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Sample records for invasive meningococcal disease

  1. Invasive Meningococcal Men Y Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-18

    Dr. Leonard Mayer, a public health microbiologist at CDC, discusses invasive meningococcal disease.  Created: 4/18/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/23/2012.

  2. Invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland, 2001-2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, Cilian

    2016-12-01

    In 1999, invasive meningococcal disease was hyperendemic in Ireland at 14.75\\/100 000 population, with 60% group B and 30% group C diseases. National sepsis guidelines and meningococcal C vaccines were introduced in 2000. Despite a spontaneous decline in group B infection, invasive meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of sepsis. This study characterises the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland since the introduction of meningococcal C vaccine and reviews its clinical presentation, hospital course and outcome in anticipation of meningococcal B vaccine introduction.

  3. Invasive Meningococcal Disease. Cuba, 1983- 2006

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    Antonio E. Pérez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD is a worldwide health problem. In Cuba, vaccination against meningococcal B-C has been carried out since 1989. The study aimed at describing the epidemiology of IMD in Cuba from 1983 to 2006 and at contributing to the immunization strategy. A descriptive and analytical study was carried out. Epidemiological data was obtained from the National Surveillance System at the Institute "Pedro Kourí". More than 1 000 cases were reported in 1986 and the overall incidence was above 10/100 000 inhabitants. Since 1989 a remarkable and continuous decline in the incidence was observed. In the last nine years a strong association of IMD to boarding school students (OR=9.4; confidence interval 95%: 5.1-17.4, recluses (OR=5.9; CI 95%: 1.5 -24.3 and day students (OR=3.9; CI 95%: 2.8-5.6 was observed. Housewife (OR=4.9; CI 95%: 1.9-12.4 and pensioned (OR=4.5; CI 95%: 1.2-16.8 showed association with mortality. Previous vaccination was a protective factor against morbidity (OR=0.6; CI 95%: 0.4-1.0 and mortality (OR=0.4; CI 95%: 0.2-0.9 by IMD. Neisseria meningitidis B4:P1.15 was the main circulating strain. Incidence of IMD declined markedly in Cuba by using group BC strain-specific meningococcal vaccine.

  4. Invasive meningococcal disease in children in Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    STEIN-ZAMIR, C.; ABRAMSON, N.; ZENTNER, G.; SHOOB, H.; VALINSKY, L.; BLOCK, C.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of childhood meningitis and septicaemia. Between 1999 and 2005, 133 invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) cases occurred in Jerusalem, 112 (84·2%) of them in children aged 0–14 years. The annual incidence rate in Jerusalem was higher than the national average (2·45±0·6 vs. 1·13±0·16/100 000 population, P=0·002). Most of the children (82·1%) were from low socio-economic Arab and Jewish ultra-orthodox communities; mortality was higher among Arab than Jewish children (1·3 vs. 0·22/100 000 person-years, P=0·004). A cluster of 10 children with severe meningococcal sepsis (three fatalities) emerged in the winter of 2003–2004. Compared to the other 102 cases in 1999–2005 both meningococcaemia (100% vs. 51%, P=0·003) and mortality (30% vs. 6·9%, P=0·014) rates were higher. Serogroup B comprised 77·6% of the bacterial isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed considerable variability among cluster isolates, but significant resemblance in Arab cases throughout 1999–2005. The increased susceptibility of specific sub-populations to IMD necessitates further evaluation. PMID:17662169

  5. The impact of meningococcal polymerase chain reaction testing on laboratory confirmation of invasive meningococcal disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Drew, Richard J

    2012-03-01

    Laboratory methods of diagnosis were examined for 266 children with invasive meningococcal disease. Seventy-five (36%) of 207 cases with bloodstream infection had both positive blood culture and blood meningococcal polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 130 (63%) negative blood culture and positive blood PCR, and 2 (1%) had positive blood culture and negative blood PCR. Sixty-three percent of cases were diagnosed by PCR alone.

  6. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  7. A decade of invasive meningococcal disease surveillance in Poland.

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    Anna Skoczyńska

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading etiologic agent of severe invasive disease. The objective of the study was to characterise invasive meningococcal disease (IMD epidemiology in Poland during the last decade, based on laboratory confirmed cases.The study encompassed all invasive meningococci collected between 2002 and 2011 in the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. The isolates were re-identified and characterised by susceptibility testing, MLST analysis, porA and fetA sequencing. A PCR technique was used for meningococcal identification directly from clinical materials.In the period studied, 1936 cases of IMD were confirmed, including 75.6% identified by culture. Seven IMD outbreaks, affecting mostly adolescents, were reported; all were caused by serogroup C meningococci of ST-11. The highest incidence was observed among children under one year of age (15.71/100,000 in 2011. The general case fatality rate in the years 2010-2011 was 10.0%. Meningococci of serogroup B, C, Y and W-135 were responsible for 48.8%, 36.6%, 1.2% and 1.2% of cases, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to third generation cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and 84.2% were susceptible to penicillin. MLST analysis (2009-2011 revealed that among serogroup B isolates the most represented were clonal complexes (CC ST-32CC, ST-18CC, ST-41/44CC, ST-213CC and ST-269CC, and among serogroup C: ST-103CC, ST-41/44CC and ST-11CC.The detection of IMD in Poland has changed over time, but observed increase in the incidence of the disease was mostly attributed to changes in the surveillance system including an expanded case definition and inclusion of data from non-culture diagnostics.

  8. Need for optimisation of immuniastion strategeis targeting Invasive Meningococcal Disease in the netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousema, J.C.M.; Ruitenberg, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a severe bacterial infectious disease with high mortality and morbidity rates worldwide. In recent years, industrialised countries have implemented vaccines targeting IMD in their National Immunisation Programmes (NIPs). In 2002, the Netherlands successfully

  9. Unusual initial abdominal presentations of invasive meningococcal disease.

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    Guiddir, Tamazoust; Gros, Marion; Hong, Eva; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-03-28

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is recognized as septicemia and/or meningitis. However, early symptoms may vary and are frequently nonspecific. Early abdominal presentations have been increasingly described. We aimed to explore a large cohort of patients with initial abdominal presentations for association with particular meningococcal strains. Confirmed IMD cases in France between 1991-2016 were screened for the presence within the 24 hours before diagnosis of at least one of the following criteria (1) abdominal pain, (2) gastro-enteritis with diarrhea and vomiting, (3) diarrhea only. Whole genome sequencing was performed on all cultured isolates. We identified 105 cases (median age 19 years) of early abdominal presentations with a sharp increase since 2014. Early abdominal pain alone was the most frequent symptom (n=67, 64%), followed by gastro-enteritis (n=26, 25%) and diarrhea alone (n=12, 11%). Twenty patients (20%) had abdominal surgery. A higher case fatality rate (24%) was observed in these cases compared to 10.4% in all IMD in France (p=0.007) with high levels of inflammation markers in the blood. Isolates of group W were significantly more predominant in these cases compared to all IMD. Most of these isolates belonged to clonal complex ST-11 (cc11) of the sublineages of the South American-UK strain. Abdominal presentations are frequently provoked by hyperinvasive isolates of meningococci. Delay in the management of these cases and the virulence of the isolates may explain the high fatality rate. Rapid recognition is a key element to improve their management.

