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Sample records for invasive pneumococcal infections

  1. Invasive pneumococcal infection despite 7-valent conjugated vaccine

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    Sebastien Joye

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite good cover with 7-valent vaccination, invasive pneumococcal infections may still be misdiagnosed and may lead to lifethreatening situations or death in young children. New serotypes are emerging and, therefore, clinicians must keep a high level of suspicion in young children regardless of their vaccination status. We report three cases of invasive pneumococcal infection due to new serotypes not covered by the 7-valent conjugated vaccine, two of which led children to death.

  2. A Case of Invasive Pneumococcal Infection with Septic Shock and Rare Complications

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    John R. Woytanowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcus is a serious illness with potentially devastating outcomes. A 64-year-old female with a medical history of psoriatic arthritis and diabetes was transferred from an outside hospital for ventilator dependent respiratory failure and altered mental status. She initially presented with worsening back pain and was found to have leukocytosis with bandemia and acute renal failure but she was in septic shock upon arrival to our tertiary care center. Her blood cultures grew Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRI of the brain revealed pus within the posterior lateral ventricles and multiple infarcts. MRI of the spine revealed a psoas abscess. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed mitral valve vegetation and her right eye developed endogenous endophthalmitis. She was treated with intravenous and intravitreal antibiotics and underwent drainage of the abscess with no improvement in mental status. Repeat imaging revealed multiple new thalamic, basal ganglia, and parietal lobe infarcts likely from septic emboli. After a protracted ICU stay, the patient’s family opted for comfort care. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections has declined rapidly since the advent of antibiotics and vaccines. With the growing incidence of antibiotic resistance as well as the emergence of new immunomodulating drugs for various pathologies, there is a concern that invasive infections will reemerge. Ventriculitis and endogenous endophthalmitis are very rare complications of pneumococcal bacteremia.

  3. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  4. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN: OPPORTUNITIES OF PROPHYLAXIS

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    S.M. Kharit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the actual problem of modern health care — pneumococcal infections and opportunities of its prophylaxis. Authors describe risk groups of development of invasive pneumococcal infections. A characteristics of available at the present times in Russia and all over the world vaccines, including pneumococcal 7-valent vaccine (PCV7 Prevenar, intended to the prophylaxis of pneumococcal infections in children under the age 2 months — 5 years old. An experience of PCV7 use in the world in analyzed. The article gives an estimation of perspectives of inclusion of PCV7 to the national immunizations schedule.Key words: children, pneumococcal infections, prophylaxis, pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:62-69

  5. [Pharmaco-economic aspects of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal infections in persons over 65 years of age; review of the literature on cost effectiveness analysis].

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    Postma, M J; Heijnen, M L A; Beutels, Ph; Jager, J C

    2002-05-04

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of vaccination to prevent invasive pneumococcal disease in the elderly. Review of the literature. Articles in Dutch or English reporting studies into the cost-effectiveness of vaccination for the prevention of invasive pneumococcal infection in persons over 65 years of age were retrieved from Medline (1980-2000; search terms: 'pneumococcal' and 'vaccine' in combination with 'costs' or 'economics') and on the basis of the reference lists in the articles found. The following aspects of the selected studies were assessed: the net costs per year of life gained, the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the elderly, the mortality due to invasive pneumococcal infections, the effectiveness of the vaccine in the prevention of invasive pneumococcal infections, and the costs of the vaccine and its administration. Attention was also given to specific age categories and to the effects of varying certain crucial assumptions. We retrieved a total of five studies: one each for the USA, Canada, the Netherlands and Spain and a multinational study for five European countries. The cost-effectiveness of vaccination of the elderly against invasive pneumococcal infections varied from cost savings to [symbol: see text] 33,000,-per life-year gained. The Dutch study estimated the cost-effectiveness at [symbol: see text] 10,100,-per life-year gained (price level 1995). Almost all the studies selected based their estimate of the effectiveness of vaccination on the same case-control study from the USA. The potential effects on cost-effectiveness of more extensive influenza vaccination and of the inclusion of re-vaccination against pneumococci were not included in the analyses. The cost-effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal infections in persons over 65 years of age (in the Netherlands as well as in several other countries) was below the previously accepted threshold of [symbol: see text] 20,000,-.

  6. Treatment and prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease.

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    Domínguez-Alegría, A R; Pintado, V; Barbolla, I

    2018-02-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a severe infection that mainly affects patients with associated comorbidity. The paediatric conjugate vaccination has resulted in a change in the adult vaccination strategy. The antibiotic resistance of pneumococcus is not currently a severe problem. Nevertheless, the World Health Organisation has included pneumococcus among the bacteria whose treatment requires the introduction of new drugs, such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole. Although the scientific evidence is still limited, the combination of beta-lactams and macrolides is recommended as empiric therapy for bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  10. Pneumococcal Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention, Immunization Action Coalition) - PDF Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Pneumococcal Infections updates ... ray Meningitis - pneumococcal Sputum gram stain Related Health Topics Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis Sinusitis Streptococcal Infections National Institutes ...

  11. Incidence and risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected individuals before and after the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Larsen, Mette; Ladelund, Steen

    2014-01-01

    with an increased risk of IPD. Detectable viral loads (RR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.79-1.98]) and a relative fall in CD4 T-cell counts were also associated with an increased risk (≥500 to 350-500 CD4 T cells/µL: RR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.21-1.37] and risk of IPD declined over time......BACKGROUND: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is an important cause of morbidity among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We described incidence and risk factors for IPD in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. METHODS: Nationwide population-based cohort study of HIV......-infected adults treated at all Danish HIV treatment centers during 1995-2012. Nineteen population-matched controls per HIV-infected individual were retrieved. The risk of IPD was assessed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: The incidence of IPD was 304.7 cases per 100 000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) in HIV...

  12. Pneumococcal serotypes and mortality following invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Thomsen, Reimar W; Riis, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pneumococcal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between specific pneumococcal serotypes and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a nationwide population-based...

  13. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine herd effects on non-invasive pneumococcal pneumonia in elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; Hollingsworth, Rosalind C; Huijts, Susanne M; Bolkenbaas, Marieke; Webber, Chris; Patterson, Scott; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Herd protection from infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccination is well established for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) but not for non-IPD pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (PCAP). We assessed the contribution of vaccine-serotypes in non-IPD PCAP in adults 65 years and older

  14. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: Potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Bos; H.C. Rüumke (Hans); K. Welte (Karl); L. Spanjaard (Lodewijk); L. van Alphen (Loek); M.J. Postma (Maarten)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the

  15. Recurrent severe invasive pneumococcal disease in an adult with previously unknown hyposplenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe C; Schejbel, Lone; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    was found. Despite immunization against S. pneumoniae and measurement of what was interpreted as protective levels of serotype-specific IgG antibodies after vaccination, the patient suffered from a third episode of IPD. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with predisposing medical conditions or a history of severe......BACKGROUND: The risk of life-threatening and invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria is increased in patients with hyposplenia or asplenia. We report a case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal meningitis in a woman with previous unknown hyposplenia. She was vaccinated after the first episode...... of meningitis and developed sufficient levels of pneumococcal antibodies. The pneumococcal strains isolated were serotype 7 F and 17 F. To our knowledge, there has been no previously reported case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in a pneumococcal vaccinated adult with hyposplenia and apparently...

  16. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jasper M.; Rümke, Hans C.; Welte, Robert; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van Alphen, Loek; Postma, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases occur in

  17. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections - Potential epidemiological and economic impact in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.M.; Rumke, H.C.; Welte, R.; Spanjaard, L.; van Alphen, L.; Postma, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases

  18. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Incidence and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Dalby, Tine; Weinberger, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) at the population level is unclear. We explored PCV13's effect in reducing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD)-related morbidity and mortality, and whether serotype-specific changes were attributable to vaccination or ...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  3. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease in Senegal.

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    Ba, I D; Ba, A; Faye, P M; Thiongane, A; Attiyé Kane, M; Sonko, A; Diop, A; Deme Ly, I; Diouf, F N; Ndiaye, O; Leye, M M M; Cissé, M F; Ba, M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the clinical, epidemiological, and outcome characteristics of IPD case patients hospitalized at the Albert-Royer National Children's Hospital (French acronym CHNEAR) to evaluate the disease burden of IPDs in a pediatric hospital of Dakar (Senegal). All children aged 0-15 years hospitalized at the CHNEAR between January 1st, 2008 and December 31st, 2013 for a documented IPD were included in the study. Medical history, risk factors, clinical, bacteriological, and outcome data was collected. Data was then analyzed using the SPSS software, version 16 (Pearson's Chi(2) test: a P-valueSenegal. Infants<2 years of age are particularly affected. The very high case fatality (17%) was significantly associated with meningeal infection sites hence the need for better access to pneumococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults in Toronto.

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    Agron Plevneshi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of high-risk populations for serious infection due to S. pneumoniae will permit appropriately targeted prevention programs. METHODS: We conducted prospective, population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease and laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in homeless adults in Toronto, a Canadian city with a total population of 2.5 M, from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006. RESULTS: We identified 69 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease and 27 cases of laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in an estimated population of 5050 homeless adults. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults was 273 infections per 100,000 persons per year, compared to 9 per 100,000 persons per year in the general adult population. Homeless persons with invasive pneumococcal disease were younger than other adults (median age 46 years vs 67 years, P<.001, and more likely than other adults to be smokers (95% vs. 31%, P<.001, to abuse alcohol (62% vs 15%, P<.001, and to use intravenous drugs (42% vs 4%, P<.001. Relative to age matched controls, they were more likely to have underlying lung disease (12/69, 17% vs 17/272, 6%, P = .006, but not more likely to be HIV infected (17/69, 25% vs 58/282, 21%, P = .73. The proportion of patients with recurrent disease was five fold higher for homeless than other adults (7/58, 12% vs. 24/943, 2.5%, P<.001. In homeless adults, 28 (32% of pneumococcal isolates were of serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine, 42 (48% of serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine, and 72 (83% of serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine. Although no outbreaks of disease were identified in shelters, there was evidence of clustering of serotypes suggestive of transmission of pathogenic strains within the homeless population. CONCLUSIONS: Homeless persons are at high risk of serious pneumococcal infection. Vaccination, physical structure changes

  5. The epidemiology of pneumococcal carriage and infections in Malaysia.

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    Le, Cheng-Foh; Jefferies, Johanna M; Yusof, Mohd Yasim Mohd; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Clarke, Stuart C

    2012-06-01

    In Malaysia, various aspects of the epidemiology of pneumococcal carriage and disease remain largely unclear due to the lack of supporting data. Although a number of relevant studies have been documented, their individual discrete findings are not sufficient to inform experts on pneumococcal epidemiology at a national level. Therefore, in this review we aim to bring together and systematically evaluate the key information regarding pneumococcal disease epidemiology in Malaysia and provide a comprehensive overview of the data. Major aspects discussed include pneumococcal carriage, disease incidence and prevalence, age factors, invasiveness of pneumococci, serotypes, molecular epidemiology and antibiotic susceptibility. Penicillin resistance is increasingly prevalent and studies suggest that the majority of pneumococcal serotypes causing pneumococcal disease in Malaysia are covered by currently available conjugate vaccines. Continued surveillance is needed to provide a better understanding of pneumococcal epidemiology in Malaysia.

  6. Antibiotic Resistance in Childhood with Pneumococcal Infection

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    Ali Gunes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Resistance to antibiotics is better. Between should not be in capitals. Antibiotics resistant has been increasing in pneumococci that cause serious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis in recent years. The resistance rates vary between geographic regions. In this study, we aimed to determine antibiotic resistance rates in pneumococcal infections in our region. Material and Method: This study included 31 pneumococcal strains isolated from blood, CSF and urine samples of patients with meningitis, sepsis and urinary tract infections who admitted Dicle University Medicine School Children Clinic and Diyarbakir Pediatric Hospital Between December 2004-April 2007. Reproducing clinical specimens with alpha-hemolysis, optochin-sensitive, bile soluble and gram-positive diplococci morphology was defined as S. pneumoniae. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of strains were measured by the E-test method. MIC values of penicillin against pneumococci was accepted as <0.06 mg / ml value of the sensitive, 0.12-1μg/ml mid-level resistance, ≥ 2 mg / ml value of the high-level resistance. Results: It was found 16% mid-level penicillin resistance and 3.2% high-level penicillin resistance by E-test method. 80.7% of Strains were percent of the penicillin-sensitive. Seftiriakson resistance was found as 3.2%. there was not Vancomycin resistance. Discussion: We think penicillin therapy is enough effective for pneumococcal infections except serious conditions such as meningitis and sepsis. Also we think it should be supported by multicenter studies.

  7. Effectiveness of the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine against invasive pneumococcal disease in people 60 years or older

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    Salsench Elisabet

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV is currently recommended in elderly and high-risk adults. However, its efficacy in preventing pneumococcal infections remains controversial. This study assessed the clinical effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD among people over 60 years. Methods Population-based case-control study that included 88 case patients over 60 years-old with a laboratory-confirmed IPD (bacteraemic pneumonia, meningitis or sepsis and 176 outpatient control subjects who were matched by primary care centre, age, sex and risk stratum. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs for vaccination were calculated using conditional logistic regression, controlling for underlying conditions. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1 - OR ×100. Results Pneumococcal vaccination rate was significantly lower in cases than in control subjects (38.6% vs 59.1%; p = 0.002. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness was 72% (OR: 0.28; 95% CI: 0.15-0.54 against all IPD and 77% (OR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.08-0.60 against vaccine-type IPD. Vaccination was significantly effective against all IPD in both age groups: 60-79 years-old (OR 0.32; 95% CI: 0.14-0.74 and people 80 years or older (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.09-0.91. Vaccination appears significantly effective as for high-risk immunocompetent subjects (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.11-0.79 as well as for immunocompromised subjects (OR: 0.12; 95% CI: 0.03-0.53. Conclusion These findings confirm the effectiveness of the 23-valent PPV against IPD, and they also support the benefit of vaccination in preventing invasive infections among high-risk and older people.

  8. Medical microbiology: laboratory diagnosis of invasive pneumococcal disease.

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    Werno, Anja M; Murdoch, David R

    2008-03-15

    The laboratory diagnosis of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) continues to rely on culture-based methods that have been used for many decades. The most significant recent developments have occurred with antigen detection assays, whereas the role of nucleic acid amplification tests has yet to be fully clarified. Despite developments in laboratory diagnostics, a microbiological diagnosis is still not made in most cases of IPD, particularly for pneumococcal pneumonia. The limitations of existing diagnostic tests impact the ability to obtain accurate IPD burden data and to assess the effectiveness of control measures, such as vaccination, in addition to the ability to diagnose IPD in individual patients. There is an urgent need for improved diagnostic tests for pneumococcal disease--especially tests that are suitable for use in underresourced countries.

  9. Recurrent Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Serotype 12F in a Vaccinated Splenectomized Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Anne Katrine; Schumacher, Anna Holst; Kantsø, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    This is the first case report of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), specifically, due to serotype 12F. The patient described here was vaccinated with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) due to previous splenectomy, and an anti-pneumococcal IgG test concluded...

  10. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Lambertsen, Lotte; Harboe, Zitta B

    2014-01-01

    %, and 78% of the cases would have been covered by the 7-, 10-, and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, respectively. Conclusions: Of children with an IPD episode, 2.4% experienced rIPD, and an underlying disease was documented in 66% of these children. Investigation of underlying conditions...... laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in children aged 0-15 y were identified from the Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark for the period 1980-2013. rIPD was defined as isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from any normally sterile site ≥ 30 days after an initial...... positive culture. Clinical data were obtained for all children with rIPD. Results: Of all children with IPD, 2.4% (59/2418) experienced at least 1 episode of rIPD, and an underlying condition was documented in 39 (66%). Immune deficiency due to transplantation (n = 9) was the most common disease; however...

  11. Impact of pneumococcal vaccines use on invasive pneumococcal disease in Nunavik (Quebec from 1997 to 2010

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    Jean-Baptiste Le Meur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2000, an outbreak of severe pneumonia caused by a virulent clone of serotype 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae was detected in the Nunavik region of Quebec. A mass immunization campaign was implemented in the spring of 2002, targeting persons ≥5 years of age and using the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23. At the same time, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced into the routine immunization programme of infants, with catch-up for children up to 4 years of age. Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in relation to PPSV23 and PCV7 use. Study design and methods: Retrospective analysis of IPD cases identified by the Quebec public health laboratory during the period 1997–2010. Results: A total of 82 IPD cases were identified during the study period. In adults, serotype 1 incidence decreased following the 2002 PPSV23 mass campaign but breakthrough cases continued to occur. Following PCV7 use in children, there was a decrease in the incidence of vaccine-type IPD and replacement by other serotypes in adults. In children, a marked decrease in the annual incidence of serotypes included in PCV7 was observed following PCV7 introduction: 162/100,000 in 1997–2001 vs. 10/100,000 in 2004–2010 (p<0.01. Concomitantly, the incidence of IPD caused by serotypes not included in PCV7 increased from 29/100,000 to 109/100,000 (p=0.11. Conclusion: The mass immunization campaign using the PPSV23 in 2002 and the introduction of PCV7 for the routine immunization of infants induced important modifications in the epidemiology of IPD. IPD rates in Nunavik remain much higher than in the southern part of the province both in children and adults. More effective pneumococcal vaccines are needed to eliminate geographic disparities in IPD risk.

  12. PSGL-1 on Leukocytes is a Critical Component of the Host Immune Response against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

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    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial uptake by phagocytic cells is a vital event in the clearance of invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. A major role of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 on leukocytes against invasive pneumococcal disease is described in this study. Phagocytosis experiments using different serotypes demonstrated that PSGL-1 is involved in the recognition, uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae. Co-localization of several clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with PSGL-1 was demonstrated, observing a rapid and active phagocytosis in the presence of PSGL-1. Furthermore, the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide and the main autolysin of the bacterium--the amidase LytA--were identified as bacterial ligands for PSGL-1. Experimental models of pneumococcal disease including invasive pneumonia and systemic infection showed that bacterial levels were markedly increased in the blood of PSGL-1-/- mice. During pneumonia, PSGL-1 controls the severity of pneumococcal dissemination from the lung to the bloodstream. In systemic infection, a major role of PSGL-1 in host defense is to clear the bacteria in the systemic circulation controlling bacterial replication. These results confirmed the importance of this receptor in the recognition and clearance of S. pneumoniae during invasive pneumococcal disease. Histological and cellular analysis demonstrated that PSGL-1-/- mice have increased levels of T cells migrating to the lung than the corresponding wild-type mice. In contrast, during systemic infection, PSGL-1-/- mice had increased numbers of neutrophils and macrophages in blood, but were less effective controlling the infection process due to the lack of this functional receptor. Overall, this study demonstrates that PSGL-1 is a novel receptor for S. pneumoniae that contributes to protection against invasive pneumococcal disease.

  13. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde N; Kristensen, Tim D; Kaltoft, Margit S

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to document the epidemiology, microbiology and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children introduction of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into the Danish routine...... immunization programme October 2007. Methods: Clinical and microbiological records on cases of IPD in children Hospital, Denmark 1996-2007, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: We identified 106 cases of IPD. The annual incidence of IPD was 11 per 100 000 in children

  14. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  15. [Recommendations for prevention of community-acquired pneumonia with bacteremia as the leading form of invasive pneumococcal infections in the population of people over 50 years of age and risk groups above 19 years of age].

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    Albrecht, Piotr; Antczak, Adam; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Bernatowska, Ewa; Stompór, Tomasz; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Gyrczuk, Ewa; Imiela, Jacek; Jedrzejczak, Wiesław; Windak, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a main cause of mortality associated with pneumococcal infections. Although, IPD is regarding mainly small children and persons in the age > 65 years, the investigations showed that because of IPD exactly sick persons are burdened with the greatest mortality in the older age, rather than of children. The most frequent form of IPD is community acquired pneumonia (CAP) with the bacteremia. The presence of even a single additional risk factor is increasing the probability of the unfavorable descent of pneumococcal infection. The risk factors for IPD and/or pneumonia with bacteremia apart from the age are among others asthma (> 2 x), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sarcoidosis (4 x), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (5 x), bronchiectases (2 x), allergic alveolitis (1.9 x) and pneumoconiosis (2 x), type 1 diabetes (4.4 x), type 2 diabetes (1.2 x), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis (4.2 to 14.9 x), kidney failure with the necessity to dialysis (12 x), immunosuppression, cardiovascular disease, alcoholism and cancers. Examinations show that the best method of IPD and CAP preventing are pneumococcal vaccinations. On the market for ages 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is available covering close the 90% of IPD triggering stereotypes. Her role in preventing CAP is uncertain and the immunological answer after vaccination at older persons and after revaccination is weak. Widely discussed disadvantageous effects of growing old of the immunological system show on the benefit from applying the immunization inducing the immunological memory, i.e. of conjugated vaccines which are activating the T-dependent reply and are ensuring the readiness for the effective secondary response. Examinations so far conducted with conjugated 7-valent and 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines at persons in the age > 50 years are confirming these expectations. Also sick persons can take benefits from PCV13 applying back from so-called IPD

  16. Use of Pneumococcal Disease Epidemiology to Set Policy and Prevent Disease during 20 Years of the Emerging Infections Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Matthew R; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2015-09-01

    Two decades ago, the Emerging Infections Program of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention implemented what seemed like a simple yet novel idea: a population- and laboratory-based surveillance system designed to identify and characterize invasive bacterial infections, including those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. This system, known as Active Bacterial Core surveillance, has since served as a flexible platform for following trends in invasive pneumococcal disease and studying vaccination as the most effective method for prevention. We report the contributions of Active Bacterial Core surveillance to every pneumococcal vaccine policy decision in the United States during the past 20 years.

  17. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde N; Kristensen, Tim D; Kaltoft, Margit S

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to document the epidemiology, microbiology and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children vaccine (PCV7) into the Danish routine...... children vaccination....... immunization programme October 2007. Methods: Clinical and microbiological records on cases of IPD in children children

  18. Bacterial Invasion of the Inner Ear in Association With Pneumococcal Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the pathways of bacterial invasion and subsequent spreading in the inner ear during pneumococcal meningitis. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was used. METHODS: Thirty rats were inoculated intrathecally with S. pneumoniae...... scala vestibuli of the basal turn of the cochlea, hematogenous spreading occurred to the spiral ligament and into the cochlear endolymph, subsequently to the vestibular endolymph. We found no evidence of alternative routes for bacterial invasion in the inner ear. Several internal barriers to bacterial...... spreading were found within the inner ear. Bacterial elimination was evidenced by engulfment by macrophages within the inner ear. CONCLUSION: From the meninges, pneumococci invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct during the first days of infection, whereas hematogenous invasion via the spiral...

  19. Immunodeficiency among children with recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Schejbel, Lone; Lundstedt, A C

    2015-01-01

    examined. RESULTS: In total, rIPD were observed in 54 children (68 cases of rIPD of 2192 IPD cases). Children with classical risk factors for IPD were excluded, and among the remaining 22 children, 15 were eligible for analysis. Of these 6 (40%) were complement C2-deficient. Impaired vaccination response......BACKGROUND: Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (rIPD) occurs mostly in children with an underlying disease, but some cases remain unexplained. Immunodeficiency has been described in children with rIPD, but the prevalence is unknown. We used a nationwide registry of all laboratory......-confirmed cases of rIPD to identify cases of unexplained rIPD and examine them for immunodeficiency. METHODS: Cases of rIPD in children 0-15 years of age from 1980 to 2008 were identified. Children without an obvious underlying disease were screened for complement function, T-cell, B-cell, natural killer...

  20. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of unusual manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Adrian; Pérez-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa; Nodar, Andrés; Martínez-Lamas, Lucía; Vasallo, Francisco Jose; Álvarez-Fernández, Maximiliano; Crespo, Manuel

    2017-06-22

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically presents as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia. However, Streptococcus pneumoniae can produce infection at any level of the body (endocarditis, arthritis, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc.), which is also known as unusual IPD (uIPD). There are very limited data available about the clinical and microbiological profile of these uncommon manifestations of pneumococcal disease. Our aim was to analyse clinical forms, microbiological profile, epidemiology and prognosis of a cohort of patients with unusual invasive pneumococcal disease (uIPD). We present a retrospective study of 389 patients (all adult and paediatric patients diagnosed during the period) diagnosed with IPD at our hospital (Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo) between 1992 and 2014. We performed an analysis of clinical, microbiological and demographical characteristics of patients comparing the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) period with the post-vaccination phase. IPD and uIPD were defined as follows; IPD: infection confirmed by the isolation of S. pneumoniae from a normally sterile site, which classically presented as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia; uIPD: any case of IPD excluding pneumonia, meningitis, otitis media, rhinosinusitis or primary bacteraemia. A total of 22 patients (6%) met the criteria of uIPD. A Charlson index >2 was more prevalent in uIPD patients than IPD patients (45% vs 24%; p=0.08). The most common clinical presentation of uIPD was osteoarticular infection (8 patients, 36%), followed by gastrointestinal disease (4 patients, 18%). Infection with serotypes included in PCV-13 was significantly higher in IPD patients (65%) than in patients with uIPD, 35% (p=0.018). Conversely, infection with multidrug-resistant strains was higher among patient with uIPD (27% vs 9%; p=0.014). The all-cause mortality rate was 15%, 13% in the IPD group and 32% among patients with uIPD (p=0

  1. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

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    Quesne Gilles

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case.

  2. Indirect effects of childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Tinevimbo Shiri, DrPhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: The full extent to which childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV can indirectly reduce illness in unvaccinated populations is not known. We aimed to estimate the magnitude and timing of indirect effects of PCVs on invasive pneumococcal disease. Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched bibliographic databases for non-randomised quasi-experimental or observational studies reporting invasive pneumococcal disease changes following PCV introduction in unvaccinated populations (studies published Sept 1, 2010, to Jan 6, 2016, updating the previous systematic review of the same topic (studies published Jan 1, 1994, to Sept 30, 2010. Two reviewers extracted summary data by consensus. We used a Bayesian mixed-effects model to account for between-study heterogeneity to estimate temporal indirect effects by pooling of invasive pneumococcal disease changes by serotype and serogroup. Findings: Data were extracted from 70 studies included in the previous review and 172 additional studies, covering 27 high-income and seven middle-income countries. The predicted mean times to attaining a 90% reduction in invasive pneumococcal disease were 8·9 years (95% credible interval [CrI] 7·8–10·3 for grouped serotypes contained in the seven-valent PCV (PCV7, and 9·5 years (6·1–16·6 for the grouped six additional serotypes contained in the 13-valent PCV (PCV13 but not in PCV7. Disease due to grouped serotypes contained in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23 decreased at similar rates per year in adults aged 19–64 years (relative risk [RR] 0·85, 95% CrI 0·75–0·95 and 65 years and older (0·87, 0·84–0·90. However, we noted no changes in either group in invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the additional 11 serotypes covered by PPV23 but not PCV13. Interpretation: Population childhood PCV programmes will lead, on average, to substantial protection across the whole population

  3. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION: MODERN VIEW ON THE ISSUE AND PREVENTION

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    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococci are spread everywhere and they are very often a component of the microflora of the upper respiratory tracts. The level of the pneumococcus carriage is correlated with age. Among children the highest frequency is observed at the age of 4,5 years (up to 90% of cases, among adults it is 5–10%. According to international and Russian data, pneumococcal infection causes up to 76% of all the aetiologically deciphered cases of community cacquired pneumonia among adults and up to 94% (aggravated cases among children. The most frequent clinical forms of pneumococcal infection among children are acute otitis media (over 30%, pneumonia and meningitis (about 5–20% of all purulent bacterial meningitis, among adults — meningitis and sepsis. In 1998, in Russia was registered the first and still the only vaccine for the prevention of pneumococcal infection — Pneumo 23 (Sanofi Pasteur. The vaccine consists of 23 antic gens of the most dangerous pneumococcus serotypes and is used for the prevention of all the forms of pneumococcal infection. The composition of Pneumo 23 corresponds to 85% of pneumococcus serotypes circulating across Europe and to 90% serotypes resistant to penicillin. According to Russian data Pneumo 23 consists of about 80% of pneumococcus serotypes isolated in healthy carriers and ill with acute respiratory diseases and of 92% of serotypes in those suffering from acute bronchitis and pneumonia. The results of the clinical studies allow us to recommend the use of the given vaccine in a complex therapy of children, suffering from latent TB infection, often recurrent episodes of bronchopulmonary pathologies, ENT diseases, bronchial asthma and other chronic diseases.Key words: therapy, pediatrics, pneumonia, bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive lungs disease, prevention, treatment, pneumococcal infection.

  4. Mathematical modelling long-term effects of replacing Prevnar7 with Prevnar13 on invasive pneumococcal diseases in England and Wales.

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    Yoon Hong Choi

    Full Text Available England and Wales recently replaced the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 with its 13-valent equivalent (PCV13, partly based on projections from mathematical models of the long-term impact of such a switch compared to ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether.A compartmental deterministic model was used to estimate parameters governing transmission of infection and competition between different groups of pneumococcal serotypes prior to the introduction of PCV13. The best-fitting parameters were used in an individual based model to describe pneumococcal transmission dynamics and effects of various options for the vaccination programme change in England and Wales. A number of scenarios were conducted using (i different assumptions about the number of invasive pneumococcal disease cases adjusted for the increasing trend in disease incidence prior to PCV7 introduction in England and Wales, and (ii a range of values representing serotype replacement induced by vaccination of the additional six serotypes in PCV13.Most of the scenarios considered suggest that ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use would cause an increase in invasive pneumococcal disease incidence, while replacing PCV7 with PCV13 would cause an overall decrease. However, the size of this reduction largely depends on the level of competition induced by the additional serotypes in PCV13. The model estimates that over 20 years of PCV13 vaccination, around 5000-62000 IPD cases could be prevented compared to stopping pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether.Despite inevitable uncertainty around serotype replacement effects following introduction of PCV13, the model suggests a reduction in overall invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in all cases. Our results provide useful evidence on the benefits of PCV13 to countries replacing or considering replacing PCV7 with PCV13, as well as data that can be used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of such a switch.

  5. Therapy for pneumococcal infection at the millennium: doubts and certainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, P

    1999-07-26

    Rapidly burgeoning worldwide multiple drug-resistant pneumococcal serotypes pose an urgent demand for new management approaches. Perhaps modern intensive care methods may have alternatives to offer. Indeed, standard assessments such as the admission APACHE II score may overestimate individual risk of death in severe CAP, and mortality can be reduced. However, among those at highest risk for mortality in the early phase of invasive disease, the conclusions reached 2-3 decades ago, that it is questionable whether a more effective drug than penicillin can be developed, and that a reduction in the number of deaths consequent to this infection can be accomplished only by widespread immunoprophylactic measures, remain inescapable. Clearly, as discussed elsewhere in this supplement, the continuing validity of these 20-year-old conclusions and the global prevalence of DRSP demand the development and marketing of new conjugate vaccines, although more widespread use of the existing 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine among high-risk populations is essential in the interim. With respect to resistance selection pressures, antibiotic prescription control may provide the answer. However, patient expectations of antibiotic therapy for trivial respiratory infection is high and, in the United Kingdom, 75% of previously healthy adults will receive it; those who do not will usually consult another physician in an effort to secure such therapy. Thus, without the intervention of government or managed care organizations, self-regulation in prescribing is unlikely. The evidence for beta-lactam treatment failure in meningitis has led to alternative approaches, with vancomycin as the primary agent. Penicillins may remain effective for otitis media, but oral cephalosporins are suspect. Data on pediatric pneumococcal pneumonia continue to suggest use of beta-lactams, at least for disease caused by strains with intermediate penicillin sensitivity. Pallares et al concluded that penicillins and

  6. Risk factors for pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization before and after pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in persons with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Søgaard, Ole S; Harboe, Zitta B

    HIV-infected individuals have excess rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. We investigated risk factors for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization at baseline and after 9 months in 96 HIV patients immunized twice with 7- valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine ±1mg CPG 7909. In total, 22 patients...

  7. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFECT OF PNEUMOCOCCAL CONJUGATED VACCINES IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENTS

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    A.A. Tarasova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal infection is the most frequent cause of death in patients with immunodeficiences. The antibiotics used previously for prevention purposes are not efficient enough due to the developing antibiotic resistance. Polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines create short-lived immunity. The overview summarizes the experience of applying conjugated pneumococcal vaccines in patients with primary immunodeficiences, HIV infection, oncological and rheumatic diseases. Key words: pneumococcal infection, pneumococcal conjugated vaccines, children, immunosuppression. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(5:18-23

  8. Genetic diversity of pneumococcal surface protein A in invasive pneumococcal isolates from Korean children, 1991-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ki Wook; Choi, Eun Hwa; Lee, Hoan Jong

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is an important virulence factor of pneumococci and has been investigated as a primary component of a capsular serotype-independent pneumococcal vaccine. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic diversity of PspA to explore its potential as a vaccine candidate. Among the 190 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected from Korean children between 1991 and 2016, two (1.1%) isolates were found to have no pspA by multiple polymerase chain reactions. The full length pspA genes from 185 pneumococcal isolates were sequenced. The length of pspA varied, ranging from 1,719 to 2,301 base pairs with 55.7-100% nucleotide identity. Based on the sequences of the clade-defining regions, 68.7% and 49.7% were in PspA family 2 and clade 3/family 2, respectively. PspA clade types were correlated with genotypes using multilocus sequence typing and divided into several subclades based on diversity analysis of the N-terminal α-helical regions, which showed nucleotide sequence identities of 45.7-100% and amino acid sequence identities of 23.1-100%. Putative antigenicity plots were also diverse among individual clades and subclades. The differences in antigenicity patterns were concentrated within the N-terminal 120 amino acids. In conclusion, the N-terminal α-helical domain, which is known to be the major immunogenic portion of PspA, is genetically variable and should be further evaluated for antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between various PspA types from pneumococcal isolates.

  9. Pneumococcal Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the cause. In the case of pneumococcal disease, antibiotics can help prevent severe illness. Diagnosis If doctors suspect invasive ... In addition to the vaccine, appropriate use of antibiotics may also slow or reverse drug-resistant pneumococcal infections. Related Links ... Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, ...

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-2 childhood meningitis in Bangladesh: a newly recognized pneumococcal infection threat.

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    Samir K Saha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of meningitis in countries where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV targeting commonly occurring serotypes are not routinely used. However, effectiveness of PCV would be jeopardized by emergence of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD caused by serotypes which are not included in PCV. Systematic hospital based surveillance in Bangladesh was established and progressively improved to determine the pathogens causing childhood sepsis and meningitis. This also provided the foundation for determining the spectrum of serotypes causing IPD. This article reports an unprecedented upsurge of serotype 2, an uncommon pneumococcal serotype, without any known intervention. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cases with suspected IPD had blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF collected from the beginning of 2001 till 2009. Pneumococcal serotypes were determined by capsular swelling of isolates or PCR of culture-negative CSF specimens. Multicenter national surveillance, expanded from 2004, identified 45,437 patients with suspected bacteremia who were blood cultured and 10,618 suspected meningitis cases who had a lumber puncture. Pneumococcus accounted for 230 culture positive cases of meningitis in children <5 years. Serotype-2 was the leading cause of pneumococcal meningitis, accounting for 20.4% (45/221; 95% CI 15%-26% of cases. Ninety eight percent (45/46 of these serotype-2 strains were isolated from meningitis cases, yielding the highest serotype-specific odds ratio for meningitis (29.6; 95% CI 3.4-256.3. The serotype-2 strains had three closely related pulsed field gel electrophoresis types. CONCLUSIONS: S. pneumoniae serotype-2 was found to possess an unusually high potential for causing meningitis and was the leading serotype-specific cause of childhood meningitis in Bangladesh over the past decade. Persisting disease occurrence or progressive spread would represent a major potential infection threat since serotype-2

  11. PROPHYLAXIS OF PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN HAS POSITIVE EFFECT ON ALL POPULATION

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    M.V. Fedoseenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern data of effectiveness prophylaxis of pneumococcal infection in children younger 1 year old with vaccine is presented in this article. Including of 7 - valency pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV-7 in immunization program of some countries resulted in decrease of morbidity as in vaccinated group, as in all population. It was marked that vaccination with PCV-7 plays important pathogenetic role in termination of hidden forms of disease and prevention of spreading of pneumococcal infection, including the most severe types, hardly treated with antibiotics.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination.

  12. Pneumococcal serotypes and serogroups causing invasive disease in Pakistan, 2005-2013.

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    Sadia Shakoor

    Full Text Available While pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been implemented in most countries worldwide, use in Asia has lagged in part because of a lack of data on the amount of disease that is vaccine preventable in the region. We describe pneumococcal serotypes elicited from 111 episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD from 2005 to 2013 among children and adults in Pakistan. Seventy-three percent (n = 81 of 111 IPD episodes were cases of meningitis (n = 76 in children 0-15 years and n = 5 among adults. Serotypes were determined by target amplification of DNA extracted from pneumococcal isolates (n = 52 or CSF specimens (n = 59. Serogroup 18 was the most common serogroup causing meningitis in children <5 years, accounting for 21% of cases (n = 13. The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV 10 or PCV10- related serotypes were found in 61% (n = 47 of childhood (age 0-15 years meningitis episodes. PCV-13 increased this coverage to 63% (one additional serotype 19A; n = 48. Our data indicate that use of PCVs would prevent a large proportion of serious pneumococcal disease.

  13. Three Decades of Follow-up of Adults After Recovery From Invasive Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oluwadamilare O; Norton, Nancy B; Gress, Todd W; Stanek, Ronald J; Mufson, Maurice A

    2017-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) carries a high case fatality rate. We investigated the lifespan of adults who recovered from IPD during a 32-year follow-up. We determined whether adults discharged after an episode of IPD from hospitals affiliated with the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in Huntington, West Virginia from 1983-2003 were alive on June 30, 2014. Lifespan was assessed by Kaplan-Meier methodology, Cox proportional hazards multivariate analysis, life expectancy using life tables for West Virginia, years of potential life lost and serotype occurrence. The study group comprised 155 adults who survived IPD. They had a mean age at discharge of 64.6 years, mean lifespan after IPD of 7.1 years, mean expected lifespan after IPD of 17.0 years, mean age at death of 71.6 years and a mean life expectancy of 81.6 years. Only 14 (9.0%) patients lived longer than their life expectancy. Of the 13 comorbid diseases analyzed, cancer and neurologic diseases and the number of comorbid diseases suffered by each patient were the significant variables associated with survival. The mean years of potential life lost was 9.936 years. Only serotype 12 of 31 serotypes recovered occurred more often in patients who survived for 11 or more years after discharge (relative risk = 3.44, 95% CI: 1.19-9.95). The fact that most adult patients who recovered from IPD died before their documented life expectancy argues for the pernicious severity of IPD and the importance of immunization of adults with pneumococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  15. Celiac Disease and Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Malorie; Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Risech-Neyman, Yesenia; Moss, Steven F; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with hyposplenism, and multiple case reports link celiac disease and pneumococcal infections; however, increased risk of pneumococcal infection in celiac disease has not been confirmed. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the risk of pneumococcal infections in celiac disease. Relevant studies were identified using electronic bibliographic searches of PubMed, OVID, Medline, and EMBASE (1980 to February 2017) and reviewing abstracts from major conferences in gastroenterology. Using number of events in celiac patients and referent patients, we calculated a summary relative risk of pneumococcal infections. All analyses were conducted in Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software using random-effects assumptions. Of a total of 156 articles, 3, representing 3 large databases (the Swedish National Inpatient Register; the Oxford Record Linkage Study; and the English National Hospital Episode Statistics) were included. Each compared patients with celiac disease and confirmed pneumococcal infection to a specific reference group: inpatients and/or the general population. Overall, the odds of pneumococcal infection were higher among hospitalized celiac patients compared with controls (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.92). There was no evidence of heterogeneity (Q[1] = 1.17, P = .56, I 2  = 0%). Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal infection. Preventive pneumococcal vaccination should be considered for those with celiac disease, with special attention to those aged 15-64 years who have not received the scheduled pneumococcal vaccination series as a child. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David

    2015-01-01

    to at least 1 protein compared to 51% of non-IPD controls. HIV IPD cases responded to more proteins than non-IPD controls (8.6 ± 8.4 vs 4.2 ± 7.6 proteins; P = .01), and had a significantly higher probability of yielding an antibody response to the proteins PiaA, PsaA, and PcpA. Twenty-two percent of HIV......-infected individuals with IPD had a serotype-specific antibody response. Younger age at the time of IPD was the only predictor of a serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody response, whereas we did not identify predictors of a protein-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses occurred more frequently...

  17. Epidemiological burden of invasive pneumococcal disease in children and adolescents with predisposing risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falleiros-Arlant, Luiza Helena; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Avila-Aguero, Maria Luisa; Pirez, Maria Catalina; Gentile, Angela; Richardson, Vesta; Brea, Jose; Mariño, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Some medical conditions constitute important risk factors for the development of invasive pneumococcal diseases in children and adolescents aged from 5 to 19 years. Conjugate vaccines have potential efficacy in this scenario, but are not available in many Latin American public healthcare systems for this age group. This study aimed to estimate the preventable fraction of invasive pneumococcal diseases among individuals aged from 5 to 19 years with associated risk factors for its development. Data regarding the Latin America population, risk factors prevalence and conjugate vaccines efficacy were obtained from the literature. Total population at risk ranged from 17.3 to 64.6 million of individuals and asthma was the most impacting risk factor. According to SIREVA, PCV13 provided a 62.9% serotypes coverage in individuals from 5 to 29 years in 2012, potentially increasing the covered population from [8,338,457-31,057,620] with PCV10 to [10,906,356-40,622,078] with PCV13. To date, according to available efficacy data, the hypothetically immunized population ranged from 11.4 to 42.4 million, representing 7.0% to 26.0% of the total population in this age group. Vaccination in risk groups should be encouraged, as it potentially contributes to the reduction in the number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION AND ASSOCIATED DISEASES — A SERIOUS PROBLEM OF MODERN HEALTH CARE

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    A.A. Baranov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal infection is one of the most widespread reasons for the development of infections of the respiratory passages (otitis, sinusitis in children. At the same time, it may act as an etiological factor of severe urgent conditions, such as pneumococcal meningitis and pneumococcal pneumonia, especially in children under 2 years old. A reliable method for preventing this infection is specific immunological prophylaxis. The article covers in detail the issue of vaccination in Russia and in other countries. The necessity of vaccination of all infants is demonstrated, as well as the necessity of participation in resolving this issue not only of pediatricians but governmental institutions as well in order to enhance safety and efficiency of vaccination and include this vaccine into the national calendar.Key words: pneumococcal infection, forms, complications, vaccination, national vaccination calendar, risk groups, children.

  19. c-di-GMP is an Effective Immunomodulator and Vaccine Adjuvant Against Pneumococcal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.; Paton, James C.; Kirby, Alun C.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Cook, Jan; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Karaolis, David K. R.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a unique bacterial intracellular signaling molecule capable of stimulating enhanced protective innate immunity against various bacterial infections. The effects of intranasal pretreatment with c-di-GMP, or intraperitoneal coadministration of c-di-GMP with the pneumolysin toxoid (PdB) or PspA before pneumococcal challenge, was investigated in mice. We found that c-di-GMP had no significant direct short-term effect on the growth rate of S. pneumoniae either in vitro or in vivo. However, intranasal pretreatment of mice with c-di-GMP resulted in significant decrease in bacterial load in lungs and blood after serotypes 2 and 3 challenge, and significant decrease in lung titers after serotype 4 challenge. Potential cellular mediators of these enhanced protective responses were identified in lungs and draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal coadministration of c-di-GMP with PdB or PspA before challenge resulted in significantly higher antigen-specific antibody titers and increased survival of mice, compared to that obtained with alum adjuvant. These findings demonstrate that local or systemic c-di-GMP administration stimulates innate and adaptive immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease. We propose that c-di-GMP can be used as an effective broad spectrum immunomodulator and vaccine adjuvant to prevent infectious diseases. PMID:18640167

  20. Serotype-specific changes in invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction: a pooled analysis of multiple surveillance sites.

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    Daniel R Feikin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccine-serotype (VT invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD rates declined substantially following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 into national immunization programs. Increases in non-vaccine-serotype (NVT IPD rates occurred in some sites, presumably representing serotype replacement. We used a standardized approach to describe serotype-specific IPD changes among multiple sites after PCV7 introduction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Of 32 IPD surveillance datasets received, we identified 21 eligible databases with rate data ≥ 2 years before and ≥ 1 year after PCV7 introduction. Expected annual rates of IPD absent PCV7 introduction were estimated by extrapolation using either Poisson regression modeling of pre-PCV7 rates or averaging pre-PCV7 rates. To estimate whether changes in rates had occurred following PCV7 introduction, we calculated site specific rate ratios by dividing observed by expected IPD rates for each post-PCV7 year. We calculated summary rate ratios (RRs using random effects meta-analysis. For children <5 years old, overall IPD decreased by year 1 post-PCV7 (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.46-0.65 and remained relatively stable through year 7 (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.35-0.68. Point estimates for VT IPD decreased annually through year 7 (RR 0.03, 95% CI 0.01-0.10, while NVT IPD increased (year 7 RR 2.81, 95% CI 2.12-3.71. Among adults, decreases in overall IPD also occurred but were smaller and more variable by site than among children. At year 7 after introduction, significant reductions were observed (18-49 year-olds [RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29-0.91], 50-64 year-olds [RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.93], and ≥ 65 year-olds [RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.95]. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent and significant decreases in both overall and VT IPD in children occurred quickly and were sustained for 7 years after PCV7 introduction, supporting use of PCVs. Increases in NVT IPD occurred in most sites, with variable magnitude. These findings may not

  1. Perfluorocarbon emulsion therapy attenuates pneumococcal infection in sickle cell mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Nawal; Andrew, Peter W; Pandya, Hitesh C

    2015-05-15

    Impaired immunity and tissue hypoxia-ischemia are strongly linked with Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenesis in patients with sickle cell anemia. Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFCEs) have high O2-dissolving capacity and can alleviate tissue hypoxia. Here, we evaluate the effects of intravenous PFCE therapy in transgenic sickle cell (HbSS) mice infected with S. pneumoniae. HbSS and C57BL/6 (control) mice intravenously infected with S. pneumoniae were treated intravenously with PFCE or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and then managed in either air/O2 (FiO2 proportion, 50%; hereafter referred to as the PFCE-O2 and PBS-O2 groups) or air only (hereafter, the PFCE-air and PBS-air groups) gas mixtures. Lungs were processed for leukocyte and bacterial counts and cytokine measurements. HbSS mice developed severe pneumococcal infection significantly faster than C57BL/6 mice (Kaplan-Maier analysis, P < .05). PFCE-O2-treated HbSS mice had significantly better survival at 72 hours than HBSS mice treated with PFCE-air, PBS-O2, or PBS-air (P < .05). PFCE-O2-treated HbSS mice also had significantly lower pulmonary leukocyte counts, lower interleukin 1β and interferon γ levels, and higher interleukin 10 levels than PFCE-air-treated HbSS mice. Clearance of S. pneumoniae from lungs of HbSS mice or C57BL/6 mice was not altered by PFCE treatment. Improved survival of PFCE-O₂-treated HbSS mice infected with S. pneumoniae is associated with altered pulmonary inflammation but not enhanced bacterial clearance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Serotype distribution of pneumococci isolated from pediatric patients with acute otitis media and invasive infections, and potential coverage of pneumococcal conjugated vaccines Distribución de serotipos de neumococos aislados de pacientes pediátricos con otitis media aguda e infecciones invasivas y su cobertura potencial a través de vacunas conjugadas

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    Vanesa Reijtman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 16-month prospective, descriptive study was conducted on pneumococcal serotype distribution isolated from children with acute otitis media (AÜM and invasive infections (INV. Eighty-nine children with pneumococcal INV and 324 with a first episode of AOM were included. Bacterial pathogens (N = 326 were isolated from the middle-ear fluid of 250 patients. A total of 30 pneumococcal serotypes were identified. Prevalent serotypes were 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F, and 18C in AOM and 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B, and 18C in INV. Potential coverage with PCV10 vaccine would be 46.5 % and 60.7 % for pneumococci involved in AOM and INV, respectively; it would be 71.7 % and 73 % with PCV13. PCV10, conjugated with a Haemophilus protein, would have an immunologic coverage of 39.9 % for AOM vs. 18.5 % with PCV13. However, differences in the prevention of INV were crucial for the decision to include the 13-valent vaccine in the national calendar for children less than two years old in Argentina.Se realizó un estudio prospectivo descriptivo sobre la distribución de serotipos de neumococos aislados de niños con otitis media aguda (OMA y con infecciones invasivas (INV en un período de 16 meses. Se incluyeron 89 niños con INV neumocócicas y 324 con un primer episodio de OMA. Trescientos cuarenta y seis patógenos se aislaron de las secreciones de oído medio obtenidas de 250 pacientes. Se identificaron 30 serotipos y los más prevalentes fueron el 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F y 18C en OMA y el 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B y 18C en INV. La cobertura potencial con la vacuna PCV10 sería de 46,5 % y 60,7 % para neumococos involucrados en OMA y en INV, respectivamente; con la PCV13, esta sería de 71,7 % y 73 %. La PCV10 conjugada con una proteína de Haemophilus tendría una cobertura inmunológica del 39,9 % para OMA, contra una cobertura del 18,5 % de la PCV13. Sin embargo, las diferencias en la prevención de INV fueron determinantes a la hora de considerar

  3. Invasive pneumococcal disease : Clinical outcomes and patient characteristics 2-6 years after introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to the pre-vaccine period, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H J; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Elberse, Karin E.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Implementation of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the Dutch national immunization program for infants led to a shift from vaccine to non-vaccine serotypes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in all age groups. We studied the impact of the serotype shift on clinical

  4. AdcAII of Streptococcus pneumoniae Affects Pneumococcal Invasiveness.

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    Lindsey R Brown

    Full Text Available Across bacterial species, metal binding proteins can serve functions in pathogenesis in addition to regulating metal homeostasis. We have compared and contrasted the activities of zinc (Zn2+-binding lipoproteins AdcA and AdcAII in the Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 background. Exposure to Zn2+-limiting conditions resulted in delayed growth in a strain lacking AdcAII (ΔAdcAII when compared to wild type bacteria or a mutant lacking AdcA (ΔAdcA. AdcAII failed to interact with the extracellular matrix protein laminin despite homology to laminin-binding proteins of related streptococci. Deletion of AdcA or AdcAII led to significantly increased invasion of A549 human lung epithelial cells and a trend toward increased invasion in vivo. Loss of AdcAII, but not AdcA, was shown to negatively impact early colonization of the nasopharynx. Our findings suggest that expression of AdcAII affects invasiveness of S. pneumoniae in response to available Zn2+ concentrations.

  5. CXCR1/2 Antagonism Is Protective during Influenza and Post-Influenza Pneumococcal Infection

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    Luciana P. Tavares

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available RationaleInfluenza A infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide especially when associated with secondary pneumococcal infections. Inflammation is important to control pathogen proliferation but may also cause tissue injury and death. CXCR1/2 are chemokine receptors relevant for the recruitment of neutrophils. We investigated the role of CXCR1/2 during influenza, pneumococcal, and post-influenza pneumococcal infections.MethodsMice were infected with influenza A virus (IAV or Streptococcus pneumoniae and then treated daily with the CXCR1/2 antagonist DF2162. To study secondary pneumococcal infection, mice were infected with a sublethal inoculum of IAV then infected with S. pneumoniae 14 days later. DF2162 was given in a therapeutic schedule from days 3 to 6 after influenza infection. Lethality, weight loss, inflammation, virus/bacteria counts, and lung injury were assessed.ResultsCXCL1 and CXCL2 were produced at high levels during IAV infection. DF2162 treatment decreased morbidity and this was associated with decreased infiltration of neutrophils in the lungs and reduced pulmonary damage and viral titers. During S. pneumoniae infection, DF2162 treatment decreased neutrophil recruitment, pulmonary damage, and lethality rates, without affecting bacteria burden. Therapeutic treatment with DF2162 during sublethal IAV infection reduced the morbidity associated with virus infection and also decreased the magnitude of inflammation, lung damage, and number of bacteria in the blood of mice subsequently infected with S. pneumoniae.ConclusionModulation of the inflammatory response by blocking CXCR1/2 improves disease outcome during respiratory influenza and pneumococcal infections, without compromising the ability of the murine host to deal with infection. Altogether, inhibition of CXCR1/2 may be a valid therapeutic strategy for treating lung infections caused by these pathogens, especially controlling secondary bacterial

  6. PCR deduction of invasive and colonizing pneumococcal serotypes from Venezuela: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Gonzalez, Teresita; Rivera-Olivero, Ismar Alejandra; Sisco, María Carolina; Spadola, Enza; Hermans, Peter W; de Waard, Jacobus H

    2014-04-15

    Serotype surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae is indispensable for evaluating the potential impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Serotyping by the standard Quellung reaction is technically demanding, time consuming, and expensive. A simple and economical strategy is multiplex PCR-based serotyping. We evaluated the cost effectiveness of a modified serial multiplex PCR (mPCR), resolving 24 serotypes in four PCR reactions and optimally targeting the most prevalent invasive and colonizing pneumococcal serotypes found in Venezuela. A total of 223 pneumococcal isolates, 140 invasive and 83 carriage isolates, previously serotyped by the Quellung reaction and representing the 18 most common serotypes/groups identified in Venezuela, were serotyped with the adapted mPCR. The mPCR serotyped 76% of all the strains in the first two PCR reactions and 91% after four reactions, correctly identifying 17 serotypes/groups. An isolate could be serotyped with mPCR in less than 2 minutes versus 15 minutes for the Quellung reaction, considerably lowering labor costs. A restrictive weakness of mPCR was found for the detection of 19F strains. Most Venezuelan 19F strains were not typeable using the mPCR, and two 19F cps serotype variants were identified. The mPCR assay is an accurate, rapid, and economical method for the identification of the vast majority of the serotypes from Venezuela and can be used in place of the standard Quellung reaction. An exception is the identification of serotype 19F. In this setting, most 19F strains were not detectable with mPCR, demonstrating a need of serology-based quality control for PCR-based serotyping.

  7. Mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most children are transiently colonized with Streptococcus pneumoniae, but very few develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Host genetic variation of innate immunity may predispose to IPD. We investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2......, on susceptibility and disease severity of IPD in previously healthy children aged

  8. Time-resolved dual RNA-seq reveals extensive rewiring of lung epithelial and pneumococcal transcriptomes during early infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprianto, Rieza; Slager, Jelle; Holsappel, Siger; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, the pneumococcus, is the main etiological agent of pneumonia. Pneumococcal infection is initiated by bacterial adherence to lung epithelial cells. The exact transcriptional changes occurring in both host and microbe during infection are unknown. Here, we

  9. [Increase in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by serotype 19A prior to the implementation of the expanded pneumococcal vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, F; Saavedra Lozano, J; Navarro Gómez, M L; Santos Sebastián, M M; Rodríguez Fernández, R; González Sánchez, M; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T

    2013-11-01

    To describe the epidemiology, clinical syndromes and microbiological characteristics of serotype 19A as the main cause of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Spain. A retrospective (1998-2004) and prospective (2005-2009) study was conducted on children with IPD produced by serotype 19A. The study was divided into three periods (P): P1 (1998-2001) when PCV7 had not been commercialized; P2 (2002-2005) with 40% vaccine coverage among children; and P3 (2006-2009) when the vaccine was added to the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Madrid. A total of 155 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) producing IPD were analysed, with 21 of them being serotype 19A (14%). An increased prevalence of serotype 19A was found: 2/45 cases (4.4%) in P1, 3/41 cases (7.3%) in P2 and 16/69 cases (23.2%) in P3. It occurred mostly in children younger than 2 years (16/21; 76%). This serotype was the main cause of meningitis (5/20; 25%), pleural empyema (3/22; 14%) and bacteraemic mastoiditis (2/4; 50%). Thirteen isolates (61.5%) had an MIC ≥ 0.12μ/ml for penicillin in extra-meningeal infections, and 3 of the 5 isolates causing meningitis (60%) had an MIC ≥ 1μ/ml for cefotaxime. Serotype 19A was the main causal agent of IPD in the PCV7 era (P3), with high antibiotic resistance rates. This serotype was responsible for all types of IPD, being the main cause of meningitis. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Guatemala City: Importance of Serotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensbauer, James T; Asturias, Edwin J; Soto, Monica; Holt, Elizabeth; Olson, Daniel; Halsey, Neal A

    2016-05-01

    To inform estimations of the potential impact of recently introduced pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), we report results of 11 years of pre-PCV surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children in Guatemala City. Cases of IPD in children younger than 5 years were identified by active surveillance at 3 referral hospitals in Guatemala City from October 1996 through 2007. Clinical and demographic data were obtained, and isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from normally sterile sites were serotyped using latex agglutination and confirmed by Quellung reaction. Four hundred fifty-two cases of IPD were identified with a case fatality rate of 21%. Meningitis was the most common cause of death (77% of all deaths) and occurred more often in infancy (median age 5 months) than other clinical syndromes. Of the 137 isolates serotyped, type 1 (26 cases, 17%), type 2 (25 cases, 16%) and type 5 (18 cases, 12%) were the most common. Serotype 2 was associated with a higher case fatality rate (28%), higher rate of meningitis (68%) and occurred in younger infants (median age, 3.5 months) than other common serotypes. Recently introduced PCV13 includes 73% of observed serotypes in the study. Infants with IPD presented at a young age. Serotype 2, rarely reported as a significant cause of IPD and not included in available PCVs, was a common cause of disease in this population. PCV13 introduction in Guatemala, begun in 2013, may not have as great an impact in disease reduction as has been observed in other countries.

