heptavalent PCV (PCV-7). Forty-four patients (20 males; 24 females) with median age 9.5 years were studied. After two doses of PCV-7, 86-100% of patients had protective antibody titres against the seven vaccine serotypes. Increases in geometric mean antibody concentrations ranged from 3.8-fold for serotype 19F to 85.8-fold for serotype 14. There was no documented invasive pneumococcal disease in our cohort during the study period. PCV can elicit protective antipneumococcal antibody responses in paediatric oncology patients.

  6. Invasive fungal infections in Argentine patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinicki, J P; Catalan Pellet, S; Pappalardo, C; Cruzat, V C; Spinetto, M A; Dubinsky, D; Tiraboschi, I N; Laborde, H A; Nasswetter, G

    2013-08-01

    Infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Invasive fungal infections (IFI) comprise a group of diseases caused by Cryptococcus, Histoplasma, Aspergillus and Candida. Few studies of IFI have been published in patients with SLE and associated factors have not been completely defined. The objectives of this paper are to estimate the frequency of IFI in admitted patients with SLE in our hospital, to determine the risk factors associated with IFI in our patients with SLE, and to compare IFI group with a control group (SLE without IFI). The medical charts of patients with IFI (EORTC/MSG, 2008) and SLE (ACR, 1997) admitted to our hospital from June 2001 until June 2012 were reviewed. To identify factors associated with IFI, we developed a case-control study (SLE + IFI vs SLE alone) in a one to three ratio adjusted for sex and age and hospitalization for other reasons. Comparison was made of demographic characteristics, duration of disease and disease activity previous to IFI diagnosis, especially three months before fungal infection. We defined severe activity as SLEDAI ≥ 8. Infection by fungi of the genus Candida was considered only in its disseminated form. Ten cases of IFI were identified in 208 patients with SLE admitted between June 2001 and June 2012. We included 40 patients with SLE (10 with IFI and 30 controls). Of the SLE-IFI patients, eight were women and the average age was 27.5 years (range, 19-42 years). Fungal isolation: eight Cryptococcus neoformans, one Histoplasma capsulatum and one Candida albicans. Sites affected: five in peripheral blood, five in central nervous system (CNS), four in skin/soft tissue and one in pleura. Mortality was 40% (p = 0.002), with Cryptococcus neoformans being the most common fungus. The SLE disease activity was severe in 70% of infected patients and no significant difference with the control group was found (p = 0.195). We also found no

  7. Sporadic isolated congenital asplenia with fulminant pneumococcal meningitis: a case report and updated literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Shigeo

    2017-12-18

    Isolated congenital asplenia (ICA) is a rare and life-threatening condition that predisposes patients to severe bacterial infections. Most of the reported cases are familial and the mode of inheritance is usually autosomal dominant. Here, we report a case of sporadic isolated asplenia and review the literature while focusing on sporadic cases. We report the case of an 11-month-old female infant who developed fulminant pneumococcal meningitis. The pneumococcal vaccine-unimmunized patient was hospitalized with fever, irritability, and purpura, and was diagnosed as having meningitis, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. She was successfully treated with prompt antibiotic therapy. During hospitalization, abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography findings, scintigraphy results, and Howell-Jolly body-containing red blood cells indicated the presence of asplenia without any visceroarterial anomalies. Moreover, the findings of peripheral blood smears and spleen ultrasonographic examinations of her parents were normal. Majority of sporadic ICA cases were detected only after the onset of overwhelming infection and had a high mortality. In cases of severe invasive pneumococcal disease, a systematic search for Howell-Jolly bodies on blood smears and the presence of asplenia on abdominal imaging are essential for detecting ICA even in the absence of any family history. After the diagnosis of ICA, patient and parent education, vaccinations, antibiotic prophylaxis, and prompt empiric treatment of febrile episode should be provided.

  8. Periodontal bacterial invasion and infection: contribution to atherosclerotic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Leticia; Herrera, David; Kozarov, Emil; Roldán, Silvia; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this review was to perform a systematic evaluation of the literature reporting current scientific evidence for periodontal bacteria as contributors to atherosclerosis. Literature from epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies concerning periodontal bacteria and atherosclerosis were reviewed. Gathered data were categorized into seven "proofs" of evidence that periodontal bacteria: 1) disseminate from the oral cavity and reach systemic vascular tissues; 2) can be found in the affected tissues; 3) live within the affected site; 4) invade affected cell types in vitro; 5) induce atherosclerosis in animal models of disease; 6) non-invasive mutants of periodontal bacteria cause significantly reduced pathology in vitro and in vivo; and 7) periodontal isolates from human atheromas can cause disease in animal models of infection. Substantial evidence for proofs 1 to 6 was found. However, proof 7 has not yet been fulfilled. Despite the lack of evidence that periodontal bacteria obtained from human atheromas can cause atherosclerosis in animal models of infection, attainment of proofs 1 to 6 provides support that periodontal pathogens can contribute to atherosclerosis. © 2013 European Federation of Periodontology and American Academy of Periodontology.

  9. Invasive fungal infections in hematology: epidemiology and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bassetti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Recent Italian and International epidemiological data show that invasive fungal infections (IFI, particularly aspergillosis, are still a crucial issue for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, in the last years the epidemiology is changing, and in order to determine the real risk of a patient and in order to improve preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic measures, it’s important to identify all the factors (e.g. age, performance status, prophylaxis that play a role in the development of IFI. Immunogenetics may potentially contribute to improve diagnosis providing new therapeutic tools, but results are limited by sample size and absence of thorough functional characterization moreover lack of replication limits translation of data to the clinical practice. Regarding candidemia an Italian study showed that the overall incidence remained unchanged between 2008 and 2010 but with an increase in the number of C. albicans aand C. glabrata infections.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus infection is equally distributed across the invasive ductal and invasive lobular forms of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Ashley James

    2015-12-01

    The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of breast cancer is still unclear, although a growing body of evidence supports a link. The aim of this study was to investigate if EBV infection was more prevalent in invasive ductal carcinoma or invasive lobular carcinoma. An immunohistochemical marker for EBV (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) clone E1-2.5) was applied to a tissue micro array section. The tissue micro array contained 80 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma, and 80 cases of invasive lobular carcinoma. Each case was scored as positive or negative for nuclear expression of EBNA1 in tumor cells using standard light microscopy. EBNA1 staining was evident in the tumor cells of 63 cases (39.4% of tumor cases). By tumor type (ductal/lobular) EBV infection was noted in 34 (42.5%) cases of invasive ductal carcinoma and 29 (36.2%) cases of invasive lobular carcinoma, this difference was not found to be significant (P=0.518). This study indicates that EBV infection is equally distributed across the ductal and lobular tumor types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a universal vaccination programme with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Annika; Hjelmgren, Jonas; Ortqvist, Ake

    2008-01-01

    that vaccination of 1 cohort could potentially prevent 9 cases of pneumococcal meningitis, 22 cases of pneumococcal septicaemia, 509 cases of hospitalized pneumonia, 7812 cases of acute otitis media, and 2.7 fatalities, among children 0-4 y of age and 6 episodes of pneumococcal meningitis and 167 cases......The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) has proved to be highly effective against invasive pneumococcal disease and has also provided some protection against all-cause pneumonia and acute otitis media. The objective of this study was to evaluate the projected health benefits, costs...

  12. Enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en niños de la Región de Murcia Invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the region of Murcia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Espín

    2002-10-01

    vaccine, the incidence and characteristics of invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the region of Murcia should be determined. This would provide information that could be useful for properly establishing the indications for vaccination. Methods: A retrospective search was conducted for cases of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in children aged less 15 years old treated in hospitals in Murcia from 1991-2000. The data sources were the databases of the microbiology services, the Minimum Data Set, the Pediatric Admissions Register and the EDO Register. Results: The incidence rate for the period 1996-2000 was 18.25 per 10(5 children per year for children aged under 1 year in the case of invasive disease (10.6 for meningitis, 13.6 for those under 2 years for invasive disease (6 for meningitis, 8.9 for those under 5 years (1.35 for meningitis and 3.7 for those under 15 years (1.3 for meningitis. Twenty-eight percent of the patients presented risk factors. Complications occurred in 35.2% and sequelae occurred in 5%. The mortality rate was 11.8%. The prevalent serogroups were 19, 6, 18, 5, 14 and 23. Conclusions: The high percentage of patients with risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease suggests the need to implement vaccination programs aimed at risk groups. Although the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the region of Murcia differs from that in other areas, the incidence of meningitis is similar to that reported by other studies. Because of the severity of the disease, cost-effectiveness studies to evaluate the possible incorporation of the vaccine in the vaccination calendar are justified.

  13. [Pneumococcal carriage in mothers and children of the Panare Amerindians from the State of Bolivar, Venezuela].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello Gonzalez, T.; Rivera-Olivero, I.A.; Pocaterra, L.; Spadola, E.; Araque, M.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Waard, J.H. de

    2010-01-01

    In North America, the indigenous groups have been identified as a population with increased risk of pneumococcal colonization and pneumococcal invasive disease. However, little information is available from South American natives. In the present study we evaluated the nasopharyngeal carriage and

  14. Pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldhoff, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infectious disease, involving the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, and the subarachnoid space. In the Netherlands most common causative agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae (72%) and Neisseria meningitidis (11%). The incidence of pneumococcal

  15. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child's Immunizations: ... cochlear implants. Why Are the PCV and PPSV Vaccines Recommended? Children younger than 2 years old, adults ...

  16. Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes Express a Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide Type 14 Cross-Reactive Antigen That Induces Protective Immunoglobulin Responses against Pneumococcal Infection in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    II, is unknown. Invasive infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae are a leading cause of meningitis and a major cause of otitis media and bacteremia...Use of Laboratory Animals (27a). MAbs specific for bacterial polysaccharides. A mouse IgG1() monoclonal antibody (MAb) (clone 44.1) and two IgM...were obtained from bone marrow (BM) cells cultured in media supplemented with 10 ng/ml of murine recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating

  17. Value of platelet count in the early diagnosis of nosocomial invasive fungal infections in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Chen; Mao, Jian

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of a platelet count (PLT) in the early diagnosis of nosocomial invasive fungal infections in premature infants. Based on clinical diagnosis combined with blood culture results, 72 premature infants of 5354 pediatric patients who were hospitalized in the neonatal ward of our hospital between September 2009 and February 2013 were diagnosed with nosocomial invasive fungal infections (fungal infection group). There were 58 premature infants diagnosed with bacterial infections during the same period (bacterial infection group). The control group included 74 premature infants without nosocomial infections who were hospitalized during the same period. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to analyze the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic efficacy of the PLT and white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in the diagnosis of fungal infections in premature infants. The risk factors for invasive fungal infections included birth weight infection group decreased in the early and acute stages of infection (p infection group decreased in the early and acute stages of infection (p infection group was more significant than the bacterial infection group (p infection group in the early stage of infection (p infection groups in the acute stage of infection (p > 0.05). ROC curve analysis of the WBC and PLT counts and the CRP level in the early diagnosis of fungal infections showed that the area under the curve of the PLT count was 0.912 (95% confidence interval:0.863-0.961), thus indicating a high accuracy with a cutoff PLT count of 157.0 × 10 9 /L. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity were 77.8% and 94.6%, respectively. We conclude that the PLT count is a convenient, economical, and effective predictor of invasive fungal infections in premature infants and has potential in the early diagnosis of fungal infections.

  18. Hydroxyurea therapy of a murine model of sickle cell anemia inhibits the progression of pneumococcal disease by down-modulating E-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D; Howard, Thad; Hu, Yunming; Pestina, Tamara I; Gao, Geli; Johnson, Melissa; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Ware, Russell E; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Persons, Derek A; Rosch, Jason W

    2012-02-23

    Sickle cell anemia is characterized by chronic hemolysis coupled with extensive vascular inflammation. This inflammatory state also mechanistically promotes a high risk of lethal, invasive pneumococcal infection. Current treatments to reduce vaso-occlusive complications include chronic hydroxyurea therapy to induce fetal hemoglobin. Because hydroxyurea also reduces leukocytosis, an understanding of the impact of this treatment on pneumococcal pathogenesis is needed. Using a sickle cell mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis, administration of hydroxyurea was found to significantly improve survival. Hydroxyurea treatment decreased neutrophil extravasation into the infected lung coincident with significantly reduced levels of E-selectin in serum and on pulmonary epithelia. The protective effect of hydroxyurea was abrogated in mice deficient in E-selectin. The decrease in E-selectin levels was also evident in human sickle cell patients receiving hydroxyurea therapy. These data indicate that in addition to induction of fetal hemoglobin, hydroxyurea attenuates leukocyte-endothelial interactions in sickle cell anemia, resulting in protection against lethal pneumococcal sepsis.

  19. Increased cytotoxicity and streptolysin O activity in group G streptococcal strains causing invasive tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Kittang, Bård R; Chakrakodi, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has emerged as an important cause of severe skin and soft tissue infections, but little is known of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying tissue pathology. Patient samples and a collection of invasive and non-invasive group G SDSE strains (n = 69...

  20. Falciparum malaria infection with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunocompetent host – case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriyani, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is an extraordinary rare in the immunocompetent host. Falciparum malaria contributes to high morbidity and mortality of malaria infection cases in the world. The impairments of both humoral and cellular immunity could be the reason of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in falciparum malaria infection. Forty-nine years old patient came with fever, jaundice, pain in the right abdomen, after visiting a remote area in Africa about one month before admission. Blood films and rapid test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. After malaria therapy in five days, consciousness was altered into somnolence and intubated with respiratory deterioration. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after falciparum malaria infection is life-threatening. There should be awareness of physicians of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in falciparum malaria infection.

  1. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection and Vaccine Implications, Auckland, New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Safar, Atheer; Lennon, Diana; Stewart, Joanna; Trenholme, Adrian; Drinkovic, Dragana; Peat, Briar; Taylor, Susan; Read, Kerry; Roberts, Sally; Voss, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection and the potential effects of a multivalent GAS vaccine in New Zealand. During January 2005–December 2006, we conducted prospective population-based laboratory surveillance of Auckland residents admitted to all public hospitals with isolation of GAS from normally sterile sites. Using emm typing, we identified 225 persons with confirmed invasive GAS infection (median 53 years of age; range 0–97 years). Overall incid...

  2. A Case of Pneumococcal Peritonitis after Caesarean Section in a Healthy Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Kourounis, Georgios; Panayiotou, Yiannis; Tabet, Patrick Paul; Richards, Brian David Wensley; Petrou, Athanasios; Loizou, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal peritonitis is prevalent in children and adults with comorbidities but extremely rare in healthy adults. Here we describe a case of pneumococcal peritonitis in a previously healthy woman with no known risk factors who presented with constipation, abdominal pain, and distention. Her only past medical history was an uncomplicated C-section two months prior to presentation. A laparotomy revealed a pneumococcal peritonitis without visible source of infection. The patient remained hos...

  3. Following in real time the impact of pneumococcal virulence factors in an acute mouse pneumonia model using bioluminescent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Malek; Abdullah, Mohammed R; Schulz, Christian; Kohler, Thomas; Pribyl, Thomas; Jensch, Inga; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2014-02-23

    Pneumonia is one of the major health care problems in developing and industrialized countries and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in knowledge of this illness, the availability of intensive care units (ICU), and the use of potent antimicrobial agents and effective vaccines, the mortality rates remain high(1). Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and one of the most common causes of bacteremia in humans. This pathogen is equipped with an armamentarium of surface-exposed adhesins and virulence factors contributing to pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The assessment of the in vivo role of bacterial fitness or virulence factors is of utmost importance to unravel S. pneumoniae pathogenicity mechanisms. Murine models of pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis are being used to determine the impact of pneumococcal factors at different stages of the infection. Here we describe a protocol to monitor in real-time pneumococcal dissemination in mice after intranasal or intraperitoneal infections with bioluminescent bacteria. The results show the multiplication and dissemination of pneumococci in the lower respiratory tract and blood, which can be visualized and evaluated using an imaging system and the accompanying analysis software.

  4. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlecht, L.M.; Peters, B.M.; Krom, B.P.; Freiberg, J.A.; Hänsch, G.M.; Filler, S.G.; Jabra-Rizk, M.A.; Shirtliff, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through

  5. ESCMID and ECMM joint clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of rare invasive yeast infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arendrup, M.C.; Boekhout, T.; Akova, M.; Meis, J.F.; Cornely, O.A.; Lorthlaro, O.

    The mortality associated with invasive fungal infections remains high with that involving rare yeast pathogens other than Candida being no exception. This is in part due to the severe underlying conditions typically predisposing patients to these healthcare-related infections (most often severe

  6. A Case of Pneumococcal Peritonitis after Caesarean Section in a Healthy Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Kourounis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal peritonitis is prevalent in children and adults with comorbidities but extremely rare in healthy adults. Here we describe a case of pneumococcal peritonitis in a previously healthy woman with no known risk factors who presented with constipation, abdominal pain, and distention. Her only past medical history was an uncomplicated C-section two months prior to presentation. A laparotomy revealed a pneumococcal peritonitis without visible source of infection. The patient remained hospitalized until completion of antibiotic regimen with Ceftriaxone and resolution of symptoms. This report adds to the small body of evidence showing possible pneumococcal peritonitis in healthy young adults.

  7. A Case of Pneumococcal Peritonitis after Caesarean Section in a Healthy Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourounis, Georgios; Panayiotou, Yiannis; Tabet, Patrick Paul; Richards, Brian David Wensley; Petrou, Athanasios; Loizou, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal peritonitis is prevalent in children and adults with comorbidities but extremely rare in healthy adults. Here we describe a case of pneumococcal peritonitis in a previously healthy woman with no known risk factors who presented with constipation, abdominal pain, and distention. Her only past medical history was an uncomplicated C-section two months prior to presentation. A laparotomy revealed a pneumococcal peritonitis without visible source of infection. The patient remained hospitalized until completion of antibiotic regimen with Ceftriaxone and resolution of symptoms. This report adds to the small body of evidence showing possible pneumococcal peritonitis in healthy young adults.

  8. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine – a health priority | Zar | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies evaluating a 9-valent PCV in South Africa and The Gambia reported a 72 - 77% reduction in vaccineserotype- specific invasive disease in vaccinated children. As many of the pneumococcal serotypes associated with antibiotic resistance are included in PCV, vaccination has also been associated with a reduction in ...

  9. ADULT PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINATION GUIDELINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fully sensitive to penicillin, in 1967 the first clinical isolate demonstrating penicillin resistance was documented. Initial reports of penicillin resistance were from Australia, New. Guinea and South Africa. More recent reports have shown a dramatic increase in pneumococcal resistance to penicillin even in countries such as the ...

  10. 75 FR 48707 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... is an infection of the covering of the brain.) Although pneumococcal meningitis is relatively rare.... Pneumococcal meningitis can also lead to other health problems, including deafness and brain damage. Before... vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your provider if the patient feels...

  11. Invasive candidiasis: from mycobiome to infection, therapy, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunes, L; Rello, J

    2016-08-01

    Candida spp. are commonly found in humans, colonizing most healthy individuals. A high prevalence of invasive candidiasis has been reported in recent years. Here, we assess the relation between Candida spp. as part of the human mycobiome, the host defense mechanisms, and the pathophysiology of invasive disease in critically ill patients. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the different immune responses to the process where Candida goes through healthy mycobiome to colonization to invasion; the involvement of other microbiota inhabitants, changes in temperature, low nitrogen levels, and the caspase system activation have been described. Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at the highest risk for invasive candidiasis, mostly due to the severity of their disease, immune-suppressive states, prolonged length of stay, broad-spectrum antibiotics, septic shock, and Candida colonization. The first approach should be using predictive scores as screening, followed by the determination of biomarkers (when available), and, in the near future, probably immune-genomics and analysis of the clinical background in order to initiate prompt and correct treatment. Regarding treatment, the initiation with an echinocandin is strongly recommended in critically ill patients. In conclusion, prompt treatment and adequate source control in the more severe patients remains the ultimate goal, as well as restoration of a healthy microbiota.

  12. Pneumococcal resistance in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, C E; Moore, J E; Murphy, P G

    1997-12-01

    The first case reports of infection with penicillin-resistant pneumococci (PRP, MIC > 0.1 mg/L) and multidrug-resistant pneumococci were made in Australia in 1967 and South Africa in 1977, respectively. Since this time these organisms have spread to become a worldwide problem. In Europe PRP prevalence rates of up to 40% have been reported from Spain and 58% from Hungary, although there has been considerable national, regional and local variation in these figures. Until recently the UK was considered to have low prevalence of PRP. As recently as 1990, 100% of 7255 strains of pneumococci from 61 centres across the UK were found to be penicillin sensitive. However, there have now been several reports of significant and rising levels of resistance nationwide. Erythromycin resistance has also risen from 2.8% to 8.6% between 1990 and 1995 in England and Wales. At the Northern Ireland Public Health Laboratory (NIPHL) 3171 strains of pneumococci were examined using the oxacillin screening test between 1988 and 1995, during which time the annual rate of penicillin resistance was found to increase from 1 mg/L) increased from 0% to 36% and levels of PRP cross-resistance to cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin were 89% and 78%, respectively, which are amongst the highest in the UK. Similar rates of penicillin resistance have now been reported from several geographically disparate regions in the UK including Liverpool, Manchester and London. The number of laboratories in England and Wales reporting the isolation of PRPs to the Central Public Health Laboratory increased from 23 (3%) in 1987 to 72 (21%) in 1991 and a recent study from this reference laboratory showed that the prevalence of pneumococcal resistance to penicillin had increased 2.5-fold between 1990 and 1995. Clearly both PRP and multidrug-resistant pneumococci are increasing in prevalence in the UK, and this increase is likely to continue. A recent model of the evolution of national PRP prevalence rates describes a slow

  13. Dynamics and Determinants of Pneumococcal Antibodies Specific against 13 Vaccine Serotypes in the Pre-Vaccination Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins-van Ginkel, Annemarijn C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413970434; Berbers, Guy A M; Grundeken, Lucienne H; Tcherniaeva, Irina; Wittenberns, Jelle I; Elberse, Karin; Mollema, Liesbeth; de Melker, Hester E; Knol, Mirjam J

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) for infants decreased overall invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), while non-vaccine serotype IPD increased. To fully understand this serotype replacement, knowledge about serotype dynamics in the pre-vaccine era is needed. In

  14. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination: patient perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, P F; Gibbons, Y M; Primrose, W R; Ellis, G; Downie, G

    2000-04-01

    The efficacy of the influenza vaccine in reducing mortality and hospital admissions is established, particularly in the elderly. However, up to 50% of those at risk do not receive the vaccine. These patients are also at risk from pneumococcal infection and there is considerable overlap between the target group for each vaccine. This study sought to identify at risk individuals from consecutive admissions to an acute geriatric unit and to gain an insight into their perceptions with regard to vaccination. The awareness of each vaccine was recorded, together with the vaccination history. Seventy four per cent of the final cohort had heard of the influenza vaccine, while only 13% had heard of the pneumococcal vaccine. Fifty per cent perceived themselves to be at risk from influenza and its complications and 87% of the cohort believed it to be a serious infection. Influenza vaccine was judged to confer good protection by 72% of the sample and yet up to 50% believed that the vaccine can make the recipient ill. Influenza is perceived as a serious infection by patients and yet many do not believe themselves to be at particular risk. Although influenza vaccination is believed to confer protection, the decision whether, or not, to accept the vaccine is coloured by many factors, including popular myths and anecdotal information from friends and relatives. The uptake of influenza vaccine is suboptimal and the awareness of the pneumococcal vaccine certainly in the elderly is poor. The need for a comprehensive nationwide education campaign promoting both influenza and pneumococcal vaccine is highlighted.

  15. Invasive carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (VIM), imipenemase (IMP) and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM), and class D ... infection control practice and antibiotic stewardship are necessary to contain the spread of CRE and limit the number of new infections. ...... species: Emergence of KPC-2 carbapenemase, molecular characterization, epidemiology, and.

  16. Anidulafungin in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Sabol

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Sabol, Tawanda GumboUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: More antifungal agents have reached clinical use in the past two decades than at any other time. The echinocandins have been a welcome addition to this group, with the latest being anidulafungin. There are several lines of evidence to support anidulafungin’s role as primary therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients, and as alternative therapy to fluconazole in patients with esophageal candidiasis with azole intolerance or triazole-resistant Candida. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies in animals have demonstrated superior efficacy, defined as maximal microbial kill, when compared to fluconazole, regardless of the fluconazole susceptibility of the Candida species. These studies, as well as dose-effect studies in patients, also support the currently recommended dose of anidulafungin. A well designed randomized controlled trial has demonstrated anidulafungin’s efficacy in patients with invasive candidiasis. In this paper, we argue that anidulafungin may be preferable to fluconazole for the treatment of candidemia. However, as of yet, the difference between anidulafungin and the other two licensed echinocandins as first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis is unclear. On the other hand, there is insufficient evidence as of yet to support first-line use of anidulafungin in patients with neutropenia or aspergillosis.Keywords: anidulafungin, pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, efficacy, candidiasis

  17. A Cluster of Paediatric Invasive Group A Streptococcal and Chicken Pox Infections

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, C

    2018-03-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a variety of acute clinical syndromes from pharyngitis and scarlet fever commonly seen in primary care to more severe life-threatening invasive disease. Invasive GAS, categorised into three groups - necrotising fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and sepsis with or without an identifiable source of infection- is a notifiable disease to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)1. Laboratory criteria for a confirmed case require isolation of GAS from a normally sterile site. The HPSC previously reported a marked increase in the incidence of invasive GAS infections from 1.65\\/100,000 population in 2011 to 3.65\\/100,000 in 20132. The increased incidence was notable also for a 300% increase in the proportion of invasive GAS cases in children. After a slight decrease in incidence in 20153 (2.3\\/100000), we noted a cluster of invasive GAS cases referred to the paediatric infectious disease (PID) department of Children’s University Hospital (CUH), Temple Street, in 2016. We sought to further characterise this cluster of paediatric invasive GAS infections.

  18. Coordination of Candida albicans Invasion and Infection Functions by Phosphoglycerol Phosphatase Rhr2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar V. Desai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Candida albicans RHR2 gene, which specifies a glycerol biosynthetic enzyme, is required for biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. Prior studies indicate that RHR2 is ultimately required for expression of adhesin genes, such as ALS1. In fact, RHR2 is unnecessary for biofilm formation when ALS1 is overexpressed from an RHR2-independent promoter. Here, we describe two additional biological processes that depend upon RHR2: invasion into an abiotic substrate and pathogenicity in an abdominal infection model. We report here that abiotic substrate invasion occurs concomitantly with biofilm formation, and a screen of transcription factor mutants indicates that biofilm and hyphal formation ability correlates with invasion ability. However, analysis presented here of the rhr2Δ/Δ mutant separates biofilm formation and invasion. We found that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant forms a biofilm upon overexpression of the adhesin gene ALS1 or the transcription factor genes BRG1 or UME6. However, the biofilm-forming strains do not invade the substrate. These results indicate that RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in substrate invasion, and mathematical modeling argues that RHR2 is required to generate turgor. Previous studies have shown that abdominal infection by C. albicans has two aspects: infection of abdominal organs and persistence in abscesses. We report here that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant is defective in both of these infection phenotypes. We find here that overexpression of ALS1 in the mutant restores infection of organs, but does not improve persistence in abscesses. Therefore, RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in abdominal infection, just as it does in substrate invasion. This report suggests that RHR2, through glycerol synthesis, coordinates adherence with host- or substrate-interaction activities that enable proliferation of the C. albicans population.

  19. Systematic Search for Primary Immunodeficiency in Adults With Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Complement Deficiency; Antibody Deficiency; Chronic Sinus Infection; Meningitis, Bacterial; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Otitis Media; Streptococcal Infection; Neisseria Infections; Haemophilus Influenza; Pneumococcal Infections

  20. Prevention of Pneumococcal Infection in Children with Chronic Diseases of the Nasopharynx Reduces the Incidence of Other Respiratory Tract Infections: Results of a Comparative Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Vavilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A promising approach to solving the problem of widespread infections of the respiratory tract in children is the use ofspecific prophylaxis against the pneumococcus.Objective: Our aim was to examine the clinical efficacy of PCV13 of children with chronic foci of infection in the nasopharynx and the changes of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract.Methods: We have evaluated the incidence of respiratory tract and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. Research period: January 2011 — January 2015. Upper airway function examination included cytologic analysis — counting the main cell populations ratio in the common cytoplasm, lysozym activity and secretory immunoglobulin of class A (sIgA in nasal secretions.Results: The study involved 876 children 2–5 years old. Main group (PCV13 amounted to 448 patients, and the control group (unvaccinated 428. Annual dynamic observation showed a significant reduction of acute morbidity by 2 times (p < 0.001, pneumonia by 2.4 times (p = 0.042, acute bronchitis by 2.5 times (p = 0.008, concomitant ENT pathology (acute otitis media and acute exacerbations of chronic sinusitis by 2.2 times (p = 0.001 and 2.3 times (p = 0.004, respectively. There was a positive effect of vaccination on the level of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract (lysozyme, sIgA, the somatic cell count in nasal secretions.Conclusion: PCV13 vaccination reduces the risk of developing acute respiratory infections and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. This is against the background of recovery in the levels of factors of local immunity.

  1. Features of host cell invasion by different infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortara Renato A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Through its life cycle from the insect vector to mammalian hosts Trypanosoma cruzi has developed clever strategies to reach the intracellular milieu where it grows sheltered from the hosts' immune system. We have been interested in several aspects of in vitro interactions of different infective forms of the parasite with cultured mammalian cells. We have observed that not only the classically infective trypomastigotes but also amastigotes, originated from the extracellular differentiation of trypomastigotes, can infect cultured cells. Interestingly, the process of invasion of different parasite infective forms is remarkably distinct and also highly dependent on the host cell type.

  2. A nationwide study on the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertion in Denmark 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitz, Michael Frantz; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Ingels, Helene; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Mølbak, Kåre; Djurhuus, Bjarki Ditlev

    2017-10-13

    Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugated Vaccines (PCV) in national immunization programs have been successful in reducing the number of invasive and lower respiratory pneumococcal infections. The impact of the vaccines on upper respiratory infections caused by pneumococci is less clear although these account for most pneumococcal infections. In this study, we used likely proxies for respiratory infections in children, such as antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertions (VTI), to estimate the impact of the vaccine on a national level. The study was designed as a population-based retrospective observational study, comparing trends in the incidence rate of antibiotic prescriptions and VTIs in the period 2000-2014, where PCV7 was introduced in 2007 and PCV13 in 2010. The introduction of PCV7 and PCV13 correlated with changes in the incidence rate from an almost steady increase in prescription of antibiotics in the pre-PCV period to a decreasing incidence for all children age 0-15years. The 2.4 DDD per person year in 2014 was at almost the same level of antibiotic use as in 2000 at 2.3 DDD per person year. Similar patterns were observed in the mostly vaccinated age groups below 5years of age. For VTI we observed a decreasing incidence rate in the years following introduction of PCV13 ending with a slightly higher incidence at 35 per 1000 person years in 2014 compared to 31 in year 2000. We conclude that the steady increase in antibiotic use and VTI in the pre-PCV period have been partially reversed to near year 2000 levels after the introduction of PCV. This indicates that implementation of pneumococcal vaccines in the Childhood Vaccination Programme has likely reduced the incidence of upper respiratory diseases due to pneumococci in Denmark. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.T.; Holm, D.; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background. Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. Methods. Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. Results. Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  4. As a Rare Site of Invasive Fungal Infection, Chronic Granulomatous Aspergillus Synovitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Canbolat Ayhan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus can causes invasive disease of various organs especially in patients with weakened immune systems. Aspergillus synovitis and arthritis are uncommon types of involvement due to this infection. Approches to fungal osteoarticular infections are based on only case reports. This paper presents a rare case of chronic granulomatous Aspergillus synovitis in an immunocompromised 5-year old girl who was treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  5. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M; Dierdorf, Nina I; Hauck, Christof R; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells.