  10. [Invasive meningococcal disease in Navarra in the era of a meningococcal C vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Desirée; Moreno, Laura; Herranz, Mercedes; Bernaola, Enrique; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Systematic childhood vaccination against meningococcus C has had a considerable impact on meningococcal invasive disease (MID). The aim of this study is to perform an analysis on the epidemiology, the clinical features, and the factors associated with a worse prognosis of MID, in the era of a meningococcal C vaccine. The study included confirmed cases of MID in children less than 15 years of age in Navarra, Spain, between 2008 and 2014. The risk of death or permanent sequelae was evaluated according to the presence of clinical features and analytical parameters at diagnosis. The average annual incidence was 7.9 cases per 100,000 children, with the highest attack rate in children < 1 year. Of 53 cases analysed, 87% were due to meningococcus B. Fever (100%), rash (91%), and elevation of procalcitonin (94%) were the most frequent findings at diagnosis. Some sign of shock was observed in 70% upon arrival at the hospital. The case-fatality rate was 3.8% and 10 % survived with permanent sequelae. Glasgow coma scale < 15 (odds ratio [OR]= 9.2), seizure (OR=8.3), sepsis without meningitis (OR=9.1), thrombocytopenia (OR=30.5), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (OR= 10.9) showed a greater association with a worse prognosis. The MID continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Therefore, new advances are needed in the prevention, early diagnosis, and detection of the factors associated with poor prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Meningococcal Disease in China

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    Zhujun Shao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitides is one of the leading causes of bacterial meningitis. The epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease varies in different countries and regions. This review summarizes the available data from China describing the burden of meningococcal disease, N. meningitidis serogroups, and vaccination programs. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA was predominant for several decades in China. However, since 2000, invasive meningococcal disease caused by MenC, MenW, or MenB has increased. MenC, belonging to a hyperinvasive clonal sequence type ST-4821 (CC4821, emerged in Anhui Province and was subsequently disseminated over two-thirds of all Chinese provinces. Serogroup W (CC11 is endemic and causes death. Serogroup B (CC4821 originated from serogroup C (CC4821 via a capsular switching mechanism. Polysaccharide A and C meningococcal vaccines have been introduced into national routine immunization programs and have effectively reduced invasive meningococcal disease. However, the vaccination strategy must be revised based on the epidemic trends in meningococcal disease in China.

  12. Invasive meningococcal disease without meningitis: a forgotten diagnosis

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    Walayat S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Saqib Walayat,1 Nooreen Hussain,1 Abdullah H Malik,1 Elsa Vazquez-Melendez,1 Bhagat S Aulakh,2 Teresa Lynch1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL, USA; 2Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL, USA Abstract: Neisseria meningitidis, a Gram-negative diplococcus, is an uncommon cause of pneumonia. There have been only about 344 cases reported worldwide from 1906 to 2015. To our knowledge, there have been only 3 cases reported in the USA in the past 2 decades. We present a case of a 72-year-old male with a past medical history of severe COPD, obstructive sleep apnea, and stage I lung cancer status post-stereotactic body radiation therapy 1 year ago, who was admitted with a 6-day history of productive cough with yellowish sputum, shortness of breath, extreme myalgias, and fatigue. Chest X-ray revealed an infiltrative process in the left lower lung field and left-sided pleural effusion. Blood cultures grew beta-lactamase-negative N. meningitidis after 24 hours. Our patient was initially treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, which were later switched to amoxicillin to complete a total of 14 days of antibiotics. Diagnosing meningococcal pneumonia requires a high level of suspicion, as sputum cultures may be falsely positive due to asymptomatic carriage of the organism in the upper respiratory tract in up to 10% of outpatient population. We highlight this case as early recognition and treatment is critical. The case fatality rate for N. meningitidis pneumonia has been reported to be higher compared with meningococcal meningitis. Keywords: Neisseria meningitidis, pneumonia, invasive meningococcal pneumonia, sepsis

  13. Epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease in the Netherlands, 1960-2012: an analysis of national surveillance data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Merijn W.; Bekker, Vincent; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van de Beek, Diederik; van der Ende, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data for invasive meningococcal disease is essential for public health policy and vaccine development. We analysed national surveillance data from the Netherlands for PorA coverage of two PorA-based meningococcal serogroup B vaccines to describe the epidemiology of invasive

  14. Dexamethasone as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of invasive meningococcal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolaj, Ilir; Dreshaj, Shemsedin; Qehaja, Emine; Tolaj, Jasmina; Doda-Ejupi, Teuta; Mehmeti, Murat

    2010-01-01

    With this study we want to evaluate the role of dexamethasone adjuvant treatment in different clinical forms of invasive meningococcal diseases. WORK METHODS: This was a randomized, open label trial that was conducted in 147 individuals with meningococcal sepsis. All of the cases have been divided in two groups: (1) Cases with meningococcal disease and CNS infection, and (2) Cases with meningococcal disease and no affection of the CNS. Cases from both groups were treated with dexamethasone, 0.15 mg/kg, every 6 h, for 4 (four) days, as adjuvant therapy. Cases which were not treated with dexamethasone were used as control group. From overall number of cases, in 130 of them, the meningococcal disease was accompanied with meningitis; in other 17 cases only signs of sepsis were present. In both clinical forms, the dexamethasone was used in 92 cases. The higher mortality rate is registered among the cases without meningitis, 17.65%, compared with 6.92% which is registered among cases with meningitis. The overall mortality rate among all cases was 8.2%. The significant difference was recorded only on CSF sugar level between two groups (treated or not with dexamethasone) on the day 1-4 of the hospitalization. Our epidemiological data are in correlation with data from other epidemiological studies. Most of the cases 69.4%, were more than 12 hours sick at home before the hospitalization, 7.5 % of cases were hospitalized within 12 hours from the onset of the diseases, while 23.1% of cases data are missing. This is in correlation with similar data from other studies. Dexamethasone has a limited effect on outcome of the invasive meningococcal disease. Dexamethasone had some effect only during the days of administration in cases with clinical form of sepsis with meningitis, by normalizing the values of CSF sugar earlier.

  15. Global practices of meningococcal vaccine use and impact on invasive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Asad; Jafri, Rabab Zehra; Messonnier, Nancy; Tevi-Benissan, Carol; Durrheim, David; Eskola, Juhani; Fermon, Florence; Klugman, Keith P; Ramsay, Mary; Sow, Samba; Zhujun, Shao; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Abramson, Jon

    2014-01-01

    A number of countries now include meningococcal vaccines in their routine immunization programs. This review focuses on different approaches to including meningococcal vaccines in country programs across the world and their effect on the burden of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) as reflected by pre and post-vaccine incidence rates in the last 20 years. Mass campaigns using conjugated meningococcal vaccines have lead to control of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the UK, Canada, Australia, Spain, Belgium, Ireland, and Iceland. Serogroup B disease, predominant in New Zealand, has been dramatically decreased, partly due to the introduction of an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine. Polysaccharide vaccines were used in high risk people in Saudi Arabia and Syria and in routine immunization in China and Egypt. The highest incidence region of the meningitis belt initiated vaccination with the serogroup A conjugate vaccine in 2010 and catch-up vaccination is ongoing. Overall results of this vaccine introduction are encouraging especially in countries with a moderate to high level of endemic disease. Continued surveillance is required to monitor effectiveness in countries that recently implemented these programs. PMID:24548156

  16. Epidemiology of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease in Ontario, Canada, 2000 to 2010

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    Dang Vica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD caused by serogroup B is the last major serogroup in Canada to become vaccine-preventable. The anticipated availability of vaccines targeting this serogroup prompted an assessment of the epidemiology of serogroup B disease in Ontario, Canada. Methods We retrieved information on confirmed IMD cases reported to Ontario’s reportable disease database between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 and probabilistically-linked these cases to Public Health Ontario Laboratory records. Rates were calculated with denominator data obtained from Statistics Canada. We calculated a crude number needed to vaccinate using the inverse of the infant ( Results A total of 259 serogroup B IMD cases were identified in Ontario over the 11-year period. Serogroup B was the most common cause of IMD. Incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.27/100,000/year, and fluctuated over time. Cases ranged in age from 13 days to 101 years; 21.4% occurred in infants, of which 72.7% were Conclusions Although rare, the proportion of IMD caused by serogroup B has increased and currently causes most IMD in Ontario, with infants having the highest risk of disease. Although serogroup B meningococcal vaccines are highly anticipated, our findings suggest that decisions regarding publicly funding serogroup B meningococcal vaccines will be difficult and may not be based on disease burden alone.