  11. [Emergence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes in the era of the 7-valent conjugate vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, F; Navarro Gómez, M L; Saavedra Lozano, J; Santos Sebastián, M M; Rodríguez Fernández, R; González Sanchéz, M; Cercenado Mansilla, E; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T

    2014-03-01

    There has been an increased incidence in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) produced by non-vaccine serotype (NVS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae after the introduction of PCV7. Our objective was to describe the epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics of IPD caused by NVS in a tertiary hospital in Madrid. Retrospective (1998-2004) and prospective (2005-2009) study evaluating IPD caused by NVS in children. The study was divided into three periods: P1 (1998-2001) when PCV7 was not commercialized; P2 (2002-2005) with 40% vaccine coverage among children; and P3 (2006-2009) when the vaccine was added to the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Madrid. We analyzed 155 cases of IPD. One hundred and fifty of these isolates were serotyped (100 were NVS). There was an increase in the prevalence of IPD from P1 (31%) to P2 (54%) and P3 (91%). The most relevant emerging serotypes were 19A, 7F, 1, 5, 3 and 15C. The most significant clinical syndromes produced by some specific serotypes were as follows: lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) by serotypes 1, 3, 5 and 15C; LRTI, primary bacteremia and meningitis by serotype 19A; and primary bacteremia by serotype 7F (66%). The large majority (83.8%) of NVS were sensitive to penicillin. There has been an increased prevalence of IPD caused by NVS since the introduction of PCV7. These changes should prompt the introduction of new pneumococcal vaccines, which include most of the NVS, in the childhood immunization calendar to prevent IPD in children. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in the Canadian North from 1999 to 2010

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    Melissa Helferty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . The International Circumpolar Surveillance network is a population-based surveillance system that collects data on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in Northern Canada. A 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was first introduced in some regions of Northern Canada in 2002, followed by 10-valent (2009 and 13-valent (PCV-13 vaccines (2010. A 23-valent polysaccharide (PPV-23 vaccine was first introduced in 1988 for special populations and adults aged 65 years and older. To describe the epidemiology in the context of pneumococcal vaccination programs, we analysed surveillance data from Northern Canada from 1999 to 2010. Methods . A standardized case report form capturing demographic and clinical information was completed for all IPD cases in Northern Canada meeting the national case definition. Isolates were sent to a reference laboratory for confirmation, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance testing. Both laboratory and epidemiological data were sent to the Public Health Agency of Canada for analysis. Population denominators were obtained from Statistics Canada. Results . From 1999 to 2010, 433 IPD cases were reported (average 36 cases per year. Incidence was greatest among infants aged <2 years and among those aged 65 years and older, with an average annual incidence of 133 and 67 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. After a peak in incidence in 2008, rates among infants have declined. Incidence rates varied from 2 to 16 times greater, depending on the year, among Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. Hospitalization was reported in 89% of all cases and the case fatality ratio was 6.0%. Clinical manifestations varied, with some patients reporting >1 manifestation. Pneumonia was the most common (70%, followed by bacteremia/septicaemia (30% and meningitis (8%. Approximately, 42% of cases aged <2 years in 2009 and 2010 had serotypes covered by the PCV-13. In addition, the majority (89% of serotypes isolated in cases

  13. Invasive pneumococcal disease in healthy adults: increase of empyema associated with the clonal-type Sweden(1-ST306.

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    Imma Grau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD occurs mainly in the elderly and patients with co-morbidities. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, serotypes and genotypes causing IPD in healthy adults. METHODS: We studied 745 culture-proven cases of IPD in adult patients aged 18-64 years (1996-2010. Patients were included in two groups: 1. adults with co-morbidities, and 2. healthy adults, who had no prior or coincident diagnosis of a chronic or immunosuppressive underlying disease. Microbiological studies included pneumococcal serotyping and genotyping. RESULTS: Of 745 IPD episodes, 525 (70% occurred in patients with co-morbidities and 220 (30% in healthy adults. The healthy adults with IPD were often smokers (56% or alcohol abusers (18%. As compared to patients with co-morbidities, the healthy adults had (P<0.05: younger age (43.5+/-13.1 vs. 48.7+/-11.3 years; higher proportions of women (45% vs. 24%, pneumonia with empyema (15% vs. 7% and infection with non-PCV7 serotypes including serotypes 1 (25% vs. 5%, 7F (13% vs. 4%, and 5 (7% vs. 2%; and lower mortality (5% vs. 20%. Empyema was more frequently caused by serotype 1. No death occurred among 79 patients with serotype 1 IPD. There was an emergence of virulent clonal-types Sweden(1-ST306 and Netherlands(7F-ST191. The vaccine serotype coverage with the PCV13 was higher in healthy adults than in patients with co-morbidities: 82% and 56%, respectively, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: In this clinical study, one-third of adults with IPD had no underlying chronic or immunosuppressive diseases (healthy adults. They were often smokers and alcohol abusers, and frequently presents with pneumonia and empyema caused by virulent clones of non-PCV7 serotypes such as the Sweden(1-ST306. Thus, implementing tobacco and alcohol abuse-cessation measures and a proper pneumococcal vaccination, such as PCV13 policy, in active smokers and alcohol abusers may diminish the burden of IPD in adults.

  14. New Pneumococcal Carriage Acquired in Association with Acute Respiratory Infection Is Prone to Cause Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auranen, Kari; Syrjänen, Ritva; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi

    2016-01-01

    For considering vaccine-prevention of pneumococcal acute otitis media (PncAOM), relationships between pneumococcal carriage, respiratory infection and PncAOM need to be understood. We analyzed nasopharyngeal samples collected from 329 unvaccinated Finnish children aged 2-24 months at scheduled visits and at visits during respiratory infection in 1994-97. We assessed temporal associations of respiratory infection with pneumococcal acquisition and whether PncAOM hazard depends on the relative timing of acquisition and the infection onset. The data comprised 607 person-years of risk-time for acquisition, 245 person-months of concurrent respiratory infection and carriage, and 119 episodes of PncAOM. The acquisition hazard was 3-fold in the month preceding respiratory sickness (hazard ratio, HR 3.5, 90% credible interval CI 2.9, 4.1) as compared to acquisition in healthy children. Moreover, the PncAOM hazard was markedly higher (HR 3.7, 90% CI 2.4, 5.3) during the first month of carriage acquired around the acute phase of respiratory infection (between 1 month before and 1 week after the sickness onset), as compared to carriage acquired later during sickness. The high proportion (76%) of PncAOM events occurring within 1 month of acquisition was due to frequent acquisition being associated with respiratory infection as well as the susceptibility of such acquisition to cause otitis media.

  15. Host Factors and Biomarkers Associated with Poor Outcomes in Adults with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

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    Shigeo Hanada

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD causes considerable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify host factors and biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in adult patients with IPD in Japan, which has a rapidly-aging population.In a large-scale surveillance study of 506 Japanese adults with IPD, we investigated the role of host factors, disease severity, biomarkers based on clinical laboratory data, treatment regimens, and bacterial factors on 28-day mortality.Overall mortality was 24.1%, and the mortality rate increased from 10.0% in patients aged ˂50 years to 33.1% in patients aged ≥80 years. Disease severity also increased 28-day mortality, from 12.5% among patients with bacteraemia without sepsis to 35.0% in patients with severe sepsis and 56.9% with septic shock. The death rate within 48 hours after admission was high at 54.9%. Risk factors for mortality identified by multivariate analysis were as follows: white blood cell (WBC count <4000 cells/μL (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-12.8, p < .001; age ≥80 years (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.0-21.6, p = .002; serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.5-8.1, p < .001; underlying liver disease (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6-7.8, p = .002; mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.6, p < .001; and lactate dehydrogenase ≥300 IU/L (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.0, p = .001. Pneumococcal serotype and drug resistance were not associated with poor outcomes.Host factors, disease severity, and biomarkers, especially WBC counts and serum creatinine, were more important determinants of mortality than bacterial factors.

  16. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients with invasive pneumococcal disease in Brazil before and after ten-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Silvia R; Passadore, Lilian F; Takagi, Elizabeth H; Fujii, Cristiane M; Yoshioka, Cristina R M; Gilio, Alfredo E; Martinez, Marina B

    2013-12-09

    The ten-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the national immunization program for childhood vaccination schedules by the Brazilian Health Public Service in March 2010. The aim of this study was to compare Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and potential coverage before (January 2006-June 2010) and after (July 2010-September 2012) PCV10 introduction. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), patient demographics, and disease characteristics were recorded. This study was conducted at the University Hospital of Sao Paulo University in Brazil from January 2006 to September 2012. Serotyping was performed using multiplex PCR typing, and antimicrobial sensitivity by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). A total of 259 S. pneumoniae strains were isolated from patients with IPD. The ages of the patients ranged from 3 months to 95 years old. The strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, pleural fluid, and blood. The incidence of IPD among patients at HU-USP changed after the introduction of PCV10. The overall incidence of IPD was 3.42 cases per 1000 admissions in the vaccine pre- implementation period and of 2.99 cases per 1000 admissions in the vaccine post-implementation period. The incidence of IPD among children<2 y.o. attended at HU-USP changed significantly after the introduction of PCV10, from 20.30 to 3.97 of incidence. The incidence of PCV10- serotypes decrease from 16.47 to 0.44 in the same age, before and after PC10 implementation, respectively. Moreover, it was possible to realize the sensitivity to penicillin among isolates increased significantly in the post-vaccine period. Data from this study suggest that PCV10 contributed to decrease with PID rate among children less than 2 y.o. The resistance rate among pneumococcal isolates also could be observed since serotypes with greater resistance to beta lactam antibiotics were not easily isolated after vaccination

  17. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  18. A Biomathematical Model of Pneumococcal Lung Infection and Antibiotic Treatment in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirm, Sibylle; Ahnert, Peter; Wienhold, Sandra; Mueller-Redetzky, Holger; Nouailles-Kursar, Geraldine; Loeffler, Markus; Witzenrath, Martin; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is considered to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The outcome depends on both, proper antibiotic treatment and the effectivity of the immune response of the host. However, due to the complexity of the immunologic cascade initiated during infection, the latter cannot be predicted easily. We construct a biomathematical model of the murine immune response during infection with pneumococcus aiming at predicting the outcome of antibiotic treatment. The model consists of a number of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing dynamics of pneumococcal population, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, neutrophils and macrophages fighting the infection and destruction of alveolar tissue due to pneumococcus. Equations were derived by translating known biological mechanisms and assuming certain response kinetics. Antibiotic therapy is modelled by a transient depletion of bacteria. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to data sets derived from mice experiments of pneumococcal lung infection with and without antibiotic treatment. Time series of pneumococcal population, debris, neutrophils, activated epithelial cells, macrophages, monocytes and IL-6 serum concentrations were available for this purpose. The antibiotics Ampicillin and Moxifloxacin were considered. Parameter fittings resulted in a good agreement of model and data for all experimental scenarios. Identifiability of parameters is also estimated. The model can be used to predict the performance of alternative schedules of antibiotic treatment. We conclude that we established a biomathematical model of pneumococcal lung infection in mice allowing predictions regarding the outcome of different schedules of antibiotic treatment. We aim at translating the model to the human situation in the near future.

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 nasal administration improves recovery of T-cell mediated immunity against pneumococcal infection in malnourished mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, N; Herrera, M; Salva, S; Villena, J; Alvarez, S

    2017-05-30

    Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria have become an interesting alternative for the prevention of respiratory infections. Previously, we demonstrated that the nasal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505, during repletion of malnourished mice, resulted in diminished susceptibility to the challenge with the respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Considering the known alterations induced by malnutrition on T lymphocytes and the importance of this cell population on the protection against respiratory pathogens, we aimed to study the effect of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 nasal administration on the recovery of T cell-mediated defences against pneumococcal infection in malnourished mice under nutritional recovery. Malnourished mice received a balanced conventional diet (BCD) for seven days or BCD for seven days with nasal L. rhamnosus CRL1505 supplementation during last two days of the treatment. After the treatments mice were infected with S. pneumoniae. Flow cytometry studies were carried out in bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lung to study T cells, and Th 1 /Th 2 cytokine profiles were determined in broncho-alveolar lavages and serum. The administration of CRL1505 strain to malnourished mice under recovery reduced quantitative and qualitative alterations of CD4 + T cells in the bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lung induced by malnutrition. In addition, CRL1505 treatment augmented Th 2 -cytokines (interleukin 10 and 4) in respiratory and systemic compartments after pneumococcal infection. These results show that modulation of CD4 + T lymphocytes induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 has an important role in the beneficial effect induced by this strain on the recovery of malnourished mice. These data also indicate that nasally administered L. rhamnosus CRL1505 may represent a non-invasive alternative to modulate and improve the T cell-mediated immunity against respiratory pathogens in immunocompromised malnourished hosts.

  20. Influenza A virus alters pneumococcal nasal colonization and middle ear infection independently of phase variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, John T; Blevins, Lance K; Pang, Bing; King, Lauren B; Perez, Antonia C; Murrah, Kyle A; Reimche, Jennifer L; Alexander-Miller, Martha A; Swords, W Edward

    2014-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is both a widespread nasal colonizer and a leading cause of otitis media, one of the most common diseases of childhood. Pneumococcal phase variation influences both colonization and disease and thus has been linked to the bacteria's transition from colonizer to otopathogen. Further contributing to this transition, coinfection with influenza A virus has been strongly associated epidemiologically with the dissemination of pneumococci from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Using a mouse infection model, we demonstrated that coinfection with influenza virus and pneumococci enhanced both colonization and inflammatory responses within the nasopharynx and middle ear chamber. Coinfection studies were also performed using pneumococcal populations enriched for opaque or transparent phase variants. As shown previously, opaque variants were less able to colonize the nasopharynx. In vitro, this phase also demonstrated diminished biofilm viability and epithelial adherence. However, coinfection with influenza virus ameliorated this colonization defect in vivo. Further, viral coinfection ultimately induced a similar magnitude of middle ear infection by both phase variants. These data indicate that despite inherent differences in colonization, the influenza A virus exacerbation of experimental middle ear infection is independent of the pneumococcal phase. These findings provide new insights into the synergistic link between pneumococcus and influenza virus in the context of otitis media. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. [Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda Solas, V; Pérez Benito, A; Domingo Puiggros, M; Larramona Carrera, H; Segura Porta, F; Fontanals Aymerich, D

    2002-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumonia is the most common bacterial cause of community-acquired pneumonia in children. The reference standard for etiological diagnosis is isolation of S. pneumoniae from blood Since the advent of conjugate vaccines, disease caused by this organism can now be prevented. Many studies have been performed of the global incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections and of pneumococcal meningitis but few studies investigated bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia and its complications in children. To determine the incidence, patient characteristics, clinical signs, laboratory data, percentage and days of hospitalization, response to antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance, complications and causal serogroups of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in our environment in order to estimate requirements for systematic vaccination programs. From January 1990 to May 2001, data on all pediatric cases of invasive pneumococcal infections diagnosed in our hospital were collected. Several characteristics of patients with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia were analyzed. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia was diagnosed in patients with positive blood or pleural fluid cultures for S. pneumoniae and radiographically evident pulmonary infiltrate. The incidence of both types of pneumonia were determined according to population census data. All S. pneumonia strains were sent to the Pneumococci Reference Laboratory of the Instituto Carlos III in Madrid for serotyping. We estimated the serotype coverage of the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine according to the serotypes included in this vaccine and their distribution. Forty cases of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia were diagnosed, yielding an incidence of 17,10 and 5 cases per 10(5) children aged less than 2, 4 and 15 years old respectively. The mean age was 50 months and 43% were aged less than 4 years. Peaks occurred in January, March, April and May. A total of 77.5% of the patients were admitted to hospital and the

  2. The Saudi Thoracic Society pneumococcal vaccination guidelines-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, N. S.; Al-Barrak, A. M.; Al-Moamary, M. S.; Zeitouni, M. O.; Idrees, M. M.; Al-Ghobain, M. O.; Al-Shimemeri, A. A.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Saudi Arabia is a host to millions of pilgrims who travel annually from all over the world for Umrah and the Hajj pilgrimages and are at risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia or invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). There is also the risk of transmission of S. pneumoniae including antibiotic resistant strains between pilgrims and their potential global spread upon their return. The country also has unique challenges posed by susceptible population to IPD due to people with hemoglobinopathies, younger age groups with chronic conditions, and growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Since the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease is constantly changing, with an increase in nonvaccine pneumococcal serotypes, vaccination policies on the effectiveness and usefulness of vaccines require regular revision. As part of the Saudi Thoracic Society (STS) commitment to promote the best practices in the field of respiratory diseases, we conducted a review of S. pneumoniae infections and the best evidence base available in the literature. The aim of the present study is to develop the STS pneumococcal vaccination guidelines for healthcare workers in Saudi Arabia. We recommend vaccination against pneumococcal infections for all children Saudi Arabia population <50 years of age, many of whom have risk factors for contracting pneumococcal infections. A section for pneumococcal vaccination before the Umrah and Hajj pilgrimages is included as well. PMID:27168856

  3. Pneumococcal infections in humans are associated with increased apoptosis and trafficking of type 1 cytokine-producing T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Skinhøj, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , little is known regarding the T-cell response during in vivo infections in humans. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that activated T cells producing type 1 cytokines were engaged in the host response to pneumococcal infections. The phenotype and function of T cells were studied in 22...

  4. Experimental pneumococcal meningitis in mice: a model of intranasal infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, P. J.; van der Poll, T.; Florquin, S.; van Deventer, S. J.; Roord, J. J.; van Furth, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    Effective laboratory animal models of bacterial meningitis are needed to unravel the pathophysiology of this disease. Previous models have failed to simulate human meningitis by using a directly intracerebral route of infection. Hyaluronidase is a virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In

  5. [Seasonal changes of invasive pneumococcal disease in children and association with day care attendance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kousaku; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Aya; Uchida, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Go; Chang, Bin; Wada, Akihito

    2012-01-01

    To determine seasonal changes in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children, we retrospectively analyzed 69 children with 72 episodes of IPD, admitted to a regional center in Kobe, Japan, between July 1994 and June 2011. IPD episodes involved occult bacteremia (n = 48), pneumonia (n = 10), meningitis (n = 10), periorbital cellulitis (n = 3), and mastoiditis (n = 1), including 3 cases of two IPD recurrences. We analyzed 5 IPD-associated factors previously documented in Europe and North Amrica with inconsistent results--1) age at onset, 2) sibling number, 3) preschool sibling number, 4) subjects' day care attendance, and 5) siblings' day care attendance. We collected information on these factors by reviewing medical charts or contacting subjects' parents or guardians by telephone. IPD peaked bimodally in April and May (n = 21) and in November and December (n = 20), decreasing prominently between July and September (n = 8). Subjects with IPD attending day care formed a significantly higher propotion during April and May than did those developing IPD during other months: 12/21 [57.1%] vs. 12/51 [23.5%], odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence interval, 1.5-12.8; p = 0.006. Combined day care attendance among subjects with IPD and/or their siblings also differed significantly between these two groups: 17/21 [80.9%] vs. 27/51 [52.9%], odds ratio 3.8, 95% confidence interval, 1.1-12.8; p = 0.027. Not significant differences were seen in age at onset, sibling number, or preschool sibling number. In contrast, however children with IPD onset during November and December showed no significant difference in association with any of the 5 factors, compared to children with IPD onset in other months. Our findings showed a bimodal peak in IPD in children, the first and highest of which occurred in April and May and was significantly associated with day care attendance by those with IPD and/or their siblings. This first peak may, however, be related to circumstances in

  6. [Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Community of Valencia. Six years of surveillance (2007-2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancotti Oliver, Lucía Rosa; Huertas Zarco, Isabel; Pérez Pérez, Elvira; Carmona Martí, Esther; Carbó Malonda, Rosa; Gil Bru, Ana; González Moran, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of conjugated anti-pneumonia vaccines has led to a change in the epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD). The aim of this study is to describe the trends in IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012. A retrospective, descriptive and longitudinal study was conducted on IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012, The information sources used were the Epidemiological Surveillance Analysis (Análisis de la Vigilancia Epidemiológica (AVE)) and the Valencian Microbiology Network (Red Microbiológica Valenciana (RedMIVA)) of the Valencia Health Department. The incidence of IPD decreased between 2007 and 2012 in all age groups, mainly in the under 5 year-olds, dropping from 30.5 cases to 12.3 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). Pneumonia was the principal presentation of the disease, with a decrease in its rates from 6.9 to 4.1 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). A gradual, non-significant, reduction from 26% to 12% (p=.23) was observed in the proportion of cases due to the serotypes contained in the heptavalent vaccine (PCV7), mainly in the under 5 year-olds. The cases due to additional serotypes in 13-valent conjugated vaccine (1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F and 19A) also showed a decreasing trend, mainly in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (52.6% vs 14.3%; p=.03), while the cases due to non-vaccine serotypes significantly increased from 42.3% to 56.7% in the general population (p=.002), and from 47.4% to 78.6% in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (p=.08). The results of this study show a reduction in the incidence of IPD, with a decrease in the proportion of cases produced by vaccine serotypes, and an increase in the proportion of those not vaccinated. Epidemiological Surveillance is necessary to monitor the trends in the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  9. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal meningitis; Pneumococcus - meningitis ... Pneumococcal meningitis is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria (also called pneumococcus, or S pneumoniae ). This type of bacteria is the ...

  10. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. Objective The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. Methods At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Results Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project’s Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620

  11. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-12-02

    The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project's Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620% (95% CI 176%-1777%) for the website

  12. Effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on serotype-specific carriage and invasive disease in England: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Flasche

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We investigated the effect of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 programme in England on serotype-specific carriage and invasive disease to help understand its role in serotype replacement and predict the impact of higher valency vaccines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from children <5 y old and family members (n=400 2 y after introduction of PCV7 into routine immunization programs. Proportions carrying Streptococcus pneumoniae and serotype distribution among carried isolates were compared with a similar population prior to PCV7 introduction. Serotype-specific case carrier ratios (CCRs were estimated using national data on invasive disease. In vaccinated children and their contacts vaccine-type (VT carriage decreased, but was offset by an increase in non-VT carriage, with no significant overall change in carriage prevalence, odds ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.76-1.49. The lower CCRs of the replacing serotypes resulted in a net reduction in invasive disease in children. The additional serotypes covered by higher valency vaccines had low carriage but high disease prevalence. Serotype 11C emerged as predominant in carriage but caused no invasive disease whereas 8, 12F, and 22F emerged in disease but had very low carriage prevalence. CONCLUSION: Because the additional serotypes included in PCV10/13 have high CCRs but low carriage prevalence, vaccinating against them is likely to significantly reduce invasive disease with less risk of serotype replacement. However, a few serotypes with high CCRs could mitigate the benefits of higher valency vaccines. Assessment of the effect of PCV on carriage as well as invasive disease should be part of enhanced surveillance activities for PCVs. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  13. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedibone M Ndlangisa

    Full Text Available We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60% from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ≥5 years was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%], some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]. In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively. Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12 and 64% (9/14 of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction.

  14. The lectin pathway of complement activation is a critical component of the innate immune response to pneumococcal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Youssif M; Lynch, Nicholas J; Haleem, Kashif S

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host defense against pneumococcal infection. Three different pathways, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways, mediate complement activation. While there is limited information available on the roles of the classical and the alternative activation...... to pneumococcal infection and fail to opsonize Streptococcus pneumoniae in the none-immune host. This defect in complement opsonisation severely compromises pathogen clearance in the lectin pathway deficient host. Using sera from mice and humans with defined complement deficiencies, we demonstrate that mouse...... of C4. This study corroborates the essential function of MASP-2 in the lectin pathway and highlights the importance of MBL-independent lectin pathway activation in the host defense against pneumococci....

  15. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine serotypes following the introduction of conjugate vaccination in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Ingels, Helene

    2013-01-01

    A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the Danish childhood immunization program (2+1 schedule) in October 2007, followed by PCV13 starting from April 2010. The nationwide incidence of IPD among children younger than 5 years nearly halved after the introduction...... of children suspected to present with a vaccine failure. The period between April 19 and December 31, 2010 was considered a PCV7/PCV13 transitional period, where both vaccines were offered. We identified 45 episodes of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype (23% of the total number) and 105 (55%) caused by one...... of the 6 additional serotypes in PCV13. Ten children had received at least one PCV7 dose before the onset of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype. Seven children were considered to be incompletely vaccinated before IPD, but only three cases fulfilled the criteria of vaccine failure (caused by serotypes 14, 19F...

  16. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    hemoglobin level of 6.5g/dL, 38,000 platelets/mm³, blood urea nitrogen of 79mg/dL and creatinine of 1.64mg/dL. On the first day, patient developed oliguria and hypervolemia and needed hemodiafiltration. Multiple organs dysfunction syndrome was followed by death on the seventh day. Necropsy showed extensive renal cortical and tubular necrosis with fibrin deposits on arterioles. COMMENTS: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease has high morbidity and mortality rates. Children with pneumococcal infection and severe hematologic or renal abnormalities should be investigated. The usefulness of early recognition of T-antigen activation on diagnosis and therapeutics, the role of complement factor H in the pathology, the ideal renal replacement method and the definition of long term outcome are issues to be investigated.

  17. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 reduces pneumococcal lung infection and inflammation in a viral and bacterial coinfection pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Anthony, Desiree; Yatmaz, Selcuk; Wijburg, Odilia; Satzke, Catherine; Levy, Bruce; Vlahos, Ross; Bozinovski, Steven

    2017-09-15

    Formyl peptide receptor 2/lipoxin A 4 (LXA 4 ) receptor (Fpr2/ALX) co-ordinates the transition from inflammation to resolution during acute infection by binding to distinct ligands including serum amyloid A (SAA) and Resolvin D1 (RvD1). Here, we evaluated the proresolving actions of aspirin-triggered RvD1 (AT-RvD1) in an acute coinfection pneumonia model. Coinfection with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza A virus (IAV) markedly increased pneumococcal lung load and neutrophilic inflammation during the resolution phase. Fpr2/ALX transcript levels were increased in the lungs of coinfected mice, and immunohistochemistry identified prominent Fpr2/ALX immunoreactivity in bronchial epithelial cells and macrophages. Levels of circulating and lung SAA were also highly increased in coinfected mice. Therapeutic treatment with exogenous AT-RvD1 during the acute phase of infection (day 4-6 post-pneumococcal inoculation) significantly reduced the pneumococcal load. AT-RvD1 also significantly reduced neutrophil elastase (NE) activity and restored total antimicrobial activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF) of coinfected mice. Pneumonia severity, as measured by quantitating parenchymal inflammation or alveolitis was significantly reduced with AT-RvD1 treatment, which also reduced the number of infiltrating lung neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages as assessed by flow cytometry. The reduction in distal lung inflammation in AT-RvD1-treated mice was not associated with a significant reduction in inflammatory and chemokine mediators. In summary, we demonstrate that in the coinfection setting, SAA levels were persistently increased and exogenous AT-RvD1 facilitated more rapid clearance of pneumococci in the lungs, while concurrently reducing the severity of pneumonia by limiting excessive leukocyte chemotaxis from the infected bronchioles to distal areas of the lungs. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Deletion of the complement C5a receptor alleviates the severity of acute pneumococcal otitis media following influenza A virus infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Hua Tong

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that influenza A virus (IAV promotes adherence, colonization, and superinfection by S. pneumoniae (Spn and contributes to the pathogenesis of otitis media (OM. The complement system is a critical innate immune defense against both pathogens. To assess the role of the complement system in the host defense and the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection, we employed a well-established transtympanically-induced mouse model of acute pneumococcal OM. We found that antecedent IAV infection enhanced the severity of acute pneumococcal OM. Mice deficient in complement C1qa (C1qa-/- or factor B (Bf -/- exhibited delayed viral and bacterial clearance from the middle ear and developed significant mucosal damage in the eustachian tube and middle ear. This indicates that both the classical and alternative complement pathways are critical for the oto-immune defense against acute pneumococcal OM following influenza infection. We also found that Spn increased complement activation following IAV infection. This was characterized by sustained increased levels of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a in serum and middle ear lavage samples. In contrast, mice deficient in the complement C5a receptor (C5aR demonstrated enhanced bacterial clearance and reduced severity of OM. Our data support the concept that C5a-C5aR interactions play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection. It is possible that targeting the C5a-C5aR axis might prove useful in attenuating acute pneumococcal OM in patients with influenza infection.

  19. Paediatric invasive pneumococcal disease on the island of Gran Canaria: 16-year prospective study (2001-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Hernández, Milagrosa; Aguiar-Santana, Ione Ahedey; Artiles Campelo, Fernando; Colino Gil, Elena

    2017-11-24

    To calculate the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the paediatric population of Gran Canaria (Spain), its clinical and epidemiological characteristics, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance, and variations in these variables before and after the introduction of the PCV13 vaccine. Prospective hospital-based study including all patients (190) aged 0-14 years admitted with confirmed IPD between January 2001-May 2010 (152 cases) and June 2010-December 2016 (38 cases). Patients were divided into 3 age groups (5 years). Clinical symptoms were mutually-exclusively classified as meningitis, bacteraemic pneumonia, pleural effusion (PE), empyema or bacteraemia without a focus. Most cases occurred in boys (59.47%), during autumn-winter (65.79%), in children aged <2 years (55.79%) and with mean age increasing from the pre-PCV13 to the post-PCV13 period (2.5 vs 3.1 years). Incidence between periods reduced by 66.4% (p<0.001): from 13.1/100,000 to 4.4/100,000. PEs (3.9% vs 18.4%, p<0.005) and empyemas (1.5% vs 16.7%, p=NS) increased in the post-PCV13 period whereas all other symptoms decreased, although this was not statistically significant. Vaccine serotypes (77% vs 40.6%, p=0.000), particularly serotypes 19A (23.9% vs 12.5%) and 14 (14.2% vs 9.4%), as well as erythromycin resistance (57.2% vs 7.9%, p=0.000) decreased in the post-PCV13 period. IPD incidence, vaccine serotypes and erythromycin resistance decreased in the post-PCV13 period whereas PEs increased. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of emergent Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 22F causing invasive pneumococcal disease using whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H B Demczuk

    Full Text Available Since implementation of the 13-valent polyvalent conjugate vaccine (PCV13 in Canada during 2010, the proportion of PCV13 serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has declined from 55% (n = 1492 in 2010 to 31% (n = 764 in 2014. A concurrent increase of non-PCV13 serotypes has occurred and 22F has become the most prevalent serotype in Canada increasing from 7% (n = 183 to 11% (n = 283. Core single nucleotide variant phylogenetic analysis was performed on 137 Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 22F isolates collected across Canada from 2005-2015. Six phylogenetic lineages (n = 117 were identified among a serotype 22F/ST433 clonal complex (CC, including a recently expanding erythromycin-resistant clone. Erythromycin-resistance was observed in 25 isolates possessing ermB, mef or a 23S rRNA A2061G point mutation; 2 penicillin-resistant isolates had recombinant pbp1a, pbp2a and/or pbp2x; 3 tetracycline-resistant isolates contained tetM; and 1 isolate was multidrug-resistant. Virulence factor analysis indicated a high level of homogeneity among the 22F/ST433 clonal complex strains. A group of 6 phylogenetic outlier strains had differing MLST, antimicrobial resistance and molecular profiles suggestive of capsule switching events. While capsule switch events among S. pneumoniae serotype 22F has been observed, increasing prevalence of S. pneumoniae serotype 22F can be attributed to an evolving homogenous clone expanding nationally through local transmission events.

  1. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-13

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Chris Van Beneden discusses the dangers of group A strep infections.  Created: 6/13/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/13/2011.

  2. [Invasive yeast infections in neutropenic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts still play an important role in the morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies. Although the overall incidence of invasive candidiasis has decreased due to widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis, the incidence of non-Candida albicans Candida species is increasing compared with that of C.albicans, and mortality of invasive candidiasis continues to be high. In addition, there has been an increase in invasive infections caused by an array of uncommon yeasts, including species of the genus Malassezia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saprochaete, characterised by their resistance to echinocandins and poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae among HIV-infected and -uninfected children <5 years of age before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Verani

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carriage is a precursor for pneumococcal disease and can be useful for evaluating pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV impact. We studied pre-PCV pneumococcal carriage among HIV-infected and -uninfected children in Mozambique. Between October 2012 and March 2013, we enrolled HIV-infected children age <5 years presenting for routine care at seven HIV clinics in 3 sites, including Maputo (urban-south, Nampula (urban-north, and Manhiça (rural-south. We also enrolled a random sample of HIV-uninfected children <5 years old from a demographic surveillance site in Manhiça. A single nasopharyngeal swab was obtained and cultured following enrichment in Todd Hewitt broth with yeast extract and rabbit serum. Pneumococcal isolates were serotyped by Quellung reaction and multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Factors associated with pneumococcal carriage were examined using logistic regression. Overall pneumococcal carriage prevalence was 80.5% (585/727, with similar prevalences among HIV-infected (81.5%, 339/416 and HIV-uninfected (79.1%, 246/311 children, and across age strata. Among HIV-infected, after adjusting for recent antibiotic use and hospitalization, there was no significant association between study site and colonization: Maputo (74.8%, 92/123, Nampula (83.7%, 82/98, Manhiça (84.6%, 165/195. Among HIV-uninfected, report of having been born to an HIV-infected mother was not associated with colonization. Among 601 pneumococcal isolates from 585 children, serotypes 19F (13.5%, 23F (13.1%, 6A (9.2%, 6B (6.2% and 19A (5.2% were most common. The proportion of serotypes included in the 10- and 13-valent vaccines was 44.9% and 61.7%, respectively, with no significant differences by HIV status or age group. Overall 36.9% (n = 268 of children were colonized with a PCV10 serotype and 49.7% (n = 361 with a PCV13 serotype. Pneumococcal carriage was common, with little variation by geographic region, age, or HIV status. PCV10 was introduced in

  4. Effects of influenza plus pneumococcal conjugate vaccination versus influenza vaccination alone in preventing respiratory tract infections in children : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Hoes, Arno W; van Loon, Anton M; Hak, Eelko

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of influenza vaccination with or without heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children. STUDY DESIGN: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprising 579 children age 18 to 72 months with

  5. Impact of positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures on adverse outcomes following hospitalized pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Benfield, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical presentation and outcome of pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) without positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures. We investigated the prognostic impact of a pulmonary infiltrate and bacteraemia on the clinical course of hospitalized...

  6. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Pneumococcal vaccines: the impact of conjugate vaccine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mäkelä, P. Helena; Siber, George R; Klugman, Keith P

    2008-01-01

    ... of Streptococcus pneumoniae with Complement Proteins 83 Margaret K. Hostetter III. Clinical Disease and Epidemiology 8 Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Serious Pneumococcal Infections in Chi...

  8. A nationwide study on the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertion in Denmark 2000-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howitz, Michael Frantz; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Ingels, Helene

    2017-01-01

    Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugated Vaccines (PCV) in national immunization programs have been successful in reducing the number of invasive and lower respiratory pneumococcal infections. The impact of the vaccines on upper respiratory infections caused by pneumococci is less clear although...... these account for most pneumococcal infections. In this study, we used likely proxies for respiratory infections in children, such as antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertions (VTI), to estimate the impact of the vaccine on a national level. The study was designed as a population-based retrospective...... reversed to near year 2000 levels after the introduction of PCV. This indicates that implementation of pneumococcal vaccines in the Childhood Vaccination Programme has likely reduced the incidence of upper respiratory diseases due to pneumococci in Denmark....

  9. Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumococcal disease kills one in every four to five people over the age of 65 who gets it. ... A second PPSV23 vaccine is recommended for these persons five years after the first PPSV23. CDC recommends only ...

  10. Cepas invasivas de pneumococo isoladas de crianças e adolescentes em Salvador Invasive pneumococcal strains isolated from children and adolescents in Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana M. Nascimento-Carvalho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever resistência antimicrobiana e sorotipos de cepas de pneumococo. MÉTODOS: durante 57 meses, foi conduzida uma vigilância de cepas invasivas de pneumococo de pacientes com idade OBJECTIVE: describe the antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of pneumococcal strains. METHODS: in a 57-month period, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal strains from patients aged < 20 years was conducted. Pneumococcus was identified by means of tests for solubility in bile and optochin. Pneumococcal resistance to penicillin was screened by 1µg oxacillin disc and minimal inhibitory concentration was determined for the strains not susceptible to penicillin. Disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods were used for surveillance of resistance to other antimicrobials. Pneumococci were serotyped by means of the Neufeld-Quellung reactions. RESULTS: of 70 patients, 57.1% were males. The mean age was 1.92 yrs (mean 3.19 + 3.66 yrs, range 1 month to 19.5 yrs; 52.9% and 81.4% were < 2 yrs and < 5 yrs, respectively. The strains were isolated from blood (91.4%, CSF (2.9%, pleural (2.9%, peritoneal (1.4% and abscess (1.4% fluids from patients with pneumonia (77.1%, fever without localizing signs (10.0%, meningitis (4.3%, others (8.6%. Resistance was detected to penicillin (20.0%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (65.7%, tetracycline (21.4%, ofloxacin (6.3%, erythromycin (5.7%, clindamycin (2.9%. All tested strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and vancomycin. Among penicillin-resistant strains, high resistance was detected in one, the same that showed intermediate resistance to cefotaxime. The most frequent serotypes were: 14 (22.9%, 5 and 6A (10.0% each, 6B and 19F (8.6% each, 9V, 18C and 23F (5.7% each. Resistance to penicillin was detected in serotypes 14 (71.4%, 6B and 19F (14.3% each. CONCLUSIONS: of 70 strains, 67.2% were classified as serotypes included in the heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine as well as

  11. Immunogenicity and Safety of the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine versus the 23-Valent Polysaccharide Vaccine in Unvaccinated HIV-Infected Adults: A Pilot, Prospective Controlled Study.

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    Francesca Lombardi

    Full Text Available Definition of the optimal pneumococcal vaccine strategy in HIV-infected adults is still under evaluation. We aimed to compare immunogenicity and safety of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 versus the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 in HIV-infected adults.We performed a pilot, prospective controlled study enrolling HIV-infected pneumococcal vaccine-naïve outpatients, aged 18-65 years with CD4 counts ≥200 cells/μL. Eligible subjects were recruited into two parallel groups: group 1 (n = 50 received two doses of PCV13 eight weeks apart, and group 2 (n = 50 received one dose of PPSV23, as part of their standard of care. Anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide immunoglobulin G concentrations were quantified by ELISA at baseline, 8, 24 and 48 weeks. Clinical and viro-immunological follow-up was performed at the same time points. Unvaccinated, age-matched HIV-negative adults (n = 100 were also enrolled as baseline controls.Pre-vaccination specific IgG titers for each pneumococcal antigen did not differ between study groups but they were constantly lower than those from the HIV-negative controls. After immunization, significant increases in IgG titers were observed in both study groups at each time point compared to baseline, but response to serotype 3 was blunted in group 1. Antibody titers for each antigen did not differ between study groups at week 48. Overall, the proportion of subjects achieving seroprotection and seroconversion to all serotypes was comparable between groups. A marked decrease in IgG levels over time was observed with both vaccines. No relevant adverse reactions were reported in either group.In this population with favorable immune profile, no relevant differences were observed in immunogenicity between PCV13 and PPSV23. Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02123433.

  12. FACTS AND OPINIONS ON USEFULNESS OF PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Kostinov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the problem of pneumococcal infections (pneumonias, meningitis, otitis in children and adults. The modern opportunities of vaccinoprophylaxis and its usefulness in public health service are shown. The perspectives and questions on safety and effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine as the basic method of pneumococcal infections prophylaxis in infants and children from risk groups (with bronchial asthma, sickle-cell anemia, etc. are presented in details.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination, pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(4:79-83

  13. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in aboriginal and non-aboriginal western Australians from 1997 through 2007 and emergence of nonvaccine serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Deborah; Willis, Judith; Moore, Hannah C; Giele, Carolien; Murphy, Denise; Keil, Anthony D; Harrison, Catherine; Bayley, Kathy; Watson, Michael; Richmond, Peter

    2010-06-01

    BACKGROUND. In 2001, Australia introduced a unique 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) 2-, 4-, and 6-month schedule with a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPPV) booster for Aboriginal children, and in 2005, 7vPCV alone in a 2-, 4-, and 6-month schedule for non-Aboriginal children. Aboriginal adults are offered 23vPPV but coverage is poor. We investigated trends in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Western Australia (WA). METHODS. Enhanced IPD surveillance has been ongoing since 1996. We calculated IPD incidence rates for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians before and after introduction of 7vPCV. RESULTS. A total of 1792 cases occurred during the period 1997-2007; the IPD incidence rate was 47 cases per 100,000 population per year among Aboriginal people and 7 cases per 100,000 population per year in non-Aboriginal people. After introduction of 7vPCV, IPD rates among Aboriginal children decreased by 46% for those Aboriginal children. IPD rates decreased by >30% in non-Aboriginal people 50 years of age but increased among Aboriginal adults (eg, from 59.1 to 109.6 cases per 100,000 population per year among those 30-49 years of age). Although IPD due to 7vPCV serotypes decreased in all age groups, IPD incidence due to non-7vPCV serotypes increased, and it almost doubled among Aboriginal adults 30-49 years of age (from 48.3 to 97.0 cases per 100,000 population per year). Among non-Aboriginal children, 37% of IPD is now due to serotype 19A. CONCLUSIONS. IPD incidence rates have decreased markedly among children and non-Aboriginal adults with a 3-dose infant 7vPCV schedule. However, IPD due to non-7vPCV serotypes has increased and is of particular concern among young Aboriginal adults, for whom an intensive 23vPPV campaign is needed. An immunization register covering all age groups should be established.

  14. Transplant tourism and invasive fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Al Salmi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deceased and live-related renal transplants (RTXs are approved procedures that are performed widely throughout the world. In certain regions, commercial RTX has become popular, driven by financial greed. Methods: This retrospective, descriptive study was performed at the Royal Hospital from 2013 to 2015. Data were collected from the national kidney transplant registry of Oman. All transplant cases retrieved were divided into two groups: live-related RTX performed in Oman and commercial-unrelated RTX performed abroad. These groups were then divided again into those with and without evidence of fungal infection, either in the wound or renal graft. Results: A total of 198 RTX patients were identified, of whom 162 (81.8% had undergone a commercial RTX that was done abroad. Invasive fungal infections (IFIs were diagnosed in 8% of patients who had undergone a commercial RTX; of these patients, 76.9% underwent a nephrectomy and 23.1% continued with a functioning graft. None of the patients with RTXs performed at the Royal Hospital contracted an IFI. The most common fungal isolates were Aspergillus species (including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, and Aspergillus nigricans, followed by Zygomycetes. However, there was no evidence of fungal infection including Aspergillus outside the graft site. Computed tomography (CT findings showed infarction of the graft, renal artery thrombosis, aneurysmal dilatation of the external iliac artery, fungal ball, or just the presence of a perigraft collection. Of the total patients with IFIs, 23.1% died due to septic shock and 53.8% were alive and on hemodialysis. The remaining 23.1% who did not undergo nephrectomy demonstrated acceptable graft function. Conclusions: This is the largest single-center study on commercial RTX reporting the highest number of patients with IFI acquired over a relatively short period of time. Aspergillus spp were the main culprit fungi, with no

  15. Dynamics of Severe and Non-Severe Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Young Children in Israel Following PCV7/PCV13 Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikman, Daniel; Dagan, Ron; Barkai, Galia; Averbuch, Diana; Guri, Alex; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Ben-Shimol, Shalom

    2018-05-10

    The introduction of the pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCVs) resulted in a substantial reduction of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) rates. However, impact on non-severe IPD (mostly occult bacteremia) has not yet been fully elucidated.We assessed severe and non-severe IPD (SIPD and NSIPD, respectively) rate dynamics in children <5 years in Israel before and after PCV7/PCV13 implementation. A prospective, population-based, nationwide surveillance. All IPD episodes recorded from 1999 through 2015, were included. NSIPD was defined as IPD episodes without meningitis, pneumonia or mastoiditis in a child with a favorable outcome (not-hospitalized or hospitalized in a non-intensive care unit <5 days, without mortality). Three sub-periods were defined: pre-PCV (1999-2008), PCV7 (2010-2011) and PCV13 (2013-2015). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated. Overall, 4,457 IPD episodes were identified; 3,398 (76.2%) SIPD, 1,022 (22.9%) NSIPD and 37 (0.8%) unknown. In 90% of NSIPD episodes, no focus was identified.In the PCV7 period, NSIPD rates significantly declined by 52%, while SIPD rates declined less prominently by 24%. Following PCV13 introduction, compared with the PCV7 period, NSIPD rates declined non-significantly by 17% while SIPD rates declined significantly further by an additional 53%. These trends resulted in overall reductions (comparing PCV13 and pre-PCV periods) of NSIPD and SIPD of 60% (IRR=0.4; 0.32-0.51) and 64% (IRR=0.36; 0.32-0.42), respectively. Following PCV7/PCV13 introduction, SIPD and NSIPD rates substantially declined, with differences in rate-dynamics, alluding to differences in serotype distribution between the two groups. Future surveillance is warranted when considering modification in treatment protocols for suspected occult bacteremia/NSIPD cases.

  16. Impact on respiratory tract infections of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine administered at 3, 5 and 11 months of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesati Laura

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical and public health importance of pneumococcal infections justifies the implementation of measures capable of reducing their incidence and severity, and explains why the recently marketed heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7 has been widely studied by pediatricians. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of PCV-7 administered at 3, 5 and 11 months of age on respiratory tract infections in very young children. Methods A total of 1,571 healthy infants (910 males aged 75–105 days (median 82 days were enrolled in this prospective cohort trial to receive a hexavalent vaccine (DTaP/IPV/HBV/Hib and PCV-7 (n = 819 or the hexavalent vaccine alone (n = 752 at 3, 5 and 11 months of age. Morbidity was recorded for the 24 months following the second dose by monthly telephone interviews conducted by investigators blinded to the study treatment assignment using standardised questionnaires. During these interviews, the caregivers and the children's pediatricians were questioned about illnesses and the use of antibiotics since the previous telephone call. All of the data were analysed using SAS Windows v.12. Results Among the 1,555 subjects (98.9% who completed the study, analysis of the data by the periods of follow-up demonstrated that radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia (CAP was significantly less frequent in the PCV-7 group during the follow-up as a whole and during the last period of follow-up. Moreover, there were statistically significant between-group differences in the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM in each half-year period of follow-up except the first, with significantly lower number of episodes in children receiving PCV-7 than in controls. Furthermore, the antibiotic prescription data showed that the probability of receiving an antibiotic course was significantly lower in the PCV-7 group than in the control group. Conclusion Our findings show the effectiveness of the simplified

  17. Effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination for elderly people in Catalonia, Spain: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Angela; Salleras, Lluis; Fedson, David S; Izquierdo, Conchita; Ruiz, Laura; Ciruela, Pilar; Fenoll, Asuncion; Casal, Julio

    2005-05-01

    Observational studies offer an approach to evaluating the effectiveness of vaccination programs. We evaluated the effectiveness of a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccination program for elderly people in Catalonia, Spain, in a matched-set case-control study. We identified 149 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease among patients aged > or =65 years who were hospitalized in 12 large hospitals in Catalonia during the period of 1 January 2001 through 31 March 2002. We selected 2 hospital control patients and 1 outpatient control subject for each case patient, matching on the basis of age and underlying medical conditions. We obtained their pneumococcal vaccination histories and used conditional logistic regression to determine effectiveness of vaccination. Among all 149 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease, 131 (87.9%) were caused by vaccine or vaccine-related serotypes. In the adjusted analysis, overall effectiveness of vaccination against infections due to all serotypes was 70% (95% confidence interval [CI], 48%-82%). Among immunocompetent subjects with or without high-risk conditions, effectiveness of vaccination was 76% (95% CI, 51%-88%), but among immunocompromised subjects it was 50% (95% CI, -44% to 82%). Among subjects with infections due to vaccine or vaccine-related serotypes, effectiveness of vaccination was 72% (95% CI, 50%-85%) overall and 78% (95% CI, 50%-90%) in those who were immunocompetent, but it was only 46% (95% CI, -54% to 81%) in those who were immunocompromised. Overall effectiveness of vaccination was 65% (95% CI, 35%-81%) during the noninfluenza period. Pneumococcal vaccination was effective in preventing invasive pneumococcal disease among all elderly persons in Catalonia. Effectiveness was greater in immunocompetent persons, most of whom had underlying high-risk conditions. The number of subjects was too small to determine whether vaccination was effective in those who were immunocompromised.

  18. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene F; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N

    2016-01-01

    NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). METHODS: Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified......BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes.......86-1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis....

  19. Long-term mortality after IPD and bacteremic versus non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H. J.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    Short-term mortality after invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumococcal pneumonia is high but data on long-term mortality (including the comparison between bacteremic and non-invasive/non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia) within the first years after diagnosis are scarce. Adult patients

  20. Detection of macrolide resistance genes in culture-negative specimens from Bangladeshi children with invasive pneumococcal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Md; Malaker, Roly; Islam, Maksuda; Baqui, Abdullah H; Darmstadt, Gary L; Whitney, Cynthia G; Saha, Samir K

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing prevalence of macrolide resistance among pneumococci in Bangladesh has been observed. However, the scenario remains incomplete, as few isolates (80%) are culture-negative. This study optimised a triplex PCR method to detect macrolide resistance genes (MRGs) (mefA and ermB) and cpsA from culture-negative pneumococcal cases to predict the prevalence and level of macrolide resistance. The presence of MRGs among pneumococcal strains (n=153) with a wide range of erythromycin MICs (culture-negative clinical specimens and corresponding isolates. The known impact of the presence of specific MRG(s) on MICs of strains was used to predict the MICs of non-culturable strains based on the presence/absence of MRG(s) in the specimens. None of the erythromycin-susceptible isolates possessed any of the MRGs, and all non-susceptible strains had ≥1 MRG. MICs were 2-16mg/L and ≥256mg/L for 93% of strains with mefA and ermB, respectively, whereas 100% of isolates with both genes had MICs≥256mg/L. PCR for body fluids showed 100% concordance with corresponding isolates when tested for MRG(s) in parallel. Erythromycin MICs can be predicted for non-culturable strains with 93-100% precision based on detection of ermB and/or mefA. This method will be useful for establishing comprehensive surveillance for macrolide resistance among pneumococci, specifically in the population with prior antibiotic use. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Meeting at Manson House, London, 12 December 1996. HIV and pneumococcal infection in Africa. Microbiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J

    1997-01-01

    By the 1930s several studies had shown that Streptococcus pneumoniae was an important pathogen in Nairobi (Kenya) and various risk factors for infection were recognized, including seasonally cold conditions, overcrowding and recent arrival in the city. Research into pneumococcal disease declined with the arrival of penicillin but recently interest has been rekindled by recognition of the pneumococcus as a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated pathogen and by the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The pneumococcus and its association with HIV were studied during the course of the Wellcome Trust/Kenya Medical Research Institute HIV Programme in Nairobi (1988-1993). There were generally high rates of pneumococcal disease. The pneumococcus (with tuberculosis and salmonellosis) was a major HIV-related pathogen. One study showed HIV seropositivity to confer a relative risk of 17.8 for pneumococcal infection. Recurrent infection accounted for a large proportion (25%) of disease episodes in a longitudinally studied cohort of HIV patients. There were higher pneumococcal carriage rates in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative patients (28% vs. 16%, P = 0.003). High rates of resistance were found to penicillin (25%). Molecular characterization of penicillin-resistant strains identified 11 separate clones, showing great genetic diversity in a small sample of isolates, and there was evidence of horizontal spread of penicillin-binding protein genes between separate lineages. Molecular characterization of isolates from patients with recurrent disease suggested that both relapse and reinfection might occur. There was molecular evidence of transfer of capsular genes between clones (serotype switching). The overall spectrum of serotypes resembled those reported elsewhere, most serotypes being included in the 23-valent vaccine. Higher numbered serotypes were associated with respiratory tract source and antibiotic resistance. Various methods were used to show 82% concordance

  2. Invasive Fungal Infections Secondary to Traumatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Kronen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare but serious complication of traumatic injury. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, natural history, mycology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes associated with post-traumatic IFI in military and civilian populations. The epidemiology of post-traumatic IFI is poorly characterized, but incidence appears to be rising. Patients often suffer from severe injuries and require extensive medical interventions. Fungi belonging to the order Mucorales are responsible for most post-traumatic IFI in both civilian and military populations. Risk factors differ between these cohorts but include specific injury patterns and comorbidities. Diagnosis of post-traumatic IFI typically follows positive laboratory results in the appropriate clinical context. The gold standard of treatment is surgical debridement in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Patients with post-traumatic IFI may be at greater risk of amputation, delays in wound healing, hospital complications, and death as compared to trauma patients who do not develop IFI. More research is needed to understand the factors surrounding the development and management of post-traumatic IFI to reduce the significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  3. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Amelieke J H; Mobegi, Fredrick M; de Jonge, Marien I; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Meis, Jacques F; Hermans, Peter W M; Ferwerda, Gerben; Bentley, Stephen D; Zomer, Aldert L

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped

  4. ASSESSMENT OF TOLERABILITY OF PNEUMOCOCCAL CONJUGATE VACCINE AND THE INFLUENCE OF THE VACCINATION ON THE INCIDENCE OF RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN DURING THE FIRST FIVE YEARS OF LIFE IN THE SAKHA REPUBLIC (YAKUTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Savvina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most frequent etiology agent of upper respiratory tract infection is pneumococcus. Most susceptible to this infection are children under 5 years old. It is known that the only effective prevention of pneumococcal infections is a specific immunoprophylaxis. Authors represent their own experience of vaccination for the child population at risk. The analysis of the effectiveness of 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in 596 children under 5 years old is demonstrated. The immunization is revealed low reactogeni city of vaccine and evident clinical effect. Thus, this vaccine may be recommended for inclusion in a regional immunization schedule in Republic of Sakha (Yakutia.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccine prophylaxis.

  5. Transplant tourism and invasive fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Salmi, I; Metry, A M; Al Ismaili, F; Hola, A; Al Riyami, M; Khamis, F; Al-Abri, S

    2018-04-01

    Deceased and live-related renal transplants (RTXs) are approved procedures that are performed widely throughout the world. In certain regions, commercial RTX has become popular, driven by financial greed. This retrospective, descriptive study was performed at the Royal Hospital from 2013 to 2015. Data were collected from the national kidney transplant registry of Oman. All transplant cases retrieved were divided into two groups: live-related RTX performed in Oman and commercial-unrelated RTX performed abroad. These groups were then divided again into those with and without evidence of fungal infection, either in the wound or renal graft. A total of 198 RTX patients were identified, of whom 162 (81.8%) had undergone a commercial RTX that was done abroad. Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) were diagnosed in 8% of patients who had undergone a commercial RTX; of these patients, 76.9% underwent a nephrectomy and 23.1% continued with a functioning graft. None of the patients with RTXs performed at the Royal Hospital contracted an IFI. The most common fungal isolates were Aspergillus species (including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, and Aspergillus nigricans), followed by Zygomycetes. However, there was no evidence of fungal infection including Aspergillus outside the graft site. Computed tomography (CT) findings showed infarction of the graft, renal artery thrombosis, aneurysmal dilatation of the external iliac artery, fungal ball, or just the presence of a perigraft collection. Of the total patients with IFIs, 23.1% died due to septic shock and 53.8% were alive and on hemodialysis. The remaining 23.1% who did not undergo nephrectomy demonstrated acceptable graft function. This is the largest single-center study on commercial RTX reporting the highest number of patients with IFI acquired over a relatively short period of time. Aspergillus spp were the main culprit fungi, with no Candida spp being isolated. A high index of suspicion might

  6. Rare variants in MYD88, IRAK4 and IKBKG and susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda K Ellis

    Full Text Available Although rare variants within the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway genes have been found to underlie human primary immunodeficiencies associated with selective predisposition to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, the contribution of variants in these genes to IPD susceptibility at the population level remains unknown. Complete re-sequencing of IRAK4, MYD88 and IKBKG genes was undertaken in 164 IPD cases from the UK and 164 geographically-matched population-based controls. 233 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs were identified, of which ten were in coding regions. Four rare coding variants were predicted to be deleterious, two variants in MYD88 and two in IRAK4. The predicted deleterious variants in MYD88 were observed as two heterozygote cases but not seen in controls. Frequencies of predicted deleterious IRAK4 SNVs were the same in cases and controls. Our findings suggest that rare, functional variants in MYD88, IRAK4 or IKBKG do not significantly contribute to IPD susceptibility in adults at the population level.

  7. [Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.D.; Lind, J.W.; Bruun, B.

    2009-01-01

    Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection are presented: a three-week-old boy with meningitis and a 62-year-old woman with arthritis and bacteremia. Since 1993 vaccination against H. influenzae type b (Hib) has been offered to Danish children. The result has been a remarkable...... decrease in invasive Hib disease. However, physicians need to be aware of the existence of non-type b invasive H. influenzae disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/19...

  8. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The rarity of invasiveness of right-sided infective endocarditis (IE) compared with left-sided has not been well recognized and evaluated. Thus, we compared invasiveness of right- versus left-sided IE in surgically treated patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 2002 to January 20...