  6. Invasive Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections among Cardiothoracic Surgical Patients Exposed to Heater-Cooler Devices1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Meghan M; Grigg, Cheri; Kinsey, Cara Bicking; Keckler, M Shannon; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Cooper, Emily; Soe, Minn M; Noble-Wang, Judith; Longenberger, Allison; Walker, Shane R; Miller, Jeffrey R; Perz, Joseph F; Perkins, Kiran M

    2017-05-01

    Invasive nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections may result from a previously unrecognized source of transmission, heater-cooler devices (HCDs) used during cardiac surgery. In July 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Health notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about a cluster of NTM infections among cardiothoracic surgical patients at 1 hospital. We conducted a case-control study to identify exposures causing infection, examining 11 case-patients and 48 control-patients. Eight (73%) case-patients had a clinical specimen identified as Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). HCD exposure was associated with increased odds of invasive NTM infection; laboratory testing identified patient isolates and HCD samples as closely related strains of M. chimaera, a MAC species. This investigation confirmed a large US outbreak of invasive MAC infections in a previously unaffected patient population and suggested transmission occurred by aerosolization from HCDs. Recommendations have been issued for enhanced surveillance to identify potential infections associated with HCDs and measures to mitigate transmission risk.

  7. Invasive Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections among Cardiothoracic Surgical Patients Exposed to Heater–Cooler Devices1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Cheri; Kinsey, Cara Bicking; Keckler, M. Shannon; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Cooper, Emily; Soe, Minn M.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Longenberger, Allison; Walker, Shane R.; Miller, Jeffrey R.; Perz, Joseph F.; Perkins, Kiran M.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections may result from a previously unrecognized source of transmission, heater–cooler devices (HCDs) used during cardiac surgery. In July 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Health notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about a cluster of NTM infections among cardiothoracic surgical patients at 1 hospital. We conducted a case–control study to identify exposures causing infection, examining 11 case-patients and 48 control-patients. Eight (73%) case-patients had a clinical specimen identified as Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). HCD exposure was associated with increased odds of invasive NTM infection; laboratory testing identified patient isolates and HCD samples as closely related strains of M. chimaera, a MAC species. This investigation confirmed a large US outbreak of invasive MAC infections in a previously unaffected patient population and suggested transmission occurred by aerosolization from HCDs. Recommendations have been issued for enhanced surveillance to identify potential infections associated with HCDs and measures to mitigate transmission risk. PMID:28418290

  8. Seasonal changes in climatic parameters and their relationship with the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Thomsen, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal variation in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease is well recognized, but little is known about its relationship with actual changes in climatic parameters. In this 8-year longitudinal population-based study in Denmark, a harmonic sinusoidal regression model was used...... to examine whether preceding changes in climatic parameters corresponded with subsequent variations in the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia, independently of seasonal variation. The study shows that changes in temperature can be used to closely predict peaks in the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia...

  9. Invasive candidiasis in critical care setting, updated recommendations from “Invasive Fungal Infections-Clinical Forum”, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhoufi, Ashraf; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Asnaashari, Amir Mohammad Hashem; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali; Bidgoli, Behrooz Farzanegan; Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Abbasi, Saeed; El-Sobky, Malak; Ghaziani, Ali; Jarrahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrami, Reza; Shirazian, Farzad; Soltani, Farhad; Yazdinejad, Homeira; Zand, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) bears a high risk of morbidity and mortality in the intensive care units (ICU). With the current advances in critical care and the use of wide-spectrum antibiotics, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) and IC in particular, have turned into a growing concern in the ICU. Further to blood cultures, some auxiliary laboratory tests and biomarkers are developed to enable an earlier detection of infection, however these test are neither consistently available nor validated in our setting. On the other hand, patients’ clinical status and local epidemiology data may justify the empiric antifungal approach using the proper antifungal option. The clinical approach to the management of IC in febrile, non-neutropenic critically ill patients has been defined in available international guidelines; nevertheless such recommendations need to be customized when applied to our local practice. Over the past three years, Iranian experts from intensive care and infectious diseases disciplines have tried to draw a consensus on the management of IFI with a particular focus on IC in the ICU. The established IFI-clinical forum (IFI-CF), comprising the scientific leaders in the field, has recently come up with and updated recommendation on the same (June 2014). The purpose of this review is to put together literature insights and Iranian experts’ opinion at the IFI-CF, to propose an updated practical overview on recommended approaches for the management of IC in the ICU. PMID:25374806

  10. Parasitic anemone infects the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Møller, Lene Friis; Sundberg, Per

    2010-01-01

    We report of the first finding of parasitic sea anemone larvae infecting the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic. Parasitic anemone larvae are common in the native habitat of Mnemiopsis, but have not previously been reported from any of the locations where Mnemiopsis...

  11. Epidemiology and emm types of invasive group A streptococcal infections in Finland, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, P W; Lindholm, L; Lyytikäinen, O; Jalava, J; Pätäri-Sampo, A; Vuopio, J

    2015-10-01

    Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) infections are a major global cause of morbidity and mortality. We analysed the surveillance data on invasive GAS and the microbiological characteristics of corresponding isolates to assess the incidence and emm type distribution of invasive GAS infections in Finland. Cases defined as patients with isolations of blood and cerebrospinal fluid S. pyogenes are mandatorily notified to the National Infectious Disease Registry and sent to the national reference laboratory for emm typing. Antimicrobial data were collected through the network including all clinical microbiology laboratories. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis was performed to assess clonality. In total, 1165 cases of invasive GAS were reported in Finland during 2008-2013; the median age was 52 years (range, 0-100) and 54% were male. The overall day 7 case fatality rate was 5.1% (59 cases). The average annual incidence was 3.6 cases per 100,000 population. A total of 1122 invasive GAS isolates (96%) were analysed by emm typing; 72 different emm types were identified, of which emm28 (297 isolates, 26%), emm89 (193 isolates, 12%) and emm1 (132 isolates, 12%) were the most common types. During 2008-2013, an increase of erythromycin resistance (1.9% to 8.7%) and clindamycin (0.9% to 9.2%) was observed. This resistance increase was in parallel with the introduction of a novel clone emm33 into Finland. The overall incidence of invasive GAS infections remained stable over the study period in Finland. We identified clonal spread of macrolide-resistant invasive emm33 GAS type, highlighting the importance of molecular surveillance.

  12. Invasive fungal infections in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Selbach Scheffel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome is a condition characterized by elevated cortisol levels that can result from either augmented endogenous production or exogenous administration of corticosteroids. The predisposition to fungal infections among patients with hypercortisolemia has been noted since Cushing’s original description of the disease. We describe here a patient with endo-genous Cushing’s syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical carcinoma, who developed concomitant disseminated cryptococcosis and candidiasis in the course of his disease.

  13. [Clinical features of invasive candidiasis and risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection in children: a multicenter study in Urumqi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai Er Ken, Ai Bi Bai; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Xiong, Dai-Qin; Xu, Pei-Ru

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the clinical features of invasive candidiasis in children and the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection. A retrospective study was performed on 134 children with invasive candidiasis and hospitalized in 5 tertiary hospitals in Urumqi, China, between January 2010 and December 2015. The Candida species distribution was investigated. The clinical data were compared between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection. The risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection were investigated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 134 Candida strains were isolated from 134 children with invasive candidiasis, and non-albicans Candida (NAC) accounted for 53.0%. The incidence of invasive candidiasis in the PICU and other pediatric wards were 41.8% and 48.5% respectively. Sixty-eight patients (50.7%) had Candida bloodstream infection, and 45 patients (33.6%) had Candida urinary tract infection. There were significant differences in age, rate of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and incidence rates of chronic renal insufficiency, heart failure, urinary catheterization, and NAC infection between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection (Pcandidiasis is similar between the PICU and other pediatric wards. NAC is the most common species of invasive candidiasis. Candida bloodstream infection is the most common invasive infection. Younger age (1-24 months) and NAC infection are the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection.

  14. The burden of invasive bacterial infections in Pemba, Zanzibar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Thriemer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a surveillance study to determine the leading causes of bloodstream infection in febrile patients seeking treatment at three district hospitals in Pemba Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania, an area with low malaria transmission. METHODS: All patients above two months of age presenting to hospital with fever were screened, and blood was collected for microbiologic culture and malaria testing. Bacterial sepsis and malaria crude incidence rates were calculated for a one-year period and were adjusted for study participation and diagnostic sensitivity of blood culture. RESULTS: Blood culture was performed on 2,209 patients. Among them, 166 (8% samples yielded bacterial growth; 87 (4% were considered as likely contaminants; and 79 (4% as pathogenic bacteria. The most frequent pathogenic bacteria isolated were Salmonella Typhi (n = 46; 58%, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 12; 15%. The crude bacteremia rate was 6/100,000 but when adjusted for potentially missed cases the rate may be as high as 163/100,000. Crude and adjusted rates for S. Typhi infections and malaria were 4 and 110/100,000 and 4 and 47/100,000, respectively. Twenty three (51%, 22 (49% and 22 (49% of the S. Typhi isolates were found to be resistant toward ampicillin, chloramphenicol and cotrimoxazole, respectively. Multidrug resistance (MDR against the three antimicrobials was detected in 42% of the isolates. CONCLUSIONS: In the presence of very low malaria incidence we found high rates of S. Typhi and S. pneumoniae infections on Pemba Island, Zanzibar. Preventive measures such as vaccination could reduce the febrile disease burden.

  15. TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION MIGHT INCREASE THE RISK OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hua CHEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep Candida infections commonly occur in immunosuppressed patients. A rare case of a multiple deep organ infection with Candida albicans and spinal tuberculosis was reported in a healthy young man. The 19-year-old man complained of month-long fever and lower back pain. He also had a history of scalded mouth syndrome. Coinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans was diagnosed using the culture of aspirates from different regions. Symptoms improved considerably after antifungal and antituberculous therapy. This case illustrates that infection with tuberculosis might impair the host's immune system and increase the risk of invasive candidiasis in an immunocompetent patient.

  16. Invasive fungal infection (IFI) in two pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derwich, K.; Andrzejewska, M.; Wachowiak, J.; Mankowski, P.

    2009-01-01

    At present over 70% of children with malignancies can be successfully cured although this is achieved at the cost of increased incidence of major complications. Fungal infections account for some 10% of all infections and, in severely immunosuppressed patients, they are still the cause of a high mortality rate (50-95%). As a result the prevention and treatment of adverse effects of antineoplastic therapy is of the most importance and can be a factor determining the success of such treatment. This paper contains two case reports of adolescent female patients diagnosed with acute leukemia who developed invasive fungal infections (IFI) in the course of intensive chemotherapy. (authors)

  17. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Clifford, Gary M.; de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 384...

  18. Temperature rise and parasitic infection interact to increase the impact of an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Ciaran; Brenner, David; McIlwaine, Christopher; Lennon, Jack J; Dick, Jaimie T A; Lucy, Frances E; Christian, Keith A

    2017-04-01

    Invasive species often detrimentally impact native biota, e.g. through predation, but predicting such impacts is difficult due to multiple and perhaps interacting abiotic and biotic context dependencies. Higher mean and peak temperatures, together with parasites, might influence the impact of predatory invasive host species additively, synergistically or antagonistically. Here, we apply the comparative functional response methodology (relationship between resource consumption rate and resource supply) in one experiment and conduct a second scaled-up mesocosm experiment to assess any differential predatory impacts of the freshwater invasive amphipod Gammarus pulex, when uninfected and infected with the acanthocephalan Echinorhynchus truttae, at three temperatures representative of current and future climate. Individual G. pulex showed Type II predatory functional responses. In both experiments, infection was associated with higher maximum feeding rates, which also increased with increasing temperatures. Additionally, infection interacted with higher temperatures to synergistically elevate functional responses and feeding rates. Parasitic infection also generally increased Q 10 values. We thus suggest that the differential metabolic responses of the host and parasite to increasing temperatures drives the synergy between infection and temperature, elevating feeding rates and thus enhancing the ecological impact of the invader. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuro-invasion by a ‘Trojan Horse’ strategy and vasculopathy during intrauterine flavivirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Smirnova, Natalia P; Tolnay, Airn-Elizabeth; Webb, Brett T; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Q; van Campen, Hana; Hansen, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a major target of several important human and animal viral pathogens causing congenital infections. However, despite the importance of neuropathological outcomes, for humans in particular, the pathogenesis, including mode of neuro-invasion, remains unresolved for most congenital virus infections. Using a natural model of congenital infection with an RNA virus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus in pregnant cattle, we sought to delineate the timing and mode of virus neuro-invasion of and spread within the brain of foetuses following experimental respiratory tract infection of the dams at day 75 of pregnancy, a time of maximal risk of tissue pathology without foetal death. Virus antigen was first detected in the foetal brains 14 days postinfection of dams and was initially restricted to amoeboid microglial cells in the periventricular germinal layer. The appearance of these cells was preceded by or concurrent with vasculopathy in the same region. While the affected microvessels were negative for virus antigen, they expressed high levels of the type I interferon-stimulated protein ISG15 and eventually disappeared in parallel with the appearance of microcavitary lesions. Subsequently, the virus spread to neurons and other glial cells. Our findings suggest that the virus enters the CNS via infected microglial precursors, the amoeboid microglial cells, in a ‘Trojan horse’ mode of invasion and that the microcavitary lesions are associated with loss of periventricular microvasculature, perhaps as a consequence of high, unrestricted induction of interferon-regulated proteins. PMID:22264283

  20. Indirect (herd) protection, following pneumococcal conjugated vaccines introduction: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaban, Gal; Ben-Shimol, Shalom

    2017-05-19

    Pneumococcal diseases are major causes of morbidity among adults, especially those over 50years of age. While pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV's) impact on pneumococcal disease rates among children is well established, the extent of its impact on adult pneumococcal related illness remains unclear. The aim of this systematic literature review was to describe the impact of PCV introduction to childhood national immunization programs worldwide on PCV-naive adult population. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database. The search was limited to articles written in English and published between January 2000 and February 2016. Studies evaluating pneumococcal disease rates in individuals over 5years of age were included. Independent extraction of articles was performed by the two authors. Search terms included: Pneumococcal conjugated vaccine, herd, indirect, adults, and pneumonia. Forty-nine articles meeting the selection criteria were identified, 39 regarding invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, one on meningitis only), 8 regarding pneumonia, and 2 on both IPD and pneumonia. The majority of reports were from the US, UK and Canada. Considerable variability in the data sources, quality and completeness was observed. While most studies reported either statistically significant reduction or insignificant changes in IPD and pneumonia disease rates in adults following PCV nationwide implementation, few studies reported statistically significant increase in pneumococcal disease rates, these were mainly from countries with low PCV coverage rates and/or inadequate surveillance. Invasive pneumococcal diseases and pneumonia rates among the adult population decreased in most countries following PCV introduction into the NIP. This indirect effect on older population seems to be dependent on PCV coverage rates and time from PCV nationwide implementation. Adults >65years old seem to benefit the most from PCV introduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  1. Virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes strains from women in peri-labor with invasive infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golińska, E; van der Linden, M; Więcek, G; Mikołajczyk, D; Machul, A; Samet, A; Piórkowska, A; Dorycka, M; Heczko, P B; Strus, M

    2016-05-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections constitute an important epidemiological problem. Many cases occur in women during the postnatal period. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of the genes responsible for production of iron-chelating protein (perR) and superantigens (speA, speB, speC, speF, speG, speH, speI, speJ, speK, speL, speM, smeZ, and ssa) in S. pyogenes strains isolated from invasive infections in women after delivery. Furthermore, this study sought to verify whether S. pyogenes strains show special phenotypic and genotypic (sla, spy1325) characteristics that may play a decisive role in adherence to the genital tract epithelium. Moreover, the emm-types and antibiotic susceptibility were determined. We tested 30 invasive S. pyogenes strains isolated from postpartum invasive infection and 37 GAS control strains isolated from the genital tracts of asymptomatic multiparous women. The majority of the tested strains were shown to express two types of emm genes (1 and 28), though emm -12, -28, -75 and -89 were uniquely expressed in the group of strains isolated from invasive infections. A significantly higher prevalence of perR in the strains from puerperal fever was shown. Significant differences were also found between the two groups with respect to the incidence of the genes related to adherence; GAS strains originating from women with sepsis/puerperal fever showed presence of these genes less frequently than those of the control group. Although differences in frequencies of the gene coding for various superantigens were noted between the compared groups of GAS strains, they were not significant.

  2. Clinical burden of pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia in Norway 2 years after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Samantha; Raluy-Callado, Mireia; Lambrelli, Dimitra; Wasiak, Radek; Eriksson, Daniel; Gray, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    This population-based, retrospective study quantified the rates of all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia in Norway from 2008 to 2009 and determined the proportions of cases caused by pneumococcal vaccine serotypes. Data on patients with all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia were obtained from the Norwegian Patient Registry, which collects hospitalization data from all Norwegian public hospitals based on International Classification of Diseases codes. Norwegian Patient Registry case records linked to the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases provided serotype data for invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with microbiological cultures. In 2008 and 2009, hospitalization rates were relatively stable for all-cause pneumonia (5.28 and 5.35, respectively, per 1000), meningitis (10.70 and 9.67, respectively, per 100,000), and septicemia (from 171.81 to 161.46 per 100,000). In contrast, rates decreased for International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnosed pneumococcal pneumonia (from 13.66 to 10.52 per 100,000), although these cases may be under-reported because of inclusion in all-cause pneumonia. Rates also decreased in diagnosed pneumococcal meningitis (from 1.60 to 1.19 per 100,000) and diagnosed pneumococcal septicemia (from 9.08 to 7.94 per 100,000). Diagnosed pneumococcal disease rates were highest in younger children and older adults, peaking at ⩾ 60 years old. Pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia caused by serotypes included in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine decreased substantially during the study period, with corresponding serotype replacement by non-7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotypes. From 2008 to 2009, International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnosed pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia decreased in most age groups but remained greatest among subjects aged 0-1 and ⩾ 60 years. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. Optimal serotype compositions for Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination under serotype replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhonen, Markku; Auranen, Kari

    2014-02-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination has proved highly effective in eliminating vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage and disease. However, the potential adverse effects of serotype replacement remain a major concern when implementing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programmes. Applying a concise predictive model, we present a ready-to-use quantitative tool to investigate the implications of serotype replacement on the net effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and to guide in the selection of optimal vaccine serotype compositions. We utilise pre-vaccination data on pneumococcal carriage and IPD and assume partial or complete elimination of vaccine-type carriage, its replacement by non-vaccine-type carriage, and stable case-to-carrier ratios (probability of IPD per carriage episode). The model predicts that the post-vaccination IPD incidences in Finland for currently available vaccine serotype compositions can eventually decrease among the target age group of children replacement through herd effects, the decrease among the older population is predicted to be much less (20-40%). We introduce a sequential algorithm for the search of optimal serotype compositions and assess the robustness of inferences to uncertainties in data and assumptions about carriage and IPD. The optimal serotype composition depends on the age group of interest and some serotypes may be highly beneficial vaccine types in one age category (e.g. 6B in children), while being disadvantageous in another. The net effectiveness will be improved only if the added serotype has a higher case-to-carrier ratio than the average case-to-carrier ratio of the current non-vaccine types and the degree of improvement in effectiveness depends on the carriage incidence of the serotype. The serotype compositions of currently available pneumococcal vaccines are not optimal and the effectiveness of vaccination in the population at large could be improved by including

  4. Optimal Serotype Compositions for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination under Serotype Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhonen, Markku; Auranen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination has proved highly effective in eliminating vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage and disease. However, the potential adverse effects of serotype replacement remain a major concern when implementing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programmes. Applying a concise predictive model, we present a ready-to-use quantitative tool to investigate the implications of serotype replacement on the net effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and to guide in the selection of optimal vaccine serotype compositions. We utilise pre-vaccination data on pneumococcal carriage and IPD and assume partial or complete elimination of vaccine-type carriage, its replacement by non-vaccine-type carriage, and stable case-to-carrier ratios (probability of IPD per carriage episode). The model predicts that the post-vaccination IPD incidences in Finland for currently available vaccine serotype compositions can eventually decrease among the target age group of children vaccine types in one age category (e.g. 6B in children), while being disadvantageous in another. The net effectiveness will be improved only if the added serotype has a higher case-to-carrier ratio than the average case-to-carrier ratio of the current non-vaccine types and the degree of improvement in effectiveness depends on the carriage incidence of the serotype. The serotype compositions of currently available pneumococcal vaccines are not optimal and the effectiveness of vaccination in the population at large could be improved by including new serotypes in the vaccine (e.g. 22 and 9N). PMID:24550722

  5. Influenza A Virus Infection Predisposes Hosts to Secondary Infection with Different Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes with Similar Outcome but Serotype-Specific Manifestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Chawla, Niharika; Sender, Vicky; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Volckmar, Julia; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are major causes of respiratory tract infections, particularly during coinfection. The synergism between these two pathogens is characterized by a complex network of dysregulated immune responses, some of which last until recovery following IAV infection. Despite the high serotype diversity of S. pneumoniae and the serotype replacement observed since the introduction of conjugate vaccines, little is known about pneumococcal strain dependency in the enhanced susceptibility to severe secondary S. pneumoniae infection following IAV infection. Thus, we studied how preinfection with IAV alters host susceptibility to different S. pneumoniae strains with various degrees of invasiveness using a highly invasive serotype 4 strain, an invasive serotype 7F strain, and a carrier serotype 19F strain. A murine model of pneumococcal coinfection during the acute phase of IAV infection showed a significantly increased degree of pneumonia and mortality for all tested pneumococcal strains at otherwise sublethal doses. The incidence and kinetics of systemic dissemination, however, remained bacterial strain dependent. Furthermore, we observed strain-specific alterations in the pulmonary levels of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and inflammatory mediators ultimately affecting immunopathology. During the recovery phase following IAV infection, bacterial growth in the lungs and systemic dissemination were enhanced in a strain-dependent manner. Altogether, this study shows that acute IAV infection predisposes the host to lethal S. pneumoniae infection irrespective of the pneumococcal serotype, while the long-lasting synergism between IAV and S. pneumoniae is bacterial strain dependent. These results hold implications for developing tailored therapeutic treatment regimens for dual infections during future IAV outbreaks. PMID:27647871

  6. [Mixed invasive fungal infection due to Rhizomucor pusillus and Aspergillus niger in an immunocompetent patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo-Laderas, Juan Carlos; Pontes-Moreno, Antonio; Robles-Arista, Juan Carlos; Bautista-Rodriguez, M Dolores; Candau-Alvarez, Alberto; Caro-Cuenca, Maria Teresa; Linares-Sicilia, María José

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis infections are rare in immunocompetent patients, and very few cases of mucormycosis associated with aspergillosis in non-haematological patients have been reported. A 17-year-old male, immunocompetent and without any previously known risk factors, was admitted to hospital due to a seizure episode 11 days after a motorcycle accident. He had a complicated clinical course as he had a mixed invasive fungal infection with pulmonary involvement due to Aspergillus niger and disseminated mucormycosis due to Rhizomucor pusillus (histopathological and microbiological diagnosis in several non-contiguous sites). He was treated with liposomal amphotericin B for 7 weeks (total cumulative dose >10 g) and required several surgical operations. The patient survived and was discharged from ICU after 5 months and multiple complications. Treatment with liposomal amphotericin B and aggressive surgical management achieved the eradication of a mixed invasive fungal infection. However, we emphasise the need to maintain a higher level of clinical suspicion and to perform microbiological techniques for early diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in non-immunocompromised patients, in order to prevent spread of the disease and the poor prognosis associated with it. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevention of invasive Cronobacter infections in young infants fed powdered infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Janine

    2012-11-01

    Invasive Cronobacter infection is rare, devastating, and epidemiologically/microbiologically linked to powdered infant formulas (PIFs). In 2002-2004, the US Food and Drug Administration advised health care professionals to minimize PIF and powdered human milk fortifier (HMF)'s preparation, feeding, and storage times and avoid feeding them to hospitalized premature or immunocompromised neonates. Labels for PIF used at home imply PIF is safe for healthy, term infants if label instructions are followed. 1) Medical, public health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Food and Drug Administration, and World Health Organization records, publications, and personal communications were used to compare 68 (1958-2003) and 30 (2004-2010) cases of invasive Cronobacter disease in children without underlying disorders. 2) The costs of PIFs and ready-to-feed formulas (RTFs) were compared. Ninety-nine percent (95/96) of all infected infants were ounces of milk-based RTF cost $0.84 more than milk-based PIF; 24 ounces of soy-based RTF cost $0.24 less than soy-based PIF. Cronobacter can infect healthy, term (not just hospitalized preterm) young infants. Invasive Cronobacter infection is extremely unusual in infants not fed PIF/HMF. RTFs are commercially sterile, require minimal preparation, and are competitively priced. The exclusive use of BM and/or RTF for infants <2 months old should be encouraged.

  8. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Lambertsen, Lotte; Harboe, Zitta B

    2014-01-01

    , anatomic abnormalities (n = 8), complement C2 deficiency (n = 4), and congenital asplenia (n = 3) were all registered more than once. No underlying disease was detected in 18 children (31%). Based on the serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae isolates in rIPD among children aged 0-5 y (n = 41), 51%, 66...... laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in children aged 0-15 y were identified from the Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark for the period 1980-2013. rIPD was defined as isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from any normally sterile site ≥ 30 days after an initial...... positive culture. Clinical data were obtained for all children with rIPD. Results: Of all children with IPD, 2.4% (59/2418) experienced at least 1 episode of rIPD, and an underlying condition was documented in 39 (66%). Immune deficiency due to transplantation (n = 9) was the most common disease; however...

  9. Cost of invasive fungal infections in the era of new diagnostics and expanded treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Drew, Richard; Johnson, Melissa; Danna, Robert; Dabrowski, Dominika; Walker, Valery; Prasad, Manishi; Alexander, Barbara; Papadopoulos, George; Perfect, John

    2012-10-01

    To determine the true institutional cost of treating invasive fungal infections in light of recent advances in diagnostic techniques and antifungal therapies for both treatment and prophylaxis of these infections. Economic analysis. Academic medical center. A total of 200 patients discharged from the hospital during 2004-2005 with a diagnosis of proven, probable, or possible aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, invasive candidiasis, or zygomycosis (cases). Patients were matched in a 1:1 fashion with patients having similar underlying disease states but no invasive fungal infections (controls). Data on demographic and clinical characteristics were collected from patients' medical records. In addition, information concerning each patient's hospitalization was recorded. Resource utilization data for a patient's entire hospitalization were collected from the hospital's charge databases and converted to costs. These data were compared between the cases and the controls. After adjusting for race-ethnicity, sex, age, and comorbid illnesses, mean total hospital cost for cases was $32,196 more than for controls (p<0.0001). Nonpharmacy costs accounted for the majority (63%) of this difference, and an additional $3996 was attributed to systemic antifungal drugs. The mean length of hospital stay was longer for cases than controls (25.8 vs 18.4 days). Treatment of patients with invasive fungal infections was associated with a significantly higher inpatient hospital cost compared with controls. However, due to new diagnostic techniques and effective antifungal therapy, the relative cost of these infections appears to be at least stable compared with the previous decade. These findings can help assess the utility of cost-avoidance strategies such as antifungal prophylaxis and application of appropriate treatment. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  10. Invasive Fungal Infections Acquired from Contaminated Food or Nutritional Supplements: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Chiller, Tom M; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-07-01

    Fungi are an integral part of the natural environment and, therefore, play many roles in relation to food: some fungi are used in food production, some are food sources themselves, and some are agents of food spoilage. Some fungi that contaminate food can also be harmful to human health. The harmful but noninfectious health consequences of mycotoxins have been well-characterized, but the extent to which fungi in food pose a risk for invasive infections is unknown. We conducted a literature review to identify cases of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) believed to have resulted from ingestion or inhalation of food, beverages, or dietary supplements (excluding Saccharomyces infections). We identified 11 publications describing cases or small outbreaks of IFIs related to foods or beverages and three describing IFIs related to dietary supplements. These food-associated IFIs were predominantly mold infections, and the few yeast infections were associated with dairy products. Suspected foodborne IFIs appear to be rare, but are increasingly described in the electronically searchable literature. They are associated with a variety of foods, are due to a variety of fungal pathogens, and primarily occur in persons with immunosuppressive conditions or other predisposing factors. Various guidelines for high-risk patients recommend avoidance of certain food products that may contain high levels of fungi, but further work is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these restrictive diets in preventing fungal infections. The relationships between food spoilage, food insecurity, and IFI risk are another area that may warrant further exploration.

  11. Chlorine gas exposure increases susceptibility to invasive lung fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Melissa A; Doran, Stephen F; Yu, Zhihong; Dunaway, Chad W; Matalon, Sadis; Steele, Chad

    2013-06-01

    Chlorine (Cl₂) is a highly irritating and reactive gas with potential occupational and environmental hazards. Acute exposure to Cl₂ induces severe epithelial damage, airway hyperreactivity, impaired alveolar fluid clearance, and pulmonary edema in the presence of heightened inflammation and significant neutrophil accumulation in the lungs. Herein, we investigated whether Cl₂ exposure affected the lung antimicrobial immune response leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Mice exposed to Cl₂ and challenged intratracheally 24 h thereafter with the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus demonstrated an >500-fold increase in A. fumigatus lung burden 72 h postchallenge compared with A. fumigatus mice exposed to room air. Cl₂-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice also demonstrated significantly higher lung resistance following methacholine challenge and increased levels of plasma proteins (albumin and IgG) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Despite enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lungs of Cl₂-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice, these cells (>60% of which were neutrophils) demonstrated a profound impairment in generating superoxide. Significantly higher A. fumigatus burden in the lungs of Cl₂ exposed mice correlated with enhanced production of IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL3. Surprisingly, however, Cl₂-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice had a specific impairment in the production of IL-17A and IL-22 in the lungs compared with mice exposed to room air and challenged with A. fumigatus. In summary, our results indicate that Cl₂ exposure markedly impairs the antimicrobial activity and inflammatory reactivity of myeloid cells in the lung leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens.

  12. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  13. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in the Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Cao, Elisabetta; Melegaro, Alessia; Klok, Rogier; Postma, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a

  14. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Pneumococcal Pneumonia. A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ariel Efrén Uriarte Méndez; Andrés Prieto Apesteguía; Jesús Vila Díaz; Jorge Luis Capote Padrón; Kendrie Villavicencio Cardoso; Alnilam Fernández González

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a condition characterized by hemolytic microangiopathic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. In its classic form it is associated with diarrhea and it has a good prognosis. When there is an invasive pneumococcal disease as underlying condition, it has a mortality rate of 25%, and half of the surviving cases develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We present the case of a 17-month-old child with hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to pneumonia with emp...

  15. Successful treatment of an invasive fungal infection caused by Talaromyces sp. with voriconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uluhan Sili

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFI are on the rise due to increasing numbers of immunosuppressed and critically ill patients. A malignant-looking pulmonary nodule in an immunosuppressed patient may indeed be caused by a fungal organism. We report a patient, who was eventually diagnosed with an IFI caused by an agent of hyalohyphomycosis, Talaromyces sp. determined via molecular methods and succesfully treated with voriconazole.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates from children in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Kang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates in Chongqing, China. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae strains were from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and 32 carriage strains from healthy children from January 2010 to December 2013 at the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Multilocus sequence typing was used to identify the sequence types (STs. Capsular serotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Drug susceptibility and resistance was determined by minimum inhibitory concentrations. Results: In this study, 11 serotypes were identified among the 83 S. pneumoniae clinical isolates tested. Prevalent serotypes were 19A (20.4%, 6A/B (20.4%, 19F (15.7%, 14 (14.5%, and 23F (10.8%. Serotype 19F was the most frequent carriage strain, and serotype 19A was the most frequent invasive strain. The ST983 was the most prevalent ST for carriage strains, and ST320 was the most prevalent ST for invasive strains. For gene analysis, psaA (99.5% and piaA (98.6% were present and much conserved in all pneumococci tested. The cps2A and pcsB genes were more frequent in invasive isolates than carriage strains. Antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal isolates to erythromycin, penicillin, meropenem, cefotaxime, and clindamycin were higher than the carriage isolates from children. Conclusion: Our epidemiological evidence shows that 19A, 6A/B, 19F, 14, and 23F remain the most prevalent serotypes, which can be targeted by PCV13. Genotypes and drug resistance varied between carriage and invasive strains. The PsaA and PiaA may be good protein vaccine candidates.