  17. Invasive meningococcal disease epidemiology and control measures: a framework for evaluation

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    Coudeville L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal disease can have devastating consequences. As new vaccines emerge, it is necessary to assess their impact on public health. In the absence of long-term real world data, modeling the effects of different vaccination strategies is required. Discrete event simulation provides a flexible platform with which to conduct such evaluations. Methods A discrete event simulation of the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease was developed to quantify the potential impact of implementing routine vaccination of adolescents in the United States with a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine protecting against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135. The impact of vaccination is assessed including both the direct effects on individuals vaccinated and the indirect effects resulting from herd immunity. The simulation integrates a variety of epidemiologic and demographic data, with core information on the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and outbreak frequency derived from data available through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Simulation of the potential indirect benefits of vaccination resulting from herd immunity draw on data from the United Kingdom, where routine vaccination with a conjugate vaccine has been in place for a number of years. Cases of disease are modeled along with their health consequences, as are the occurrence of disease outbreaks. Results When run without a strategy of routine immunization, the simulation accurately predicts the age-specific incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and the site-specific frequency of outbreaks in the Unite States. 2,807 cases are predicted annually, resulting in over 14,000 potential life years lost due to invasive disease. In base case analyses of routine vaccination, life years lost due to infection are reduced by over 45% (to 7,600 when routinely vaccinating adolescents 12 years of age at 70% coverage. Sensitivity analyses indicate that herd immunity plays

  18. Second hand smoke exposure and the risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children: systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Murray Rachael L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive meningococcal disease remains an important cause of serious morbidity and mortality in children and young people. There is a growing body of literature to suggest that exposure to passive smoke may play a role in the development of the disease, therefore we have performed a systematic review to provide a comprehensive estimate of the magnitude of this effect for smoking by any household member, by individual family members, and of maternal smoking before and after birth. Methods Four databases (Medline, Embase, PsychINFO and CAB Abstracts database were searched to identify studies (to June 2012 and reference lists scanned for further studies. Titles, abstracts and full texts were checked for eligibility independently by two authors. Quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated using random effect models, with heterogeneity quantified using I2. Results We identified 18 studies which assessed the effects of SHS on the risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children. SHS in the home doubled the risk of invasive meningococcal disease (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.63 to 2.92, I2 = 72%, with some evidence of an exposure-response gradient. The strongest effect was seen in children under 5 years (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.09, I2 = 47%. Maternal smoking significantly increased the risk of invasive meningococcal disease by 3 times during pregnancy (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.52-5.66 and by 2 times after birth (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.54-3.31. Conclusions SHS exposure, and particularly passive foetal exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy, significantly increases the risk of childhood invasive meningococcal disease. It is likely that an extra 630 cases of invasive meningococcal disease annually in children under 16 are directly attributable to SHS exposure in UK homes.

  19. Epidemiology of invasive meningococcal B disease in Australia, 1999-2015: priority populations for vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Brett N; Chiu, Clayton K; Jayasinghe, Sanjay H; Richmond, Peter C; McVernon, Jodie; Lahra, Monica M; Andrews, Ross M; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-11-06

    To describe trends in the age-specific incidence of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Australia, 1999-2015. Analysis in February 2017 of de-identified notification data from the Australian National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System of all notifications of IMD in Australia with a recorded diagnosis date during 1999-2015.Major outcomes: IMD notification rates in Australia, 1999-2015, by age, serogroup, Indigenous status, and region. The incidence of meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) disease declined progressively from 1.52 cases per 100 000 population in 2001 to 0.47 per 100 000 in 2015. During 2006-2015, MenB accounted for 81% of IMD cases with a known serogroup; its highest incidence was among infants under 12 months of age (11.1 [95% CI, 9.81-12.2] per 100 000), children aged 1-4 years (2.82 [95% CI, 2.52-3.15] per 100 000), and adolescents aged 15-19 years (2.40 [95% CI, 2.16-2.67] per 100 000). Among the 473 infants under 2 years of age with MenB, 43% were under 7 months and 69% under 12 months of age. The incidence of meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) disease prior to the introduction of the MenC vaccine in 2003 was much lower in infants than for MenB (2.60 cases per 100 000), the rate peaking in people aged 15-19 years (3.32 per 100 000); the overall case fatality rate was also higher (MenC, 8%; MenB, 4%). The incidence of MenB disease was significantly higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australians during 2006-2015 (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 3.8; 95% CI, 3.3-4.5). Based on disease incidence at its current low endemic levels, priority at risk age/population groups for MenB vaccination include all children between 2 months and 5 years of age, Indigenous children under 10 years of age, and all adolescents aged 15-19 years. Given marked variation in meningococcal disease trends over time, close scrutiny of current epidemiologic data is essential.

  20. Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

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    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD. METHODS: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.06, 1.31. In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23. Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32. No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

  1. Risk factors for invasive meningococcal disease in southern Queensland, 2000-2001.

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    McCall, B J; Neill, A S; Young, M M

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the risk factors for invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in southern Queensland. A case control study during the calendar years 2000-2001 was undertaken. Eighty-four laboratory-confirmed cases of IMD were notified. Four patients died and were excluded from the present study. Sixty-two (78%) eligible cases and 79 controls selected from the same age group and medical practice as cases, were interviewed. Univariate analysis found that IMD was associated with sharing bedrooms with two or more people (odds ratio (OR) 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-17.0, P = 0.01), any exposure to tobacco smoke (smoker or passive exposure; OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.1-4.8, P = 0.02), passive exposure to tobacco smoke (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0-5.6, P = 0.03) and recent upper respiratory tract infection (OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-4.1, P = 0.06). Children who were breast-fed were less likely to develop IMD (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-1.1, P = 0.04). Attendance at a childcare centre was not associated with an increased risk of IMD. In multivariate analysis, IMD was associated with children under 6 years of age who shared a bedroom with two or more people (OR 7.4; 95% CI 1.5-36.1, P = 0.01) or who had a primary carer who smoked (OR 9.1; 95% CI 2.1-39.9, P = 0.003). This is the second Australian study that identifies links between risk of IMD and exposure to cigarette smoke. The risk of IMD in young children could be further reduced if primary caregivers did not smoke. This information may contribute a new perspective to antismoking campaigns.

  2. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

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    Matute-Cruz Petra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848 diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72% of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93. Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality.

  3. Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene, MBL2, Polymorphisms Do Not Increase Susceptibility to Invasive Meningococcal Disease in a Population of Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene F; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Clausen, Louise Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    of the innate immune system may predispose to invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). In this study, we investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, and its promoter on susceptibility to IMD and IMD-associated mortality among children. Methods.  Children (...Background.  Neisseria meningitidis is the cause of meningococcal bacteremia and meningitis, and nasopharyngeal colonization with this pathogen is common. The incidence of invasive disease is highest in infants, whereas adolescents more often are carriers. Altered regulation or dysfunction...

  4. European public health policies for managing contacts of invasive meningococcal disease cases better harmonised in 2013 than in 2007.

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    Vygen, Sabine; Hellenbrand, Wiebke; Stefanoff, Pawel; Hanquet, Germaine; Heuberger, Sigrid; Stuart, James

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, a European survey identified variation in country policies on public health management of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). In 2009-10, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) published evidence-based guidance on IMD. We therefore surveyed again European countries to describe policies for managing IMD cases and contacts in 2013. We asked national IMD public health experts from 32 European countries to complete a questionnaire focusing on post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for IMD contacts and meningococcal vaccination. Proportions in 2007 and 2013 were compared using the chi-squared test. All 32 countries responded, with responses from two regions for Belgium and Italy; half stated having used ECDC guidance to update national recommendations. PEP was recommended to close contacts in 33 of 34 countries/regions, mainly ciprofloxacin for adults (29/32 countries) and rifampicin for children (29/32 countries). ECDC guidance for managing IMD contacts in airplanes was strictly followed by five countries/regions. Twenty-three countries/regions participated in both surveys. Compared with 2007, in 2013, more countries/regions recommended i) ceftriaxone for children (15/23 vs 6/20; p = 0.03), ii) PEP for all children in the same preschool group (8/23 vs 17/23; p = 0.02). More countries/regions recommended evidence-based measures for IMD public health management in 2013 than 2007. However, some discrepancies remain and they call for further harmonisation.

  5. Multidisciplinary analysis of invasive meningococcal disease as a framework for continuous quality and safety improvement in regional Australia.