  9. Invasive fungal infections in Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Alza, Y; Sánchez-Bautista, J; Fajardo-Rivero, J F; Figueroa, C L

    2018-06-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement. Complications, such as invasive fungal infections usually occur in patients with a greater severity of the disease. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk variables associated with invasive fungal infections in a Colombian systemic lupus erythematosus population. Materials and methods A cross-sectional, retrospective study that evaluated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus for six years. The primary outcome was invasive fungal infection. Descriptive, group comparison and bivariate analysis was performed using Stata 12.0 software. Results Two hundred patients were included in this study; 84.5% of the patients were women and the median age was 36 years; 68% of the subjects had haematological complications; 53.3% had nephropathy; 45% had pneumopathy and 28% had pericardial impairment; 7.5% of patients had invasive fungal infections and the most frequently isolated fungus was Candida albicans. Pericardial disease, cyclophosphamide use, high disease activity, elevated ESR, C3 hypocomplementemia, anaemia and lymphopenia had a significant association with invasive fungal infection ( P lupus erythematosus, which was higher than that reported in other latitudes. In this population the increase in disease activity, the presence of pericardial impairment and laboratory alterations (anaemia, lymphopenia, increased ESR and C3 hypocomplementemia) are associated with a greater possibility of invasive fungal infections. Regarding the use of drugs, unlike other studies, in the Colombian population an association was found only with the previous administration of cyclophosphamide. In addition, patients with invasive fungal infections and systemic lupus erythematosus had a higher prevalence of mortality and hospital readmission compared with patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without invasive fungal infection.

  10. Invasive Candida Infections in the ICU: Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankovszky Péter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections have become a serious problem in the critically ill. One of the main reasons is the development of an immunocompromised condition. The most frequently found pathogens are Candida species. In order to provide adequate treatment, understanding this potentially life-threatening infection is mandatory. The aim of this summary is to view Candida infections from a different perspective and to give an overview on epidemiology, the range of pathophysiology from colonization to the invasive infections, and its impact on mortality. New therapeutic options will also be discussed and how these relate to current guidelines. Finally, the key issue of the choice of antifungal agents will be evaluated.

  11. Risk Factors for Pneumococcal Colonization of the Nasopharynx in Alaska Native Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Jonathan; Rudolph, Karen; Bruden, Dana; Hurlburt, Debby; Bruce, Michael G; Hennessy, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Alaska Native children have high invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) rates, and lack of in-home running water has been shown to have a significant association with infection. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines reduced IPD; however, this population saw substantial replacement disease and colonization with nonvaccine serotypes. We evaluated risk factors for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization in Alaska Native adults and children. We conducted annual surveys from 2008 through 2011 of residents of all ages in 8 rural Alaskan villages. Interviews were conducted, medical charts were reviewed, and nasopharyngeal swabs were cultured for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed for 3 age groups (under 10 years, 10-17 years, and 18 years and older) to determine risk factors for colonization. We obtained 12 535 nasopharyngeal swabs from 4980 participants. Our population lived in severely crowded conditions, and 48% of households lacked in-home running water. In children water, household crowding, and more children in the home. Pneumococcal vaccination status was not associated with colonization. In older children and adults, increased number of persons in the household was associated with pneumococcal colonization. Higher colonization prevalence may partially explain increased IPD rates seen in those lacking in-home water services. Improving availability of sanitation services and reducing household crowding may reduce the burden of IPD in this population. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Invasive carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There are no paediatric reports of invasive infection caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) from Africa. Objectives. To document a series of cases of CRE infections at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, describing the clinical and microbiological findings in these ...

  13. Incidencia de enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en Cantabria (1995-2001 e implicaciones para el calendario vacunal Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria, Spain, (1995-2001 and implications for the childhood inmunization schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir la incidencia de enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en Cantabria en los años 1995-2001. Método: Consulta de los registros del conjunto mínimo básico de datos (CMBD de los hospitales públicos de Cantabria, así como altas de los hospitales privados, registro de enfermedades de declaración obligatoria (EDO, y diagnósticos microbiológicos e historias clínicas de los niños ingresados en el Servicio de Pediatría del Hospital Cantabria (el hospital de referencia de tercer nivel. Resultados: Se obtuvo una incidencia de meningitis de 5,55, 5,03 y 0,76/100.000 en los niños Objective: To describe the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria (Spain between 1995 and 2001. Method: We reviewed the records of the Minimum Data Set (MDS of public hospitals in Cantabria, discharges from private hospitals and the registry of diseases of mandatory reporting, as well as the microbiologic diagnoses and medical records of children discharged from the Pediatric Service of the Cantabria Hospital (the tertiary care hospital in our autonomous community. Results: We obtained a meningitis incidence of 5.55, 5.03 and 0.76/100,000 in children < 2 years, ≥ 2 and < 5 years, and ≥ 5 years respectively, and an incidence of invasive disease of 11.11, 11.32 and 1.49/100,000 in the same age groups. Conclusions: The incidence of meningitis and invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria is low. We discuss factors that should be taken into account when introducing the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the childhood immunization schedule of Cantabria.

  14. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed.

  15. Invasive mold infections: virulence and pathogenesis of mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, Giulia; Borghi, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  16. Invasive Mold Infections: Virulence and Pathogenesis of Mucorales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  17. Epidemiology and treatment approaches in management of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriengkauykiat J, Ito JI

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jane Kriengkauykiat1,2, James I Ito2, Sanjeet S Dadwal21Department of Pharmacy, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USAAbstract: Over the past 20 years, the number of invasive fungal infections has continued to persist, due primarily to the increased numbers of patients subjected to severe immunosuppression. Despite the development of more active, less toxic antifungal agents and the standard use of antifungal prophylaxis, invasive fungal infections (especially invasive mold infections continue to be a significant factor in hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation outcomes, resulting in high mortality rates. Since the use of fluconazole as standard prophylaxis in the hematopoietic cell transplantation setting, invasive candidiasis has come under control, but no mold-active antifungal agent (except for posaconazole in the setting of acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome has been shown to improve the survival rate over fluconazole. With the advent of new azole and echinocandin agents, we have seen the emergence of more azole-resistant and echinocandin-resistant fungi. The recent increase in zygomycosis seen in the hematopoietic cell transplantation setting may be due to the increased use of voriconazole. This has implications for the empiric approach to pulmonary invasive mold infections when zygomycosis cannot be ruled out. It is imperative that an amphotericin B product, an antifungal that has never developed resistance in over 50 years, be initiated. The clinical presentations of invasive mold infections and invasive candidiasis can be nonspecific and the diagnostic tests insensitive, so a high index of suspicion and immediate initiation of empiric therapy is required. Unfortunately, our currently available serologic tests do not predict infection ahead of disease, and, therefore cannot be used to initiate "preemptive" therapy. Also, the Aspergillus galactomannan test gives a false negative

  18. Invasive mold infections : virulence and pathogenesis of mucorales

    OpenAIRE

    Morace, G.; Borghi, E.

    2012-01-01

    Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the...

  19. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James; Gordon, Steven M; Houghtaling, Penny L; Tingleff, Jens; Navia, José L; Blackstone, Eugene H; Pettersson, Gösta B

    2018-01-01

    The rarity of invasiveness of right-sided infective endocarditis (IE) compared with left-sided has not been well recognized and evaluated. Thus, we compared invasiveness of right- versus left-sided IE in surgically treated patients. From January 2002 to January 2015, 1292 patients underwent surgery for active IE, 138 right-sided and 1224 left-sided. Among patients with right-sided IE, 131 had tricuspid and 7 pulmonary valve IE; 12% had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Endocarditis-related invasiveness was based on echocardiographic and operative findings. Invasive disease was rare on the right side, occurring in 1 patient (0.72%; 95% confidence interval 0.02%-4.0%); rather, it was limited to valve cusps/leaflets or was superficial. In contrast, IE was invasive in 408 of 633 patients with aortic valve (AV) IE (65%), 113 of 369 with mitral valve (MV) IE (31%), and 148 of 222 with AV and MV IE (67%). Staphylococcus aureus was a more predominant organism in right-sided than left-sided IE (right 40%, AV 19%, MV 29%), yet invasion was observed almost exclusively on the left side of the heart, which was more common and more severe with AV than MV IE and more common with prosthetic valve endocarditis than native valve IE. Rarity of right-sided invasion even when caused by S aureus suggests that invasion and development of cavities/"abscesses" in patients with IE may be driven more by chamber pressure than organism, along with other reported host-microbial interactions. The lesser invasiveness of MV compared with AV IE suggests a similar mechanism: decompression of MV annulus invasion site(s) toward the left atrium. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Colonization and Impact of a Single Dose of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Indian Children With HIV and Their Unvaccinated Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bikas K; Bhattacharya, Sangeeta Das; Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Ganaie, Feroze; Bhaskar, Arun; Bhattacharyya, Subhasish; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar; Moss, William J; Panda, Samiran; Ravikumar, Kadahalli Lingegowda; Das, Ranjan Saurav; Mandal, Sutapa

    2018-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases risk of invasive disease from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) prevent invasive disease and acquisition of vaccine type (VT) pneumococcus in the nasopharynx. To look at the safety and impact of one dose of PCV13 on acquisition of VT pneumococcal carriage in Indian children with HIV. We conducted a cohort study in families of HIV-infected children (CLH) and families of HIV-uninfected children (HUC) in West Bengal. All children received one dose of PCV13. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from children and parents at baseline and 2 months after vaccination. One hundred and fifteen CLH and 47 HUC received one dose of PCV13. Fifty-eight percent of CLH were on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the median nadir CD4 count was 287. There were no significant adverse events in either group. HUC had more VT colonization than CLH-55% versus 23% of all pneumococcal isolates. HIV infection doubled the risk of nonvaccine serotype colonization (P = 0.03). There was no difference in acquisition of VT isolates in CLH (4.4%) and HUC (4.5%) post-PCV13; however, older CLH (>5 years) had decreased clearance of VT strains. ART made no difference in pneumococcal colonization at baseline or after PCV13; however, CLH with higher nadir CD4 counts before starting ART were less likely to have VT colonization post-PCV13 (prevalence ratio, 0.2; 95% confidence interval: 0.1-0.5). While there was no difference in acquisition of VT nasopharyngeal carriage of pneumococcus in CLH and HUC after one dose of PCV13, earlier access to ART may impact response to PCV13 in CLH.

  1. Invasive fungal infections in endogenous Cushing's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Rafael Selbach; Dora, José Miguel; Weinert, Letícia Schwerz; Aquino, Valério; Maia, Ana Luiza; Canani, Luis Henrique; Goldani, Luciano Z.

    2010-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a condition characterized by elevated cortisol levels that can result from either augmented endogenous production or exogenous administration of corticosteroids. The predisposition to fungal infections among patients with hypercortisolemia has been noted since Cushing's original description of the disease. We describe here a patient with endogenous Cushing's syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical carcinoma, who developed concomitant disseminated cryptococcosis and candidiasis in the course of his disease. PMID:24470886

  2. Delayed cerebral thrombosis complicating pneumococcal meningitis: an autopsy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Background: Delayed cerebral thrombosis (DCT) is a devastating cerebrovascular complication in patients with excellent initial recovery of pneumococcal meningitis. The aetiology is unknown, but direct bacterial invasion, activation of coagulation or post-infectious immunoglobulin deposition has been

  3. Enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en la población infantil de la Comunidad Valenciana Invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the community of Valencia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goicoechea-Sáez

    2003-12-01

    .Objective: Pneumococcal disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The recent authorization of the heptavalent conjugate vaccine has increased interest in this disease. The objective of this study was to identify the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this disease, as well as its outcome in the pediatric population of the Autonomous Community of Valencia. Method: Data were obtained from the medical records of children aged less than 15 years who were positive for pneumococcus isolation on admission to hospital between 1996 and 2000. All the public hospitals of the Autonomous Community of Valencia were included. Changes in incidence were evaluated by comparing rates and outcomes (sequelae and lethality through frequency and age distribution. Results: One hundred twenty-seven cases were registered, giving a mean annual rate of 3.89/105 inhabitants aged less than 15 years. The rate was 20.14 in children aged less than 2 years. A total of 29.1% of the children had previous health problems. The main clinical manifestations included sepsis/bacteremia (38%, pneumonia (31% and meningitis (24%. At discharge sequelae were present in 10 children, 75% of whom were aged less than 2 years. Eight children died (6.3% lethality. Conclusions: In the period and region studied, pneumococcal infection was present mainly in children aged less than 2 years and in those with previous health problems. In the last few years, mortality has increased. Thus, inclusion of pneumococcal disease in the epidemiological surveillance system would be appropriate to achieve more precise estimations of its epidemiological patterns and to determine whether the conjugate vaccine represents a solution to the problems currently associated with this bacteria.

  4. Evaluation of anti-pneumococcal capsular antibodies as adjunctive therapy in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian; Frimodt-Moller, N; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacteraemia concomitant with meningitis has been shown to greatly affect outcome. Consequently, the efficacy of serotype-specific anti-pneumococcal antiserum (APAS) was investigated in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. METHODS: Rats were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae...... serotype 3. All rats received ceftriaxone starting 26 h post-infection. APAS was administered either at the time of infection or 26 h post-infection and effects were compared with rats treated with antibiotics only. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A significant clinical benefit was found when APAS was given...... at the time of infection whereas no effect was found when administered 26 h after infection. This work indicates that the clinical value of using APAS in pneumococcal meningitis may be limited...

  5. Invasive pneumococcal diseases among hospitalized children in Lima, Peru Enfermedades neumocócicas invasoras en niños hospitalizados en Lima, Perú

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    Theresa J. Ochoa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and the antibiotic susceptibility and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae in pediatric patients in Lima, Peru. METHODS: A 2-year, multicenter, passive surveillance study conducted from May 2006- April 2008 in 11 public hospitals and five private laboratories in Lima, Peru, in patients less than 16 years of age with sterile site cultures yielding S. pneumoniae. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed by Etest® (AB Biodisk, Solna, Switzerland. Strains were serotyped by the Quellung reaction. RESULTS: In all, 101 IPD episodes were studied, 68.3% of which were among children less than 24 months of age. Diagnoses were: pneumonia (47.5%, meningitis (38.6%, and sepsis (7.9%. The overall case fatality rate was 22.0%; case fatality rate in meningitis was 32.4%. While 80.0% of fatal cases were in those less than 24 months of age, only 50.7% of non-fatal cases (P OBJETIVO: Determinar la epidemiología de la enfermedad neumocócica invasora y la sensibilidad a los antibióticos y la distribución de los serotipos de S. pneumoniae en pacientes pediátricos en Lima, Perú. MÉTODOS: Estudio multicéntrico de vigilancia pasiva durante dos años, entre mayo del 2006 y abril del 2008, en 11 hospitales públicos y 5 consultorios privados de Lima, en pacientes menores de 16 años con cultivos de sitios estériles positivos para S. pneumoniae. Se determinó la sensibilidad a los antibióticos mediante Etest® (AB Biodisk, Solna, Suiza. Se serotipificaron las cepas mediante la reacción de Quellung. RESULTADOS: En total, se estudiaron 101 episodios de enfermedad neumocócica invasora, 68,3% de ellos en niños menores de 24 meses, con los siguientes diagnósticos: neumonía (47,5%, meningitis (38,6% y septicemia (7,9%. La tasa de letalidad general fue de 22,0% y la tasa de letalidad por meningitis de 32,4%. Si bien 80,0% de los casos mortales ocurrió en menores de 24 meses, solo 50

  6. Outbreaks of Invasive Kingella kingae Infections in Closed Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagupsky, Pablo; Ben-Ami, Yael; Trefler, Ronit; Porat, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To describe the results of the epidemiologic investigation of outbreaks of invasive Kingella kingae infections among attendees at daycare facilities located in 4 closed communities in Israel. The preschool-aged population of communities with clusters of Kingella cases had oropharyngeal cultures performed. K kingae isolates from infected patients and healthy contacts were genotyped by pulsed field gel electrophoresis to determine the spread of outbreak strains. The affected closed communities (3 military bases and 1 "kibbutz" commune) were characterized by tight social and family networks and intensive mingling. The outbreaks affected 9 of 51 attendees (attack rate: 17.6%) age 8-19 months (median: 12 months), within a 21-day period. Cases included skeletal system infections (n = 8) and bacteremia (n = 1); K kingae isolates were confirmed by the use of blood culture vials and selective media. Clinical presentation was mild and acute-phase reactants were usually normal or only moderately elevated. Thirty out of 55 (54.5%) asymptomatic children carried the outbreak strains. Analysis of the 3 clusters in which the entire preschool-aged population was cultured revealed that 31 of 71 (43.7%) children younger than 24 months of age were colonized with K kingae organisms compared with 8 of 105 (7.6%) older children (P presentation of invasive K kingae infections and the fastidious nature of the organism, a high index of suspicion and use of sensitive detection methods are recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Universal Routine Vaccination on Pneumococcal Disease in Italian Children

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    Francesca Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the effectiveness of pneumococcal universal vaccination in preventing vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in the PCV7/PCV13 shifting period was estimated to be 84.3% (95% CI: 84.0–84.6% in children <5 years. This study aims at corroborating the estimation of both the effectiveness (VE of PCVs and its impact in reducing pneumococcal diseases. A 1 : 3 matched-case-control study was conducted among children <5 years old hospitalized for IPD or pneumococcal pneumonia (PP between 2006 and 2012 in the Puglia region. Moreover, hospitalizations for pneumococcal outcomes in the pre- and postvaccination period and the hospitalization risk ratios (HRRs with 95% CIs were computed in Italy and in the first eight regions that introduced PCVs in 2006. The overall effectiveness of PCVs was 75% (95% CI: 61%–84%; it was 69% (95% CI: 30%–88% against IPD and 77% (95% CI: 61%–87% against PP. PCVs showed a significant impact on IPD and acute otitis media either at a national level or in those regions with a longer vaccination history, with a nearly 40% reduction of hospitalizations for both outcomes. Our findings provide further evidence of the effectiveness of PCVs against pneumococcal diseases and its impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in children <5 years, indicating the importance of maintaining high immunization coverage.

  8. Isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnelley MA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monica A Donnelley,1,2 Elizabeth S Zhu,1 George R Thompson 3rd3 1Department of Inpatient Pharmacy, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Touro University College of Pharmacy, Vallejo, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California – Davis, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: We have a limited arsenal with which to treat invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales. The morbidity and mortality for both pathogens remains high. A triazole antifungal, isavuconazole, was recently granted approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. A randomized double-blind comparison trial for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis found isavuconazole noninferior to voriconazole. A separate, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of isavuconazole in the treatment of mucormycosis found comparable response rates to amphotericin B and posaconazole treated historical controls. The prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate is commercially available in both an oral and intravenous formulation and is generally well tolerated. Isavuconazole’s broad spectrum of activity, limited side effect profile, and favorable pharmacokinetics will likely solidify its place in therapy. Keywords: isavuconazonium, antifungal, zygomycosis, mucor, mould infection, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, therapy, new agent

  9. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae invasive infection: The first reported case in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleb, A; Sebbar, E; Frikh, M; Boubker, S; Moussaoui, A; El Mekkaoui, A; Khannoussi, W; Kharrasse, G; Belefquih, B; Lemnouer, A; Ismaili, Z; Elouennass, M

    2017-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a cosmopolitan yeast, widely used in agro-alimentary and pharmaceutical industry. Its impact in human pathology is rare, but maybe still underestimated compared to the real situation. This yeast is currently considered as an emerging and opportunistic pathogen. Risk factors are immunosuppression and intravascular device carrying. Fungemias are the most frequent clinical forms. We report the first case of S. cerevisiae invasive infection described in Morocco, and to propose a review of the literature cases of S. cerevisiae infections described worldwide. A 77-year-old patient, with no notable medical history, who was hospitalized for a upper gastrointestinal stenosis secondary to impassable metastatic gastric tumor. Its history was marked by the onset of septic shock, with S. cerevisiae in his urine and in his blood, with arguments for confirmation of invasion: the presence of several risk factors in the patient, positive direct microbiological examination, abundant and exclusive culture of S. cerevisiae from clinical samples. Species identification was confirmed by the study of biochemical characteristics of the isolated yeast. Confirmation of S. cerevisiae infection requires a clinical suspicion in patients with risk factors, but also a correct microbiological diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson DT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dustin T Wilson,1,2 V Paul Dimondi,1,3 Steven W Johnson,1,4 Travis M Jones,1 Richard H Drew1,5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Campbell University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Buies Creek, NC, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, NC, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Hospital, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Despite recent advances in both diagnosis and prevention, the incidence of invasive fungal infections continues to rise. Available antifungal agents to treat invasive fungal infections include polyenes, triazoles, and echinocandins. Unfortunately, individual agents within each class may be limited by spectrum of activity, resistance, lack of oral formulations, significant adverse event profiles, substantial drug–drug interactions, and/or variable pharmacokinetic profiles. Isavuconazole, a second-generation triazole, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in March 2015 and the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 for the treatment of adults with invasive aspergillosis (IA or mucormycosis. Similar to amphotericin B and posaconazole, isavuconazole exhibits a broad spectrum of in vitro activity against yeasts, dimorphic fungi, and molds. Isavuconazole is available in both oral and intravenous formulations, exhibits a favorable safety profile (notably the absence of QTc prolongation, and reduced drug–drug interactions (relative to voriconazole. Phase 3 studies have evaluated the efficacy of isavuconazole in the management of IA, mucormycosis, and invasive candidiasis. Based on the results of these studies, isavuconazole appears to be a viable treatment option for patients with IA as well as those patients with mucormycosis who are not able to tolerate or fail amphotericin B or posaconazole therapy. In contrast, evidence of

  11. Immunogenicity and Immunological Memory Induced by the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Followed by the 23-Valent Polysaccharide Vaccine in HIV-Infected Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmaki, Paraskevi F; Chini, Maria C; Mangafas, Nikolaos M; Tzanoudaki, Marianna T; Piperi, Christina P; Lazanas, Marios Z; Spoulou, Vana S

    2018-05-02

    Vaccine-induced memory B-cell (MBC) subsets have distinct roles in the establishment of protective immunity; MBCs expressing nonswitched immunoglobulin M (IgM+ MBCs) replenish the MBC pool, whereas MBCs expressing isotype-switched immunoglobulin (sIg+ MBCs) differentiate into plasma cells upon antigen reencounter. We investigated immunogenicity and MBCs induced by combined 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. Forty HIV-seropositive adults receiving ART with undetectable viral loads were enrolled. Seventeen had a CD4+ T-cell count of ≥400 cells/μL (group A), and 23 had a CD4+ T-cell count of 200-399 cells/μL (group B). All adults received PCV13 and, 1 year later, PPV23. Levels of IgM+ MBCs (defined as polysaccharide [PS]-specific CD19+CD10-CD27+CD21++IgM+ MBCs) and sIg+ MBCs (defined as PS-specific CD19+CD10-CD27+CD21++IgM- MBCs) and antibodies against PS14 and PS3 were measured prior and 1 month after each vaccination. Immunization caused a significant increase in PS antibodies, compared with levels at baseline (P < .001). Group B achieved significantly lower titers than group A (P < .05 for both PS14 and PS3). After receipt of PCV13, levels of IgM+ MBCs were unchanged, whereas levels of sIg+ MBCs increased significantly (P < .05 for PS14 and P < .001 for PS3). In contrast, following PPV23 receipt, levels of IgM+ MBCs were significantly reduced, and levels of sIg+ MBCs remained stable. A positive correlation was observed between baseline IgM+ and sIg+ MBC counts 1 month after PCV13 receipt but not after PPV23 receipt. PPV23 receipt 12 months after PCV13 receipt improved PCV13 immunogenicity. The reduction in the IgM+ MBC count observed after PPV23 receipt suggests that PPV23 has a depleting effect on PCV13-associated immunological memory. NCT03041051.

  12. Hepatic safety of itraconazole intravenous solution in treatment of invasive fungal infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱利平

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hepatic safety of itraconazole intravenous solution in the treatment of invasive fungal infection. Methods Forty-nine patients with invasive fungal infection, such as pneumonia, meningitis, endocarditis, and blood stream infection, caused by Aspergillus spp. Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida spp. Penicillium marneffei,and Prototheca wiekerhamii, 50 of which had underlying diseases, including hepatic disea-

  13. Pneumococcal Carriage in Children under Five Years in Uganda-Will Present Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines Be Appropriate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Lindstrand

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the major cause of death in children globally, with more than 900,000 deaths annually in children under five years of age. Streptococcus pneumoniae causes most deaths, most often in the form of community acquired pneumonia. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs are currently being implemented in many low-income countries. PCVs decrease vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage, a prerequisite for invasive pneumococcal disease, and thereby affects pneumococcal disease and transmission. In Uganda, PCV was launched in 2014, but baseline data is lacking for pneumococcal serotypes in carriage.To study pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage and serotype distribution in children under 5 years of age prior to PCV introduction in Uganda.Three cross-sectional pneumococcal carriage surveys were conducted in 2008, 2009 and 2011, comprising respectively 150, 587 and 1024 randomly selected children aged less than five years from the Iganga/Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. The caretakers were interviewed about illness history of the child and 1723 nasopharyngeal specimens were collected. From these, 927 isolates of S. pneumoniae were serotyped.Overall, the carriage rate of S. pneumoniae was 56% (957/1723. Pneumococcal carriage was associated with illness on the day of the interview (OR = 1.50, p = 0.04. The most common pneumococcal serotypes were in descending order 19F (16%, 23F (9%, 6A (8%, 29 (7% and 6B (7%. One percent of the strains were non-typeable. The potential serotype coverage rate for PCV10 was 42% and 54% for PCV13.About half of circulating pneumococcal serotypes in carriage in the Ugandan under-five population studied was covered by available PCVs.

  14. Increased incidence of adult pneumococcal pneumonia during school holiday periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Chamira; Bewick, Thomas; Sheppard, Carmen; Greenwood, Sonia; McKeever, Tricia M.; Slack, Mary; Lim, Wei Shen

    2017-01-01

    Child contact is a recognised risk factor for adult pneumococcal disease. Peaks in invasive pneumococcal disease incidence observed during winter holidays may be related to changes in social dynamics. This analysis was conducted to examine adult pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) incidence during school holiday periods. Between September 2008 and 2013, consecutive adults admitted to hospitals covering the Greater Nottingham area with a diagnosis of CAP were studied. Pneumococcal pneumonia was detected using culture and antigen detection methods. Of 2221 adults studied, 575 (25.9%) were admitted during school holidays and 643 (29.0%) had pneumococcal CAP. CAP of pneumococcal aetiology was significantly more likely in adults admitted during school holidays compared to term time (35.3% versus 26.7%; adjusted OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11–1.72, p=0.004). Over the 5-year period, the age-adjusted incidence of hospitalised pneumococcal CAP was higher during school holidays compared to term time (incident rate ratio 1.35, 95% CI 1.14–1.60, pholidays compared to term time (42.0% versus 33.7%, OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.00–2.03, p=0.046). Further study of transmission dynamics in relation to these findings and to identify appropriate intervention strategies is warranted. PMID:28326311

  15. Pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldhoff, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infectious disease, involving the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, and the subarachnoid space. In the Netherlands most common causative agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae (72%) and Neisseria meningitidis (11%). The incidence of pneumococcal

  16. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child's Immunizations: ... cochlear implants. Why Are the PCV and PPSV Vaccines Recommended? Children younger than 2 years old, adults ...

  17. [Pneumococcal carriage in mothers and children of the Panare Amerindians from the State of Bolivar, Venezuela].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello Gonzalez, T.; Rivera-Olivero, I.A.; Pocaterra, L.; Spadola, E.; Araque, M.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Waard, J.H. de

    2010-01-01

    In North America, the indigenous groups have been identified as a population with increased risk of pneumococcal colonization and pneumococcal invasive disease. However, little information is available from South American natives. In the present study we evaluated the nasopharyngeal carriage and

  18. Enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en niños de la Región de Murcia Invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the region of Murcia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Espín

    2002-10-01

    vaccine, the incidence and characteristics of invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the region of Murcia should be determined. This would provide information that could be useful for properly establishing the indications for vaccination. Methods: A retrospective search was conducted for cases of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in children aged less 15 years old treated in hospitals in Murcia from 1991-2000. The data sources were the databases of the microbiology services, the Minimum Data Set, the Pediatric Admissions Register and the EDO Register. Results: The incidence rate for the period 1996-2000 was 18.25 per 10(5 children per year for children aged under 1 year in the case of invasive disease (10.6 for meningitis, 13.6 for those under 2 years for invasive disease (6 for meningitis, 8.9 for those under 5 years (1.35 for meningitis and 3.7 for those under 15 years (1.3 for meningitis. Twenty-eight percent of the patients presented risk factors. Complications occurred in 35.2% and sequelae occurred in 5%. The mortality rate was 11.8%. The prevalent serogroups were 19, 6, 18, 5, 14 and 23. Conclusions: The high percentage of patients with risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease suggests the need to implement vaccination programs aimed at risk groups. Although the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the region of Murcia differs from that in other areas, the incidence of meningitis is similar to that reported by other studies. Because of the severity of the disease, cost-effectiveness studies to evaluate the possible incorporation of the vaccine in the vaccination calendar are justified.

  19. INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF ADMINISTRATION OF PNEUMOCOCCAL CONJUGATED VACCINES: PROBLEMS, PROGRESS, PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Fedoseenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the review of results of International conference on pneumococcal conjugated vaccines. Main results of international experience in the field of control of pneumococcal infection spreading are analyzed. Authors present modern data of clinical and economic effectiveness and safety of pneumococcal conjugated vaccine RCV-7, and describe experience of administration of vaccines of next generation – PCV-10 and PCV-13.Key words: children, pneumococcal infections, prophylaxis, vaccines.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(1:130-134

  20. Periodontal bacterial invasion and infection: contribution to atherosclerotic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Leticia; Herrera, David; Kozarov, Emil; Roldán, Silvia; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this review was to perform a systematic evaluation of the literature reporting current scientific evidence for periodontal bacteria as contributors to atherosclerosis. Literature from epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies concerning periodontal bacteria and atherosclerosis were reviewed. Gathered data were categorized into seven "proofs" of evidence that periodontal bacteria: 1) disseminate from the oral cavity and reach systemic vascular tissues; 2) can be found in the affected tissues; 3) live within the affected site; 4) invade affected cell types in vitro; 5) induce atherosclerosis in animal models of disease; 6) non-invasive mutants of periodontal bacteria cause significantly reduced pathology in vitro and in vivo; and 7) periodontal isolates from human atheromas can cause disease in animal models of infection. Substantial evidence for proofs 1 to 6 was found. However, proof 7 has not yet been fulfilled. Despite the lack of evidence that periodontal bacteria obtained from human atheromas can cause atherosclerosis in animal models of infection, attainment of proofs 1 to 6 provides support that periodontal pathogens can contribute to atherosclerosis. © 2013 European Federation of Periodontology and American Academy of Periodontology.

  1. Hydroxyurea therapy of a murine model of sickle cell anemia inhibits the progression of pneumococcal disease by down-modulating E-selectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D.; Howard, Thad; Hu, Yunming; Pestina, Tamara I.; Gao, Geli; Johnson, Melissa; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Ware, Russell E.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Persons, Derek A.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is characterized by chronic hemolysis coupled with extensive vascular inflammation. This inflammatory state also mechanistically promotes a high risk of lethal, invasive pneumococcal infection. Current treatments to reduce vaso-occlusive complications include chronic hydroxyurea therapy to induce fetal hemoglobin. Because hydroxyurea also reduces leukocytosis, an understanding of the impact of this treatment on pneumococcal pathogenesis is needed. Using a sickle cell mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis, administration of hydroxyurea was found to significantly improve survival. Hydroxyurea treatment decreased neutrophil extravasation into the infected lung coincident with significantly reduced levels of E-selectin in serum and on pulmonary epithelia. The protective effect of hydroxyurea was abrogated in mice deficient in E-selectin. The decrease in E-selectin levels was also evident in human sickle cell patients receiving hydroxyurea therapy. These data indicate that in addition to induction of fetal hemoglobin, hydroxyurea attenuates leukocyte–endothelial interactions in sickle cell anemia, resulting in protection against lethal pneumococcal sepsis. PMID:22130804

  2. Drug treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neralla, Sridhar; Meyer, Keith C

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae has been recognised as a major cause of pneumonia since the time of Sir William Osler. Drug-resistant S. pneumoniae (DRSP), which have gradually become resistant to penicillins as well as more recently developed macrolides and fluoroquinolones, have emerged as a consequence of indiscriminate use of antibacterials coupled with the ability of the pneumococcus to adapt to a changing antibacterial milieu. Pneumococci use cell wall choline components to bind platelet-activating factor receptors, colonise mucosal surfaces and evade innate immune defenses. Numerous virulence factors that include hyaluronidase, neuraminidase, iron-binding proteins, pneumolysin and autolysin then facilitate cytolysis of host cells and allow tissue invasion and bloodstream dissemination. Changes in pneumococcal cell wall penicillin-binding proteins account for resistance to penicillins, mutations in the ermB gene cause high-level macrolide resistance and mutations in topoisomerase IV genes coupled with GyrA gene mutations alter DNA gyrase and lead to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Risk factors for lower respiratory tract infections in the elderly include age-associated changes in oral clearance, mucociliary clearance and immune function. Other risks for developing pneumonia include poor nutrition, hypoalbuminaemia, bedridden status, aspiration, recent viral infection, the presence of chronic organ dysfunction syndromes including parenchymal lung disease and recent antibacterial therapy. Although the incidence of infections caused by DRSP is rising, the effect of an increase in the prevalence of resistant pneumococci on mortality is not clear. When respiratory infections occur, rapid diagnosis and prompt, empirical administration of appropriate antibacterial therapy that ensures adequate coverage of DRSP is likely to increase the probability of a successful outcome when treating community-acquired pneumonia in elderly patients, particularly those with multiple

  3. Epstein-Barr virus infection is equally distributed across the invasive ductal and invasive lobular forms of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Ashley James

    2015-12-01

    The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of breast cancer is still unclear, although a growing body of evidence supports a link. The aim of this study was to investigate if EBV infection was more prevalent in invasive ductal carcinoma or invasive lobular carcinoma. An immunohistochemical marker for EBV (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) clone E1-2.5) was applied to a tissue micro array section. The tissue micro array contained 80 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma, and 80 cases of invasive lobular carcinoma. Each case was scored as positive or negative for nuclear expression of EBNA1 in tumor cells using standard light microscopy. EBNA1 staining was evident in the tumor cells of 63 cases (39.4% of tumor cases). By tumor type (ductal/lobular) EBV infection was noted in 34 (42.5%) cases of invasive ductal carcinoma and 29 (36.2%) cases of invasive lobular carcinoma, this difference was not found to be significant (P=0.518). This study indicates that EBV infection is equally distributed across the ductal and lobular tumor types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of pneumococcal vaccination in prevention of pneumococcal disease among adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Philip; Lim, Lean Huat; Loo, Chian Min; Low, James Alvin; Tan, Carol; Tan, Eng Kiat; Wong, Sin Yew; Setia, Sajita

    2014-01-01

    The burden of disease associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in adults can be considerable but is largely preventable through routine vaccination. Although substantial progress has been made with the recent licensure of the new vaccines for prevention of pneumonia in adults, vaccine uptake rates need to be improved significantly to tackle adult pneumococcal disease effectively. Increased education regarding pneumococcal disease and improved vaccine availability may contribute to a reduction in pneumococcal disease through increased vaccination rates. The increase in the elderly population in Singapore as well as globally makes intervention in reducing pneumococcal disease an important priority. Globally, all adult vaccines remain underused and family physicians give little priority to pneumococcal vaccination for adults in daily practice. Family physicians are specialists in preventive care and can be leaders in ensuring that adult patients get the full benefit of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases. They can play a key role in the immunization delivery of new and routine vaccines by educating the public on the risks and benefits associated with vaccines. Local recommendations by advisory groups on vaccination in adults will also help to tackle vaccine preventable diseases in adults.

  5. IRAK4 Deficiency in a Patient with Recurrent Pneumococcal Infections: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gobin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiencies are genetic defects of the innate or adaptive immune system, resulting in a propensity to infections. The innate immune system is the first line of defense against pathogens and is critical to recognize microbes and start the inflammatory cascade. Sensing of microbes occurs by a number of pathogen-recognition receptors, resulting in the activation of inflammatory signal transduction pathways, such as the activation of NF-κB. Herein, we describe a case of IRAK4 deficiency, a key signal transduction molecule of toll-like and IL-1 receptors. We highlight the complexities in diagnosis of these disorders and review genetic defects of the NF-κB pathway.

  6. Severe febrile systemic reaction to pneumococcal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed; Yousef, Mahmoud; Shridharani, Sachin

    2005-02-01

    Polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (Pneumovax, PPV) has been shown to substantially reduce the risk of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in susceptible individuals. Side effects, such as mild local erythema, induration, pain and fever, have been reported with various frequencies. Rarely, systemic symptoms, including high fever, headache, nausea and photophobia, have been reported in the literature. This case report describes a 38-year-old male who developed severe and prolonged local and systemic symptoms necessitating hospitalization following a dose of pneumovax.

  7. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Associated with Pneumococcal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Schriber

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The first documented case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP associated with pneumococcal septicemia is reported. This association has been previously demonstrated with hemolytic uremic syndrome. The patient presented with recurrent seizures, oliguric renal failure, fever, thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia; coagulation studies were normal. Blood and sputum cultures were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. The patient responded to therapy with plasmapheresis and antiplatelet agents as well as antibiotics. Coincident infection should be searched for in all cases of TTP.

  8. Meeting the challenge: prevention of pneumococcal disease with conjugate vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echániz-Avilés Irma Gabriela

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading causes of both invasive and noninvasive diseases in the pediatric population and continues to represent a significant public health burden worldwide. The increasing incidence of antibioticresistant strains of the pathogen has complicated treatment and management of the various pneumococcal disease manifestations. Thus, the best management strategy may be the prevention of pneumococcal diseases through vaccination. Although several pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been clinically studied in infants and children, only a 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PNCRM7; Prevnar®/Prevenar® is currently approved for the prevention of invasive disease. Vaccination with PNCRM7 is safe and effective in infants and young children. Routine vaccination with the conjugate vaccine could improve outcomes by safeguarding against the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae, thus simplifying the management of pneumococcal disease. Additionally, the overall costs associated with the treatment of pneumococcal diseases could be substantially reduced, particularly in developing countries. The time has come for fully applying this new advancement against S. pneumoniae, to benefit the children of the world. The Spanish version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  9. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine – a health priority | Zar | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies evaluating a 9-valent PCV in South Africa and The Gambia reported a 72 - 77% reduction in vaccineserotype- specific invasive disease in vaccinated children. As many of the pneumococcal serotypes associated with antibiotic resistance are included in PCV, vaccination has also been associated with a reduction in ...

  10. The double edge to parasite escape: invasive host is less infected but more infectable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Carolyn L; Miura, Osamu; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Byers, James E

    2017-09-01

    Nonnative species that escape their native-range parasites may benefit not only from reduced infection pathology, but also from relaxed selection on costly immune defenses, promoting reallocation of resources toward growth or reproduction. However, benefits accruing from a reduction in defense could come at the cost of increased infection susceptibility. We conducted common garden studies of the shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus from highly parasitized native (Japan) populations and largely parasite-free invasive (USA) populations to test for differences in susceptibility to infection by native-range rhizocephalan parasites, and to explore differences in host resource allocation. Nonnative individuals showed at least 1.8 times greater susceptibility to infection than their native counterparts, and had reduced standing metabolic rates, suggesting that less of their energy was spent on physiological self-maintenance. Our results support an indirect advantage to parasite escape via the relaxation of costly physiological defenses. However, this advantage comes at the cost of heightened susceptibility, a trade-off of parasite escape that is seldom considered. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Falciparum malaria infection with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunocompetent host – case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriyani, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is an extraordinary rare in the immunocompetent host. Falciparum malaria contributes to high morbidity and mortality of malaria infection cases in the world. The impairments of both humoral and cellular immunity could be the reason of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in falciparum malaria infection. Forty-nine years old patient came with fever, jaundice, pain in the right abdomen, after visiting a remote area in Africa about one month before admission. Blood films and rapid test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. After malaria therapy in five days, consciousness was altered into somnolence and intubated with respiratory deterioration. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after falciparum malaria infection is life-threatening. There should be awareness of physicians of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in falciparum malaria infection.

  12. Pathological and therapeutic significance of cellular invasion by Proteus mirabilis in an enterocystoplasty infection stone model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Mathoera (Rejiv); D.J. Kok (Dirk); C.M. Verduin (Cees); R.J.M. Nijman (Rien)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractProteus mirabilis infection often leads to stone formation. We evaluated how bacterium-mucin adhesion, invasion, and intracellular crystal formation are related to antibiotic sensitivity and may cause frequent stone formation in enterocystoplasties. Five intestinal

  13. Host defence against disseminated and invasive candida albicans infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is the primary etiologic agent of disseminated and invasive candidiasis. The incidence of disseminated and invasive candidiasis has paralleled the use of modern medical procedures that adversely affect the immune system, and highlights the difficulty of treating

  14. Increased cytotoxicity and streptolysin O activity in group G streptococcal strains causing invasive tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Kittang, Bård R; Chakrakodi, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has emerged as an important cause of severe skin and soft tissue infections, but little is known of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying tissue pathology. Patient samples and a collection of invasive and non-invasive group G SDSE strains (n = 6...

  15. Invasive Aspergillus niger complex infections in a Belgian tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, E; Maertens, J; Meersseman, P; Saegeman, V; Dupont, L; Lagrou, K

    2014-05-01

    The incidence of invasive infections caused by the Aspergillus niger species complex was 0.043 cases/10 000 patient-days in a Belgian university hospital (2005-2011). Molecular typing was performed on six available A. niger complex isolates involved in invasive disease from 2010 to 2011, revealing A. tubingensis, which has higher triazole minimal inhibitory concentrations, in five out of six cases. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  16. Incidence of Hospitalized Pneumococcal Pneumonia among Adults in Guatemala, 2008-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Carmen Lucía; Verani, Jennifer R.; Lopez, María Renee; Paredes, Antonio; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Roldan, Aleida; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim A.; McCracken, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia worldwide. However, the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults in low- and middle-income countries is not well described. Methods Data from 2008–2012 was analyzed from two surveillance sites in Guatemala to describe the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults. A case of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was defined as a positive pneumococcal urinary antigen test or blood culture in persons aged ≥ 18 years hospitalized with an acute respiratory infection (ARI). Results Among 1595 adults admitted with ARI, 1363 (82%) had either urine testing (n = 1286) or blood culture (n = 338) performed. Of these, 188 (14%) had pneumococcal pneumonia, including 173 detected by urine only, 8 by blood culture only, and 7 by both methods. Incidence rates increased with age, with the lowest rate among 18–24 year-olds (2.75/100,000) and the highest among ≥65 year-olds (31.3/100,000). The adjusted incidence of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was 18.6/100,000 overall, with in-hospital mortality of 5%. Conclusions An important burden of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia in adults was described, particularly for the elderly. However, even adjusted rates likely underestimate the true burden of pneumococcal pneumonia in the community. These data provide a baseline against which to measure the indirect effects of the 2013 introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children in Guatemala. PMID:26488871

  17. Recommendations for pneumococcal immunization outside routine childhood immunization programs in Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The global burden of pneumococcal diseases is high, with young children and adults≥50 years of age at highest risk of infection. Two types of vaccine are available for the prevention of pneumococcal diseases caused by specific Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes: the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7, PCV10, and PCV13). Despite pneumococcal immunization programs in adults and children, the burden in adults has remained high. Most European countries have national or local/regional vaccination recommendations. The objective of this review was to provide an overview of the government recommendations for pneumococcal vaccination outside routine childhood vaccination programs for 16 Western European countries as of August 2014. We found that recommendations for pneumococcal immunization across Europe are complex and vary greatly among countries in terms of age groups and risk groups recommended for vaccination, as well as which vaccine should be administered. Clarifying or simplifying these recommendations and improving their dissemination could help to increase pneumococcal vaccine uptake and decrease the high burden of pneumococcal diseases in adults, both through a direct effect of the vaccine and via a herd effect in unvaccinated individuals.

  18. Incidence of Hospitalized Pneumococcal Pneumonia among Adults in Guatemala, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Carmen Lucía; Verani, Jennifer R; Lopez, María Renee; Paredes, Antonio; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Roldan, Aleida; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim A; McCracken, John P

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia worldwide. However, the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults in low- and middle-income countries is not well described. Data from 2008-2012 was analyzed from two surveillance sites in Guatemala to describe the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults. A case of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was defined as a positive pneumococcal urinary antigen test or blood culture in persons aged ≥ 18 years hospitalized with an acute respiratory infection (ARI). Among 1595 adults admitted with ARI, 1363 (82%) had either urine testing (n = 1286) or blood culture (n = 338) performed. Of these, 188 (14%) had pneumococcal pneumonia, including 173 detected by urine only, 8 by blood culture only, and 7 by both methods. Incidence rates increased with age, with the lowest rate among 18-24 year-olds (2.75/100,000) and the highest among ≥65 year-olds (31.3/100,000). The adjusted incidence of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was 18.6/100,000 overall, with in-hospital mortality of 5%. An important burden of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia in adults was described, particularly for the elderly. However, even adjusted rates likely underestimate the true burden of pneumococcal pneumonia in the community. These data provide a baseline against which to measure the indirect effects of the 2013 introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children in Guatemala.

  19. Effect of early measles vaccine on pneumococcal colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Nadja Skadkær; Byberg, Stine; Hervig Jacobsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measles vaccine (MV) may have non-specific beneficial effects for child health and particularly seems to prevent respiratory infections. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia among children worldwide, and nasopharyngeal colonization precedes infection....... OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether providing early MV at 18 weeks of age reduced pneumococcal colonization and/or density up to 9 months of age. METHOD: The study was conducted in 2013-2014 in Guinea-Bissau. Pneumococcal vaccine was not part of the vaccination program. Infants aged 18 weeks were block...

  20. ESCMID and ECMM joint clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of rare invasive yeast infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arendrup, M.C.; Boekhout, T.; Akova, M.; Meis, J.F.; Cornely, O.A.; Lorthlaro, O.

    The mortality associated with invasive fungal infections remains high with that involving rare yeast pathogens other than Candida being no exception. This is in part due to the severe underlying conditions typically predisposing patients to these healthcare-related infections (most often severe

  1. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe : A molecular-epidemiological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, Hajo; Aanensen, David M; van den Wijngaard, Cees C; Spratt, Brian G; Harmsen, Dag; Friedrich, Alexander W; Tami, Adriana

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs) are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe.

  2. Prevention of Pneumococcal Infection in Children with Chronic Diseases of the Nasopharynx Reduces the Incidence of Other Respiratory Tract Infections: Results of a Comparative Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Vavilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A promising approach to solving the problem of widespread infections of the respiratory tract in children is the use ofspecific prophylaxis against the pneumococcus.Objective: Our aim was to examine the clinical efficacy of PCV13 of children with chronic foci of infection in the nasopharynx and the changes of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract.Methods: We have evaluated the incidence of respiratory tract and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. Research period: January 2011 — January 2015. Upper airway function examination included cytologic analysis — counting the main cell populations ratio in the common cytoplasm, lysozym activity and secretory immunoglobulin of class A (sIgA in nasal secretions.Results: The study involved 876 children 2–5 years old. Main group (PCV13 amounted to 448 patients, and the control group (unvaccinated 428. Annual dynamic observation showed a significant reduction of acute morbidity by 2 times (p < 0.001, pneumonia by 2.4 times (p = 0.042, acute bronchitis by 2.5 times (p = 0.008, concomitant ENT pathology (acute otitis media and acute exacerbations of chronic sinusitis by 2.2 times (p = 0.001 and 2.3 times (p = 0.004, respectively. There was a positive effect of vaccination on the level of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract (lysozyme, sIgA, the somatic cell count in nasal secretions.Conclusion: PCV13 vaccination reduces the risk of developing acute respiratory infections and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. This is against the background of recovery in the levels of factors of local immunity.

  3. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Holm, David; Liptrot, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. METHODS: Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. RESULTS: Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  4. Systematic Search for Primary Immunodeficiency in Adults With Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Complement Deficiency; Antibody Deficiency; Chronic Sinus Infection; Meningitis, Bacterial; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Otitis Media; Streptococcal Infection; Neisseria Infections; Haemophilus Influenza; Pneumococcal Infections

  5. Central nervous system involvement in adult patients with invasive infection caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanguren, B; Esteban, L; Guillán, M; de Felipe, A; Alonso Cánovas, A; Navas, E; Quereda, C; Corral, I

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is frequently an asymptomatic coloniser and a cause of neonatal and puerperal sepsis. Infections in nonpregnant adults are uncommon. The frequency of neurological complications caused by invasive infection with this microorganism in adults remains unknown. Here, we study the frequency and characteristics of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in adults with invasive S. agalactiae infection. Review of all adults with invasive S. agalactiae infection between 2003 and 2011 in a tertiary hospital. S. agalactiae was isolated from blood, CSF or synovial fluid in 75 patients. Among them, 7 (9,3%) displayed neurological involvement: 5 men and 2 nonpregnant women, aged between 20 and 62 years. Diagnoses were spinal epidural abscess due to spondylodiscitis with spinal cord compression; acute bacterial meningitis; ischemic stroke as presentation of bacterial endocarditis (2 patients each); and meningoventriculitis after neurosurgery and ventricular shunting. One patient with endocarditis caused by S. agalactiae and S. aureus died in the acute phase, and another died 3 months later from metastatic cancer. The other patients recovered without sequelae. All patients had systemic predisposing factors for infection and 5 (71,4%) had experienced disruption of the mucocutaneous barrier as a possible origin of the infection. CNS involvement is not uncommon in adult patients with invasive infection caused by S. agalactiae. Isolating S. agalactiae, especially in cases of meningitis, should lead doctors to search for predisposing systemic disease and causes of mucocutaneous barrier disruption. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Seasonal changes in climatic parameters and their relationship with the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Thomsen, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal variation in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease is well recognized, but little is known about its relationship with actual changes in climatic parameters. In this 8-year longitudinal population-based study in Denmark, a harmonic sinusoidal regression model was used...... to examine whether preceding changes in climatic parameters corresponded with subsequent variations in the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia, independently of seasonal variation. The study shows that changes in temperature can be used to closely predict peaks in the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia...

  7. Early-onset invasive aspergillosis and other fungal infections in patients treated with ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghez, David; Calleja, Anne; Protin, Caroline; Baron, Marine; Ledoux, Marie-Pierre; Damaj, Gandhi; Dupont, Mathieu; Dreyfus, Brigitte; Ferrant, Emmanuelle; Herbaux, Charles; Laribi, Kamel; Le Calloch, Ronan; Malphettes, Marion; Paul, Franciane; Souchet, Laetitia; Truchan-Graczyk, Malgorzata; Delavigne, Karen; Dartigeas, Caroline; Ysebaert, Loïc

    2018-04-26

    Ibrutinib has revolutionized the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and is now being increasingly used. Although considered to be less immunosuppressive than conventional immunochemotherapy, the observation of a few cases of invasive fungal infections in patients treated with ibrutinib prompted us to conduct a retrospective survey. We identified 33 cases of invasive fungal infections in patients receiving ibrutinib alone or in combination. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) was overrepresented (27/33) and was associated with cerebral localizations in 40% of the cases. Remarkably, most cases of invasive fungal infections occurred with a median of 3 months after starting ibrutinib. In 18/33 cases, other conditions that could have contributed to decreased antifungal responses, such as corticosteroids, neutropenia, or combined immunochemotherapy, were present. These observations indicate that ibrutinib may be associated with early-onset invasive fungal infections, in particular IA with frequent cerebral involvement, and that patients on ibrutinib should be closely monitored in particular when other risk factors of fungal infections are present. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Anidulafungin in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Sabol

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Sabol, Tawanda GumboUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: More antifungal agents have reached clinical use in the past two decades than at any other time. The echinocandins have been a welcome addition to this group, with the latest being anidulafungin. There are several lines of evidence to support anidulafungin’s role as primary therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients, and as alternative therapy to fluconazole in patients with esophageal candidiasis with azole intolerance or triazole-resistant Candida. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies in animals have demonstrated superior efficacy, defined as maximal microbial kill, when compared to fluconazole, regardless of the fluconazole susceptibility of the Candida species. These studies, as well as dose-effect studies in patients, also support the currently recommended dose of anidulafungin. A well designed randomized controlled trial has demonstrated anidulafungin’s efficacy in patients with invasive candidiasis. In this paper, we argue that anidulafungin may be preferable to fluconazole for the treatment of candidemia. However, as of yet, the difference between anidulafungin and the other two licensed echinocandins as first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis is unclear. On the other hand, there is insufficient evidence as of yet to support first-line use of anidulafungin in patients with neutropenia or aspergillosis.Keywords: anidulafungin, pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, efficacy, candidiasis

  9. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M; Dierdorf, Nina I; Hauck, Christof R; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells.

  10. A Cluster of Paediatric Invasive Group A Streptococcal and Chicken Pox Infections

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, C

    2018-03-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a variety of acute clinical syndromes from pharyngitis and scarlet fever commonly seen in primary care to more severe life-threatening invasive disease. Invasive GAS, categorised into three groups - necrotising fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and sepsis with or without an identifiable source of infection- is a notifiable disease to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)1. Laboratory criteria for a confirmed case require isolation of GAS from a normally sterile site. The HPSC previously reported a marked increase in the incidence of invasive GAS infections from 1.65\\/100,000 population in 2011 to 3.65\\/100,000 in 20132. The increased incidence was notable also for a 300% increase in the proportion of invasive GAS cases in children. After a slight decrease in incidence in 20153 (2.3\\/100000), we noted a cluster of invasive GAS cases referred to the paediatric infectious disease (PID) department of Children’s University Hospital (CUH), Temple Street, in 2016. We sought to further characterise this cluster of paediatric invasive GAS infections.

  11. Serious invasive Saffold virus infections in children, 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Alex Christian Yde; Böttiger, Blenda; Banner, Jytte

    2012-01-01

    The first human virus in the genus Cardiovirus was described in 2007 and named Saffold virus (SAFV). Cardioviruses can cause severe infections of the myocardium and central nervous system in animals, but SAFV has not yet been convincingly associated with disease in humans. To study a possible ass...... association between SAFV and infections in the human central nervous system, we designed a real-time PCR for SAFV and tested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from children...

  12. Estimating the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Said

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal pneumonia causes significant morbidity and mortality among adults. Given limitations of diagnostic tests for non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, most studies report the incidence of bacteremic or invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, and thus, grossly underestimate the pneumococcal pneumonia burden. We aimed to develop a conceptual and quantitative strategy to estimate the non-bacteremic disease burden among adults with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP using systematic study methods and the availability of a urine antigen assay.We performed a systematic literature review of studies providing information on the relative yield of various diagnostic assays (BinaxNOW® S. pneumoniae urine antigen test (UAT with blood and/or sputum culture in diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia. We estimated the proportion of pneumococcal pneumonia that is bacteremic, the proportion of CAP attributable to pneumococcus, and the additional contribution of the Binax UAT beyond conventional diagnostic techniques, using random effects meta-analytic methods and bootstrapping. We included 35 studies in the analysis, predominantly from developed countries. The estimated proportion of pneumococcal pneumonia that is bacteremic was 24.8% (95% CI: 21.3%, 28.9%. The estimated proportion of CAP attributable to pneumococcus was 27.3% (95% CI: 23.9%, 31.1%. The Binax UAT diagnosed an additional 11.4% (95% CI: 9.6, 13.6% of CAP beyond conventional techniques. We were limited by the fact that not all patients underwent all diagnostic tests and by the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic tests themselves. We address these resulting biases and provide a range of plausible values in order to estimate the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults.Estimating the adult burden of pneumococcal disease from bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia data alone significantly underestimates the true burden of disease in adults. For every case of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

  13. Optimal serotype compositions for Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination under serotype replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhonen, Markku; Auranen, Kari

    2014-02-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination has proved highly effective in eliminating vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage and disease. However, the potential adverse effects of serotype replacement remain a major concern when implementing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programmes. Applying a concise predictive model, we present a ready-to-use quantitative tool to investigate the implications of serotype replacement on the net effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and to guide in the selection of optimal vaccine serotype compositions. We utilise pre-vaccination data on pneumococcal carriage and IPD and assume partial or complete elimination of vaccine-type carriage, its replacement by non-vaccine-type carriage, and stable case-to-carrier ratios (probability of IPD per carriage episode). The model predicts that the post-vaccination IPD incidences in Finland for currently available vaccine serotype compositions can eventually decrease among the target age group of children replacement through herd effects, the decrease among the older population is predicted to be much less (20-40%). We introduce a sequential algorithm for the search of optimal serotype compositions and assess the robustness of inferences to uncertainties in data and assumptions about carriage and IPD. The optimal serotype composition depends on the age group of interest and some serotypes may be highly beneficial vaccine types in one age category (e.g. 6B in children), while being disadvantageous in another. The net effectiveness will be improved only if the added serotype has a higher case-to-carrier ratio than the average case-to-carrier ratio of the current non-vaccine types and the degree of improvement in effectiveness depends on the carriage incidence of the serotype. The serotype compositions of currently available pneumococcal vaccines are not optimal and the effectiveness of vaccination in the population at large could be improved by including

  14. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  15. As a Rare Site of Invasive Fungal Infection, Chronic Granulomatous Aspergillus Synovitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Canbolat Ayhan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus can causes invasive disease of various organs especially in patients with weakened immune systems. Aspergillus synovitis and arthritis are uncommon types of involvement due to this infection. Approches to fungal osteoarticular infections are based on only case reports. This paper presents a rare case of chronic granulomatous Aspergillus synovitis in an immunocompromised 5-year old girl who was treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  16. Invasive fungal infections in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Selbach Scheffel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome is a condition characterized by elevated cortisol levels that can result from either augmented endogenous production or exogenous administration of corticosteroids. The predisposition to fungal infections among patients with hypercortisolemia has been noted since Cushing’s original description of the disease. We describe here a patient with endo-genous Cushing’s syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical carcinoma, who developed concomitant disseminated cryptococcosis and candidiasis in the course of his disease.