  17. Virulence of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in animal models of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Ramachandran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium sequence type (ST 313 produces septicemia in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there are known genetic and phenotypic differences between ST313 strains and gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, conflicting data about the in vivo virulence of ST313 strains have been reported. To resolve these differences, we tested clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and ST19 strains in murine and rhesus macaque infection models. The 50% lethal dose (LD50 was determined for three Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 strains in mice. For dissemination studies, bacterial burden in organs was determined at various time-points post-challenge. Indian rhesus macaques were infected with one ST19 and one ST313 strain. Animals were monitored for clinical signs and bacterial burden and pathology were determined. The LD50 values for ST19 and ST313 infected mice were not significantly different. However, ST313-infected BALB/c mice had significantly higher bacterial numbers in blood at 24 h than ST19-infected mice. ST19-infected rhesus macaques exhibited moderate-to-severe diarrhea while ST313-infected monkeys showed no-to-mild diarrhea. ST19-infected monkeys had higher bacterial burden and increased inflammation in tissues. Our data suggest that Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 invasiveness may be investigated using mice. The non-human primate results are consistent with clinical data, suggesting that ST313 strains do not cause diarrhea.

  18. Avaliação da resposta humoral à vacina pneumocócica 7-valente em crianças com Aids Evaluación de la vacuna neumocócica 7-valente en la respuesta humoral de niños con SIDA Evaluation of humoral response to heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in HIV-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel de Camargo Costa

    2008-10-01

    Paulo (Sureste de Brasil, en 2002-2003. La dosis de anticuerpos IgG contra los polisacáridos de la cápsula neumocócica fue realizada por medio de ensayo inmuno enzimático (ELISA. Los anticuerpos fueron dosificados inmediatamente antes y un mes después de la aplicación de la segunda dosis de la vacuna. Se utilizaron dos criterios para evaluar la respuesta a la vacuna: títulos de anticuerpos ? 1,3 ?g/mL en la serología post-inmunización y aumento ?4 veces en los títulos de la serología post-inmunización con relación a la pre-inmunización. RESULTADOS: Para el primer criterio (?1,3 ?g/mL, 26 (65% niños obtuvieron respuesta serológica con la vacuna, 12 (30% de ellas presentaron títulos de IgG post-inmunización en niveles de por lo menos 1,3 ?g/mL para todos los serotipos. Para el segundo criterio (incremento >4 veces en los títulos para cuatro serotipos o mas, se obtuvo respuesta serológica en 15 (37,5% niños. CONCLUSIONES: La respuesta frente a la vacuna fue considerada satisfactoria, con aumento estadísticamente significativo de los títulos geométricos promedios post-vacunales con relación a los pre-vacunales para todos los serotipos estudiados.OBJECTIVE: Invasive pneumococcal disease is a major cause of death in HIV-infected children. The objective of the study was to assess the quantitative antibody response to the seven pneumococcal serotypes of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a group of HIV-infected children. METHODS: Study comprising 40 HIV-infected children aged between 2 and 9 years followed up in a specialized outpatient clinic in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2002 and 2003. Enzyme immunoassay (ELISA was used to measure IgG antibody titers against pneumococcus capsule. Antibodies were measured immediately before and 1 month after the second dose of the vaccine. Two response criteria were used: IgG titers >1.3 µg/mL in the post-immunization serology and an increase of at least 4-fold in post- compared to pre

  19. Cost-effectiveness and Health Benefits of Pediatric 23-valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine, 7-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Forecasting 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiuting; Gai Tobe, Ruoyan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Mori, Rintaro

    2016-11-01

    Each year in China, approximately 700,000 children under 5 years old are diagnosed with pneumonia, and 30,000 die of the disease. Although 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) are available in China, the costs are borne by the consumer, resulting in low coverage for PCV-7. We aimed to conduct a simulation study to assess the cost-effectiveness and health benefits of PCV-7, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) and PPV-23 to prevent childhood pneumonia and other vaccine-preventive diseases in China. An economic evaluation was performed using a Markov simulation model. Parameters including demographic, epidemiological data, costs and efficacy of vaccines were obtained from previous studies. A hypothetical cohort of 100,000 newborns (focusing on pneumococcal diseases ≤7 years old) was followed up until death or 100 years of age. The model incorporated the impact of vaccination on reduction of incidence of pneumococcal diseases and mortality of children ≤7 years. Outcomes are presented in terms of disease cases averted, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Under baseline assumptions, PPV-23 is currently the only cost-effective option, whereas PCV-13 showed the greatest impact on pneumococcal disease burden, reducing invasive pneumococcal diseases by 31.3%, pneumonia by 15.3% and gaining 73.8 QALYs (10,000 individuals at discount rate of 3%). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of PCV-13 and PCV-7 are US$29,460/QALY and US$104,094/QALY, respectively, showing no cost-effectiveness based on the World Health Organization recommended willingness-to-pay threshold. On the other hand, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of PCVs were most sensitive to vaccination costs; if it reduces 4.7% and 32.2% for PCV-7 and PCV-13, respectively, the vaccination will be cost-effective. To scale up current vaccination strategies and achieve potential health

  20. Neuro-invasion by a 'Trojan Horse' strategy and vasculopathy during intrauterine flavivirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Smirnova, Natalia P; Tolnay, Airn-Elizabeth; Webb, Brett T; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Q; van Campen, Hana; Hansen, Thomas R

    2012-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a major target of several important human and animal viral pathogens causing congenital infections. However, despite the importance of neuropathological outcomes, for humans in particular, the pathogenesis, including mode of neuro-invasion, remains unresolved for most congenital virus infections. Using a natural model of congenital infection with an RNA virus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus in pregnant cattle, we sought to delineate the timing and mode of virus neuro-invasion of and spread within the brain of foetuses following experimental respiratory tract infection of the dams at day 75 of pregnancy, a time of maximal risk of tissue pathology without foetal death. Virus antigen was first detected in the foetal brains 14 days postinfection of dams and was initially restricted to amoeboid microglial cells in the periventricular germinal layer. The appearance of these cells was preceded by or concurrent with vasculopathy in the same region. While the affected microvessels were negative for virus antigen, they expressed high levels of the type I interferon-stimulated protein ISG15 and eventually disappeared in parallel with the appearance of microcavitary lesions. Subsequently, the virus spread to neurons and other glial cells. Our findings suggest that the virus enters the CNS via infected microglial precursors, the amoeboid microglial cells, in a 'Trojan horse' mode of invasion and that the microcavitary lesions are associated with loss of periventricular microvasculature, perhaps as a consequence of high, unrestricted induction of interferon-regulated proteins. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2012 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  1. Defining opportunistic invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients with cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplants: an international consensus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rex, J.H.; Pauw, B.E. de; Bennett, J.E.; Bille, J.; Crokaert, F.; Denning, D.W.; Donnelly, J.P.; Edwards, J.E.; Erjavec, Z.; Fiere, D.; Lortholary, O.; Maertens, J.K.M.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Patterson, T.F.; Ritter, J.; Selleslag, D.; Shah, P.M.; Stevens, D.A.; Walsh, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    During the past several decades, there has been a steady increase in the frequency of opportunistic invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in immunocompromised patients. However, there is substantial controversy concerning optimal diagnostic criteria for these IFIs. Therefore, members of the European

  2. Infection and invasion of roots by symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia during nodulation of temperate legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Daniel J

    2004-06-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genera Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Azorhizobium (collectively referred to as rhizobia) grow in the soil as free-living organisms but can also live as nitrogen-fixing symbionts inside root nodule cells of legume plants. The interactions between several rhizobial species and their host plants have become models for this type of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Temperate legumes such as alfalfa, pea, and vetch form indeterminate nodules that arise from root inner and middle cortical cells and grow out from the root via a persistent meristem. During the formation of functional indeterminate nodules, symbiotic bacteria must gain access to the interior of the host root. To get from the outside to the inside, rhizobia grow and divide in tubules called infection threads, which are composite structures derived from the two symbiotic partners. This review focuses on symbiotic infection and invasion during the formation of indeterminate nodules. It summarizes root hair growth, how root hair growth is influenced by rhizobial signaling molecules, infection of root hairs, infection thread extension down root hairs, infection thread growth into root tissue, and the plant and bacterial contributions necessary for infection thread formation and growth. The review also summarizes recent advances concerning the growth dynamics of rhizobial populations in infection threads.

  3. Capsular switching as a strategy to increase pneumococcal virulence in experimental otitis media model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Vishakha; Stevenson, Abbie; Figueira, Marisol; Orthopoulos, George; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Pelton, Stephen I

    2014-04-01

    We hypothesized that capsular switch event, in which pneumococcus acquires a new capsule operon by horizontal gene transfer, may result in emergence of strains with increased virulence in acute otitis media. Using serotype 6A strain from a patient with invasive pneumococcal disease and clonally distant serotype 6C strain isolated from asymptomatic carrier we created 6A:6C (6A background with 6C capsule) capsular transformants and applied whole genome macro-restriction analysis to assess conservation of the 6A chassis. Next, we assessed complement (C3) and antibodies deposition on surface of pneumococcal cells and tested capsule recipient, capsule donor and two 6A:6C transformants for virulence in chinchilla experimental otitis media model. Both 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants bound less C3 compared to 6C capsule-donor strain but more compared to serotype 6A capsule-recipient strain. Pneumococci were present in significantly higher proportion of ears among animals challenged with either of two 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants compared to chinchillas infected with 6C capsule-donor strain [p < 0.001] whereas a significantly decreased proportion of ears were infected with 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants as compared to 6A capsule-recipient strain. Our observations though limited to two serotypes demonstrate that capsular switch events can result in Streptococcus pneumoniae strains of enhanced virulence for respiratory tract infection. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Ceftaroline Fosamil Use in 2 Pediatric Patients With Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda W; Newman, Patrick M; Ocheltree, Sara; Beaty, Rachel; Hassoun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens causing pediatric infections including skin and soft tissue infections, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and septic shock. For decades, patients were treated with antibiotics such as vancomycin and clindamycin, but there is an increasing incidence of resistance to these traditional therapies. We describe 2 cases of patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections with bacteremia who experienced vancomycin therapy failure but who were successfully treated with ceftaroline fosamil. Case 1 involves an 8-year-old Hispanic male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA bacteremia, thigh abscess, and osteomyelitis. The patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit in septic shock. Case 2 involves an 8-year-old Caucasian male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA sepsis, right arm abscess, and osteomyelitis. We were able to successfully treat both patients with CA-MRSA sepsis and invasive infection-who failed vancomycin therapy-with ceftaroline fosamil with no adverse efiects. Despite the positive outcome in both pediatric patients, clinical trials with ceftaroline fosamil are needed to further support its use in pediatric patients.

  5. Legionella jordanis in hematopoietic SCT patients radiographically mimicking invasive mold infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R; Rappo, U; Glickman, M; Seo, S K; Sepkowitz, K; Eagan, J; Small, T N

    2011-08-01

    Opportunistic pulmonary infections are a major cause of post-transplant morbidity and mortality. Among these infections, Aspergillus is a common cause of fatal pneumonia. Owing to the precarious clinical condition of many patients who acquire invasive mold infections, clinicians often treat them on the basis of radiographic findings, such as the halo sign. However, in patients who do not respond to treatment or who have uncommon presentations, bronchoscopy or lung biopsy looking for other pathogens should be considered. This study describes two cases in which the radiographic halo signs characteristic of Aspergillus were in fact due to Legionella jordanis, a pathogen that has been culture proven only in two patients previously (both of whom had underlying lung pathology) and diagnosed by serologic evidence in several other patients. In immunocompromised patients, Legionella can present as a cavitary lesion. Thus, presumptive treatment for this organism should be considered in post-transplant patients who do not have a classic presentation for invasive fungal infection and/or who fail to respond to conventional treatment. These cases illustrate the importance of obtaining tissue cultures to differentiate among the wide variety of pathogens present in this patient population.

  6. Invasive Pasteurella multocida Infections - Report of Five Cases at a Minnesota Hospital, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, P; Snippes-Vagnone, P; Smith, K

    2016-09-01

    During October 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health was notified of five Hospital A patients with Pasteurella multocida bacteraemia; three had died. Human soft tissue infection with P. multocida typically results from cat or dog bites or scratches. Invasive infection, defined as a P. multocida isolate from a usually sterile site, is rare. We evaluated P. multocida isolations at Hospital A, compared with other Minnesota hospitals to understand invasive infection trends. A case was defined as clinically confirmed P. multocida in a Minnesota resident during 2012-2014. All hospital laboratories were queried; Fisher's exact test was used for comparison. Medical charts were reviewed for 2014 Hospital A patients with P. multocida infections. The Minnesota clinical laboratories survey response rate was 79% (63/80). At Hospital A, proportion of P. multocida isolates from usually sterile sites increased from 0% (0/2) during 2012 to 11% (1/9) during 2013, and to 86% (5/6) during 2014. The proportion of patients with P. multocida isolated from sterile sites was 35% (6/17) at Hospital A compared with 10% (58/583) statewide during 2012-2014 combined (P multocida infection, all five were men; median age was 70 (range: 44-78) years. Four were temporally clustered within a 33-day period; three of those had bacteraemia on admission, making hospital acquisition possible in only one. Among five bacteraemia patients, four had cirrhosis and/or skin ulcerations, and three died. The proportion of invasive P. multocida cases was substantially higher at Hospital A during 2014. No epidemiologic links between patients were found. Three had known pet exposure. Collaborative educational efforts of chronically ill pet owners by physicians and veterinarians can acknowledge the health benefits of pet ownership, while minimizing risk for serious invasive zoonotic infections, including those caused by P. multocida. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the

  7. Emergence of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans (Apiotrichum mycotoxinivorans invasive infections in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Nobrega de Almeida Jr

    Full Text Available We report the first two cases of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans infections in Latin America. We also conducted a literature review and a microbiological investigation, including that of clinical and environmental isolates. A 30-year-old man with chronic renal failure had disseminated infection after dialysis and a 15-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis (CF had pulmonary exacerbations with positive respiratory samples. A review of the relevant literature revealed that deep-seated infections were related to immunosuppression or invasive devices, while most of the CF patients showed a decline in lung function after positive cultures. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three distinct circulating genotypes. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis showed similar spectral profiles and correctly identified all strains/isolates. Biofilm production was documented in a bloodstream isolate and biofilm-producing cells showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations against antifungals.

  8. Emergence of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans (Apiotrichum mycotoxinivorans) invasive infections in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, João Nobrega de; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Barberino, Maria Goreth M de Andrade; Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro F da; Brandão, Oriana M; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Padovan, Ana Carolina Barbosa

    2017-10-01

    We report the first two cases of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans infections in Latin America. We also conducted a literature review and a microbiological investigation, including that of clinical and environmental isolates. A 30-year-old man with chronic renal failure had disseminated infection after dialysis and a 15-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis (CF) had pulmonary exacerbations with positive respiratory samples. A review of the relevant literature revealed that deep-seated infections were related to immunosuppression or invasive devices, while most of the CF patients showed a decline in lung function after positive cultures. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three distinct circulating genotypes. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis showed similar spectral profiles and correctly identified all strains/isolates. Biofilm production was documented in a bloodstream isolate and biofilm-producing cells showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations against antifungals.

  9. The burden of pneumococcal disease in children less than 5 years of age in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howidi, Mohammad; Muhsin, Haider; Rajah, Jaishen

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in both developing and industrialized countries, especially among young children and in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. It is implicated in both invasive (e.g. meningitis and septicemia) as well as noninvasive disease (community-acquired pneumonia and otitis media). The objective of the current study was to describe the overall epidemiology of both invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal disease in Abu Dhabi over a 5-year period. Retrospective review of all pediatric (≤ 5 year old) pneumococcal disease admissions to Shaikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) and Mafraq Hospital in Abu Dhabi from 1 January 2001 till 31 December 2005.th We retrieved computerized data from the health information management systems (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD9) diagnosis codes) as well as manual surveillance in the laboratory record of pneumococcal isolates. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease was 13.6/100, 000 per year (95% CI, 6.5-24.9) and the incidence of noninvasive pneumococcal disease was 172.5/100,000 per year (95% CI, 143.8-205.2). The total incidence rate was 186.0/100, 000 per year (95% CI, 156.2-219.9). This epidemiological survey indicates that the incidence rates in the United Arab Emirate are higher than in Western countries where conjugate pneumococcal vaccine has been introduced. This study is important as it documents the incidence of pneumococcal disease in the era before introduction of the conjugate pneumococcal vaccine and allows for future research to document the impact of a new vaccine considering the geographic variation of pneumococcal serotypes.

  10. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe: a molecular-epidemiological analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajo Grundmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe.In each country, staphylococcal reference laboratories secured the participation of a sufficient number of hospital laboratories to achieve national geo-demographic representation. Participating laboratories collected successive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection using an agreed protocol. All isolates were sent to the respective national reference laboratories and characterised by quality-controlled sequence typing of the variable region of the staphylococcal spa gene (spa typing, and data were uploaded to a central database. Relevant genetic and phenotypic information was assembled for interactive interrogation by a purpose-built Web-based mapping application. Between September 2006 and February 2007, 357 laboratories serving 450 hospitals in 26 countries collected 2,890 MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection. A wide geographical distribution of spa types was found with some prevalent in all European countries. MSSA were more diverse than MRSA. Genetic diversity of MRSA differed considerably between countries with dominant MRSA spa types forming distinctive geographical clusters. We provide evidence that a network approach consisting of decentralised typing and visualisation of aggregated data using an interactive mapping tool can provide important information on the dynamics of MRSA populations such as early signalling of emerging strains, cross border spread, and importation by travel.In contrast to MSSA, MRSA spa types have a predominantly regional distribution in Europe. This finding is indicative of the selection and spread of a limited number of clones within health care

  11. Health related quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Saba, Grèce; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Gaillat, Jacques; Bonnin, Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Illes, Hajnal-Gabriela; Laurichesse, Henri; Detournay, Bruno; Petitpretz, Patrick; de Pouvourville, Gérard

    2018-01-01

    Background Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia is a lung infection that causes serious health problems and can lead to complications and death. The aim of this study was to observe and analyze health related quality of life after a hospital episode for patients with community acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France. Methods A total of 524 individuals were enrolled prospectively in the study and were followed for 12 months after hospital discharge. Presence of streptococcus pneumoniae ...

  12. The uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among immunocompromised patients attending rheumatology outpatient clinics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-07-01

    PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES: The patients using immunosuppressive agents are considered at high risk for acquiring different infections. Accordingly, international guidelines recommend vaccinating such patients against influenza and pneumococcal organisms. The aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to assess the influenza and pneumococcal vaccination uptake among our rheumatology outpatients who are immunosuppressed; (2) to identify the factors influencing immunisation uptake among our sample of patients.

  13. Ten years of surveillance for invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae during the era of antiretroviral scale-up and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean B Everett

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To document trends in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in a central hospital in Malawi during the period of national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis.Between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009 almost 100,000 blood cultures and 40,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cultures were obtained from adults and children admitted to the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi with suspected severe bacterial infection.4,445 pneumococcal isolates were obtained over the 10 year period. 1,837 were from children: 885 (19.9% from blood and 952 (21.4% from CSF. 2,608 were from adults: 1,813 (40.8% from blood and 795 (17.9% from CSF. At the start of the surveillance period cotrimoxazole resistance was 73.8% and at the end was 92.6%. Multidrug resistance (MDR was present in almost one third of isolates and was constant over time. Free ART was introduced in Malawi in 2004. From 2005 onwards there was a decline in invasive pneumococcal infections with a negative correlation between ART scale-up and the decline in IPD (Pearson's correlation r = -0.91; p<0.001.During 2004-2009, national ART scale-up in Malawi was associated with a downward trend in IPD at QECH. The introduction of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected groups has not coincided with a further increase in pneumococcal cotrimoxazole or multidrug resistance. These data highlight the importance of surveillance for high disease burden infections such as IPD in the region, which will be vital for monitoring pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction into national immunisation programmes.

  14. A peptide of heparin cofactor II inhibits endotoxin-mediated shock and invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kalle

    Full Text Available Sepsis and septic shock remain important medical problems with high mortality rates. Today's treatment is based mainly on using antibiotics to target the bacteria, without addressing the systemic inflammatory response, which is a major contributor to mortality in sepsis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed to counteract these complex sepsis pathologies. Heparin cofactor II (HCII has recently been shown to be protective against Gram-negative infections. The antimicrobial effects were mapped to helices A and D of the molecule. Here we show that KYE28, a 28 amino acid long peptide representing helix D of HCII, is antimicrobial against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Moreover, KYE28 binds to LPS and thereby reduces LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing NF-κB/AP-1 activation in vitro. In mouse models of LPS-induced shock, KYE28 significantly enhanced survival by dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Finally, in an invasive Pseudomonas infection model, the peptide inhibited bacterial growth and reduced the pro-inflammatory response, which lead to a significant reduction of mortality. In summary, the peptide KYE28, by simultaneously targeting bacteria and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses represents a novel therapeutic candidate for invasive infections.

  15. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV. Conclusions: HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection. PMID:27331659

  16. Pneumococcal Sepsis Complicated by Splenic Abscesses and Purpura Fulminans in a 15-Month-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Pangonis MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an invasive organism that causes a wide range of common diseases, including sinusitis, acute otitis media, and pneumonia. Splenic abscesses and purpura fulminans (PF are rare complications of pneumococcal disease. Splenic abscesses caused by S pneumoniae have only been reported in the adult literature. PF has been described in the pediatric population as a rare complication in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD with and without underlying immunological disorders such as asplenia. Here, we report a patient with IPD complicated by splenic abscesses and PF. Our patient initially presented with bacteremia, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She subsequently developed PF and splenic abscesses. She survived her illness after receiving a total of 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This case highlights 2 rare complications of IPD and demonstrates the need to keep pneumococcal disease in the differential diagnosis even in children whose vaccination status is up to date.

  17. Real-time in vivo imaging of invasive- and biomaterial-associated bacterial infections using fluorescently labelled vancomycin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Marleen; Schäfer, Tina; Gazendam, Joost A C; Ohlsen, Knut; Tsompanidou, Eleni; de Goffau, Marcus C; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Crane, Lucia M A; Lim, Ed; Francis, Kevin P; Cheung, Lael; Olive, Michael; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; van Dam, Gooitzen M

    2013-01-01

    Invasive and biomaterial-associated infections in humans are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Here, guided by recent advances in clinically relevant optical imaging technologies, we explore the use of fluorescently labelled vancomycin (vanco-800CW) to specifically target and detect infections

  18. Severe invasive methicillin-resistant S. aureus (USA300 clone infection in an Italian adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Valentini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This report describes an uncommon presentation of invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA infection in an immunocompetent adolescent without any other risk factor, characterized by septicaemia, meningitis, necrotising pneumonia and deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Successful treatment was performed with linezolid, rifampicin and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH. MRSA molecular typing revealed the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL gene, and a genetic background identical to USA300 clone, an emerging aggressive CA-MRSA strain in USA and Europe.

  19. The controversial impact of B cells subsets on immune response to pneumococcal vaccine in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Tsachouridou

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Low concentrations of total B cells and exhausted memory B cells was the strongest independent predictor of poor pneumococcal vaccine responsiveness, emphasizing that B cell subset disturbances are associated with a poor vaccine response among HIV-infected patients.

  20. Characterizing the burden of invasive Pseudomonas infection on neonatal units in the UK between 2005 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadambari, S; Botgros, A; Clarke, P; Vergnano, S; Anthony, M; Chang, J; Collinson, A; Embleton, N; Kennea, N; Settle, P; Heath, P T; Menson, E N

    2014-10-01

    Concern about Pseudomonas infection in neonatal units has focused on outbreaks. This study analysed cases of invasive Pseudomonas infection in 18 UK neonatal units participating in the NeonIN Neonatal Infection Surveillance Network from January 2005 to December 2011. Forty-two cases were reported. The majority (35/42, 93%) of cases were late-onset (median 14 days, range 2-262 days), the highest incidence was seen in extremely-low-birthweight infants and all cases were sporadic. One-third of cases were known to be colonized prior to invasive disease. Attributable mortality was 18%. Opportunities for preventing invasive disease due to this important pathogen should be prioritized. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Non-Human Primate Model of Severe Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Luis F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Soni, Nilam J.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Gilley, Ryan P.; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Noda, Julio R.; Winter, Vicki T.; de la Garza, Melissa A.; Shade, Robert E.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Anzueto, Antonio; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and infectious death in adults worldwide. A non-human primate model is needed to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of severe pneumonia, identify diagnostic tools, explore potential therapeutic targets, and test clinical interventions during pneumococcal pneumonia. Objective To develop a non-human primate model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Seven adult baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were surgically tethered to a continuous monitoring system that recorded heart rate, temperature, and electrocardiography. Animals were inoculated with 109 colony-forming units of S. pneumoniae using bronchoscopy. Three baboons were rescued with intravenous ampicillin therapy. Pneumonia was diagnosed using lung ultrasonography and ex vivo confirmation by histopathology and immunodetection of pneumococcal capsule. Organ failure, using serum biomarkers and quantification of bacteremia, was assessed daily. Results Challenged animals developed signs and symptoms of pneumonia 4 days after infection. Infection was characterized by the presence of cough, tachypnea, dyspnea, tachycardia and fever. All animals developed leukocytosis and bacteremia 24 hours after infection. A severe inflammatory reaction was detected by elevation of serum cytokines, including Interleukin (IL)1Ra, IL-6, and IL-8, after infection. Lung ultrasonography precisely detected the lobes with pneumonia that were later confirmed by pathological analysis. Lung pathology positively correlated with disease severity. Antimicrobial therapy rapidly reversed symptomology and reduced serum cytokines. Conclusions We have developed a novel animal model for severe pneumococcal pneumonia that mimics the clinical presentation, inflammatory response, and infection kinetics seen in humans. This is a novel model to test vaccines and treatments, measure biomarkers to diagnose pneumonia, and predict outcomes. PMID:27855182

  2. Cerebral Vasculitis Complicating Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khedher

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral vasculitis is an uncommon life-threatening complication of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Patient and methods: We report the case of a 64-year-old woman with pneumococcal meningitis who developed parainfectious vasculitis causing ischaemic brain damage. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical and radiological recovery after delayed addition of corticosteroid was achieved. Discussion: This report shows that the onset of neurological deficits following pneumococcal meningitis can be caused by cerebral vasculitis. Underdosing with antibiotics and delayed adjunctive dexamethasone seem to favour this complication. There are no guidelines for treatment but high doses of steroids led to resolution in this case.

  3. Infection and invasion mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi in the congenital transmission of Chagas' disease: a proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerling, Ulrike; Bosco, Cleo; Galanti, Norbel

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease is produced by the haemophlagelated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by haematophages insects such as Triatoma infestans (vinchuca). Due to vector control, congenital transmission gains importance and is responsible for the presence and expansion of this disease in non-endemic areas. The mechanisms of congenital infection are uncertain. It has been suggested that the parasite reaches the fetus through the bloodstream by crossing the placental barrier, and that congenital Chagas' disease is the result of complex interactions between the immune response, placental factors, and the parasite's characteristics. We review the cellular and molecular mechanisms of infection and invasion of the parasite and how immune and placental factors may modulate this process. Finally, we propose a possible model for the vertical transmission of Chagas' disease.

  4. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  5. Voriconazole for secondary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients: results of the VOSIFI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Catherine; Rovira, Montserrat; Maertens, Johan; Olavarria, Eduardo; Faucher, Catherine; Bilger, Karin; Pigneux, Arnaud; Cornely, Oliver A; Ullmann, Andrew J; Bofarull, Rodrigo Martino; de la Cámara, Rafael; Weisser, Maja; Liakopoulou, Effie; Abecasis, Manuel; Heussel, Claus Peter; Pineau, Marc; Ljungman, Per; Einsele, Hermann

    2010-10-01

    Recurrence of prior invasive fungal infection (relapse rate of 30-50%) limits the success of stem cell transplantation. Secondary prophylaxis could reduce disease burden and improve survival. A prospective, open-label, multicenter trial was conducted evaluating voriconazole (4 mg/kg/12 h intravenously or 200 mg/12 h orally) as secondary antifungal prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients with previous proven or probable invasive fungal infection. Voriconazole was started 48 h or more after completion of conditioning chemotherapy and was planned to be continued for 100-150 days. Patients were followed for 12 months. The primary end-point of the study was the incidence of proven or probable invasive fungal infection. Forty-five patients were enrolled, 41 of whom had acute leukemia. Previous invasive fungal infections were proven or probable aspergillosis (n=31), proven candidiasis (n=5) and other proven or probable infections (n=6); prior infection could not be confirmed in three patients. The median duration of voriconazole prophylaxis was 94 days. Eleven patients (24%) died within 12 months of transplantation, but only one due to systemic fungal disease. Three invasive fungal infections occurred post-transplant: two relapses (one candidemia and one fatal scedosporiosis) and one new zygomycosis in a patient with previous aspergillosis. The 1-year cumulative incidence of invasive fungal disease was 6.7±3.6%. Two patients were withdrawn from the study due to treatment-related adverse events (i.e. liver toxicity). Voriconazole appears to be safe and effective for secondary prophylaxis of systemic fungal infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The observed incidence of 6.7% (with one attributable death) is considerably lower than the relapse rate reported in historical controls, thus suggesting that voriconazole is a promising prophylactic agent in this population.

  6. Fluconazole Doses Used for Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Units: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonart, Letícia Paula; Tonin, Fernanda Stumpf; Ferreira, Vinicius Lins; Tavares da Silva Penteado, Suelem; de Araújo Motta, Fábio; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of different doses of fluconazole used for invasive prophylaxis of fungal infection in neonates. A systematic search was conducted with PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science. A manual search was performed as well. Only randomized controlled trials of neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) who received fluconazole prophylaxis for invasive fungal infection, regardless of the dose or therapeutic regimen, were included in this review. Data on baseline characteristics, outcomes incidence of proven invasive Candida infection, overall mortality, and invasive Candida infection-related mortality were extracted. Eleven studies were included in the review, with fluconazole doses of 3, 4, or 6?mg/kg. When the incidence of invasive Candida and invasive Candida-related mortality were considered as outcomes, the 3 and 6?mg/kg fluconazole doses were found to be statistically superior to placebo (OR, 5.48 [95% credible interval, 1.81-18.94] and 2.63 [1.18-7.02], respectively, and 15.32 [1.54-54.31] and 9.14 [1.26-142.7], respectively), but data for the 3 doses were not statistically significantly different. Use of the lowest fluconazole dose (3?mg/kg) should be recommended for Candida prophylaxis in neonates, given that increasing the fluconazole dose is not associated with higher efficacy and has greater potential for toxicity and increased cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo and in vitro studies on the roles of neutrophil extracellular traps during secondary pneumococcal pneumonia after primary pulmonary influenza infection

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    Anandi eNarayana Moorthy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza virus infections may lead to debilitating disease, and account for significant fatalities annually worldwide. Most of these deaths are attributed to the complications of secondary bacterial pneumonia. Evidence is accumulating to support the notion that neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs harbor several antibacterial proteins, and trap and kill bacteria. We have previously demonstrated the induction of NETs that contribute to lung tissue injury in severe influenza pneumonia. However, the role of these NETs in secondary bacterial pneumonia is unclear. In this study, we explored whether NETs induced during pulmonary influenza infection have functional significance against infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae and other bacterial and fungal species. Our findings revealed that NETs do not participate in killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae in vivo and in vitro. Dual viral and bacterial infection elevated the bacterial load compared to animals infected with bacteria alone. Concurrently, enhanced lung pathogenesis was observed in dual-infected mice compared to those challenged with influenza virus or bacteria alone. The intensified NETs in dual-infected mice often appeared as clusters that were frequently filled with partially degraded DNA, as evidenced by punctate histone protein staining. The severe pulmonary pathology and excessive NETs generation in dual infection correlated with exaggerated inflammation and damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier. NETs stimulation in vitro did not significantly alter the gene expression of several antimicrobial proteins, and these NETs did not exhibit any bactericidal activity. Fungicidal activity against Candida albicans was observed at similar levels both in presence or absence of NETs. These results substantiate that the NETs released by primary influenza infection do not protect against secondary bacterial infection, but may compromise lung function.