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    Taylor, Kathryn A; Durrheim, David N; Merritt, Tony; Massey, Peter; Ferguson, John; Ryan, Nick; Hullick, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    System factors in a regional Australian health district contributed to avoidable care deviations from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) management guidelines. Traditional root cause analysis (RCA) is not well-suited to IMD, focusing on individual cases rather than system improvements. As IMD requires complex care across healthcare silos, it presents an opportunity to explore and address system-based patient safety issues. Baseline assessment of IMD cases (2005-2006) identified inadequate triage, lack of senior clinician review, inconsistent vital sign recording and laboratory delays as common issues, resulting in antibiotic administration delays and inappropriate or premature discharge. Clinical governance, in partnership with clinical and public health services, established a multidisciplinary Meningococcal Reference Group (MRG) to routinely review management of all IMD cases. The MRG comprised representatives from primary care, acute care, public health, laboratory medicine and clinical governance. Baseline data were compared with two subsequent evaluation points (2011-2012 and 2013-2015). Phase I involved multidisciplinary process mapping and development of a standardised audit tool from national IMD management guidelines. Phase II involved formalisation of group processes and advocacy for operational change. Phase III focused on dissemination of findings to clinicians and managers. Greatest care improvements were observed in the final evaluation. Median antibiotic delay decreased from 72 to 42 min and proportion of cases triaged appropriately improved from 38% to 75% between 2013 and 2015. Increasing fatal outcomes were attributed to the emergence of more virulent meningococcal serotypes. The MRG was a key mechanism for identifying system gaps, advocating for change and enhancing communication and coordination across services. Employing IMD case review as a focus for district-level process reflection presents an innovative patient safety approach

  6. Meningococcal disease serogroup C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas IE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Félix O Dickinson1, Antonio E Pérez1, Iván E Cuevas21Department of Epidemiology, “Pedro Kourí” Institute, Havana, Cuba; 2Pharmacovigilance Group, Finlay Institute, Havana, CubaAbstract: Despite current advances in antibiotic therapy and vaccines, meningococcal disease serogroup C (MDC remains a serious threat to global health, particularly in countries in North and Latin America, Europe, and Asia. MDC is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and neurological sequelae and it is a heavy economic burden. At the individual level, despite advances in antibiotics and supportive therapies, case fatality rate remains nearly 10% and severe neurological sequelae are frequent. At the population level, prevention and control of infection is more challenging. The main approaches include health education, providing information to the public, specific treatment, chemoprophylaxis, and the use of vaccines. Plain and conjugate meningococcal C polysaccharide vaccines are considered safe, are well tolerated, and have been used successfully for over 30 years. Most high-income countries use vaccination as a part of public health strategies, and different meningococcal C vaccination schedules have proven to be effective in reducing incidence. This is particularly so with conjugate vaccines, which have been found to induce immunogenicity in infants (the age group with the highest incidence rates of disease, stimulate immunologic memory, have longer effects, not lead to hyporesponsiveness with repeated dosing, and decrease acquisition of nasopharyngeal carriage, inducing herd immunity. Antibiotics are considered a cornerstone of MDC treatment and must be administered empirically as soon as possible. The choice of which antibiotic to use should be made based on local antibiotic resistance, availability, and circulating strains. Excellent options for a 7-day course are penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone and

  7. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... Meningococcal meningitis is characterized by sudden onset of headache, fever, and stiffness of the neck, sometimes accompanied ...

  8. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM197 conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo®) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; DeTora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo®) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need. PMID:21904459

  9. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM(197) conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; Detora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo(®)) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.

  10. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM197 conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo® in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bröker M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Bröker, Brian Cooper, Lisa M DeTora, Jeffrey J StoddardGlobal Medical Affairs, Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Marburg, Germany, and Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo® was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.Keywords: invasive meningococcal disease, quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Neisseria meningitidis

  11. Acute meningococcal disease in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ulrikka; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Steensen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is a rapidly progressing infection, which continues to cause deaths among children and adolescents. In this review, clinical signs and initial treatment of acute childhood meningococcal disease is described. Operational flow charts have been developed for assessment of non......-blanching rash and initial treatment of meningococcal disease....

  12. Prospects for eradication of meningococcal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nadel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia remain a serious global health threat. This review focuses on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease following the recent implementation of effective vaccines and the potential utility of a vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus.

  13. Susceptibility to invasive meningococcal disease: polymorphism of complement system genes and Neisseria meningitidis factor H binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan T Bradley

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis can cause severe infection in humans. Polymorphism of Complement Factor H (CFH is associated with altered risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD. We aimed to find whether polymorphism of other complement genes altered risk and whether variation of N. meningitidis factor H binding protein (fHBP affected the risk association.We undertook a case-control study with 309 European cases and 5,200 1958 Birth Cohort and National Blood Service cohort controls. We used additive model logistic regression, accepting P<0.05 as significant after correction for multiple testing. The effects of fHBP subfamily on the age at infection and severity of disease was tested using the independent samples median test and Student's T test. The effect of CFH polymorphism on the N. meningitidis fHBP subfamily was investigated by logistic regression and Chi squared test.Rs12085435 A in C8B was associated with odds ratio (OR of IMD (0.35 [95% CI 0.19-0.67]; P = 0.03 after correction. A CFH haplotype tagged by rs3753396 G was associated with IMD (OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.42-0.76], P = 1.6x10⁻⁴. There was no bacterial load (CtrA cycle threshold difference associated with carriage of this haplotype. Host CFH haplotype and meningococcal fHBP subfamily were not associated. Individuals infected with meningococci expressing subfamily A fHBP were younger than those with subfamily B fHBP meningococci (median 1 vs 2 years; P = 0.025.The protective CFH haplotype alters odds of IMD without affecting bacterial load for affected heterozygotes. CFH haplotype did not affect the likelihood of infecting meningococci having either fHBP subfamily. The association between C8B rs12085435 and IMD requires independent replication. The CFH association is of interest because it is independent of known functional polymorphisms in CFH. As fHBP-containing vaccines are now in use, relationships between CFH polymorphism and vaccine effectiveness and side-effects may become

  14. Whole genome typing of the recently emerged Canadian serogroup W Neisseria meningitidis sequence type 11 clonal complex isolates associated with invasive meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond S.W. Tsang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the Canadian invasive serogroup W Neisseria meningitidis (MenW sequence type 11 (ST-11 clonal complex (CC isolates by whole genome typing and to compare Canadian isolates with similar isolates from elsewhere. Methods: Whole genome typing of 30 MenW ST-11 CC, 20 meningococcal group C (MenC ST-11 CC, and 31 MenW ST-22 CC isolates was performed on the Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequence database platform. Canadian MenW ST-11 CC isolates were compared with the 2000 MenW Hajj outbreak strain, as well as with MenW ST-11 CC from other countries. Results: Whole genome typing showed that the Canadian MenW ST-11 CC isolates were distinct from the traditional MenW ST-22 CC; they were not capsule-switched contemporary MenC strains that incorporated MenW capsules. While some recent MenW disease cases in Canada were caused by MenW ST-11 CC isolates showing relatedness to the 2000 MenW Hajj strain, many were non-Hajj isolates similar to current MenW ST-11 isolates found globally. Geographical and temporal variations in genotypes and surface protein antigen genes were found among the MenW ST-11 CC isolates. Conclusions: The current MenW ST-11 isolates did not arise by capsule switching from contemporary MenC ST-11 isolates. Both the Hajj-related and non-Hajj MenW ST-11 CC strains were associated with invasive meningococcal disease in Canada. Keywords: Neisseria meningitidis, Invasive meningococcal disease, Whole genome typing

  15. Acute meningococcal disease in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ulrikka; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Steensen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is a rapidly progressing infection, which continues to cause deaths among children and adolescents. In this review, clinical signs and initial treatment of acute childhood meningococcal disease is described. Operational flow charts have been developed for assessment of non...

  16. [Meningococcal disease: frequently asked questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofré, José

    2012-12-01

    On account of an increase of serogroup W135 meningococcal disease (M.D.) observed in Santiago, Chile, during last two years the medical community has experienced an avidity to update their knowledge about M.D. treatment and its prevention. In a queries and answers mode, the following topics on M.D. are presented: nasopharyngeal carriage and its importance, immunity and protection against the disease, reasons to choice ceftriaxone as the first line antibiotic in treatment, rationality and indications of chemoprophylaxis, fundamentals and advantages of conjugate vaccines, its indications, schedules, contraindications and decisions making in public health.