  17. Parasitic anemone infects the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Møller, Lene Friis; Sundberg, Per

    2010-01-01

    We report of the first finding of parasitic sea anemone larvae infecting the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic. Parasitic anemone larvae are common in the native habitat of Mnemiopsis, but have not previously been reported from any of the locations where Mnemiopsis ...

  18. Invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a young patient with hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Rabelo de Carvalho Parahym

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a patient with hematological malignancies after chemotherapy treatment and empiric antifungal therapy with caspofungin. Although severely immunocompromised the patient survived been treated with amphotericin B lipid complex associated with voriconazole.

  19. [Clinical features of invasive candidiasis and risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection in children: a multicenter study in Urumqi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai Er Ken, Ai Bi Bai; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Xiong, Dai-Qin; Xu, Pei-Ru

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the clinical features of invasive candidiasis in children and the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection. A retrospective study was performed on 134 children with invasive candidiasis and hospitalized in 5 tertiary hospitals in Urumqi, China, between January 2010 and December 2015. The Candida species distribution was investigated. The clinical data were compared between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection. The risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection were investigated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 134 Candida strains were isolated from 134 children with invasive candidiasis, and non-albicans Candida (NAC) accounted for 53.0%. The incidence of invasive candidiasis in the PICU and other pediatric wards were 41.8% and 48.5% respectively. Sixty-eight patients (50.7%) had Candida bloodstream infection, and 45 patients (33.6%) had Candida urinary tract infection. There were significant differences in age, rate of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and incidence rates of chronic renal insufficiency, heart failure, urinary catheterization, and NAC infection between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection (Pcandidiasis is similar between the PICU and other pediatric wards. NAC is the most common species of invasive candidiasis. Candida bloodstream infection is the most common invasive infection. Younger age (1-24 months) and NAC infection are the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates from children in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Kang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates in Chongqing, China. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae strains were from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and 32 carriage strains from healthy children from January 2010 to December 2013 at the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Multilocus sequence typing was used to identify the sequence types (STs. Capsular serotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Drug susceptibility and resistance was determined by minimum inhibitory concentrations. Results: In this study, 11 serotypes were identified among the 83 S. pneumoniae clinical isolates tested. Prevalent serotypes were 19A (20.4%, 6A/B (20.4%, 19F (15.7%, 14 (14.5%, and 23F (10.8%. Serotype 19F was the most frequent carriage strain, and serotype 19A was the most frequent invasive strain. The ST983 was the most prevalent ST for carriage strains, and ST320 was the most prevalent ST for invasive strains. For gene analysis, psaA (99.5% and piaA (98.6% were present and much conserved in all pneumococci tested. The cps2A and pcsB genes were more frequent in invasive isolates than carriage strains. Antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal isolates to erythromycin, penicillin, meropenem, cefotaxime, and clindamycin were higher than the carriage isolates from children. Conclusion: Our epidemiological evidence shows that 19A, 6A/B, 19F, 14, and 23F remain the most prevalent serotypes, which can be targeted by PCV13. Genotypes and drug resistance varied between carriage and invasive strains. The PsaA and PiaA may be good protein vaccine candidates.

  1. Invasive fungal infection (IFI) in two pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derwich, K.; Andrzejewska, M.; Wachowiak, J.; Mankowski, P.

    2009-01-01

    At present over 70% of children with malignancies can be successfully cured although this is achieved at the cost of increased incidence of major complications. Fungal infections account for some 10% of all infections and, in severely immunosuppressed patients, they are still the cause of a high mortality rate (50-95%). As a result the prevention and treatment of adverse effects of antineoplastic therapy is of the most importance and can be a factor determining the success of such treatment. This paper contains two case reports of adolescent female patients diagnosed with acute leukemia who developed invasive fungal infections (IFI) in the course of intensive chemotherapy. (authors)

  2. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Clifford, Gary M.; de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 384...

  3. TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION MIGHT INCREASE THE RISK OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hua CHEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep Candida infections commonly occur in immunosuppressed patients. A rare case of a multiple deep organ infection with Candida albicans and spinal tuberculosis was reported in a healthy young man. The 19-year-old man complained of month-long fever and lower back pain. He also had a history of scalded mouth syndrome. Coinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans was diagnosed using the culture of aspirates from different regions. Symptoms improved considerably after antifungal and antituberculous therapy. This case illustrates that infection with tuberculosis might impair the host's immune system and increase the risk of invasive candidiasis in an immunocompetent patient.

  4. Avaliação da resposta humoral à vacina pneumocócica 7-valente em crianças com Aids Evaluación de la vacuna neumocócica 7-valente en la respuesta humoral de niños con SIDA Evaluation of humoral response to heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in HIV-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel de Camargo Costa

    2008-10-01

    Paulo (Sureste de Brasil, en 2002-2003. La dosis de anticuerpos IgG contra los polisacáridos de la cápsula neumocócica fue realizada por medio de ensayo inmuno enzimático (ELISA. Los anticuerpos fueron dosificados inmediatamente antes y un mes después de la aplicación de la segunda dosis de la vacuna. Se utilizaron dos criterios para evaluar la respuesta a la vacuna: títulos de anticuerpos ? 1,3 ?g/mL en la serología post-inmunización y aumento ?4 veces en los títulos de la serología post-inmunización con relación a la pre-inmunización. RESULTADOS: Para el primer criterio (?1,3 ?g/mL, 26 (65% niños obtuvieron respuesta serológica con la vacuna, 12 (30% de ellas presentaron títulos de IgG post-inmunización en niveles de por lo menos 1,3 ?g/mL para todos los serotipos. Para el segundo criterio (incremento >4 veces en los títulos para cuatro serotipos o mas, se obtuvo respuesta serológica en 15 (37,5% niños. CONCLUSIONES: La respuesta frente a la vacuna fue considerada satisfactoria, con aumento estadísticamente significativo de los títulos geométricos promedios post-vacunales con relación a los pre-vacunales para todos los serotipos estudiados.OBJECTIVE: Invasive pneumococcal disease is a major cause of death in HIV-infected children. The objective of the study was to assess the quantitative antibody response to the seven pneumococcal serotypes of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a group of HIV-infected children. METHODS: Study comprising 40 HIV-infected children aged between 2 and 9 years followed up in a specialized outpatient clinic in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2002 and 2003. Enzyme immunoassay (ELISA was used to measure IgG antibody titers against pneumococcus capsule. Antibodies were measured immediately before and 1 month after the second dose of the vaccine. Two response criteria were used: IgG titers >1.3 µg/mL in the post-immunization serology and an increase of at least 4-fold in post- compared to pre

  5. The uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among immunocompromised patients attending rheumatology outpatient clinics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-07-01

    PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES: The patients using immunosuppressive agents are considered at high risk for acquiring different infections. Accordingly, international guidelines recommend vaccinating such patients against influenza and pneumococcal organisms. The aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to assess the influenza and pneumococcal vaccination uptake among our rheumatology outpatients who are immunosuppressed; (2) to identify the factors influencing immunisation uptake among our sample of patients.

  6. Health related quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Saba, Grèce; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Gaillat, Jacques; Bonnin, Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Illes, Hajnal-Gabriela; Laurichesse, Henri; Detournay, Bruno; Petitpretz, Patrick; de Pouvourville, Gérard

    2018-01-01

    Background Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia is a lung infection that causes serious health problems and can lead to complications and death. The aim of this study was to observe and analyze health related quality of life after a hospital episode for patients with community acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France. Methods A total of 524 individuals were enrolled prospectively in the study and were followed for 12 months after hospital discharge. Presence of streptococcus pneumoniae ...

  7. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Human Respiratory Epithelium Affected by Invasive Candida Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Aun Muhammad

    Full Text Available Invasive candidiasis is potentially life-threatening systemic fungal infection caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans. Candida enters the blood stream and disseminate throughout the body and it is often observed in hospitalized patients, immunocompromised individuals or those with chronic diseases. This infection is opportunistic and risk starts with the colonization of C. albicans on mucocutaneous surfaces and respiratory epithelium. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs which are involved in the regulation of virtually every cellular process. They regulate and control the levels of mRNA stability and post-transcriptional gene expression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been associated in many disease states, and miRNA-based therapies are in progress. In this study, we investigated possible variations of miRNA expression profiles of respiratory epithelial cells infected by invasive Candida species. For this purpose, respiratory epithelial tissues of infected individuals from hospital laboratory were accessed before their treatment. Invasive Candida infection was confirmed by isolation of Candia albicans from the blood cultures of the same infected individuals. The purity of epithelial tissues was assessed by flow cytometry (FACSCalibur cytometer; BD Biosciences, Heidelberg, Germany using statin antibody (S-44. TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR (in a TaqMan Low Density Array format was used for miRNA expression profiling. MiRNAs investigated, the levels of expression of 55 miRNA were significantly altered in infected tissues. Some miRNAs showed dramatic increase (miR-16-1 or decrease of expression (miR-17-3p as compared to control. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these miRNA-targeted genes suggests that Candidal infection affect many important biological pathways. In summary, disturbance in miRNA expression levels indicated the change in cascade of pathological processes and the regulation of respiratory epithelial functions

  8. [Mixed invasive fungal infection due to Rhizomucor pusillus and Aspergillus niger in an immunocompetent patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo-Laderas, Juan Carlos; Pontes-Moreno, Antonio; Robles-Arista, Juan Carlos; Bautista-Rodriguez, M Dolores; Candau-Alvarez, Alberto; Caro-Cuenca, Maria Teresa; Linares-Sicilia, María José

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis infections are rare in immunocompetent patients, and very few cases of mucormycosis associated with aspergillosis in non-haematological patients have been reported. A 17-year-old male, immunocompetent and without any previously known risk factors, was admitted to hospital due to a seizure episode 11 days after a motorcycle accident. He had a complicated clinical course as he had a mixed invasive fungal infection with pulmonary involvement due to Aspergillus niger and disseminated mucormycosis due to Rhizomucor pusillus (histopathological and microbiological diagnosis in several non-contiguous sites). He was treated with liposomal amphotericin B for 7 weeks (total cumulative dose >10 g) and required several surgical operations. The patient survived and was discharged from ICU after 5 months and multiple complications. Treatment with liposomal amphotericin B and aggressive surgical management achieved the eradication of a mixed invasive fungal infection. However, we emphasise the need to maintain a higher level of clinical suspicion and to perform microbiological techniques for early diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in non-immunocompromised patients, in order to prevent spread of the disease and the poor prognosis associated with it. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections in Denmark during 2003 and 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luca-Harari, B.; Linden, M. van der; Staum-Kattoft, M.

    2008-01-01

    Active surveillance of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections was conducted in Denmark during 2003 and 2004 as a part of the Strep-EURO initiative. The main objective was to improve understanding of the epidemiology of invasive GAS disease in Denmark. During the 2 years, 278 cases were...... reported, corresponding to a mean annual incidence of 2.6 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The vast majority of isolates, 253 (91%), were from blood, with the remaining 25 (9%) being from cerebrospinal fluid, joints, or other normally sterile sites. The mean case fatality rate (CFR) was 20%, with the rate...... countries, GAS invasive disease shows a sustained, high endemicity, with involvement of both established and emerging streptococcal emm and T types Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  10. Reactive oxygen species induced by Streptococcus pyogenes invasion trigger apoptotic cell death in infected epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Chihiro; Nozawa, Takashi; Maruyama, Fumito; Tsumoto, Kohei; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2010-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS), one of the most common pathogens of humans, attaches and invades into human pharyngeal or skin epithelial cells. We have previously reported that induction of apoptosis is associated with GAS invasion, which induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. We demonstrate here that GAS-induced apoptosis is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Both the induction of apoptosis and ROS production markedly increased upon invasion of wild-type GAS strain JRS4 into HeLa cells; however, the apoptotic response was not observed in fibronectin-binding protein F1-disrupted mutant SAM1-infected cells. In Bcl-2-overexpressing HeLa cells (HBD98-2-4), the induction of apoptosis, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly suppressed, whereas the numbers of invaded GAS was not different between HeLa (mock cells) and the HeLa HBD98-2-4 cells. Whereas Rac1 activation occurred during GAS invasion, ROS production in GAS-infected cells was clearly inhibited by transfection with the Rac1 mutants (L37 or V12L37), but not by the dominant active mutant (V12L61) or by the dominant negative mutant (N17). These observations indicate that GAS invasion triggers ROS production through Rac1 activation and generated ROS induced mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cellular apoptosis.

  11. Coinfection with Haemophilus influenzae promotes pneumococcal biofilm formation during experimental otitis media and impedes the progression of pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Kristin E D; Armbruster, Chelsie E; Juneau, Richard A; Hong, Wenzhou; Pang, Bing; Swords, W Edward

    2010-10-01

    Otitis media is an extremely common pediatric infection and is mostly caused by bacteria that are carried within the nasopharyngeal microbiota. It is clear that most otitis media cases involve simultaneous infection with multiple agents. Chinchillas were infected with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or a combination of both organisms, and the course of disease was compared. In vitro experiments were also performed to address how coinfection impacts biofilm formation. The incidence of systemic disease was reduced in coinfected animals, compared with those infected with pneumococcus alone. Pneumococci were present within surface-attached biofilms in coinfected animals, and a greater proportion of translucent colony type was observed in the coinfected animals. Because this colony type has been associated with pneumococcal biofilms, the impact of coinfection on pneumococcal biofilm formation was investigated. The results clearly show enhanced biofilm formation in vitro by pneumococci in the presence of H. influenzae. Based on these data, we conclude that coinfection with H. influenzae facilitates pneumococcal biofilm formation and persistence on the middle ear mucosal surface. This enhanced biofilm persistence correlates with delayed emergence of opaque colony variants within the bacterial population and a resulting decrease in systemic infection.

  12. Simultaneous Chronic Invasive Fungal Infection and Tracheal Fungus Ball Mimicking Cancer in an Immunocompetent Patient

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    Erdoğan Çetinkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections of the lung are uncommon and mainly affect people with immune deficiency. There are crucial problems in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and candidiasis are the most common opportunistic fungal infections. Aspergillus species (spp. are saprophytes molds that exist in nature as spores and rarely cause disease in immunocompetent individuals. In patients with immune deficiency or chronic lung disease, such as cavitary lung disease or bronchiectasis, Aspergillus may cause a variety of aspergillosis infections. Here we present a case of a 57-year-old patient without immunodeficiency or chronic lung disease who was diagnosed with endotracheal fungus ball and chronic fungal infection, possibly due to Aspergillus. Bronchoscopic examination showed a paralyzed right vocal cord and vegetating mass that was yellow in color, at the posterior wall of tracheal lumen. After 3 months, both the parenchymal and tracheal lesions were completely resolved.

  13. Successful treatment of an invasive fungal infection caused by Talaromyces sp. with voriconazole

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    Uluhan Sili

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFI are on the rise due to increasing numbers of immunosuppressed and critically ill patients. A malignant-looking pulmonary nodule in an immunosuppressed patient may indeed be caused by a fungal organism. We report a patient, who was eventually diagnosed with an IFI caused by an agent of hyalohyphomycosis, Talaromyces sp. determined via molecular methods and succesfully treated with voriconazole.

  14. Virulence of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in animal models of infection.

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    Girish Ramachandran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium sequence type (ST 313 produces septicemia in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there are known genetic and phenotypic differences between ST313 strains and gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, conflicting data about the in vivo virulence of ST313 strains have been reported. To resolve these differences, we tested clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and ST19 strains in murine and rhesus macaque infection models. The 50% lethal dose (LD50 was determined for three Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 strains in mice. For dissemination studies, bacterial burden in organs was determined at various time-points post-challenge. Indian rhesus macaques were infected with one ST19 and one ST313 strain. Animals were monitored for clinical signs and bacterial burden and pathology were determined. The LD50 values for ST19 and ST313 infected mice were not significantly different. However, ST313-infected BALB/c mice had significantly higher bacterial numbers in blood at 24 h than ST19-infected mice. ST19-infected rhesus macaques exhibited moderate-to-severe diarrhea while ST313-infected monkeys showed no-to-mild diarrhea. ST19-infected monkeys had higher bacterial burden and increased inflammation in tissues. Our data suggest that Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 invasiveness may be investigated using mice. The non-human primate results are consistent with clinical data, suggesting that ST313 strains do not cause diarrhea.

  15. Virulence of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Girish; Panda, Aruna; Higginson, Ellen E; Ateh, Eugene; Lipsky, Michael M; Sen, Sunil; Matson, Courtney A; Permala-Booth, Jasnehta; DeTolla, Louis J; Tennant, Sharon M

    2017-08-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium sequence type (ST) 313 produces septicemia in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there are known genetic and phenotypic differences between ST313 strains and gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, conflicting data about the in vivo virulence of ST313 strains have been reported. To resolve these differences, we tested clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and ST19 strains in murine and rhesus macaque infection models. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) was determined for three Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 strains in mice. For dissemination studies, bacterial burden in organs was determined at various time-points post-challenge. Indian rhesus macaques were infected with one ST19 and one ST313 strain. Animals were monitored for clinical signs and bacterial burden and pathology were determined. The LD50 values for ST19 and ST313 infected mice were not significantly different. However, ST313-infected BALB/c mice had significantly higher bacterial numbers in blood at 24 h than ST19-infected mice. ST19-infected rhesus macaques exhibited moderate-to-severe diarrhea while ST313-infected monkeys showed no-to-mild diarrhea. ST19-infected monkeys had higher bacterial burden and increased inflammation in tissues. Our data suggest that Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 invasiveness may be investigated using mice. The non-human primate results are consistent with clinical data, suggesting that ST313 strains do not cause diarrhea.

  16. Pneumococcal Sepsis Complicated by Splenic Abscesses and Purpura Fulminans in a 15-Month-Old Child

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    Scott Pangonis MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an invasive organism that causes a wide range of common diseases, including sinusitis, acute otitis media, and pneumonia. Splenic abscesses and purpura fulminans (PF are rare complications of pneumococcal disease. Splenic abscesses caused by S pneumoniae have only been reported in the adult literature. PF has been described in the pediatric population as a rare complication in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD with and without underlying immunological disorders such as asplenia. Here, we report a patient with IPD complicated by splenic abscesses and PF. Our patient initially presented with bacteremia, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She subsequently developed PF and splenic abscesses. She survived her illness after receiving a total of 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This case highlights 2 rare complications of IPD and demonstrates the need to keep pneumococcal disease in the differential diagnosis even in children whose vaccination status is up to date.

  17. Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in 5-15 year old children with and without comorbidities in Germany after the introduction of PCV13: Implications for vaccinating children with comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Raphael; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Bogdan, Christian; van der Linden, Mark; Imöhl, Matthias; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2015-11-27

    To describe the burden of suffering from IPD in children aged 5-15 years with and without comorbidities up to 5 years after the introduction of PCV13 in Germany and to identify the potential benefit for PCV13 and PPV23 vaccination. The surveillance of IPD for children children from 2010 to 2014 in Germany. Incidence was estimated by capture-recapture analysis with stratification by absence/presence of comorbidities. Coverage of the observed serotypes by different vaccines was assessed. 142 (Capture recapture-corrected: 437) cases were reported: 72.5% were healthy children and 27.5% had a comorbidity. The incidence of IPD related to children with comorbidities was 0.2 per 100,000. One third of these cases had serotypes not included in either vaccine. The remaining cases might benefit from pneumococcal vaccination but one third of all cases was not vaccinated. The additional potential benefit of PPV23 compared to PCV13 with respect to coverage was 10%. The incidence of IPD in children with comorbidities in Germany is low. Pneumococcal vaccination uptake in children with comorbidities should be increased, although only about two-thirds of the cases might be preventable by presently available vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunosuppressive drugs impairs antibody response of the polysaccharide and conjugated pneumococcal vaccines in patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Thomsen, Ole Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) have a higher risk of infectious diseases including pneumococcal infections, and the risk increases with immunotherapy. The primary endpoint of this study was to investigate the specific antibody response to two pneumococcal vaccines in CD patients...... with and without immunosuppressive treatment four weeks post vaccination. METHODS: In a randomized trial of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV13), a group of CD patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (IS) alone or in combination...... with TNF-α antagonists were compared to a group of CD patients not treated with any of these drugs (untreated). Specific pneumococcal antibody concentrations were measured against 12 serotypes common to the two vaccines before and 4 week after vaccination. RESULTS: PCV13 induced a significantly higher...

  19. Two atypical cases of Kingella kingae invasive infection with concomitant human rhinovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmaci, Romain; Ilharreborde, Brice; Doit, Catherine; Presedo, Ana; Lorrot, Mathie; Alison, Marianne; Mazda, Keyvan; Bidet, Philippe; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

    We describe two atypical cases of Kingella kingae infection in children diagnosed by PCR, one case involving a soft tissue abscess and one case a femoral Brodie abscess. Both patients had concomitant human rhinovirus infection. K. kingae strains, isolated from an oropharyngeal swab, were characterized by multilocus sequence typing and rtxA sequencing.

  20. Emergence of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans (Apiotrichum mycotoxinivorans invasive infections in Latin America

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    João Nobrega de Almeida Jr

    Full Text Available We report the first two cases of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans infections in Latin America. We also conducted a literature review and a microbiological investigation, including that of clinical and environmental isolates. A 30-year-old man with chronic renal failure had disseminated infection after dialysis and a 15-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis (CF had pulmonary exacerbations with positive respiratory samples. A review of the relevant literature revealed that deep-seated infections were related to immunosuppression or invasive devices, while most of the CF patients showed a decline in lung function after positive cultures. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three distinct circulating genotypes. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis showed similar spectral profiles and correctly identified all strains/isolates. Biofilm production was documented in a bloodstream isolate and biofilm-producing cells showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations against antifungals.

  1. Emergence of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans (Apiotrichum mycotoxinivorans) invasive infections in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, João Nobrega de; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Barberino, Maria Goreth M de Andrade; Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro F da; Brandão, Oriana M; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Padovan, Ana Carolina Barbosa

    2017-10-01

    We report the first two cases of Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans infections in Latin America. We also conducted a literature review and a microbiological investigation, including that of clinical and environmental isolates. A 30-year-old man with chronic renal failure had disseminated infection after dialysis and a 15-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis (CF) had pulmonary exacerbations with positive respiratory samples. A review of the relevant literature revealed that deep-seated infections were related to immunosuppression or invasive devices, while most of the CF patients showed a decline in lung function after positive cultures. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three distinct circulating genotypes. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis showed similar spectral profiles and correctly identified all strains/isolates. Biofilm production was documented in a bloodstream isolate and biofilm-producing cells showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations against antifungals.

  2. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe: a molecular-epidemiological analysis.

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    Hajo Grundmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe.In each country, staphylococcal reference laboratories secured the participation of a sufficient number of hospital laboratories to achieve national geo-demographic representation. Participating laboratories collected successive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection using an agreed protocol. All isolates were sent to the respective national reference laboratories and characterised by quality-controlled sequence typing of the variable region of the staphylococcal spa gene (spa typing, and data were uploaded to a central database. Relevant genetic and phenotypic information was assembled for interactive interrogation by a purpose-built Web-based mapping application. Between September 2006 and February 2007, 357 laboratories serving 450 hospitals in 26 countries collected 2,890 MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection. A wide geographical distribution of spa types was found with some prevalent in all European countries. MSSA were more diverse than MRSA. Genetic diversity of MRSA differed considerably between countries with dominant MRSA spa types forming distinctive geographical clusters. We provide evidence that a network approach consisting of decentralised typing and visualisation of aggregated data using an interactive mapping tool can provide important information on the dynamics of MRSA populations such as early signalling of emerging strains, cross border spread, and importation by travel.In contrast to MSSA, MRSA spa types have a predominantly regional distribution in Europe. This finding is indicative of the selection and spread of a limited number of clones within health care

  3. Familias de la proteína de superficie PspA de Streptococcus pneumoniae: Relación con serotipos y localización Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA families: Relation with serotypes and clinical site of infection

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    Clara Mayoral

    2010-10-01

    . These properties convert PspA as ideal candidate for the formulation of a pneumococcal vaccine. Investigations of the PspA families were mostly carried out on prevalent serotypes in other countries. The aim of this study was to identify PspA families from Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates of our region as well as to associate them to prevalent serotypes or pathologies. We studied 70 isolates from pediatric patients with invasive infections. PCR was performed using specific primers for each family. In these studies we observed that 60% were PspA family 1, 34% were PspA family 2 and 6% remained unclassified. Serotypes 1 and 5 presented only family 1; serotypes 14, 6B, 19F y 18C showed genes from both families. Family 1 was observed respectively in 60 y 50% of pneumonias and meningitis. The family 2 was identified in 33 and 50% of pneumonias and meningitis. This information about the PspA family distribution could become a valuable contribution to develop an effective regional vaccine using recombinant PspA as immunogen.

  4. A peptide of heparin cofactor II inhibits endotoxin-mediated shock and invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

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    Martina Kalle

    Full Text Available Sepsis and septic shock remain important medical problems with high mortality rates. Today's treatment is based mainly on using antibiotics to target the bacteria, without addressing the systemic inflammatory response, which is a major contributor to mortality in sepsis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed to counteract these complex sepsis pathologies. Heparin cofactor II (HCII has recently been shown to be protective against Gram-negative infections. The antimicrobial effects were mapped to helices A and D of the molecule. Here we show that KYE28, a 28 amino acid long peptide representing helix D of HCII, is antimicrobial against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Moreover, KYE28 binds to LPS and thereby reduces LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing NF-κB/AP-1 activation in vitro. In mouse models of LPS-induced shock, KYE28 significantly enhanced survival by dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Finally, in an invasive Pseudomonas infection model, the peptide inhibited bacterial growth and reduced the pro-inflammatory response, which lead to a significant reduction of mortality. In summary, the peptide KYE28, by simultaneously targeting bacteria and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses represents a novel therapeutic candidate for invasive infections.

  5. A peptide of heparin cofactor II inhibits endotoxin-mediated shock and invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Martina; Papareddy, Praveen; Kasetty, Gopinath; van der Plas, Mariena J A; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock remain important medical problems with high mortality rates. Today's treatment is based mainly on using antibiotics to target the bacteria, without addressing the systemic inflammatory response, which is a major contributor to mortality in sepsis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed to counteract these complex sepsis pathologies. Heparin cofactor II (HCII) has recently been shown to be protective against Gram-negative infections. The antimicrobial effects were mapped to helices A and D of the molecule. Here we show that KYE28, a 28 amino acid long peptide representing helix D of HCII, is antimicrobial against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Moreover, KYE28 binds to LPS and thereby reduces LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing NF-κB/AP-1 activation in vitro. In mouse models of LPS-induced shock, KYE28 significantly enhanced survival by dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Finally, in an invasive Pseudomonas infection model, the peptide inhibited bacterial growth and reduced the pro-inflammatory response, which lead to a significant reduction of mortality. In summary, the peptide KYE28, by simultaneously targeting bacteria and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses represents a novel therapeutic candidate for invasive infections.

  6. Complement component 5 contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehrl, Bianca; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Murr, Carmen; Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G.B.; Baas, Frank; Pfister, Hans W.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Morgan, B. Paul; Barnum, Scott R.; van der Ende, Arie; Koedel, Uwe; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the proinflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. Additionally, SNPs in genes encoding complement pathway proteins have been linked to susceptibility to pneumococcal infection, although no associations with disease severity or outcome have been established. Here, we have performed a robust prospective nationwide genetic association study in patients with bacterial meningitis and found that a common nonsynonymous complement component 5 (C5) SNP (rs17611) is associated with unfavorable disease outcome. C5 fragment levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis correlated with several clinical indicators of poor prognosis. Consistent with these human data, C5a receptor–deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower CSF wbc counts and decreased brain damage compared with WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with C5-specific monoclonal antibodies prevented death in all mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Thus, our results suggest C5-specific monoclonal antibodies could be a promising new antiinflammatory adjuvant therapy for pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:21926466

  7. Epithelial invasion outcompetes hypha development during Candida albicans infection as revealed by an image-based systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, Franziska; Wilson, Duncan; Lehnert, Teresa; Hube, Bernhard; Thilo Figge, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen of the human mucosal flora, frequently causing infections. The fungus is responsible for invasive infections in immunocompromised patients that can lead to sepsis. The yeast to hypha transition and invasion of host-tissue represent major determinants in the switch from benign colonizer to invasive pathogen. A comprehensive understanding of the infection process requires analyses at the quantitative level. Utilizing fluorescence microscopy with differential staining, we obtained images of C. albicans undergoing epithelial invasion during a time course of 6 h. An image-based systems biology approach, combining image analysis and mathematical modeling, was applied to quantify the kinetics of hyphae development, hyphal elongation, and epithelial invasion. The automated image analysis facilitates high-throughput screening and provided quantities that allow for the time-resolved characterization of the morphological and invasive state of fungal cells. The interpretation of these data was supported by two mathematical models, a kinetic growth model and a kinetic transition model, that were developed using differential equations. The kinetic growth model describes the increase in hyphal length and revealed that hyphae undergo mass invasion of epithelial cells following primary hypha formation. We also provide evidence that epithelial cells stimulate the production of secondary hyphae by C. albicans. Based on the kinetic transition model, the route of invasion was quantified in the state space of non-invasive and invasive fungal cells depending on their number of hyphae. This analysis revealed that the initiation of hyphae formation represents an ultimate commitment to invasive growth and suggests that in vivo, the yeast to hypha transition must be under exquisitely tight negative regulation to avoid the transition from commensal to pathogen invading the epithelium. © 2013 International Society for

  8. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV. Conclusions: HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection. PMID:27331659

  9. Detection of Pneumococcal DNA in Blood by Polymerase Chain Reaction for Diagnosing Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Young Children From Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpeth, Susan C; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Scott, J Anthony G; Park, Daniel E; Watson, Nora L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Thea, Donald M; Adrian, Peter V; Ahmed, Dilruba; Antonio, Martin; Bunthi, Charatdao; DeLuca, Andrea N; Driscoll, Amanda J; Githua, Louis Peter; Higdon, Melissa M; Kahn, Geoff; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Makprasert, Sirirat; Mazumder, Razib; Moore, David P; Mwansa, James; Nyongesa, Sammy; Prosperi, Christine; Sow, Samba O; Tamboura, Boubou; Whistler, Toni; Zeger, Scott L; Murdoch, David R

    2017-06-15

    We investigated the performance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on blood in the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia among children from 7 low- and middle-income countries. We tested blood by PCR for the pneumococcal autolysin gene in children aged 1-59 months in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study. Children had World Health Organization-defined severe or very severe pneumonia or were age-frequency-matched community controls. Additionally, we tested blood from general pediatric admissions in Kilifi, Kenya, a PERCH site. The proportion PCR-positive was compared among cases with microbiologically confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia (MCPP), cases without a confirmed bacterial infection (nonconfirmed), cases confirmed for nonpneumococcal bacteria, and controls. In PERCH, 7.3% (n = 291/3995) of cases and 5.5% (n = 273/4987) of controls were blood pneumococcal PCR-positive (P < .001), compared with 64.3% (n = 36/56) of MCPP cases and 6.3% (n = 243/3832) of nonconfirmed cases (P < .001). Blood pneumococcal PCR positivity was higher in children from the 5 African countries (5.5%-11.5% among cases and 5.3%-10.2% among controls) than from the 2 Asian countries (1.3% and 1.0% among cases and 0.8% and 0.8% among controls). Among Kilifi general pediatric admissions, 3.9% (n = 274/6968) were PCR-positive, including 61.7% (n = 37/60) of those with positive blood cultures for pneumococcus. The utility of pneumococcal PCR on blood for diagnosing childhood pneumococcal pneumonia in the 7 low- and middle-income countries studied is limited by poor specificity and by poor sensitivity among MCPP cases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Pneumococcal lipoproteins involved in bacterial fitness, virulence, and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Sylvia; Voß, Franziska; Gómez Mejia, Alejandro; Brown, Jeremy S; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) has evolved sophisticated strategies to survive in several niches within the human body either as a harmless commensal or as a serious pathogen causing a variety of diseases. The dynamic interaction between pneumococci and resident host cells during colonization of the upper respiratory tract and at the site of infection is critical for bacterial survival and the development of disease. Pneumococcal lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins and have pivotal roles in bacterial fitness including envelope stability, cell division, nutrient acquisition, signal transduction, transport (as substrate-binding proteins of ABC transporter systems), resistance to oxidative stress and antibiotics, and protein folding. In addition, lipoproteins are directly involved in virulence-associated processes such as adhesion, colonization, and persistence through immune evasion. Conversely, lipoproteins are also targets for the host response both as ligands for toll-like receptors and as targets for acquired antibodies. This review summarizes the multifaceted roles of selected pneumococcal lipoproteins and how this knowledge can be exploited to combat pneumococcal infections. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a universal vaccination programme with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Annika; Hjelmgren, Jonas; Ortqvist, Ake

    2008-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) has proved to be highly effective against invasive pneumococcal disease and has also provided some protection against all-cause pneumonia and acute otitis media. The objective of this study was to evaluate the projected health benefits, costs...... of pneumococcal septicaemia among adults. The incremental cost per QALY and LY gained was estimated to Euro 29,200 and Euro 51,400, respectively. When herd immunity was accounted for, the cost per QALYand LY gained was estimated to Euro 5500 and Euro 6600, respectively. Thus, the health benefits of a national...... and cost-effectiveness of vaccination with the 7-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine compared with no vaccination, in all infants in Sweden, taking herd immunity into account. A Markov model was used and a hypothetical birth cohort was simulated for a lifelong perspective. The results show...

  12. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines: proceedings from an interactive symposium at the 41st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Stephen I; Dagan, Ron; Gaines, Beverly M; Klugman, Keith P; Laufer, Dagna; O'Brien, Katherine; Schmitt, Heinz J

    2003-04-02

    Globally, Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive and noninvasive disease in infants and young children. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains has increased interest in prevention through immunization. Currently, the only available conjugate pneumococcal vaccine is a seven-valent formulation, PNCRM7. This paper presents excerpts from a symposium that provided an update of ongoing surveillance data and clinical trials evaluating pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The topics addressed included: (1) PNCRM7 postmarketing safety data; (2) the impact of PNCRM7 in premature infants; (3) the direct and indirect effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on colonization; (4) the effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on replacement disease and the rate of resistance among replacement serotypes; (5) the current recommendations for the use of PNCRM7; and (6) the potential impact of conjugate vaccines in Europe and the Asia-Pacific region.

  13. Implementation of minimally invasive and objective humane endpoints in the study of murine Plasmodium infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellavalle, B; Kirchhoff, J; Maretty, L

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Defining appropriate and objective endpoints for animal research can be difficult. Previously we evaluated and implemented a body temperature (BT) of ECM) and were interested in a similar endpoint for a model of severe malarial...... anaemia (SMA). Furthermore, we investigate the potential of a minimally invasive, non-contact infrared thermometer for repeated BT measurement. ECM was induced with Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection in C57Bl/6 mice. SMA was induced with Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection in A/J mice. Our previous published...... endpoint was applied in ECM and 30 °C was pre-determined as the lowest permitted limit for termination in SMA according to consultation with the Danish Animal Inspectorate. Infrared thermometer was compared with the rectal probe after cervical dislocation, ECM and SMA. Linear regression analysis of rectal...

  14. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition. (letters)

  15. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Brith; Pauksen, Karlis; Sylvan, Staffan P E

    2008-04-28

    The present prospective study was conducted from 2003-2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area.The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS) even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31%) received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11%) were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34%) individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21%) the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39%) individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28%) the pneumococcal vaccine.Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine). Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age). For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75-84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza season 2005. The present study confirmed the

  16. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvan Staffan PE

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present prospective study was conducted from 2003–2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area. The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. Results In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31% received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11% were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34% individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21% the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39% individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28% the pneumococcal vaccine. Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine. Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age. For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75–84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza

  17. Invasive Fungal Infections in the ICU: How to Approach, How to Treat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Paramythiotou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are a growing problem in critically ill patients and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Most of them are due to Candida species, especially Candida albicans. Invasive candidiasis includes candidaemia, disseminated candidiasis with deep organ involvement and chronic disseminated candidiasis. During the last decades rare pathogenic fungi, such as Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Fusarium species and Scedosporium have also emerged. Timely diagnosis and proper treatment are of paramount importance for a favorable outcome. Besides blood cultures, several laboratory tests have been developed in the hope of facilitating an earlier detection of infection. The antifungal armamentarium has also been expanded allowing a treatment choice tailored to individual patients’ needs. The physician can choose among the old class of polyenes, the older and newer azoles and the echinocandins. Factors related to patient’s clinical situation and present co-morbidities, local epidemiology data and purpose of treatment (prophylactic, pre-emptive, empiric or definitive should be taken into account for the appropriate choice of antifungal agent.

  18. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection and Vaccine Implications, Auckland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Atheer; Stewart, Joanna; Trenholme, Adrian; Drinkovic, Dragana; Peat, Briar; Taylor, Susan; Read, Kerry; Roberts, Sally; Voss, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection and the potential effects of a multivalent GAS vaccine in New Zealand. During January 2005–December 2006, we conducted prospective population-based laboratory surveillance of Auckland residents admitted to all public hospitals with isolation of GAS from normally sterile sites. Using emm typing, we identified 225 persons with confirmed invasive GAS infection (median 53 years of age; range 0–97 years). Overall incidence was 8.1 cases per 100,00 persons per year (20.4/100,000/year for Maori and Pacific Islanders; 24.4/100,000/year for persons >65 years of age; 33/100,000/year for infants Auckland’s lowest socioeconomic quintile. Twenty-two persons died, for an overall case-fatality rate of 10% (63% for toxic shock syndrome). Seventy-four percent of patients who died had an underlying condition. To the population in our study, the proposed 26-valent vaccine would provide limited benefit. PMID:21749758

  19. Characterization of some pneumococcal bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    The growth of pneumococcal phages at high cell and phage densities is enhanced strongly by the substitution of potassium for sodium in the medium. Initial titers of 2 x 10 10 to 4 x 10 10 PFU/ml are readily obtained, and concentrated stocks are stable in a storage buffer described here. The mechanism of the cation effect is obscure. Phages ω3 and ω8 each have linear double-stranded DNA of 33 x 10 6 daltons per particle, with an apparent guanine plus cytosine content of 47 to 49 mol percent, as determined by buoyancy and melting temperature, but with an unusual absorbance spectrum. Efficiency of plating is high if sufficient time is allowed for a relatively slow adsorption, which differs several-fold in rate between the two phages. Morphologically, these and other pneumococcal phages are similar to coliphage lambda but with a longer tail and tail fiber. Upon UV inactivation, ω3 and ω8 have D 37 values of 33 and 55 J/m 2 , respectively, and each shows multiplicity reactivation. A total of 13 ts mutants have been isolated from the two phages, representing only two complementation groups; complementation and recombination occur between ω3 and ω8 mutants. Both phages provoke high-titer antisera with extensive cross-reactivity against a number of newly isolated pneumococcal phages

  20. Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Invasive Candidiasis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Global Emergence ... antifungal drugs. Learn more about C. auris Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a ...

  1. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederhold NP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nathan P Wiederhold Departments of Pathology and Medicine/Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, South Texas Reference Laboratories, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data

  2. New perspectives on the gastrointestinal mode of transmission in invasive Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlech, W.F. III

    1984-01-01

    The route or mechanism of transmission of Listeria monocytogenes from its rural veterinary reservoir to newborn and older human populations has been obscure. Anecdotal reports of milk-borne infection from cows with Listeria mastitis have been published, but intensive investigations of small outbreaks of L. monocytogenes infections in humans have not supported a gastrointestinal mode of infection. Several recent studies, however, strongly suggest this possibility, and case-control studies of epidemic listeriosis in the Canadian Maritime provinces in 1981 documented an association between ingestion of uncooked vegetables and the development of illness (p = 0.02). In that study, coleslaw from a regional producer which was distributed throughout the Maritimes was considered to be the vehicle of transmission. Cabbage, the raw product in the production of coleslaw, was contaminated at a farm prior to arrival at the plant. Contamination occurred through fertilization with raw manure from a flock of sheep known to harbor L. monocytogenes. Therefore, an indirect link was established between Listeria monocytogenes infection of sheep on a cabbage farm and subsequent development of invasive listeriosis in humans. This study supports findings from other epidemiologic studies of human listeriosis and is consistent with results of investigations into the mode of transmission of natural and laboratory-acquired listeriosis in animals. 34 references.

  3. Invasive Trichosporon Infection: A systematic review on a re-emerging fungal pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Nobrega De Almeida Júnior

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aimed to better depict the clinical features and address the issue of therapeutic management of Trichosporon deep-seated infections.Methods: We comprehensively reviewed the cases of invasive Trichosporon infection reported in the literature from 1994 (date of taxonomic modification to 2015. Data from antifungal susceptibility testing (AST studies were also analyzed. Results: Two hundred and three cases were retained and split into four groups: hemopathy (n=79, other immunodeficiency conditions (n =41, miscellaneous (n=58 and newborns (n=25. Trichosporon asahii was the main causative species (46.7% and may exhibit cross-resistance to different antifungal classes. The unfavorable outcome rate was at 44.3%. By multivariate analysis, breakthrough infection (OR 2.45 was associated with unfavorable outcome, whilst the use of an azole-based therapy improved the prognosis (OR 0.16. Voriconazole-based treatment was associated with favorable outcome in hematological patients (73.6% vs. 41.8%; p=0.016. Compiled data from AST demonstrated that (i T. asahii exhibits the highest MICs to amphotericin B and (ii voriconazole has the best in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates of Trichosporon spp. Conclusions: Trichosporon infection is not only restricted to hematological patients. Analysis of compiled data from AST and clinical outcome support the use of voriconazole as first line therapy.

  4. Vitamin D-deficient mice have more invasive urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Olof; Lüthje, Petra; Sullivan, Devin; Aspenström, Pontus; Brauner, Annelie

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a common health problem with consequences not limited to bone and calcium hemostasis. Low levels have also been linked to tuberculosis and other respiratory infections as well as autoimmune diseases. We have previously shown that supplementation with vitamin D can induce the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin during ex vivo infection of human urinary bladder. In rodents, however, cathelicidin expression is not linked to vitamin D and therefore this vitamin D-related effect fighting bacterial invasion is not relevant. To determine if vitamin D had further protective mechanisms during urinary tract infections, we therefore used a mouse model. In vitamin D-deficient mice, we detected more intracellular bacterial communities in the urinary bladder, higher degree of bacterial spread to the upper urinary tract and a skewed cytokine response. Furthermore, we show that the vitamin D receptor was upregulated in the urinary bladder and translocated into the cell nucleus after E. coli infection. This study supports a more general role for vitamin D as a local immune response mediator in the urinary tract.

  5. Pneumococcal vaccination in adults: rationale, state of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icardi, G; Sticchi, L; Bagnasco, A; Iudici, R; Durando, P

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the availability, since the early 1980s, of a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PP V23), its recommendation and increased use in the last decades, and the indirect benefits against invasive pneumococcal diseases following the pediatric immunization strategies with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), pneumoccal diseases, particularly Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP), still remain a substantial burden among older adults in Western countries. The recent availability on the market of a second generation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, with an enlarged spectrum of protection against some serotypes not included in the PCV7 (i.e., the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine--PCV13), opens new interesting perspectives for improving the control of this significant health-care issue among the entire population. The most interesting and up-dated epidemiological data regarding the impact of SP in adults and the elderly in Western countries, together with the available evidence concerning the efficacy and effectiveness of the PPV23 in the same population, are reported and discussed below.

  6. PHARMACOECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF 13-VALENT PNEUMOCOCCAL CONJUGATE VACCINE IN IMMUNIZATION OF CHILDREN IN RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ​A. V. Rudakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: cost-effectiveness assessment and budget impact analysis for 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 in infant immunization program in Russian Federation. Materials and methods: 10 year modeling with social perspective (direct medical and indirect costs and life expectancy with discounting by 3,5% per year and population effect based on results of clinical studies, global PCV13 use and Russian epidemiological data has been established. Budget impact has been analyzed without discounting. Direct effect was assessed by influence on pneumococcal meningitis, bacteremia, pneumonia and acute otitis media (AOM incidence, population effect — by pneumococcal meningitis and hospitalized all-cause pneumonia incidence. Results: Possible PCV13 effectiveness was estimated as 76,6% for invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD and 23,7% for hospitalized cases of AOM. Vaccination (per 100 000 vaccinated infants can prevent 13,8 lethal cases in vaccinated population and 171,1 — in unvaccinated population. Cost-effectiveness ratio for PCV13 is estimated as 32,400 rubles / LYG and 32,400 rubles / QALY. Cost of 1 lethal case prevention is 140 100 rubles, additional cost for 10 years is 111,5 rubles per child. Conclusions: PCV13 mass vaccination of infants in Russian Federation is highly cost-effective and will significantly cut expenses due to pneumococcal diseases treatment. 

  7. NFKBIZ polymorphisms and susceptibility to pneumococcal disease in European and African populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephen J; Khor, Chiea C; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Rautanen, Anna; Segal, Shelley; Moore, Catrin E; Davies, Robert J O; Day, Nicholas P; Peshu, Norbert; Crook, Derrick W; Berkley, James A; Williams, Thomas N; Scott, J Anthony; Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-01-01

    The proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) plays a central role in host defence against pneumococcal disease. Both rare mutations and common polymorphisms in the NFKBIA gene encoding the NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α associate with susceptibility to bacterial disease, but the possible role of polymorphisms within the related IκB-ζ gene NFKBIZ in the development of invasive pneumococcal disease has not previously been reported. To investigate this further, we examined the frequencies of 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning NFKBIZ in two case-control studies, comprising UK Caucasian (n=1008) and Kenyan (n=723) individuals. Nine polymorphisms within a single UK linkage disequilibrium block and all four polymorphisms within the equivalent, shorter Kenyan linkage disequilibrium block displayed either significant association with invasive pneumococcal disease or a trend towards association. For each polymorphism, heterozygosity was associated with protection from invasive pneumococcal disease when compared to the combined homozygous states (e.g. for rs600718, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=7.576, P=0.006, OR=0.67, 95% CI for OR: 0.51-0.88; for rs616597, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=8.715, P=0.003, OR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86). We conclude that multiple NFKBIZ polymorphisms associate with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in humans. The study of multiple populations may aid fine-mapping of associations within extensive regions of strong linkage disequilibrium (‘transethnic mapping’). PMID:19798075

  8. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Prevalence of nasopharyngeal antibiotic-Resistant pneumococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Pneumococcal resistance was significant in this group of children with easy access to paediatric services and antibiotic use. The implication of such high resistance for the treatment of pneumococcal diseases is that high-dose amoxicillin is the preferred empirical oral therapy for treatment of otitis media.

  10. Pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation: preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Both clinical data and laboratory studies demonstrated the risk of pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation. This review examines strategies to prevent post-implant meningitis. Medline/PubMed database; English articles after 1980. Search terms: cochlear implants, pneumococcus meningitis, streptococcus pneumonia, immunization, prevention. Narrative review. All articles relating to post-implant meningitis without any restriction in study designs were assessed and information extracted. The presence of inner ear trauma as a result of surgical technique or cochlear implant electrode array design was associated with a higher risk of post-implant meningitis. Laboratory data demonstrated the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing meningitis induced via the hematogenous route of infection. Fibrous sealing around the electrode array at the cochleostomy site, and the use of antibiotic-coated electrode array reduced the risk of meningitis induced via an otogenic route. The recent scientific data support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommendation of pneumococcal vaccination for the prevention of meningitis in implant recipients. Nontraumatic cochlear implant design, surgical technique, and an adequate fibrous seal around the cochleostomy site further reduce the risk of meningitis. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Threshold shift: effects of cochlear implantation on the risk of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2007-04-01

    The study goals were to examine whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of meningitis in the absence of other risk factors and to understand the pathogenesis of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation. Four weeks following surgery, 54 rats (18 of which received a cochleostomy alone, 18 of which received a cochleostomy and acute cochlear implantation using standard surgical techniques, and 18 of which received a cochlear implant) were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae via three different routes of bacterial inoculation (middle ear, inner ear, and intraperitoneal) to represent all potential routes of bacterial infection from the upper respiratory tract to the meninges. The presence of a cochlear implant reduced the threshold of bacteria required to cause pneumococcal meningitis from all routes of infection in healthy animals. The presence of a cochlear implant increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis regardless of the route of bacterial infection. Early detection and treatment of pneumococcal infection such as otitis media may be required, as cochlear implantation may lead to a reduction of infectious threshold for meningitis.

  12. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015. PMID:26180063

  13. [Pneumococcal vaccines in children: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potin, Marcela

    2014-08-01

    Conjugated pneumococal vaccines had a notable impact on prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in vacccinated and non vaccinated (herd immunity) populations. In Chile a 10 valent conjugated vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in the Nacional Immunization Program (NIP) in 2011, initially in a 3+1 schedule at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age, and since 2012 in a 2+1 schedule (2, 4 and 12 months). In prematures schedule 3+1 was maintained. No catch up or high risk groups vaccination strategies were used. The inclusion of PCV10 has reduced the rates of IPD; 66% in infants less than 12 months old and a 60% in 12-24 months old. After 3 years of the introduction of PCV10, no herd immunity has been seen. Serotype replacement shows an increase of ST 3 but not ST19A. Surveillance shows that another vaccine with 13 serotypes (PCV13) would cover an additional 5 to 10% of cases. The nule herd immunity and more extense coverage of PCV13, suggests that NIP should switch from PCV10 to PCV13.

  14. The cost-effectiveness of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination for infants in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Choi, Yoon Hong; Trotter, Caroline; Miller, Elizabeth; Jit, Mark

    2012-11-26

    In the immunisation schedule in England and Wales, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was replaced by the 13-valent vaccine (PCV-13) in April 2010 after having been used since September 2006. The introduction of PCV-7 was informed by a cost effectiveness analysis using an infectious disease model which projected herd immunity and serotype replacement effects based on the post-vaccine experience in the United States at that time. To investigate the cost effectiveness of the introduction of PCV-13. Invasive disease incidence following vaccination was projected from a dynamic infectious disease model, and combined with serotype specific disease outcomes obtained from a large hospital dataset linked to laboratory confirmation of invasive pneumococcal disease. The economic impact of replacing PCV-7 with PCV-13 was compared to stopping the use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether. Discontinuing PCV-7 would lead to a projected increase in invasive pneumococcal disease, costs and loss of quality of life compared to the introduction of PCV-13. However under base case assumptions (assuming no impact on non-invasive disease, maximal competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types, time horizon of 30 years, vaccine price of £49.60 a dose+£7.50 administration costs and discounting of costs and benefits at 3.5%) the introduction of PCV-13 is only borderline cost effective compared to a scenario of discontinuing of PCV-7. The intervention becomes more cost-effective when projected impact of non-invasive disease is included or the discount factor for benefits is reduced to 1.5%. To our knowledge this is the first evaluation of a transition from PCV-7 to PCV-13 based on a dynamic model. The cost-effectiveness of such a policy change depends on a number of crucial assumptions for which evidence is limited, particularly the impact of PCV-13 on non-invasive disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunogenicity of a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in elderly residents of a long-term care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Valenzuela B.

    Full Text Available S. pneumoniae is a significant cause of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly, and accounts for the majority of the pneumonia deaths among the elderly. We conducted this randomized double-blind study to evaluate the immune response to a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the persistence of antibodies two years after the vaccination in an elderly population in Santiago, Chile. A total of 118 elderly nursing home residents received either the pneumococcal or a tetanus control vaccine. Serum samples were taken at enrolment, at two months, and at two years post-vaccination. Pre-vaccination anti-pneumococcal antibody geometric mean concentrations (GMC were similar in both study groups, with increased levels of antibodies found only against serotype 14. The pneumococcal vaccine was highly immunogenic at 2 months, and titers remained high two years after the vaccination for the 10 serotypes studied in this elderly population. The results thus support the benefits of this pneumococcal vaccine in this elderly population who are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  16. Rapid, serial, non-invasive assessment of drug efficacy in mice with autoluminescent Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is the world's third most common mycobacterial infection. There is no vaccine against BU and surgery is needed for patients with large ulcers. Although recent experience indicates combination chemotherapy with streptomycin and rifampin improves cure rates, the utility of this regimen is limited by the 2-month duration of therapy, potential toxicity and required parenteral administration of streptomycin, and drug-drug interactions caused by rifampin. Discovery and development of drugs for BU is greatly hampered by the slow growth rate of M. ulcerans, requiring up to 3 months of incubation on solid media to produce colonies. Surrogate markers for evaluating antimicrobial activity in real-time which can be measured serially and non-invasively in infected footpads of live mice would accelerate pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU. Previously, we developed bioluminescent M. ulcerans strains, demonstrating proof of concept for measuring luminescence as a surrogate marker for viable M. ulcerans in vitro and in vivo. However, the requirement of exogenous substrate limited the utility of such strains, especially for in vivo experiments.For this study, we engineered M. ulcerans strains that express the entire luxCDABE operon and therefore are autoluminescent due to endogenous substrate production. The selected reporter strain displayed a growth rate and virulence similar to the wild-type parent strain and enabled rapid, real-time monitoring of in vitro and in vivo drug activity, including serial, non-invasive assessments in live mice, producing results which correlated closely with colony-forming unit (CFU counts for a panel of drugs with various mechanisms of action.Our results indicate that autoluminescent reporter strains of M. ulcerans are exceptional tools for pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU due to their potential to drastically reduce the time, effort, animals, compound

  17. Community-based outbreaks in vulnerable populations of invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 5 and 8 in Calgary, Canada.

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    Otto G Vanderkooi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD typically occur within institutions. Beginning in 2005, we detected an increase in serotype (ST 5 and ST8 IPD cases, predominantly in homeless persons living in an open community. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CASPER (Calgary Area S. pneumoniae Epidemiology Research surveillance study of all IPD (sterile site isolates in our region (pop ~1,100,000. Interviews and chart reviews of all cases and all isolates phenotypically analyzed and selected isolated tested by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During 2005-2007, 162 cases of ST5 IPD and 45 cases of ST8 IPD were identified. The isolates demonstrated phenotypic and genotypic clonality. The ST5 isolates were sequence type (ST 289 and demonstrated intermediate susceptibility to TMP-SMX. The ST8 isolates were predominantly ST1268, with a susceptible antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Individuals with ST5 IPD were more likely to be middle aged (OR 2.6, homeless (OR 4.4, using illicit drugs(OR 4.8, and asthmatic(OR 2.6. Those with ST8 were more likely to be male (OR 4.4, homeless (OR 2.6, aboriginal (OR7.3, and a current smoker (OR 2.5. Overlapping outbreaks of ST5 and ST8 IPD occurred in an open community in Calgary, Canada and homelessness was a predominant risk factor. Homelessness represents a unique community in which pneumococcal outbreaks can occur.

  18. 75 FR 48707 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... very sick. It causes blood infections, pneumonia, and meningitis, mostly in young children. (Meningitis... have many causes, and PCV13 only works against the types of pneumococcal bacteria targeted by the... the parent or legal representative in the case of a child) receiving vaccines covered under the...

  19. ADULT RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME (ARDS) DUE TO BACTEREMIC PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANNES, GPM; BOERSMA, WG; BAUR, CHJM; POSTMUS, PE

    We describe a patient, who had no pre-existing disease, with bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a rare complication. In spite of the use of antibiotics and intensive treatment the mortality rate of this kind of infection remains high. Streptococcus

  20. Did the dutch pneumococcal vaccination campaign decrease the need for antibiotics in children?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Bijlsma, Maarten J.; Bos, Jens; Hak, Eelko

    2013-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for a significant amount of respiratory infections and acute otitis media (AOM) and use of antibiotics in children. In June 2006 a four-dose 7-valent pneumococcal vaccination campaign (PVC) was introduced in the Netherlands; 94% of children born

  1. Non-invasive index of liver fibrosis induced by alcohol, thioacetamide and schistosomal infection in mice

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    El-Beltagy Doha M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non invasive approaches will likely be increasing utilized to assess liver fibrosis. This work provides a new non invasive index to predict liver fibrosis induced in mice. Methods Fibrosis was generated by thioacetamide (TAA, chronic intake of ethanol, or infection with S. mansoni in 240 mice. Both progression and regression of fibrosis (after treatment with silymarin and/or praziquantel were monitored. The following methods were employed: (i The METAVIR system was utilized to grade and stage liver inflammation and fibosis; (ii Determination of hepatic hydroxyproline and collagen; and (iii Derivation of a new hepatic fibrosis index from the induced changes, and its prospective validation in a group of 70 mice. Results The index is composed of 4 serum variable including total proteins, γ-GT, bilirubin and reduced glutathione (GSH, measured in diseased, treated and normal mice. These parameters were highly correlated with both the histological stage and the grade. They were combined in a logarithmic formula, which non-invasively scores the severity of liver fibrosis through a range (0 to 2, starting with healthy liver (corresponding to stage 0 to advanced fibrosis (corresponding stage 3.Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC for the accuracy of the index to predict the histological stages demonstrated that the areas under the curve (AUC were 0.954, 0.979 and 0.99 for index values corresponding to histological stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Also, the index was correlated with stage and grade, (0.947 and 0.859, respectively. The cut off values that cover the range between stages 0-1, 1-2 and 2-3 are 0.4, 1.12 and 1.79, respectively. The results in the validation group confirmed the accuracy of the test. The AUROC was 0.869 and there was good correlation with the stage of fibrosis and grade of inflammation. Conclusion The index fulfils the basic criteria of non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis since it is liver

  2. Intestinal Adenovirus Shedding Before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Is a Risk Factor for Invasive Infection Post-transplant

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    Karin Kosulin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses (HAdV are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric human stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients. Our previous studies identified the gastrointestinal tract as a site of HAdV persistence, but the role of intestinal virus shedding pre-transplant for the risk of ensuing invasive infection has not been entirely elucidated. Molecular HAdV monitoring of serial stool samples using RQ-PCR was performed in 304 children undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Analysis of stool and peripheral blood specimens was performed pre-transplant and at short intervals until day 100 post-HSCT. The virus was detected in the stool of 129 patients (42%, and 42 tested positive already before HSCT. The patients displaying HAdV shedding pre-transplant showed a significantly earlier increase of intestinal HAdV levels above the critical threshold associated with high risk of invasive infection (p < 0.01. In this subset of patients, the occurrence of invasive infection characterized by viremia was significantly higher than in patients without HAdV shedding before HSCT (33% vs 7%; p < 0.0001. The data demonstrate that intestinal HAdV shedding before HSCT confers a greatly increased risk for invasive infection and disseminated disease post-transplant, and highlights the need for timely HAdV monitoring and pre-emptive therapeutic considerations in HSCT recipients.