  8. Invasive Candida Infections and the Harm From Antibacterial Drugs in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ulrik Stæhr; Hein, Lars; Lundgren, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    patients in the high exposure arm, the use of ciprofloxacin and piperacillin/tazobactam was 51% and 75% higher than in the standard exposure arm; no difference in antibiotic exposure was observed between the randomized arms in surgical patients. Among medical intensive care patients, invasive Candida...... infection was more frequent in the high exposure arm (6.2%; 27/437) than in standard exposure arm (3.3%; 14/424) (hazard ratio = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.6; p = 0.05). Ciprofloxacin used at study entry independently predicted invasive Candida infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.1 [1.1-4.1]); the risk gradually...... increased with duration of ciprofloxacin therapy: six of 384 in patients not exposed (1.6%), eight of 212 (3.8%) when used for 1-2 days (hazard ratio = 2.5; 95% CI, 0.9-7.3), and 31 of 493 (6.3%) when used for 3 days (hazard ratio = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.6-9.3; p = 0.002). Patients with any ciprofloxacin...

  9. Cucumispora ornata n. sp. (Fungi: Microsporidia) infecting invasive 'demon shrimp' (Dikerogammarus haemobaphes) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Jamie; Dunn, Alison M; Stebbing, Paul D; Ross, Stuart H; Kerr, Rose C; Stentiford, Grant D

    2015-06-01

    Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, the 'demon shrimp', is an amphipod native to the Ponto-Caspian region. This species invaded the UK in 2012 and has become widely established. Dikerogammarus haemobaphes has the potential to introduce non-native pathogens into the UK, creating a potential threat to native fauna. This study describes a novel species of microsporidian parasite infecting 72.8% of invasive D. haemobaphes located in the River Trent, UK. The microsporidium infection was systemic throughout the host; mainly targeting the sarcolemma of muscle tissues. Electron microscopy revealed this parasite to be diplokaryotic and have 7-9 turns of the polar filament. The microsporidium is placed into the 'Cucumispora' genus based on host histopathology, fine detail parasite ultrastructure, a highly similar life-cycle and SSU rDNA sequence phylogeny. Using this data this novel microsporidian species is named Cucumispora ornata, where 'ornata' refers to the external beading present on the mature spore stage of this organism. Alongside a taxonomic discussion, the presence of a novel Cucumispora sp. in the United Kingdom is discussed and related to the potential control of invasive Dikerogammarus spp. in the UK and the health of native species which may come into contact with this parasite. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection and Vaccine Implications, Auckland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Atheer; Stewart, Joanna; Trenholme, Adrian; Drinkovic, Dragana; Peat, Briar; Taylor, Susan; Read, Kerry; Roberts, Sally; Voss, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection and the potential effects of a multivalent GAS vaccine in New Zealand. During January 2005–December 2006, we conducted prospective population-based laboratory surveillance of Auckland residents admitted to all public hospitals with isolation of GAS from normally sterile sites. Using emm typing, we identified 225 persons with confirmed invasive GAS infection (median 53 years of age; range 0–97 years). Overall incidence was 8.1 cases per 100,00 persons per year (20.4/100,000/year for Maori and Pacific Islanders; 24.4/100,000/year for persons >65 years of age; 33/100,000/year for infants Auckland’s lowest socioeconomic quintile. Twenty-two persons died, for an overall case-fatality rate of 10% (63% for toxic shock syndrome). Seventy-four percent of patients who died had an underlying condition. To the population in our study, the proposed 26-valent vaccine would provide limited benefit. PMID:21749758

  11. Pneumococcal pneumonia prevention among adults: is the herd effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in children as good a way as the active immunization of the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Rosa; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The indirect protection of adults as a result of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants has been discussed from different epidemiological points of view. In some countries, including Italy, even after pediatric vaccination, vaccine serotypes are still responsible for most pneumonia and invasive diseases in the elderly. Although the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA) produced encouraging results, it has not showed the efficacy of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine in preventing pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia regardless of the number of episodes and serotype. Addressing these points by monitoring the direct impact of adult vaccination in real life distinguished from the effects of herd immunity will assist public health decision-making on the most effective adult pneumococcal vaccination strategies.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederhold NP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nathan P Wiederhold Departments of Pathology and Medicine/Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, South Texas Reference Laboratories, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data

  13. Familias de la proteína de superficie PspA de Streptococcus pneumoniae: Relación con serotipos y localización Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA families: Relation with serotypes and clinical site of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Mayoral

    2010-10-01

    . These properties convert PspA as ideal candidate for the formulation of a pneumococcal vaccine. Investigations of the PspA families were mostly carried out on prevalent serotypes in other countries. The aim of this study was to identify PspA families from Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates of our region as well as to associate them to prevalent serotypes or pathologies. We studied 70 isolates from pediatric patients with invasive infections. PCR was performed using specific primers for each family. In these studies we observed that 60% were PspA family 1, 34% were PspA family 2 and 6% remained unclassified. Serotypes 1 and 5 presented only family 1; serotypes 14, 6B, 19F y 18C showed genes from both families. Family 1 was observed respectively in 60 y 50% of pneumonias and meningitis. The family 2 was identified in 33 and 50% of pneumonias and meningitis. This information about the PspA family distribution could become a valuable contribution to develop an effective regional vaccine using recombinant PspA as immunogen.

  14. Invasive Trichosporon Infection: A systematic review on a re-emerging fungal pathogen

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    João Nobrega De Almeida Júnior

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aimed to better depict the clinical features and address the issue of therapeutic management of Trichosporon deep-seated infections.Methods: We comprehensively reviewed the cases of invasive Trichosporon infection reported in the literature from 1994 (date of taxonomic modification to 2015. Data from antifungal susceptibility testing (AST studies were also analyzed. Results: Two hundred and three cases were retained and split into four groups: hemopathy (n=79, other immunodeficiency conditions (n =41, miscellaneous (n=58 and newborns (n=25. Trichosporon asahii was the main causative species (46.7% and may exhibit cross-resistance to different antifungal classes. The unfavorable outcome rate was at 44.3%. By multivariate analysis, breakthrough infection (OR 2.45 was associated with unfavorable outcome, whilst the use of an azole-based therapy improved the prognosis (OR 0.16. Voriconazole-based treatment was associated with favorable outcome in hematological patients (73.6% vs. 41.8%; p=0.016. Compiled data from AST demonstrated that (i T. asahii exhibits the highest MICs to amphotericin B and (ii voriconazole has the best in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates of Trichosporon spp. Conclusions: Trichosporon infection is not only restricted to hematological patients. Analysis of compiled data from AST and clinical outcome support the use of voriconazole as first line therapy.

  15. New perspectives on the gastrointestinal mode of transmission in invasive Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlech, W.F. III

    1984-01-01

    The route or mechanism of transmission of Listeria monocytogenes from its rural veterinary reservoir to newborn and older human populations has been obscure. Anecdotal reports of milk-borne infection from cows with Listeria mastitis have been published, but intensive investigations of small outbreaks of L. monocytogenes infections in humans have not supported a gastrointestinal mode of infection. Several recent studies, however, strongly suggest this possibility, and case-control studies of epidemic listeriosis in the Canadian Maritime provinces in 1981 documented an association between ingestion of uncooked vegetables and the development of illness (p = 0.02). In that study, coleslaw from a regional producer which was distributed throughout the Maritimes was considered to be the vehicle of transmission. Cabbage, the raw product in the production of coleslaw, was contaminated at a farm prior to arrival at the plant. Contamination occurred through fertilization with raw manure from a flock of sheep known to harbor L. monocytogenes. Therefore, an indirect link was established between Listeria monocytogenes infection of sheep on a cabbage farm and subsequent development of invasive listeriosis in humans. This study supports findings from other epidemiologic studies of human listeriosis and is consistent with results of investigations into the mode of transmission of natural and laboratory-acquired listeriosis in animals. 34 references.

  16. [Antifungal therapy for infants, children and adolescents with suspected or documented invasive fungal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, C M

    2010-04-01

    Fungal nosocomial infections have gradually and consistently increased since the 90s.This increasing threat is closely related with the growing number of people with immune system disorders and their survival. It is also related with the destruction of their physical barriers against infection due to the use of cytotoxic drugs or invasive procedures, such is the case of cancer patients and bone marrow and solid organ transplant patients. Increased survival of patients with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, premature babies and patients with complex congenital malformations, especially in the gastrointestinal tract, also add up to this scenario. The occurrence of yeast and filamentous fungi infections, especially of the Candida species, has been on the rise. Azole agents overuse, especially fluconazole, for the treatment and prophylaxis of fungal infections has put selective pressure on Candida spp. which resulted in an increase of non-albican species such as C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. famata, among others, as well as their growing resistance to these antifungal agents.

  17. Vitamin D-deficient mice have more invasive urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Olof; Lüthje, Petra; Sullivan, Devin; Aspenström, Pontus; Brauner, Annelie

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a common health problem with consequences not limited to bone and calcium hemostasis. Low levels have also been linked to tuberculosis and other respiratory infections as well as autoimmune diseases. We have previously shown that supplementation with vitamin D can induce the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin during ex vivo infection of human urinary bladder. In rodents, however, cathelicidin expression is not linked to vitamin D and therefore this vitamin D-related effect fighting bacterial invasion is not relevant. To determine if vitamin D had further protective mechanisms during urinary tract infections, we therefore used a mouse model. In vitamin D-deficient mice, we detected more intracellular bacterial communities in the urinary bladder, higher degree of bacterial spread to the upper urinary tract and a skewed cytokine response. Furthermore, we show that the vitamin D receptor was upregulated in the urinary bladder and translocated into the cell nucleus after E. coli infection. This study supports a more general role for vitamin D as a local immune response mediator in the urinary tract.

  18. A pharmacist-driven academic detailing program to increase adult pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Aisling R; DeAngelis, Jennifer M; Ward, Kristina E; Orr, K Kelly; Morrill, Haley J; Gosciminski, Michael; LaPlante, Kerry L

    2017-09-23

    To describe our statewide, pharmacist-led education campaign to increase knowledge and awareness of pneumococcal immunization recommendations. Immunization providers and residents in the state of Rhode Island. A clinical pathway (i.e., decision-support tool) was developed to educate health professionals about appropriate indications, administration schedules, and frequently asked questions for the 2 different adult pneumococcal vaccines. Academic detailing and distribution of the clinical pathway to health professionals was conducted across Rhode Island. Community outreach activities included radio ads as well as distribution of patient handouts and wallet cards at community events. To our knowledge, this was the first statewide, pharmacist-driven academic detailing and community outreach campaign to promote adult pneumococcal vaccination. Academically detailed immunization providers received a 6-question survey. Pneumococcal disease rate differences between the study periods were evaluated with the use of Fisher exact tests, whereas changes in vaccination were assessed with the use of chi-square tests. From November 2013 through July 2015, our academic detailers visited and distributed our vaccination pathway materials to more than 400 practice sites across Rhode Island, including 68% of community pharmacies and all adult acute care hospitals. Of the 413 surveys completed, 92% of respondents agreed that their knowledge of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, 13-valent and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, 23-valent had improved. Pneumococcal vaccination increased significantly (absolute difference 3.9%, percentage change in proportion 5.4%; P = 0.01), and pneumococcal disease decreased significantly between the preintervention and intervention periods (-2.74/10,000 discharges [95% CI -5.15 to -0.32], P = 0.02). Invasive pneumococcal disease decreased by 21 cases per 1,000,000 population per year between the preintervention and postintervention periods (-42

  19. [Nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in the intensive care units of a national hospital of Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chincha, Omayra; Cornelio, Elia; Valverde, Violeta; Acevedo, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In order to describe the incidence of nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in intensive care units (UCI) of the National Hospital Cayetano Heredia, a retrospective observational study was conducted using the data from the Office of Epidemiology and Environmental Health from 2010 to 2012. A total number of 222 nosocomial infections were reported; the general medicine UCI reported the highest incidence of pneumonia cases associated to a mechanical ventilator in 1000 days of use of the device (28.6); infection of the blood stream associated to central venous catheter (11.9), and infection of the urinary tract associated to a catheter (8,1). The main infectious agents isolated were Pseudomona sp. (32.3%) in the emergency UCI, negative Staphylococcus coagulasa (36%) in the general medicine UCI and Candida sp (69.2%) in the Surgery UCI. The rates of infections associated to invasive devices were high as in other national hospitals with limited resources and infrastructure.

  20. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections in Germany: impact of non-type b serotypes in the post-vaccine era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milde-Busch Astrid

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccination led to a significant decrease in invasive bacterial infections in children. The aim of this study was to assess a potential shift to more non-type b invasive infections in a population with high Hib vaccination coverage and to compare the burden of suffering between children with Hib, capsulated non-b and non-capsulated Hi infections. Methods Cases with confirmed invasive Hi infections were ascertained through two independent nationwide active surveillance systems in 1998–2005. Information on possible predisposing conditions and clinical information was available from 2001 onwards. Results The total number of reported non-type b Hi cases varied between 10 cases in 1998, 27 in 2000 and 14 in 2005. In each year, non-capsulated serotypes outnumbered capsulated non-type b ones. 192 cases were detected in 2001–2005, more than one half was non-type b and 88% of the non-type b cases were non-capsulated. For cases with Hib/capsulated non-type b infections the most common clinical presentation was meningitis (67% each; 89%/78% had no potential predisposing condition, 75%/72% completely recovered from disease and 6% (each died. In contrast, meningitis was diagnosed in 34% of the non-capsulated Hi infections, septicaemia in 28% and pneumonia 21%; 62% had no potential predisposing condition, 83% completely recovered and 3% died. Conclusion There was no increase in non-type b Hi invasive infections during 8 years of active surveillance in Germany. Invasive disease due to non-type b Hi is not confined to children with risk factors. In patients with capsulated non-type b Hi infections the proportion of meningitis cases is similar to Hib, but double as high as in non-capsulated Hi.

  1. PNEUMOCOCCAL CAPSULAR ANTIGEN-DETECTION AND PNEUMOCOCCAL SEROLOGY IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    1991-01-01

    Background Methods to determine the microbial cause of community acquired pneumonia include detection of pneumococcal antigen and measurement of pneumococcal capsular antibody response. Their usefulness compared with conventional microbiological techniques was investigated in patients with

  2. Minimal Invasive Fixation Can Decrease Infection Rates in Diabetic and Obese Patients With Severe Ankle Fracture and Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Dailey, Matthew; Huff, Scott; Qu, Yihuai; White, Erik; Liu, Jiayong

    2018-03-01

    Ankle fractures involving syndesmosis disruption cause severely unstable joint conditions. Traditional invasive operations put certain patient groups at an increased risk of infection. There is limited literature discussing the outcomes of minimally invasive fixation of severe ankle fractures including syndesmotic injury, as clinicians may be tempted to treat these difficult cases with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). A retrospective case-control study was conducted on patients treated at a level one trauma center. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on presence of diabetes and/or obesity (body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m 2 ). Those with either comorbidity were defined as high infection risk patients and placed in a comorbidity group. Patients were further divided into subgroups based on the operation's invasiveness; either traditional ORIF or percutaneous cannulated screw fixation. Comorbid patients (N = 67) were more likely to sustain Weber C fractures compared to noncomorbid patients (N = 43) (59.70% to 37.21%, P = .019). Additionally, patients receiving minimally invasive fixation procedures experienced fewer infections than those receiving ORIF (0 vs 11 incidences, P = .01), without effect on union rates, fracture reduction, pain, need for revision surgery, or time to full weightbearing. Diabetic and obese patients are at an increased risk of experiencing severe ankle fractures. The use of minimally invasive fixation methods can reduce the risk of postoperative infection without sacrificing other surgical outcomes, even with fractures involving syndesmotic injury. Therapeutic, Level III: Retrospective comparative study.

  3. Frequent house invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected triatomines in a suburban area of Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The demographic transition of populations from rural areas to large urban centers often results in a disordered occupation of forest remnants and increased economic pressure to develop high-income buildings in these areas. Ecological and socioeconomic factors associated with these urban transitions create conditions for the potential transmission of infectious diseases, which was demonstrated for Chagas disease.We analyzed 930 triatomines, mainly Triatoma tibiamaculata, collected in artificial and sylvatic environments (forests near houses of a suburban area of the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil between 2007 and 2011. Most triatomines were captured at peridomiciles. Adult bugs predominated in all studied environments, and nymphs were scarce inside houses. Molecular analyses of a randomly selected sub-sample (n=212 of triatomines showed Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates of 65%, 50% and 56% in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments, respectively. We detected the T. cruzi lineages I and II and mixed infections. We also showed that T. tibiamaculata fed on blood from birds (50%, marsupials (38%, ruminants (7% and rodents (5%. The probability of T. cruzi infection was higher in triatomines that fed on marsupial blood (odds ratio (OR = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.22-3.11. Moreover, we observed a protective effect against infection in bugs that fed on bird blood (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.30-0.73.The frequent invasion of houses by infected triatomines indicates a potential risk of T. cruzi transmission to inhabitants in this area. Our results reinforce that continuous epidemiological surveillance should be performed in areas where domestic transmission is controlled but enzootic transmission persists.

  4. Frequent house invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected triatomines in a suburban area of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Gilmar; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Reis, Renato Barbosa; Santos, Carlos Gustavo Silva Dos; Amorim, Alekhine; Andrade, Sônia Gumes; Reis, Mitermayer G

    2015-04-01

    The demographic transition of populations from rural areas to large urban centers often results in a disordered occupation of forest remnants and increased economic pressure to develop high-income buildings in these areas. Ecological and socioeconomic factors associated with these urban transitions create conditions for the potential transmission of infectious diseases, which was demonstrated for Chagas disease. We analyzed 930 triatomines, mainly Triatoma tibiamaculata, collected in artificial and sylvatic environments (forests near houses) of a suburban area of the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil between 2007 and 2011. Most triatomines were captured at peridomiciles. Adult bugs predominated in all studied environments, and nymphs were scarce inside houses. Molecular analyses of a randomly selected sub-sample (n=212) of triatomines showed Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates of 65%, 50% and 56% in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments, respectively. We detected the T. cruzi lineages I and II and mixed infections. We also showed that T. tibiamaculata fed on blood from birds (50%), marsupials (38%), ruminants (7%) and rodents (5%). The probability of T. cruzi infection was higher in triatomines that fed on marsupial blood (odds ratio (OR) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-3.11). Moreover, we observed a protective effect against infection in bugs that fed on bird blood (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.30-0.73). The frequent invasion of houses by infected triatomines indicates a potential risk of T. cruzi transmission to inhabitants in this area. Our results reinforce that continuous epidemiological surveillance should be performed in areas where domestic transmission is controlled but enzootic transmission persists.

  5. Apnea induced by respiratory syncytial virus infection is not associated with viral invasion of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Daniella Levy; Yarden-Bilavsky, Havatzelet; Mendelson, Ella; Yuhas, Yael; Ashkenazi, Shai; Nahum, Elhanan; Berent, Eva; Hindiyeh, Musa; Bilavsky, Efraim

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to study whether direct central nervous system invasion is responsible for the neurologic manifestations seen in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Cerebrospinal fluid from infants with RSV infection was tested for the detection of the following respiratory RNA viruses: RSV, influenza A and B, pandemic influenza H1N1, Parainfluenza-3, human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, parechovirus and enterovirus. All children tested negative for the presence of viral material in the cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the notion that the mechanism of RSV-induced neurologic manifestations, including apnea, is not direct central nervous system invasion.

  6. Invasive Candida krusei infection and Candida vasculitis of a leg ulcer in an immunocompetent patient: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Jud

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A 71 year old female Caucasian farmer without any known immunosuppression presented with a painful ulcer of her right lower leg after a trauma caused by a wood billet. There was no response to empirical antibacterial treatment. An ulcer biopsy showed an invasive Candida infection of the soft tissue and leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Voriconazole treatment was followed by wound healing. Invasive Candida infection and localized Candida vasculitis represent a rare cause of persisting leg ulcers. The similar clinical picture of chronic venous leg ulcers might blur the true cause and refractory cases should therefore promptly be processed by histopathological diagnostics.

  7. Invasive Candida krusei infection and Candida vasculitis of a leg ulcer in an immunocompetent patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Philipp; Valentin, Thomas; Regauer, Sigrid; Gary, Thomas; Hackl, Gerald; Rief, Peter; Brodmann, Marianne; Hafner, Franz

    2017-02-01

    A 71year old female Caucasian farmer without any known immunosuppression presented with a painful ulcer of her right lower leg after a trauma caused by a wood billet. There was no response to empirical antibacterial treatment. An ulcer biopsy showed an invasive Candida infection of the soft tissue and leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Voriconazole treatment was followed by wound healing. Invasive Candida infection and localized Candida vasculitis represent a rare cause of persisting leg ulcers. The similar clinical picture of chronic venous leg ulcers might blur the true cause and refractory cases should therefore promptly be processed by histopathological diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacodynamic studies of voriconazole: informing the clinical management of invasive fungal infections.

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    Job, Kathleen M; Olson, Jared; Stockmann, Chris; Constance, Jonathan E; Enioutina, Elena Y; Rower, Joseph E; Linakis, Matthew W; Balch, Alfred H; Yu, Tian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Thorell, Emily A; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2016-08-01

    Voriconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent commonly used to treat invasive fungal infections (IFI), including aspergillosis, candidiasis, Scedosporium infection, and Fusarium infection. IFI often occur in immunocompromised patients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this review is to summarize the pharmacodynamic properties of voriconazole and to provide considerations for potential optimal dosing strategies. Studies have demonstrated superior clinical response when an AUC/MIC >25 or Cmin/MIC >1 is attained in adult patients, correlating to a trough concentration range as narrow as 2-4.5 mg/L; however, these targets are poorly established in the pediatric population. Topics in this discussion include voriconazole use in multiple age groups, predisposing patient factors for IFI, and considerations for clinicians managing IFI. Expert commentary: The relationship between voriconazole dosing and exposure is not well defined due to the large inter- and intra-subject variability. Development of comprehensive decision support tools for individualizing dosing, particularly in children who require higher dosing, will help to increase the probability of achieving therapeutic efficacy and decrease sub-therapeutic dosing and adverse events.

  9. Subversion of autophagy in adherent invasive Escherichia coli-infected neutrophils induces inflammation and cell death.

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    Abderrahman Chargui

    Full Text Available Invading bacteria are recognized, captured and killed by a specialized form of autophagy, called xenophagy. Recently, defects in xenophagy in Crohn's disease (CD have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human chronic inflammatory diseases of uncertain etiology of the gastrointestinal tract. We show here that pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC isolated from CD patients are able to adhere and invade neutrophils, which represent the first line of defense against bacteria. Of particular interest, AIEC infection of neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells blocked autophagy at the autolysosomal step, which allowed intracellular survival of bacteria and exacerbated interleukin-8 (IL-8 production. Interestingly, this block in autophagy correlated with the induction of autophagic cell death. Likewise, stimulation of autophagy by nutrient starvation or rapamycin treatment reduced intracellular AIEC survival and IL-8 production. Finally, treatment with an inhibitor of autophagy decreased cell death of AIEC-infected neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells. In conclusion, excessive autophagy in AIEC infection triggered cell death of neutrophils.

  10. Standardization of fungal polymerase chain reaction for the early diagnosis of invasive fungal infection

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    P Deshpande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An early initiation of antifungal therapy in invasive fungal infections (IFIs is critical in reducing the high mortality rate. Current diagnosis of fungal infection relies on microscopy, culture, antigen, antibody specific tests and histological diagnosis. However, these tests either lack sensitivity or specificity. There is thus the need for a rapid, specific and accurate diagnostic method. Objective: The aim of our study was to establish PCR for the rapid detection of Candida and Aspergillus species in clinical specimens with improved sensitivity and specificity. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 proven cases of IFI (confirmed by culture were collected. A total of 15 healthy, 15 patients suffering from bacterial sepsis and 15 patients with HIV, HBV viral infections were included as controls. Clinical specimens were subjected to a standardized nested amplification to produce Round I (504 bp and Round II (150 bp amplicons. Restriction digestion was performed on these products for further identification. Results: Analytical sensitivity was determined using 10 6 -10 CFU/ml of cell suspension. The lower detection limit of the assay was 10 CFU/ml of blood. This test was 100% sensitive and specific with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 96.7%. Conclusion: The assay was found to be effective for the rapid detection of Candida and Aspergillus in clinical specimens.

  11. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections

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    Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015. PMID:26180063

  12. The economic costs to United States hospitals of invasive fungal infections in transplant patients.

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    Menzin, Joseph; Meyers, Juliana L; Friedman, Mark; Korn, Jonathan R; Perfect, John R; Langston, Amelia A; Danna, Robert P; Papadopoulos, George

    2011-05-01

    Patients with a solid organ transplant (SOTs) and hematopoietic stem cell or bone marrow transplants (HSC/BMTs) are at risk of contracting invasive fungal infections (IFIs). Data on the economic burden of IFIs in the United States are sparse. We conducted a retrospective matched cohort study using the 2004-2005 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The IFI cohort included patients with ICD-9-CM codes indicating a transplant procedure and an IFI. Matched controls (transplant recipients without an IFI) were chosen based on age (10 year categories), sex, region, hospital type, year, and transplant type. Mortality, length of stay, and costs were reported overall, by transplant type, and by type of mycosis. Nine thousand eight hundred ninety-six patients underwent SOT, and 4661 underwent HSC/BMT. Of these, 80 (0.8%) SOT and 111 (2.4%) HSC/BMT patients had an IFI. Mean age was 41.8 years (SOT) and 37.8 years (HSC/BMT). Aspergillosis was the most common infection. Patients with an IFI had a 5-fold increase in mortality, an additional 19.2 hospital days, and $55,400 in excess costs compared with patients without an IFI. Excess mortality, length of stay, and costs varied by type of transplant and mycosis. The clinical and economic burden of IFIs in transplant recipients may be high. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Complement component 5 contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

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    Woehrl, Bianca; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Murr, Carmen; Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G.B.; Baas, Frank; Pfister, Hans W.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Morgan, B. Paul; Barnum, Scott R.; van der Ende, Arie; Koedel, Uwe; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the proinflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. Additionally, SNPs in genes encoding complement pathway proteins have been linked to susceptibility to pneumococcal infection, although no associations with disease severity or outcome have been established. Here, we have performed a robust prospective nationwide genetic association study in patients with bacterial meningitis and found that a common nonsynonymous complement component 5 (C5) SNP (rs17611) is associated with unfavorable disease outcome. C5 fragment levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis correlated with several clinical indicators of poor prognosis. Consistent with these human data, C5a receptor–deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower CSF wbc counts and decreased brain damage compared with WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with C5-specific monoclonal antibodies prevented death in all mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Thus, our results suggest C5-specific monoclonal antibodies could be a promising new antiinflammatory adjuvant therapy for pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:21926466

  14. Voriconazole for prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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    Marks, David I; Liu, Qifa; Slavin, Monica

    2017-05-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) are associated with a high mortality, and accordingly most alloHSCT recipients receive prophylaxis with antifungal agents. Despite some improvement in outcomes of IFIs over time, they continue to represent substantial clinical risk, mortality, and financial burden. Areas covered: We review the main pathogens responsible for IFIs in recipients of alloHSCT, current treatment recommendations, and discuss clinical and economic considerations associated with voriconazole prophylaxis of IFIs in these patients. Expert commentary: The clinical efficacy of voriconazole appears to be at least equivalent to other antifungal treatments, and generally well tolerated. Overall, benefit-risk balance is favorable, and findings from cost-effectiveness analyses support the use of voriconazole prophylaxis of IFIs in recipients of alloHSCT.

  15. Pyricularia pennisetigena and P. zingibericola from invasive grasses infect signal grass, barley and wheat

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    Juliana Teodora de Assis Reges

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species from the Pyricularia genus are associated with blast disease in plants from the Poaceae family, causing losses in economically important crops such as rice, oat, rye, barley, wheat and triticale. This study aimed at characterizing the pathogenicity spectrum of P. pennisetigena and P. zingibericola to signal grass, barley and wheat, as well as comparing them with those from the species P. grisea and P. oryzae pathotype Triticum, which occur widely in the Brazilian agroecosystem. Twenty isolates of Pyricularia spp. were obtained from infected leaf samples of invasive plant species from wheat fields. The isolates classification into distinct Pyricularia species was done using molecular phylogeny based on actin and calmodulin genes. Pyricularia pennisetigena and P. zingibericola inoculated on plant leaves, at a concentration adjusted to 105 conidia mL-1, were pathogenic to signal grass, barley and wheat, with varying levels of aggressiveness.

  16. Invasive Amoebiasis: A Review of Entamoeba Infections Highlighted with Case Reports

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    Christopher Skappak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica infections of the gastrointestinal tract are common in the developing world but rare in North America. The authors present two cases: one involving an individual who had not travelled to an endemic area and another involving an individual who was born in Bulgaria. Both presented with severe abdominal pain and diarrhea. Endoscopic assessment revealed scattered colonic ulcerations and one patient was found to have a liver abscess on imaging. Stool ova and parasite studies were negative in both cases and both were diagnosed on review of colonic biopsies. On review of all Entamoeba cases in the Calgary Health Zone (Alberta, ova and parasite analysis found an average of 63.7 Entamoeba cases per year and a pathology database review revealed a total of seven cases of invasive E histolytica (2001 to 2011. Both patients responded well to antibiotic therapy. E histolytica should be considered in new-onset colitis, especially in individuals from endemic areas.