  17. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  18. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  20. Whole genome typing of the recently emerged Canadian serogroup W Neisseria meningitidis sequence type 11 clonal complex isolates associated with invasive meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Raymond S W; Ahmad, Tauqeer; Tyler, Shaun; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Deeks, Shelley L; Gilca, Rodica; Hoang, Linda; Tyrrell, Gregory; Van Caeseele, Paul; Van Domselaar, Gary; Jamieson, Frances B

    2018-04-01

    This study was performed to analyze the Canadian invasive serogroup W Neisseria meningitidis (MenW) sequence type 11 (ST-11) clonal complex (CC) isolates by whole genome typing and to compare Canadian isolates with similar isolates from elsewhere. Whole genome typing of 30 MenW ST-11 CC, 20 meningococcal group C (MenC) ST-11 CC, and 31 MenW ST-22 CC isolates was performed on the Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequence database platform. Canadian MenW ST-11 CC isolates were compared with the 2000 MenW Hajj outbreak strain, as well as with MenW ST-11 CC from other countries. Whole genome typing showed that the Canadian MenW ST-11 CC isolates were distinct from the traditional MenW ST-22 CC; they were not capsule-switched contemporary MenC strains that incorporated MenW capsules. While some recent MenW disease cases in Canada were caused by MenW ST-11 CC isolates showing relatedness to the 2000 MenW Hajj strain, many were non-Hajj isolates similar to current MenW ST-11 isolates found globally. Geographical and temporal variations in genotypes and surface protein antigen genes were found among the MenW ST-11 CC isolates. The current MenW ST-11 isolates did not arise by capsule switching from contemporary MenC ST-11 isolates. Both the Hajj-related and non-Hajj MenW ST-11 CC strains were associated with invasive meningococcal disease in Canada. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Meningococcal Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of limb(s), deafness, nervous system problems, or brain damage. Top of Page Related Links Meningococcal Vaccination Preteen Vaccine Campaign Podcast: Meningitis Immunization for Adolescents Meningitis Sepsis ...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2014In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases...

  3. The meningococcal antibody test: how useful in the diagnosis of meningococcal disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, N; Berthelsen, L; Wachmann, H

    2005-01-01

    Based on 9257 [correction] blood samples received from 7365 patients with a request for a meningococcal antibody test (MAT) during a 10-year period (1986-1995), the usefulness of the test in the diagnosis of meningococcal disease was assessed. Of 635 patients with culture-confirmed meningococcal ...

  4. Meningococcal disease in the Middle East and Africa: Findings and updates from the Global Meningococcal Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrow, Ray; Caugant, Dominique A; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Christensen, Hannah; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Findlow, Jamie; Glennie, Linda; Von Gottberg, Anne; Kechrid, Amel; Vázquez Moreno, Julio; Razki, Aziza; Smith, Vincent; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Tali-Maamar, Hassiba; Zerouali, Khalid

    2017-07-01

    The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) has recently considered current issues in Middle Eastern and African countries, and produced two recommendations: (i) that vaccination of attendees should be considered for some types of mass-gathering events, as some countries mandate for the Hajj, and (ii) vaccination of people with human immunodeficiency virus should be used routinely, because of increased meningococcal disease (MD) risk. Differences exist between Middle Eastern and African countries regarding case and syndrome definitions, surveillance, and epidemiologic data gaps. Sentinel surveillance provides an overview of trends and prevalence of different capsular groups supporting vaccine selection and planning, whereas cost-effectiveness decisions require comprehensive disease burden data, ideally counting every case. Surveillance data showed importance of serogroup B MD in North Africa and serogroup W expansion in Turkey and South Africa. Success of MenAfriVac ® in the African "meningitis belt" was reviewed; the GMI believes similar benefits may follow development of a low-cost meningococcal pentavalent vaccine, currently in phase 1 clinical trial, by 2022. The importance of carriage and herd protection for controlling invasive MD and the importance of advocacy and awareness campaigns were also highlighted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine (Trumenba(®)): A Review in Active Immunization Against Invasive Meningococcal Group B Disease in Individuals Aged 10-25 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; Dhillon, Sohita

    2015-10-01

    Bivalent rLP2086 vaccine (Trumenba(®)) [hereafter referred to as rLP2086] is a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) vaccine recently licensed in the USA for active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by MenB in individuals 10-25 years of age. rLP2086, which contains two variants of the meningococcal surface protein factor H-binding protein (fHBP), was approved by the FDA under the accelerated approval pathway after the immunogenicity of the vaccine was demonstrated in several phase II trials. This article reviews the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of rLP2086 as demonstrated in the trials with a focus on the US setting and on use of the vaccine as per FDA-approved labeling. rLP2086 is approved in the USA as a three-dose series administered in a 0-, 2-, and 6-month schedule. In the phase II trials, rLP2086 elicited a robust immune response against a panel of MenB test strains. A strong immune response was evident in a marked proportion of subjects after two vaccine doses, with a further increase after a third dose. The four primary test strains used were selected to be representative of MenB strains prevalent in the USA, with each expressing an fHBP variant heterologous to the vaccine antigens. rLP2086 was generally well tolerated in the trials, with most adverse reactions being mild to moderate in severity. Although some questions remain, including the duration of the protective response, rLP2086 vaccine has the potential to be a valuable tool for the prevention of invasive MenB disease.

  6. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with a ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining around ...

  7. Meningococcal disease and future drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, L K; Colding, H; Hartzen, S H

    2011-01-01

    recent data and current knowledge on molecular mechanisms of meningococcal disease and explains how host immune responses ultimately may aggravate neuropathology and the clinical prognosis. Within this context, particular importance is paid to the endotoxic components that provide potential drug targets...... for novel neuroprotective adjuvants, which are needed in order to improve the clinical management of meningoencephalitis and patient prognosis....

  8. Complement pathways and meningococcal disease : diagnostic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, A G; Truedsson, L; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2001-01-01

    Complement is an immunological effector system that bridges innate and acquired immunity in several ways. There is a striking association between susceptibility to meningococcal disease and various forms of complement deficiency (1,2). In defense against bacterial infection, the most important fu...

  9. Consensus recommendation for meningococcal disease prevention for Hajj and Umra pilgrimage/travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibl, A; Tufenkeji, H; Khalil, M; Memish, Z

    2013-04-01

    The Islamic Hajj to Makkah (Mecca) has been associated with outbreaks of invasive meningococcal disease and the global spread of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W-135. For Hajj pilgrims the quadrivalent vaccination against serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y is a mandatory requirement. Novel conjugate vaccines may provide benefits for the community by reduction of carriage. With the introduction of the new generation of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menveo, Menactra, and others pending license) and their recent implementation in Saudi Arabia, experts from 11 countries in the Middle East region met at a Meningococcal Leadership Forum (MLF), in Dubai in May 2010 to exchange opinions on meningococcal disease and prevention strategies. These experts discussed the importance of introducing conjugate vaccines for pilgrims and travellers, and elaborated a consensus recommendation to support healthcare professionals and decision-makers.

  10. Upper respiratory tract infection, heterologous immunisation and meningococcal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, R. J.; Bijlmer, H. A.; Tobi, H.; Dankert, J.; Bouter, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that an episode of upper respiratory tract infection or heterologous immunisation is a predisposing factor for the occurrence of meningococcal disease, data from 377 cases of meningococcal disease and their household contacts (n = 1124) were analysed by conditional logistic

  11. Changing epidemiology of Infant Meningococcal Disease after the introduction of meningococcal serogroup C vaccine in Italy, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, P; Fazio, C; Neri, A; Boros, S; Renna, G; Pompa, M G

    2015-07-17

    In Italy, the incidence of Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) was around 0.28 per 100,000 over the last years. Since the risk IMD is usually high among infants aged less than 1 year, we decided to evaluate the trend of IMD cases reported between 2006 and 2014 in this age group. In particular, the study aim was to describe the main characteristics of IMD cases in infants following the introduction of MCC vaccine (2005) and to estimate the number of cases which are potentially preventable through early vaccination. The National Surveillance System of Bacterial Meningitis was established in 1994 and in 2007 was extended to all invasive bacterial diseases. Clinical data and isolates and/or clinical samples are collected from hospitalized patients throughout the country. IMD cases are reported by clinicians to the local health authorities, and samples are sent to the Reference Laboratory at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità for further characterization and storage at -80°C. In particular, serogroup identification is obtained by agglutination with commercial antisera or by multiplex PCR. The annual incidence for infants B was more frequently detected among infants aged B was the most commonly detected over time. The long-term impact of meningococcal C conjugate vaccine and the effect of the introduction of meningococcal B vaccination among infants need to be evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential Capsule Switching from Serogroup Y to B: The Characterization of Three such Neisseria meningitidis Isolates Causing Invasive Meningococcal Disease in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond SW Tsang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Three group B Neisseria meningitidis isolates, recovered from meningococcal disease cases in Canada and typed as B:2c:P1.5, were characterized. Multilocus sequence typing showed that all three isolates were related because of an identical sequence type (ST 573. Isolates typed as 2c:P1.5 are common in serogroup Y meningococci but rare in isolates from serogroups B or C. Although no serogroup Y isolates have been typed as ST-573, eight isolates showed five to six housekeeping gene alleles that were identical to that of ST-573. This suggested that the B:2c:P1.5 isolates may have originated from serogroup Y organisms, possibly by capsule switching.