  3. IL1B and DEFB1 Polymorphisms Increase Susceptibility to Invasive Mold Infection After Solid-Organ Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojtowicz, A.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Lecompte, T.; Bibert, S.; Manuel, O.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Rueger, S.; Berger, C.; Boggian, K.; Cusini, A.; Garzoni, C.; Hirsch, H.H.; Weisser, M.; Mueller, N.J.; Meylan, P.R.; Steiger, J.; Kutalik, Z.; Pascual, M.; Delden, C. van; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Bochud, P.Y.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune genes have been associated with susceptibility to invasive mold infection (IMI) among hematopoietic stem cell but not solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients. METHODS: Twenty-four SNPs from systematically selected genes were genotyped

  4. Pneumococcal meningitis: epidemiological profile pre- and post-introduction of the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine

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    Tatiane E. Hirose

    2015-03-01

    sorotipos dentre os casos. Método: Estudo observacional, transversal, com coleta de dados retrospectiva dos casos de meningite pneumocócica no Estado do Paraná, notificados ao SINAN, no período de 1998 a 2011. Foram analisados 1339 casos de meningite pneumocócica e comparados os 1205 casos do período pré-vacina (1998 a 2009 com os 134 do período pós-vacina (2010 a 2011. A análise estatística descritiva e comparativa (teste qui-quadrado e razão de prevalência foi realizada no software de estatística JMP 5.1.2 (JMP Statistical Discovery, Carolina do Norte, EUA e no Programa EPI INFO 6. Resultados: Observou-se redução significativa das taxas médias de incidência e mortalidade na população geral. A análise dos casos nos períodos pré e pós-vacina nas faixas etárias contempladas pela vacinação (menores de 2 anos mostrou reduções significativas das taxas de incidência (6,01 casos/100.000 para 2,49 casos/100.000 habitantes, mortalidade (1,85 casos/100.000 habitantes para 0,47 casos/100.000 habitantes, enquanto que a letalidade média não apresentou variação significativa. Houve redução significativa dos casos cujos sorotipos estão incluídos na vacina (80,7% para 53,3%. Conclusão: Mesmo com um tempo reduzido de uso, a vacina pneumocócica conjugada 10 valente já apresentou um impacto relevante na diminuição dos coeficientes de incidência e mortalidade dos casos de meningite entre os lactentes, além de redução de casos cujos sorotipos estão incluídos na vacina. Keywords: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pneumococcal meningitis, Invasive pneumococcal disease, Vaccines, Palavras-chave: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Meningite pneumocócica, Doença pneumocócica invasiva, Vacinas

  5. Invasive pulmonary fungal infections in patients with connective tissue disease: a retrospective study from northern China

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    H.F. Ge

    Full Text Available Invasive pulmonary fungal infection (IPFI is a potentially fatal complication in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD. The current study aimed to uncover the clinical characteristics and risk factors of patients with IPFI-CTD. The files of 2186 CTD patients admitted to a single center in northern China between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 47 CTD patients with IPFI were enrolled into this study and assigned to the CTD-IPFI group, while 47 uninfected CTD patients were assigned to the control group. Clinical manifestations were recorded, and risk factors of IPFI were calculated by stepwise logistical regression analysis. Forty-seven (2.15% CTD patients developed IPFI. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients were responsible for the highest proportion (36.17% of cases with IPFI. Candida albicans (72.3% accounted for the most common fungal species. CTD-IPFI patients had significantly elevated white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and fasting glucose values compared to controls (P<0.05. Cough, sputum and blood in phlegm were the most common symptoms. Risk factors of IPFI in CTD included maximum prednisone dose ≥30 mg/day within 3 months prior to infection, anti-microbial drug therapy, and interstitial pneumonia. CTD patients who have underlying interstitial pneumonia, prior prednisone or multiple antibiotics, were more likely to develop IPFI.

  6. Pneumococcal disease: Closing the gap

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    Ashfaq Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available oday, India is home to 99 million elderly people. By 2050, the number of elderly in this country will have gone up to 300 million1. With an increase in life expectancy from 32 years at the time of independence to 67.14 years in 20121, 10% of the population finds itself labeled as ‘senior citizen’. Inevitably, age brings with it comorbidities, immune senescence and pneumococcal disease. Pneumonia, in deference to its considerable morbidity and mortality, was exalted by Sir William Osler to its dubious pedestal of “Captain of all these Men of Death”. Unsurprisingly, immune debility and in several regions of the planet increasing antibiotic resistance, have ensured that pneumococcal pneumonia continues to take a large toll of senior citizens. Death rates have hardly budged over the last three decades. In India, pneumonia accounts for 25-30% deaths in the elderly3, a fatality rate almost unrivalled by most other terminal diseases. Among 15 high-burden countries, India has the dubious distinction of ranking third from last in the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD4. During the World Immunization Week 2015 (April 24th to 30th, the ‘Close the Immunization Gap’ campaign gains crucial importance. Immunization, long vaunted as one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions there is, prevent 2 to 3 million deaths every year, and saves enor-mous hospitalization costs and prevents loss of productivity. The recently published CAPiTA study (Community Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults, evaluated the efficacy of a novel 13-valent conju-gate vaccine for Pneumococcal pneumonia a vac-cine proven for its efficacy in children for the first time in older adults over 85,000 of them. Childhood vaccination with ‘PCV-13’, of course, was instrumental in reducing nasopharyngeal carriage of Strep pneumonia and decreasing the prevalence of Pneumococcal disease in the community at large. Altogether, the idea

  7. Novos pontos de corte de sensibilidade nas taxas de resistência antimicrobiana de cepas invasivas de pneumococo New susceptibility breakpoints in antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal strains

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    Paula Carolina Bejo Wolkers

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar impacto dos novos pontos de corte de sensibilidade à penicilina nas taxas de resistência de cepas de pneumococo obtidas de crianças com pneumonia. MÉTODOS: Cepas de pneumococo isoladas no laboratório de análises clínicas do Hospital de Clínicas de Uberlândia, Uberlândia (MG, a partir de amostras de pacientes internados foram enviadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo (SP, para confirmação da identificação, sorotipagem e determinação da sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos. RESULTADOS: De abril de 1999 a dezembro de 2008 foram enviadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz 330 cepas de pneumococo, sendo 195 (59% provenientes de pacientes com diagnóstico de pneumonia. Destas, foram analisadas 100 cepas de pacientes com idade ≤ 12 anos; a idade dos pacientes variou de 1 a 12,6 anos, com média de 2,4 e mediana de 1,7 anos; 47 pacientes eram do sexo masculino; as fontes de recuperação foram sangue (42% e líquido pleural (58%. Foram detectadas 35 cepas oxacilina-resistentes: segundo os critérios do Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI de 2007 [concentração inibitória mínima (CIM ≤ 0,06 µg/mL para sensibilidade (S, 0,12 a 1 µg/mL para resistência intermediária (RI e ≥ 2 µg/mL para resistência plena (RP], 22 cepas apresentaram RI e 11, RP para penicilina. De acordo com os critérios atuais do CLSI de 2008 (≤ 2 µg/mL para S, 4 µg/mL para RI e ≥ 8 µg/mL para RP apenas uma cepa confirmou RI à penicilina. Detectou-se resistência a cotrimoxazol (80%, tetraciclina (21%, eritromicina (13%, clindamicina (13% e ceftriaxona (uma cepa, simultaneamente resistente a penicilina. CONCLUSÕES: Com a aplicação dos novos pontos de corte para sensibilidade in vitro, as taxas de resistência a penicilina caíram 97%, de 33 para 1%.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of new penicillin susceptibility breakpoints on resistance rates of pneumococcal strains collected from children with pneumonia. METHODS

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasivas: serotipos y resistencia antimicrobiana Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections: serotypes and antimicrobial resistance

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    Gladys Antonia Cueto Montoya

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Las meningoencefalitis bacterianas constituyen una enfermedad invasiva importante, quizás no tanto por su frecuencia, como por la gravedad de su cuadro. Los cambios en la epidemiología de los síndromes neurológicos infecciosos en Cuba a partir de la vacunación contra meningococo BC y Haemophilus influenzae b han hecho que el Streptococcus pneumoniae constituya el agente causal más frecuente. Debido al incremento de la resistencia de este microorganismo a los antibióticos habituales, se realizaron modificaciones al régimen terapéutico convencional, fundamentalmente en las meningitis pediátricas. Es necesario lograr el aislamiento en cultivo de este agente para conocer los serotipos más frecuentes en el país, y lograr una vacuna neumocócica conjugada, así como para la vigilancia de las cepas frente a los antimicrobianos.The bacterial meningoencephalitis is an important invasive disease, not only because of its frequency, but also because of the severity of its picture. The changes in the epidemiology of the neurological infectious syndromes in Cuba starting from the vaccination against meningococcus BC and Haemophilus infuenzae b have made that Streptococcus pneumoniae be the most frequent causal agent. Due to the increase of the resistance of this microorganism to habitual antibiotics, modifications were made in the conventional therapeutic regimen, mainly in the pediatric meningitis. It is necessary to achieve the isolation in culture of this agent to know the most common serotypes in the country, to attain a conjugated pneumococcal vaccine, and to keep the surveillance of the strains against the antimicrobials.

  9. Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Colonization among Children after Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction

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    Manoochehr Karami

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organization has recommended all countries to introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV in routine immunization schedule, especially those countries with higher rate of mortality in children. However, Islamic Republic of Iran and more than 50 other countries including Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Belarus, Belize, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Cabo Verde, Chad, China, Comoros, Cook Islands, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Dominica, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Gabon, Grenada, Guinea, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Jordan, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Montenegro, Nauru, Poland, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Seychelles, Slovenia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Ukraine, Vanuatu, and Viet Namhave not introduced PCV till April 2016.

  10. A new non-invasive approach based on polyhexamethylene biguanide increases the regression rate of HPV infection

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    Gentile Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV infection is a worldwide problem strictly linked to the development of cervical cancer. Persistence of the infection is one of the main factors responsible for the invasive progression and women diagnosed with intraepithelial squamous lesions are referred for further assessment and surgical treatments which are prone to complications. Despite this, there are several reports on the spontaneous regression of the infection. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of a long term polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB-based local treatment in improving the viral clearance, reducing the time exposure to the infection and avoiding the complications associated with the invasive treatments currently available. Method 100 women diagnosed with HPV infection were randomly assigned to receive six months of treatment with a PHMB-based gynecological solution (Monogin®, Lo.Li. Pharma, Rome - Italy or to remain untreated for the same period of time. Results A greater number of patients, who received the treatment were cleared of the infection at the two time points of the study (three and six months compared to that of the control group. A significant difference in the regression rate (90% Monogin group vs 70% control group was observed at the end of the study highlighting the time-dependent ability of PHMB to interact with the infection progression. Conclusions The topic treatment with PHMB is a preliminary safe and promising approach for patients with detected HPV infection increasing the chance of clearance and avoiding the use of invasive treatments when not strictly necessary. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01571141

  11. Effect of helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue

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    Hua Xin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue. Methods: The gastric cancer tissues surgically removed in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were collected and divided into Hp negative, Hp-L negative and Hp-L positive according to the condition of helicobacter pylori infection. The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression were detected. Results: LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-positive gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues while ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1 and Mst1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues; LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1, Mst1, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-negative gastric cancer tissues were not different from those in Hpnegative gastric cancer tissues. Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori L-form infection can influence the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression to promote cell proliferation and invasion, and inhibit cell apoptosis.

  12. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

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    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  13. EXPERIENCE OF APPLICATION AND SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF THE 13-VALENT PNEUMOCOCCAL CONJUGATE VACCINE IN UNDER-5 CHILDREN

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    M. V. Fedoseenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compulsory use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the framework of national pediatric immunization schedules of the developed countries resulted in significant decrease in the prevalence of the pneumococcal infections induced by the vaccinal serotypes. However, a growth in prevalence of the pneumonia and acute otitis media caused by non-vaccinal strains has also been observed. This required introduction of a new 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine with a wider range of pneumococcal population coverage. The experience of application accumulated in various countries (2010 onwards and results of the authors’ observations indicate high safety of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for both healthy under-5 children and patients with various medical issues. The article presents results of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination tolerance assessment. The study involved 110 children from 2 months to 5 years of age. In most cases immunization concurred with other pediatric vaccines. The incidence of local reactions in vaccinated children did not exceed 33%, of generalized reactions – 11%. The authors observed a comparable incidence of side reactions in both virtually healthy children and children with various medical issues.

  14. Mortality reductions for older adults differ by race/ethnicity and gender since the introduction of adult and pediatric pneumococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; Metlay, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    We determined the effectiveness of a 23-valent-polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV-23) and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) in reducing adult pneumococcal mortality by comparing historically predicted declines in pneumococcal disease mortality with observed patterns since the introduction of PPV-23 and PCV-7, including analyses of age, gender, and racial/ethnic subgroups. We analyzed all deaths registered on U.S. death certificates reporting any site of pneumococcal infection (e.g., meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, bacteremia, and peritonitis) from 1968 to 2006. We used time-series dynamic linear regression on annual pneumococcal mortality rates to determine the percentage reduction in post-1983 mortality rates for a given increase in PPV-23 vaccination rates and post-2000 mortality rates for a given increase in PCV-7 vaccination rates. Pneumococcal mortality decreased well before the introduction of PPV-23 in 1983 and again before the introduction of PCV-7 in 2000. The level of PPV-23 vaccination was associated with a direct and significant reduction in adult mortality, especially white female adults > or = 65 years of age. In contrast, the level of PCV-7 vaccination in the population was not associated with an indirect and significant reduction in pneumococcal mortality beyond the historical pace of decline. PPV-23 introduction was associated with a reduction in pneumococcal mortality among older adults > or = 65 years of age beyond levels predicted by secular trends, whereas PCV-7 introduction was not. Mortality reduction was not uniformly experienced across the population, revealing the need for additional strategies to reduce pneumococcal mortality in older adults.

  15. Combination of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA with whole cell pertussis vaccine increases protection against pneumococcal challenge in mice.

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    Maria Leonor S Oliveira

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory acute infections around the world. In Latin America, approximately 20,000 children under 5 years of age die of pneumococcal diseases annually. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is among the best-characterized pneumococcal antigens that confer protection in animal models of pneumococcal infections and, as such, is a good alternative for the currently available conjugated vaccines. Efficient immune responses directed to PspA in animal models have already been described. Nevertheless, few low cost adjuvants for a subunit pneumococcal vaccine have been proposed to date. Here, we have tested the adjuvant properties of the whole cell Bordetella pertussis vaccine (wP that is currently part of the DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine administrated to children in several countries, as an adjuvant to PspA. Nasal immunization of BALB/c mice with a combination of PspA5 and wP or wP(low--a new generation vaccine that contains low levels of B. pertussis LPS--conferred protection against a respiratory lethal challenge with S. pneumoniae. Both PspA5-wP and PspA5-wP(low vaccines induced high levels of systemic and mucosal antibodies against PspA5, with similar profile, indicating no essential requirement for B. pertussis LPS in the adjuvant properties of wP. Accordingly, nasal immunization of C3H/HeJ mice with PspA5-wP conferred protection against the pneumococcal challenge, thus ruling out a role for TLR4 responses in the adjuvant activity and the protection mechanisms triggered by the vaccines. The high levels of anti-PspA5 antibodies correlated with increased cross-reactivity against PspAs from different clades and also reflected in cross-protection. In addition, passive immunization experiments indicated that antibodies played an important role in protection in this model. Finally, subcutaneous immunization with a combination of PspA5 with DTP(low protected mice against challenge with two

  16. Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Emergence of Resistant Pathogens and New Antifungal Therapies

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    Maria N. Gamaletsou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections caused by drug-resistant organisms are an emerging threat to heavily immunosuppressed patients with hematological malignancies. Modern early antifungal treatment strategies, such as prophylaxis and empirical and preemptive therapy, result in long-term exposure to antifungal agents, which is a major driving force for the development of resistance. The extended use of central venous catheters, the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of certain antifungal agents, neutropenia, other forms of intense immunosuppression, and drug toxicities are other contributing factors. The widespread use of agricultural and industrial fungicides with similar chemical structures and mechanisms of action has resulted in the development of environmental reservoirs for some drug-resistant fungi, especially azole-resistant Aspergillus species, which have been reported from four continents. The majority of resistant strains have the mutation TR34/L98H, a finding suggesting that the source of resistance is the environment. The global emergence of new fungal pathogens with inherent resistance, such as Candida auris, is a new public health threat. The most common mechanism of antifungal drug resistance is the induction of efflux pumps, which decrease intracellular drug concentrations. Overexpression, depletion, and alteration of the drug target are other mechanisms of resistance. Mutations in the ERG11 gene alter the protein structure of C-demethylase, reducing the efficacy of antifungal triazoles. Candida species become echinocandin-resistant by mutations in FKS genes. A shift in the epidemiology of Candida towards resistant non-albicans Candida spp. has emerged among patients with hematological malignancies. There is no definite association between antifungal resistance, as defined by elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations, and clinical outcomes in this population. Detection of genes or mutations conferring resistance with the use of molecular methods

  17. Methods of Controlling Invasive Fungal Infections Using CD8+ T Cells

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    Pappanaicken R. Kumaresan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFIs cause high rates of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Pattern-recognition receptors present on the surfaces of innate immune cells recognize fungal pathogens and activate the first line of defense against fungal infection. The second line of defense is the adaptive immune system which involves mainly CD4+ T cells, while CD8+ T cells also play a role. CD8+ T cell-based vaccines designed to prevent IFIs are currently being investigated in clinical trials, their use could play an especially important role in acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients. So far, none of the vaccines used to treat IFI have been approved by the FDA. Here, we review current and future antifungal immunotherapy strategies involving CD8+ T cells. We highlight recent advances in the use of T cells engineered using a Sleeping Beauty vector to treat IFIs. Recent clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell therapy to treat patients with leukemia have shown very promising results. We hypothesized that CAR T cells could also be used to control IFI. Therefore, we designed a CAR that targets β-glucan, a sugar molecule found in most of the fungal cell walls, using the extracellular domain of Dectin-1, which binds to β-glucan. Mice treated with D-CAR+ T cells displayed reductions in hyphal growth of Aspergillus compared to the untreated group. Patients suffering from IFIs due to primary immunodeficiency, secondary immunodeficiency (e.g., HIV, or hematopoietic transplant patients may benefit from bioengineered CAR T cell therapy.

  18. First Report of a Case of Pneumococcal Meningitis Which Did Not Respond to the Ceftriaxone Therapy despite the Isolated Organism Being Sensitive to This Antibiotic In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mojtabavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old man presented with pneumococcal meningitis which did not respond to the ceftriaxone therapy, in spite of in-vitro susceptibility (minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.016 μg/dLit of the isolated organism to this antibacterial agent, although ceftriaxone is still the drug of choice for such pneumococcal meningitis. Review of published articles revealed no report of clinical resistance in organisms which were susceptible to the same antimicrobial agent in vitro. This alarming emergence of isolates with in vivo resistance should be considered and even could lead to a shift in the empirical antibiotic therapy for pneumococcal infections.

  19. Natural infection of the feline lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus in the invasive snail Achatina fulica from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Romina; Diaz, Julia Ines; Salomón, Oscar Daniel; Navone, Graciela Teresa

    2017-02-15

    The giant African snail Achatina fulica is an invasive mollusk native to Africa, the first record in Argentina was in Puerto Iguazú, in northeastern Argentina in 2010. Recently it was reported in Corrientes Province. This snail can act as an intermediate host of Metastrongyloidea nematodes of importance in public health as: Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Angiostrongylus costaricensis and Angiostrongylus vasorum. Taking into account the presence of A. fulica in Argentina, the objectives of this study is to assess the presence of Metastrongyloidea nematodes in this mollusk species in Puerto Iguazú, Misiones, close to the international border with Brazil and Paraguay. A total of 451 samples were collected from February 2014 to November 2015. The snails were processed using a digestion technique to recover the parasites. A total of 206 nematodes larvae were founded in the digestion solution of 10 hosts (P=2%; MA=0.5; MI=21). Third larval stage (L3) nematodes identified as Aelurostrongylus abstrusus were founded parasitizing the snails. No other larval stage was observed. This species has veterinary importance because it causes 'aelurostrongilosis', also known as feline strongyloidosis. This study constitutes the first record of a Metastrongyloidea nematode in A. fulica in Argentina and also highlights the susceptibility of this mollusk as intermediate host of other helminthes of health importance. The present study suggests that there is a need to establish an epidemiological monitoring system in order to prevent the possible installation of an infected mollusks focus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Invasive fungal infections and antifungal therapies in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Kubiak, David W; Chandraker, Anil K; Tullius, Stefan G

    2007-12-01

    This manuscript will review the risk factors, prevalence, clinical presentation, and management of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Primary literature was obtained via MEDLINE (1966-April 2007) and EMBASE. Abstracts were obtained from scientific meetings or pharmaceutical manufacturers and included in the analysis. All studies and abstracts evaluating IFIs and/or antifungal therapies, with a primary focus on solid organ transplantation, were considered for inclusion. English-language literature was selected for inclusion, but was limited to those consisting of human subjects. Infectious complications following SOT are common. IFIs are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in this patient population. Determining the best course of therapy is difficult due to the limited availability of data in SOT recipients. Well-designed clinical studies are infrequent and much of the available information is often based on case-reports or retrospective analyses. Transplant practitioners must remain aware of their therapeutic options and the advantages and disadvantages associated with the available treatment alternatives.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive infections over a decade at Kilifi County Hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Sonal P; Boinett, Christine J; Ellington, Matthew J; Kagia, Ngure; Mwarumba, Salim; Nyongesa, Sammy; Mturi, Neema; Kariuki, Samuel; Scott, J Anthony G; Thomson, Nicholas R; Morpeth, Susan C

    2017-10-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recent years have seen an explosion of resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and emergence of carbapenem resistance. Here, we examine 198 invasive K. pneumoniae isolates collected from over a decade in Kilifi County Hospital (KCH) in Kenya. We observe a significant increase in MDR K. pneumoniae isolates, particularly to third generation cephalosporins conferred by ESBLs. Using whole-genome sequences, we describe the population structure and the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes within it. More than half of the isolates examined in this study were ESBL-positive, encoding CTX-M-15, SHV-2, SHV-12 and SHV-27, and 79% were MDR conferring resistance to at least three antimicrobial classes. Although no isolates in our dataset were found to be resistant to carbapenems we did find a plasmid with the genetic architecture of a known New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM)-carrying plasmid in 25 isolates. In the absence of carbapenem use in KCH and because of the instability of the NDM-1 gene in the plasmid, the NDM-1 gene has been lost in these isolates. Our data suggests that isolates that encode NDM-1 could be present in the population; should carbapenems be introduced as treatment in public hospitals in Kenya, resistance is likely to ensue rapidly. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial Resistance in Invasive Bacterial Infections in Hospitalized Children, Cambodia, 2007-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Lewis, Andrew; Takata, Junko; Miliya, Thyl; Lubell, Yoel; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Rith, Kolthida; McKellar, Gregor; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; McGonagle, Erin; Stoesser, Nicole; Moore, Catrin E; Parry, Christopher M; Turner, Claudia; Day, Nicholas P J; Cooper, Ben S; Turner, Paul

    2018-05-01

    To determine trends, mortality rates, and costs of antimicrobial resistance in invasive bacterial infections in hospitalized children, we analyzed data from Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, for 2007-2016. A total of 39,050 cultures yielded 1,341 target pathogens. Resistance rates were high; 82% each of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were multidrug resistant. Hospital-acquired isolates were more often resistant than community-acquired isolates; resistance trends over time were heterogeneous. K. pneumoniae isolates from neonates were more likely than those from nonneonates to be resistant to ampicillin-gentamicin and third-generation cephalosporins. In patients with community-acquired gram-negative bacteremia, third-generation cephalosporin resistance was associated with increased mortality rates, increased intensive care unit admissions, and 2.26-fold increased healthcare costs among survivors. High antimicrobial resistance in this setting is a threat to human life and the economy. In similar low-resource settings, our methods could be reproduced as a robust surveillance model for antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Nasopharyngeal colonization and invasive disease are enhanced by the cell wall hydrolases LytB and LytC of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx and one of the major pathogens causing invasive disease worldwide. Dissection of the molecular pathways responsible for colonization, invasion, and evasion of the immune system will provide new targets for antimicrobial or vaccine therapies for this common pathogen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have constructed mutants lacking the pneumococcal cell wall hydrolases (CWHs LytB and LytC to investigate the role of these proteins in different phases of the pneumococcal pathogenesis. Our results show that LytB and LytC are involved in the attachment of S. pneumoniae to human nasopharyngeal cells both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction of both proteins with phagocytic cells demonstrated that LytB and LytC act in concert avoiding pneumococcal phagocytosis mediated by neutrophils and alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, C3b deposition was increased on the lytC mutant confirming that LytC is involved in complement evasion. As a result, the lytC mutant showed a reduced ability to successfully cause pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Bacterial mutants lacking both LytB and LytC showed a dramatically impaired attachment to nasopharyngeal cells as well as a marked degree of attenuation in a mouse model of colonization. In addition, C3b deposition and phagocytosis was more efficient for the double lytB lytC mutant and its virulence was greatly impaired in both systemic and pulmonary models of infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms that the CWHs LytB and LytC of S. pneumoniae are essential virulence factors involved in the colonization of the nasopharynx and in the progress of invasive disease by avoiding host immunity.

  4. A public health and budget impact analysis of vaccinating the elderly and at-risk adults with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yiling; Gauthier, Aline; Keeping, Sam; Carroll, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of the routine childhood immunization, a change in epidemiology of pneumococcal disease has been seen in both children and adults. This study aimed to quantify the public health and budget impact of pneumococcal vaccination of the elderly and those in at risk groups in the UK. The model was adapted from a previous population-based Markov model. At-risk adults and the elderly were assumed to receive PPV23 or PCV13 vaccination or no vaccination. Over the study period (2012-2016), PPV23 vaccination led to a reduction in the number of invasive pneumococcal disease cases in most scenarios. The net budget impact ranged between £15 and £39 million (vs no vaccination) or between -£116 and -£93 million (vs PCV13). PPV23 vaccination program remains the optimal strategy from public health and budgetary perspectives despite epidemiological changes. PCV13 is likely to impose a significant budget with limited health benefits.

  5. The adult nasopharyngeal microbiome as a determinant of pneumococcal acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Amelieke Jh; Zomer, Aldert L; Gritzfeld, Jenna F; Ferwerda, Gerben; van Hijum, Sacha Aft; Ferreira, Daniela M; Shak, Joshua R; Klugman, Keith P; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; de Jonge, Marien I; Gordon, Stephen B; Hermans, Peter Wm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several cohort studies have indicated associations between S. pneumoniae and other microbes in the nasopharynx. To study causal relationships between the nasopharyngeal microbiome and pneumococcal carriage, we employed an experimental human pneumococcal carriage model. Healthy adult

  6. Serotype distribution in non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas Lars Vibe; Skovgaard, Marlene; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2013-01-01

    There is limited knowledge of serotypes that cause non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NBP). Here we report serotypes, their associated disease potential and coverage of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in adults with NBP and compare these to bacteremic pneumonia (BP).......There is limited knowledge of serotypes that cause non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NBP). Here we report serotypes, their associated disease potential and coverage of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in adults with NBP and compare these to bacteremic pneumonia (BP)....

  7. INVASIVE CANDIDA INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AND HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: CURRENT EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Girmenia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the global epidemiological impact of invasive candidiasis (IC in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM and in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients has decreased and the incidence of invasive aspergillosis  exceeded that of Candida infections. The use of prevention strategies, first of all antifungal prophylaxis with triazoles,  contributed to the reduction of IC in these populations as demonstrated by several  epidemiological studies. However, relatively little is known about the current epidemiological patterns of IC in HM and HSCT populations, because recent epidemiological data almost exclusively derive from retrospective experiences and few prospective data are available. Several prospective, controlled studies in the prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases have been conducted in both the HM and HSCT setting. On the contrary, most of the prospective controlled trials that demonstrated the efficacy of the antifungal drugs echinocandins and voriconazole in the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis mainly involved  patients with underlying conditions other than HM or  HSCT.  For these reasons, international guidelines provided specific indications for the prophylaxis strategies in HM and HSCT patients, whereas the  recommendations on therapy of documented Candida infections are based on the results observed in the general population and should be considered with caution.

  8. Antifungal treatment for invasive Candida infections: a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis

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    Nachega Jean B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of mortality among patients at risk. Treatment guidelines vary on optimal treatment strategies. We aimed to determine the effects of different antifungal therapies on global response rates, mortality and safety. Methods We searched independently and in duplicate 10 electronic databases from inception to May 2009. We selected any randomized trial assessing established antifungal therapies for confirmed cases of invasive candidiasis among predominantly adult populations. We performed a meta-analysis and then conducted a Bayesian mixed treatment comparison to differentiate treatment effectiveness. Sensitivity analyses included dosage forms of amphotericin B and fluconazole compared to other azoles. Results Our analysis included 11 studies enrolling a total of 965 patients. For our primary analysis of global response rates, we pooled 7 trials comparing azoles to amphotericin B, Relative Risk [RR] 0.87 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.78–0.96, P = 0.007, I2 = 43%, P = 0.09. We also pooled 2 trials of echinocandins versus amphotericin B and found a pooled RR of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.99–1.23, P = 0.08. One study compared anidulafungin to fluconazole and yielded a RR of 1.26 (95% CI, 1.06–1.51 in favor of anidulafungin. We pooled 7 trials assessing azoles versus amphotericin B for all-cause mortality, resulting in a pooled RR of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.74–1.05, P = 0.17, I2 = 0%, P = 0.96. Echinocandins versus amphotericin B (2 trials for all-cause mortality resulted in a pooled RR of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84–1.20, P = 0.93. Anidulafungin versus fluconazole resulted in a RR of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.48–1.10, P = 0.34. Our mixed treatment comparison analysis found similar within-class effects across all interventions. Adverse event profiles differed, with amphotericin B exhibiting larger adverse event effects. Conclusion Treatment options appear to offer preferential effects on response rates and mortality. When

  9. Impact of the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the Brazilian routine childhood national immunization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Marta; Cintra, Otavio; Harriague, Julie; Hausdorff, William P; Hoet, Bernard

    2016-05-27

    Brazil introduced the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV, Synflorix™, GSK Vaccines) in the routine childhood immunization program in 2010 with a 3+1 schedule (with catch-up for children media. Nasopharyngeal carriage of vaccine-type and any-type pneumococci decreased after the primary doses, with no early signs of replacement with other pathogens. Finally, herd protection against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia in unvaccinated subjects was shown in some studies for some age groups. In conclusion, pneumococcal disease decreased after the introduction of PHiD-CV into the Brazilian national immunization program. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the long-term overall impact of PHiD-CV in the Brazilian population. Copyright © 2016 GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. IL1B and DEFB1 Polymorphisms Increase Susceptibility to Invasive Mold Infection After Solid-Organ Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Gresnigt, Mark S.; Lecompte, Thanh; Bibert, Stephanie; Manuel, Oriol; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Rüeger, Sina; Berger, Christoph; Boggian, Katia; Cusini, Alexia; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H.; Weisser, Maja; Mueller, Nicolas J.; Meylan, Pascal R.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune genes have been associated with susceptibility to invasive mold infection (IMI) among hematopoietic stem cell but not solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Methods. Twenty-four SNPs from systematically selected genes were genotyped among 1101 SOT recipients (715 kidney transplant recipients, 190 liver transplant recipients, 102 lung transplant recipients, 79 heart transplant recipients, and 15 recipients of other transplants) fro...

  11. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57 Section 410.57 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its...

  12. Prophylactic Saccharomyces boulardii versus nystatin for the prevention of fungal colonization and invasive fungal infection in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Gamze; Celik, Istemi Han; Erdeve, Omer; Saygan, Sibel; Dilmen, Ugur; Canpolat, Fuat Emre

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to compare the efficacy of orally administered Saccharomyces boulardii versus nystatin in prevention of fungal colonization and invasive fungal infections in very low birth weight infants. A prospective, randomized comparative study was conducted in preterm infants with a gestational age of ≤ 32 weeks and birth weight of ≤ 1,500 g. They were randomized into two groups, to receive S. boulardii or nystatin. Skin and stool cultures were performed for colonization and blood cultures for invasive infections, weekly. A total of 181 infants were enrolled (S. boulardii group, n = 91; nystatin group, n = 90). Fungal colonization of the skin (15.4 vs 18.9 %, p = 0.532) and the stool (32.2 vs 27 %, p = 0.441) were not different between the probiotic and nystatin groups. Two patients had Candida-positive blood culture in the nystatin group whereas none in the probiotic group. Feeding intolerance, clinical sepsis, and number of sepsis attacks were significantly lower in the probiotics group than in the nystatin group. Prophylactic S. boulardii supplementation is as effective as nystatin in reducing fungal colonization and invasive fungal infection, more effective in reducing the incidence of clinical sepsis and number of sepsis attacks and has favorable effect on feeding intolerance.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of a Program to Eliminate Disparities in Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates in Elderly Minority Populations: An Exploratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelidis, Constantinos I.; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Invasive pneumococcal disease is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States, particularly among the elderly (>65 years). There are large racial disparities in pneumococcal vaccination rates in this population. Here, we estimate the cost-effectiveness of a hypothetical national vaccination intervention program designed to eliminate racial disparities in pneumococcal vaccination in the elderly. Methods In an exploratory analysis, a Markov decision-analysis model was developed, taking a societal perspective and assuming a 1-year cycle length, 10-year vaccination program duration, and lifetime time horizon. In the base-case analysis, it was conservatively assumed that vaccination program promotion costs were $10 per targeted minority elder per year, regardless of prior vaccination status and resulted in the elderly African American and Hispanic pneumococcal vaccination rate matching the elderly Caucasian vaccination rate (65%) in year 10 of the program. Results The incremental cost-effectiveness of the vaccination program relative to no program was $45,161 per quality-adjusted life-year gained in the base-case analysis. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the likelihood of the vaccination program being cost-effective at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000 and $100,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained was 64% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions In a conservative analysis biased against the vaccination program, a national vaccination intervention program to ameliorate racial disparities in pneumococcal vaccination would be cost-effective. PMID:23538183

  14. Redistribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes After Nationwide 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Program in Children in Northern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ying-Chun; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Lu, Chun-Yi; Huang, Daniel Tsung-Ning; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Chang, Luan-Yin; Huang, Li-Min; Chi, Hsin

    2017-12-01

    After the introduction of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, public health officials in Taiwan monitored a decline in circulating vaccine serotypes and the emergence of nonvaccine serotypes in children with invasive pneumococcal disease. A gradually expanded PCV13 national immunization program was launched in 2013 in Taiwan. Here, we evaluate the changes in the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility in children during the evolution of vaccination policy. S. pneumoniae isolates from children with pneumococcal disease were collected and serotyped from 2010 to 2015 in northern Taiwan. PCVs were administered at the recipients' expense between 2010 and 2012, and then PCV13 was partially reimbursed by the government beginning in 2013. The distribution and diversity of serotypes were analyzed along with their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Among a total of 498 isolates, the proportion of invasive pneumococcal disease isolates declined (47.1%-10.6%) during the study period, and serotype diversity increased after 2011. Between 2010 and 2012, the dominant serotypes were 19A, 19F, 3, 6B and 14, and serotype 19A rose from 44.1% to 57.5%. Serotypes 19A, 15A, 19F and 15B were more prevalent from 2013 to 2015, and serotype 19A decreased from 42.1% to 4.5%. Serotypes 19F and 15A became the most commonly detected serotypes in 2015. Overall, PCV13 additional serotypes were reduced by 80% (P program is effective against pneumococcal disease in Taiwanese children, mainly by reducing PCV13 additional serotypes.

  15. Challenges in microbiological diagnosis of invasive Aspergillus infections [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Alexandre Alanio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA has been increasingly reported in populations other than the historical hematology patients and there are new questions about the performance of microbiological tools. Microscopy and culture have been completed by biomarkers, either antigens or DNA, and in blood or respiratory specimens or both. First studied in hematology, the antigen galactomannan performance in serum is low in other patient populations where the pathophysiology of the infection can be different and the prevalence of IA is much lower. DNA detection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR in blood or serum (or both has reached a certain level of acceptance thanks to consensus methods based on real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. When used on respiratory specimens, galactomannan and qPCR depend on standardization of the sampling and the diverse mycological procedures. Thus, culture remains the main diagnostic criterion in critically ill patients. The current trend toward more effective anti-mold prophylaxis in hematology hampers the yield of a screening strategy, as is usually performed in hematology. Therefore, circulating biomarkers as confirmatory tests should be considered and their performance should be reappraised in each new setting. The use of azole prophylaxis also raises the issue of selecting azole-resistance Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Ideally, the biomarkers will be more efficient when individual genetic risks of IA are defined. Culture, though not standardized, remains a key element for the diagnosis of IA and has the advantage to easily detect molds other than A. fumigatus. It is still unclear whether next-generation sequencing will replace culture in the future.

  16. Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

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    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD. METHODS: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.06, 1.31. In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23. Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32. No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

  17. [Nasopharyngeal carriage of pneumococcal serotypes in healthy pre-school aged children after 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vera, César; Ruiz Andrés, María Ángeles; Arana Navarro, Teresa; Moneo Hernández, Isabel; Castillo Laita, José Antonio; Macipe Costa, Rosa; Revillo Pinilla, María José

    2011-06-11

    To determine the characteristics influencing pneumococcal serotype colonization in healthy pre-school aged children, the distribution of serotypes and their antimicrobial susceptibility, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine (VNC-7 v). SUJETOS AND METHODS: Nasopharyngeal samples were collected from children under 6 years of age attending well-child examinations in the province of Zaragoza (Spain). Logistic regression was used to study different variables related to the status of the carriers. Of the 371 children studied 30.7% were found to be carriers. With a vaccine coverage rate of 66%, factors related with presence of pneumococcal carriage were found to be the number of siblings (OR 1.44; CI 95% 1.05-1.97 for each sibling), attending a school or child day care centre (OR 3.99; CI 95% 2.00-7.96) and suffering from a minor upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) (OR 1.72; CI 95% 1.02-2.90). Only 8.7% corresponded to VNC-7 v serotypes. The most common non VNC-7 v serotypes isolated were 19A, 6A, 15B, 11, and 15A. Significantly greater resistance was detected among VNC-7 v serotypes. Children in the setting of this study carried pneumococci more commonly when they have siblings, attend school or day care, or suffer from minor URTI. In the VNC-7 v vaccine era, VNC-7 v serotypes have become rare occurrences (8.7%) and emerging serotypes present better susceptibility to antibiotics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Economic Evaluation of Posaconazole Versus Standard Azole Therapy as Prophylaxis against Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Prolonged Neutropenia in Canada

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    Amir A Tahami Monfared

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Posaconazole prophylaxis in high-risk neutropenic patients prevents invasive fungal infection (IFI. An economic model was used to assess the cost effectiveness of posaconazole from a Canadian health care system perspective.

  19. Predicting pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department: evaluation of clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijts, S M; Boersma, W G; Grobbee, D E; Gruber, W C; Jansen, K U; Kluytmans, J A J W; Kuipers, B A F; Palmen, F; Pride, M W; Webber, C; Bonten, M J M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the value of clinical predictors available in the emergency department (ED) in predicting Streptococcus pneumoniae as the cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective, observational, cohort study of patients with CAP presenting in the ED was performed. Pneumococcal aetiology of CAP was based on either bacteraemia, or S. pneumoniae being cultured from sputum, or urinary immunochromatographic assay positivity, or positivity of a novel serotype-specific urinary antigen detection test. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors and various cut-off values of probability scores were used to evaluate the usefulness of the model. Three hundred and twenty-eight (31.0%) of 1057 patients with CAP had pneumococcal CAP. Nine independent predictors for pneumococcal pneumonia were identified, but the clinical utility of this prediction model was disappointing, because of low positive predictive values or a small yield. Clinical criteria have insufficient diagnostic capacity to predict pneumococcal CAP. Rapid antigen detection tests are needed to diagnose S. pneumoniae at the time of hospital admission. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Turkey: a decision analytical model

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    Bakır Mustafa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, which place a considerable burden on healthcare resources, can be reduced in a cost-effective manner using a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7. We compare the cost effectiveness of a 13-valent PCV (PCV-13 and a 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV with that of PCV-7 in Turkey. Methods A cost-utility analysis was conducted and a decision analytical model was used to estimate the proportion of the Turkish population Results PCV-13 and PHiD-CV are projected to have a substantial impact on pneumococcal disease in Turkey versus PCV-7, with 2,223 and 3,156 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs and 2,146 and 2,081 life years, respectively, being saved under a 3+1 schedule. Projections of direct medical costs showed that a PHiD-CV vaccination programme would provide the greatest cost savings, offering additional savings of US$11,718,813 versus PCV-7 and US$8,235,010 versus PCV-13. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that PHiD-CV dominated PCV-13 in terms of QALYs gained and cost savings in 58.3% of simulations. Conclusion Under the modeled conditions, PHiD-CV would provide the most cost-effective intervention for reducing pneumococcal disease in Turkish children.

  1. Interaction of Vaccination and Reduction of Antibiotic Use Drives Unexpected Increase of Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cellès, Matthieu Domenech; Pons-Salort, Margarita; Varon, Emmanuelle; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Ligier, Caroline; Letort, Véronique; Opatowski, Lulla; Guillemot, Didier

    2015-06-11

    Antibiotic-use policies may affect pneumococcal conjugate-vaccine effectiveness. The reported increase of pneumococcal meningitis from 2001 to 2009 in France, where a national campaign to reduce antibiotic use was implemented in parallel to the introduction of the 7-valent conjugate vaccine, provides unique data to assess these effects. We constructed a mechanistic pneumococcal transmission model and used likelihood to assess the ability of competing hypotheses to explain that increase. We find that a model integrating a fitness cost of penicillin resistance successfully explains the overall and age-stratified pattern of serotype replacement. By simulating counterfactual scenarios of public health interventions in France, we propose that this fitness cost caused a gradual and pernicious interaction between the two interventions by increasing the spread of nonvaccine, penicillin-susceptible strains. More generally, our results indicate that reductions of antibiotic use may counteract the benefits of conjugate vaccines introduced into countries with low vaccine-serotype coverages and high-resistance frequencies. Our findings highlight the key role of antibiotic use in vaccine-induced serotype replacement and suggest the need for more integrated approaches to control pneumococcal infections.

  2. The adult nasopharyngeal microbiome as a determinant of pneumococcal acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Amelieke Jh; Zomer, Aldert L; Gritzfeld, Jenna F; Ferwerda, Gerben; van Hijum, Sacha Aft; Ferreira, Daniela M; Shak, Joshua R; Klugman, Keith P; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; de Jonge, Marien I; Gordon, Stephen B; Hermans, Peter Wm

    2014-01-01

    Several cohort studies have indicated associations between S. pneumoniae and other microbes in the nasopharynx. To study causal relationships between the nasopharyngeal microbiome and pneumococcal carriage, we employed an experimental human pneumococcal carriage model. Healthy adult volunteers were assessed for pneumococcal carriage by culture of nasal wash samples (NWS). Those without natural pneumococcal carriage received an intranasal pneumococcal inoculation with serotype 6B or 23F. The composition of the nasopharyngeal microbiome was longitudinally studied by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing on NWS collected before and after challenge. Among 40 selected volunteers, 10 were natural carriers and 30 were experimentally challenged. At baseline, five distinct nasopharyngeal microbiome profiles were identified. The phylogenetic distance between microbiomes of natural pneumococcal carriers was particularly large compared to non-carriers. A more diverse microbiome prior to inoculation was associated with the establishment of pneumococcal carriage. Perturbation of microbiome diversity upon pneumococcal challenge was strain specific. Shifts in microbiome profile occurred after pneumococcal exposure, and those volunteers who acquired carriage more often diverted from their original profile. S. pneumoniae was little prominent in the microbiome of pneumococcal carriers. Pneumococcal acquisition in healthy adults is more likely to occur in a diverse microbiome and appears to promote microbial heterogeneity.

  3. Non-Type b Haemophilus influenzae Invasive Infections in North Dakota and South Dakota, 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Stephanie; Kaushik, Ashlesha; Mauriello, Clifford; Chatterjee, Archana

    2017-09-01

    Reports of children with non-type b Haemophilus influenzae infection in the United States in recent years have been limited. Here, we report the spectrum and severity of disease associated with invasive non-type b H influenzae infection in 17 patients at 2 tertiary-care children's hospitals over a 2-year period. Meningitis was the most common diagnosis. The majority of the patients had neurologic sequelae, and 1 patient died. The high proportions of hospitalization, intensive care utilization, and neurologic complications reveal that non-type b H influenzae infection was associated with significant morbidity in this pediatric population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. New Parameters to Quantitatively Express the Invasiveness of Bacterial Strains from Implant-Related Orthopaedic Infections into Osteoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Campoccia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Complete eradication of bacterial infections is often a challenging task, especially in presence of prosthetic devices. Invasion of non-phagocytic host cells appears to be a critical mechanism of microbial persistence in host tissues. Hidden within host cells, bacteria elude host defences and antibiotic treatments that are intracellularly inactive. The intracellular invasiveness of bacteria is generally measured by conventional gentamicin protection assays. The efficiency of invasion, however, markedly differs across bacterial species and adjustments to the titre of the microbial inocula used in the assays are often needed to enumerate intracellular bacteria. Such changes affect the standardisation of the method and hamper a direct comparison of bacteria on a same scale. This study aims at investigating the precise relation between inoculum, in terms of multiplicity of infection (MOI, and internalised bacteria. The investigation included nine Staphylococcus aureus, seven Staphylococcus epidermidis, five Staphylococcus lugdunensis and two Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains, which are co-cultured with MG63 human osteoblasts. Unprecedented insights are offered on the relations existing between MOI, number of internalised bacteria and per cent of internalised bacteria. New parameters are identified that are of potential use for qualifying the efficiency of internalization and compare the behaviour of bacterial strains.

  5. New Parameters to Quantitatively Express the Invasiveness of Bacterial Strains from Implant-Related Orthopaedic Infections into Osteoblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoccia, Davide; Montanaro, Lucio; Ravaioli, Stefano; Cangini, Ilaria; Testoni, Francesca; Visai, Livia; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2018-04-03

    Complete eradication of bacterial infections is often a challenging task, especially in presence of prosthetic devices. Invasion of non-phagocytic host cells appears to be a critical mechanism of microbial persistence in host tissues. Hidden within host cells, bacteria elude host defences and antibiotic treatments that are intracellularly inactive. The intracellular invasiveness of bacteria is generally measured by conventional gentamicin protection assays. The efficiency of invasion, however, markedly differs across bacterial species and adjustments to the titre of the microbial inocula used in the assays are often needed to enumerate intracellular bacteria. Such changes affect the standardisation of the method and hamper a direct comparison of bacteria on a same scale. This study aims at investigating the precise relation between inoculum, in terms of multiplicity of infection (MOI), and internalised bacteria. The investigation included nine Staphylococcus aureus , seven Staphylococcus epidermidis , five Staphylococcus lugdunensis and two Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains, which are co-cultured with MG63 human osteoblasts. Unprecedented insights are offered on the relations existing between MOI, number of internalised bacteria and per cent of internalised bacteria. New parameters are identified that are of potential use for qualifying the efficiency of internalization and compare the behaviour of bacterial strains.

  6. Vaccination for the control of childhood bacterial pneumonia - Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C Otczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia in childhood is endemic in large parts of the world and in particular, in developing countries, as well as in many indigenous communities within developed nations. Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugate vaccines are currently available against the leading bacterial causes of pneumonia.  The use of the vaccines in both industrialised and developing countries have shown a dramatic reduction in the burden of pneumonia and invasive disease in children.  However, the greatest threat facing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness is serotype replacement.  The current vaccines provide serotype-specific, antibody–mediated protection against only a few of the 90+ capsule serotypes.  Therefore, there has been a focus in recent years to rapidly advance technologies that will result in broader disease coverage and more affordable vaccines that can be used in developing countries.  The next generation of pneumococcal vaccines have advanced to clinical trials.

  7. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination and varicella status in inflammatory arthritis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, E M

    2011-11-15

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis are at increased risk of vaccine preventable infections. This risk is increased by immunomodulatory therapies. Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcal disease reduces the risk. Severe cases of varicella infection have occurred in patients on biologic therapies. We sought to identify vaccination rates for commonly acquired infections and to ascertain varicella immune status in patients with inflammatory arthritis. 100 patients with inflammatory arthritis were administered a standardised questionnaire. Data collected included age, diagnosis, vaccination history, history of varicella, treatment and the presence of other indications for vaccination. 58 patients (58%) had not received the influenza vaccine in the past year. Only 19 patients (19%) had ever received pneumococcal vaccine. Anti TNF use did not predict vaccination (p = .46). An increasing number of co morbid conditions predicted both pneumococcal (p < 0.003) and influenza vaccine (p < 0.03) administration. Nineteen patients (19%) gave no history of varicella infection, none having had varicella titres checked pre treatment. Immunisation rates in patients with inflammatory arthritis on immunosuppressive therapies are low. Immunisation schedules should be available for each patient during rheumatology and general practice consultations.

  8. Risk of Infective Endocarditis After Invasive Dental Treatments: A Case-Only Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzu-Ting; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Lai, Mei-Shu; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2018-04-19

    Background -Invasive dental treatments (IDTs) can yield temporary bacteremia and has therefore been considered a potential risk factor of infective endocarditis (IE). It is hypothesized that, through the trauma caused by IDTs, bacteria gain entry to the bloodstream and may attach to abnormal heart valves or damaged heart tissue, giving rise to IE. However, the association between IDTs and IE remains controversial. The aim of this study is to estimate the association between IDTs and IE. Methods -The data in this study were obtained from the Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. We selected two case-only study designs, case-crossover and self-controlled case series, to analyze the data. The advantage of these methods is that confounding factors which do not vary with time are adjusted for implicitly. In the case-crossover design, conditional logistic regression model with exposure to IDTs was used to estimate the risks of IE following an IDT with 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks delay, respectively. In the self-controlled case series design, conditional Poisson regression model was used to estimate the risk of IE for the risk periods of 1-4, 5-8, 9-12, and 13-16 weeks following an IDT. Results -In total, 9120 and 8181 IE patients were included in case-crossover design and self-controlled case series design, respectively. In case-crossover design, 277 cases and 249 controls received IDTs during the exposure period, and the odds ratio was 1.12 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.94-1.34) for 4 weeks. In self-controlled case series design, we observed that 407 IE occurred during the first four weeks after IDTs, and the age-adjusted incidence rate ratio was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.02-1.26) for 1-4 weeks after IDTs. Conclusions -In both study designs, we did not observe a clinically larger risk for IE in the short periods after IDTs. We also found no association between IDTs and IE among high-risk patients. Therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of IE is not required for the

  9. Typing of Candida isolates from patients with invasive infection and concomitant colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brillowska-Dabrowska, A.; Bergmann, O.; Jensen, Irene Møller

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between colonizing and invasive isolates from patients with candidaemia. Molecular typing was performed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We found MLST to be sufficient for typing Candida isolates, and that......We investigated the relationship between colonizing and invasive isolates from patients with candidaemia. Molecular typing was performed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We found MLST to be sufficient for typing Candida isolates...

  10. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Angela B; Pai, Rekha; Crook, Derrick W; Beall, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the United States (US) in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990), but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s) at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny), recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  11. Adverse reactions to simultaneous influenza and pneumococcal conjugate vaccinations in children : randomized double-blind controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Smulders, Sara; Hoes, Arno W; Hak, Eelko

    In a randomized double-blind controlled trial, the safety was assessed of simultaneous administration of influenza and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in children with previous physician-diagnosed respiratory tract infections. In total, 579 children aged 18-72 months were assigned to receive

  12. Assessing likely invasion sites of Zika virus-infected mosquitoes in civilian and naval maritime ports in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollars TM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas M Kollars College of Health Sciences, Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA, USA Abstract: Several mosquito species are capable of invading new geographic regions and exploiting niches that are similar to their natural home ranges where they may introduce, or reintroduce, pathogens. In addition to initial invasion, introduction of new genotypes into established populations may also occur. Zika virus is spreading throughout the world, posing significant health risks to human populations, particularly pregnant women and their infants. The first locally acquired case of Zika virus in the US occurred in July 2016 in Miami, Florida on the Atlantic coast; the first locally acquired case in another US county occurred in the Tampa, Florida area. Three port cities in Florida were chosen to assess the risk of import and spread of Zika virus: Mayport Naval Station, Miami, and Tampa. The bioagent transport and enviromental modeling system TIGER model and ArcGIS were used to analyze abiotic and biotic factors influencing potentially Zika-infected Aedes species, should they enter through these ports. The model was tested by overlaying documented and suspected concurrent Zika cases and comparing published high-risk areas for Zika virus. In addition to Zika hot zones being identified, output indicates surveillance and integrated mosquito management should expect larger zones. Surveillance sites at ports should be identified and prioritized for pathogen and vector control to reduce the import of mosquitoes infected with Zika virus. Low resolution maps often provide valuable suitability of the geographic expansion of organisms. Providing a higher resolution predictive map, identifying probable routes of invasion, and providing areas at high risk for initial invasion and control zones, will aid in controlling and perhaps eliminating the spread of arboviruses through mosquito vectors. Keywords: Aedes, Zika virus, invasive species, maritime ports, biological

  13. (1, 3)-β-D-glucan assay for diagnosing invasive fungal infections in critically ill patients with hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, Elie; Guigue, Nicolas; Darmon, Michael; Mokart, Djamel; Lemiale, Virginie; Kouatchet, Achille; Mayaux, Julien; Vincent, François; Nyunga, Martine; Bruneel, Fabrice; Rabbat, Antoine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Lebert, Christine; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique; Pene, Frédéric

    2016-04-19

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are life-threatening complications of hematological malignancies that must be diagnosed early to allow effective treatment. Few data are available on the performance of serum (1-3)-β-D-glucan (BG) assays for diagnosing IFI in patients with hematological malignancies admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, 737 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies admitted to 17 ICUs routinely underwent a BG assay at ICU admission. IFIs were diagnosed using standard criteria applied by three independent specialists. Among the 737 patients, 439 (60%) required mechanical ventilation and 273 (37%) died before hospital discharge. Factors known to alter BG concentrations were identified in most patients. IFIs were documented in 78 (10.6%) patients (invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, n = 54; Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, n = 13; candidemia, n = 13; and fusarium infections, n = 3). BG concentrations (pg/mL) were higher in patients with than without IFI (144 (77-510) vs. 50 (30-125), 80 pg/mL were IFI, admission SOFA score, autologous bone-marrow or hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, and microbiologically documented bacterial infection. In conclusion, in unselected critically ill hematology patients with factors known to affect serum BG, this biomarker showed only moderate diagnostic performance and rarely detected IFI. However, the negative predictive value was high. Studies are needed to assess whether a negative BG test indicates that antifungal de-escalation is safe.

  14. Pneumococcal peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis - three case reports and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Tiago Assis; Vizinho, Ricardo; Branco, Patricia; Gaspar, Augusta; Barata, José Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Peritonitis and catheter-related infections are a frequent complication in peritoneal dialysis, usually driven by commensal microorganisms. They carry a significant morbidity and mortality burden and have known consequences on viability of peritoneal dialysis and patient survival. This article describes three clinical cases, in which three different peritoneal dialysis patients presented pneumococcal peritonitis, two of which were related with obvious previous or concomitant respiratory sympt...

  15. High Prevalence of Co-Infections by Invasive and Non-Invasive Chlamydia trachomatis Genotypes during the Lymphogranuloma Venereum Outbreak in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rodriguez-Dominguez

    Full Text Available The evolution of Chlamydia trachomatis is mainly driven by recombination events. This fact can be fuelled by the coincidence in several European regions of the high prevalence of non-invasive urogenital genotypes and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV outbreaks. This scenario could modify the local epidemiology and favor the selection of new C. trachomatis variants. Quantifying the prevalence of co-infection could help to predict the potential risk in the selection of new variants with unpredictable results in pathogenesis or transmissibility. In the 2009-2013 period, 287 clinical samples with demonstrated presence of C. trachomatis were selected. They were divided in two groups. The first group was constituted by 137 samples with C. trachomatis of the LGV genotypes, and the second by the remaining 150 samples in which the presence of LGV genotypes was previously excluded. They were analyzed to detect the simultaneous presence of non-LGV genotypes based on pmpH and ompA genes. In the first group, co-infections were detected in 10.9% of the cases whereas in the second group the prevalence was 14.6%, which is the highest percentage ever described among European countries. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence among men who have sex with men of a pmpH-recombinant variant, similar to strains described in Seattle in 2002. This variant was the result of genetic exchange between genotypes belonging to LGV and members of G-genotype. Sequencing of other genes, phylogenetically related to pathotype, confirmed that the putative recombinant found in Madrid could have a common origin with the strains described in Seattle. Countries with a high prevalence of co-infections and high migration flows should enhance surveillance programs in at least their vulnerable population.