  17. Rapid, serial, non-invasive assessment of drug efficacy in mice with autoluminescent Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

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    Zhang, Tianyu; Li, Si-Yang; Converse, Paul J; Grosset, Jacques H; Nuermberger, Eric L

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is the world's third most common mycobacterial infection. There is no vaccine against BU and surgery is needed for patients with large ulcers. Although recent experience indicates combination chemotherapy with streptomycin and rifampin improves cure rates, the utility of this regimen is limited by the 2-month duration of therapy, potential toxicity and required parenteral administration of streptomycin, and drug-drug interactions caused by rifampin. Discovery and development of drugs for BU is greatly hampered by the slow growth rate of M. ulcerans, requiring up to 3 months of incubation on solid media to produce colonies. Surrogate markers for evaluating antimicrobial activity in real-time which can be measured serially and non-invasively in infected footpads of live mice would accelerate pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU. Previously, we developed bioluminescent M. ulcerans strains, demonstrating proof of concept for measuring luminescence as a surrogate marker for viable M. ulcerans in vitro and in vivo. However, the requirement of exogenous substrate limited the utility of such strains, especially for in vivo experiments. For this study, we engineered M. ulcerans strains that express the entire luxCDABE operon and therefore are autoluminescent due to endogenous substrate production. The selected reporter strain displayed a growth rate and virulence similar to the wild-type parent strain and enabled rapid, real-time monitoring of in vitro and in vivo drug activity, including serial, non-invasive assessments in live mice, producing results which correlated closely with colony-forming unit (CFU) counts for a panel of drugs with various mechanisms of action. Our results indicate that autoluminescent reporter strains of M. ulcerans are exceptional tools for pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU due to their potential to drastically reduce the time, effort, animals, compound, and costs

  18. Rapid, serial, non-invasive assessment of drug efficacy in mice with autoluminescent Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

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    Tianyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is the world's third most common mycobacterial infection. There is no vaccine against BU and surgery is needed for patients with large ulcers. Although recent experience indicates combination chemotherapy with streptomycin and rifampin improves cure rates, the utility of this regimen is limited by the 2-month duration of therapy, potential toxicity and required parenteral administration of streptomycin, and drug-drug interactions caused by rifampin. Discovery and development of drugs for BU is greatly hampered by the slow growth rate of M. ulcerans, requiring up to 3 months of incubation on solid media to produce colonies. Surrogate markers for evaluating antimicrobial activity in real-time which can be measured serially and non-invasively in infected footpads of live mice would accelerate pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU. Previously, we developed bioluminescent M. ulcerans strains, demonstrating proof of concept for measuring luminescence as a surrogate marker for viable M. ulcerans in vitro and in vivo. However, the requirement of exogenous substrate limited the utility of such strains, especially for in vivo experiments.For this study, we engineered M. ulcerans strains that express the entire luxCDABE operon and therefore are autoluminescent due to endogenous substrate production. The selected reporter strain displayed a growth rate and virulence similar to the wild-type parent strain and enabled rapid, real-time monitoring of in vitro and in vivo drug activity, including serial, non-invasive assessments in live mice, producing results which correlated closely with colony-forming unit (CFU counts for a panel of drugs with various mechanisms of action.Our results indicate that autoluminescent reporter strains of M. ulcerans are exceptional tools for pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU due to their potential to drastically reduce the time, effort, animals, compound

  19. Pneumococcal vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A multicenter placebo-controlled randomized double-blind study.

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    Grabar, Sophie; Groh, Matthieu; Bahuaud, Mathilde; Le Guern, Véronique; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Mathian, Alexis; Hanslik, Thomas; Guillevin, Loïc; Batteux, Frédéric; Launay, Odile

    2017-09-05

    Invasive pneumococcal disease and respiratory tract infections are both frequent and severe in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to compare the immunological efficacy and safety of pneumococcal vaccination with the 23-valent polysaccharide (PPS) vaccine alone to a sequential immunization with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate (PnCj) vaccine followed by PPS in patients with SLE and stable diseaase. Multicenter randomized placebo-controlled double-blind trial: PPS vaccine alone (placebo-PPS group) or PnCj vaccine followed by PPS vaccine (PnCj-PPS group) 24weeks later. The primary endpoint was the rate of responders at week 28 to at least 5 of the 7 serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F) shared by both PPS and PnCj. Pneumococcal IgG antibodies' opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) were also assessed. Twenty-five patients in the placebo-PPS group and 17 in the PnCj-PPS group were included in a modified intention-to-treat analysis. The primary endpoint was reached in 72% (18/25) in the placebo-PPS and 76% (13/17) in the PnCj-PPS group (p=0.75). There was no difference in the rates of responders with OPA. At week 52, 13/18 (72%) patients in the placebo-PPS group and 10/13 (77%) patients in the PnCj-PPS group (p=0.77) that met the primary endpoint at week 28 were still responders to ≥5/7 serotypes shared by both PPS and PnCj vaccines. Nine SLE flares were reported in 6 patients (4 in the placebo-PPS and 2 in the PnCj-PPS groups respectively, p=0.70). Sequential administration of PnCj vaccine followed by PPS vaccine is safe and shows short-term immunological efficacy in patients with SLE but was not superior to the PPS vaccine alone. www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT NCT00611663. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of Pneumococcal DNA in Blood by Polymerase Chain Reaction for Diagnosing Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Young Children From Low- and Middle-Income Countries

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    Deloria Knoll, Maria; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Park, Daniel E.; Watson, Nora L.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R.; Hammitt, Laura L.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Orin S.; Madhi, Shabir A.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Thea, Donald M.; Adrian, Peter V.; Ahmed, Dilruba; Antonio, Martin; Bunthi, Charatdao; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Githua, Louis Peter; Higdon, Melissa M.; Kahn, Geoff; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A.; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Makprasert, Sirirat; Mazumder, Razib; Moore, David P.; Mwansa, James; Nyongesa, Sammy; Prosperi, Christine; Sow, Samba O.; Tamboura, Boubou; Whistler, Toni; Zeger, Scott L.; Murdoch, David R.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Levine, Orin S.; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Feikin, Daniel R.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Fancourt, Nicholas; Fu, Wei; Hammitt, Laura L.; Higdon, Melissa M.; Kagucia, E. Wangeci; Karron, Ruth A.; Li, Mengying; Park, Daniel E.; Prosperi, Christine; Wu, Zhenke; Zeger, Scott L.; Watson, Nora L.; Crawley, Jane; Murdoch, David R.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Endtz, Hubert P.; Zaman, Khalequ; Goswami, Doli; Hossain, Lokman; Jahan, Yasmin; Ashraf, Hasan; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Antonio, Martin; McLellan, Jessica; Machuka, Eunice; Shamsul, Arifin; Zaman, Syed M.A.; Mackenzie, Grant; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Awori, Juliet O.; Morpeth, Susan C.; Kamau, Alice; Kazungu, Sidi; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Kotloff, Karen L.; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Sow, Samba O.; Sylla, Mamadou; Tamboura, Boubou; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Kourouma, Nana; Toure, Aliou; Madhi, Shabir A.; Moore, David P.; Adrian, Peter V.; Baillie, Vicky L.; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Groome, Michelle J.; Mahomed, Nasreen; Baggett, Henry C.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Maloney, Susan A.; Bunthi, Charatdao; Rhodes, Julia; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Akarasewi, Pasakorn; Thea, Donald M.; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Chipeta, James; Seidenberg, Phil; Mwansa, James; wa Somwe, Somwe; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Anderson, Trevor P.; Mitchell, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. We investigated the performance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on blood in the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia among children from 7 low- and middle-income countries. Methods. We tested blood by PCR for the pneumococcal autolysin gene in children aged 1–59 months in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study. Children had World Health Organization–defined severe or very severe pneumonia or were age-frequency–matched community controls. Additionally, we tested blood from general pediatric admissions in Kilifi, Kenya, a PERCH site. The proportion PCR-positive was compared among cases with microbiologically confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia (MCPP), cases without a confirmed bacterial infection (nonconfirmed), cases confirmed for nonpneumococcal bacteria, and controls. Results. In PERCH, 7.3% (n = 291/3995) of cases and 5.5% (n = 273/4987) of controls were blood pneumococcal PCR-positive (P < .001), compared with 64.3% (n = 36/56) of MCPP cases and 6.3% (n = 243/3832) of nonconfirmed cases (P < .001). Blood pneumococcal PCR positivity was higher in children from the 5 African countries (5.5%–11.5% among cases and 5.3%–10.2% among controls) than from the 2 Asian countries (1.3% and 1.0% among cases and 0.8% and 0.8% among controls). Among Kilifi general pediatric admissions, 3.9% (n = 274/6968) were PCR-positive, including 61.7% (n = 37/60) of those with positive blood cultures for pneumococcus. Discussion. The utility of pneumococcal PCR on blood for diagnosing childhood pneumococcal pneumonia in the 7 low- and middle-income countries studied is limited by poor specificity and by poor sensitivity among MCPP cases. PMID:28575371

  1. Mortality, length of hospitalization, and costs associated with invasive fungal infections in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzin, Joseph; Meyers, Juliana L; Friedman, Mark; Perfect, John R; Langston, Amelia A; Danna, Robert P; Papadopoulos, George

    2009-10-01

    The mortality, length of hospitalization, and costs associated with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in hospitalized patients were studied. This retrospective database study used data from the 2004 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide In-patient Sample. Patients were selected for inclusion based on diagnostic codes corresponding to an IFI. A control group was matched to the IFI group based on high-risk conditions (i.e., cancer, infection with human immunodeficiency virus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and solid-organ, hematopoietic stem cell, or bone marrow transplant), age, sex, and hospital region and teaching status. Excess mortality, length of hospital stay, and costs were estimated as the differences between the IFI and control groups. A total of 11,881 patients were identified with a discharge diagnosis of an IFI who could be matched to a control. Frequent infections included candidiasis (40.2%), other mycoses (36.3%), and aspergillosis (16.4%). Patients with IFIs had a significantly higher mortality rate (15% versus 5%), mean +/- S.E. length of stay (18.7 +/- 0.4 days versus 7.3 +/- 0.1 days), and mean +/- S.E. costs ($44,726 +/- $1,255 versus $15,445 +/- $404) (p < 0.001 for all comparisons) than did patients without IFIs. The burden of IFIs varied by high-risk condition (highest for transplant recipients and patients with cancer) and type of infection (highest for candidiasis, zygomycosis, and aspergillosis). Examination of a large database showed that, compared with high-risk patients without IFIs, those with IFIs had higher mortality, a longer hospital stay, and higher costs associated with their hospitalization.

  2. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Brith; Pauksen, Karlis; Sylvan, Staffan P E

    2008-04-28

    The present prospective study was conducted from 2003-2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area.The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS) even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31%) received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11%) were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34%) individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21%) the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39%) individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28%) the pneumococcal vaccine.Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine). Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age). For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75-84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza season 2005. The present study confirmed the

  3. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity

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    Sylvan Staffan PE

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present prospective study was conducted from 2003–2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area. The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. Results In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31% received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11% were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34% individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21% the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39% individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28% the pneumococcal vaccine. Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine. Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age. For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75–84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza

  4. Herd immunity and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a quantitative model.

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    Haber, Michael; Barskey, Albert; Baughman, Wendy; Barker, Lawrence; Whitney, Cynthia G; Shaw, Kate M; Orenstein, Walter; Stephens, David S

    2007-07-20

    Invasive pneumococcal disease in older children and adults declined markedly after introduction in 2000 of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for young children. An empirical quantitative model was developed to estimate the herd (indirect) effects on the incidence of invasive disease among persons >or=5 years of age induced by vaccination of young children with 1, 2, or >or=3 doses of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Prevnar (PCV7), containing serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F. From 1994 to 2003, cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were prospectively identified in Georgia Health District-3 (eight metropolitan Atlanta counties) by Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs). From 2000 to 2003, vaccine coverage levels of PCV7 for children aged 19-35 months in Fulton and DeKalb counties (of Atlanta) were estimated from the National Immunization Survey (NIS). Based on incidence data and the estimated average number of doses received by 15 months of age, a Poisson regression model was fit, describing the trend in invasive pneumococcal disease in groups not targeted for vaccination (i.e., adults and older children) before and after the introduction of PCV7. Highly significant declines in all the serotypes contained in PCV7 in all unvaccinated populations (5-19, 20-39, 40-64, and >64 years) from 2000 to 2003 were found under the model. No significant change in incidence was seen from 1994 to 1999, indicating rates were stable prior to vaccine introduction. Among unvaccinated persons 5+ years of age, the modeled incidence of disease caused by PCV7 serotypes as a group dropped 38.4%, 62.0%, and 76.6% for 1, 2, and 3 doses, respectively, received on average by the population of children by the time they are 15 months of age. Incidence of serotypes 14 and 23F had consistent significant declines in all unvaccinated age groups. In contrast, the herd immunity effects on vaccine-related serotype 6A incidence were inconsistent. Increasing trends of non

  5. Non-invasive index of liver fibrosis induced by alcohol, thioacetamide and schistosomal infection in mice

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    El-Beltagy Doha M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non invasive approaches will likely be increasing utilized to assess liver fibrosis. This work provides a new non invasive index to predict liver fibrosis induced in mice. Methods Fibrosis was generated by thioacetamide (TAA, chronic intake of ethanol, or infection with S. mansoni in 240 mice. Both progression and regression of fibrosis (after treatment with silymarin and/or praziquantel were monitored. The following methods were employed: (i The METAVIR system was utilized to grade and stage liver inflammation and fibosis; (ii Determination of hepatic hydroxyproline and collagen; and (iii Derivation of a new hepatic fibrosis index from the induced changes, and its prospective validation in a group of 70 mice. Results The index is composed of 4 serum variable including total proteins, γ-GT, bilirubin and reduced glutathione (GSH, measured in diseased, treated and normal mice. These parameters were highly correlated with both the histological stage and the grade. They were combined in a logarithmic formula, which non-invasively scores the severity of liver fibrosis through a range (0 to 2, starting with healthy liver (corresponding to stage 0 to advanced fibrosis (corresponding stage 3.Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC for the accuracy of the index to predict the histological stages demonstrated that the areas under the curve (AUC were 0.954, 0.979 and 0.99 for index values corresponding to histological stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Also, the index was correlated with stage and grade, (0.947 and 0.859, respectively. The cut off values that cover the range between stages 0-1, 1-2 and 2-3 are 0.4, 1.12 and 1.79, respectively. The results in the validation group confirmed the accuracy of the test. The AUROC was 0.869 and there was good correlation with the stage of fibrosis and grade of inflammation. Conclusion The index fulfils the basic criteria of non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis since it is liver

  6. Surveillance of pneumococcal-associated disease among hospitalized children in Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh, Dang Duc; Kilgore, Paul E; Slack, Mary P E; Nyambat, Batmunkh; Tho, Le Huu; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Nguyen, Hien Anh; Nguyen, Cat Dinh; Chong, Chia Yin; Nguyen, Dong; Ariyoshi, Koya; Clemens, John D; Jodar, Luis

    2009-03-01

    To understand the epidemiology of childhood bacterial diseases, including invasive pneumococcal disease, prospective surveillance was conducted among hospitalized children in Nha Trang, Vietnam. From April 2005 through August 2006, pediatricians at the Khanh Hoa General Hospital used standardized screening criteria to identify children aged <5 years who had signs and symptoms of invasive bacterial disease. All cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood specimens collected were tested by bacterial culture. Selected culture-negative specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae by antigen detection or for Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Neisseria meningitidis, and S. pneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 987 children were enrolled (794 with pneumonia, 76 with meningitis, and 117 with other syndromes consistent with invasive bacterial disease); 84% of children were aged 0-23 months, and 57% were male. Seven (0.71%) of 987 blood cultures and 4 (15%) of 26 CSF cultures were positive for any bacterial pathogen (including 6 for H. influenzae type b and 1 for S. pneumoniae). Pneumococcal antigen testing and PCR identified an additional 16 children with invasive pneumococcal disease (12 by antigen testing and 4 by PCR). Among children aged <5 years who lived in Nha Trang, the incidence rate of invasive pneumococcal disease was at least 48.7 cases per 100,000 children (95% confidence interval, 27.9-85.1 cases per 100,000 children). S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae type b were the most common causes of laboratory-confirmed invasive bacterial disease in children. PCR and antigen testing increased the sensitivity of detection and provided a more accurate estimate of the burden of invasive bacterial disease in Vietnam.

  7. Intestinal Adenovirus Shedding Before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Is a Risk Factor for Invasive Infection Post-transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kosulin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses (HAdV are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric human stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients. Our previous studies identified the gastrointestinal tract as a site of HAdV persistence, but the role of intestinal virus shedding pre-transplant for the risk of ensuing invasive infection has not been entirely elucidated. Molecular HAdV monitoring of serial stool samples using RQ-PCR was performed in 304 children undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Analysis of stool and peripheral blood specimens was performed pre-transplant and at short intervals until day 100 post-HSCT. The virus was detected in the stool of 129 patients (42%, and 42 tested positive already before HSCT. The patients displaying HAdV shedding pre-transplant showed a significantly earlier increase of intestinal HAdV levels above the critical threshold associated with high risk of invasive infection (p < 0.01. In this subset of patients, the occurrence of invasive infection characterized by viremia was significantly higher than in patients without HAdV shedding before HSCT (33% vs 7%; p < 0.0001. The data demonstrate that intestinal HAdV shedding before HSCT confers a greatly increased risk for invasive infection and disseminated disease post-transplant, and highlights the need for timely HAdV monitoring and pre-emptive therapeutic considerations in HSCT recipients.

  8. Experience with Proctectomy to Manage Combat Casualties Sustaining Catastrophic Perineal Blast Injury Complicated by Invasive Mucor Soft-Tissue Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    resuscitation and surgery . Inherent in the survival of casualties with such devastating injuries is both the risk for invasive infections and the need for...injured combat casualties receiving far-forward resuscitation, damage control surgery , and rapid evacuation in recent overseas contingency opera- tions...included resuscitative thoracotomy, pelvic external fixation, laparotomy for proximal vascular control and fecal diversion, and debridement of traumatic

  9. NFKBIZ polymorphisms and susceptibility to pneumococcal disease in European and African populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephen J; Khor, Chiea C; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Rautanen, Anna; Segal, Shelley; Moore, Catrin E; Davies, Robert J O; Day, Nicholas P; Peshu, Norbert; Crook, Derrick W; Berkley, James A; Williams, Thomas N; Scott, J Anthony; Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-01-01

    The proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) plays a central role in host defence against pneumococcal disease. Both rare mutations and common polymorphisms in the NFKBIA gene encoding the NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α associate with susceptibility to bacterial disease, but the possible role of polymorphisms within the related IκB-ζ gene NFKBIZ in the development of invasive pneumococcal disease has not previously been reported. To investigate this further, we examined the frequencies of 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning NFKBIZ in two case-control studies, comprising UK Caucasian (n=1008) and Kenyan (n=723) individuals. Nine polymorphisms within a single UK linkage disequilibrium block and all four polymorphisms within the equivalent, shorter Kenyan linkage disequilibrium block displayed either significant association with invasive pneumococcal disease or a trend towards association. For each polymorphism, heterozygosity was associated with protection from invasive pneumococcal disease when compared to the combined homozygous states (e.g. for rs600718, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=7.576, P=0.006, OR=0.67, 95% CI for OR: 0.51-0.88; for rs616597, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=8.715, P=0.003, OR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86). We conclude that multiple NFKBIZ polymorphisms associate with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in humans. The study of multiple populations may aid fine-mapping of associations within extensive regions of strong linkage disequilibrium (‘transethnic mapping’). PMID:19798075

  10. Invasive pulmonary fungal infections in patients with connective tissue disease: a retrospective study from northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.F. Ge

    Full Text Available Invasive pulmonary fungal infection (IPFI is a potentially fatal complication in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD. The current study aimed to uncover the clinical characteristics and risk factors of patients with IPFI-CTD. The files of 2186 CTD patients admitted to a single center in northern China between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 47 CTD patients with IPFI were enrolled into this study and assigned to the CTD-IPFI group, while 47 uninfected CTD patients were assigned to the control group. Clinical manifestations were recorded, and risk factors of IPFI were calculated by stepwise logistical regression analysis. Forty-seven (2.15% CTD patients developed IPFI. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients were responsible for the highest proportion (36.17% of cases with IPFI. Candida albicans (72.3% accounted for the most common fungal species. CTD-IPFI patients had significantly elevated white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and fasting glucose values compared to controls (P<0.05. Cough, sputum and blood in phlegm were the most common symptoms. Risk factors of IPFI in CTD included maximum prednisone dose ≥30 mg/day within 3 months prior to infection, anti-microbial drug therapy, and interstitial pneumonia. CTD patients who have underlying interstitial pneumonia, prior prednisone or multiple antibiotics, were more likely to develop IPFI.

  11. Variations of Invasive Salmonella Infections by Population Size in Asante Akim North Municipal, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Espinoza, Ligia M; Nichols, Chelsea; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Al-Emran, Hassan M; Baker, Stephen; Clemens, John D; Dekker, Denise Myriam; Eibach, Daniel; Krumkamp, Ralf; Boahen, Kennedy; Im, Justin; Jaeger, Anna; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Pak, Gi Deok; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Park, Jin Kyung; Sarpong, Nimako; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Toy, Trevor; Wierzba, Thomas F; Marks, Florian; May, Jürgen

    2016-03-15

    The Typhoid Fever Surveillance in Africa Program (TSAP) estimated adjusted incidence rates (IRs) for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and invasive nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars (iNTS) of >100 cases per 100 000 person-years of observation (PYO) for children aged Municipal (AAN), Ghana, between March 2010 and May 2012. We analyzed how much these rates differed between rural and urban settings. Children recruited at the Agogo Presbyterian Hospital and meeting TSAP inclusion criteria were included in the analysis. Towns with >32 000 inhabitants were considered urban; towns with populations rates for children aged rate ratios (SRRs) to evaluate differences between settings. Eighty-eight percent (2651/3000) of recruited patients met inclusion criteria and were analyzed. IRs of Salmonella bloodstream infections in children 100 per 100 000 PYO in both settings. Among rural children, the Salmonella Typhi and iNTS rates were 2 times (SRR, 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-3.5) and almost 3 times (SRR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.9-4.3) higher, respectively, than rates in urban children. IRs of Salmonella bloodstream infections in children rates in the less populated setting. Variations in the distribution of the disease should be considered to implement future studies and intervention strategies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. [In vitro activity of ampicillin-ceftriaxone against Enterococcus faecalis isolates recovered from invasive infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguer Moreira, Noelia; Nastro, Marcela; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Ángela; Rodríguez, Carlos Hernán

    2016-01-01

    In vitro activity of the combination of ampicillin- ceftriaxone against 30 Enterococcus faecalis isolates recovered from invasive infections in patients admitted to Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martin in the city of Buenos Aires was assessed. Ampicillin- ceftriaxone synergies were determined by microdilution in Müeller-Hinton (MH) broth with and without subinhibitory concentrations of ceftriaxone. Synergy was detected in 22/30 isolates. A decrease in both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed in 14/30 isolates, whereas in 6/30 isolates the decrease was observed in the MIC value and only in the MBC value in the 2 remaining isolates. The bactericidal activity of the combination showed to be higher at low concentrations of ampicillin (ceftriaxone combination and thus, its efficacy was confirmed in the treatment of severe infections by E. faecalis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Community-based outbreaks in vulnerable populations of invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 5 and 8 in Calgary, Canada.

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    Otto G Vanderkooi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD typically occur within institutions. Beginning in 2005, we detected an increase in serotype (ST 5 and ST8 IPD cases, predominantly in homeless persons living in an open community. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CASPER (Calgary Area S. pneumoniae Epidemiology Research surveillance study of all IPD (sterile site isolates in our region (pop ~1,100,000. Interviews and chart reviews of all cases and all isolates phenotypically analyzed and selected isolated tested by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During 2005-2007, 162 cases of ST5 IPD and 45 cases of ST8 IPD were identified. The isolates demonstrated phenotypic and genotypic clonality. The ST5 isolates were sequence type (ST 289 and demonstrated intermediate susceptibility to TMP-SMX. The ST8 isolates were predominantly ST1268, with a susceptible antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Individuals with ST5 IPD were more likely to be middle aged (OR 2.6, homeless (OR 4.4, using illicit drugs(OR 4.8, and asthmatic(OR 2.6. Those with ST8 were more likely to be male (OR 4.4, homeless (OR 2.6, aboriginal (OR7.3, and a current smoker (OR 2.5. Overlapping outbreaks of ST5 and ST8 IPD occurred in an open community in Calgary, Canada and homelessness was a predominant risk factor. Homelessness represents a unique community in which pneumococcal outbreaks can occur.

  14. Characterization of some pneumococcal bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    The growth of pneumococcal phages at high cell and phage densities is enhanced strongly by the substitution of potassium for sodium in the medium. Initial titers of 2 x 10 10 to 4 x 10 10 PFU/ml are readily obtained, and concentrated stocks are stable in a storage buffer described here. The mechanism of the cation effect is obscure. Phages ω3 and ω8 each have linear double-stranded DNA of 33 x 10 6 daltons per particle, with an apparent guanine plus cytosine content of 47 to 49 mol percent, as determined by buoyancy and melting temperature, but with an unusual absorbance spectrum. Efficiency of plating is high if sufficient time is allowed for a relatively slow adsorption, which differs several-fold in rate between the two phages. Morphologically, these and other pneumococcal phages are similar to coliphage lambda but with a longer tail and tail fiber. Upon UV inactivation, ω3 and ω8 have D 37 values of 33 and 55 J/m 2 , respectively, and each shows multiplicity reactivation. A total of 13 ts mutants have been isolated from the two phages, representing only two complementation groups; complementation and recombination occur between ω3 and ω8 mutants. Both phages provoke high-titer antisera with extensive cross-reactivity against a number of newly isolated pneumococcal phages

  15. Clinical and Epidemiological Evidence of the Red Queen Hypothesis in Pneumococcal Serotype Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Blaschke, Anne J; Mason, Edward O; Presson, Angela P; Forney, Larry J; Byington, Carrie L

    2016-09-01

    The Red Queen hypothesis is an evolutionary theory that describes the reciprocal coevolution of competing species. We sought to study whether introduction of the 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7 and PCV13, respectively) altered pneumococcal serotype dynamics among children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) as predicted by the Red Queen hypothesis. This study examined pneumococcal isolates (n = 641) obtained from children <18 years of age hospitalized with IPD from 1997 to 2014 in Utah. A review of the literature also identified several additional studies conducted in the United States and Europe that were used to test the external generalizability of our Utah findings. Simpson's index was used to quantify pneumococcal serotype diversity. In Utah, the introduction of PCV7 and PCV13 was associated with rapid increases in serotype diversity (P < .001). Serotypes rarely present before vaccine introduction emerged as common causes of IPD. Diversity then decreased (P < .001) as competition selected for the fittest serotypes and new evolutionary equilibriums were established. This pattern was also observed more broadly in the United States, the United Kingdom, Norway, and Spain. This vaccine-driven example of human/bacterial coevolution appears to confirm the Red Queen hypothesis, which reveals a limitation of serotype-specific vaccines and offers insights that may facilitate alternative strategies for the elimination of IPD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Pneumococcal vaccination in adults: rationale, state of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icardi, G; Sticchi, L; Bagnasco, A; Iudici, R; Durando, P

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the availability, since the early 1980s, of a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PP V23), its recommendation and increased use in the last decades, and the indirect benefits against invasive pneumococcal diseases following the pediatric immunization strategies with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), pneumoccal diseases, particularly Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP), still remain a substantial burden among older adults in Western countries. The recent availability on the market of a second generation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, with an enlarged spectrum of protection against some serotypes not included in the PCV7 (i.e., the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine--PCV13), opens new interesting perspectives for improving the control of this significant health-care issue among the entire population. The most interesting and up-dated epidemiological data regarding the impact of SP in adults and the elderly in Western countries, together with the available evidence concerning the efficacy and effectiveness of the PPV23 in the same population, are reported and discussed below.

  17. Diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STI) using self-collected non-invasive specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2004-01-01

    Paramount in control of transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is their prompt recognition and appropriate treatment. In countries where definitive diagnoses are difficult, a 'syndromic approach' to management of STIs is recommended and practiced, yet many STIs have common symptoms or are asymptomatic and therefore go undetected and untreated. This is of particular concern with the recognition that HIV transmission is increased with co-existent STIs: the attributable risk for each STI varying with the prevalence within a particular population. Hence, HIV public health prevention approaches must include STI preventative strategies to be effective. Even then, microbiological screening is incorporated into STI control strategies; lack of access to appropriate services (especially in rural and remote areas), reluctance of at-risk populations to attend for treatment, fear of invasive genital examinations, and lower sensitivities of conventional diagnostic assays reduces the effectiveness of such programmes. Therefore, accurate, cost-effective, reliable diagnostic assays (preferably those which can be used in the field) are needed to impact on the incidence of the various STIs, as well as HIV. With the advent of molecular technologies, including target and signal amplification methods, diagnoses of STIs have been revolutionised and allow the use of non or minimally invasive sampling techniques, some of which are self-collected by the patient, e.g. first-void urine, cervico-vaginal lavage, low vaginal swabs, and tampons. Most studies evaluating such self-sampling with molecular diagnostic techniques have demonstrated an equivalent or superior detection of STIs as compared to conventional sampling and detection methods. These sampling methods can also be used to determine prevalence of STIs in various populations, but particularly those with difficult access to medical care. In this article, the utility of self-sampling collection devices for detection of

  18. Preliminary results of a novel quorum sensing inhibitor against pneumococcal infection and biofilm formation with special interest to otitis media and cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevizci, Raşit; Düzlü, Mehmet; Dündar, Yasemin; Noyanalpan, Ningur; Sultan, Nedim; Tutar, Hakan; Bayazıt, Yıldırım A

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of a novel quorum sensing inhibitor (QSI), coded as 'yd 47', against otitis media and biofilm formation on Cochlear implants (CIs). Small pieces cut from cochlear implant were implanted under the skin in the retroauricular area on both sides of four guinea pigs. The implant pieces in the study and control sides were implanted in Streptococcus pneumoniae strain solution and saline, respectively. The right and left middle ears were also instilled with a solution containing pneumococci and saline, respectively. The animals were only given an intraperitoneal 'yd 47' twice daily for three months to be assessed later with electron microscopy. Clinical examination with palpation, inspection and otoscopy did not reveal any sign of implant infection or otitis media. In the study and control implant materials, soft tissues around the implant and tympanic membranes, there was no biofilm formation by pneumococci. Contamination by various cells and some rod-shaped bacteria (not diplococcic) were seen in some of the materials. In conclusion, the novel QSI seems promising in the prevention of otitis media and biofilm formation on CIs by pneumococci.

  19. Prevalence of nasopharyngeal antibiotic-Resistant pneumococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Pneumococcal resistance was significant in this group of children with easy access to paediatric services and antibiotic use. The implication of such high resistance for the treatment of pneumococcal diseases is that high-dose amoxicillin is the preferred empirical oral therapy for treatment of otitis media.

  20. The cost-effectiveness of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination for infants in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Choi, Yoon Hong; Trotter, Caroline; Miller, Elizabeth; Jit, Mark

    2012-11-26

    In the immunisation schedule in England and Wales, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was replaced by the 13-valent vaccine (PCV-13) in April 2010 after having been used since September 2006. The introduction of PCV-7 was informed by a cost effectiveness analysis using an infectious disease model which projected herd immunity and serotype replacement effects based on the post-vaccine experience in the United States at that time. To investigate the cost effectiveness of the introduction of PCV-13. Invasive disease incidence following vaccination was projected from a dynamic infectious disease model, and combined with serotype specific disease outcomes obtained from a large hospital dataset linked to laboratory confirmation of invasive pneumococcal disease. The economic impact of replacing PCV-7 with PCV-13 was compared to stopping the use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether. Discontinuing PCV-7 would lead to a projected increase in invasive pneumococcal disease, costs and loss of quality of life compared to the introduction of PCV-13. However under base case assumptions (assuming no impact on non-invasive disease, maximal competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types, time horizon of 30 years, vaccine price of £49.60 a dose+£7.50 administration costs and discounting of costs and benefits at 3.5%) the introduction of PCV-13 is only borderline cost effective compared to a scenario of discontinuing of PCV-7. The intervention becomes more cost-effective when projected impact of non-invasive disease is included or the discount factor for benefits is reduced to 1.5%. To our knowledge this is the first evaluation of a transition from PCV-7 to PCV-13 based on a dynamic model. The cost-effectiveness of such a policy change depends on a number of crucial assumptions for which evidence is limited, particularly the impact of PCV-13 on non-invasive disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue. Methods: The gastric cancer tissues surgically removed in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were collected and divided into Hp negative, Hp-L negative and Hp-L positive according to the condition of helicobacter pylori infection. The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression were detected. Results: LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-positive gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues while ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1 and Mst1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues; LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1, Mst1, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-negative gastric cancer tissues were not different from those in Hpnegative gastric cancer tissues. Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori L-form infection can influence the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression to promote cell proliferation and invasion, and inhibit cell apoptosis.