  13. Can we control all-cause meningococcal disease in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadarangani, M; Pollard, A J

    2016-12-01

    Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is potentially devastating, with a case fatality rate of 5-15% and high rates of significant sequelae among survivors after septicaemia or meningitis. Capsular group C (MenC) conjugate vaccines have been highly successful in achieving control of MenC disease across Europe, and some countries have also introduced quadrivalent MenACWY conjugate vaccines to reduce disease caused by groups A, W and Y in addition to C. These vaccines putatively elicit protective levels of bactericidal antibodies in all age groups, induce immunologic memory and reduce nasopharyngeal carriage, thereby leading to herd protection. Protein-based meningococcal vaccines based on subcapsular components, and designed primarily to target capsular group B (MenB) disease, have recently been licensed. These vaccines are highly immunogenic in infants and adolescents, inducing bactericidal antibodies against strains expressing high levels of vaccine antigens which are identical to the variants present in the vaccines. Effectiveness of these vaccines at a population level will be determined by whether vaccine-induced antibodies provide cross-protection against variants of the vaccine antigens present on the surface of the diverse collection of circulating invasive strains. The level of serum bactericidal activity induced against strains also seems to depend on the level of expression of the vaccine antigens. The duration of protection and the impact on carriage of meningococci will have a major bearing on the overall effectiveness of the programme. In September 2015 the UK became the first country to introduce the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) into a national routine immunization schedule, and data on the effectiveness of this programme are anticipated in the next few years. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Meningococcal disease, a clinical and epidemiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rodrigo Siqueira; Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Dutra Gazineo, Jorge Luiz; Balbino Miguel, Paulo Sérgio; Santana, Luiz Alberto; Oliveira, Lisa; Geller, Mauro

    2017-11-01

    Meningococcal disease is the acute infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis, which has humans as the only natural host. The disease is widespread around the globe and is known for its epidemical potential and high rates of lethality and morbidity. The highest number of cases of the disease is registered in the semi-arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa. In Brazil, it is endemic with occasional outbreaks, epidemics and sporadic cases occurring throughout the year, especially in the winter. The major epidemics of the disease occurred in Brazil in the 70's caused by serogroups A and C. Serogroups B, C and Y represent the majority of cases in Europe, the Americas and Australia. However, there has been a growing increase in serogroup W in some areas. The pathogen transmission happens for respiratory route (droplets) and clinically can lead to meningitis and sepsis (meningococcemia). The treatment is made with antimicrobial and supportive care. For successful prevention, we have some measures like vaccination, chemoprophylaxis and droplets' precautions. In this review, we have described and clarify clinical features of the disease caused by N. meningitidis regarding its relevance for healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preventing secondary cases of invasive meningococcal capsular group B (MenB) disease using a recently-licensed, multi-component, protein-based vaccine (Bexsero(®)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Cordery, Rebecca; Mandal, Sema; Christensen, Hannah; Campbell, Helen; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary E

    2014-11-01

    To assess the potential use of a protein-based meningococcal group B (MenB) vaccine (Bexsero(®)) in addition to antibiotic chemoprophylaxis for preventing secondary cases. Published studies on the risk of secondary meningococcal infections were used to estimate the numbers needed to vaccinate (NNV) with Bexsero(®) to prevent a secondary case in household and educational settings. Most secondary cases occur within a few days of diagnosis in the index case. Unlike conjugate vaccines, early protection offered after a single dose of Bexsero(®) is likely to be low, particularly in young children, who are at higher risk of secondary infection. NNV was dependent on predicted meningococcal strain coverage, estimated onset of protection after one Bexsero(®) dose and estimated vaccine efficacy. Even in the most favourable scenario where we assume the vaccine is administered within 4 days of the index case and prevents 90% of cases occurring after 14 days, the NNV for household contacts was >1000. NNV in educational settings was much higher. The estimated NNV should be taken into account when deciding policy to recommend Bexsero(®) for close contacts of single cases in household or educational settings. Bexsero(®) may have a protective role in clusters and outbreaks. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... booster. Unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated first-year college students living in residence halls should receive 1 dose of MCV4. Teens who are unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated may need to receive an MCV4 if they travel to areas with high rates of meningococcal disease, ...

  17. Risk factors for meningococcal disease in Cape Town | Moodley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the risk factors associated with meningococcal disease among children living in Cape Town. Design. A case-control study was conducted from October 1993 to January 1995. Setting. The study population consisted of all children tmder the age of 14 years who were resident in the Cape Town ...

  18. New recombinant vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal B disease

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    Taha MK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muhamed-Kheir Taha, Ala-Eddine DeghmaneInstitut Pasteur, Unit of Invasive Bacterial Infections and National Reference Center for Meningococci, Paris, FranceAbstract: Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening invasive infection (mainly septicemia and meningitis that occurs as epidemic or sporadic cases. The causative agent, Neisseria meningitidis or meningococcus, is a capsulated Gram-negative bacterium. Current vaccines are prepared from the capsular polysaccharides (that also determine serogroups and are available against strains of serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135 that show variable distribution worldwide. Plain polysaccharide vaccines were first used and subsequently conjugate vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity were introduced. The capsular polysaccharide of meningococcal serogroup B is poorly immunogenic due to similarity to the human neural cells adhesion molecule. Tailor-made, strain-specific vaccines have been developed to control localized and clonal outbreaks due to meningococci of serogroup B but no “universal” vaccine is yet available. This unmet medical need was recently overcome using several subcapsular proteins to allow broad range coverage of strains and to reduce the risk of escape variants due to genetic diversity of the meningococcus. Several vaccines are under development that target major or minor surface proteins. One vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis, under registration, is a multicomponent recombinant vaccine that showed an acceptable safety profile and covers around 80% of the currently circulating serogroup B isolates. However, its reactogenicity in infants seems to be high and the long term persistence of the immune response needs to be determined. Its activity on carriage, and therefore transmission, is under evaluation. Indirect protection is expected through restricting strain circulation and acquisition. This vaccine covers the circulating strains according to the presence of the targeted antigens in the

  19. Meningococcal disease in the Asia-Pacific region: Findings and recommendations from the Global Meningococcal Initiative.

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    Borrow, Ray; Lee, Jin-Soo; Vázquez, Julio A; Enwere, Godwin; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Kamiya, Hajime; Kim, Hwang Min; Jo, Dae Sun

    2016-11-21

    The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) is a global expert group that includes scientists, clinicians, and public health officials with a wide range of specialties. The purpose of the Initiative is to promote the global prevention of meningococcal disease (MD) through education, research, and cooperation. The first Asia-Pacific regional meeting was held in November 2014. The GMI reviewed the epidemiology of MD, surveillance, and prevention strategies, and outbreak control practices from participating countries in the Asia-Pacific region.Although, in general, MD is underreported in this region, serogroup A disease is most prominent in low-income countries such as India and the Philippines, while Taiwan, Japan, and Korea reported disease from serogroups C, W, and Y. China has a mixed epidemiology of serogroups A, B, C, and W. Perspectives from countries outside of the region were also provided to provide insight into lessons learnt. Based on the available data and meeting discussions, a number of challenges and data gaps were identified and, as a consequence, several recommendations were formulated: strengthen surveillance; improve diagnosis, typing and case reporting; standardize case definitions; develop guidelines for outbreak management; and promote awareness of MD among healthcare professionals, public health officials, and the general public. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Pros and cons of vaccination against serogroup B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Rodríguez, Miguel; Domínguez García, Ángela

    2018-02-09

    A vaccine has recently been approved in the EU against meningococcal serogroup B, the main cause of meningococcal disease. There is a fierce debate about the decision regarding a universal vaccination in infants older than 2 months, as recommended by the majority of scientific societies. In western Europe the only country to have included the universal vaccination is the United Kingdom, with a lower incidence of the disease than Ireland. Other countries have also adopted it, such as the Czech Republic, Cuba and certain regions of Italy. Numerous cost-effectiveness studies have been published regarding the vaccination with different assumptions, which have supported the decision not to implant the universal vaccination because it exceeds the will to pay for a health benefit. We discuss the pros and cons of the universal vaccination against meningococcal B, recommended by the Sociedad Española de Pediatría (Spanish Society of Paediatrics), which as yet has not been implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Meningococcal disease awareness and meningoccocal vaccination among Greek students planning to travel abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Maltezou, Helena C

    2017-06-09

    Objective Students living in dormitories are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Our aim was to evaluate Greek students planning to study abroad about their level of meningococcal disease awareness and attitudes and practices towards meningococcal vaccination. Methods We studied 231 Greek ERASMUS students using a questionnaire. Results Students had a mean number of 4.1 correct answers out of six questions. In particular 66.5% 79.3%, 72.3% and 82.3% of them answered correctly about the etiology, transmission, epidemiology and treatment of meningococcal disease, respectively. Only 23.4% were vaccinated, whereas 14.7% were planning to do so in the near future. Students who answered correctly ≥5 questions were more likely to be male, vaccinated against meningococcal meningitis and science students. Conclusion We found an overall good level of knowledge about meningococcal disease among Greek students planning to study or already studying abroad. Knowledge about meningococcal disease was associated with vaccine uptake. However, vaccination rate against meningococcal disease was low.