  16. High Prevalence of Co-Infections by Invasive and Non-Invasive Chlamydia trachomatis Genotypes during the Lymphogranuloma Venereum Outbreak in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Dominguez, Mario; Gonzalez-Alba, Jose Maria; Puerta, Teresa; Menendez, Blanca; Sanchez-Diaz, Ana Maria; Canton, Rafael; del Romero, Jorge; Galan, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of Chlamydia trachomatis is mainly driven by recombination events. This fact can be fuelled by the coincidence in several European regions of the high prevalence of non-invasive urogenital genotypes and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) outbreaks. This scenario could modify the local epidemiology and favor the selection of new C. trachomatis variants. Quantifying the prevalence of co-infection could help to predict the potential risk in the selection of new variants with unpredictable results in pathogenesis or transmissibility. In the 2009-2013 period, 287 clinical samples with demonstrated presence of C. trachomatis were selected. They were divided in two groups. The first group was constituted by 137 samples with C. trachomatis of the LGV genotypes, and the second by the remaining 150 samples in which the presence of LGV genotypes was previously excluded. They were analyzed to detect the simultaneous presence of non-LGV genotypes based on pmpH and ompA genes. In the first group, co-infections were detected in 10.9% of the cases whereas in the second group the prevalence was 14.6%, which is the highest percentage ever described among European countries. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence among men who have sex with men of a pmpH-recombinant variant, similar to strains described in Seattle in 2002. This variant was the result of genetic exchange between genotypes belonging to LGV and members of G-genotype. Sequencing of other genes, phylogenetically related to pathotype, confirmed that the putative recombinant found in Madrid could have a common origin with the strains described in Seattle. Countries with a high prevalence of co-infections and high migration flows should enhance surveillance programs in at least their vulnerable population.

  17. Effect of Serotype on Pneumococcal Competition in a Mouse Colonization Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzciński, Krzysztof; Li, Yuan; Weinberger, Daniel M; Thompson, Claudette M; Cordy, Derrick; Bessolo, Andrew; Malley, Richard; Lipsitch, Marc

    2015-09-15

    Competitive interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae strains during host colonization could influence the serotype distribution in nasopharyngeal carriage and pneumococcal disease. We evaluated the competitive fitness of strains of serotypes 6B, 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, and 35B in a mouse model of multiserotype carriage. Isogenic variants were constructed using clinical strains as the capsule gene donors. Animals were intranasally inoculated with a mixture of up to six pneumococcal strains of different serotypes, with separate experiments involving either clinical isolates or isogenic capsule-switch variants of clinical strain TIGR4. Upper-respiratory-tract samples were repeatedly collected from animals in order to monitor changes in the serotype ratios using quantitative PCR. A reproducible hierarchy of capsular types developed in the airways of mice inoculated with multiple strains. Serotype ranks in this hierarchy were similar among pneumococcal strains of different genetic backgrounds in different strains of mice and were not altered when tested under a range of host conditions. This rank correlated with the measure of the metabolic cost of capsule synthesis and in vitro measure of pneumococcal cell surface charge, both parameters considered to be predictors of serotype-specific fitness in carriage. This study demonstrates the presence of a robust competitive hierarchy of pneumococcal serotypes in vivo that is driven mainly, but not exclusively, by the capsule itself. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading cause of death due to respiratory bacterial infections but also a commensal frequently carried in upper airways. Available vaccines induce immune responses against polysaccharides coating pneumococcal cells, but with over 90 different capsular types (serotypes) identified, they can only target strains of the selected few serotypes most prevalent in disease. Vaccines not only protect vaccinated individuals against disease but also protect by

  18. Pneumococcal vaccine targeting strategy for older adults: customized risk profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balicer, Ran D; Cohen, Chandra J; Leibowitz, Morton; Feldman, Becca S; Brufman, Ilan; Roberts, Craig; Hoshen, Moshe

    2014-02-12

    Current pneumococcal vaccine campaigns take a broad, primarily age-based approach to immunization targeting, overlooking many clinical and administrative considerations necessary in disease prevention and resource planning for specific patient populations. We aim to demonstrate the utility of a population-specific predictive model for hospital-treated pneumonia to direct effective vaccine targeting. Data was extracted for 1,053,435 members of an Israeli HMO, age 50 and older, during the study period 2008-2010. We developed and validated a logistic regression model to predict hospital-treated pneumonia using training and test samples, including a set of standard and population-specific risk factors. The model's predictive value was tested for prospectively identifying cases of pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and was compared to the existing international paradigm for patient immunization targeting. In a multivariate regression, age, co-morbidity burden and previous pneumonia events were most strongly positively associated with hospital-treated pneumonia. The model predicting hospital-treated pneumonia yielded a c-statistic of 0.80. Utilizing the predictive model, the top 17% highest-risk within the study validation population were targeted to detect 54% of those members who were subsequently treated for hospitalized pneumonia in the follow up period. The high-risk population identified through this model included 46% of the follow-up year's IPD cases, and 27% of community-treated pneumonia cases. These outcomes were compared with international guidelines for risk for pneumococcal diseases that accurately identified only 35% of hospitalized pneumonia, 41% of IPD cases and 21% of community-treated pneumonia. We demonstrate that a customized model for vaccine targeting performs better than international guidelines, and therefore, risk modeling may allow for more precise vaccine targeting and resource allocation than current national and international

  19. Hyposplenism as a cause of pneumococcal meningoencephalitis in an adult patient with coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Caraceni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coeliac disease can be associated with hyposplenism and splenic atrophy, which may increase the patient’s risk for fatal infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae or Pneumococcus. It is general opinion that many more patients with coeliac disease have died from hyposplenism-related infections than those reported in literature. Case report: A 62-year-old woman with recently diagnosed coeliac disease was hospitalized with high fever, disorientation, and nuchal rigidity. Cerebral computed tomography was negative. Laboratory tests showed an elevated leukocyte count and very high levels of C reactive protein. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contained an increased number of mononuclear cells associated with a low glucose level and high protein concentrations. The CSF culture was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Neurological conditions rapidly deteriorated with the onset of coma, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed initial signs of encephalitis extending above and below the tentorium. Abdominal ultrasonography disclosed splenic hypotrophy that raised the suspicion of hyposplenism. The diagnosis of hyposplenism was confirmed by demonstration of Howell-Jolly bodies in a peripheral blood smear. Discussion: This is the first reported case of pneumococcal meningoencephalitis caused by splenic hypofunction in a patient with coeliac disease. When coeliac disease is diagnosed with a marked delay in an elderly patient, spleen function should always be assessed. If impaired, the patient should undergo vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to prevent pneumococcal infections.

  20. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children 1 and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor Routine Recommendations for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) and Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV23) For children Administer PCV13 ...

  1. Distribución de serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasoras en el Hospital de Niños de Santa Fe Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections at the Hospital de Niños of Santa Fe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mayoral

    2008-03-01

    of penicillin. Serotype 14 was the most frequent followed by serotypes 1, 6B, 18C, 7F, 19 F and 5. Serotype 14 showed a statistically significant correlation with MICs of penicillin ranging from 0,5 to 2 mg/l. Although this serotype was more frequently observed in pneumonia than in meningitis, there was not a significant association with any particular pathology. Serotypes 14 and 1, were prevalent among children under and over 2 years old, respectively. Most of these isolates with MICs of penicillin = 2 mg/l, were from patients with pneumonia and not with meningitis. The serotype distribution was similar to that during the period 1993-99, with the exception of serotypes 18C, 4, 12F and 22F which had never been found before. The emergence of these serotypes makes it essential to continue surveillance to determine which conjugated vaccine formulation would be suitable to prevent the most frequent pneumococcal invasive infections.

  2. Early diagnosis of fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, colonization versus invasive disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sabina; Husain, Shahid

    2018-05-21

    The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains challenging in solid organ transplants in general, and in lung transplant recipients, in particular, because of colonization. Lung transplant recipients may be over treated with antifungal drugs because of the lack of appropriate diagnostic tools. A review of the new developments of diagnostic tools and whether this help distinguishing colonization from invasive disease is presented. Efforts are being made to develop new tools that will allow us to identify which patients will develop IPA, and those who will be able to control the disease.

  3. Mannose-binding lectin codon 54 gene polymorphism in relation to risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Cumhur; Onay, Huseyin; Oguz, Serife Suna; Ozdemir, Taha Resid; Erdeve, Omer; Ozkinay, Ferda; Dilmen, Ugur

    2011-09-01

    Preterm neonates are susceptible to infection due to a combination of sub-optimal immunity and increased exposure to invasive organisms. Invasive fungal infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among preterm infants cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system, which may be especially important in the neonatal setting. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of any association between MBL gene polymorphism and nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates. Codon 54 (B allele) polymorphism in exon 1 of the MBL gene was investigated in 31 patients diagnosed as nosocomial invasive fungal infection and 30 control preterm neonates. AB genotype was determined in 26% and 30% of patient and control groups, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant. AA genotype was determined in 74% of the patient group and in 67% of the control group, and the difference was not statistically significant. B allele frequency was not different significantly in the patient group (13%) compared to the control group (18%). In our study, no relationship was found between MBL codon 54 gene polymorphism and the risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates in NICU.

  4. Global invasive bacterial vaccine-preventable diseases surveillance--2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jillian; Agócs, Mary; Serhan, Fatima; Singh, Simarjit; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; O'Brien, Katherine; Mwenda, Jason M; Mihigo, Richard; Oliveira, Lucia; Teleb, Nadia; Ahmed, Hinda; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Wijesinghe, Pushpa; Thapa, Arun Bhadra; Fox, Kimberly; Paladin, Fem Julia; Hajjeh, Rana; Schwartz, Stephanie; Van Beneden, Chris; Hyde, Terri; Broome, Claire; Cherian, Thomas

    2014-12-12

    Meningitis and pneumonia are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children globally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae causing a large proportion of disease. Vaccines are available to prevent many of the common types of these infections. S. pneumoniae was estimated to have caused 11% of deaths in children aged Organization (WHO) has recommended inclusion of PCV in childhood immunization programs worldwide, especially in countries with high child mortality. As of November 26, 2014, a total of 112 (58%) of all 194 WHO member states and 44 (58%) of the 76 member states ever eligible for support from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance (Gavi), have introduced PCV. Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance that includes data on serotypes, along with meningitis and pneumonia syndromic surveillance, provides important data to guide decisions to introduce PCV and monitor its impact.

  5. VACCINATION OF PREMATURE INFANTS AND CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN IRKUTSK USING CONJUGATED PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Il'ina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: analyzing the results of pneumococcal infection vaccination conducted to reduce infantile morbidity and mortality in 2011-2012 at the expenses of the Irkutsk municipal budget. Patients and methods. Vaccination using the 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine was conducted for more than 700 risk group children: premature infants, children with congenital heart diseases or bronchopulmonary dysplasia from 2 months to 2 years of age. 193 vaccinated children had been observed for 1.5 years. 30% of premature infants and 46% of children with congenital heart diseases were vaccinated using the PCV7/PCV13 vaccine at the age of 2-6 months, 52 and 40% - at the age of 7-11 months, accordingly. The PCV7/PCV13 vaccine was administered together with other vaccines of the national preventive vaccination calendar in 65% of cases. Results. Rate of general post-vaccinal reactions (body temperature increase from 37.6 to 38.0oC – 4%; no local reactions were registered. No other unfavorable phenomena were noted in the post-vaccinal period. No cases of pneumonia, meningitis, acute otitis media and bronchoobstructive syndrome were registered within the observation period. Conclusions: pneumococcal infection vaccination of premature infants with congenital heart diseases and bronchopulmonary dysplasia conducted in Irkutsk proved high efficacy and safety of the used vaccine – PCV7/PCV13. 

  6. [Invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients with focus on aspergillosis and its causative agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloušová, Dita; Lengerová, Martina; Volfová, Pavlína; Bejdák, Petr; Kocmanová, Iva; Mayer, Jiří; Ráčil, Zdeněk

    2012-08-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFD) are a life-threatening infectious complications in immunocompromised patients and are associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality. The most common invasive mycosis in patients who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is invasive aspergilosis (IA), most frequently caused by the clinically dominant species Aspergillus fumigatus and, rarely, also by Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus niger. In recent years, other related Aspergillus species were also reported to cause IFD, phenotypically similar to A. fumigatus and moreover, frequently exhibiting resistance towards various antifungals. For example, it is Aspergillus lentulus, Aspergillus viridinutans, Neosartoya fischeri, etc. Classical microbiological methods such as direct microscopy or culture are usually used for the identification of Aspergillus species. The application of PCR-based molecular techniques and monitoring of secondary metabolites production enable detection and identification of species, which are not distinguishable solely by their morphology. PCR methods are also useful for molecular strain typing of aspergilli and can reveal the genetic diversity of isolates.

  7. The immunological mechanisms that control pneumococcal carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P Jochems

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the human nasopharynx by pneumococcus is extremely common and is both the primary reservoir for transmission and a prerequisite for disease. Current vaccines targeting the polysaccharide capsule effectively prevent colonization, conferring herd protection within vaccinated communities. However, these vaccines cover only a subset of all circulating pneumococcal strains, and serotype replacement has been observed. Given the success of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV in preventing colonization in unvaccinated adults within vaccinated communities, reducing nasopharyngeal colonization has become an outcome of interest for novel vaccines. Here, we discuss the immunological mechanisms that control nasopharyngeal colonization, with an emphasis on findings from human studies. Increased understanding of these immunological mechanisms is required to identify correlates of protection against colonization that will facilitate the early testing and design of novel vaccines.

  8. The epidemiology and outcomes of invasive Candida infections among organ transplant recipients in the United States: results of the Transplant-Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, David R; Safdar, Nasia; Baddley, John W; Alexander, Barbara; Brumble, Lisa; Freifeld, Allison; Hadley, Susan; Herwaldt, Loreen; Kauffman, Carol; Lyon, G Marshall; Morrison, Vicki; Patterson, Thomas; Perl, Trish; Walker, Randall; Hess, Tim; Chiller, Tom; Pappas, Peter G

    2016-12-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) is a common cause of mortality in solid organ transplant recipients (OTRs), but knowledge of epidemiology in this population is limited. The present analysis describes data from 15 US centers that prospectively identified IC from nearly 17 000 OTRs. Analyses were undertaken to determine predictors of infection and mortality. A total of 639 cases of IC were identified. The most common species was Candida albicans (46.3%), followed by Candida glabrata (24.4%) and Candida parapsilosis (8.1%). In 68 cases >1 species was identified. The most common infection site was bloodstream (44%), followed by intra-abdominal (14%). The most frequently affected allograft groups were liver (41.1%) and kidney (35.3%). All-cause mortality at 90 days was 26.5% for all species and was highest for Candida tropicalis (44%) and C. parapsilosis (35.2%). Non-white race and female gender were more commonly associated with non-albicans species. A high rate of breakthrough IC was seen in patients receiving antifungal prophylaxis (39%). Factors associated with mortality include organ dysfunction, lung transplant, and treatment with a polyene antifungal. The only modifiable factor identified was choice of antifungal drug class based upon infecting Candida species. These data highlight the common and distinct features of IC in OTRs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Epithelial Cell–Derived Secreted and Transmembrane 1a Signals to Activated Neutrophils during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Zabinski, Mary C.; Yuen, Constance K.; Lung, Wing Yi; Gower, Adam C.; Belkina, Anna C.; Ramirez, Maria I.; Deng, Jane C.; Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelial cell responses are critical to the outcome of lung infection. In this study, we aimed to identify unique contributions of epithelial cells during lung infection. To differentiate genes induced selectively in epithelial cells during pneumonia, we compared genome-wide expression profiles from three sorted cell populations: epithelial cells from uninfected mouse lungs, epithelial cells from mouse lungs with pneumococcal pneumonia, and nonepithelial cells from those same infected lungs. Of 1,166 transcripts that were more abundant in epithelial cells from infected lungs compared with nonepithelial cells from the same lungs or from epithelial cells of uninfected lungs, 32 genes were identified as highly expressed secreted products. Especially strong signals included two related secreted and transmembrane (Sectm) 1 genes, Sectm1a and Sectm1b. Refinement of sorting strategies suggested that both Sectm1 products were induced predominantly in conducting airway epithelial cells. Sectm1 was induced during the early stages of pneumococcal pneumonia, and mutation of NF-κB RelA in epithelial cells did not diminish its expression. Instead, type I IFN signaling was necessary and sufficient for Sectm1 induction in lung epithelial cells, mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. For target cells, Sectm1a bound to myeloid cells preferentially, in particular Ly6GbrightCD11bbright neutrophils in the infected lung. In contrast, Sectm1a did not bind to neutrophils from uninfected lungs. Sectm1a increased expression of the neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL2 by neutrophils from the infected lung. We propose that Sectm1a is an epithelial product that sustains a positive feedback loop amplifying neutrophilic inflammation during pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:27064756

  10. Epithelial Cell-Derived Secreted and Transmembrane 1a Signals to Activated Neutrophils during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Wasserman, Gregory A; Zabinski, Mary C; Yuen, Constance K; Lung, Wing Yi; Gower, Adam C; Belkina, Anna C; Ramirez, Maria I; Deng, Jane C; Quinton, Lee J; Jones, Matthew R; Mizgerd, Joseph P

    2016-09-01

    Airway epithelial cell responses are critical to the outcome of lung infection. In this study, we aimed to identify unique contributions of epithelial cells during lung infection. To differentiate genes induced selectively in epithelial cells during pneumonia, we compared genome-wide expression profiles from three sorted cell populations: epithelial cells from uninfected mouse lungs, epithelial cells from mouse lungs with pneumococcal pneumonia, and nonepithelial cells from those same infected lungs. Of 1,166 transcripts that were more abundant in epithelial cells from infected lungs compared with nonepithelial cells from the same lungs or from epithelial cells of uninfected lungs, 32 genes were identified as highly expressed secreted products. Especially strong signals included two related secreted and transmembrane (Sectm) 1 genes, Sectm1a and Sectm1b. Refinement of sorting strategies suggested that both Sectm1 products were induced predominantly in conducting airway epithelial cells. Sectm1 was induced during the early stages of pneumococcal pneumonia, and mutation of NF-κB RelA in epithelial cells did not diminish its expression. Instead, type I IFN signaling was necessary and sufficient for Sectm1 induction in lung epithelial cells, mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. For target cells, Sectm1a bound to myeloid cells preferentially, in particular Ly6G(bright)CD11b(bright) neutrophils in the infected lung. In contrast, Sectm1a did not bind to neutrophils from uninfected lungs. Sectm1a increased expression of the neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL2 by neutrophils from the infected lung. We propose that Sectm1a is an epithelial product that sustains a positive feedback loop amplifying neutrophilic inflammation during pneumococcal pneumonia.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus infection and breast invasive ductal carcinoma in Egyptian women: A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naby, Noha Ed Hassab; Hassan Mohamed, Hameda; Mohamed Goda, Asmaa; El Sayed Mohamed, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    A controversy of the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in breast carcinomas has been reported in the literature. We carried on this research to explore possible association between EBV infection and breast invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in Egyptian women attending our center. This study carried out at Sohag university hospital on 84 paraffin embedded samples of breast tissue, of them 42 breast IDC as the case group and 42 breast fibroadenomas as the control group. Nested PCRand immunohistochemistry (IHC) done separately for all samples to identify the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) gene and EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) respectively, in breast cancer cells and controls. Specimen considered positive when both (EBNA-1) gene and LMP-1 were detected using PCR and IHC separately for the same sample, this was achieved by 10/42 (23.81%) of breast IDC (case group) and 6/42 (14.29%) of breast fibro-adenomas (control group) (P-value=0.4). Nodal involvement was the only parameter that demonstrated a significant statistical relationship with EBV presence in cancerous tissue with p-value=0.003. Our research could not find a significant statistical association between EBV infection and breast IDC in Egyptian women attending our center, but, there might be an association between the existence of EBV and tumor aggressiveness. Copyright © 2017 National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Loss of Wolbachia infection during colonisation in the invasive Argentine ant Linepithema humile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, M; Pedersen, J S; Keller, L

    2005-03-01

    WOLBACHIA are maternally inherited bacteria, which are very common in arthropods and nematodes. Wolbachia infection may affect host reproduction through feminisation, parthenogenesis, male-killing, cytoplasmic incompatibility and increased fecundity. Previous studies showing discrepancies between the phylogenies of Wolbachia and its arthropod hosts indicate that infection is frequently lost, but the causes of symbiont extinction have so far remained elusive. Here, we report data showing that colonisation of new habitats is a possible mechanism leading to the loss of infection. The presence and prevalence of Wolbachia were studied in three native and eight introduced populations of the Argentine ant Linepithema humile. The screening shows that the symbiont is common in the three native L. humile populations analysed. In contrast, Wolbachia was detected in only one of the introduced populations. The loss of infection associated with colonisation of new habitats may result from drift (founder effect) or altered selection pressures in the new habitat. Furthermore, a molecular phylogeny based on sequences of the Wolbachia wsp gene indicates that L. humile has been infected by a single strain. Horizontal transmission of the symbiont may be important in ants as suggested by the sequence similarity of strains in the three genera Linepithema, Acromyrmex, and Solenopsis native from South and Central America.

  13. Deep Invasive Fungal Infection of the Hand in a Child Mimicking a Local Gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Chatterjee, Shamita

    2018-04-01

    Subcutaneous and deep fungal infections in the hand are rare among children. These are usually found in immunocompromised adults or in persons engaged in soil handling activities, due to direct exposure, especially in the tropics. Delay in diagnosis is usual because pyogenic and other granulomatous infections are considered first. The authors present the case of a healthy, immunocompetent 2½-year-old child who presented with progressive swelling of the right hand mimicking a localized gigantism of the entire hand. Multiple operative drainage procedures done previously had failed to resolve the condition. A biopsy established the presence of fungal hyphae, thus confirming the diagnosis of deep fungal infection of the hand and guided proper therapeutic intervention. A strong index of suspicion needs to be maintained in cases not responding to conventional antibacterial therapy, and both microbiologic and histopathologic samples need to be obtained to establish the diagnosis.

  14. Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Placenta Invasion and Infection: The Use of Human Chorionic Villi Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo E. Fretes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, endemic in Latin America, is associated with premature labor and miscarriage. During vertical transmission the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi crosses the placental barrier. However, the exact mechanism of the placental infection remains unclear. We review the congenital transmission of T. cruzi, particularly the role of possible local placental factors that contribute to the vertical transmission of the parasite. Additionally, we analyze the different methods available for studying the congenital transmission of the parasite. In that context, the ex vivo infection with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of human placental chorionic villi constitutes an excellent tool for studying parasite infection strategies as well as possible local antiparasitic mechanisms.

  15. Papillary necrosis with invasive fungal infections: a case series of 29 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishan L.; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Joshi, Kusum; Chakrbarti, Arunaloke; Kohli, Harbir S.; Jha, Vivekanand; Sakhuja, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal papillary necrosis (RPN) is associated with a number of comorbid conditions. However, it has been rarely reported in patients with fungal infections of the kidney. Methods We analyzed medical records of our hospital for the last two decades and identified 29 patients with fungal infections and RPN. Results Among the 29 patients, there were 24 men and 5 women. The median (range) age at presentation was 31.2 years (2 days–73 years). Three patients (10%) were kidney transplant recipients. The remaining had varied co-existing medical conditions that included diabetes mellitus in 16 (55%) and septicemia in 4 (14%). Clinical features at presentation were fever and oliguric kidney failure in 17 patients and loin pain accompanied by passage of fleshy material per urethra in 11 (38%). Diagnosis was made ante-mortem in 17 (59%) patients. Twenty patients (69%) had infection limited to the kidneys, while in the rest, it was disseminated. Kidney involvement was bilateral in 17 patients (59%). Urinalysis showed pyuria in 23 (79%) and microhematuria in 8 (28%) patients. Fungal infections included candidiasis (69%), aspergillosis (21%) and zygomycosis (10%). Of the 17 patients in whom the diagnoses was made ante-mortem, 12 survived and 5 died. Overall mortality was observed in 48% of cases. Conclusions We herein report a series of patients with RPN associated with fungal infections of the kidney. Presentation varies from asymptomatic urinary tract infection to severe kidney failure with poor outcome. High index of suspicion is necessary to reduce the associated high mortality in these patients. PMID:27293566

  16. Retrospective economic evaluation of childhood 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Australia: Uncertain herd impact on pneumonia critical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newall, A T; Reyes, J F; McIntyre, P; Menzies, R; Beutels, P; Wood, J G

    2016-01-12

    Retrospective cost-effectiveness analyses of vaccination programs using routinely collected post-implementation data are sparse by comparison with pre-program analyses. We performed a retrospective economic evaluation of the childhood 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) program in Australia. We developed a deterministic multi-compartment model that describes health states related to invasive and non-invasive pneumococcal disease. Costs (Australian dollars, A$) and health effects (quality-adjusted life years, QALYs) were attached to model states. The perspective for costs was that of the healthcare system and government. Where possible, we used observed changes in the disease rates from national surveillance and healthcare databases to estimate the impact of the PCV7 program (2005-2010). We stratified our cost-effectiveness results into alternative scenarios which differed by the outcome states included. Parameter uncertainty was explored using probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The PCV7 program was estimated to have prevented ∼5900 hospitalisations and ∼160 deaths from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Approximately half of these were prevented in adults via herd protection. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was ∼A$161,000 per QALY gained when including only IPD-related outcomes. The cost-effectiveness of PCV7 remained in the range A$88,000-$122,000 when changes in various non-invasive disease states were included. The inclusion of observed changes in adult non-invasive pneumonia deaths substantially improved cost-effectiveness (∼A$9000 per QALY gained). Using the initial vaccine price negotiated for Australia, the PCV7 program was unlikely to have been cost-effective (at conventional thresholds) unless observed reductions in non-invasive pneumonia deaths in the elderly are attributed to it. Further analyses are required to explore this finding, which has significant implications for the incremental benefit achievable by adult PCV

  17. Clinical characteristics and outcome of invasive fungal infections in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients in a medical center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Lung Lin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Invasive fungal infection (IFI causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies, especially those with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, recurrent acute leukemia, high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and outcome of IFIs in pediatric AML patients in a medical center in Taiwan. Methods: We performed retrospective chart reviews. We enrolled pediatric AML patients who were admitted to National Taiwan University Hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. IFI was defined according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group 2008 consensus criteria. Results: In total, 78 patients were included for analysis. Twenty two episodes of IFIs were identified in 16 patients. The incidence for IFIs was 20.5% (16/78, and no specific trend of increase or decrease was observed through the study period (p=0.374. Candida species caused the majority (59.1% of IFIs. Prolonged neutropenia and elevated alanine aminotransferase and creatinine values were factors associated with IFIs (p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.001, respectively. Patients with endotracheal intubation or inotropes usage had a higher probability of developing IFIs (p<0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. The overall mortality of IFIs was 53% (8/15 over 10 years, and patients with pulmonary aspergillosis had the highest mortality (80%. Conclusion: IFIs continue to pose significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric AML patients, and patients with other hematology-oncology cancers. Recognition of factors associated with IFIs may help us early identify IFIs and promptly initiate antifungal therapy. Keywords: acute myeloid leukemia, invasive fungal infection, pediatrics

  18. Fibrinogen and fibronectin binding cooperate for valve infection and invasion in Staphylococcus aureus experimental endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Que, Yok-Ai; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Piroth, Lionel; François, Patrice; Widmer, Eleonora; Entenza, José M; Sinha, Bhanu; Herrmann, Mathias; Francioli, Patrick; Vaudaux, Pierre; Moreillon, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The expression of Staphylococcus aureus adhesins in Lactococcus lactis identified clumping factor A (ClfA) and fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) as critical for valve colonization in rats with experimental endocarditis. This study further analyzed their role in disease evolution. Infected

  19. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Brown (Aisling F.); A.G. Murphy (Alison G.); S.J. Lalor (Stephen J.); J.M. Leech (John M.); K.M. O’Keeffe (Kate M.); M. Mac Aogáin (Micheál); D.P. O’Halloran (Dara P.); K.A. Lacey (Keenan A.); M. Tavakol (Mehri); C.H. Hearnden (Claire H.); D. Fitzgerald-Hughes (Deirdre); H. Humphreys (Hilary); J.P. Fennell (Jérôme P.); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); T.J. Foster (Timothy J.); J.A. Geoghegan (Joan A.); E.C. Lavelle (Ed C.); T.R. Rogers (Thomas R.); R.M. McLoughlin (Rachel M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we

  20. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Stephen J.; Leech, John M.; O’Keeffe, Kate M.; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O’Halloran, Dara P.; Lacey, Keenan A.; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H.; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P.; van Wamel, Willem J.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  1. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, Aisling F

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans.

  2. Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical-pathological correlations (MeninGene-Path)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, J.Y.; Brouwer, M.C.; Aronica, E.; van de Beek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and

  3. Pneumococcal meningitis: Clinical-pathological correlations (meningene-path)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and

  4. Cost-effectiveness of 2 + 1 dosing of 13-valent and 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earnshaw Stephanie R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirteen-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 and 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 are two recently approved vaccines for the active immunization against Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal disease in infants and children. PCV13 offers broader protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae; however, PCV10 offers potential protection against non-typeable Haemophilus influenza (NTHi. We examined public health and economic impacts of a PCV10 and PCV13 pediatric national immunization programs (NIPs in Canada. Methods A decision-analytic model was developed to examine the costs and outcomes associated with PCV10 and PCV13 pediatric NIPs. The model followed individuals over the remainder of their lifetime. Recent disease incidence, serotype coverage, population data, percent vaccinated, costs, and utilities were obtained from the published literature. Direct and indirect effects were derived from 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine. Additional direct effect of 4% was attributed to PCV10 for moderate to severe acute otitis media to account for potential NTHi benefit. Annual number of disease cases and costs (2010 Canadian dollars were presented. Results In Canada, PCV13 was estimated to prevent more cases of disease (49,340 when considering both direct and indirect effects and 7,466 when considering direct effects only than PCV10. This translated to population gains of 258 to 13,828 more quality-adjusted life-years when vaccinating with PCV13 versus PCV10. Annual direct medical costs (including the cost of vaccination were estimated to be reduced by $5.7 million to $132.8 million when vaccinating with PCV13. Thus, PCV13 dominated PCV10, and sensitivity analyses showed PCV13 to always be dominant or cost-effective versus PCV10. Conclusions Considering the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease in Canada, PCV13 is shown to be a cost-saving immunization program because it provides substantial public

  5. Host immunity in the protective response to nasal immunization with a pneumococcal antigen associated to live and heat-killed Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintiñi, Elisa O; Medina, Marcela S

    2011-08-11

    At present, available pneumococcal vaccines have failed to eradicate infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Search for effective vaccine continues and some serotype independent pneumococcal proteins are considered as candidates for the design of new vaccines, especially a mucosal vaccine, since pneumococci enter the body through mucosal surfaces. Selection of the appropriate adjuvant is important for mucosal vaccines, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with immunostimulant properties are promissory candidates. In this work, we assessed the adjuvant effect of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), when nasally administered with a pneumococcal antigen (pneumococcal protective protein A: PppA) for the prevention of pneumococcal infection. Adjuvanticity of both live (LcV) and heat-killed (LcM) was evaluated and humoral and cellular antigen-specific immune response was assessed in mucosal and systemic compartments. The potential mechanisms induced by nasal immunization were discussed. Nasal immunization of young mice with PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM induced anti-PppA IgA and IgG antibodies in mucosal and systemic compartments and levels of these specific antibodies remained high even at day 45 after the 3rd Immunization (3rd I). These results were correlated with IL-4 induction by the mixture of antigen plus LcV and LcM. Also, PppA+Lc (V and M) induced stimulation of Th1 and Th17 cells involved in the defence against pneumococci. The protection against pneumococcal respiratory challenge at day 30 after the 3rd I showed that PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM immunizations significantly reduced pathogen counts in nasal lavages while prventing their passage into lung and blood. Survival of mice immunized with the co-application of PppA plus LcV and LcM was significantly higher than in mice immunized with PppA alone and control mice when intraperitoneal challenge was performed. No significant differences between the treatments involving LcV and LcM were found. Live and heat-killed L

  6. Host immunity in the protective response to nasal immunization with a pneumococcal antigen associated to live and heat-killed Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vintiñi Elisa O

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, available pneumococcal vaccines have failed to eradicate infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Search for effective vaccine continues and some serotype independent pneumococcal proteins are considered as candidates for the design of new vaccines, especially a mucosal vaccine, since pneumococci enter the body through mucosal surfaces. Selection of the appropriate adjuvant is important for mucosal vaccines, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunostimulant properties are promissory candidates. In this work, we assessed the adjuvant effect of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, when nasally administered with a pneumococcal antigen (pneumococcal protective protein A: PppA for the prevention of pneumococcal infection. Adjuvanticity of both live (LcV and heat-killed (LcM was evaluated and humoral and cellular antigen-specific immune response was assessed in mucosal and systemic compartments. The potential mechanisms induced by nasal immunization were discussed. Results Nasal immunization of young mice with PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM induced anti-PppA IgA and IgG antibodies in mucosal and systemic compartments and levels of these specific antibodies remained high even at day 45 after the 3rd Immunization (3rd I. These results were correlated with IL-4 induction by the mixture of antigen plus LcV and LcM. Also, PppA+Lc (V and M induced stimulation of Th1 and Th17 cells involved in the defence against pneumococci. The protection against pneumococcal respiratory challenge at day 30 after the 3rd I showed that PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM immunizations significantly reduced pathogen counts in nasal lavages while prventing their passage into lung and blood. Survival of mice immunized with the co-application of PppA plus LcV and LcM was significantly higher than in mice immunized with PppA alone and control mice when intraperitoneal challenge was performed. No significant differences between the treatments involving LcV and

  7. Invasive Salmonella Infections in Areas of High and Low Malaria Transmission Intensity in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Holly M.; Lester, Rebecca; Nadjm, Behzad; Mtove, George; Todd, Jim E.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Philemon, Rune; Amos, Ben; Morrissey, Anne B.; Reyburn, Hugh; Crump, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology of Salmonella Typhi and invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) differs, and prevalence of these pathogens among children in sub-Saharan Africa may vary in relation to malaria transmission intensity. Methods. We compared the prevalence of bacteremia among febrile pediatric inpatients aged 2 months to 13 years recruited at sites of high and low malaria endemicity in Tanzania. Enrollment at Teule Hospital, the high malaria transmission site, was from June 2006 through May 2007, and at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), the low malaria transmission site, from September 2007 through August 2008. Automated blood culture, malaria microscopy with Giemsa-stained blood films, and human immunodeficiency virus testing were performed. Results. At Teule, 3639 children were enrolled compared to 467 at KCMC. Smear-positive malaria was detected in 2195 of 3639 (60.3%) children at Teule and 11 of 460 (2.4%) at KCMC (P < .001). Bacteremia was present in 336 of 3639 (9.2%) children at Teule and 20 of 463 (4.3%) at KCMC (P < .001). NTS was isolated in 162 of 3639 (4.5%) children at Teule and 1 of 463 (0.2%) at KCMC (P < .001). Salmonella Typhi was isolated from 11 (0.3%) children at Teule and 6 (1.3%) at KCMC (P = .008). With NTS excluded, the prevalence of bacteremia at Teule was 5.0% and at KCMC 4.1% (P = .391). Conclusions. Where malaria transmission was intense, invasive NTS was common and Salmonella Typhi was uncommon, whereas the inverse was observed at a low malaria transmission site. The relationship between these pathogens, the environment, and the host is a compelling area for further research. PMID:24336909

  8. Association of infant pneumococcal vaccination with pneumococcal pneumonia among mothers : A nested case-control study using the GPRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, Eelko; Shea, Kimberly M.; Jick, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    Since implementation of infant immunization with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), increased rates of pneumococcal pneumonia have been reported among adults. Using a cohort of mother-infant pairs identified from the General Practice Research Database in the UK we found that from 2006

  9. A clinical and bacteriologic investigation of invasive streptococcal infections in Japan on the basis of serotypes, toxin production, and genomic DNA fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, K; Ichiyama, S; Iinuma, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Ohta, M; Ooe, K; Shimizu, Y; Igarashi, H; Murai, T; Shimokata, K

    1997-08-01

    In a survey of invasive streptococcal infections in Japan, we analyzed isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes collected between 1992 and 1994. Genomic DNA fingerprints produced by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were compared by computer-assisted analysis. Conventional serologic M types were subdivided into PFGE types showing close genetic similarity. Among the 42 isolates from patients with invasive diseases, 16 PFGE types were identified and genetic diversity was clearly demonstrated. Identical fingerprints were observed in both invasive and noninvasive isolates. Only 43% of invasive isolates produced streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SPE A), and 31% did not contain the speA gene. These findings suggest that the dissemination of a specific clone is not sufficient to explain all cases of these diseases in Japan and pose a question as to the role of SPE A as a major virulent factor. Bacterial factors other than SPE A and host factors should be considered in evaluation of the pathogenesis of the diseases.

  10. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF 23-VALENT PNEUMOCOCCAL POLYSACCHARIDE VACCINE IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    M. S. Naumtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the clinical efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 70 patients (55 women and 15 men aged 23–70 years, including 40 patients with RA and 30 people without systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (a control group who had a recent history of 2 and more cases of lower respiratory tract infections (bronchitis, pneumonia. When included, all the patients received anti-inflammatory therapy with methotrexate (MT (n = 24, leflunomide (LEF (n = 6, or MT + tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors (n = 10. A single 0.5-ml dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine Pneumo-23 (Sanofi Pasteur was administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly during continuous MT or LEF therapy for the underlying disease or 3–4 weeks before the use of a TNF-α inhibitor. During control visits (1 and 3 months and 1 year after administration of the vaccine, the patients underwent physical examination and routine clinical and laboratory studies. Results. No clinical and radiological symptoms of pneumonia were recorded in any case during a 12-month follow-up. The RA and control groups showed a more than 2-fold increase in anti-pneumococcal antibody levels 1 year after vaccination. The vaccine was well tolerated by 50 patients. Sixteen patients were observed to have pain, cutaneous swelling and hyperemia and 4 had subfebrility. There were neither episodes of RA exacerbation nor new autoimmune disorders during the follow-up. Conclusion. The findings suggest that 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine shows a good clinical efficacy, adequate immunogenicity, and good tolerability in the patients with RA. 

  11. Fatal invasive aspergillosis: a rare co-infection with an unexpected image presentation in a patient with dengue shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Ching; Chang, Ko; Lu, Po-Liang; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Huang-Chi

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary infiltration and pleural effusion caused by permeability syndrome are the hallmark of pulmonary manifestation of dengue cases. We report a 95-year-old chronic obstructive pulmonary disease case having dengue shock syndrome. Chest X-ray examination revealed diffuse lung infiltration. However, bilateral pneumotoceles were unexpectedly found in computed tomography (CT) images. Dengue virus type 2 infection was confirmed by virus culture, serology and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Profound shock with bilateral lung infiltration developed rapidly in 2 days with supportive care and empirical ampicillin/ sulbactam. Bronchoscopy revealed a whitish plaque over bilateral upper bronchi. Biopsy via bronchoscopy revealed moulds with vascular invasion. Culture of bronchial alveolar lavage yielded Aspergillus flavus. The patient died despite amphotericin B treatment, which was started since finding the whitish plaque with bronchoscopy examination. Besides to considering capillary leakage syndrome, our case report and literature review alert clinicians that CT and bronchoscopy may help to identify the true pathogen though all cases with concurrent dengue and Aspergillus infections had fatal outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Call for Action: Invasive Fungal Infections Associated With Ibrutinib and Other Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors Targeting Immune Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamilos, Georgios; Lionakis, Michail S; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2018-01-06

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii, Cryptococcus neoformans, and ubiquitous airborne filamentous fungi have been recently reported in patients with hematological cancers historically considered at low risk for invasive fungal infections (IFIs), after receipt of the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. The spectrum and severity of IFIs often observed in these patients implies the presence of a complex immunodeficiency that may not be solely attributed to mere inhibition of Bruton tyrosine kinase. In view of the surge in development of small molecule kinase inhibitors for treatment of malignant and autoimmune diseases, it is possible that there would be an emergence of IFIs associated with the effects of these molecules on the immune system. Preclinical assessment of the immunosuppressive effects of kinase inhibitors and human studies aimed at improving patient risk stratification for development of IFIs could lead to prevention, earlier diagnosis, and better outcomes in affected patients. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. THE RATIONALE FOR ALPHA-INTERFERON IMMUNOTHERAPY IN INFANTS WITH FUNCTIONAL GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS AND ACUTE INVASIVE INTESTINAL INFECTION

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    E. R. Meskina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute intestinal  infections  in children are a considerable  medical and social problem  worldwide. Immune therapy  could  help  to reduce the frequency of post-infectious functional intestinal dysfunction  in patients  with comorbidities. Aim: To evaluate  the  efficacy of human  recombinant interferon  alpha-2b, administered at acute  phase  of an acute  invasive intestinal  infection to infants in the first months  of age, suffering from functional  bowel  disorders. Materials and methods: This  was  an  open-label,  randomized (envelope method, prospective  study in two parallel groups. The study included  59 infants of the  first months  of life, who were breastfed, had a history of intestinal  dysfunction  and were hospitalized  to  an  infectious  department. We studied  efficacy of recombinant interferon  alpha-2b administered in rectal suppositories  at a dose  of   chromatography with measurement of short-chain fatty acids. Results: Standard treatment was ineffective in 63.3% (95% CI 43.9–80.0% of patients. Administration   of  interferon   alpha-2b   reduced the rate of treatment failure by day 14 to 32% (95% CI 9–56% and  the  risk of persistent  diarrhea  for more than  one month  to 29% (95% CI 5–53%. In those patients  who were administered interferon, inflammation at days 25 to 55 was less severe and the levels of i-forms of short-chain fatty acids were lower. Conclusion: Immunotherapy with recombinant interferon alpha-2b seems to be a promising way to improve  combination treatment of acute invasive intestinal infections in infants with a history of intestinal dysfunction, as it reduces the risk of post-infectious intestinal disorders.

  14. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response.

  15. Human and Pneumococcal Cell Surface Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Proteins Are Both Ligands of Human C1q Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M.; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (KD = 0.34–2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  16. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuijt, Tim J; Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Scicluna, Brendon P; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Roelofs, Joris J T H; de Boer, J Daan; Hoogendijk, Arjan J; de Beer, Regina; de Vos, Alex; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2016-04-01

    Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is unknown. Here, we investigate the function of the gut microbiota in the host defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. We depleted the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infected them intranasally with S. pneumoniae. We then performed survival and faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) experiments and measured parameters of inflammation and alveolar macrophage whole-genome responses. We found that the gut microbiota protects the host during pneumococcal pneumonia, as reflected by increased bacterial dissemination, inflammation, organ damage and mortality in microbiota-depleted mice compared with controls. FMT in gut microbiota-depleted mice led to a normalisation of pulmonary bacterial counts and tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 levels 6 h after pneumococcal infection. Whole-genome mapping of alveolar macrophages showed upregulation of metabolic pathways in the absence of a healthy gut microbiota. This upregulation correlated with an altered cellular responsiveness, reflected by a reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from gut microbiota-depleted mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose S. pneumoniae. This study identifies the intestinal microbiota as a protective mediator during pneumococcal pneumonia. The gut microbiota enhances primary alveolar macrophage function. Novel therapeutic strategies could exploit the gut-lung axis in bacterial infections. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Pneumococcal Induced T-activation with Resultant Thrombotic Microangiopathy

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    J.W. Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic microangiopathies are disorders resulting from platelet thromboses forming in the microvasculature with resultant schistocyte forms. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia often complicated by acute renal failure in children. HUS is typically caused by bacterial infection, most commonly enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Neuraminidase-producing organisms, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae have also been reported as potential etiologies. The pathogenesis in these cases involves cleavage of sialic acid residues from the surfaces of erythrocytes, platelets, and glomerular capillary endothelial cells, exposing the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, a process known as T-activation. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis ultimately resulting in a thrombotic microangiopathy with acute renal failure, most consistent with HUS. The patient's direct antiglobulin test was positive. Polyagglutination was observed with human adult serum, but not with umbilical cord serum. Her red blood cells (RBCs were reactive against peanut and soybean lectins, but not Salvia sclarea or Salvia horminum lectins. These findings are consistent with T-activation. Clinicians should be cognizant of the possibility of T-activation with resultant HUS in patients infected with neuraminidase-producing bacteria. Such patients may be difficult to identify using monoclonal typing antisera, as these typically do not have anti-T antibodies. Whether such patients are at risk for transfusion-associated hemolysis is debatable.

  18. Loss of Wolbachia infection during colonisation in the invasive Argentine ant Linepithema humile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, M.; Pedersen, Jes Søe; Keller, L.

    2005-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited bacteria, which are very common in arthropods and nematodes. Wolbachia infection may affect host reproduction through feminisation, parthenogenesis, male-killing, cytoplasmic incompatibility and increased fecundity. Previous studies showing discrepancies between...... of Wolbachia were studied in three native and eight introduced populations of the Argentine ant Linepithema humile. The screening shows that the symbiont is common in the three native L. humile populations analysed. In contrast, Wolbachia was detected in only one of the introduced populations. The loss...... transmission of the symbiont may be important in ants as suggested by the sequence similarity of strains in the three genera Linepithema, Acromyrmex, and Solenopsis native from South and Central America....

  19. Estimating health service utilization for treatment of pneumococcal disease: the case of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, A M C; Novaes, C G; de Soárez, P C; Toscano, C M; Novaes, H M D

    2013-07-02

    Health service utilization (HSU) is an essential component of economic evaluations of health initiatives. Defining HSU for cases of pneumococcal disease (PD) is particularly complex considering the varying clinical manifestations and diverse severity. We describe the process of developing estimates of HSU for PD as part of an economic evaluation of the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Brazil. Nationwide inpatient and outpatient HSU by children under-5 years with meningitis (PM), sepsis (PS), non-meningitis non-sepsis invasive PD (NMNS), pneumonia, and acute otitis media (AOM) was estimated. We assumed that all cases of invasive PD (PM, PS, and NMNS) required hospitalization. The study perspective was the health system, including both the public and private sectors. Data sources were obtained from national health information systems, including the Hospital Information System (SIH/SUS) and the Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN); surveys; and community-based and health care facility-based studies. We estimated hospitalization rates of 7.69 per 100,000 children under-5 years for PM (21.4 for children Brazil. Estimating HSU for noninvasive disease was challenging, particularly in the case of outpatient care, for which secondary data are scarce. Information for the private sector is lacking in Brazil, but estimates were possible with data from the public sector and national population surveys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Monitoring the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines into West Africa: design and implementation of a population-based surveillance system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Mackenzie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs in developing countries is expected to lead to a significant reduction in childhood deaths. However, PCVs have been associated with replacement disease with non-vaccine serotypes. We established a population-based surveillance system to document the direct and indirect impact of PCVs on the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and radiological pneumonia in those aged 2 months and older in The Gambia, and to monitor changes in serotype-specific IPD. Here we describe how this surveillance system was set up and is being operated as a partnership between the Medical Research Council Unit and the Gambian Government. This surveillance system is expected to provide crucial information for immunisation policy and serves as a potential model for those introducing routine PCV vaccination in diverse settings.

  1. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of non invasive tests for helicobacter pylori infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, A.; Haseeb, H.A.H.; Bilal, R.; Latif, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To compare urea breath and stool antigen in children, with histological diagnosis for Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Children between 3 and 15 years of age reporting in pediatric outpatient department with upper gastrointestinal symptoms were included. All the participating children underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 3 tests namely: histopathological identification of H. pylori (the traditional gold standard), urea breath test and stool antigen test were carried out on each child. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were calculated for each noninvasive test used in the study. A total of 54 patients completed the study with a mean age of 8.2 years. On histological examination, 72% (39) were positive for H. pylori infection. On gross endoscopic examination, only 9 patients had signs of gastritis as compared to 39 histological positives. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of stool antigen test were: 77%, 73% and 89% respectively whereas the same for urea breath test were: 79%, 80% and 91% respectively. Both the noninvasive tests were found to be sensitive and specific as compared with histological identification, for the diagnosis of H. pylori in our pediatric population. The accuracy of urea breath test was better than the stool antigen test but later was easier to perform and could fulfill the criteria for a rapid bedside diagnostic test. (author)

  2. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

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    Ryuta Yonezawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan.

  3. Identification by PCR of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars associated with invasive infections among febrile patients in Mali.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Tennant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients.We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali.We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2 strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:- strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains.We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries.

  4. Phenotypes and genotypes of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from invasive and non-invasive infections from Mexico and the USA during 1999–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Katahira, Eva; Jaramillo-Valdivia, Abril N.; de los Angeles Barajas-García, María; Bryant, Amy; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Márquez-Díaz, Francisco; Tinoco, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Corona, José; Stevens, Dennis L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the prevalence, phenotypes, and genes responsible for erythromycin resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Mexico and the USA. Methods Eighty-nine invasive and 378 non-invasive isolates from Mexico, plus 148 invasive, 21 non-invasive, and five unclassified isolates from the USA were studied. Susceptibilities to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin were evaluated according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standards. Phenotypes of erythromycin resistance were identified by triple disk test, and screening for mefA, ermTR, and ermB genes was carried out by PCR. Results All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin. Erythromycin resistance was found in 4.9% of Mexican strains and 5.2% of USA strains. Phenotypes in Mexican strains were 95% M and 5% cMLS; in strains from the USA, phenotypes were 33.3% iMLS, 33.3% iMLS-D, and 33.3% M. Erythromycin resistance genes in strains from Mexico were mefA (95%) and ermB (5%); USA strains harbored ermTR (56%), mefA (33%), and none (11%). In Mexico, all erythromycin-resistant strains were non-invasive, whereas 89% of strains from the USA were invasive. Conclusions Erythromycin resistance continues to exist at low levels in both Mexico and the USA, although the genetic mechanisms responsible differ between the two nations. These genetic differences may be related to the invasive character of the S. pyogenes isolated. PMID:22217469

  5. Differential B-cell memory around the 11-month booster in children vaccinated with a 10- or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westen, Els; Wijmenga-Monsuur, Alienke J; van Dijken, Harry H; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Kuipers, Betsy; Knol, Mirjam J; Berbers, Guy A M; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Rots, Nynke Y; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both the 10- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV10 and PCV13) induce immunological memory against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections caused by vaccine serotypes. In addition to comparing serum antibody levels, we investigated frequencies of serotype-specific plasma cells

  6. Double blow: Alien crayfish infected with invasive temnocephalan in South African waters

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    Louis du Preez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Trade in live, freshwater crayfish for ornamental markets, as well as for aquaculture, has grown rapidly and has become the major pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous crayfish species to several countries worldwide. Here we report on the first record of the Australian "redclaw" Cherax quadracarinatus in the natural waters of a game reserve in South Africa. To compound the situation, these redclaw crayfish were infected with a non-indigenous temnocephalan flatworm parasite. Both crayfish and temnocephalan were in full breeding condition, with young. Further spreading of this crayfish to the subtropical, water-rich, northern KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa and southern Mozambique is predicted. Not only might the crayfish compete with indigenous aquatic invertebrates but the non-host-specific temnocephalan might transfer to local decapods, such as freshwater crabs.

  7. Key points concerning amyloid infectivity and prion-like neuronal invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba eEspargaró

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Traditionally only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. Although recent publications have showed that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein and tau protein, also propagate in a prion-like manner, the link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has not been evidenced. The extremely low infectivity in natural conditions of the most of non-prion amyloids is far from the spreading capacity displayed by the prions. However, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in the understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions have yielded essential information that can be applied to shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidences suggest that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could be key factors affecting their spreading. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by a small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would prevent infectivity.

  8. Public health and economic impact of vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7 in the context of the annual influenza epidemic and a severe influenza pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strutton David R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza pandemic outbreaks occurred in the US in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Historical evidence suggests that the majority of influenza-related deaths during the 1918 US pandemic were attributable to bacterial pneumococcal infections. The 2009 novel influenza A (H1N1 outbreak highlights the importance of interventions that may mitigate the impact of a pandemic. Methods A decision-analytic model was constructed to evaluate the impact of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 on pneumococcal disease incidence and mortality during a typical influenza season (13/100 and a severe influenza pandemic (30/100. Outcomes were compared for current PCV7 vaccination practices vs. no vaccination. The model was estimated using published sources and includes indirect (herd protection of non-vaccinated persons. Results The model predicts that PCV7 vaccination in the US is cost saving for a normal influenza season, reducing pneumococcal-related costs by $1.6 billion. In a severe influenza pandemic, vaccination would save $7.3 billion in costs and prevent 512,000 cases of IPD, 719,000 cases of pneumonia, 62,000 IPD deaths, and 47,000 pneumonia deaths; 84% of deaths are prevented due to indirect (herd protection in the unvaccinated. Conclusions PCV7 vaccination is highly effective and cost saving in both normal and severe pandemic influenza seasons. Current infant vaccination practices may prevent >1 million pneumococcal-related deaths in a severe influenza pandemic, primarily due to herd protection.

  9. Public health and economic impact of vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7) in the context of the annual influenza epidemic and a severe influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jaime L; McGarry, Lisa J; Klugman, Keith P; Strutton, David R; Gilmore, Kristen E; Weinstein, Milton C

    2010-01-21

    Influenza pandemic outbreaks occurred in the US in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Historical evidence suggests that the majority of influenza-related deaths during the 1918 US pandemic were attributable to bacterial pneumococcal infections. The 2009 novel influenza A (H1N1) outbreak highlights the importance of interventions that may mitigate the impact of a pandemic. A decision-analytic model was constructed to evaluate the impact of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on pneumococcal disease incidence and mortality during a typical influenza season (13/100) and a severe influenza pandemic (30/100). Outcomes were compared for current PCV7 vaccination practices vs. no vaccination. The model was estimated using published sources and includes indirect (herd) protection of non-vaccinated persons. The model predicts that PCV7 vaccination in the US is cost saving for a normal influenza season, reducing pneumococcal-related costs by $1.6 billion. In a severe influenza pandemic, vaccination would save $7.3 billion in costs and prevent 512,000 cases of IPD, 719,000 cases of pneumonia, 62,000 IPD deaths, and 47,000 pneumonia deaths; 84% of deaths are prevented due to indirect (herd) protection in the unvaccinated. PCV7 vaccination is highly effective and cost saving in both normal and severe pandemic influenza seasons. Current infant vaccination practices may prevent >1 million pneumococcal-related deaths in a severe influenza pandemic, primarily due to herd protection.

  10. Mammalian cell invasion and intracellular trafficking by Trypanosoma cruzi infective forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato A. Mortara

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, occurs as different strains or isolates that may be grouped in two major phylogenetic lineages: T. cruzi I, associated with the sylvatic cycle and T. cruzi II, linked to the human disease. In the mammalian host the parasite has to invade cells and many studies implicated the flagellated trypomastigotes in this process. Several parasite surface components and some of host cell receptors with which they interact have been identified. Our work focused on how amastigotes, usually found growing in the cytoplasm, can invade mammalian cells with infectivities comparable to that of trypomastigotes. We found differences in cellular responses induced by amastigotes and trypomastigotes regarding cytoskeletal components and actin-rich projections. Extracellularly generated amastigotes of T. cruzi I strains may display greater infectivity than metacyclic trypomastigotes towards cultured cell lines as well as target cells that have modified expression of different classes of cellular components. Cultured host cells harboring the bacterium Coxiella burnetii allowed us to gain new insights into the trafficking properties of the different infective forms of T. cruzi, disclosing unexpected requirements for the parasite to transit between the parasitophorous vacuole to its final destination in the host cell cytoplasm.O agente etiológico da doença de Chagas, Trypanosoma cruzi, ocorre como cepas ou isolados que podem ser agrupados em duas grandes linhagens filogenéticas: T. cruzi I associada ao ciclo silvestre e T. cruzi II ligada à doençahumana. No hospedeiro mamífero o parasita tem que invadir células, e vários estudos relacionam as formas flageladas tripomastigotas neste processo. Diferentes componentes de superfície dos parasitas e alguns dos respectivos receptores foram identificados. Em nosso trabalho temos procurado compreender como amastigotas, que normalmente são encontrados crescendo

  11. Clonal distribution of pneumococcal serotype 19F isolates from Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparding, Nadja; Dayie, Nicholas Tete Kwaku Dzifa; Mills, Richael O.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pneumococcal strains are classified according to their capsular polysaccharide and more than 90 different serotypes are currently known. In this project, three distinct groups of pneumococcal carriage isolates from Gh...... in Ghana in that many new clones were identified. This supports the importance of continued monitoring of pneumococcal carriage in Ghana and elsewhere when vaccines, e.g., PCV-13, have been introduced to monitor the possible future spread of antimicrobial resistant clones....

  12. Invaded Invaders: Infection of Invasive Brown Treesnakes on Guam by an Exotic Larval Cestode with a Life Cycle Comprised of Non-Native Hosts.