  2. A new non-invasive approach based on polyhexamethylene biguanide increases the regression rate of HPV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentile Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV infection is a worldwide problem strictly linked to the development of cervical cancer. Persistence of the infection is one of the main factors responsible for the invasive progression and women diagnosed with intraepithelial squamous lesions are referred for further assessment and surgical treatments which are prone to complications. Despite this, there are several reports on the spontaneous regression of the infection. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of a long term polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB-based local treatment in improving the viral clearance, reducing the time exposure to the infection and avoiding the complications associated with the invasive treatments currently available. Method 100 women diagnosed with HPV infection were randomly assigned to receive six months of treatment with a PHMB-based gynecological solution (Monogin®, Lo.Li. Pharma, Rome - Italy or to remain untreated for the same period of time. Results A greater number of patients, who received the treatment were cleared of the infection at the two time points of the study (three and six months compared to that of the control group. A significant difference in the regression rate (90% Monogin group vs 70% control group was observed at the end of the study highlighting the time-dependent ability of PHMB to interact with the infection progression. Conclusions The topic treatment with PHMB is a preliminary safe and promising approach for patients with detected HPV infection increasing the chance of clearance and avoiding the use of invasive treatments when not strictly necessary. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01571141

  3. Pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation: preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Both clinical data and laboratory studies demonstrated the risk of pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation. This review examines strategies to prevent post-implant meningitis. Medline/PubMed database; English articles after 1980. Search terms: cochlear implants, pneumococcus meningitis, streptococcus pneumonia, immunization, prevention. Narrative review. All articles relating to post-implant meningitis without any restriction in study designs were assessed and information extracted. The presence of inner ear trauma as a result of surgical technique or cochlear implant electrode array design was associated with a higher risk of post-implant meningitis. Laboratory data demonstrated the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing meningitis induced via the hematogenous route of infection. Fibrous sealing around the electrode array at the cochleostomy site, and the use of antibiotic-coated electrode array reduced the risk of meningitis induced via an otogenic route. The recent scientific data support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommendation of pneumococcal vaccination for the prevention of meningitis in implant recipients. Nontraumatic cochlear implant design, surgical technique, and an adequate fibrous seal around the cochleostomy site further reduce the risk of meningitis. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasivas: serotipos y resistencia antimicrobiana Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections: serotypes and antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Antonia Cueto Montoya

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Las meningoencefalitis bacterianas constituyen una enfermedad invasiva importante, quizás no tanto por su frecuencia, como por la gravedad de su cuadro. Los cambios en la epidemiología de los síndromes neurológicos infecciosos en Cuba a partir de la vacunación contra meningococo BC y Haemophilus influenzae b han hecho que el Streptococcus pneumoniae constituya el agente causal más frecuente. Debido al incremento de la resistencia de este microorganismo a los antibióticos habituales, se realizaron modificaciones al régimen terapéutico convencional, fundamentalmente en las meningitis pediátricas. Es necesario lograr el aislamiento en cultivo de este agente para conocer los serotipos más frecuentes en el país, y lograr una vacuna neumocócica conjugada, así como para la vigilancia de las cepas frente a los antimicrobianos.The bacterial meningoencephalitis is an important invasive disease, not only because of its frequency, but also because of the severity of its picture. The changes in the epidemiology of the neurological infectious syndromes in Cuba starting from the vaccination against meningococcus BC and Haemophilus infuenzae b have made that Streptococcus pneumoniae be the most frequent causal agent. Due to the increase of the resistance of this microorganism to habitual antibiotics, modifications were made in the conventional therapeutic regimen, mainly in the pediatric meningitis. It is necessary to achieve the isolation in culture of this agent to know the most common serotypes in the country, to attain a conjugated pneumococcal vaccine, and to keep the surveillance of the strains against the antimicrobials.

  5. Threshold shift: effects of cochlear implantation on the risk of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2007-04-01

    The study goals were to examine whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of meningitis in the absence of other risk factors and to understand the pathogenesis of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation. Four weeks following surgery, 54 rats (18 of which received a cochleostomy alone, 18 of which received a cochleostomy and acute cochlear implantation using standard surgical techniques, and 18 of which received a cochlear implant) were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae via three different routes of bacterial inoculation (middle ear, inner ear, and intraperitoneal) to represent all potential routes of bacterial infection from the upper respiratory tract to the meninges. The presence of a cochlear implant reduced the threshold of bacteria required to cause pneumococcal meningitis from all routes of infection in healthy animals. The presence of a cochlear implant increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis regardless of the route of bacterial infection. Early detection and treatment of pneumococcal infection such as otitis media may be required, as cochlear implantation may lead to a reduction of infectious threshold for meningitis.

  6. Immunogenicity of a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in elderly residents of a long-term care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Valenzuela B.

    Full Text Available S. pneumoniae is a significant cause of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly, and accounts for the majority of the pneumonia deaths among the elderly. We conducted this randomized double-blind study to evaluate the immune response to a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the persistence of antibodies two years after the vaccination in an elderly population in Santiago, Chile. A total of 118 elderly nursing home residents received either the pneumococcal or a tetanus control vaccine. Serum samples were taken at enrolment, at two months, and at two years post-vaccination. Pre-vaccination anti-pneumococcal antibody geometric mean concentrations (GMC were similar in both study groups, with increased levels of antibodies found only against serotype 14. The pneumococcal vaccine was highly immunogenic at 2 months, and titers remained high two years after the vaccination for the 10 serotypes studied in this elderly population. The results thus support the benefits of this pneumococcal vaccine in this elderly population who are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  7. [Invasive fungal infections in children with cancer, neutropenia and fever, in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Yalda; Brücher, Roberto; Alvarez, Ana María; Becker, Ana; Cofré, José; Enríquez, Nancy; Payá, Ernesto; Salgado, Carmen; Santolaya, María Elena; Tordecilla, Juan; Varas, Mónica; Villarroel, Milena; Viviani, Tamara; Zubieta, Marcela; O'Ryan, Miguel

    2002-10-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) cause prolonged hospitalizations and increase the possibility of death among patients with cancer and febrile neutropenia (FN). Up to 10% of febrile neutropenic episodes may be caused by IFI. To estimate the incidence of IFI among a large group of Chilean children with cancer and FN. Clinical and laboratory information was collected from a data base provided by the "Programa Infantil Nacional de Drogas Antineoplásicas" (PINDA) that included 445 FN episodes occurring in five hospitals in Santiago, Chile. This information was used to identify children that presented with signs and symptoms compatible with an IFI. According to predefined criteria based on a literature review, IFI episodes were categorized as "proven", "probable" or "possible". A total of 41/445 episodes (9.2%) were compatible with an IFI of which 4 (0.9%) were proven, 23 (5.2%) probable, and 14 (3.1%) possible. Hospitalization was longer (27 vs 8 days, p < .01), new infectious foci appeared with higher frequency (71 vs 38%, p < .01), and mortality was higher (10 vs 1.6%, p < .001) in children with IFI compatible episodes, when compared to children who did not have an IFI. The estimated incidence of IFI in Chilean children with cancer and FN ranged between 6-9% depending on the stringency of criteria selection used for classification. This estimate is similar to that reported by other studies. The low detection yield of clinically compatible IFI underscores the need of improved diagnosis of fungal infections in this population.

  8. Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Emergence of Resistant Pathogens and New Antifungal Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Walsh, Thomas J; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2018-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections caused by drug-resistant organisms are an emerging threat to heavily immunosuppressed patients with hematological malignancies. Modern early antifungal treatment strategies, such as prophylaxis and empirical and preemptive therapy, result in long-term exposure to antifungal agents, which is a major driving force for the development of resistance. The extended use of central venous catheters, the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of certain antifungal agents, neutropenia, other forms of intense immunosuppression, and drug toxicities are other contributing factors. The widespread use of agricultural and industrial fungicides with similar chemical structures and mechanisms of action has resulted in the development of environmental reservoirs for some drug-resistant fungi, especially azole-resistant Aspergillus species, which have been reported from four continents. The majority of resistant strains have the mutation TR34/L98H, a finding suggesting that the source of resistance is the environment. The global emergence of new fungal pathogens with inherent resistance, such as Candida auris, is a new public health threat. The most common mechanism of antifungal drug resistance is the induction of efflux pumps, which decrease intracellular drug concentrations. Overexpression, depletion, and alteration of the drug target are other mechanisms of resistance. Mutations in the ERG11 gene alter the protein structure of C-demethylase, reducing the efficacy of antifungal triazoles. Candida species become echinocandin-resistant by mutations in FKS genes. A shift in the epidemiology of Candida towards resistant non-albicans Candida spp. has emerged among patients with hematological malignancies. There is no definite association between antifungal resistance, as defined by elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations, and clinical outcomes in this population. Detection of genes or mutations conferring resistance with the use of molecular methods may offer better

  9. Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Emergence of Resistant Pathogens and New Antifungal Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria N. Gamaletsou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections caused by drug-resistant organisms are an emerging threat to heavily immunosuppressed patients with hematological malignancies. Modern early antifungal treatment strategies, such as prophylaxis and empirical and preemptive therapy, result in long-term exposure to antifungal agents, which is a major driving force for the development of resistance. The extended use of central venous catheters, the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of certain antifungal agents, neutropenia, other forms of intense immunosuppression, and drug toxicities are other contributing factors. The widespread use of agricultural and industrial fungicides with similar chemical structures and mechanisms of action has resulted in the development of environmental reservoirs for some drug-resistant fungi, especially azole-resistant Aspergillus species, which have been reported from four continents. The majority of resistant strains have the mutation TR34/L98H, a finding suggesting that the source of resistance is the environment. The global emergence of new fungal pathogens with inherent resistance, such as Candida auris, is a new public health threat. The most common mechanism of antifungal drug resistance is the induction of efflux pumps, which decrease intracellular drug concentrations. Overexpression, depletion, and alteration of the drug target are other mechanisms of resistance. Mutations in the ERG11 gene alter the protein structure of C-demethylase, reducing the efficacy of antifungal triazoles. Candida species become echinocandin-resistant by mutations in FKS genes. A shift in the epidemiology of Candida towards resistant non-albicans Candida spp. has emerged among patients with hematological malignancies. There is no definite association between antifungal resistance, as defined by elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations, and clinical outcomes in this population. Detection of genes or mutations conferring resistance with the use of molecular methods

  10. Methods of Controlling Invasive Fungal Infections Using CD8+ T Cells

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    Pappanaicken R. Kumaresan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFIs cause high rates of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Pattern-recognition receptors present on the surfaces of innate immune cells recognize fungal pathogens and activate the first line of defense against fungal infection. The second line of defense is the adaptive immune system which involves mainly CD4+ T cells, while CD8+ T cells also play a role. CD8+ T cell-based vaccines designed to prevent IFIs are currently being investigated in clinical trials, their use could play an especially important role in acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients. So far, none of the vaccines used to treat IFI have been approved by the FDA. Here, we review current and future antifungal immunotherapy strategies involving CD8+ T cells. We highlight recent advances in the use of T cells engineered using a Sleeping Beauty vector to treat IFIs. Recent clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell therapy to treat patients with leukemia have shown very promising results. We hypothesized that CAR T cells could also be used to control IFI. Therefore, we designed a CAR that targets β-glucan, a sugar molecule found in most of the fungal cell walls, using the extracellular domain of Dectin-1, which binds to β-glucan. Mice treated with D-CAR+ T cells displayed reductions in hyphal growth of Aspergillus compared to the untreated group. Patients suffering from IFIs due to primary immunodeficiency, secondary immunodeficiency (e.g., HIV, or hematopoietic transplant patients may benefit from bioengineered CAR T cell therapy.

  11. Poor Long-Term Efficacy of Prevnar-13 in Sickle Cell Disease Mice Is Associated with an Inability to Sustain Pneumococcal-Specific Antibody Titers.

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    Steven M Szczepanek

    Full Text Available One of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease (SCD is infection with the pneumococcal bacterium (Streptococcus pneumoniae. Unfortunately, the polysaccharide-conjugate vaccine appears to be less effective in individuals with SCD when compared to the general population. We sought to better understand the relative efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in a SCD mouse challenge model.Transgenic control and SCD mice were monitored for mortality after intranasal pneumococcal infection or pneumococcal vaccination with Prevnar-13 and type-matched challenge. Anti-pneumococcal antibody titers were measured by ELISA and opsonophagocytosis was measured in vitro.Mortality after pneumococcal infection was similar between control and SCD mice. However, after three intramuscular polysaccharide-conjugate vaccinations, all control mice were protected following high-dose intranasal infection, whereas 60% of SCD mice died. Anti-pneumococcal antibody titers showed initial IgG and IgM responses in both groups, but waning titers were observed in the SCD group, even after boosting. When functionally assayed in vitro, serum from SCD mice 13 weeks after a second booster shot maintained little to no ability to opsonize pneumococci, while serum from control mice sustained a significantly higher capacity opsonization. Thus, it appears that SCD mice do not maintain antibody responses to pneumococcal polysaccharides after Prevnar-13 vaccination, thereby leaving them susceptible to mortality after type-matched infection.Our results emphasize the need to better understand the correlates of immune protection in SCD so that pneumococcal vaccines can be improved and mortality reduced in this susceptible population.

  12. Combat trauma-associated invasive fungal wound infections: epidemiology and clinical classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrob, A C; Weisbrod, A B; Dunne, J R; Rodriguez, C J; Malone, D; Lloyd, B A; Warkentien, T E; Wells, J; Murray, C K; Bradley, W; Shaikh, F; Shah, J; Aggarwal, D; Carson, M L; Tribble, D R

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) in combat casualties led to development of a combat trauma-specific IFI case definition and classification. Prospective data were collected from 1133 US military personnel injured in Afghanistan (June 2009-August 2011). The IFI rates ranged from 0·2% to 11·7% among ward and intensive care unit admissions, respectively (6·8% overall). Seventy-seven IFI cases were classified as proven/probable (n = 54) and possible/unclassifiable (n = 23) and compared in a case-case analysis. There was no difference in clinical characteristics between the proven/probable and possible/unclassifiable cases. Possible IFI cases had shorter time to diagnosis (P = 0·02) and initiation of antifungal therapy (P = 0·05) and fewer operative visits (P = 0·002) compared to proven/probable cases, but clinical outcomes were similar between the groups. Although the trauma-related IFI classification scheme did not provide prognostic information, it is an effective tool for clinical and epidemiological surveillance and research.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive infections over a decade at Kilifi County Hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Sonal P; Boinett, Christine J; Ellington, Matthew J; Kagia, Ngure; Mwarumba, Salim; Nyongesa, Sammy; Mturi, Neema; Kariuki, Samuel; Scott, J Anthony G; Thomson, Nicholas R; Morpeth, Susan C

    2017-10-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recent years have seen an explosion of resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and emergence of carbapenem resistance. Here, we examine 198 invasive K. pneumoniae isolates collected from over a decade in Kilifi County Hospital (KCH) in Kenya. We observe a significant increase in MDR K. pneumoniae isolates, particularly to third generation cephalosporins conferred by ESBLs. Using whole-genome sequences, we describe the population structure and the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes within it. More than half of the isolates examined in this study were ESBL-positive, encoding CTX-M-15, SHV-2, SHV-12 and SHV-27, and 79% were MDR conferring resistance to at least three antimicrobial classes. Although no isolates in our dataset were found to be resistant to carbapenems we did find a plasmid with the genetic architecture of a known New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM)-carrying plasmid in 25 isolates. In the absence of carbapenem use in KCH and because of the instability of the NDM-1 gene in the plasmid, the NDM-1 gene has been lost in these isolates. Our data suggests that isolates that encode NDM-1 could be present in the population; should carbapenems be introduced as treatment in public hospitals in Kenya, resistance is likely to ensue rapidly. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial Resistance in Invasive Bacterial Infections in Hospitalized Children, Cambodia, 2007-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Lewis, Andrew; Takata, Junko; Miliya, Thyl; Lubell, Yoel; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Rith, Kolthida; McKellar, Gregor; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; McGonagle, Erin; Stoesser, Nicole; Moore, Catrin E; Parry, Christopher M; Turner, Claudia; Day, Nicholas P J; Cooper, Ben S; Turner, Paul

    2018-05-01

    To determine trends, mortality rates, and costs of antimicrobial resistance in invasive bacterial infections in hospitalized children, we analyzed data from Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, for 2007-2016. A total of 39,050 cultures yielded 1,341 target pathogens. Resistance rates were high; 82% each of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were multidrug resistant. Hospital-acquired isolates were more often resistant than community-acquired isolates; resistance trends over time were heterogeneous. K. pneumoniae isolates from neonates were more likely than those from nonneonates to be resistant to ampicillin-gentamicin and third-generation cephalosporins. In patients with community-acquired gram-negative bacteremia, third-generation cephalosporin resistance was associated with increased mortality rates, increased intensive care unit admissions, and 2.26-fold increased healthcare costs among survivors. High antimicrobial resistance in this setting is a threat to human life and the economy. In similar low-resource settings, our methods could be reproduced as a robust surveillance model for antimicrobial resistance.

  15. Hospital and provider patient volumes, cesarean section rates, and early postpartum invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parriott, Andrea M; Brown, Joelle M; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2014-02-01

    We sought to examine whether hospital and provider volumes and cesarean section rates influenced early postpartum invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. We used data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a representative sample of US community hospitals. Multivariate hierarchical regression models were used to estimate odds ratios adjusted for hospital total discharges, nurse:patient ratio, urbanicity, teaching status, bed size, ownership, and geographic region and patient age, race, expected payer, and comorbidities. The total sample size for the hospital analysis was 3,487,350 deliveries, which included 555 cases of MRSA infection. The total sample size for the provider analysis was 1,186,703 deliveries, with 221 cases of MRSA infection. Hospital and provider patient (deliveries) volumes and cesarean section rates were not associated with early postpartum invasive MRSA infection. Barring major bias in our estimates, our results suggest that transmission from providers may not be a predominant route of postpartum MRSA infection in US hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Novos pontos de corte de sensibilidade nas taxas de resistência antimicrobiana de cepas invasivas de pneumococo New susceptibility breakpoints in antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal strains

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    Paula Carolina Bejo Wolkers

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar impacto dos novos pontos de corte de sensibilidade à penicilina nas taxas de resistência de cepas de pneumococo obtidas de crianças com pneumonia. MÉTODOS: Cepas de pneumococo isoladas no laboratório de análises clínicas do Hospital de Clínicas de Uberlândia, Uberlândia (MG, a partir de amostras de pacientes internados foram enviadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo (SP, para confirmação da identificação, sorotipagem e determinação da sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos. RESULTADOS: De abril de 1999 a dezembro de 2008 foram enviadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz 330 cepas de pneumococo, sendo 195 (59% provenientes de pacientes com diagnóstico de pneumonia. Destas, foram analisadas 100 cepas de pacientes com idade ≤ 12 anos; a idade dos pacientes variou de 1 a 12,6 anos, com média de 2,4 e mediana de 1,7 anos; 47 pacientes eram do sexo masculino; as fontes de recuperação foram sangue (42% e líquido pleural (58%. Foram detectadas 35 cepas oxacilina-resistentes: segundo os critérios do Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI de 2007 [concentração inibitória mínima (CIM ≤ 0,06 µg/mL para sensibilidade (S, 0,12 a 1 µg/mL para resistência intermediária (RI e ≥ 2 µg/mL para resistência plena (RP], 22 cepas apresentaram RI e 11, RP para penicilina. De acordo com os critérios atuais do CLSI de 2008 (≤ 2 µg/mL para S, 4 µg/mL para RI e ≥ 8 µg/mL para RP apenas uma cepa confirmou RI à penicilina. Detectou-se resistência a cotrimoxazol (80%, tetraciclina (21%, eritromicina (13%, clindamicina (13% e ceftriaxona (uma cepa, simultaneamente resistente a penicilina. CONCLUSÕES: Com a aplicação dos novos pontos de corte para sensibilidade in vitro, as taxas de resistência a penicilina caíram 97%, de 33 para 1%.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of new penicillin susceptibility breakpoints on resistance rates of pneumococcal strains collected from children with pneumonia. METHODS

  17. The value of clinical features in differentiating between viral, pneumococcal and atypical bacterial pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korppi, Matti; Don, Massimiliano; Valent, Francesca; Canciani, Mario

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the value of clinical features in differentiating between viral, pneumococcal and atypical bacterial pneumonia in children. A retrospective analysis of clinical signs and symptoms, supplemented with chest radiograph and serum procalcitonin data, in 101 children with community-acquired pneumonia. Viral and bacterial aetiology was studied prospectively by antibody assays, and pneumococcal infection was found in 18, atypical bacterial infection in 28 and viral infection alone in 22 cases. Chest radiographs and serum procalcitonin were studied in all cases. Data on clinical signs and symptoms were retrospectively collected from the medical cards of the patients. Among symptoms, cough was present in 89% and fever (>37.5 degrees C) in 88% of the cases. Among physical signs, crackles were present in 49% and decreased breath sounds in 58%. No significant associations were found between any of the clinical signs or symptoms and the aetiology of pneumonia. In multivariate analyses, age over 5 years and serum procalcitonin over 1.0 ng/mL were the only independent predictors of bacterial aetiology, but no finding was able to screen between pneumococcal and atypical bacterial aetiology of infection. No clinical or radiological characteristic was helpful in the separation between viral, pneumococcal and atypical bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children.

  18. ADULT RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME (ARDS) DUE TO BACTEREMIC PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANNES, GPM; BOERSMA, WG; BAUR, CHJM; POSTMUS, PE

    We describe a patient, who had no pre-existing disease, with bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a rare complication. In spite of the use of antibiotics and intensive treatment the mortality rate of this kind of infection remains high. Streptococcus

  19. Pneumococcus and the Elderly in Italy: A Summary of Available Evidence Regarding Carriage, Clinical Burden of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections and On-Field Effectiveness of PCV13 Vaccination

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    Andrea Orsi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is currently the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI in adults, elderly and high-risk subjects worldwide. The clear benefits of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in childhood have been accompanied by a decrease of vaccine-serotype invasive diseases among adults in several countries, mainly due to the herd effect mediated by the reduction of vaccine-serotype nasopharyngeal colonization in both age groups, but this reduction in the incidence of pneumonia has not been observed. The “Community Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults” (CAPITA study provided conclusive evidence about 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 efficacy in preventing CAP in adults and led Western countries to issue new recommendations for pneumococcal immunization targeting subjects >50 years and high-risk groups, with marked differences with respect to age and/or risk groups immunized, eligibility for reimbursement and national, regional or local implementation. Several Italian regions implemented PCV13 immunization programs in adults and interesting data have been come available in the last years, especially from Liguria, a Northern region with a high and long-lasting pneumococcal vaccine immunological pressure in infants. In this review, currently available evidence from Italy and Liguria regarding pneumococcal carriage, burden of CAP and LRTI, and on-field effectiveness of PCV13 immunization in adults and elderly will be summarized.

  20. INVASIVE CANDIDA INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AND HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: CURRENT EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS.

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    Corrado Girmenia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the global epidemiological impact of invasive candidiasis (IC in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM and in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients has decreased and the incidence of invasive aspergillosis  exceeded that of Candida infections. The use of prevention strategies, first of all antifungal prophylaxis with triazoles,  contributed to the reduction of IC in these populations as demonstrated by several  epidemiological studies. However, relatively little is known about the current epidemiological patterns of IC in HM and HSCT populations, because recent epidemiological data almost exclusively derive from retrospective experiences and few prospective data are available. Several prospective, controlled studies in the prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases have been conducted in both the HM and HSCT setting. On the contrary, most of the prospective controlled trials that demonstrated the efficacy of the antifungal drugs echinocandins and voriconazole in the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis mainly involved  patients with underlying conditions other than HM or  HSCT.  For these reasons, international guidelines provided specific indications for the prophylaxis strategies in HM and HSCT patients, whereas the  recommendations on therapy of documented Candida infections are based on the results observed in the general population and should be considered with caution.

  1. Heterogeneity in the Infection Biology of Campylobacter jejuni Isolates in Three Infection Models Reveals an Invasive and Virulent Phenotype in a ST21 Isolate from Poultry.

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    Suzanne Humphrey

    Full Text Available Although Campylobacter is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis in the world and the importance of poultry as a source of infection is well understood we know relatively little about its infection biology in the broiler chicken. Much of what we know about the biology of Campylobacter jejuni is based on infection of inbred or SPF laboratory lines of chickens with a small number of isolates used in most laboratory studies. Recently we have shown that both the host response and microbial ecology of C. jejuni in the broiler chicken varies with both the host-type and significantly between C. jejuni isolates. Here we describe heterogeneity in infection within a panel of C. jejuni isolates in two broiler chicken breeds, human intestinal epithelial cells and the Galleria insect model of virulence. All C. jejuni isolates colonised the chicken caeca, though colonisation of other parts of the gastrointestinal tract varied between isolates. Extra-intestinal spread to the liver varied between isolates and bird breed but a poultry isolate 13126 (sequence type 21 showed the greatest levels of extra-intestinal spread to the liver in both broiler breeds with over 70% of birds of the fast growing breed and 50% of the slower growing breed having C. jejuni in their livers. Crucially 13126 is significantly more invasive than other isolates in human intestinal epithelial cells and gave the highest mortality in the Galleria infection model. Taken together our findings suggest that not only is there considerable heterogeneity in the infection biology of C. jejuni in avian, mammalian and alternative models, but that some isolates have an invasive and virulent phenotype. Isolates with an invasive phenotype would pose a significant risk and increased difficulty in control in chicken production and coupled with the virulent phenotype seen in 13126 could be an increased risk to public health.

  2. Variations in infection levels and parasite-induced mortality among sympatric cryptic lineages of native amphipods and a congeneric invasive species: Are native hosts always losing?

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    Matthias Galipaud

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shared parasites can strongly influence the outcome of competition between congeneric, sympatric hosts, and thus host population dynamics. Parasite-mediated competition is commonly hypothesized as an important factor in biological invasion success; invasive species often experience lower infection levels and/or parasite-induced mortality than native congeneric hosts. However, variation in infection levels among sympatric hosts can be due to contrasting abilities to avoid infection or different parasite-induced mortality rates following infection. Low parasite infection levels in a specific host can be due to either factor but have drastically different implications in interaction outcomes between sympatric hosts.We assessed acanthocephalan infection levels (prevalence and abundance among cryptic molecular taxonomic units (MOTU of the native G. pulex/G. fossarum species complex from multiple populations where they occur in sympatry. We concomitantly estimated the same parameters in the invasive Gammarus roeseli commonly found in sympatry with G. pulex/G. fossarum MOTUs. We then tested for potential differences in parasite-induced mortality among these alternative hosts. As expected, the invasive G. roeseli showed relatively low infection level and was not subject to parasite-induced mortality. We also found that both acanthocephalan infection levels and parasite-induced mortality varied greatly among cryptic MOTUs of the native amphipods. Contrary to expectations, some native MOTUs displayed levels of resistance to their local parasites similar to those observed in the invasive G. roeseli. Overall, cryptic diversity in native amphipods coupled with high levels of variability in infection levels and parasite-induced mortality documented here may strongly influence inter-MOTU interactions and native population dynamics as well as invasion success and population dynamics of the congeneric invasive G. roeseli. Keywords: Biological invasion

  3. Pneumococcal Vaccination Among Medicare Beneficiaries Occurring After the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommendation for Routine Use Of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine for Adults Aged ≥65 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carla L; Williams, Walter W; Warnock, Rob; Pilishvili, Tamara; Kim, David; Kelman, Jeffrey A

    2017-07-14

    On September 19, 2014, CDC published the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendation for the routine use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) among adults aged ≥65 years, to be used in series with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) (1). This replaced the previous recommendation that adults aged ≥65 years should be vaccinated with a single dose of PPSV23. As a proxy for estimating PCV13 and PPSV23 vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥65 years before and after implementation of these revised recommendations, CDC analyzed claims for vaccination submitted for reimbursement to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Claims from any time during a beneficiary's enrollment in Medicare Parts A (hospital insurance) and B (medical insurance) since reaching age 65 years were assessed among beneficiaries continuously enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B during annual periods from September 19, 2009, through September 18, 2016. By September 18, 2016, 43.2% of Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years had claims for at least 1 dose of PPSV23 (regardless of PCV13 status), 31.5% had claims for at least 1 dose of PCV13 (regardless of PPSV23 status), and 18.3% had claims for at least 1 dose each of PCV13 and PPSV23. Claims for either type of pneumococcal vaccine were highest among beneficiaries who were older, white, or with chronic and immunocompromising medical conditions than among healthy adults. Implementation of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee's standards for adult immunization practice to assess vaccination status at every patient encounter, recommend needed vaccines, and administer vaccination or refer to a vaccinating provider might help increase pneumococcal vaccination coverage and reduce the risk for pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease among older adults (2).

  4. Antifungal treatment for invasive Candida infections: a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis

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    Nachega Jean B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of mortality among patients at risk. Treatment guidelines vary on optimal treatment strategies. We aimed to determine the effects of different antifungal therapies on global response rates, mortality and safety. Methods We searched independently and in duplicate 10 electronic databases from inception to May 2009. We selected any randomized trial assessing established antifungal therapies for confirmed cases of invasive candidiasis among predominantly adult populations. We performed a meta-analysis and then conducted a Bayesian mixed treatment comparison to differentiate treatment effectiveness. Sensitivity analyses included dosage forms of amphotericin B and fluconazole compared to other azoles. Results Our analysis included 11 studies enrolling a total of 965 patients. For our primary analysis of global response rates, we pooled 7 trials comparing azoles to amphotericin B, Relative Risk [RR] 0.87 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.78–0.96, P = 0.007, I2 = 43%, P = 0.09. We also pooled 2 trials of echinocandins versus amphotericin B and found a pooled RR of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.99–1.23, P = 0.08. One study compared anidulafungin to fluconazole and yielded a RR of 1.26 (95% CI, 1.06–1.51 in favor of anidulafungin. We pooled 7 trials assessing azoles versus amphotericin B for all-cause mortality, resulting in a pooled RR of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.74–1.05, P = 0.17, I2 = 0%, P = 0.96. Echinocandins versus amphotericin B (2 trials for all-cause mortality resulted in a pooled RR of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84–1.20, P = 0.93. Anidulafungin versus fluconazole resulted in a RR of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.48–1.10, P = 0.34. Our mixed treatment comparison analysis found similar within-class effects across all interventions. Adverse event profiles differed, with amphotericin B exhibiting larger adverse event effects. Conclusion Treatment options appear to offer preferential effects on response rates and mortality. When

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a cause of invasive infections in Central Africa: a case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, M. A. M.; Kalkman, R.; Remppis, J.; Beyeme, J. O.; Kraef, C.; Schaumburg, F.; Alabi, A. S.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) colonization and infection are increasingly being reported worldwide and are associated with severe illness. The vast majority of MRSA infections are skin and soft tissue infections, while invasive disease remains rare. In

  6. Pneumococcal Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Learn No links available Research Statistics and Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles Resources Find an Expert For You Children Patient ... Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Statistics and Research ... Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library ...