  2. An evaluation of emerging vaccines for childhood meningococcal disease

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    Nelson Christopher B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal meningitis is a major cause of disease worldwide, with frequent epidemics particularly affecting an area of sub-Saharan Africa known as the “meningitis belt”. Neisseria meningitidis group A (MenA is responsible for major epidemics in Africa. Recently W-135 has emerged as an important pathogen. Currently, the strategy for control of such outbreaks is emergency use of meningococcal (MC polysaccharide vaccines, but these have a limited ability to induce herd immunity and elicit an adequate immune response in infant and young children. In recent times initiatives have been taken to introduce meningococcal conjugate vaccine in these African countries. Currently there are two different types of MC conjugate vaccines at late stages of development covering serogroup A and W-135: a multivalent MC conjugate vaccine against serogroup A,C,Y and W-135; and a monovalent conjugate vaccine against serogroup A. We aimed to perform a structured assessment of these emerging meningococcal vaccines as a means of reducing global meningococal disease burden among children under 5 years of age. Methods We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In the first stage we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging MC vaccines relevant to 12 criteria of interest. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies. They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their “collective optimism” towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. Results For MenA conjugate vaccine the experts showed very high level of optimism (~ 90% or more for 7 out of the 12 criteria. The experts felt that the likelihood of efficacy on meningitis was very high (~ 90%. Deliverability

  3. Evolutionary Events Associated with an Outbreak of Meningococcal Disease in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Becher, Dörte; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Frosch, Matthias; Hellenbrand, Wiebke; Hong, Eva; Parent du Châtelet, Isabelle; Prior, Karola; Harmsen, Dag; Vogel, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Meningococci spread via respiratory droplets, whereas the closely related gonococci are transmitted sexually. Several outbreaks of invasive meningococcal disease have been reported in Europe and the United States among men who have sex with men (MSM). We recently identified an outbreak of serogroup C meningococcal disease among MSM in Germany and France. In this study, genomic and proteomic techniques were used to analyze the outbreak isolates. In addition, genetically identical urethritis isolates were recovered from France and Germany and included in the analysis. Genome sequencing revealed that the isolates from the outbreak among MSM and from urethritis cases belonged to a clade within clonal complex 11. Proteome analysis showed they expressed nitrite reductase, enabling anaerobic growth as previously described for gonococci. Invasive isolates from MSM, but not urethritis isolates, further expressed functional human factor H binding protein associated with enhanced survival in a newly developed transgenic mouse model expressing human factor H, a complement regulatory protein. In conclusion, our data suggest that urethritis and outbreak isolates followed a joint adaptation route including adaption to the urogenital tract. PMID:27167067

  4. Evolutionary Events Associated with an Outbreak of Meningococcal Disease in Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamed-Kheir Taha

    Full Text Available Meningococci spread via respiratory droplets, whereas the closely related gonococci are transmitted sexually. Several outbreaks of invasive meningococcal disease have been reported in Europe and the United States among men who have sex with men (MSM. We recently identified an outbreak of serogroup C meningococcal disease among MSM in Germany and France. In this study, genomic and proteomic techniques were used to analyze the outbreak isolates. In addition, genetically identical urethritis isolates were recovered from France and Germany and included in the analysis. Genome sequencing revealed that the isolates from the outbreak among MSM and from urethritis cases belonged to a clade within clonal complex 11. Proteome analysis showed they expressed nitrite reductase, enabling anaerobic growth as previously described for gonococci. Invasive isolates from MSM, but not urethritis isolates, further expressed functional human factor H binding protein associated with enhanced survival in a newly developed transgenic mouse model expressing human factor H, a complement regulatory protein. In conclusion, our data suggest that urethritis and outbreak isolates followed a joint adaptation route including adaption to the urogenital tract.

  5. Vaccines for prevention of group B meningococcal disease: Not your father's vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-11-27

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. EpiScanGIS: an online geographic surveillance system for meningococcal disease

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    Albert Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveillance of infectious diseases increasingly relies on Geographic Information Systems (GIS. The integration of pathogen fine typing data in dynamic systems and visualization of spatio-temporal clusters are a technical challenge for system development. Results An online geographic information system (EpiScanGIS based on open source components has been launched in Germany in May 2006 for real time provision of meningococcal typing data in conjunction with demographic information (age, incidence, population density. Spatio-temporal clusters of disease detected by computer assisted cluster analysis (SaTScan™ are visualized on maps. EpiScanGIS enables dynamic generation of animated maps. The system is based on open source components; its architecture is open for other infectious agents and geographic regions. EpiScanGIS is available at http://www.episcangis.org, and currently has 80 registered users, mostly from the public health service in Germany. At present more than 2,900 cases of invasive meningococcal disease are stored in the database (data as of June 3, 2008. Conclusion EpiScanGIS exemplifies GIS applications and early-warning systems in laboratory surveillance of infectious diseases.

  7. Pre-admission antibiotics for suspected cases of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Rupali, Priscilla; Tharyan, Prathap; Abraham, Ooriapadickal Cherian; Thomas, Kurien

    2017-06-14

    Meningococcal disease can lead to death or disability within hours after onset. Pre-admission antibiotics aim to reduce the risk of serious disease and death by preventing delays in starting therapy before confirmation of the diagnosis. To study the effectiveness and safety of pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo, and different pre-admission antibiotic regimens in decreasing mortality, clinical failure, and morbidity in people suspected of meningococcal disease. We searched CENTRAL (6 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to 6 January 2017), Embase (1980 to 6 January 2017), Web of Science (1985 to 6 January 2017), LILACS (1982 to 6 January 2017), and prospective trial registries to January 2017. We previously searched CAB Abstracts from 1985 to June 2015, but did not update this search in January 2017. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing antibiotics versus placebo or no intervention, in people with suspected meningococcal infection, or different antibiotics administered before admission to hospital or confirmation of the diagnosis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data from the search results. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous data. We included only one trial and so did not perform data synthesis. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found no RCTs comparing pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo. We included one open-label, non-inferiority RCT with 510 participants, conducted during an epidemic in Niger, evaluating a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone versus a single dose of intramuscular long-acting (oily) chloramphenicol. Ceftriaxone was not inferior to chloramphenicol in reducing mortality (RR 1.21, 95% CI 0.57 to 2.56; N = 503; 308 confirmed meningococcal meningitis; 26 deaths; moderate-quality evidence), clinical failures (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.32 to

  8. An outbreak of serogroup C (ST-11) meningococcal disease in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Cruz, Enrique; Espinosa-De Los Monteros, Luz Elena; Navarro-Alvarez, Samuel; Aranda-Lozano, Jose Luis; Volker-Soberanes, Maria Luisa; Rivas-Landeros, Rosa Maria; Alvelais-Arzamendi, Ariadna Annete; Vazquez, Julio Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has been reported to be endemic in children from Tijuana, Mexico and the risk of an outbreak was always a threat. To describe all clinical, epidemiological and microbiological features of a meningococcal outbreak that occurred in Tijuana, Mexico. All cases with IMD were admitted at different emergency departments within the city and diagnosed by culture and agglutination tests. Further restriction fragment length polymorphism pulse field gel electrophoresis (RFLP-PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) were performed. All clinical and epidemiological characteristics and interventions were evaluated, as well as risk factors associated with mortality. From 30 January 2013 to 30 March 2013 there were 19 cases of IMD all caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. The median age was 16 years (2-47), with higher frequency among individuals at least 13 years old (73.7%). At admission, meningitis was the main clinical presentation (94.7%), followed by purpura (78.9%), septic shock (42.1%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, 36.8%). Overall mortality was seven (36.8%). Variables associated with higher mortality were, at admission, presence of septic shock, DIC and thrombocytopenia less than 70,000. All 19 cases had no identifiable site or cluster as the source of the outbreak. RFLP-PFGE showed a discriminatory power for only one profile on all N. meningitidis strains analyzed and a clone ST-11 was identified in all strains. Public health interventions were continuous case reporting of all suspected cases of IMD, an increase in active surveillance in all hospitals, training of medical and laboratory personnel, massive and rapid chemoprophylaxis to all close contacts as indicated, and promotion of good health habits. An outbreak with high mortality of IMD occurred in Tijuana, Mexico. This event and evidence of endemicity should encourage health authorities to evaluate meningococcal vaccination in the region.