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    Elden T Holldorf

    Full Text Available Multiple host introductions to the same non-native environment have the potential to complete life cycles of parasites incidentally transported with them. Our goal was to identify a recently detected parasitic flatworm in the invasive Brown Treesnake (Boiga irregularis on the remote Pacific island of Guam. We considered possible factors influencing parasite transmission, and tested for correlations between infection status and potential indicators of host fitness. We used genetic data from the parasite and information about the native ranges of other possible non-native hosts to hypothesize how it arrived on Guam and how its life cycle may be currently supported.We identified the parasite by comparing larval morphology and mtDNA sequences with other Pseudophyllid tapeworms. We assessed probability of infection in individual snakes using logistic regression and examined different factors influencing presence of parasites in hosts.We identified the parasite as the pseudophyllid cestode Spirometra erinaceieuropaei, with all sampled worms from multiple snakes sharing a single mtDNA haplotype. Infection appears to be limited to the only freshwater watershed on the island, where infection prevalence was high (77.5%. Larger snakes had a higher probability of being infected, consistent with the chronic nature of such infections. While infection status was positively correlated with body condition, infected snakes tended to have lower intra-peritoneal fat body mass, potentially indicating a negative effect on energy stores.We discovered that B. irregularis inhabiting a small area of forested habitat in a freshwater watershed on Guam are often infected by a novel parasite of Asian origin. While further work is needed, this species of Spirometra, itself a non-native species, likely depends on a suite of recently introduced hosts from different parts of the world to complete the life cycle. This baseline study provides little evidence of any effects on host

  13. NLF20: an antimicrobial peptide with therapeutic potential against invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kasetty, Gopinath; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing resistance to antibiotics makes antimicrobial peptides interesting as novel therapeutics. Here, we report on studies of the peptide NLF20 (NLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR), corresponding to an epitope of the D helix of heparin cofactor II (HCII), a plasma protein mediating bacterial clearance. Peptide effects were evaluated by a combination of in vitro and in vivo methods, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxicity assays, fluorescence and electron microscopy, and experimental models of endotoxin shock and Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. The results showed that NLF20 displayed potent antimicrobial effects against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and P. aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus and the fungi Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Importantly, this antimicrobial effect was retained in human blood, particularly for P. aeruginosa. Fluorescence and electron microscopy studies showed that the peptide exerted membrane-breaking effects. In an animal model of P. aeruginosa sepsis, NLF20 reduced bacterial levels, resulting in improved survival. Reduced mortality was also observed in experimental animal models of endotoxin shock, which was paralleled with modulated IFN-γ, IL-10 and coagulation responses. Together, these results indicate that functional epitopes of HCII may have therapeutic potential against bacterial infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Infective endocarditis in patients with cancer: a consequence of invasive procedures or a harbinger of neoplasm?

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    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Muñoz, Patricia; Sandoval, Carmen; Fariñas, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Cuadra, Manuel; Pericás Pulido, Juan M.; Miró, José M.; Goenaga-Sánchez, Miguel Á.; de Alarcón, Arístides; Bonache-Bernal, Francisco; Rodríguez, MªÁngeles; Noureddine, Mariam; Bouza Santiago, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to draw a comparison between the characteristics of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with cancer and those of IE in noncancer patients. Patients with IE, according to the modified Duke criteria, were prospectively included in the GAMES registry between January 2008 and February 2014 in 30 hospitals. Patients with active cancer were compared with noncancer patients. During the study period, 161 episodes of IE fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We studied 2 populations: patients whose cancer was diagnosed before IE (73.9%) and those whose cancer and IE were diagnosed simultaneously (26.1%). The latter more frequently had community-acquired IE (67.5% vs 26.4%, P endocarditis (21.7% vs 30.3%, P = .022) and surgery when indicated (24.2% vs 46.5%, P < .01) were less common. In-hospital mortality (34.8% vs 25.8%, P = .012) and 1-year mortality (47.8% vs 30.9%, P < .01) were higher in cancer patients, although 30-day mortality was not (24.8% vs 19.3%, P = .087). A significant proportion of cases of IE (5.6%) were recorded in cancer patients, mainly as a consequence of medical interventions. IE may be a harbinger of occult cancer, particularly that of gastrointestinal or urinary origin. PMID:28930826

  15. IL1B and DEFB1 Polymorphisms Increase Susceptibility to Invasive Mold Infection After Solid-Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Gresnigt, Mark S; Lecompte, Thanh; Bibert, Stephanie; Manuel, Oriol; Joosten, Leo A B; Rüeger, Sina; Berger, Christoph; Boggian, Katia; Cusini, Alexia; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Weisser, Maja; Mueller, Nicolas J; Meylan, Pascal R; Steiger, Jürg; Kutalik, Zoltan; Pascual, Manuel; van Delden, Christian; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-15

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune genes have been associated with susceptibility to invasive mold infection (IMI) among hematopoietic stem cell but not solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Twenty-four SNPs from systematically selected genes were genotyped among 1101 SOT recipients (715 kidney transplant recipients, 190 liver transplant recipients, 102 lung transplant recipients, 79 heart transplant recipients, and 15 recipients of other transplants) from the Swiss Transplant Cohort Study. Association between SNPs and the end point were assessed by log-rank test and Cox regression models. Cytokine production upon Aspergillus stimulation was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy volunteers and correlated with relevant genotypes. Mold colonization (n = 45) and proven/probable IMI (n = 26) were associated with polymorphisms in the genes encoding interleukin 1β (IL1B; rs16944; recessive mode, P = .001 for colonization and P = .00005 for IMI, by the log-rank test), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN; rs419598; P = .01 and P = .02, respectively), and β-defensin 1 (DEFB1; rs1800972; P = .001 and P = .0002, respectively). The associations with IL1B and DEFB1 remained significant in a multivariate regression model (P = .002 for IL1B rs16944; P = .01 for DEFB1 rs1800972). The presence of 2 copies of the rare allele of rs16944 or rs419598 was associated with reduced Aspergillus-induced interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α secretion by PBMCs. Functional polymorphisms in IL1B and DEFB1 influence susceptibility to mold infection in SOT recipients. This observation may contribute to individual risk stratification. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Invasive infection caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is a disease affecting patients with high comorbidity and associated with high long-term mortality

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    Nauclér, P.; Kalin, M.; Giske, C. G.

    2018-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is after Escherichia coli (EC) the most common gram-negative species causing invasive infections. Herein, we analyzed risk factors and prognosis in invasive infections caused by KP versus EC, in an area with low antimicrobial resistance. Moreover, we compared antimicrobial resistance and relative prevalence of KP and EC (KP/EC-ratio) in different European countries, using EARS-Net data. Adult patients admitted to Karolinska University Hospital 2006–2012 with invasive infection caused by KP (n = 599) were matched regarding sex and age with patients infected by EC. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Comorbidity was adjusted for with multivariable analysis. European data were retrieved from the EARS-Net database. No differences were observed in 7- and 30-day mortality between the groups. The 90-day mortality was significantly higher in the KP cohort (26% versus 17%, pKarolinska University Hospital compared to aggregate data from 20 EARS-Net countries could be related to absence of clonal spread of multidrug-resistant KP. PMID:29624618

  17. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of caspofungin versus liposomal amphotericin B in empirical treatment of invasive fungal infections in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S J; Senol, E; Kara, A; Al-Badriyeh, D; Kong, D C M; Dinleyici, E C

    2013-09-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are a major concern within healthcare systems. This pharmacoeconomic study evaluated the use of caspofungin (CAS) versus liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) in the empirical treatment of IFIs within the Turkish healthcare system. A decision-analytic model was adopted, utilising data from a randomised, non-inferiority clinical trial and a panel of clinical experts in Turkey. A five-point composite outcome measure was used to evaluate both agents. Sensitivity analyses were performed. In the base-case scenario, CAS was preferred over L-AmB by Turkish Lira (TL) 3961 per patient treated, TL 12 904 per successfully treated patient and TL 3972 per death averted. One-way sensitivity analysis did not change the study outcome. Monte Carlo simulation concluded a 71.0% chance of the outcome favouring CAS. The results were most sensitive to changes in length of stay. This is the first economic evaluation of the empirical treatment of IFIs in Turkey and suggests that CAS is more cost effective than L-AmB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Invasive fungal infection among hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients with mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit

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    Hung Chen-Yiu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive fungal infection (IFI is associated with high morbidity and high mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT patientsThe purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics and outcomes of HSCT patients with IFIs who are undergoing MV at a single institution in Taiwan. Methods We performed an observational retrospective analysis of IFIs in HSCT patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV in an intensive care unit (ICU from the year 2000 to 2009. The characteristics of these HSCT patients and risk factors related to IFIs were evaluated. The status of discharge, length of ICU stay, date of death and cause of death were also recorded. Results There were 326 HSCT patients at the Linkou Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital (Taipei, Taiwan during the study period. Sixty of these patients (18% were transferred to the ICU and placed on mechanical ventilators. A total of 20 of these 60 patients (33% had IFIs. Multivariate analysis indicated that independent risk factors for IFI were admission to an ICU more than 40 days after HSCT, graft versus host disease (GVHD, and high dose corticosteroid (p p = 0.676. Conclusion There was a high incidence of IFIs in HSCT patients requiring MV in the ICU in our study cohort. The independent risk factors for IFI are ICU admission more than 40 days after HSCT, GVHD, and use of high-dose corticosteroid.

  19. Clinical and epidemiological factors associated with methicillin resistance in community-onset invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections: prospective multicenter cross-sectional study in Korea.

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    Eu Suk Kim

    Full Text Available Successful empirical therapy of Staphylococcus aureus infections requires the ability to predict methicillin resistance. Our aim was to identify predictors of methicillin resistance in community-onset (CO invasive S. aureus infections. Sixteen hospitals across Korea participated in this study from May to December 2012. We prospectively included cases of S. aureus infection in which S. aureus was isolated from sterile clinical specimens ≤ 72 hours after hospitalization. Clinical and epidemiological data were gathered and compared in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA cases. Community-associated (CA infections were defined as in previous studies. In total, there were 786 cases of community-onset S. aureus infection, 102 (13.0% of which were CA-MRSA. In addition to known risk factors, exposure to 3rd generation cephalosporins in the past 6 months [odds ratio (OR, 1.922; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.176-3.142] and close contact with chronically ill patients in the past month (OR, 2.647; 95% CI, 1.189-5.891 were independent risk factors for MRSA infection. However, no clinical predictors of CA-MRSA were identified. Methicillin resistance, CO infection, and appropriateness of empirical antibiotics were not significantly related to 30-day mortality. MRSA infection should be suspected in patients recently exposed to 3rd generation cephalosporins or chronically-ill patients. There were no reliable predictors of CA-MRSA infection, and mortality was not affected by methicillin resistance.

  20. Association between invasive cancer of the cervix and HIV-1 infection in Tanzania: the need for dual screening

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    Ngoma Twalib

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of the cervix is the second commonest malignancy in females worldwide and is the leading malignancy among women in Tanzania. Cancer of the cervix has been strongly associated with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV which is a sexually transmitted disease. However, the role of HIV-1 in the aetiology of cancer of the cervix is less clear. Studies suggest that HPV and HIV-1 infection are synergistic and therefore their dual occurrence may fuel increased incidence of cancer of the cervix and AIDS. We therefore conducted a study to determine the association between cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Methods The study was carried out in Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar-es-salaam, Tanzania between January and March 2007. A hospital-based case control design was used to study 138 cases and 138 controls. The cases were consenting women 18 years and above with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, while the controls were consenting non-cancer adult women attendants or visitors. The participants were counselled and tested for HIV-1 and interviewed to assess risk factors for cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Estimation of risk was done by computing odds ratios and confidence intervals. Confounding and interaction between the factors were assessed using logistic regression. Results HIV-1 prevalence was much higher among the cases (21.0% than among the controls (11.6%. In logistic regression, HIV-1 was associated with cancer of the cervix (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4–5.9. Among the cases the mean age was lower for HIV-1 infected (44.3 years than HIV-1 uninfected women (54 years, p = 0.0001. Conclusion HIV-1 infection is associated with invasive cancer of the cervix. Resource-constrained countries with a high burden of HIV-1 and cervical cancer should adopt a high-risk approach that targets HIV-1 positive women for screening of cervical cancer initially by utilizing HIV/AIDS resources.

  1. Using Inverse Problem Methods with Surveillance Data in Pneumococcal Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Karyn L.; Banks, H. T.; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The design and evaluation of epidemiological control strategies is central to public health policy. While inverse problem methods are routinely used in many applications, this remains an area in which their use is relatively rare, although their potential impact is great. We describe methods particularly relevant to epidemiological modeling at the population level. These methods are then applied to the study of pneumococcal vaccination strategies as a relevant example which poses many challenges common to other infectious diseases. We demonstrate that relevant yet typically unknown parameters may be estimated, and show that a calibrated model may used to assess implemented vaccine policies through the estimation of parameters if vaccine history is recorded along with infection and colonization information. Finally, we show how one might determine an appropriate level of refinement or aggregation in the age-structured model given age-stratified observations. These results illustrate ways in which the collection and analysis of surveillance data can be improved using inverse problem methods. PMID:20209093

  2. Bacteremia causes hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Leib, S.L.; Rowland, Ian J

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bacteremia and systemic complications both play important roles in brain pathophysiological alterations and the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. Their individual contributions to the development of brain damage, however, still remain to be defined. METHODS: Using an adult...... rat pneumococcal meningitis model, the impact of bacteremia accompanying meningitis on the development of hippocampal injury was studied. The study comprised of the three groups: I. Meningitis (n=11), II. meningitis with attenuated bacteremia resulting from iv injection of serotype......-specific pneumococcal antibodies (n=14), and III. uninfected controls (n=6). RESULTS: Pneumococcal meningitis resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis score 0.22 (0.18-0.35) compared to uninfected controls (0.02 (0.00-0.02), Mann Whitney test, P=0.0003). Also, meningitis with an attenuation of bacteremia...

  3. Influence of bacterial interactions on pneumococcal colonization of the nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Joshua R; Vidal, Jorge E; Klugman, Keith P

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common commensal inhabitant of the nasopharynx and a frequent etiologic agent in serious diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis. Multiple pneumococcal strains can colonize the nasopharynx, which is also home to many other bacterial species. Intraspecies and interspecies interactions influence pneumococcal carriage in important ways. Co-colonization by two or more pneumococcal strains has implications for vaccine serotype replacement, carriage detection, and pneumonia diagnostics. Interactions between the pneumococcus and other bacterial species alter carriage prevalence, modulate virulence, and affect biofilm formation. By examining these interactions, this review highlights how the bacterial ecosystem of the nasopharynx changes the nature and course of pneumococcal carriage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Promoting pneumococcal immunizations among rural Medicare beneficiaries using multiple strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth A; Harwell, Todd S; Donahue, Peg M; Weisner, M'liss A; McInerney, Michael J; Holzman, Greg S; Helgerson, Steven D

    2003-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases among adults are major contributing causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. However, adult immunizations continue to be underutilized in both urban and rural areas. To evaluate the effectiveness of a community-wide education campaign and mailed reminders promoting pneumococcal immunizations to rural Medicare beneficiaries. We implemented a community-wide education campaign, and mailed reminders were sent to Medicare beneficiaries in 1 media market in Montana to increase pneumococcal immunizations. In a second distinct media market, mailed reminders only were sent to beneficiaries. The proportion of respondents aged 65 years and older aware of pneumococcal immunizations increased significantly from baseline to follow-up among respondents both in the education-plus-reminder (63% to 78%, P = 0.04) and the reminder-only (64% to 74%, P = 0.05) markets. Overall from 1998 to 1999, there was a 3.7-percentage-point increase in pneumococcal immunization claims for Medicare beneficiaries in the education-plus-reminder market and a 1.5-percentage-point increase in the reminder-only market. Medicare beneficiaries sent reminders in the education-plus-reminder market compared to those in the reminder-only market were more likely to have a claim for pneumococcal immunization in 1999 (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.28). The results suggest that these quality improvement strategies (community education plus reminders and reminders alone) modestly increased pneumococcal immunization awareness and pneumococcal immunization among rural adults. Mailed reminder exposure was associated with an increased prevalence of pneumococcal immunizations between 1998 and 1999 and was augmented somewhat by the education campaign.

  5. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Positivity Predictors of the Pneumococcal Urinary Antigen Test in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, Luis; Zalacain, Rafael; Menéndez, Rosario; Reyes, Soledad; Capelastegui, Alberto; Cillóniz, Catia; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martín-Villasclaras, Juan J; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Gabarrús, Albert; Musher, Daniel M; Torres, Antoni

    2015-10-01

    Detection of the C-polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine by an immune-chromatographic test is increasingly used to evaluate patients with community-acquired pneumonia. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this test in the largest series of cases to date and used logistic regression models to determine predictors of positivity in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We performed a multicenter, prospective, observational study of 4,374 patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The urinary antigen test was done in 3,874 cases. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 916 cases (21%); 653 (71%) of these cases were diagnosed exclusively by the urinary antigen test. Sensitivity and specificity were 60 and 99.7%, respectively. Predictors of urinary antigen positivity were female sex; heart rate≥125 bpm, systolic blood pressureantibiotic treatment; pleuritic chest pain; chills; pleural effusion; and blood urea nitrogen≥30 mg/dl. With at least six of all these predictors present, the probability of positivity was 52%. With only one factor present, the probability was only 12%. The urinary antigen test is a method with good sensitivity and excellent specificity in diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia, and its use greatly increased the recognition of community-acquired pneumonia due to S. pneumoniae. With a specificity of 99.7%, this test could be used to direct simplified antibiotic therapy, thereby avoiding excess costs and risk for bacterial resistance that result from broad-spectrum antibiotics. We also identified predictors of positivity that could increase suspicion for pneumococcal infection or avoid the unnecessary use of this test.

  6. Concurrent Infection with Hepatitis C Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Majumdar, Sumit R; Eurich, Dean T

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about concurrent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We hypothesized that co-infection with HCV and S. pneumoniae would increase risk for death and complications. We captured sociodemographic and serologic data for adults with IPD in a population-based cohort study in northern Alberta, Canada, during 2000-2014. IPD patients infected with HCV were compared with IPD patients not infected with HCV for risk of in-hospital deaths and complications by using multivariable logistic regression. A total of 355 of 3,251 patients with IPD were co-infected with HCV. The in-hospital mortality rate was higher for IPD patients infected with HCV. Prevalence of most IPD-related complications (e.g., cellulitis, acute kidney injury, mechanical ventilation) was also higher in HCV-infected patients. Infection with HCV is common in patients with IPD, and HCV is independently associated with an increased risk for serious illness and death.

  7. Bias with respect to socioeconomic status: A closer look at zip code matching in a pneumococcal vaccine effectiveness study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Link-Gelles

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 was introduced in the US for prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease in children. Individual-level socioeconomic status (SES is a potential confounder of the estimated effectiveness of PCV13 and is often controlled for in observational studies using zip code as a proxy. We assessed the utility of zip code matching for control of SES in a post-licensure evaluation of the effectiveness of PCV13 (calculated as [1-matched odds ratio]*100. We used a directed acyclic graph to identify subsets of confounders and collected SES variables from birth certificates, geocoding, a parent interview, and follow-up with medical providers. Cases tended to be more affluent than eligible controls (for example, 48.3% of cases had private insurance vs. 44.6% of eligible controls, but less affluent than enrolled controls (52.9% of whom had private insurance. Control of confounding subsets, however, did not result in a meaningful change in estimated vaccine effectiveness (original estimate: 85.1%, 95% CI 74.8–91.9%; adjusted estimate: 82.5%, 95% CI 65.6–91.1%. In the context of a post-licensure vaccine effectiveness study, zip code appears to be an adequate, though not perfect, proxy for individual SES. Keywords: Socioeconomic status, PCV13, Pneumococcus, Pneumococcal vaccine, Vaccine effectiveness, Matched case-control

  8. Immunogenicity and safety of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine administered to older infants and children naïve to pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Jacek; Brzostek, Jerzy; Szymański, Henryk; Tetiurka, Bogusław; Toporowska-Kowalska, Ewa; Wasowska-Królikowska, Krystyna; Sarkozy, Denise A; Giardina, Peter C; Gruber, William C; Emini, Emilio A; Scott, Daniel A

    2015-03-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children vaccine (PCV13) has been developed and approved in many countries worldwide. Assess the safety and immunogenicity of PCV13 in healthy older infants and children naïve to previous pneumococcal vaccination. This was a phase 3, open-label, multicenter study conducted in Polish children (N=354) who were vaccinated according to 3 age-appropriate catch-up schedules: Group 1 (aged 7 to vaccine doses only; and Group 3 (aged 24 to vaccine, was determined for each vaccine serotype. In addition, antipolysaccharide immunoglobulin (Ig) G geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were calculated. Safety assessments included systemic and local reactions, and adverse events. The proportion of immunological responders was ≥88% across groups for all serotypes. Antipolysaccharide IgG GMCs were generally similar across groups. Each schedule elicited immune response levels against all 13 serotypes comparable to or greater than levels previously reported in infants after a 3-dose series. The 3 catch-up schedules had similar tolerability and safety profiles; a trend was present towards greater local tenderness with increasing age and subsequent dose administration. Immunological responses and safety results support the use of PCV13 for catch-up schedules in older infants and children naïve to pneumococcal vaccination. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Spermidine Biosynthesis and Transport Modulate Pneumococcal Autolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are small cationic molecules that have far-reaching roles in biology. In the case of pathogenic bacteria, these functions include those central to their pathogenesis. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major bacterial pathogen, causing a diverse range of diseases that account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this work, we characterize the polyamine biosynthetic pathway of S. pneumoniae, demonstrating that this organism produces spermidine from arginine. The synthesis of spermidine was found to be nonessential for growth in a polyamine-free chemically defined medium. However, mutant strains lacking the ability to synthesize or transport spermidine displayed a significant delay in the onset of autolysis. We provide evidence for a model in which spermidine modulates the activity of the major autolysin LytA in the pneumococcal cell wall compartment via interactions with negatively charged molecules, such as teichoic acids. PMID:25092031

  10. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  11. Efficacy and safety of micafungin for prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing haplo-identical hematopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Cheikh, J; Venton, G; Crocchiolo, R; Fürst, S; Faucher, C; Granata, A; Oudin, C; Coso, D; Bouabdallah, R; Vey, N; Duran, S; Fougereau, E; Berger, P; Chabannon, C; Blaise, D

    2013-11-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) such as candidiasis and mold infections have caused significant morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients in recent years. Micafungin, a new echinocandin, inhibits fungal cell wall β-glucan synthesis, with potent activity against most species of Candida and Aspergillus. The aim of this observational study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of micafungin in prophylaxis of IFIs in 26 high-risk adult patients with various hematological diseases receiving haplo-identical Allo-SCT. Only two patients had a history of possible aspergillosis before transplant treated by voriconazole. The patients received a median of four lines (2-7) of treatment before Allo-SCT. Thirteen patients (50%) received at least one prior Auto-SCT; and eight patients (31%) received a previous Allo-SCT. Patients received a median of 29 infusions (range, 15-85) of micafungin (50 mg/day i.v. as a 1-h infusion). The treatment was initiated at the beginning of the transplant conditioning regimen until the hospital discharge. None of our patients discontinued the treatment for drug-related adverse events. Micafungin was not associated with any hepatotoxicity. Only one patient (4%) discontinued the treatment because of early disease progression. In all patients no Candida and/or Aspergillus species was documented after 3 and 6 months from transplant. None of our patients presented a positive galactomannan antigenemia >0.5. Nine patients (35%) presented a CMV reactivation. Four patients presented an acute GVHD grade II and two patients presented a chronic GVHD. The median follow-up was 11 months (3-23). At the last follow-up, there were 20 patients (77%) who were alive; four patients (12%) died because of disease progression and two patients because of graft failure. Micafungin has a good safety and tolerability profile, with an efficacy in preventing IFI in this high-risk population. Our data provide support for an efficacy study in a

  12. Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella Infections in Asia: Clinical Observations, Disease Outcome and Dominant Serovars from an Infectious Disease Hospital in Vietnam.

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    Nguyen Phu Huong Lan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS infections are now a well-described cause of morbidity and mortality in children and HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. In contrast, the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of iNTS disease in Asia are not well documented. We retrospectively identified >100 cases of iNTS infections in an infectious disease hospital in Southern Vietnam between 2008 and 2013. Clinical records were accessed to evaluate demographic and clinical factors associated with iNTS infection and to identify risk factors associated with death. Multi-locus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all organisms. Of 102 iNTS patients, 71% were HIV-infected, >90% were adults, 71% were male and 33% reported intravenous drug use. Twenty-six/92 (28% patients with a known outcome died; HIV infection was significantly associated with death (p = 0.039. S. Enteritidis (Sequence Types (ST11 (48%, 43/89 and S. Typhimurium (ST19, 34 and 1544 (26%, 23/89 were the most commonly identified serovars; S. Typhimurium was significantly more common in HIV-infected individuals (p = 0.003. Isolates from HIV-infected patients were more likely to exhibit reduced susceptibility against trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than HIV-negative patients (p = 0.037. We conclude that iNTS disease is a severe infection in Vietnam with a high mortality rate. As in sub-Saharan Africa, HIV infection was a risk factor for death, with the majority of the burden in this population found in HIV-infected adult men.

  13. Nasal immunization of mice with Lactobacillus casei expressing the Pneumococcal Surface Protein A: induction of antibodies, complement deposition and partial protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Ivana B; Darrieux, Michelle; Ferreira, Daniela M; Miyaji, Eliane N; Silva, Débora A; Arêas, Ana Paula M; Aires, Karina A; Leite, Luciana C C; Ho, Paulo L; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S

    2008-04-01

    Strategies for the development of new vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections try to overcome problems such as serotype coverage and high costs, present in currently available vaccines. Formulations based on protein candidates that can induce protection in animal models have been pointed as good alternatives. Among them, the Pneumococcal Surface Protein A (PspA) plays an important role during systemic infection at least in part through the inhibition of complement deposition on the pneumococcal surface, a mechanism of evasion from the immune system. Antigen delivery systems based on live recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) represents a promising strategy for mucosal vaccination, since they are generally regarded as safe bacteria able to elicit both systemic and mucosal immune responses. In this work, the N-terminal region of clade 1 PspA was constitutively expressed in Lactobacillus casei and the recombinant bacteria was tested as a mucosal vaccine in mice. Nasal immunization with L. casei-PspA 1 induced anti-PspA antibodies that were able to bind to pneumococcal strains carrying both clade 1 and clade 2 PspAs and to induce complement deposition on the surface of the bacteria. In addition, an increase in survival of immunized mice after a systemic challenge with a virulent pneumococcal strain was observed.

  14. Increased risk of Group B Streptococcus invasive infection in HIV-exposed but uninfected infants : a review of the evidence and possible mechanisms

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    NICOLAS DAUBY

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Group B streptococcus (GBS is a major cause of neonatal sepsis and mortality worldwide. Studies from both developed and developing countries have shown that HIV exposed but uninfected (HEU infants are at increased risk of infectious morbidity, as compared to HIV unexposed uninfected infants (HUU. A higher susceptibility to GBS infections has been reported in HEU infants, particularly late-onset diseases (LOD and more severe manifestations of GBS diseases. We review here the possible explanations for increased susceptibility to GBS infection. Maternal GBS colonization during pregnancy is a major risk factor for early-onset GBS invasive disease but colonization rates are not higher in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected pregnant women, while selective colonization with more virulent strains in HIV-infected women is suggested in some studies. Lower serotype specific GBS maternal antibody transfer and quantitative and qualitative defects of innate immune responses in HEU infants may play a role in the increased risk of GBS invasive disease. The impact of maternal antiretroviral treatment and its consequences on immune activation in HEU newborns is important to study. Maternal immunization presents a promising intervention to reduce GBS burden in the growing HEU population.

  15. Assessment of microbiological air quality in hemato-oncology units and its relationship with the occurrence of invasive fungal infections: an integrative review

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    Mayra Goncalves Menegueti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide aging of the human population has promoted an increase in the incidence of neoplasia, including hematological cancers, which render patients particularly vulnerable to invasive fungal infections. For this reason, air filtration in hemato-oncology units has been recommended. However, scarce literature has assessed the impact of microbiological air quality on the occurrence of fungal infections in this population. We performed an integrative review of studies in the MEDLINE database that were published between January 1980 and October 2012, using the following combinations of keywords: air × quality × HEPA, air × quality × hematology, and airborne fungal infections. The search yielded only 13 articles, suggesting that high-efficiency filtering of the ambient air in hemato-oncology units can prevent the incidence of invasive fungal infections. However, no randomized clinical trial was found to confirm this suggestion. Currently, there is no consensus about the maximum allowable count of fungi in the air, which complicates filtration monitoring, including filter maintenance and replacement, and needs to be addressed in future studies.

  16. Pediatric Acute Otitis Media in the Era of Pneumococcal Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Kareem O; Ishman, Stacey L; Altaye, Mekibib; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Choo, Daniel I

    2017-05-01

    Objectives (1) Describe longitudinal trends in annual prevalence of hospital admission for pediatric acute otitis media (AOM) and complications of AOM (CAOM) since introduction of pneumococcal vaccination in 2000 and (2) describe the longitudinal trend of prevalence of hospital admission for pneumococcal meningitis in children with AOM-related diagnoses in the postvaccination era. Study Design Retrospective analysis of Kids' Inpatient Database from 2000 to 2012. Setting Community, nonrehabilitation hospitals. Subjects and Methods To determine annual prevalence of admission for AOM/CAOM, nationally weighted frequencies of children aged otitis media, acute mastoiditis, suppurative labyrinthitis, and/or acute petrositis were collected. The frequency of coexisting pneumococcal meningitis diagnoses among these patients was also collected. Trend analysis of prevalences of admission for AOM/CAOM and for pneumococcal meningitis occurring in the setting of AOM/CAOM from 2000 to 2012 was performed. Results Between 2000 and 2012, annual prevalence of admission for AOM/CAOM decreased from 3.956 to 2.618 per 100,000 persons ( P < .0001) (relative risk reduction 34%). Declines in admission prevalence were most pronounced in children <1 year of age (from 22.647 to 8.715 per 100,000 persons between 2000 and 2012, P < .0001) and 1 to 2 years of age (from 13.652 to 5.554 per 100,000 persons between 2000 and 2012, P < .0001). For all ages, the admission prevalence for pneumococcal meningitis and concomitant AOM/CAOM decreased (from 1.760 to 0.717 per 1,000,000 persons, P < .0001) over the study period. Conclusions The prevalence of hospital admission for pediatric AOM/CAOM has declined since the advent of pneumococcal vaccination. Admission rates for pneumococcal meningitis with AOM/CAOM have similarly declined.

  17. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2005-01-01

    , blocking leukocyte entry to the central nervous system in experimental pneumococcal meningitis compromises the survival prognosis but does not affect the risk of brain damage or level of infection in this compartment. Conversely, poorer prognosis was associated with an increase in bacterial load in blood......The role of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the evolution of the pathophysiological changes that occur in bacterial meningitis is unclear. Here, we investigate how leukocyte recruitment to the CSF, modulated by the leukocyte blocker fucoidin, affects the extent of brain......, suggesting that leukocyte blockage affects the host's ability to control systemic infection....

  18. Hearing loss and cochlear damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis, with special reference to the role of neutrophil granulytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, CT; Caye-Thomsen, P; Lund, SP

    2006-01-01

    of an augmented neutrophil response on the development of hearing loss and cochlear damage in a model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rats. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and histopathology in rats...... infection. Pretreatment with G-CSF increased hearing loss 24 h after infection and on day 8 compared to untreated rats (Mann-Whitney, P = 0.012 and P = 0.013 respectively). The increased sensorineural hearing loss at day 8 was associated with significantly decreased spiral ganglion cell counts (P = 0...

  19. RAPID DETECTION OF PNEUMOCOCCAL ANTIGEN IN PLEURAL FLUID OF PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    Background Detection of pneumococcal antigen may help to increase the rate of diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia. This study was designed to determine the value of rapid detection of pneumococcal antigen in pleural fluid from patients with community acquired pneumonia. Methods Thoracentesis was

  20. Prevalence and trend in the use of hospital-based standing orders programs for influenza and pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentakota, Sri Ram; Halperin, William

    2007-08-01

    In 2002, federal regulations authorized the use of standing orders programs (SOPs) for promoting influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. In 2003, the New Jersey Hospital Association conducted a demonstration project illustrating the efficacy of SOPs, and the state health department informed healthcare facilities of their benefits. We describe the prevalence of reported use of SOPs in New Jersey hospitals in 2003 and 2005 and identify hospital characteristics associated with the use of SOPs. A survey was mailed to the directors of infection control at 117 New Jersey hospitals during the period from January to May 2005 (response rate, 90.6%). Data on hospital characteristics were obtained from hospital directories and online resources. The prevalence of use of SOPs for influenza vaccination was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.1%-59.9%) in 2003, and it increased to 78.3% (95% CI, 69.2%-85.7%) in 2005. The prevalence of SOP use for pneumococcal vaccination was similar. In 2005, the reported rate of use of SOPs for inpatients (influenza vaccination, 76.4%; pneumococcal vaccination, 75.5%) was significantly higher than that for outpatients (influenza vaccination, 9.4%; pneumococcal vaccination, 8.5%). Prevalence ratios for SOP use comparing acute care and non-acute care hospitals were 1.71 (95% CI, 1.2-2.5) for influenza vaccination SOPs and 1.8 for (95% CI, 1.2-2.7) pneumococcal vaccination SOPs. Acute care hospitals with a ratio of admissions to total beds greater than 36.7 reported greater use of SOPs for pneumococcal vaccination, compared with those that had a ratio of less than 36.7. The increase in the prevalence of reported use of SOPs among New Jersey hospitals in 2005, compared with 2003, was contemporaneous with SOP-related actions taken by the federal government, the state government, and the New Jersey Hospital Association. Opportunities persist for increased use of SOPs among non-acute care hospitals and for outpatients.

  1. Capacity of non-invasive hepatic fibrosis algorithms to replace transient elastography to exclude cirrhosis in people with hepatitis C virus infection: A multi-centre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Melissa Louise; Riordan, Stephen M; Bopage, Rohan; Lloyd, Andrew R; Post, Jeffrey John

    2018-01-01

    Achievement of the 2030 World Health Organisation (WHO) global hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination targets will be underpinned by scale-up of testing and use of direct-acting antiviral treatments. In Australia, despite publically-funded testing and treatment, less than 15% of patients were treated in the first year of treatment access, highlighting the need for greater efficiency of health service delivery. To this end, non-invasive fibrosis algorithms were examined to reduce reliance on transient elastography (TE) which is currently utilised for the assessment of cirrhosis in most Australian clinical settings. This retrospective and prospective study, with derivation and validation cohorts, examined consecutive patients in a tertiary referral centre, a sexual health clinic, and a prison-based hepatitis program. The negative predictive value (NPV) of seven non-invasive algorithms were measured using published and newly derived cut-offs. The number of TEs avoided for each algorithm, or combination of algorithms, was determined. The 850 patients included 780 (92%) with HCV mono-infection, and 70 (8%) co-infected with HIV or hepatitis B. The mono-infected cohort included 612 men (79%), with an overall prevalence of cirrhosis of 16% (125/780). An 'APRI' algorithm cut-off of 1.0 had a 94% NPV (95%CI: 91-96%). Newly derived cut-offs of 'APRI' (0.49), 'FIB-4' (0.93) and 'GUCI' (0.5) algorithms each had NPVs of 99% (95%CI: 97-100%), allowing avoidance of TE in 40% (315/780), 40% (310/780) and 40% (298/749) respectively. When used in combination, NPV was retained and TE avoidance reached 54% (405/749), regardless of gender or co-infection. Non-invasive algorithms can reliably exclude cirrhosis in many patients, allowing improved efficiency of HCV assessment services in Australia and worldwide.

  2. Exposure to welding fumes and lower airway infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Reetika; Periselneris, Jimstan; Lanone, Sophie; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Melton, Geoffrey; Palmer, Keith T; Andujar, Pascal; Antonini, James M; Cohignac, Vanessa; Erdely, Aaron; Jose, Ricardo J; Mudway, Ian; Brown, Jeremy; Grigg, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Welders are at increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia. The mechanism for this association is not known. The capacity of pneumococci to adhere to and infect lower airway cells is mediated by host-expressed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR). We sought to assess the effect of mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF) on PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection to human airway cells in vitro and on pneumococcal airway infection in a mouse model. The oxidative potential of MS-WF was assessed by their capacity to reduce antioxidants in vitro. Pneumococcal adhesion and infection of A549, BEAS-2B, and primary human bronchial airway cells were assessed by means of quantitative bacterial culture and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU). After intranasal instillation of MS-WF, mice were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung CFU values were determined. PAFR protein levels were assessed by using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and PAFR mRNA expression was assessed by using quantitative PCR. PAFR was blocked by CV-3988, and oxidative stress was attenuated by N-acetylcysteine. MS-WF exhibited high oxidative potential. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells MS-WF increased pneumococcal adhesion and infection and PAFR protein expression. Both CV-3988 and N-acetylcysteine reduced MS-WF-stimulated pneumococcal adhesion and infection of airway cells. MS-WF increased mouse lung PAFR mRNA expression and increased BALF and lung pneumococcal CFU values. In MS-WF-exposed mice CV-3988 reduced BALF CFU values. Hypersusceptibility of welders to pneumococcal pneumonia is in part mediated by the capacity of welding fumes to increase PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection of lower airway cells. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  3. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model.

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    Jully Gogoi-Tiwari

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model.Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection.Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05 in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain.This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of mammary tissue damage

  4. Involvement of microRNAs-MMPs-E-cadherin in the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongmei; Li, Xiaohui; Du, Jie; Yin, Youcong; Li, Yuanjian

    2018-06-15

    It has been found that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)is not only the main cause of gastric cancer, but also closely related to its metastasis. E-cadherin cleavage induced by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) plays an important role in the tumor metastasis. In the present study, we investigated the role of microRNAs-MMPs-E-cadherin in migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells treated with H. pylori. The results showed that H. pylori induced migration and invasion of SGC-7901 cells with a down-regulation of E-cadherin expression, which were abolished by MMPs knock down, E-cadherin overexpression, mimics of miR128 and miR148a. MiR128/miR148a inhibitors restored MMP-3/MMP-7 expression, down-regulated E-cadherin level, and accelerated cellular migration and invasion. This study suggests that H. pylori induces migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells through reduction of E-cadherin function by activation of MMP-3, - 7. The present results also suggest that the activated MMPs/E-cadherin pathway is related with down-regulation of miR128/miR148a in the human gastric cancer cells infected with H. pylori. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. High rate of pneumococcal bacteremia in a prospective cohort of older children and adults in an area of high HIV prevalence in rural western Kenya

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    Oundo Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although causing substantial morbidity, the burden of pneumococcal disease among older children and adults in Africa, particularly in rural settings, is not well-characterized. We evaluated pneumococcal bacteremia among 21,000 persons ≥5 years old in a prospective cohort as part of population-based infectious disease surveillance in rural western Kenya from October 2006-September 2008. Methods Blood cultures were done on patients meeting pre-defined criteria - severe acute respiratory illness (SARI, fever, and admission for any reason at a referral health facility within 5 kilometers of all 33 villages where surveillance took place. Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae was done by latex agglutination and quellung reaction and antibiotic susceptibility testing was done using broth microdilution. We extrapolated incidence rates based on persons with compatible illnesses in the surveillance population who were not cultured. We estimated rates among HIV-infected persons based on community HIV prevalence. We projected the national burden of pneumococcal bacteremia cases based on these rates. Results Among 1,301 blood cultures among persons ≥5 years, 52 (4% yielded pneumococcus, which was the most common bacteria isolated. The yield was higher among those ≥18 years than 5-17 years (6.9% versus 1.6%, p 95%. The crude rate of pneumococcal bacteremia was 129/100,000 person-years, and the adjusted rate was 419/100,000 person-years. Nineteen (61% of 31 patients with HIV results were HIV-positive. The adjusted rate among HIV-infected persons was 2,399/100,000 person-years (Rate ratio versus HIV-negative adults, 19.7, 95% CI 12.4-31.1. We project 58,483 cases of pneumococcal bacteremia will occur in Kenyan adults in 2010. Conclusions Pneumococcal bacteremia rates were high among persons ≥5 years old, particularly among HIV-infected persons. Ongoing surveillance will document if expanded use of highly-active antiretroviral

  6. The health and economic impact of vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7) during an annual influenza epidemic and influenza pandemic in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Ronald; Roberts, Craig S; An, Zhijie; Chen, Chieh-I; Wang, Bruce

    2015-07-24

    China has experienced several severe outbreaks of influenza over the past century: 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009. Influenza itself can be deadly; however, the increase in mortality during an influenza outbreak is also attributable to secondary bacterial infections, specifically pneumococcal disease. Given the history of pandemic outbreaks and the associated morbidity and mortality, we investigated the cost-effectiveness of a PCV7 vaccination program in China from the context of typical and pandemic influenza seasons. A decision-analytic model was employed to evaluate the impact of a 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7) infant vaccination program on the incidence, mortality, and cost associated with pneumococcal disease during a typical influenza season (15% flu incidence) and influenza pandemic (30% flu incidence) in China. The model incorporated Chinese data where available and included both direct and indirect (herd) effects on the unvaccinated population, assuming a point in time following the initial introduction of the vaccine where the impact of the indirect effects has reached a steady state, approximately seven years following the implementation of the vaccine program. Pneumococcal disease incidence, mortality, and costs were evaluated over a one year time horizon. Healthcare costs were calculated using a payer perspective and included vaccination program costs and direct medical expenditures from pneumococcal disease. The model predicted that routine PCV7 vaccination of infants in China would prevent 5,053,453 cases of pneumococcal disease and 76,714 deaths in a single year during a normal influenza season.The estimated incremental-cost-effectiveness ratios were ¥12,281 (US$1,900) per life-year saved and ¥13,737 (US$2,125) per quality-adjusted-life-year gained. During an influenza pandemic, the model estimated that routine vaccination with PCV7 would prevent 8,469,506 cases of pneumococcal disease and 707,526 deaths, and would be cost-saving. Routine

  7. Is 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13 Combined With 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV23 Superior to PPSV23 Alone for Reducing Incidence or Severity of Pneumonia in Older Adults? A Clin-IQ

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    Starla Hayward

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the public health concerns, pneumonia also accounts for a significant cost to the health care system. Currently there are two leading vaccines targeted against Streptococcus pneumoniae: 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13. Until recently, the recommendation for adult pneumonia vaccination has been a single dose of PPSV23 for all adults aged 65 years or older. However, concerns were raised regarding the vaccine’s efficacy due to the persistent burden of pneumococcal disease in the elderly population. This paper focuses on two trials that evaluated the safety and efficacy of PCV13 in the adult population. The first study reveals improved immune response with the addition of PCV13 to PPSV23, while the second shows PCV13 was effective in the prevention of vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia. Both studies observed adequate safety profiles for PCV13 in series with PPSV23 and with PCV13 compared to placebo.

  8. Nationwide Trends in Bacterial Meningitis before the Introduction of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine—Burkina Faso, 2011–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo-Traoré, Rasmata; Medah, Isaïe; Sangare, Lassana; Yaméogo, Issaka; Sawadogo, Guetawendé; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Hema-Ouangraoua, Soumeya; McGee, Lesley; Srinivasan, Velusamy; Aké, Flavien; Congo-Ouédraogo, Malika; Sanou, Soufian; Ba, Absatou Ky; Novak, Ryan T.; Van Beneden, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background Following introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in 2006 and serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine in 2010, Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) became the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in Burkina Faso. We describe bacterial meningitis epidemiology, focusing on pneumococcal meningitis, before 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) introduction in the pediatric routine immunization program in October 2013. Methods Nationwide population-based meningitis surveillance collects case-level demographic and clinical information and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory results. Sp infections are confirmed by culture, real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR), or latex agglutination, and CSF serotyped using real-time and conventional PCR. We calculated incidence rates in cases per 100,000 persons, adjusting for age and proportion of cases with CSF tested at national reference laboratories, and case fatality ratios (CFR). Results During 2011–2013, 1,528 pneumococcal meningitis cases were reported. Average annual adjusted incidence rates were 26.9 (meningitis occurred among children aged <1 year. The majority of cases were due to PCV13-associated serotypes; introduction of PCV13 should substantially decrease this burden. PMID:27832151

  9. Cefditoren and ceftriaxone enhance complement-mediated immunity in the presence of specific antibodies against antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains.

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    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Specific antibodies mediate humoral and cellular protection against invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae by activating complement mediated immunity, promoting phagocytosis and stimulating bacterial clearance. The emergence of pneumococcal strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for public health. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flow cytometry was used to determine whether complement-mediated immunity against three antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates is enhanced in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone. The binding of acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component, and of complement component C1q, to pneumococci was enhanced in the presence of serum plus either of these antibiotics. Both antibiotics therefore trigger the activation of the classical complement pathway against S. pneumoniae. C3b deposition was also increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone confirming that the presence of these antibiotics enhances complement-mediated immunity to S. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using cefditoren and ceftriaxone to promote the binding of acute phase proteins and C1q to pneumococci, and to increase C3b deposition, when anti-pneumococcal antibodies are present, might help reduce the impact of antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae infections.

  10. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijmen J Hommes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/- and wild-type (Wt alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39, an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303 via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2.

  11. Invasive Candida Infections and the Harm From Antibacterial Drugs in Critically Ill Patients: Data From a Randomized, Controlled Trial to Determine the Role of Ciprofloxacin, Piperacillin-Tazobactam, Meropenem, and Cefuroxime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ulrik S; Hein, Lars; Lundgren, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Use of antibiotics in critically ill patients may increase the risk of invasive Candida infection. The objective of this study was to determine whether increased exposure to antibiotics is associated with increased prevalence of invasive Candida infection. DESIGN:: Substudy using data......, n = 604) or a "standard exposure" guided by current guidelines (n = 596). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Seventy-four patients met the endpoint, "invasive Candida infection," 40 in the high exposure arm and 34 in standard exposure arm (relative risk = 1.2; 95% CI, 0.7-1.8; p = 0.52). Among medical...... patients in the high exposure arm, the use of ciprofloxacin and piperacillin/tazobactam was 51% and 75% higher than in the standard exposure arm; no difference in antibiotic exposure was observed between the randomized arms in surgical patients. Among medical intensive care patients, invasive Candida...

  12. Acute Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Mouse Induces Infertility or Placental Parasite Invasion and Ischemic Necrosis Associated with Massive Fetal Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mjihdi, Abdelkarim; Lambot, Marie-Alexandra; Stewart, Ian J.; Detournay, Olivier; Noël, Jean-Christophe; Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine

    2002-01-01

    Pathogens may impair reproduction in association or not with congenital infections. We have investigated the effect of acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan agent of Chagas’ disease in Latin America, on reproduction of mice. Although mating of infected mice occurred at a normal rate, 80% of them did not become gravid. In the few gravid infected mice, implantation numbers were as in uninfected control mice, but 28% of fetuses resorbed. Such infertility and early fetal losses we...

  13. A non-fatal case of invasive zygomycete (Lichtheimia corymbifera) infection in an allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eickhardt, Steffen; Braendstrup, Peter; Clasen-Linde, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant infections in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients often have severe consequences. This is especially the case when dealing with zygomycete infections where the result is often fatal. A major problem when dealing with zygomycete infections is the need...... for an accurate and fast diagnosis as the phylum is highly resistant towards the conventional antifungals. We herein describe a non-fatal case of Lichtheimia corymbifera infection in an allo-HCT recipient....

  14. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (pmastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of mammary tissue damage, with or without use of antimicrobials and/or anti-inflammatory compounds for the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  15. Burden of vaccine-preventable pneumococcal disease in hospitalized adults: A Canadian Immunization Research Network (CIRN) Serious Outcomes Surveillance (SOS) network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Jason J; ElSherif, May; Ye, Lingyun; MacKinnon-Cameron, Donna; Li, Li; Ambrose, Ardith; Hatchette, Todd F; Lang, Amanda L; Gillis, Hayley; Martin, Irene; Andrew, Melissa K; Boivin, Guy; Bowie, William; Green, Karen; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark; McCarthy, Anne; McGeer, Allison; Moraca, Sanela; Semret, Makeda; Stiver, Grant; Trottier, Sylvie; Valiquette, Louis; Webster, Duncan; McNeil, Shelly A

    2017-06-22

    Pneumococcal community acquired pneumonia (CAP Spn ) and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although childhood immunization programs have reduced the overall burden of pneumococcal disease, there is insufficient data in Canada to inform immunization policy in immunocompetent adults. This study aimed to describe clinical outcomes of pneumococcal disease in hospitalized Canadian adults, and determine the proportion of cases caused by vaccine-preventable serotypes. Active surveillance for CAP Spn and IPD in hospitalized adults was performed in hospitals across five Canadian provinces from December 2010 to 2013. CAP Spn were identified using sputum culture, blood culture, a commercial pan-pneumococcal urine antigen detection (UAD), or a serotype-specific UAD. The serotype distribution was characterized using Quellung reaction, and PCR-based serotyping on cultured isolates, or using a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) serotype-specific UAD assay. In total, 4769 all-cause CAP cases and 81 cases of IPD (non-CAP) were identified. Of the 4769 all-cause CAP cases, a laboratory test for S. pneumoniae was performed in 3851, identifying 14.3% as CAP Spn . Of CAP cases among whom all four diagnostic test were performed, S. pneumoniae was identified in 23.2% (144/621). CAP Spn cases increased with age and the disease burden of illness was evident in terms of requirement for mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission, and 30-day mortality. Of serotypeable CAP Spn or IPD results, predominance for serotypes 3, 7F, 19A, and 22F was observed. The proportion of hospitalized CAP cases caused by a PCV13-type S. pneumoniae ranged between 7.0% and 14.8% among cases with at least one test for S. pneumoniae performed or in whom all four diagnostic tests were performed, respectively. Overall, vaccine-preventable pneumococcal CAP and IPD were shown to be significant causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized

  16. Reactogenicity, safety and immunogenicity of a protein-based pneumococcal vaccine in Gambian children aged 2-4 years: A phase II randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutola, A; Ota, M O; Ogundare, E O; Antonio, M; Owiafe, P; Worwui, A; Greenwood, B; Alderson, M; Traskine, M; Verlant, V; Dobbelaere, K; Borys, D

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been successful in preventing invasive pneumococcal disease but effectiveness has been challenged by replacement of vaccine serotypes with non-vaccine serotypes. Vaccines targeting common pneumococcal protein(s) found in most/all pneumococci may overcome this limitation. This phase II study assessed safety and immunogenicity of a new protein-based pneumococcal vaccine containing polysaccharide conjugates of 10 pneumococcal serotypes combined with pneumolysin toxoid(dPly) and pneumococcal histidine triad protein D(PhtD) (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30) in African children. 120 Gambian children (2-4 years, not previously vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae) randomized (1:1) received a single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 or PCV13. Adverse events occurring over 4 d post-vaccination were reported, and blood samples obtained pre- and 1-month post-vaccination. Serious adverse events were reported for 6 months post-vaccination. Solicited local and systemic adverse events were reported at similar frequency in each group. One child (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 group) reported a grade 3 local reaction to vaccination. Haematological and biochemical parameters seemed similar pre- and 1-month post-vaccination in each group. High pre-vaccination Ply and PhtD antibody concentrations were observed in each group, but only increased in PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees one month post-vaccination. One month post-vaccination, for each vaccine serotype ≥96.2% of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees had serotype-specific polysaccharide antibody concentrations ≥0.20µg/mL except serotypes 6B (80.8%) and 23F (65.4%), and ≥94.1% had OPA titres of ≥8 except serotypes 1 (51.9%), 5 (38.5%) and 6B (78.0%), within ranges seen in PCV13-vaccinated children. A single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccine, administered to Gambian children aged 2-4 y not previously vaccinated with a pneumococcal vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic.

  17. Pneumococcal Serotypes Colonise the Nasopharynx in Children at Different Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Prevalence of pneumococcal serotypes in carriage and disease has been described but absolute serotype colonisation densities have not been reported. 515 paediatric nasal swab DNA extracts were subjected to lytA qPCR and molecular serotyping by microarray. Absolute serotype densities were derived from total pneumococcal density (qPCR cycle threshold and standard curve and relative abundance (microarray and varied widely. Compared to all serotype densities observed, the strongest evidence of differences was seen for serotypes 21 and 35B (higher and 3, 38 and non-typeables (lower (p<0.05 with a similar hierarchy when only a single serotype carriage was assessed. There was no evidence of any overall density differences between children with single or multiple serotypes detected but serotypes with mid-range densities were more prevalent. The hierarchy of distinct pneumococcal serotype carriage densities described here for the first time, may help explain the dynamics of transmission between children.

  18. Identifying wildlife reservoirs of neglected taeniid tapeworms: Non-invasive diagnosis of endemic Taenia serialis infection in a wild primate population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Crease, India; Griffin, Randi H; Gomery, Megan A; Dorny, Pierre; Noh, John C; Handali, Sukwan; Chastain, Holly M; Wilkins, Patricia P; Nunn, Charles L; Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Beehner, Jacinta C; Bergman, Thore J

    2017-07-01

    Despite the global distribution and public health consequences of Taenia tapeworms, the life cycles of taeniids infecting wildlife hosts remain largely undescribed. The larval stage of Taenia serialis commonly parasitizes rodents and lagomorphs, but has been reported in a wide range of hosts that includes geladas (Theropithecus gelada), primates endemic to Ethiopia. Geladas exhibit protuberant larval cysts indicative of advanced T. serialis infection that are associated with high mortality. However, non-protuberant larvae can develop in deep tissue or the abdominal cavity, leading to underestimates of prevalence based solely on observable cysts. We adapted a non-invasive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect circulating Taenia spp. antigen in dried gelada urine. Analysis revealed that this assay was highly accurate in detecting Taenia antigen, with 98.4% specificity, 98.5% sensitivity, and an area under the curve of 0.99. We used this assay to investigate the prevalence of T. serialis infection in a wild gelada population, finding that infection is substantially more widespread than the occurrence of visible T. serialis cysts (16.4% tested positive at least once, while only 6% of the same population exhibited cysts). We examined whether age or sex predicted T. serialis infection as indicated by external cysts and antigen presence. Contrary to the female-bias observed in many Taenia-host systems, we found no significant sex bias in either cyst presence or antigen presence. Age, on the other hand, predicted cyst presence (older individuals were more likely to show cysts) but not antigen presence. We interpret this finding to indicate that T. serialis may infect individuals early in life but only result in visible disease later in life. This is the first application of an antigen ELISA to the study of larval Taenia infection in wildlife, opening the doors to the identification and description of infection dynamics in reservoir

  19. Xylitol-supplemented nutrition enhances bacterial killing and prolongs survival of rats in experimental pneumococcal sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renko, Marjo; Valkonen, Päivi; Tapiainen, Terhi; Kontiokari, Tero; Mattila, Pauli; Knuuttila, Matti; Svanberg, Martti; Leinonen, Maija; Karttunen, Riitta; Uhari, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Background Xylitol has antiadhesive effects on Streptococcus pneumoniae and inhibits its growth, and has also been found to be effective in preventing acute otitis media and has been used in intensive care as a valuable source of energy. Results We evaluated the oxidative burst of neutrophils in rats fed with and without xylitol. The mean increase in the percentage of activated neutrophils from the baseline was higher in the xylitol-exposed group than in the control group (58.1% vs 51.4%, P = 0.03 for the difference) and the mean induced increase in the median strength of the burst per neutrophil was similarly higher in the xylitol group (159.6 vs 140.3, P = 0.04). In two pneumococcal sepsis experiments rats were fed either a basal powder diet (control group) or the same diet supplemented with 10% or 20% xylitol and infected with an intraperitoneal inoculation of S. pneumoniae after two weeks. The mean survival time was 48 hours in the xylitol groups and 34 hours in the control groups (P Xylitol has beneficial effects on both the oxidative killing of bacteria in neutrophilic leucocytes and on the survival of rats with experimental pneumococcal sepsis. PMID:18334022

  20. A minimally invasive approach to spleen histopathology in dogs: A new method for follow-up studies of spleen changes in the course of Leishmania infantum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Silvana Ornelas; Fontes, Jonathan L M; Laranjeira, Daniela F; Vassallo, José; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Dos-Santos, Washington L C

    2016-10-01

    Severe forms of zoonotic visceral leishmaniosis (ZVL) are associated with disruption of the spleen structure. However, the study of spleen histology requires splenectomy or necropsy. In this work, we present a minimally invasive cell-block technique for studying spleen tissue histology in dogs with ZVL. We examined 13 dogs with and seven dogs without Leishmania infantum infection. The dogs with Leishmania infection had a lower frequency of lymphoid follicles (2/13, Fisher's test, Pdogs (5/7 exhibiting lymphoid follicles and a plasma cell score of 1). The dogs with Leishmania infection also presented with granulomas (8/13) and infected macrophages (5/13). These differences in the histological presentations of spleen tissue from infected and uninfected dogs corresponded to changes observed in conventional histology. Hence, the cell-block technique described here may be used in the follow-up care and study of dogs with ZVL and other diseases in both clinical practice and research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonsurgical endodontic therapy along with minimal invasive treatment utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis for the management of infected radicular cystic lesion: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Salaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radicular cyst (RC is the most common odontogenic cyst of inflammatory origin affecting the jaws; involves the roots of the carious or traumatic non-vital tooth. Different therapeutic modalities, such as nonsurgical endodontic therapy or surgical enucleation with primary closure, decompression etc., were proposed for the management of such lesions. Presenting a case of a 28-year-old otherwise healthy male patient who reported with pain and swelling with respect to tooth #41, 31. Diagnosis of infected RC at a rare location was established on the basis of clinical, radiographical and fine needle aspiration cytological examination. Looking after the clinical characteristics, origin, extension, size of cystic lesion and patient cooperation; nonsurgical endodontic therapy utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis was opted. One year post-operative result suggested that nonsurgical endodontic therapy along with minimally invasive treatment utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis is an effective tool to transform infected radicular cystic lesion to healthy periapical periodontal tissue.