  7. Pneumococcal disease: Closing the gap

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    Ashfaq Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available oday, India is home to 99 million elderly people. By 2050, the number of elderly in this country will have gone up to 300 million1. With an increase in life expectancy from 32 years at the time of independence to 67.14 years in 20121, 10% of the population finds itself labeled as ‘senior citizen’. Inevitably, age brings with it comorbidities, immune senescence and pneumococcal disease. Pneumonia, in deference to its considerable morbidity and mortality, was exalted by Sir William Osler to its dubious pedestal of “Captain of all these Men of Death”. Unsurprisingly, immune debility and in several regions of the planet increasing antibiotic resistance, have ensured that pneumococcal pneumonia continues to take a large toll of senior citizens. Death rates have hardly budged over the last three decades. In India, pneumonia accounts for 25-30% deaths in the elderly3, a fatality rate almost unrivalled by most other terminal diseases. Among 15 high-burden countries, India has the dubious distinction of ranking third from last in the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD4. During the World Immunization Week 2015 (April 24th to 30th, the ‘Close the Immunization Gap’ campaign gains crucial importance. Immunization, long vaunted as one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions there is, prevent 2 to 3 million deaths every year, and saves enor-mous hospitalization costs and prevents loss of productivity. The recently published CAPiTA study (Community Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults, evaluated the efficacy of a novel 13-valent conju-gate vaccine for Pneumococcal pneumonia a vac-cine proven for its efficacy in children for the first time in older adults over 85,000 of them. Childhood vaccination with ‘PCV-13’, of course, was instrumental in reducing nasopharyngeal carriage of Strep pneumonia and decreasing the prevalence of Pneumococcal disease in the community at large. Altogether, the idea

  8. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Voriconazole in the Management of Invasive Fungal Infections: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewa, Hazem; El-Mekaty, Eman; El-Bardissy, Ahmed; Ensom, Mary H H; Wilby, Kyle John

    2015-12-01

    The broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent voriconazole is highly efficacious against invasive fungal infections (IFIs) caused by Aspergillus spp. and Candida spp. IFIs are associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially in vulnerable populations such as patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplant as well as other immunocompromised patients. Efficacy of voriconazole in these patients is critical to ensure positive outcomes and reduce mortality. However, a major limitation of voriconazole is the risk of adverse events such as hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity. As such, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has been suggested as a mechanism to optimize both efficacy and safety. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate evidence from the primary literature that assessed TDM outcomes for voriconazole as well as evaluate the association between CYP2C19 polymorphism and the clinical outcomes of voriconazole. Findings showed associations for both efficacy and safety outcomes with measurement of drug concentrations, yet exact targets or thresholds remain unclear. As such, TDM should be reserved for those patients not responding to therapy with voriconazole or those experiencing adverse drug reactions. Future studies should attempt to further define these populations within controlled settings. Studies that evaluated the effect of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphism on clinical outcomes found no significant relationship between CYP2C19 genotype and hepatotoxicity. These negative findings may be due to lack of power, use of phenotypes not well-defined, and the presence of other interacting factors that may impact voriconazole pharmacokinetics. Future well-designed studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  9. Treatment of invasive fungal infections: stability of voriconazole infusion solutions in PVC bags

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    Andréa I.H. Adams

    Full Text Available Voriconazole is a novel broad-spectrum antifungal drug, employed in the treatment of invasive fungal infections, and represents an alternative to amphotericin B treatment. The manufacturer recommends that any unused reconstituted product should be stored at 2ºC to 8ºC, for no more than 24 h, but no recommendations about i.v. infusion solutions are given. Previous works have reported on the stability of voriconazole in polyolefin bags and just one in 5% dextrose polyvinyl chloride (PVC bags, at a 4 mg.mL-1 concentration. In this work, the stability of voriconazole as an i.v. infusion solution in 0.9% sodium chloride and in 5% dextrose, in PVC bags, at 0.5 mg.mL-1, stored at 4 ºC and at room temperature, protected from light, was evaluated. These infusion solutions were analyzed for a 21-day period. Chemical stability was evaluated by HPLC assay. Visual inspection was performed and pH of the solutions was measured. No color change or precipitation in the solutions was observed. The drug content remained above 90% for 11 days in 0.9% sodium chloride and for 9 days in 5% dextrose solutions. The i.v. infusion solutions stored at room temperature were not stable. At room temperature, the voriconazole content dropped down to 88.3 and 86.6%, in 0.9% sodium chloride or 5% dextrose solutions, respectively, two days after admixture. Assays performed at the end of the study suggest the sorption of voriconazole by the PVC bags. The results of this study allow cost-effective batch production in the hospital pharmacy.

  10. Management of Invasive Fungal Infections in Pediatric Acute Leukemia and the Appropriate Time for Restarting Chemotherapy

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    Özlem Tüfekçi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rapid and effective treatment of invasive fungal infection (IFI in patients with leukemia is important for survival. In this study, we aimed to describe variations regarding clinical features, treatment modalities, time of restarting chemotherapy, and outcome in children with IFI and acute leukemia (AL. METHODS: The charts of all pediatric AL patients in our clinic between the years of 2001 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received prophylactic fluconazole during the chemotherapy period. RESULTS: IFI was identified in 25 (14% of 174 AL patients. Most of them were in the consolidation phase of chemotherapy and the patients had severe neutropenia. The median time between leukemia diagnosis and definition of IFI was 122 days. Twenty-four patients had pulmonary IFI. The most frequent finding on computed tomography was typical parenchymal nodules. The episodes were defined as proven in 4 (16% patients, probable in 7 (28% patients, and possible in 14 (56% patients. The median time for discontinuation of chemotherapy was 27 days. IFI was treated successfully in all patients with voriconazole, amphotericin B, caspofungin, or posaconazole alone or in combination. Chemotherapy was restarted in 50% of the patients safely within 4 weeks and none of those patients experienced reactivation of IFI. All of them were given secondary prophylaxis. The median time for antifungal treatment and for secondary prophylaxis was 26 and 90 days, respectively. None of the patients died due to IFI. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Our data show that rapid and effective antifungal therapy with rational treatment modalities may decrease the incidence of death and that restarting chemotherapy within several weeks may be safe in children with AL and IFI.

  11. Challenges in microbiological diagnosis of invasive Aspergillus infections [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Alexandre Alanio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA has been increasingly reported in populations other than the historical hematology patients and there are new questions about the performance of microbiological tools. Microscopy and culture have been completed by biomarkers, either antigens or DNA, and in blood or respiratory specimens or both. First studied in hematology, the antigen galactomannan performance in serum is low in other patient populations where the pathophysiology of the infection can be different and the prevalence of IA is much lower. DNA detection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR in blood or serum (or both has reached a certain level of acceptance thanks to consensus methods based on real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. When used on respiratory specimens, galactomannan and qPCR depend on standardization of the sampling and the diverse mycological procedures. Thus, culture remains the main diagnostic criterion in critically ill patients. The current trend toward more effective anti-mold prophylaxis in hematology hampers the yield of a screening strategy, as is usually performed in hematology. Therefore, circulating biomarkers as confirmatory tests should be considered and their performance should be reappraised in each new setting. The use of azole prophylaxis also raises the issue of selecting azole-resistance Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Ideally, the biomarkers will be more efficient when individual genetic risks of IA are defined. Culture, though not standardized, remains a key element for the diagnosis of IA and has the advantage to easily detect molds other than A. fumigatus. It is still unclear whether next-generation sequencing will replace culture in the future.

  12. Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

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    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD. METHODS: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.06, 1.31. In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23. Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32. No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

  13. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

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    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results. Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  14. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998-2014.

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    Feasey, Nicholas A; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Melita A

    2015-11-01

    The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Between 1998 and 2014, 167,028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10,139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  15. Risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of invasive fungal infections in solid organ transplant recipients.

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    Bodro, M; Sabé, N; Gomila, A; Ayats, J; Baliellas, C; Roca, J; Melilli, E; Carratalà, J

    2012-11-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. We sought to assess risk factors, clinical characteristics, and current outcomes of IFI in SOT recipients. We reviewed all episodes of IFI occurring among SOT recipients in a university hospital from 2008 to 2011. To determine risk factors for IFI we carried out a matched case-control study (1:2 ratio). Control subjects were matched for transplant type and timing. We documented 20 episodes of IFI among 744 SOT recipients (2.7%). Sixty-five percent of cases were proven IFI and 35% were probable IFI. The types of IFI documented were aspergillosis in 8 cases, candidiasis in 7, pneumocystosis in 3, Emmonsia species in infection 1, and disseminated cryptococcosis in 1. Ninety-nine percent of the patients had received a prior antibiotic therapy (3 months), 40% presented allograft rejection (3 months), and 40% had prior kidney injury. Complications of IFI included septic shock (50%), respiratory failure (55%), multiple-organ dysfunction (55%), and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (50%). Median days from transplantation to diagnosis was 103 for candidiasis (range, 27-4644) and 1195 for aspergillosis (range, 0-4319). In a comparison of case patients with 40 matched control subjects, case patients more frequently presented prior ICU stay (3 months; P = .05), hemodialysis requirement (P = .02), receipt of high-dose prednisone (6 months; P = .006), and prior antibiotic therapy (P < .001). Prior use of antibiotic treatment was the only risk factor for IFI (odds ratio [OR] 93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.3-1042). Case-fatality rate was 60%. In our recent experience, 2.7% of SOT recipients developed IFI, mainly aspergillosis followed by candidiasis. Prior ICU admission, hemodialysis, receipt of high-dose prednisone, and prior antibiotic use were more frequent in cases when compared with control subjects, with the latter factor being the only

  16. Nasopharyngeal colonization and invasive disease are enhanced by the cell wall hydrolases LytB and LytC of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx and one of the major pathogens causing invasive disease worldwide. Dissection of the molecular pathways responsible for colonization, invasion, and evasion of the immune system will provide new targets for antimicrobial or vaccine therapies for this common pathogen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have constructed mutants lacking the pneumococcal cell wall hydrolases (CWHs LytB and LytC to investigate the role of these proteins in different phases of the pneumococcal pathogenesis. Our results show that LytB and LytC are involved in the attachment of S. pneumoniae to human nasopharyngeal cells both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction of both proteins with phagocytic cells demonstrated that LytB and LytC act in concert avoiding pneumococcal phagocytosis mediated by neutrophils and alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, C3b deposition was increased on the lytC mutant confirming that LytC is involved in complement evasion. As a result, the lytC mutant showed a reduced ability to successfully cause pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Bacterial mutants lacking both LytB and LytC showed a dramatically impaired attachment to nasopharyngeal cells as well as a marked degree of attenuation in a mouse model of colonization. In addition, C3b deposition and phagocytosis was more efficient for the double lytB lytC mutant and its virulence was greatly impaired in both systemic and pulmonary models of infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms that the CWHs LytB and LytC of S. pneumoniae are essential virulence factors involved in the colonization of the nasopharynx and in the progress of invasive disease by avoiding host immunity.

  17. Changing epidemiology of Streptococcus pyogenes emm types and associated invasive and noninvasive infections in Southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Fang; Wang, Shih-Min; Lin, Ya-Lan; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lin, Ming T; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2009-08-01

    A total of 242 isolates were recovered from 76 patients with invasive diseases, 89 with scarlet fever, and 77 with pharyngitis. The most frequent emm types were types 12 (43.4%), 4 (18.2%), and 1 (16.9%). emm12 reemerged in 2005 and peaked in 2007. emm11 was recovered only from patients with invasive disease.

  18. Epidemiological data and antifungal susceptibility in invasive fungal infections - a Romanian infectious diseases tertiary hospital’s experience. Preliminary report

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    Agrosoaie Radu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Invasive fungal infections have stood as an important research subject for the past 20 years, being considered as a crucial effect of advancing healthcare services. Low identification rates of invasive fungal infections in blood cultures and low sensibility of biomarkers determine empiric treatments which lead to a change in epidemiological data and antifungal susceptibility. The aim: The epidemiological evaluation of invasive fungal infections and the assessment of antifungal resistance related to this condition. Methods and material: An “antifungal stewardship” retrospective study was developed between January 2010 and April 2016. An epidemiological analysis was performed on 79 cases with proven invasive fungal infections in bloodstream, catheter, and cerebrospinal fluid. We considered: age, gender, HIV status, place of residence, and first option in medical practice of antifungal treatment. The laboratory analysis was performed by the Microbiology Laboratory at “Prof. Dr. Matei Bals” National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Bucharest. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC’s of 15 isolates were identified using colorimetric micro broth dilution panel YEASTONE ®YO10 and compared with susceptibilities obtained by VITEK2®C system. Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 was used as reference. Results: The incidence of invasive fungal infections was 3.7 on 1000 hospitalized patients. The age of the study population ranged between 12 and 83 years, and most were male (59%. The majority of subjects were from an urban area (84%, and 27% of them were HIV positive. The results obtained in VITEK2C® were similar with those from YEASTONE® YO10 for fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B (100%, without any minor, major or very major errors. The fluconazole was the first option of treatment, followed by voriconazole, caspofungin, anidulafungin. In 37% of cases the first treatment option was replaced with a secondary antifungal

  19. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in The Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling.

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    De Cao, Elisabetta; Melegaro, Alessia; Klok, Rogier; Postma, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a dynamic transmission model for the spread of pneumococci and potential subsequent invasive pneumococcal disease has been adapted to the Dutch setting. Overall, invasive pneumococcal disease cases in the Netherlands are predicted to decrease from a pre-vaccination level of 2623 cases annually to 2475, 2289, 2185, 2179, and 2178 cases annually 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-years, respectively, post-vaccination. Therefore, vaccination with PCV13 in the Netherlands is predicted to lower invasive pneumococcal disease cases per year by up to 445 cases in the medium- to long-term. The results are quite robust for the sensitivity analyses performed on the parameters that regulate herd immunity and competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types.

  20. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in The Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling.

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    Elisabetta De Cao

    Full Text Available This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a dynamic transmission model for the spread of pneumococci and potential subsequent invasive pneumococcal disease has been adapted to the Dutch setting. Overall, invasive pneumococcal disease cases in the Netherlands are predicted to decrease from a pre-vaccination level of 2623 cases annually to 2475, 2289, 2185, 2179, and 2178 cases annually 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-years, respectively, post-vaccination. Therefore, vaccination with PCV13 in the Netherlands is predicted to lower invasive pneumococcal disease cases per year by up to 445 cases in the medium- to long-term. The results are quite robust for the sensitivity analyses performed on the parameters that regulate herd immunity and competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types.

  1. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2005-01-01

    damage and outcome in pneumococcal meningitis in rats treated with ceftriaxone from 28 h after infection. Rats treated with fucoidin from time of infection had an excess risk of a fatal outcome compared to rats not receiving fucoidin (25/63 versus 5/34, p=0.012), whereas the risk of cortical damage...

  2. Effectiveness of the 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPV23 against Pneumococcal Disease in the Elderly: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

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    Gerhard Falkenhorst

    Full Text Available Routine vaccination of elderly people against pneumococcal diseases is recommended in many countries. National guidelines differ, recommending either the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23, the 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or both. Considering the ongoing debate on the effectiveness of PPV23, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of the vaccine efficacy/effectiveness (VE of PPV23 against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and pneumococcal pneumonia in adults aged ≥60 years living in industrialized countries.We searched for pertinent clinical trials and observational studies in databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We assessed the risk of bias of individual studies using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool for randomized controlled trials and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for observational studies. We rated the overall quality of the evidence by GRADE criteria. We performed meta-analyses of studies grouped by outcome and study design using random-effects models. We applied a sensitivity analysis excluding studies with high risk of bias.We identified 17 eligible studies. Pooled VE against IPD (by any serotype was 73% (95%CI: 10-92% in four clinical trials, 45% (95%CI: 15-65% in three cohort studies, and 59% (95%CI: 35-74% in three case-control studies. After excluding studies with high risk of bias, pooled VE against pneumococcal pneumonia (by any serotype was 64% (95%CI: 35-80% in two clinical trials and 48% (95%CI: 25-63% in two cohort studies. Higher VE estimates in trials (follow-up ~2.5 years than in observational studies (follow-up ~5 years may indicate waning protection. Unlike previous meta-analyses, we excluded two trials with high risk of bias regarding the outcome pneumococcal pneumonia, because diagnosis was based on serologic methods with insufficient specificity.Our meta-analysis revealed significant VE of PPV23 against both

  3. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

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    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  4. Vasculotide reduces pulmonary hyperpermeability in experimental pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutbier, Birgitt; Jiang, Xiaohui; Dietert, Kristina; Ehrler, Carolin; Lienau, Jasmin; Van Slyke, Paul; Kim, Harold; Hoang, Van C; Maynes, Jason T; Dumont, Daniel J; Gruber, Achim D; Weissmann, Norbert; Mitchell, Timothy J; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2017-11-13

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite effective antimicrobial therapy, CAP can induce pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability resulting in life-threatening lung failure due to an exaggerated host-pathogen interaction. Treatment of acute lung injury is mainly supportive because key elements of inflammation-induced barrier disruption remain undetermined. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1)-mediated Tie2 activation reduces, and the Ang-1 antagonist Ang-2 increases, inflammation and endothelial permeability in sepsis. Vasculotide (VT) is a polyethylene glycol-clustered Tie2-binding peptide that mimics the actions of Ang-1. The aim of our study was to experimentally test whether VT is capable of diminishing pneumonia-induced lung injury. VT binding and phosphorylation of Tie2 were analyzed using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and phospho-Tie-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Human and murine lung endothelial cells were investigated by immunofluorescence staining and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Pulmonary hyperpermeability was quantified in VT-pretreated, isolated, perfused, and ventilated mouse lungs stimulated with the pneumococcal exotoxin pneumolysin (PLY). Furthermore, Streptococcus pneumoniae-infected mice were therapeutically treated with VT. VT showed dose-dependent binding and phosphorylation of Tie2. Pretreatment with VT protected lung endothelial cell monolayers from PLY-induced disruption. In isolated mouse lungs, VT decreased PLY-induced pulmonary permeability. Likewise, therapeutic treatment with VT of S. pneumoniae-infected mice significantly reduced pneumonia-induced hyperpermeability. However, effects by VT on the pulmonary or systemic inflammatory response were not observed. VT promoted pulmonary endothelial stability and reduced lung permeability in different models of pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, VT may provide a novel therapeutic perspective for reduction of permeability in

  5. Invasive candidiasis in intensive care units in China: Risk factors and prognoses of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Luan, Ting; Wu, Xingmao; Li, Guofu; Qiu, Haibo; Kang, Yan; Qin, Bingyu; Fang, Qiang; Cui, Wei; Qin, Yingzhi; Li, Jianguo; Zang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the risk factors and prognoses of patients with invasive Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida (NAC) infection in intensive care units (ICUs) in China. Between November 2009 and April 2011, we performed a prospective study of critically ill patients with invasive Candida infection from 67 ICUs across China to compare the risk factors and mortality between patients with C albicans and NAC infection. There were 306 patients with proven invasive Candida; 244 cases (a total 389 Candida isolates) were sent to laboratory for strain identification (C albicans, 40.1%; NAC, 59.9%). More patients admitted for surgery or trauma had NAC infection than C albicans infection. C albicans infection was more common in patients with subclavian vein catheters or peritoneal drainage tubes. Compared with patients with C albicans infection, patients with NAC infection had longer antifungal therapy (P albicans remains the most common pathogen in candidiasis in critical care patients. However, the number of NAC infections exceeded C albicans infections. Compared with patients with C albicans infection, patients with NAC infection had heavier disease burdens. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lacking PVL, as a Cause of Severe Invasive Infection Treated with Linezolid

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    Catarina Gouveia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is an emerging public health problem worldwide. Severe invasive infections have been described, mostly associated with the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL. In Portugal limited information exists regarding CA-MRSA infections. In this study we describe the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old female, sport athlete, who presented to the hospital with acetabulofemoral septic arthritis, myositis, fasciitis, acetabulum osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. The MRSA isolated from blood and synovial fluid was PVL negative and staphylococcal enterotoxin type P (SEP and type L (SEL positive, with a vancomycin MIC of 1.0 mg/L and resistant to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. The patient was submitted to multiple surgical drainages and started on vancomycin, rifampicin, and gentamycin. Due to persistence of fever and no microbiological clearance, linezolid was started with improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of severe invasive infection caused by CA-MRSA in Portugal, which was successfully treated with linezolid. In spite of the severity of infection, the MRSA isolate did not produce PVL.

  7. Genome-wide molecular dissection of serotype M3 group A Streptococcus strains causing two epidemics of invasive infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Stephen B; Sylva, Gail L; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Granville, Chanel N; Liu, Mengyao; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Whitney, Adeline R; Parkins, Larye D; Hoe, Nancy P; Adams, Gerald J; Low, Donald E; DeLeo, Frank R; McGeer, Allison; Musser, James M

    2004-08-10

    Molecular factors that contribute to the emergence of new virulent bacterial subclones and epidemics are poorly understood. We hypothesized that analysis of a population-based strain sample of serotype M3 group A Streptococcus (GAS) recovered from patients with invasive infection by using genome-wide investigative methods would provide new insight into this fundamental infectious disease problem. Serotype M3 GAS strains (n = 255) cultured from patients in Ontario, Canada, over 11 years and representing two distinct infection peaks were studied. Genetic diversity was indexed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, DNA-DNA microarray, whole-genome PCR scanning, prophage genotyping, targeted gene sequencing, and single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. All variation in gene content was attributable to acquisition or loss of prophages, a molecular process that generated unique combinations of proven or putative virulence genes. Distinct serotype M3 genotypes experienced rapid population expansion and caused infections that differed significantly in character and severity. Molecular genetic analysis, combined with immunologic studies, implicated a 4-aa duplication in the extreme N terminus of M protein as a factor contributing to an epidemic wave of serotype M3 invasive infections. This finding has implications for GAS vaccine research. Genome-wide analysis of population-based strain samples cultured from clinically well defined patients is crucial for understanding the molecular events underlying bacterial epidemics.

  8. Mortality reductions for older adults differ by race/ethnicity and gender since the introduction of adult and pediatric pneumococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; Metlay, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    We determined the effectiveness of a 23-valent-polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV-23) and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) in reducing adult pneumococcal mortality by comparing historically predicted declines in pneumococcal disease mortality with observed patterns since the introduction of PPV-23 and PCV-7, including analyses of age, gender, and racial/ethnic subgroups. We analyzed all deaths registered on U.S. death certificates reporting any site of pneumococcal infection (e.g., meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, bacteremia, and peritonitis) from 1968 to 2006. We used time-series dynamic linear regression on annual pneumococcal mortality rates to determine the percentage reduction in post-1983 mortality rates for a given increase in PPV-23 vaccination rates and post-2000 mortality rates for a given increase in PCV-7 vaccination rates. Pneumococcal mortality decreased well before the introduction of PPV-23 in 1983 and again before the introduction of PCV-7 in 2000. The level of PPV-23 vaccination was associated with a direct and significant reduction in adult mortality, especially white female adults > or = 65 years of age. In contrast, the level of PCV-7 vaccination in the population was not associated with an indirect and significant reduction in pneumococcal mortality beyond the historical pace of decline. PPV-23 introduction was associated with a reduction in pneumococcal mortality among older adults > or = 65 years of age beyond levels predicted by secular trends, whereas PCV-7 introduction was not. Mortality reduction was not uniformly experienced across the population, revealing the need for additional strategies to reduce pneumococcal mortality in older adults.

  9. Combination of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA with whole cell pertussis vaccine increases protection against pneumococcal challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leonor S Oliveira

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory acute infections around the world. In Latin America, approximately 20,000 children under 5 years of age die of pneumococcal diseases annually. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is among the best-characterized pneumococcal antigens that confer protection in animal models of pneumococcal infections and, as such, is a good alternative for the currently available conjugated vaccines. Efficient immune responses directed to PspA in animal models have already been described. Nevertheless, few low cost adjuvants for a subunit pneumococcal vaccine have been proposed to date. Here, we have tested the adjuvant properties of the whole cell Bordetella pertussis vaccine (wP that is currently part of the DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine administrated to children in several countries, as an adjuvant to PspA. Nasal immunization of BALB/c mice with a combination of PspA5 and wP or wP(low--a new generation vaccine that contains low levels of B. pertussis LPS--conferred protection against a respiratory lethal challenge with S. pneumoniae. Both PspA5-wP and PspA5-wP(low vaccines induced high levels of systemic and mucosal antibodies against PspA5, with similar profile, indicating no essential requirement for B. pertussis LPS in the adjuvant properties of wP. Accordingly, nasal immunization of C3H/HeJ mice with PspA5-wP conferred protection against the pneumococcal challenge, thus ruling out a role for TLR4 responses in the adjuvant activity and the protection mechanisms triggered by the vaccines. The high levels of anti-PspA5 antibodies correlated with increased cross-reactivity against PspAs from different clades and also reflected in cross-protection. In addition, passive immunization experiments indicated that antibodies played an important role in protection in this model. Finally, subcutaneous immunization with a combination of PspA5 with DTP(low protected mice against challenge with two

  10. Non-Type b Haemophilus influenzae Invasive Infections in North Dakota and South Dakota, 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Stephanie; Kaushik, Ashlesha; Mauriello, Clifford; Chatterjee, Archana

    2017-09-01

    Reports of children with non-type b Haemophilus influenzae infection in the United States in recent years have been limited. Here, we report the spectrum and severity of disease associated with invasive non-type b H influenzae infection in 17 patients at 2 tertiary-care children's hospitals over a 2-year period. Meningitis was the most common diagnosis. The majority of the patients had neurologic sequelae, and 1 patient died. The high proportions of hospitalization, intensive care utilization, and neurologic complications reveal that non-type b H influenzae infection was associated with significant morbidity in this pediatric population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. New Parameters to Quantitatively Express the Invasiveness of Bacterial Strains from Implant-Related Orthopaedic Infections into Osteoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Campoccia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Complete eradication of bacterial infections is often a challenging task, especially in presence of prosthetic devices. Invasion of non-phagocytic host cells appears to be a critical mechanism of microbial persistence in host tissues. Hidden within host cells, bacteria elude host defences and antibiotic treatments that are intracellularly inactive. The intracellular invasiveness of bacteria is generally measured by conventional gentamicin protection assays. The efficiency of invasion, however, markedly differs across bacterial species and adjustments to the titre of the microbial inocula used in the assays are often needed to enumerate intracellular bacteria. Such changes affect the standardisation of the method and hamper a direct comparison of bacteria on a same scale. This study aims at investigating the precise relation between inoculum, in terms of multiplicity of infection (MOI, and internalised bacteria. The investigation included nine Staphylococcus aureus, seven Staphylococcus epidermidis, five Staphylococcus lugdunensis and two Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains, which are co-cultured with MG63 human osteoblasts. Unprecedented insights are offered on the relations existing between MOI, number of internalised bacteria and per cent of internalised bacteria. New parameters are identified that are of potential use for qualifying the efficiency of internalization and compare the behaviour of bacterial strains.

  12. New Parameters to Quantitatively Express the Invasiveness of Bacterial Strains from Implant-Related Orthopaedic Infections into Osteoblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoccia, Davide; Montanaro, Lucio; Ravaioli, Stefano; Cangini, Ilaria; Testoni, Francesca; Visai, Livia; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2018-04-03

    Complete eradication of bacterial infections is often a challenging task, especially in presence of prosthetic devices. Invasion of non-phagocytic host cells appears to be a critical mechanism of microbial persistence in host tissues. Hidden within host cells, bacteria elude host defences and antibiotic treatments that are intracellularly inactive. The intracellular invasiveness of bacteria is generally measured by conventional gentamicin protection assays. The efficiency of invasion, however, markedly differs across bacterial species and adjustments to the titre of the microbial inocula used in the assays are often needed to enumerate intracellular bacteria. Such changes affect the standardisation of the method and hamper a direct comparison of bacteria on a same scale. This study aims at investigating the precise relation between inoculum, in terms of multiplicity of infection (MOI), and internalised bacteria. The investigation included nine Staphylococcus aureus , seven Staphylococcus epidermidis , five Staphylococcus lugdunensis and two Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains, which are co-cultured with MG63 human osteoblasts. Unprecedented insights are offered on the relations existing between MOI, number of internalised bacteria and per cent of internalised bacteria. New parameters are identified that are of potential use for qualifying the efficiency of internalization and compare the behaviour of bacterial strains.

  13. Pneumococcal Vaccination in High-Risk Individuals: Are We Doing It Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatou, Ioanna; Spoulou, Vana

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal use of the 23-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for the protection of high-risk individuals, such as children and adults with immunocompromising conditions and the elderly. The effectiveness and immunogenicity of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) are limited in such high-risk populations compared to the healthy, with meta-analyses failing to provide robust evidence on vaccine efficacy against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) or pneumonia. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a PPV23-induced state of immune tolerance or hyporesponsiveness to subsequent vaccination, where the response to revaccination does not reach the levels achieved with primary vaccination. The clinical significance of hyporesponsiveness is not yet clarified, but attenuated humoral and cellular response could lead to reduced levels of protection and increased susceptibility to pneumococcal disease. As disease epidemiology among high-risk groups shows that we are still in need of maximum serotype coverage, the optimal use of PPV23 in the context of combined conjugate/polysaccharide vaccine schedules is an important priority. In this minireview, we discuss PPV23-induced hyporesponsiveness and its implications in designing highly effective vaccination schedules for the optimal protection for high-risk individuals. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. A public health and budget impact analysis of vaccinating the elderly and at-risk adults with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yiling; Gauthier, Aline; Keeping, Sam; Carroll, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of the routine childhood immunization, a change in epidemiology of pneumococcal disease has been seen in both children and adults. This study aimed to quantify the public health and budget impact of pneumococcal vaccination of the elderly and those in at risk groups in the UK. The model was adapted from a previous population-based Markov model. At-risk adults and the elderly were assumed to receive PPV23 or PCV13 vaccination or no vaccination. Over the study period (2012-2016), PPV23 vaccination led to a reduction in the number of invasive pneumococcal disease cases in most scenarios. The net budget impact ranged between £15 and £39 million (vs no vaccination) or between -£116 and -£93 million (vs PCV13). PPV23 vaccination program remains the optimal strategy from public health and budgetary perspectives despite epidemiological changes. PCV13 is likely to impose a significant budget with limited health benefits.

  15. Invasive Bacillus cereus Infection in a Renal Transplant Patient: A Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan John

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a common cause of gastrointestinal diseases. The majority of individuals with B cereus-related food poisoning recover without any specific treatment. It can, however, rarely cause invasive disease in immunocompromised patients.

  16. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties of Oral Voriconazole in Patients with Invasive Fungal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taotao; Xie, Jiao; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaowei; Lei, Jin'e; Wang, Xue; Dong, Haiyan; Yang, Qianting; Chen, Limei; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2015-09-01

    To assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) properties of voriconazole and to investigate the relationship between PK/PD parameters and the efficacy of a fixed-dose oral regimen in the treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). Prospective and observational PK/PD study. A university-affiliated medical center. Fifteen hospitalized patients with proven IFIs who were treated with oral voriconazole for at least 2 weeks. We investigated the PK/PD properties of voriconazole using a noncompartmental analysis in 15 patients. Marked interpatient variation in voriconazole pharmacokinetic properties was noted including peak plasma concentrations (median 2.31 mg/L, range 1.06-4.01 mg/L), 12-hour area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCτ ) (median 21.18 hr mg/L, range 7.71-42.07 hr mg/L), ratio of the unbound drug AUC over 24 hours (fAUC24 ) divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC24 :MIC; median 62.61, range 6.48-415.30), and the free trough plasma concentration (Cmin ) divided by the MIC (fCmin :MIC; median 1.81, range 0.46-15.52). There was a good correlation between voriconazole Cmin and AUCτ (R(2)  = 0.805). Voriconazole therapy was effective in 66.7% of patients (10/15). No significant difference was observed with regard to successful clinical response between the patients with a fAUC24 :MIC and fCmin :MIC values higher than 25 and higher than 1 (10/12 vs 10/13, respectively; χ(2)  = 1.61, p=0.688). There is substantial interpatient variability in the PK/PD properties of voriconazole. fAUC24 :MIC values higher than 25 and fCmin :MIC values higher than 1 may predict clinical response in patients with IFIs. Designing an optimal dosage regimen based on individual PK/PD properties will improve the efficacy in patients with IFIs. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  17. Risk of Infective Endocarditis After Invasive Dental Treatments: A Case-Only Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzu-Ting; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Lai, Mei-Shu; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2018-04-19

    Background -Invasive dental treatments (IDTs) can yield temporary bacteremia and has therefore been considered a potential risk factor of infective endocarditis (IE). It is hypothesized that, through the trauma caused by IDTs, bacteria gain entry to the bloodstream and may attach to abnormal heart valves or damaged heart tissue, giving rise to IE. However, the association between IDTs and IE remains controversial. The aim of this study is to estimate the association between IDTs and IE. Methods -The data in this study were obtained from the Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. We selected two case-only study designs, case-crossover and self-controlled case series, to analyze the data. The advantage of these methods is that confounding factors which do not vary with time are adjusted for implicitly. In the case-crossover design, conditional logistic regression model with exposure to IDTs was used to estimate the risks of IE following an IDT with 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks delay, respectively. In the self-controlled case series design, conditional Poisson regression model was used to estimate the risk of IE for the risk periods of 1-4, 5-8, 9-12, and 13-16 weeks following an IDT. Results -In total, 9120 and 8181 IE patients were included in case-crossover design and self-controlled case series design, respectively. In case-crossover design, 277 cases and 249 controls received IDTs during the exposure period, and the odds ratio was 1.12 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.94-1.34) for 4 weeks. In self-controlled case series design, we observed that 407 IE occurred during the first four weeks after IDTs, and the age-adjusted incidence rate ratio was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.02-1.26) for 1-4 weeks after IDTs. Conclusions -In both study designs, we did not observe a clinically larger risk for IE in the short periods after IDTs. We also found no association between IDTs and IE among high-risk patients. Therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of IE is not required for the

  18. Typing of Candida isolates from patients with invasive infection and concomitant colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brillowska-Dabrowska, A.; Bergmann, O.; Jensen, Irene Møller

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between colonizing and invasive isolates from patients with candidaemia. Molecular typing was performed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We found MLST to be sufficient for typing Candida isolates, and that......We investigated the relationship between colonizing and invasive isolates from patients with candidaemia. Molecular typing was performed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We found MLST to be sufficient for typing Candida isolates...

  19. [Influenza and pneumococcal vaccine coverage among patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaecke Collard, Claire; Novella, Jean-Luc; Mahmoudi, Rachid

    2013-03-01

    Elderly patients are particularly affected by influenza and pneumococcal infections and consequences of these infections in this population are huge because of the frailty of these patients. Vaccines are nevertheless available to prevent these diseases. The aim of the study was to assess influenza and anti-pneumococcal vaccination coverage among patients admitted in acute geriatric unit and the characteristics of the vaccinated patients. We conducted a prospective observational study involving 149 patients admitted in this kind of unit. Among these patients, influenza coverage was 73.8%. Vaccination rate was significantly higher among institutionalized patients (p=0.01), patients with cognitive disorders (p=0.01) and semi-dependant patients (p=0.02). Anti-pneumococcal vaccination was recommended for 55.7% of the patients because of their comorbidities. Among this specific population, vaccination coverage was very low (10.8%). The best vaccination rate was observed for semi-dependant patients (pvaccination, anti-pneumococcal vaccination coverage is very low among hospitalized elderly patients despite their frailty. We should focus our efforts to improve vaccination rate in this specific population.

  20. The role of television advertising in increasing pneumococcal vaccination coverage among the elderly, North Coast, New South Wales, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cate; Corben, Paul; Turahui, John; Gilmour, Robin

    2008-10-01

    North Coast Area Health Service (NCAHS) conducted a seven week television advertising campaign to raise community awareness of the availability of free adult pneumococcal vaccination and to increase coverage among North Coast residents in high risk groups. Effectiveness of the campaign was evaluated by examining vaccine ordering patterns of North Coast vaccination providers from 2005/2006 as a proxy for vaccination coverage. In the months during and immediately following (June-September 2006) the advertising campaign, a significantly higher proportion of vaccines were despatched to North Coast immunisation service providers. The advertising campaign was an effective strategy to promote vaccination among NCAHS residents not immunised in the first year of the National Pneumococcal Program for Older Australians. This higher immunisation coverage is expected to contribute to the statewide trend of significant reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) notifications.

  1. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... statements/ppv.html CDC review information for Pneumococcal Polysaccharide VIS: Page last reviewed: April 24, 2015 Page ...

  2. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13): What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs. This makes prevention of the disease, through vaccination, even more important. 2 PCV13 vaccine Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (called PCV13) protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria. PCV13 is routinely given to ...

  3. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) - What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs. This makes prevention of the disease, through vaccination, even more important. 2. PCV13 vaccine Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (called PCV13) protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria. PCV13 is routinely given to ...

  4. The adult nasopharyngeal microbiome as a determinant of pneumococcal acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Amelieke Jh; Zomer, Aldert L; Gritzfeld, Jenna F; Ferwerda, Gerben; van Hijum, Sacha Aft; Ferreira, Daniela M; Shak, Joshua R; Klugman, Keith P; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; de Jonge, Marien I; Gordon, Stephen B; Hermans, Peter Wm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several cohort studies have indicated associations between S. pneumoniae and other microbes in the nasopharynx. To study causal relationships between the nasopharyngeal microbiome and pneumococcal carriage, we employed an experimental human pneumococcal carriage model. Healthy adult

  5. Assessing likely invasion sites of Zika virus-infected mosquitoes in civilian and naval maritime ports in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollars TM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas M Kollars College of Health Sciences, Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA, USA Abstract: Several mosquito species are capable of invading new geographic regions and exploiting niches that are similar to their natural home ranges where they may introduce, or reintroduce, pathogens. In addition to initial invasion, introduction of new genotypes into established populations may also occur. Zika virus is spreading throughout the world, posing significant health risks to human populations, particularly pregnant women and their infants. The first locally acquired case of Zika virus in the US occurred in July 2016 in Miami, Florida on the Atlantic coast; the first locally acquired case in another US county occurred in the Tampa, Florida area. Three port cities in Florida were chosen to assess the risk of import and spread of Zika virus: Mayport Naval Station, Miami, and Tampa. The bioagent transport and enviromental modeling system TIGER model and ArcGIS were used to analyze abiotic and biotic factors influencing potentially Zika-infected Aedes species, should they enter through these ports. The model was tested by overlaying documented and suspected concurrent Zika cases and comparing published high-risk areas for Zika virus. In addition to Zika hot zones being identified, output indicates surveillance and integrated mosquito management should expect larger zones. Surveillance sites at ports should be identified and prioritized for pathogen and vector control to reduce the import of mosquitoes infected with Zika virus. Low resolution maps often provide valuable suitability of the geographic expansion of organisms. Providing a higher resolution predictive map, identifying probable routes of invasion, and providing areas at high risk for initial invasion and control zones, will aid in controlling and perhaps eliminating the spread of arboviruses through mosquito vectors. Keywords: Aedes, Zika virus, invasive species, maritime ports, biological

  6. Evaluation of impact of 23 valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine following 7 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Australian Indigenous children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Chiu, Clayton; Menzies, Rob; Lehmann, Deborah; Cook, Heather; Giele, Carolien; Krause, Vicki; McIntyre, Peter

    2015-11-27

    High incidence and serotype diversity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Indigenous children in remote Australia led to rapid introduction of 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (7vPCV) at 2, 4 and 6 months in 2001, followed by 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV) in the second year of life. All other Australian children were offered 3 doses of 7vPCV without a booster from 2005. This study evaluated the impact of the unique pneumococcal vaccine schedule of 7vPCV followed by the 23vPPV booster among Indigenous Australian children. Changes in IPD incidence derived from population-based passive laboratory surveillance in Indigenous children vaccine introduction period (Indigenous 1994-2000; non-Indigenous 2002-2004) to the post-vaccine period (2008-2010 in both groups) using incidence rate ratios (IRRs) stratified by age into serotype groupings of vaccine (7v and 13vPCV and 23vPPV) and non-vaccine types. Vaccine coverage was assessed from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. At baseline, total IPD incidence per 100,000 was 216 (n=230) in Indigenous versus 55 (n=1993) in non-Indigenous children. In 2008-2010, IRRs for 7vPCV type IPD were 0.03 in both groups, but for 23v-non7v type IPD 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.8) in Indigenous versus 3.1 (95% CI 2.5-3.7) in non-Indigenous, difference driven primarily by serotype 19A IPD (IRR 0.6 in Indigenous versus 4.3 in non-Indigenous). For non-7vPCV type IPD overall, IRR was significantly higher in those age-eligible for 23vPPV booster compared to those younger, but in both age groups was lower than for non-Indigenous children. These ecologic data suggest a possible "serotype replacement sparing" effect of 23vPPV following 7vPCV priming, especially for serotype 19A with supportive evidence from other immunogenicity and carriage studies. Applicability post 10vPCV or 13v PCV priming in similar settings would depend on local serotype distribution of IPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. Serotype Distribution in Non-Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Skovgaard, Marlene; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2013-01-01

    There is limited knowledge of serotypes that cause non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NBP). Here we report serotypes, their associated disease potential and coverage of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in adults with NBP and compare these to bacteremic pneumonia (BP).......There is limited knowledge of serotypes that cause non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NBP). Here we report serotypes, their associated disease potential and coverage of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in adults with NBP and compare these to bacteremic pneumonia (BP)....

  8. Case of invasive nontypable Haemophilus influenzae respiratory tract infection with a large quantity of neutrophil extracellular traps in sputum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamaguchi S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shigeto Hamaguchi,1,* Masafumi Seki,1,* Norihisa Yamamoto,1 Tomoya Hirose,2 Naoya Matsumoto,2 Taro Irisawa,2 Ryosuke Takegawa,2 Takeshi Shimazu,2 Kazunori Tomono11Division of Infection Control and Prevention, 2Department of Traumatology and Acute Critical Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Haemophilus influenzae type b was once the most common cause of invasive H. influenzae infection, but the incidence of this disease has decreased markedly with introduction of conjugate vaccines to prevent the disease. In contrast, the incidence of invasive infection caused by nontypable H. influenzae has increased in the US and in European countries. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs are fibrous structures released extracellularly from activated neutrophils during inflammation, including in pneumonia, and rapidly trap and kill pathogens as a first line of immunological defense. However, their function and pathological role have not been fully investigated. Here, we report a case of fatal nontypable H. influenzae infection with severe pneumonia and bacteremia in an adult found to have a vast amount of NETs in his sputum. The patient had a two-day history of common cold-like symptoms and was taken to the emergency room as a cardiopulmonary arrest. He recovered temporarily, but died soon afterwards, although appropriate antibiotic therapy and general management had been instituted. Massive lobular pneumonia and sepsis due to nontypable H. influenzae was found, in spite of H. influenzae type b vaccine being available. His sputum showed numerous bacteria phagocytosed by neutrophils, and immunohistological staining indicated a number of NETs containing DNA, histone H3, and neutrophil elastase. This case highlights an association between formation of NETs and severe respiratory and septic infection. An increase in severe nontypable H. influenzae disease can be expected as a

  9. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a doctor...

  10. The use of infrared thermography as a non-invasive method for fever detection in sheep infected with bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Diego, Ana C; Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro J; Pedrera, Miriam; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Gómez-Villamandos, José C; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José M

    2013-10-01

    Fever, which is closely linked to viraemia, is considered to be both the main and the earliest clinical sign in sheep infected with bluetongue virus (BTV). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of infrared thermography (IRT) for early detection of fever in sheep experimentally infected with bluetongue virus serotype 1 (BTV-1) and serotype 8 (BTV-8). This would reduce animal stress during experimental assays and assist in the development of a screening method for the identification of fever in animals suspected of being infected with BTV. Rectal and infrared eye temperatures were collected before and after BTV inoculation. The two temperature measures were positively correlated (r=0.504, Pinfrared temperatures was observed when temperatures were above physiological levels. IRT discriminated between febrile and non-febrile sheep with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 97%. The results showed that eye temperature measured using IRT was a useful non-invasive method for the assessment of fever in sheep infected with BTV under experimental conditions. Further research is required to evaluate the use of IRT under field conditions to identify potentially infected animals in bluetongue surveillance programmes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reno-invasive fungal infection presenting as acute renal failure: Importance of renal biopsy for early diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshi Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal zygomycosis, caused by invasive fungi, is a rare and potentially fatal infec-tion. The patient usually presents with non-specific symptoms and renal failure. A 34-year-old male non-diabetic and without any predisposing factors for systemic fungal infection presented to the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, high-grade fever and acute renal failure with a serum creatinine of 6.5. A computed tomography showed bilateral diffuse globular nephromegaly. A urine smear for fungal examination showed right angle branching hyphae and kidney biopsy showed fungal hyphae within the glomeruli, tubules and interstitium. Although radiological investigations can give us a clue, the definitive diagnosis can only be made by kidney biopsy. A high index of suspicion and timely diagnosis is important for a proper management.

  12. Acute Primary Pneumococcal Purulent Pericarditis With Cardiac Tamponade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hiren; Patel, Charmi; Soni, Mrugesh; Patel, Amit; Banda, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial pericarditis is a rapidly progressive and highly fatal infection, and is often diagnosed postmortem in half of the cases. Even with drainage and antibiotics, the mortality rate is high. Gram-positive cocci, specifically Streptococcus penumoniae, have been the most common cause of bacterial pericarditis with a preceding primary site of infection. Following the introduction of antibiotics in the 1940s and more recently the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, the incidence has drastically decreased. We describe an extremely rare case of primary streptococcus pneumoniae purulent pericarditis that presented with cardiac tamponade. The patient was successfully treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and urgent pericardiocentesis. Due to the high mortality rate with purulent pericarditis, a high index of suspicion is needed when acute pericarditis is suspected for early diagnosis to instate appropriate therapy with antibiotics and drainage. PMID:26469910

  13. O-Serotype Conversion in Salmonella Typhimurium Induces Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella infections remain a big problem worldwide, causing enteric fever by Salmonella Typhi (or Paratyphi or self-limiting gastroenteritis by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS in healthy individuals. NTS may become invasive and cause septicemia in elderly or immuno-compromised individuals, leading to high mortality and morbidity. No vaccines are currently available for preventing NTS infection in human. As these invasive NTS are restricted to several O-antigen serogroups including B1, D1, C1, and C2, O-antigen polysaccharide is believed to be a good target for vaccine development. In this study, a strategy of O-serotype conversion was investigated to develop live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against the major serovars of NTS infections. The immunodominant O4 serotype of S. Typhimurium was converted into O9, O7, and O8 serotypes through unmarked chromosomal deletion–insertion mutations. O-serotype conversion was confirmed by LPS silver staining and western blotting. All O-serotype conversion mutations were successfully introduced into the live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccine S738 (Δcrp Δcya to evaluate their immunogenicity in mice model. The vaccine candidates induced high amounts of heterologous O-polysaccharide-specific functional IgG responses. Vaccinated mice survived a challenge of 100 times the 50% lethality dose (LD50 of wild-type S. Typhimurium. Protective efficacy against heterologous virulent Salmonella challenges was highly O-serotype related. Furthermore, broad-spectrum protection against S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, and S. Choleraesuis was observed by co-vaccination of O9 and O7 O-serotype-converted vaccine candidates. This study highlights the strategy of expressing heterologous O-polysaccharides via genetic engineering in developing live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against NTS infections.

  14. Characterization of protective immune responses induced by pneumococcal surface protein A in fusion with pneumolysin derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelly Goulart

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA and Pneumolysin derivatives (Pds are important vaccine candidates, which can confer protection in different models of pneumococcal infection. Furthermore, the combination of these two proteins was able to increase protection against pneumococcal sepsis in mice. The present study investigated the potential of hybrid proteins generated by genetic fusion of PspA fragments to Pds to increase cross-protection against fatal pneumococcal infection. Pneumolisoids were fused to the N-terminus of clade 1 or clade 2 pspA gene fragments. Mouse immunization with the fusion proteins induced high levels of antibodies against PspA and Pds, able to bind to intact pneumococci expressing a homologous PspA with the same intensity as antibodies to rPspA alone or the co-administered proteins. However, when antibody binding to pneumococci with heterologous PspAs was examined, antisera to the PspA-Pds fusion molecules showed stronger antibody binding and C3 deposition than antisera to co-administered proteins. In agreement with these results, antisera against the hybrid proteins were more effective in promoting the phagocytosis of bacteria bearing heterologous PspAs in vitro, leading to a significant reduction in the number of bacteria when compared to co-administered proteins. The respective antisera were also capable of neutralizing the lytic activity of Pneumolysin on sheep red blood cells. Finally, mice immunized with fusion proteins were protected against fatal challenge with pneumococcal strains expressing heterologous PspAs. Taken together, the results suggest that PspA-Pd fusion proteins comprise a promising vaccine strategy, able to increase the immune response mediated by cross-reactive antibodies and complement deposition to heterologous strains, and to confer protection against fatal challenge.

  15. Predictors of pneumococcal vaccination uptake in hospitalized patients aged 65 years and over shortly following the commencement of a publicly funded national pneumococcal vaccination program in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridda, Iman; MacIntyre, Raina C; Lindley, Richard I; McIntyre, Peter B; Sullivan, John; Gilbert, Gwendolyn; Kovoor, Pramesh; Manolios, Nicholas; Fox, John

    2007-01-01

    In January 2005, Australia became the first country to introduce a publicly funded pneumococcal vaccination program for persons 65 years and older which is free at point of service, although the vaccine cost had previously been partially subsidized. Hospitalization in this age group is an important indicator of risk of invasive pneumococcal disease but vaccine uptake has been suboptimal. To determine vaccination rates and predictors of vaccination in the elderly hospitalised patients before and after January 2005. We validated vaccination status against general practitioner (GP) records for patients aged > or = 65 years admitted to a large teaching hospital in Sydney between 16th of May 2005 and the 20th of February 2006 and examined predictors of vaccination. Commencement of the new program resulted in a significant increase in vaccination uptake from 39% of inpatients prior to the free program to 73% in the same cohort of inpatients post January 2005. We found that patient recall of vaccination status was not reliable. Self-report of pneumococcal vaccination had a sensitivity of 0.53 and a specificity of 0.55, highlighting that validation of vaccination status is required. Age over 80 years and dementia significantly predicted under-vaccination. This highlights the importance of integrating free vaccine supply and delivery in primary care to achieve high vaccination coverage. However, demented patients and the very elderly remain under-vaccinated, despite being admitted to hospital for active management of acute conditions.

  16. Distribución de serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasoras en el Hospital de Niños de Santa Fe Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections at the Hospital de Niños of Santa Fe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mayoral

    2008-03-01

    of penicillin. Serotype 14 was the most frequent followed by serotypes 1, 6B, 18C, 7F, 19 F and 5. Serotype 14 showed a statistically significant correlation with MICs of penicillin ranging from 0,5 to 2 mg/l. Although this serotype was more frequently observed in pneumonia than in meningitis, there was not a significant association with any particular pathology. Serotypes 14 and 1, were prevalent among children under and over 2 years old, respectively. Most of these isolates with MICs of penicillin = 2 mg/l, were from patients with pneumonia and not with meningitis. The serotype distribution was similar to that during the period 1993-99, with the exception of serotypes 18C, 4, 12F and 22F which had never been found before. The emergence of these serotypes makes it essential to continue surveillance to determine which conjugated vaccine formulation would be suitable to prevent the most frequent pneumococcal invasive infections.

  17. Role of Oxidative Stress in the Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S.; Simões, Lutiana R.; Elias, Samuel G.; Quevedo, João

    2013-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute purulent infection affecting the pia mater, the arachnoid, and the subarachnoid spaces. Streptococcus pneumoniae crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by both transcellular traversal and disruption of the intraepithelial tight junctions to allow intercellular traversal. During multiplication, pneumococci release their bacterial products, which are highly immunogenic and may lead to an increased inflammatory response in the host. Thus, these compounds are recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of toll-like receptors. These receptors induce the activation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), which interacts with various protein kinases, including IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4), which is phosphorylated and dissociated from MyD88. These products also interact with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 dependent signaling pathway (TRAF6). This cascade provides a link to NF-κB-inducing kinase, resulting in the nuclear translocation of NF-κB leading to the production of cytokines, chemokines, and other proinflammatory molecules in response to bacterial stimuli. Consequently, polymorphonuclear cells are attracted from the bloodstream and then activated, releasing large amounts of NO•, O2 •, and H2O2. This formation generates oxidative and nitrosative stress, subsequently, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage, and BBB breakdown, which contributes to cell injury during pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:23766853

  18. Vaccination for the control of childhood bacterial pneumonia - Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C Otczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia in childhood is endemic in large parts of the world and in particular, in developing countries, as well as in many indigenous communities within developed nations. Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugate vaccines are currently available against the leading bacterial causes of pneumonia.  The use of the vaccines in both industrialised and developing countries have shown a dramatic reduction in the burden of pneumonia and invasive disease in children.  However, the greatest threat facing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness is serotype replacement.  The current vaccines provide serotype-specific, antibody–mediated protection against only a few of the 90+ capsule serotypes.  Therefore, there has been a focus in recent years to rapidly advance technologies that will result in broader disease coverage and more affordable vaccines that can be used in developing countries.  The next generation of pneumococcal vaccines have advanced to clinical trials.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Turkey: a decision analytical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakır Mustafa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, which place a considerable burden on healthcare resources, can be reduced in a cost-effective manner using a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7. We compare the cost effectiveness of a 13-valent PCV (PCV-13 and a 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV with that of PCV-7 in Turkey. Methods A cost-utility analysis was conducted and a decision analytical model was used to estimate the proportion of the Turkish population Results PCV-13 and PHiD-CV are projected to have a substantial impact on pneumococcal disease in Turkey versus PCV-7, with 2,223 and 3,156 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs and 2,146 and 2,081 life years, respectively, being saved under a 3+1 schedule. Projections of direct medical costs showed that a PHiD-CV vaccination programme would provide the greatest cost savings, offering additional savings of US$11,718,813 versus PCV-7 and US$8,235,010 versus PCV-13. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that PHiD-CV dominated PCV-13 in terms of QALYs gained and cost savings in 58.3% of simulations. Conclusion Under the modeled conditions, PHiD-CV would provide the most cost-effective intervention for reducing pneumococcal disease in Turkish children.

  20. Pneumococcal pneumonia presenting with septic shock: host- and pathogen-related factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vidal, C; Ardanuy, C; Tubau, F; Viasus, D; Dorca, J; Liñares, J; Gudiol, F; Carratalà, J

    2010-01-01

    Host- and pathogen-related factors associated with septic shock in pneumococcal pneumonia are not well defined. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for septic shock and to ascertain patient outcomes. Serotypes, genotypes and antibiotic resistance of isolated strains were also analysed. Observational analysis of a prospective cohort of non-severely immunosuppressed hospitalised adults with pneumococcal pneumonia. Septic shock was defined as a systolic blood pressure of 4 h after fluid replacement. 1041 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia diagnosed by Gram stain and culture of appropriate samples and/or urine antigen test were documented, of whom 114 (10.9%) had septic shock at admission. After adjustment, independent risk factors for shock were current tobacco smoking (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.02 to 4.34; p = 0.044), chronic corticosteroid treatment (OR, 4.45; 95% CI, 1.75 to 11.32; p = 0.002) and serotype 3 (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.475; p = 0.022). No significant differences were found in genotypes and rates of antibiotic resistance. Compared with the remaining patients, patients with septic shock required mechanical ventilation more frequently (37% vs 4%; pshock. Septic shock is a frequent complication of pneumococcal pneumonia and causes high morbidity and mortality. Current tobacco smoking, chronic corticosteroid treatment and infection caused by serotype 3 are independent risk factors for this complication.

  1. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination and varicella status in inflammatory arthritis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, E M

    2011-11-15

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis are at increased risk of vaccine preventable infections. This risk is increased by immunomodulatory therapies. Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcal disease reduces the risk. Severe cases of varicella infection have occurred in patients on biologic therapies. We sought to identify vaccination rates for commonly acquired infections and to ascertain varicella immune status in patients with inflammatory arthritis. 100 patients with inflammatory arthritis were administered a standardised questionnaire. Data collected included age, diagnosis, vaccination history, history of varicella, treatment and the presence of other indications for vaccination. 58 patients (58%) had not received the influenza vaccine in the past year. Only 19 patients (19%) had ever received pneumococcal vaccine. Anti TNF use did not predict vaccination (p = .46). An increasing number of co morbid conditions predicted both pneumococcal (p < 0.003) and influenza vaccine (p < 0.03) administration. Nineteen patients (19%) gave no history of varicella infection, none having had varicella titres checked pre treatment. Immunisation rates in patients with inflammatory arthritis on immunosuppressive therapies are low. Immunisation schedules should be available for each patient during rheumatology and general practice consultations.

  2. Revised definitions of invasive fungal disease from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) Consensus Group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, B.E. de; Walsh, T.J.; Donnelly, J.P.; Stevens, D.A.; Edwards, J.E.; Calandra, T; Pappas, P.G.; Maertens, J.; Lortholary, O.; Kauffman, C.A.; Denning, D.W.; Patterson, T.F.; Maschmeyer, G.; Bille, J.; Dismukes, W.E.; Herbrecht, R.; Hope, W.W.; Kibbler, C.C.; Kullberg, B.J.; Marr, K.A.; Munoz, P.; Odds, F.C.; Perfect, J.R.; Restrepo, A.; Ruhnke, M.; Segal, B.H.; Sobel, J.D.; Sorrell, T.C.; Viscoli, C.; Wingard, J.R.; Zaoutis, T.; Bennett, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive fungal diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Clarity and uniformity in defining these infections are important factors in improving the quality of clinical studies. A standard set of definitions strengthens the consistency and reproducibility of such studies.

  3. Pneumococcal serotypes and mortality following invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Thomsen, Reimar W; Riis, Anders

    2009-01-01

    younger than age 5 y. Age, male sex, meningitis, high comorbidity level, alcoholism, and early decade of diagnosis were significantly associated with mortality. Among individuals aged 5 y and older, serotypes 31, 11A, 35F, 17F, 3, 16F, 19F, 15B, and 10A were associated with highly increased mortality...... as compared with serotype 1 (all: adjusted odds ratio >or=3, p

  4. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Angela B; Pai, Rekha; Crook, Derrick W; Beall, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the United States (US) in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990), but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s) at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny), recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  5. The effect of age on the response to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahm Moon H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. To prevent invasive pneumococcal diseases, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV is recommended in subjects over 65 years of age. Although it has been reported to provide approximately 50-80% protection against invasive disease in the general elderly population, there is still controversy as to the effectiveness of the PPV in the elderly. Methods To evaluate the immune response to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in the elderly, samples from young adults and elderly were obtained before and one month after vaccination. The quantitative and qualitative response to the vaccine were measured by the ELISA and opsonophagocytic killing assay for eight vaccine type serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, 23F and one vaccine-related serotype (6A. Results The response to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine showed a similar response between adults and elderly when evaluated by the ELISA, however the functional activity of the antibodies elicited after vaccination were lower in the elderly group for more than half of the serotypes evaluated. In comparison of the antibody needed for 1:8 opsonic titer, more antibodies were needed in the elderly for serotypes Pn 4, 19F, 23F and 6A, suggesting the functional activity of antibody detected by the ELISA was lower in the elderly compared with the adult group for these serotypes. As for subjects with an opsonic titer Conclusions Although the amount of antibodies elicited were similar between the two age groups, distinct differences in function were noted. This report highlights the importance of a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the immunogenic response to the PPV in the elderly age group. Trial registration This trial is registered with Clinical trials.gov. Registration number NCT00964769

  6. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B Brueggemann

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced in the United States (US in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990, but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny, recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  7. Managing invasive fungal infections: relying on clinical instincts or on a rational navigation system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pauw, Ben E; Viscoli, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The management of invasive fungal disease in the immunocompromised host is complex and requires the specialized knowledge of physicians whose primary interest is actually the underlying disease rather than infectious complications. This Supplement aims to provide these physicians with some tools that may help to guide them through the maze of suspicion that an invasive fungal disease is present by offering an integrated care pathway of rational patient management. Such pathways will inevitably vary in detail in different centres and depend for their success on the presence of multidisciplinary teams and an explicit agreement on at least the minimum requirements for effective management. The integrated care pathways presented constitute an objective instrument to allow regular audits for recognizing opportunities to change practice if and when weaknesses are identified.

  8. Loss of Humoral and Cellular Immunity to Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella during Current or Convalescent Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Malawian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Tonney S; Nyirenda, James T; Tembo, Dumizulu L; Storm, Janet; Dube, Queen; Msefula, Chisomo L; Jambo, Kondwani C; Mwandumba, Henry C; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Melita A; Mandala, Wilson L

    2017-07-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) infections are commonly associated with Plasmodium falciparum infections, but the immunologic basis for this linkage is poorly understood. We hypothesized that P. falciparum infection compromises the humoral and cellular immunity of the host to NTS, which increases the susceptibility of the host to iNTS infection. We prospectively recruited children aged between 6 and 60 months at a Community Health Centre in Blantyre, Malawi, and allocated them to the following groups; febrile with uncomplicated malaria, febrile malaria negative, and nonfebrile malaria negative. Levels of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-specific serum bactericidal activity (SBA) and whole-blood bactericidal activity (WBBA), complement C3 deposition, and neutrophil respiratory burst activity (NRBA) were measured. Levels of SBA with respect to S Typhimurium were reduced in febrile P. falciparum -infected children (median, -0.20 log10 [interquartile range {IQR}, -1.85, 0.32]) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, -1.42 log10 [IQR, -2.0, -0.47], P = 0.052). In relation to SBA, C3 deposition on S Typhimurium was significantly reduced in febrile P. falciparum -infected children (median, 7.5% [IQR, 4.1, 15.0]) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, 29% [IQR, 11.8, 48.0], P = 0.048). WBBA with respect to S Typhimurium was significantly reduced in febrile P. falciparum -infected children (median, 0.25 log10 [IQR, -0.73, 1.13], P = 0.0001) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, -1.0 log10 [IQR, -1.68, -0.16]). In relation to WBBA, S Typhimurium-specific NRBA was reduced in febrile P. falciparum -infected children (median, 8.8% [IQR, 3.7, 20], P = 0.0001) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, 40.5% [IQR, 33, 65.8]). P. falciparum infection impairs humoral and cellular immunity to S Typhimurium in children during malaria episodes, which may explain the increased risk of iNTS observed

  9. Adverse reactions to simultaneous influenza and pneumococcal conjugate vaccinations in children : randomized double-blind controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Smulders, Sara; Hoes, Arno W; Hak, Eelko

    In a randomized double-blind controlled trial, the safety was assessed of simultaneous administration of influenza and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in children with previous physician-diagnosed respiratory tract infections. In total, 579 children aged 18-72 months were assigned to receive

  10. Adjuvant treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves outcome of experimental pneumococcal meningitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasanmoentalib, E. Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Morgan, B. Paul; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We compared adjunctive treatment with placebo, dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, and the combination of dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. In this prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized trial, 96 mice were infected intracisternally with 10(7)

  11. Invasion and translocation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from urosepsis and patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owrangi, B; Masters, N; Kuballa, A; O'Dea, C; Vollmerhausen, T L; Katouli, M

    2018-01-16

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are found in high numbers in the gut of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs). We hypothesised that in hospitalised patients, UPEC strains might translocate from the gut to the blood stream and that this could be due to the presence of virulence genes (VGs) that are not commonly found in UPEC strains that cause UTI only. To test this, E. coli strains representing 75 dominant clonal groups of UPEC isolated from the blood of hospitalised patients with UTI (urosepsis) (n = 22), hospital-acquired (HA) UTI without blood infection (n = 24) and strains isolated from patients with community-acquired (CA)-UTIs (n = 29) were tested for their adhesion to, invasion and translocation through Caco-2 cells, in addition to the presence of 34 VGs associated with UPEC. Although there were no differences in the rate and degree of translocation among the groups, urosepsis and HA-UTI strains showed significantly higher abilities to adhere (P = 0.0095 and P UPEC strains, irrespective of their source, are capable of translocating through gut epithelium. However, urosepsis and HA-UTI strains have a much better ability to interact with gu