  2. A non-fatal case of invasive zygomycete (Lichtheimia corymbifera) infection in an allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhardt, Steffen; Braendstrup, Peter; Clasen-Linde, Erik; Jensen, Karl E; Alhede, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Vindeløv, Lars; Moser, Claus

    2013-05-01

    Post-transplant infections in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients often have severe consequences. This is especially the case when dealing with zygomycete infections where the result is often fatal. A major problem when dealing with zygomycete infections is the need for an accurate and fast diagnosis as the phylum is highly resistant towards the conventional antifungals. We herein describe a non-fatal case of Lichtheimia corymbifera infection in an allo-HCT recipient. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  3. Characterization of pneumococcal purpura-producing principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, C; Kreger, A

    1980-07-01

    hypothesis that activity is associated with pneumococcal peptidoglycan solubilized by the bacterium's autolysin.

  4. Towards Translational ImmunoPET/MR Imaging of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis: The Humanised Monoclonal Antibody JF5 Detects Aspergillus Lung Infections In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Genna; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Maurer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    and magnetic resonance imaging (immunoPET/MRI) using a [64Cu] DOTA-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb), mJF5, specific to Aspergillus. To enable translation of the tracer to the clinical setting, we report here the development of a humanised version of the antibody (hJF5), and pre-clinical imaging of lung...... of the fungus from invasive lung biopsy, considered the gold standard for IPA detection, is slow and often not possible in critically ill patients. In a previous study, we reported the development of a novel non-invasive procedure for IPA diagnosis based on antibody-guided positron emission tomography...... infection using a [64Cu] NODAGA-hJF5 tracer. The humanised antibody tracer shows a significant increase in in vivo biodistribution in A. fumigatus infected lungs compared to its radiolabeled murine counterpart [64Cu] NODAGA-mJF5. Using reverse genetics of the pathogen, we show that the antibody binds...

  5. Determinants of wound infections for breast procedures: assessment of the risk of wound infection posed by an invasive procedure for subsequent operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, M; Biswas, J; Gupta, S; Alam, N

    2009-12-01

    Wound infection remains a major source of postoperative morbidity leading to prolonged hospital stays and increased total cost, including indirect expenses related to the wound infection. We examined whether there is any higher risk of wound infection in patients undergo a reoperation after an initial operation or excision/incision biopsy. A retrospective review of medical charts of patients with breast operations between January 1990 and July 2008 was carried out. The overall incidence of wound infection was 18.2% (231/1267). The rate of wound infection was (32%) when reoperation was done after previous modified radical mastectomy, 18.9% and 16.8% when the previous operations were lumpectomy/segmenectomy with axillary dissection and simple mastectomy without axillary dissection, respectively and (10.8%) when reoperation was performed after previous biopsy. Reoperation involving axillary dissection was associated with significantly higher rates of wound infection (pprocedure affects the risk of wound infection in subsequent operation in patients with breast cancer. Significantly higher risks of wound infection are seen in those patients who had undergone axillary dissection or modified radical mastectomy.

  6. Fusarium solani causing quasi-invasive infection of the foot in an immunocompetent middle-aged man from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan H Kudur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium solani is commonly found in soil, and it is associated with infections in immunocompromised individuals. Fusaroium solani causing infection in immunocompetent adult male is rare and usually overlooked. We report a case of mycetoma caused by Fusariom solani in an immunocompetent adult male from South India.

  7. Host and microbe characteristics of pneumococcal colonization in elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krone, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis was to investigate various aspects of pneumococcal – host –commensal interactions in the respiratory tract of the elderly. Furthermore, we aimed to address the paucity of information regarding the underlying mechanisms of disease in this high risk group. Since Streptococcus

  8. Patient outcome in adults with pneumococcal meningitis or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among these, 158 of 167 consenting to testing (95%) were HIV positive. Inpatient mortality was 65% for pneumococcal meningitis (n=64), 20% for pneumococcaemic pneumonia (n=92) and 26% for patients with pneumococcaemia without localising signs (n=43). Lowered conscious level (OR 5.8, p<0.001), hypotension(OR ...

  9. Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-06-06

    Dr. George Nelson, a CDC medical officer, discusses the relationship between pneumococcal pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1.  Created: 6/6/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/6/2012.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of infant pneumococcal vaccination in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vemer, P.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The Dutch National Immunization Program offers the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10). Also licensed for use in the infant population is the 13-valent PCV (PCV13). To update cost-effectiveness (CE) estimates of PCV13 over PCV10, using current epidemiological and economic

  11. Helper T cell epitope-mapping reveals MHC-peptide binding affinities that correlate with T helper cell responses to pneumococcal surface protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Singh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the requirements for protection against pneumococcal carriage and pneumonia will greatly benefit efforts in controlling these diseases. Several proteins and polysaccharide capsule have recently been implicated in the virulence of and protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumonia. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is highly conserved among S. pneumonia strains, inhibits complement activation, binds lactoferrin, elicits protective systemic immunity against pneumococcal infection, and is necessary for full pneumococcal virulence. Identification of PspA peptides that optimally bind human leukocyte antigen (HLA would greatly contribute to global vaccine efforts, but this is hindered by the multitude of HLA polymorphisms. Here, we have used an experimental data set of 54 PspA peptides and in silico methods to predict peptide binding to HLA and murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II. We also characterized spleen- and cervical lymph node (CLN-derived helper T lymphocyte (HTL cytokine responses to these peptides after S. pneumonia strain EF3030-challenge in mice. Individual, yet overlapping peptides, 15 amino acids in length revealed residues 199 to 246 of PspA (PspA(199-246 consistently caused the greatest IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-5 and proliferation as well as moderate IL-10 and IL-4 responses by ex vivo stimulated splenic and CLN CD4(+ T cells isolated from S. pneumonia strain EF3030-challeged F(1 (B6xBALB/c mice. IEDB, RANKPEP, SVMHC, MHCPred, and SYFPEITHI in silico analysis tools revealed peptides in PspA(199-246 also interact with a broad range of HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP allelles. These data suggest that predicted MHC class II-peptide binding affinities do not always correlate with T helper (Th cytokine or proliferative responses to PspA peptides, but when used together with in vivo validation can be a useful tool to choose candidate pneumococcal HTL epitopes.

  12. Rationale and methods of a randomized controlled trial of immunogenicity, safety and impact on carriage of pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines in infants in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Deborah; Kirarock, Wendy; van den Biggelaar, Anita H J; Passey, Megan; Jacoby, Peter; Saleu, Gerard; Masiria, Geraldine; Nivio, Birunu; Greenhill, Andrew; Orami, Tilda; Francis, Jacinta; Ford, Rebecca; Kirkham, Lea-Ann; Solomon, Vela; Richmond, Peter C; Pomat, William S

    2017-01-01

    Children in third-world settings including Papua New Guinea (PNG) experience early onset of carriage with a broad range of pneumococcal serotypes, resulting in a high incidence of severe pneumococcal disease and deaths in the first 2 years of life. Vaccination trials in high endemicity settings are needed to provide evidence and guidance on optimal strategies to protect children in these settings against pneumococcal infections. This report describes the rationale, objectives, methods, study population, follow-up and specimen collection for a vaccination trial conducted in an endemic and logistically challenging setting in PNG. The trial aimed to determine whether currently available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) are suitable for use under PNG's accelerated immunization schedule, and that a schedule including pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) in later infancy is safe and immunogenic in this high-risk population. This open randomized-controlled trial was conducted between November 2011 and March 2016, enrolling 262 children aged 1 month between November 2011 and April 2014. The participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive 10-valent PCV (10vPCV) or 13-valent PCV (13vPCV) in a 1-2-3-month schedule, with further randomization to receive PPV or no PPV at age 9 months, followed by a 1/5 th PPV challenge at age 23 months. A total of 1229 blood samples were collected to measure humoral and cellular immune responses and 1238 nasopharyngeal swabs to assess upper respiratory tract colonization and carriage load. Serious adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Of the 262 children enrolled, 87% received 3 doses of PCV, 79% were randomized to receive PPV or no PPV at age 9 months, and 67% completed the study at 24 months of age with appropriate immunization and challenge. Laboratory testing of the many samples collected during this trial will determine the impact of the different vaccine schedules and formulations on nasopharyngeal

  13. Cost-effectiveness of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Neisha; Chen, Cynthia; Yoong, Joanne; Luvsan, Munkh-Erdene; Fox, Kimberley; Sarankhuu, Amarzaya; La Vincente, Sophie; Jit, Mark

    2017-02-15

    The Ministry of Health (MOH), Mongolia, is considering introducing 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in its national immunization programme to prevent the burden of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of introducing PCV13 compared to no PCV vaccination in Mongolia. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of introducing PCV13 compared to no PCV vaccination was assessed using an age-stratified static multiple cohort model. The risk of various clinical presentations of pneumococcal disease (meningitis, pneumonia, non-meningitis non-pneumonia invasive pneumococcal disease and acute otitis media) at all ages for thirty birth cohorts was assessed. The analysis considered both health system and societal perspectives. A 3+0 vaccine schedule and price of US$3.30 per dose was assumed for the baseline scenario based on Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance's advance market commitment tail price. The ICER of PCV13 introduction is estimated at US$52 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted (health system perspective), and cost-saving (societal perspective). Although indirect effects of PCV have been well-documented, a conservative scenario that does not consider indirect effects estimated PCV13 introduction to cost US$79 per DALY averted (health system perspective), and US$19 per DALY averted (societal perspective). Vaccination with PCV13 is expected to cost around US$920,000 in 2016, and thereafter US$820,000 every year. The programme is likely to reduce direct disease-related costs to MOH by US$440,000 in the first year, increasing to US$510,000 by 2025. Introducing PCV13 as part of Mongolia's national programme appears to be highly cost-effective when compared to no vaccination and cost-saving from a societal perspective at vaccine purchase prices offered through Gavi. Notwithstanding uncertainties around some parameters, cost-effectiveness of PCV introduction for Mongolia remains

  14. ROLE OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE IN THE STRUCTURE OF BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN THE CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED TO INPATIENT HOSPITALS IN MOSCOW IN 2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes in the RF are extremely limited. 3 pneumococcal conjugated vaccines are approved inRussia; however, neither has yet been employed in the framework of the national population immunization program. At the same time, it is the dataon the serotype range of pneumococcal infections that may be considered the prognostic efficacy criterion for the national vaccination programs.The objective of this research is identification of the circulating S. pneumoniae serotypes and spread of pneumococcal etiology infections in the structure of bacterial infections in the infants hospitalized to 5 inpatient hospital of Moscow in 2011–2012. The trial involved 864 patients in tote. Vast majority of patients (86% had acute purulent otitis media and sinusitis. Community-acquired pneumonia was diagnosed in 9% of patients, sepsis and bacteremia — in 3.6%; purulent meningitis — 1.2% of patients. It has been revealed that S. pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in the structure of nasopharyngeal carriage in the children under 5 years of age hospitalized with acute bacterial infections, and the primary bacterial causative agent of acute otitis media at this age. Nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage analysis revealed the prevalent serotypes — 19F, 14, 23F, 3, 6A and B; they were present in 3/4 of all cases; 19F was the most frequent (> 20%. Diversity of the S. pneumoniae serotypes detected in middle ear liquid was less significant — 17 serotypes (in comparison with 24 serotypes in nasopharynx. The 5 prevalent serotypes were 19F, 3, 14, 23F, 6B and 19A (> 75% in tote. Detection rate of serotypes 3 and 19A in middle ear liquid significantly exceeded the detection rate of these serotypes in case of nasopharyngeal carriage. The study of invasive infections revealed serotypes 14, 23F, 3 and 15C. These data may be used as a benchmark for future monitoring and evaluation of effect of PCV vaccines on epidemiology of

  15. Identification, variation and transcription of pneumococcal repeat sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Small interspersed repeats are commonly found in many bacterial chromosomes. Two families of repeats (BOX and RUP) have previously been identified in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a nasopharyngeal commensal and respiratory pathogen of humans. However, little is known about the role they play in pneumococcal genetics. Results Analysis of the genome of S. pneumoniae ATCC 700669 revealed the presence of a third repeat family, which we have named SPRITE. All three repeats are present at a reduced density in the genome of the closely related species S. mitis. However, they are almost entirely absent from all other streptococci, although a set of elements related to the pneumococcal BOX repeat was identified in the zoonotic pathogen S. suis. In conjunction with information regarding their distribution within the pneumococcal chromosome, this suggests that it is unlikely that these repeats are specialised sequences performing a particular role for the host, but rather that they constitute parasitic elements. However, comparing insertion sites between pneumococcal sequences indicates that they appear to transpose at a much lower rate than IS elements. Some large BOX elements in S. pneumoniae were found to encode open reading frames on both strands of the genome, whilst another was found to form a composite RNA structure with two T box riboswitches. In multiple cases, such BOX elements were demonstrated as being expressed using directional RNA-seq and RT-PCR. Conclusions BOX, RUP and SPRITE repeats appear to have proliferated extensively throughout the pneumococcal chromosome during the species' past, but novel insertions are currently occurring at a relatively slow rate. Through their extensive secondary structures, they seem likely to affect the expression of genes with which they are co-transcribed. Software for annotation of these repeats is freely available from ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/pathogens/strep_repeats/. PMID:21333003

  16. Pharmacists as providers: targeting pneumococcal vaccinations to high risk populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitel, Michael; Cohen, Ed; Duncan, Ian; Pegus, Cheryl

    2011-10-19

    Older adults and persons with chronic conditions are at increased risk for pneumococcal disease. Severe pneumococcal disease represents a substantial humanistic and economic burden to society. Although pneumococcal vaccination (PPSV) can decrease risk for serious consequences, vaccination rates are suboptimal. As more people seek annual influenza vaccinations at community pharmacies, pharmacists have the ability to identify at-risk patients and provide PPSV. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of pharmacists educating at-risk patients on the importance of receiving a pneumococcal vaccination. Using de-identified claims from a large, national pharmacy chain, all patients who had received an influenza vaccination between August 1, 2010 and November 14, 2010 and who were eligible for PPSV were identified for the analysis. Based on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations, at-risk patients were identified as over 65 years of age or as aged 2-64 with a comorbid conditions. A benchmark medical and pharmacy claims database of commercial and Medicare health plan members was used to derive a PPSV vaccination rate typical of traditional care delivery to compare to pharmacy-based vaccination. Period incidence of PPSV was calculated and compared. Among the 1.3 million at-risk patients who were vaccinated by a pharmacist during the study period, 65,598 (4.88%) also received a pneumococcal vaccine. This vaccination rate was significantly higher than the benchmark rate of 2.90% (34,917/1,204,104; pvaccination rate (6.60%; 26,430/400,454) of any age group. Pharmacists were successful at identifying at-risk patients and providing additional immunization services. Concurrent immunization of PPSV with influenza vaccination by pharmacists has potential to improve PPSV coverage. These results support the expanding role of community pharmacists in the provision of wellness and prevention services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. An audit of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in rheumatology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowden, Evin; Mitchell, William S

    2007-07-04

    Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for a number of clinical risk groups including patients treated with major immunosuppressant disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such immunisation is not only safe but immunogenic in patients with rheumatic diseases. We sought to establish dual vaccination rates and significant influencing factors amongst our hospital rheumatology outpatients. We audited a sample of 101 patients attending hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics on any form of disease modifying treatment by clinical questionnaire and medical record perusal. Further data were collected from the local immunisation coordinating agency and analysed by logistic regression modelling. Although there was a high rate of awareness with regard to immunisation, fewer patients on major immunosuppressants were vaccinated than patients with additional clinical risk factors against influenza (53% vs 93%, p risk factors was confirmed as significant in determining vaccination status by logistic regression for both influenza (OR 10.89, p < 0.001) and streptococcus pneumoniae (OR 4.55, p = 0.002). The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis was also found to be a significant factor for pneumococcal vaccination (OR 5.1, p = 0.002). There was a negative trend suggesting that patients on major immunosuppressants are less likely to be immunised against pneumococcal antigen (OR 0.35, p = 0.067). Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation is suboptimal amongst patients on current immunosuppressant treatments attending rheumatology outpatient clinics. Raising awareness amongst patients may not be sufficient to improve vaccination rates and alternative strategies such as obligatory pneumococcal vaccination prior to treatment initiation and primary care provider education need to be explored.

  18. Multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of invasive fungal infections in adult patients. Prophylaxis, empirical, preemptive or targeted therapy, which is the best in the different hosts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Zaragoza

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Rafael Zaragoza1, Javier Pemán2, Miguel Salavert3, Ángel Viudes2, Amparo Solé4, Isidro Jarque5, Emilio Monte6, Eva Romá6, Emilia Cantón71Servicio de Medicina Intensiva, Hospital Universitario Dr Peset, Valencia, Spain; 2Servicio de Microbiología; 3Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas; 4Unidad de Trasplante Pulmonar; 5Servicio de Hematología; 6Servicio de Farmacia; 7Unidad de Microbiología Experimental, Centro de Investigación, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia, SpainAbstract: The high morbidity, mortality, and health care costs associated with invasive fungal infections, especially in the critical care setting and immunocompromised host, have made it an excellent target for prophylactic, empiric, and preemptive therapy interventions principally based on early identification of risk factors. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. In the last years there have been important developments in antifungal pharmacotherapy. An approach to the new diagnosis tools in the clinical mycology laboratory and an analysis of the use new antifungal agents and its application in different clinical situations has been made. Furthermore, an attempt of developing a state of the art in each clinical scenario (critically ill, hematological, and solid organ transplant patients has been performed, trying to choose the best strategy for each clinical situation (prophylaxis, pre-emptive, empirical, or targeted therapy. The high mortality rates in these settings make mandatory the application of early de-escalation therapy in critically ill patients with fungal infection. In addition, the possibility of antifungal combination therapy might be considered in solid organ transplant and hematological patients.Keywords: invasive fungal infections, prophylaxis, empirical therapy, preemptive treatment, targeted therapy

  19. Pneumococcal meningitis: epidemiological profile pre‐ and post‐introduction of the pneumococcal 10‐valent conjugate vaccine

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    Tatiane E. Hirose

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Even after a short time of use, the 10‐valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has already had a significant impact in reducing the incidence and mortality of meningitis cases among infants, as well as the reduction of cases whose serotypes are included in the vaccine.

  20. Economic aspects of hospital treated pneumococcal pneumonia and the results of Pneumo 23 vaccine use in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION In Serbia, there is a significant number of persons suffering of pneumococcal pneumonia. Persons aged 65 years or older, immunocompromised patients, patients with co-morbidities, such as chronic obstructive lung disease and congestive heart failure, are at the highest risk for developing pneumococcal pneumonia. Most of the patients are treated empirically, although it is often overlooked that Streptococcus pneumoniae can be resistant to the used antibiotics. The treatment costs of such inpatients and outpatients are very high. In Serbia, immunization of persons at risk to develop the diseases caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is carried out using pneumococcus polysaccharide vaccine according to clinical indications. The exact number of immunized persons and the total number of registered patients are still unknown, but it is certain of being unjustifiably low. OBJECTIVE The goal of the study was to investigate, during a one-year period, the number and basic characteristics of persons hospitably treated for pneumonia, the type of cause of the infection, applied antibiotic medications, duration and costs of hospital treatment at the Institute for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis of the Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade. METHOD We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with pneumonia treated at the Institute for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis of the Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade during 2006. RESULTS During the observed one-year period, 290 patients underwent hospital treatment, of whom the cause of the infection was confirmed in 116 (40%. The average duration of hospitalization was 12 days, with treatment cost of 32,031.74 RSD (402.42 EUR per patient. The treatment cost per patient including general and intensive care was 18,290.01 RSD (229.78 EUR. The distribution cost of Pneumo 23 vaccine in Serbia, without purchase tax, was 746.90 RSD (9.38 EUR. CONCLUSION Pneumococcal pneumonia is a significant medical

  1. Acute suppurative parotitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in an HIV-infected man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman Vinasco, Luis; Bares, Sara; Sandkovsky, Uriel

    2015-03-02

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man who presented with progressive unilateral parotid gland enlargement and subsequently tested positive for HIV. A CT scan of the neck performed with contrast showed a phlegmon in the region of the right parotid tail measuring approximately 2.5×2.4 cm. Cultures of the aspirated fluid grew Streptococcus pneumoniae and the S. pneumoniae urinary antigen test was also positive. The patient underwent surgical debridement and received antimicrobial therapy with complete resolution of the parotitis. Parotitis caused by S. pneumoniae is rare, and HIV infection should be suspected in any case of invasive pneumococcal disease. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

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    Linda Weyler

    Full Text Available The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  3. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  4. Development and validation of a risk model for identification of non-neutropenic, critically ill adult patients at high risk of invasive Candida infection: the Fungal Infection Risk Evaluation (FIRE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D; Muskett, H; Harvey, S; Grieve, R; Shahin, J; Patel, K; Sadique, Z; Allen, E; Dybowski, R; Jit, M; Edgeworth, J; Kibbler, C; Barnes, R; Soni, N; Rowan, K

    2013-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that invasive fungal disease (IFD) is more likely to occur in non-neutropenic patients in critical care units. A number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have evaluated antifungal prophylaxis in non-neutropenic, critically ill patients, demonstrating a reduction in the risk of proven IFD and suggesting a reduction in mortality. It is necessary to establish a method to identify and target antifungal prophylaxis at those patients at highest risk of IFD, who stand to benefit most from any antifungal prophylaxis strategy. To develop and validate risk models to identify non-neutropenic, critically ill adult patients at high risk of invasive Candida infection, who would benefit from antifungal prophylaxis, and to assess the cost-effectiveness of targeting antifungal prophylaxis to high-risk patients based on these models. Systematic review, prospective data collection, statistical modelling, economic decision modelling and value of information analysis. Ninety-six UK adult general critical care units. Consecutive admissions to participating critical care units. None. Invasive fungal disease, defined as a blood culture or sample from a normally sterile site showing yeast/mould cells in a microbiological or histopathological report. For statistical and economic modelling, the primary outcome was invasive Candida infection, defined as IFD-positive for Candida species. Systematic review: Thirteen articles exploring risk factors, risk models or clinical decision rules for IFD in critically ill adult patients were identified. Risk factors reported to be significantly associated with IFD were included in the final data set for the prospective data collection. Data were collected on 60,778 admissions between July 2009 and March 2011. Overall, 383 patients (0.6%) were admitted with or developed IFD. The majority of IFD patients (94%) were positive for Candida species. The most common site of infection was blood (55%). The incidence of IFD

  5. A Perfect Storm: Increased Colonization and Failure of Vaccination Leads to Severe Secondary Bacterial Infection in Influenza Virus-Infected Obese Mice

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    Erik A. Karlsson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a risk factor for developing severe disease following influenza virus infection; however, the comorbidity of obesity and secondary bacterial infection, a serious complication of influenza virus infections, is unknown. To fill this gap in knowledge, lean and obese C57BL/6 mice were infected with a nonlethal dose of influenza virus followed by a nonlethal dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Strikingly, not only did significantly enhanced death occur in obese coinfected mice compared to lean controls, but also high mortality was seen irrespective of influenza virus strain, bacterial strain, or timing of coinfection. This result was unexpected, given that most influenza virus strains, especially seasonal human A and B viruses, are nonlethal in this model. Both viral and bacterial titers were increased in the upper respiratory tract and lungs of obese animals as early as days 1 and 2 post-bacterial infection, leading to a significant decrease in lung function. This increased bacterial load correlated with extensive cellular damage and upregulation of platelet-activating factor receptor, a host receptor central to pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, while vaccination of obese mice against either influenza virus or pneumococcus failed to confer protection, antibiotic treatment was able to resolve secondary bacterial infection-associated mortality. Overall, secondary bacterial pneumonia could be a widespread, unaddressed public health problem in an increasingly obese population.

  6. [Invasive infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b after the institution of the conjugated vaccine on the expanded programm on immunization in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces R, Pablo; Donoso F, Alejandro; Camacho A, Jorge; Llorente H, Marcela

    2006-03-01

    After almost a decade since the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines in Chile (in a 2-4-6 month schedule), Hib invasive infections have dramatically decreased, albeit they remain to occasionally produce disease in pediatric patients. We report our experience with children whom developed Hib invasive disease in children since 2000 to 2004. Medical records of children with Hib were reviewed in order to describe the epidemiology, main clinical and laboratory findings, management and complications. Twenty three patients (17 male), between 1 and 71 months (median 30 months) were identified: pneumonia (7), meningitis (4), pleuropneumonia (2), empyema (2), sepsis (2), cellulitis (2), meningitis and pleuropneumonia (1), purpura fulminans (1), miositis (1) and epiglottitis (1). No deaths were observed and four patients presented severe sequelae at hospital discharge. Twenty patients were considered vaccine failures. Hib remains as a sporadic cause of severe disease in Chile and thus for physicians should still keep it in mind. Case analysis and active surveillance are necessary to monitor the current immunization regimen.

  7. COMPARISON OF THREE DISTINCT PROPHYLACTIC AGENTS AGAINST INVASIVE FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING HAPLO-IDENTICAL HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION AND POST-TRANSPLANT CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Elcheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, invasive fungal infections (IFI have remained an important problem in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT. The optimal approach for prophylactic antifungal therapy has yet to be determined. We conducted a retrospective, bi-institutional comparative clinical study, and compared the efficacy and safety of micafungin 50mg/day (iv with those of fluconazole (400mg/day or itraconazole 200mg/day (iv as prophylaxis for adult patients with various haematological diseases receiving haplo-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation (haplo. Overall, 99 patients were identified; 30 patients received micafungin, and 69 patients received fluconazole or itraconazole. After a median follow-up of 13 months (range: 5-23, Proven or probable IFIs were reported in 3 patients (10% in the micafungin group and 8 patients (12% in the fluconazole or itraconazole group. Fewer patients in the micafungin group had invasive aspergillosis (1 [3%] vs. 5 [7%], P=0.6. A total of 4 (13% patients in the micafungin group and 23 (33% patients in the fluconazole or itraconazole group received empirical antifungal therapy (P = 0.14. No serious adverse events related to treatment were reported by patients and there was no treatment discontinuation because of drug-related adverse events in both groups. Despite the retrospective design of the study and limited sample, it contributes reassuring data to confirm results from randomised clinical trials, and to define a place for micafungin in prophylaxis after haplo.

  8. Modulation of the inflammation-coagulation interaction during pneumococcal pneumonia by immunobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505: role of Toll-like receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelaya, Hortensia; Villena, Julio; Lopez, Andres Gramajo; Alvarez, Susana; Agüero, Graciela

    2014-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of nasally given Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 on the immunocoagulative response during pneumococcal infection in immunocompetent mice. In addition, we aimed to gain insight into the mechanism involved in the immunomodulatory effect of the L. rhamnosus CRL1505 strain by evaluating the role of TLR2. Results showed that nasally given L. rhamnosus CRL1505 effectively regulates inflammation and hemostatic alterations during the pneumococcal infection. Immunobiotic treatment significantly reduced permeability of the bronchoalveolar-capillary barrier, and general cytotoxicity, decreasing lung tissue damage. The CRL1505 strain improved the production of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10 after pneumococcal challenge. In addition, increased TM and TF expressions were found in lungs of L. rhamnosus CRL1505-treated mice. Moreover, we demonstrated, for the first time, that the TLR2 signaling pathway has a role in the induction of IFN-γ and IL-10 and in the reduction of TF. The results also allow us to speculate that a PRR, other than TLR2, may mediate the immunobiotic activity of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 and could explain changes in TNF-α and TM. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen test: a reliable non-invasive test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, O. J.; Bosman, D. K.; van't Hoff, B. W.; Taminiau, J. A.; ten Kate, F. J.; van der Ende, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen (HpSA) test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective cohort study in an academic medical centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 106 consecutive children who underwent gastroscopy were

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of neonatal pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Papua New Guinean children: a randomised controlled trial.

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    William S Pomat

    Full Text Available Approximately 826,000 children, mostly young infants, die annually from invasive pneumococcal disease. A 6-10-14-week schedule of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV is efficacious but neonatal PCV may provide earlier protection and better coverage. We conducted an open randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea to compare safety, immunogenicity and priming for memory of 7-valent PCV (PCV7 given in a 0-1-2-month (neonatal schedule with that of the routine 1-2-3-month (infant schedule.We randomized 318 infants at birth to receive PCV7 in the neonatal or infant schedule or no PCV7. All infants received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV at age 9 months. Serotype-specific serum IgG for PCV7 (VT serotypes and non-VT serotypes 2, 5 and 7F were measured at birth and 2, 3, 4, 9, 10 and 18 months of age. Primary outcomes were geometric mean concentrations (GMCs and proportions with concentration ≥ 0.35 µg/ml of VT serotype-specific pneumococcal IgG at age 2 months and one month post-PPV.We enrolled 101, 105 and 106 infants, respectively, into neonatal, infant and control groups. Despite high background levels of maternally derived antibody, both PCV7 groups had higher GMCs than controls at age 2 months for serotypes 4 (p<0.001 and 9V (p<0.05 and at age 3 months for all VTs except 6B. GMCs for serotypes 4, 9V, 18C and 19F were significantly higher (p<0.001 at age 2 months in the neonatal (one month post-dose2 PCV7 than in the infant group (one month post-dose1 PCV7. PPV induced significantly higher VT antibody responses in PCV7-primed than unprimed infants, with neonatal and infant groups equivalent. High VT and non-VT antibody concentrations generally persisted to age 18 months.PCV7 is well-tolerated and immunogenic in PNG neonates and young infants and induces immunologic memory to PPV booster at age 9 months with antibody levels maintained to age 18 months.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00219401.

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae PspC Subgroup Prevalence in Invasive Disease and Differences in Contribution to Complement Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maten, Erika; van den Broek, Bryan; de Jonge, Marien I; Rensen, Kim J W; Eleveld, Marc J; Zomer, Aldert L; Cremers, Amelieke J H; Ferwerda, Gerben; de Groot, Ronald; Langereis, Jeroen D; van der Flier, Michiel

    2018-04-01

    The pneumococcal capsular serotype is an important determinant of complement resistance and invasive disease potential, but other virulence factors have also been found to contribute. Pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC), a highly variable virulence protein that binds complement factor H to evade C3 opsonization, is divided into two subgroups: choline-bound subgroup I and LPxTG-anchored subgroup II. The prevalence of different PspC subgroups in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and functional differences in complement evasion are unknown. The prevalence of PspC subgroups in IPD isolates was determined in a collection of 349 sequenced strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from adult patients. pspC deletion mutants and isogenic pspC switch mutants were constructed to study differences in factor H binding and complement evasion in relation to capsule thickness. Subgroup I pspC was far more prevalent in IPD isolates than subgroup II pspC The presence of capsule was associated with a greater ability of bound factor H to reduce complement opsonization. Pneumococcal subgroup I PspC bound significantly more factor H and showed more effective complement evasion than subgroup II PspC in isogenic encapsulated pneumococci. We conclude that variation in the PspC subgroups, independent of capsule serotypes, affects pneumococcal factor H binding and its ability to evade complement deposition. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Prevalence of Invasive Infections Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae among Adult Patients in U.S. Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodise, Thomas; Ye, Michael J; Zhao, Qi

    2017-08-01

    This large-scale retrospective analysis ( n = 60,551) of the Premier inpatient database (1 January 2011 to 31 December 2014) found an overall prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains of 2.3% (range, 0.9% to 5.8% by geographic region) among patients with infections due to Enterobacteriaceae Ongoing monitoring and development of decision support tools/algorithms are needed for identification of high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Targeted treatment of invasive fungal infections accelerates healing of foot wounds in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, G; Neethu, K; Varma, A K; Mangalanandan, T S; Shashikala, S; Dinesh, K R; Sundaram, K R; Varma, N; Jayakumar, R V; Bal, A; Kumar, H

    2012-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that fluconazole plus standard care is superior to the standard care for diabetic foot wounds infected with deep-seated fungal infections. We carried out a randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel-arm study in 75 patients with both fungal and bacterial infections in deep tissues of diabetic foot wounds. Thirty-seven patients (control group) were given standard care (surgical debridement + culture-specific antibiotics + offloading + glycaemic control) and 38 patients (treatment group) were given fluconazole 150 mg daily plus standard care. Wound surface area was measured every 2 weeks until the endpoints (complete epithelialization or skin grafting) were met. By week 4, the mean wound surface area reduced to 27.3 from 111.5 cm(2) in the treatment group, as opposed to 67.1 from 87.3 cm(2) in the control group. Subsequently, the mean wound surface areas were remarkably smaller in the treatment group compared with the control group, and statistically significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in mean wound surface area were observed between the treatment group and the control group at week 6. However, no statistically significant (P ≤ 0.47) difference in complete healing was observed between the treatment group and the control group, 20 vs. 24. The mean wound healing time for the treatment group was 7.3 weeks, whereas for the control group it was 11.3 weeks (P ≤ 0.022). Similarly, the probability of wound healing in the treatment group was 50 vs. 20% in the control group at week 10. Fluconazole plus standard care was superior to standard care alone in accelerating wound reduction among patients with diabetes with deep-seated fungal infections in diabetic foot wounds. Those in the treatment group who did heal, healed more quickly (P ≤ 0.022), but overall healing was not different. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  14. An audit of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in rheumatology outpatients

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    Mitchell William S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for a number of clinical risk groups including patients treated with major immunosuppressant disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such immunisation is not only safe but immunogenic in patients with rheumatic diseases. We sought to establish dual vaccination rates and significant influencing factors amongst our hospital rheumatology outpatients. Method We audited a sample of 101 patients attending hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics on any form of disease modifying treatment by clinical questionnaire and medical record perusal. Further data were collected from the local immunisation coordinating agency and analysed by logistic regression modelling. Results Although there was a high rate of awareness with regard to immunisation, fewer patients on major immunosuppressants were vaccinated than patients with additional clinical risk factors against influenza (53% vs 93%, p Conclusion Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation is suboptimal amongst patients on current immunosuppressant treatments attending rheumatology outpatient clinics. Raising awareness amongst patients may not be sufficient to improve vaccination rates and alternative strategies such as obligatory pneumococcal vaccination prior to treatment initiation and primary care provider education need to be explored.

  15. Advance market commitment for pneumococcal vaccines: putting theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernuschi, Tania; Furrer, Eliane; Schwalbe, Nina; Jones, Andrew; Berndt, Ernst R; McAdams, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Markets for life-saving vaccines do not often generate the most desired outcomes from a public health perspective in terms of product quantity, quality, affordability, programmatic suitability and/or sustainability for use in the lowest income countries. The perceived risks and uncertainties about sustainably funded demand from developing countries often leads to underinvestment in development and manufacturing of appropriate products. The pilot initiative Advance Market Commitment (AMC) for pneumococcal vaccines, launched in 2009, aims to remove some of these market risks by providing a legally binding forward commitment to purchase vaccines according to predetermined terms. To date, 14 countries have already introduced pneumococcal vaccines through the AMC with a further 39 countries expected to introduce before the end of 2013.This paper describes early lessons learnt on the selection of a target disease and the core design choices for the pilot AMC. It highlights the challenges faced with tailoring the AMC design to the specific supply situation of pneumococcal vaccines. It points to the difficulty - and the AMC's apparent early success - in establishing a long-term, credible commitment in a constantly changing unpredictable environment. It highlights one of the inherent challenges of the AMC: its dependence on continuous donor funding to ensure long-term purchases of products. The paper examines alternative design choices and aims to provide a starting point to inform discussions and encourage debate about the potential application of the AMC concept to other fields.

  16. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

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    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  17. From individual to herd protection with pneumococcal vaccines: the contribution of the Cuban pneumococcal conjugate vaccine implementation strategy

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    Nivaldo Linares-Pérez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is currently undergoing advanced clinical evaluation prior to its planned introduction in Cuba. The implementation of the pneumococcal vaccination strategy has been designed with consideration of the need to maximize both its direct and indirect effects. A novel approach is suggested, which addresses preschool children as the first-line target group to generate herd immunity in infants and to have an impact on transmission at the community level. The clinical evaluation pipeline is described herein, including evaluations of effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and impact. The scientific contribution of the Cuban strategy could support a paradigm shift from individual protection to a population effect based on a rigorous body of scientific evidence.

  18. Gut Microbiota Contributes to Resistance Against Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Immunodeficient Rag-/- Mice.

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    Felix, Krysta M; Jaimez, Ivan A; Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V; Ma, Heqing; Raslan, Walid A; Klinger, Christina N; Doyle, Kristian P; Wu, Hsin-Jung J

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes infection-related mortality worldwide. Immunocompromised individuals, including young children, the elderly, and those with immunodeficiency, are especially vulnerable, yet little is known regarding S. pneumoniae- related pathogenesis and protection in immunocompromised hosts. Recently, strong interest has emerged in the gut microbiota's impact on lung diseases, or the "gut-lung axis." However, the mechanisms of gut microbiota protection against gut-distal lung diseases like pneumonia remain unclear. We investigated the role of the gut commensal, segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB), against pneumococcal pneumonia in immunocompetent and immunocompromised mouse models. For the latter, we chose the Rag -/- model, with adaptive immune deficiency. Immunocompetent adaptive protection against S. pneumoniae infection is based on antibodies against pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides, prototypical T cell independent-II (TI-II) antigens. Although SFB colonization enhanced TI-II antibodies in C57BL/6 mice, our data suggest that SFB did not further protect these immunocompetent animals. Indeed, basal B cell activity in hosts without SFB is sufficient for essential protection against S. pneumoniae . However, in immunocompromised Rag -/- mice, we demonstrate a gut-lung axis of communication, as SFB influenced lung protection by regulating innate immunity. Neutrophil resolution is crucial to recovery, since an unchecked neutrophil response causes severe tissue damage. We found no early neutrophil recruitment differences between hosts with or without SFB; however, we observed a significant drop in lung neutrophils in the resolution phase of S. pneumoniae infection, which corresponded with lower CD47 expression, a molecule that inhibits phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, in SFB-colonized Rag -/- mice. SFB promoted a shift in lung neutrophil phenotype from inflammatory neutrophils expressing high levels of CD18 and low levels of CD62L, to pro

  19. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

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    Eric S Donkor

    Full Text Available Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa.Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing.Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs were identified, of which 38% (29 were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%, and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66 belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63.The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5 are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  20. Infection cycle of Artichoke Italian latent virus in tobacco plants: meristem invasion and recovery from disease symptoms.

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    Elisa Santovito

    Full Text Available Nepoviral infections induce recovery in fully expanded leaves but persist in shoot apical meristem (SAM by a largely unknown mechanism. The dynamics of infection of a grapevine isolate of Artichoke Italian latent virus (AILV-V, genus Nepovirus in tobacco plants, including colonization of SAM, symptom induction and subsequent recovery of mature leaves from symptoms, were characterized. AILV-V moved from the inoculated leaves systemically and invaded SAM in 7 days post-inoculation (dpi, remaining detectable in SAM at least up to 40 dpi. The new top leaves recovered from viral symptoms earliest at 21 dpi. Accumulation of viral RNA to a threshold level was required to trigger the overexpression of RDR6 and DCL4. Consequently, accumulation of viral RNA decreased in the systemically infected leaves, reaching the lowest concentration in the 3rd and 4th leaves at 23 dpi, which was concomitant with recovery of the younger, upper leaves from disease symptoms. No evidence of virus replication was found in the recovered leaves, but they contained infectious virus particles and were protected against re-inoculation with AILV-V. In this study we also showed that AILV-V did not suppress initiation or maintenance of RNA silencing in transgenic plants, but was able to interfere with the cell-to-cell movement of the RNA silencing signal. Our results suggest that AILV-V entrance in SAM and activation of RNA silencing may be distinct processes since the latter is triggered in fully expanded leaves by the accumulation of viral RNA above a threshold level rather than by virus entrance in SAM.

  1. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines for preventing otitis media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortanier, Alexandre C.; Venekamp, Roderick P.; Boonacker, Chantal W. B.; Hak, Eelko; Schilder, Anne G. M.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Damoiseaux, Roger A. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute otitis media (AOM) is a very common respiratory infection in early infancy and childhood. The marginal benefits of antibiotics for AOM in low-risk populations in general, the increasing problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the huge estimated direct and indirect annual

  2. Economic aspects of pneumococcal pneumonia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graeve, Diana; Beutels, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    In this review, the economic aspects of pneumococcal pneumonia are analysed, including the costs, cost effectiveness and cost benefit of treatment and prevention. We identified eight cost-of-illness studies, 15 analyses comparing the costs of different treatment options and 15 economic evaluations of prevention that met our search criteria. The studies were conducted largely in Europe and the US. Most pertained to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in general, without specific analysis of pneumococcus-related illness. Many of the studies were considered to be of poor quality for the following reasons: comparison without randomisation or control variables, disregard of health outcomes, small sample size, restriction of costs to drug costs and vague or disputable sources of cost information. In the US, hospitalisation costs resulting from CAP can be estimated to be between US 7,000 dollars and US 8,000 dollars per admission or US 4 million dollars per 100,000 population. Hospitalisation costs are significant (representing about 90% of total costs), but are much lower in Europe than in the US (one-third to one-ninth of the US estimates in the UK and Spain, respectively). In general, economic studies of treatment for pneumococcal pneumonia are in line with clinical evidence. A drug with proven clinical effectiveness would also appear to be supported from an economic stand point. Furthermore, economic data support an early switch from an intravenous to an oral antibacterial, the use of quinolones for inpatients with CAP, and also the use of guidelines built on clinical evidence. Of all the possible preventive strategies for pneumococcal pneumonia, only vaccination has been subjected to economic evaluation. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine seems relatively cost effective (and potentially cost saving) for those between 65 and 75 years of age, for military recruits and for HIV positive patients with a sufficiently high CD4 cell count. Evaluations of the pneumococcal

  3. Impact of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal meningitis in children up to two years of age in Brazil

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    Indianara Maria Grando

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae on the morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal meningitis in children ≤ 2 years in Brazil, from 2007 to 2012. This is a descriptive study and ecological analysis using data from the Information System on Notifiable Diseases. Pre-vaccination (2007-2009 and post-vaccination (2011-2012 periods were defined to compare incidence rates and mortality. A total of 1,311 cases and 430 deaths were reported during the study period. Incidence decreased from 3.70/100,000 in 2007 to 1.84/100,000 in 2012, and mortality decreased from 1.30/100,000 to 0.40/100,000, or 50% and 69% respectively, with the greatest impact in the 6-11 month age group. This decrease in Pneumococcal meningitis morbidity and mortality rates two years after introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine suggests its effectiveness.

  4. Evaluating the costs of pneumococcal disease in selected Latin American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constenla, Dagna

    2007-10-01

    To estimate the costs of pneumococcal disease in Brazil, Chile and Uruguay, to describe how these costs vary between different patient groups, and to discuss factors that affect these cost variations. The cost of pneumococcal disease was estimated from the health care perspective. For each country, baseline cost estimates were primarily developed using health resources information from patient-level data and facility-specific cost data. A regression model was constructed separately for four types of pneumococcal diseases. The skewness-kurtosis test and the Cook-Weisberg test were performed to test the normality of the residuals and the heteroscedasticity, respectively. The treatment of pneumococcal meningitis generated up to US$ 5 435 per child. The treatment costs of pneumococcal pneumonia were lower, ranging from US$ 372 per child to US$ 3 483 per child. Treatment of acute otitis media cost between US$ 20 per child and US$ 217 per child. The main source of treatment costs variations was level of service provided and country in which costs were incurred. However, the tendency of costs to change with these variables was not statistically significant at the 5% level for most pneumococcal disease models. Pneumococcal disease resulted in significant economic burden to selected health care systems in Latin America. The patterns of treatment cost of pneumococcal disease showed a great deal of variation.

  5. Antibody Responses to Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Taiwanese Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Chih-Cheng Lai

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Taiwanese elderly adults with COPD, even in advanced age, can mount a significant antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. This study may support the existing recommendation that pneumococcal vaccine be offered to persons ≥ 65 years old with COPD. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(3: 196-203

  6. Intersubspecific recombination in Xylella fastidiosa Strains native to the United States: infection of novel hosts associated with an unsuccessful invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Hopkins, Donald L; Morano, Lisa D; Russell, Stephanie E; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa infects xylem and causes disease in many plant species in the Americas. Different subspecies of this bacterium and different genotypes within subspecies infect different plant hosts, but the genetics of host adaptation are unknown. Here we examined the hypothesis that the introduction of novel genetic variation via intersubspecific homologous recombination (IHR) facilitates host shifts. We investigated IHR in 33 X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates previously identified as recombinant based on 8 loci (7 multilocus sequence typing [MLST] loci plus 1 locus). We found significant evidence of introgression from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa in 4 of the loci and, using published data, evidence of IHR in 6 of 9 additional loci. Our data showed that IHR regions in 2 of the 4 loci were inconsistent (12 mismatches) with X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa alleles found in the United States but consistent with alleles from Central America. The other two loci were consistent with alleles from both regions. We propose that the recombinant forms all originated via genomewide recombination of one X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex ancestor with one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa donor from Central America that was introduced into the United States but subsequently disappeared. Using all of the available data, 5 plant hosts of the recombinant types were identified, 3 of which also supported non-IHR X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex, but 2 were unique to recombinant types from blueberry (7 isolates from Georgia, 3 from Florida); and blackberry (1 each from Florida and North Carolina), strongly supporting the hypothesis that IHR facilitated a host shift to blueberry and possibly blackberry.

  7. Consensus recommendation for India and Bangladesh for the use of pneumococcal vaccine in mass gatherings with special reference to Hajj pilgrims

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    Dilip Mathai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are prevalent among Hajj pilgrims with pneumonia being a leading cause of hospitalization. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common pathogen isolated from patients with pneumonia and respiratory tract infections during Hajj. There is a significant burden of pneumococcal disease in India, which can be prevented. Guidelines for preventive measures and adult immunization have been published in India, but the implementation of the guidelines is low. Data from Bangladesh are available about significant mortality due to respiratory infections; however, literature regarding guidelines for adult immunization is limited. There is a need for extensive awareness programs across India and Bangladesh. Hence, there was a general consensus about the necessity for a rapid and urgent implementation of measures to prevent respiratory infections in pilgrims traveling to Hajj. About ten countries have developed recommendations for pneumococcal vaccination in Hajj pilgrims: France, the USA, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, the UAE (Dubai Health Authority, Singapore, Malaysia, Egypt, and Indonesia. At any given point whether it is Hajj or Umrah, more than a million people are present in the holy places of Mecca and Madina. Therefore, the preventive measures taken for Hajj apply for Umrah as well. This document puts forward the consensus recommendations by a group of twenty doctors following a closed-door discussion based on the scientific evidence available for India and Bangladesh regarding the prevention of respiratory tract infections in Hajj pilgrims.

  8. Monitoring of clinical strains and environmental fungal aerocontamination to prevent invasive aspergillosis infections in hospital during large deconstruction work: a protocol study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffert, Sophie Tiphaine; Melloul, Elise; Dananché, Cédric; Hénaff, Laetitia; Bénet, Thomas; Cassier, Pierre; Dupont, Damien; Guillot, Jacques; Botterel, Françoise; Wallon, Martine; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Vanhems, Philippe

    2017-11-25

    Monitoring fungal aerocontamination is an essential measure to prevent severe invasive aspergillosis (IA) infections in hospitals. One central block among 32 blocks of Edouard Herriot Hospital (EHH) was entirely demolished in 2015, while care activities continued in surrounding blocks. The main objective was to undertake broad environmental monitoring and clinical surveillance of IA cases to document fungal dispersion during major deconstruction work and to assess clinical risk. A daily environmental survey of fungal loads was conducted in eight wards located near the demolition site. Air was collected inside and outside selected wards by agar impact samplers. Daily spore concentrations were monitored continuously by volumetric samplers at a flow rate of 10 L.min -1 . Daily temperature, wind direction and speed as well as relative humidity were recorded by the French meteorological station Meteociel. Aspergillus fumigatus strains stored will be genotyped by multiple-locus, variable-number, tandem-repeat analysis. Antifungal susceptibility will be assessed by E-test strips on Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium supplemented with agar. Ascertaining the adequacy of current environmental monitoring techniques in hospital is of growing importance, considering the rising impact of fungal infections and of curative antifungal costs. The present study could improve the daily management of IA risk during major deconstruction work and generate new data to ameliorate and redefine current guidelines. This study was approved by the clinical research and ethics committees of EHH. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. [Histopathological Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Infections in Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues in Conjunction with Molecular Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Minoru; Tochigi, Naobumi; Sadamoto, Sota; Yamagata Murayama, Somay; Wakayama, Megumi; Nemoto, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between histopathology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and in situ hybridization (ISH) for the identification of causative fungi in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens. Since pathogenic fungi in tissue specimens can be difficult to identify morphologically, PCR and ISH have been usually employed as auxiliary procedures. However, little comparison has been made on the sensitivity and specificity of PCR and ISH using FFPE specimens. Therefore, to compare and clarify the reproducibility and usefulness of PCR and ISH as auxiliary procedures for histological identification, we performed histopathological review, PCR assays, and ISH to identify pathogenic fungi in 59 FFPE tissue specimens obtained from 49 autopsies. The following are the main findings for this retrospective review: i) even for cases classified as "mold not otherwise specified" (MNOS), two cases could be identified as Aspergillus species by molecular methods; ii) all cases classified as non-zygomycetes mold (NZM) were Aspergillus species and were not identified by molecular methods as other fungi; iii) all 3 cases classified as zygomycetes mold (ZM) could be identified by molecular methods as Mucorales; iv) except for 1 case identified by molecular methods as Trichosporon spp., 5 cases were originally identified as dimorphic yeast (DY). As a measure of nucleic acid integrity, PCR and ISH successfully detected human and fungal nucleic acids in approximately 60% of the specimens. Detection of Aspergillus DNA by nested PCR assay and by ISH against the A. fumigatus ALP gene were similarly sensitive and significant (pmolecular methods such as ISH and PCR on FFPE specimens with pathological diagnosis should improve diagnostic accuracy of fungal infection.

  10. Comparative RNA-seq analysis of early-infected peach leaves by the invasive phytopathogen Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni.

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    Didier Socquet-Juglard

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is a quarantine bacterial pathogen that threatens peach production by causing necrotic spots on leaves and fruits, thus with the potential of severely reducing yields. The current understanding of the host plant defense responses to the pathogen is very limited. Using whole transcriptome sequencing, differential gene expression was analyzed at two time points, 2 h and 12 h post inoculation (hpi, by comparing the inoculated samples to their respective controls. On the total of 19,781 known peach genes that were expressed in all time points and conditions, 34 and 263 were differentially expressed at 2 and 12 hpi, respectively. Of those, 82% and 40% were up-regulated, respectively; and 18% and 60% were down-regulated, respectively. The functional annotation based on gene ontology (GO analysis highlighted that genes involved in metabolic process and response to stress were particularly represented at 2 hpi whereas at 12 hpi cellular and metabolic processes were the categories with the highest number of genes differentially expressed. Of particular interest among the differentially expressed genes identified were several pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP receptors, disease resistance genes including several RPM1-like and pathogenesis related thaumatin encoding genes. Other genes involved in photosynthesis, in cell wall reorganization, in hormone signaling pathways or encoding cytochrome were also differentially expressed. In addition, novel transcripts were identified, providing another basis for further characterization of plant defense-related genes. Overall, this study gives a first insight of the peach defense mechanisms during the very early stages of infection with a bacterial disease in the case of a compatible interaction.

  11. Diagnostic value of (1, 3)-β-D-glucan assay and galactomannan test for invasive fungal infection in patients of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Jiang Hongmei; Wang Jijun; Liu Yan; Zhao Wei; Ning Yongzhong; Zhang Jie; Ke Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic values of (1, 3)-β-D-glucan (G) and galactomannan (GM) for invasive fungal infection (IFI) in patients of acute radiation sickness (ARS). Methods: Samples of periogeral blood, pharyngeal secretion, urine, and feces were collected from 316 patients with ARS and suspected to suffer from IFI, 192 males and 124 females, aged 60.50 (1-96), with the underlying diseases of blood or respiration systems. Platelia Aspergillus EIA kit was used to detect the plasma BG (G test), and ELISA was used to detect the serum GM (GM test). Fungal culture and bacterial culture were performed. Results: The positive rates of G test, GM test, and fungal culture were 36.33%, 35.84%, and 34.18% respectively, but the positive rate of fungal culture of blood sample was 1-316 only. Pearson correlation analysis showed that G test, GM test and fungal culture test were positively correlated with IFI clinical diagnosis respectively (χ 2 =0.564, 0.357, 0.727, P<0.05). Conclusions: Easy to operate, rapid, and highly sencitive, G test and GM test can be used as adjunctive methods for early IFI diagnosis in ARS patients. (authors)

  12. Lung MRI of invasive fungal infection at 3 Tesla: evaluation of five different pulse sequences and comparison with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)

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    Yan, Chenggong; Tan, Xiangliang; Li, Caixia; Wu, Yuankui; Hao, Peng; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Yikai [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wei, Qi; Feng, Ru; Xu, Jun [Southern Medical University, Department of Hematology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, New Territories (China)

    2014-09-18

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of five MR sequences to detect pulmonary infectious lesions in patients with invasive fungal infection (IFI), using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as the reference standard. Thirty-four immunocompromised patients with suspected IFI underwent MDCT and MRI. The MR studies were performed using five pulse sequences at 3.0 T: T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE), short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), spectrally selective attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR), T1-weighted high resolution isotropic volume excitation (e-THRIVE) and T1-weighted fast field echo (T1-FFE). The size, lesion-to-lung contrast ratio and the detectability of pulmonary lesions on MR images were assessed. Image quality and artefacts on different sequences were also rated. A total of 84 lesions including nodules (n = 44) and consolidation (n = 40) were present in 75 lobes. SPAIR and e-THRIVE images achieved high overall lesion-related sensitivities for the detection of pulmonary abnormalities (90.5 % and 86.9 %, respectively). STIR showed the highest lesion-to-lung contrast ratio for nodules (21.8) and consolidation (17.0), whereas TSE had the fewest physiological artefacts. MRI at 3.0 T can depict clinically significant pulmonary IFI abnormalities with high accuracy compared to MDCT. SPAIR and e-THRIVE are preferred sequences for the detection of infectious lesions of 5 mm and larger. (orig.)

  13. Use of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging for assessment of treatment response to invasive fungal infection in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Chenggong; Xiong, Wei; Wu, Yuankui; Li, Caixia; Xu, Yikai [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Jun; Wei, Qi; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa [Southern Medical University, Department of Hematology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, New Territories, Hon Kong (China)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) -derived parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) could act as imaging biomarkers for predicting antifungal treatment response. Forty-six consecutive patients (mean age, 33.9 ± 13.0 y) with newly diagnosed invasive fungal infection (IFI) in the lung according to EORTC/MSG criteria were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3.0 T using 11 b values (0-1000 sec/mm{sup 2}). ADC, pseudodiffusion coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and the diffusion coefficient D were compared between patients with favourable (n=32) and unfavourable response (n=14). f values were significantly lower in the unfavourable response group (12.6%±4.4%) than in the favourable response group (30.2%±8.6%) (Z=4.989, P<0.001). However, the ADC, D, and D* were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed f to be a significant predictor for differentiation, with a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 92.9%. IVIM-MRI is potentially useful in the prediction of antifungal treatment response to patients with IFI in the lung. Our results indicate that a low perfusion fraction f may be a noninvasive imaging biomarker for unfavourable response. (orig.)

  14. Safety and tolerability of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durando, Paolo; Rosselli, Roberto; Cremonesi, Ilaria; Orsi, Andrea; Albanese, Erika; Barberis, Ilaria; Paganino, Chiara; Trucchi, Cecilia; Martini, Mariano; Marensi, Lorenzo; Turello, Valter; Study Group, the Ligurian Pneumococcal; Bregante, Alessandro; Cacciani, Roberto; Iudici, Rocco; La Marca, Diego; Pedano, Leonardo; Petrucci, Amadio Franco; Santolini, Maria; Sbisà, Valentina; Zacconi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background In September 2011 the European Medical Agency authorized the use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in adults aged ≥50 years. The same occurred in the US in December 2011 when the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of PCV13 in the same target age-group with indication for the prevention of invasive pneumococcal diseases and community acquired pneumonia sustained by the serotypes contained in the vaccine. The Liguria Region, in Italy, implemented in 2013 an active and free of charge immunization strategy with PCV13 among adults affected by specific risk conditions and the elderly aged ≥70 years. Methods An observational study was performed in order to assess the safety and tolerability of PCV13 among elderly dwelling in the metropolitan area of Genoa, the capital city of Liguria Region. Eligible subjects, who received PCV13 following the public health immunization campaign at the Local Health Unit 3 of Genoa, provided a written informed consent to take part in the study. Eight-hundred-seventy-one subjects were enrolled between October 2013 and May 2014: all were monitored by qualified healthcare personnel for at least 30 min after vaccination at the outpatient clinics, in order to assess any possible sudden reaction. The occurrence of a series of local and systemic solicited reactions and of any unsolicited Adverse Events (AEs) was monitored using a self-administered clinical diary and by regular phone contacts up to 14 and 21 d following immunization, respectively. Moreover, a 6-months follow-up following vaccination was planned in order to monitor Severe Adverse Events (SAEs). Results No sudden reaction occurred in vaccinees at the outpatient clinics. Pain (27.4%) was the most frequent reaction reported by subjects at the injection site, while new muscle pain (13.6%), fatigue (10.7%), and headache (9.9%) resulted the most common systemic reactions. Rates of the main reactions reported in this on-field study resulted

  15. An evaluation of emerging vaccines for childhood pneumococcal pneumonia

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    Zhang Jian Shayne F

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is the leading cause of child mortality worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP or pneumococcus is estimated to cause 821,000 child deaths each year. It has over 90 serotypes, of which 7 to 13 serotypes are included in current formulations of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines that are efficacious in young children. To further reduce the burden from SP pneumonia, a vaccine is required that could protect children from a greater diversity of serotypes. Two different types of vaccines against pneumococcal pneumonia are currently at varying stages of development: a multivalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine covering additional SP serotypes; and a conserved common pneumococcal protein antigen (PPA vaccine offering protection for all serotypes. Methods We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was don