  9. Effectiveness of antibiotics given before admission in reducing mortality from meningococcal disease: systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahné, Susan J M; Charlett, André; Purcell, Bernadette; Samuelsson, Susanne; Camaroni, Ivonne; Ehrhard, Ingrid; Heuberger, Sigrid; Santamaria, Maria; Stuart, James M

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence for effectiveness of treatment with antibiotics before admission in reducing case fatality from meningococcal disease. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane register of trials and systematic reviews, database of abstracts of reviews of effectiveness,

  10. Risk and protective factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents: matched cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Tully, Joanna; Viner, Russell M; Coen, Pietro G; Stuart, James M; Zambon, Maria; Peckham, Catherine; Booth, Clare; Klein, Nigel; Kaczmarski, Ed; Booy, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine biological and social risk factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents. Design: Prospective, population based, matched cohort study with controls matched for age and sex in 1:1 matching. Controls were sought from the general practitioner. Setting: Six contiguous regions of England, which represent some 65% of the country’s population. Participants: 15-19 year olds with meningococcal disease recruited at hospital admission in six regions (repr...

  11. Meningococcal B Vaccine Failure With a Penicillin-Resistant Strain in a Young Adult on Long-Term Eculizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Lucidarme, Jay; Bingham, Coralie; Warwicker, Paul; Goodship, Tim; Borrow, Ray; Ladhani, Shamez N

    2017-09-01

    We describe a case of invasive meningococcal disease due to a vaccine-preventable and penicillin-resistant strain in a fully immunized young adult on long-term complement inhibitor therapy and daily penicillin chemoprophylaxis. Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human complement C5 protein and inhibits the terminal complement pathway. It is currently recommended for the treatment of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathies. An unwanted complication of inhibiting complement, however, is an increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease. Here, we report the first case of meningococcal group B vaccine failure in a young adult receiving eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. She developed invasive meningococcal disease due to a vaccine-preventable and penicillin-resistant meningococcal group B strain 4 months after receiving 2 doses of meningococcal group B vaccine while on oral penicillin prophylaxis against meningococcal infection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Changes in the evolution of meningococcal disease, 2001-2008, Catalonia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ana I; Dominguez, Angela; Oviedo, Manuel; Minguell, Sofia; Jansa, Josep M; Codina, Gemma; Vazquez, Julio A

    2009-05-26

    Reported cases of meningococcal disease between 1997 and 2008 were analyzed to determine the evolution after the introduction of a conjugated vaccine. In case-fatality-rate increased only in serogroup B (3% and 7.4%, p=0.026). Serosubtype P1.15 was the most frequent in serogroup B (31%), mainly associated with serotype 4 (80%), and in serogroup C subtype P1.5 (36%), with serosubtype 2a (86%). Exhaustive surveillance of circulating meningococcal strains is essential.

  13. Background Paper for the update of meningococcal vaccination recommendations in Germany: use of the serogroup B vaccine in persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellenbrand, Wiebke; Koch, Judith; Harder, Thomas; Bogdan, Christian; Heininger, Ulrich; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Terhardt, Martin; Vogel, Ulrich; Wichmann, Ole; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2015-11-01

    In December 2013 Bexsero® became available in Germany for vaccination against serogroup B meningococci (MenB). In August 2015 the German Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) endorsed a recommendation for use of this vaccine in persons at increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). This background paper summarizes the evidence underlying the recommendation. Bexsero® is based on surface protein antigens expressed by about 80% of circulating serogroup B meningococci in Germany. The paper reviews available data on immunogenicity and safety of Bexsero® in healthy children and adolescents; data in persons with underlying illness and on the effectiveness in preventing clinical outcomes are thus far unavailable.STIKO recommends MenB vaccination for the following persons based on an individual risk assessment: (1) Persons with congenital or acquired immune deficiency or suppression. Among these, persons with terminal complement defects and properdin deficiency, including those under eculizumab therapy, are at highest risk with reported invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) incidences up 10,000-fold higher than in the general population. Persons with asplenia were estimated to have a ~ 20-30-fold increased risk of IMD, while the risk in individuals with other immune defects such as HIV infection or hypogammaglobulinaemia was estimated at no more than 5-10-fold higher than the background risk. (2) Laboratory staff with a risk of exposure to N. meningitidis aerosols, for whom an up to 271-fold increased risk for IMD has been reported. (3) Unvaccinated household (-like) contacts of a MenB IMD index case, who have a roughly 100-200-fold increased IMD risk in the year after the contact despite chemoprophylaxis. Because the risk is highest in the first 3 months and full protective immunity requires more than one dose (particularly in infants and toddlers), MenB vaccine should be administered as soon as possible following identification of the serogroup of the

  14. Global epidemiology of capsular group W meningococcal disease (1970-2015): Multifocal emergence and persistence of hypervirulent sequence type (ST)-11 clonal complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mustapha M; Marsh, Jane W; Harrison, Lee H

    2016-03-18

    Following an outbreak in Mecca Saudi Arabia in 2000, meningococcal strains expressing capsular group W (W) emerged as a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) worldwide. The Saudi Arabian outbreak strain (Hajj clone) belonging to the ST-11 clonal complex (cc11) is similar to W cc11 causing occasional sporadic disease before 2000. Since 2000, W cc11 has caused large meningococcal disease epidemics in the African meningitis belt and endemic disease in South America, Europe and China. Traditional molecular epidemiologic typing suggested that a majority of current W cc11 burden represented global spread of the Hajj clone. However, recent whole genome sequencing (WGS) analyses revealed significant genetic heterogeneity among global W cc11 strains. While continued spread of the Hajj clone occurs in the Middle East, the meningitis belt and South Africa have co-circulation of the Hajj clone and other unrelated W cc11 strains. Notably, South America, the UK, and France share a genetically distinct W cc11 strain. Other W lineages persist in low numbers in Europe, North America and the meningitis belt. In summary, WGS is helping to unravel the complex genomic epidemiology of group W meningococcal strains. Wider application of WGS and strengthening of global IMD surveillance is necessary to monitor the continued evolution of group W lineages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Systemic meningococcal disease in children: survival analysis, Arkhangelsk region, Northwest Russia, 1991–2011

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    O. V. Samodova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic meningococcal infection requires prompt and adequate medical care. It is considered as unpredictable disease due to extreme severity of a patient’s condition and high risk for fatal outcome. Survival of the children with systemic meningococcal infection was studied. Retrospective cohort includes all cases of systemic meningococcal disease in children arose in Arkhangelsk region in 1991–2011. Rate of fatal outcomes was high (41%. All death cases occurred during first three days of illness. Survival of the patient with correct pre-admission diagnosis was higher in comparison with initially undiagnosed cases. Survival functions were influenced by form of the disease and presence of septic shock. The usage of intramuscular injection of glucocorticoids on pre-admission stage according to the common recommendations did not improve the outcome.

  16. [Epidemiology of the meningococcal disease in Catalonia before and after vaccination against serogroup C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ana I; Domínguez, Angela; Oviedo, Manuel; Minguell, Sofía; Jansà, Josep M; Codina, Gemma; Vázquez, Julio A

    2009-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a serious public health problem worldwide. In Catalonia, after implementing the vaccination program, there has been a significant decrease in cases caused by meningococcus C. Reported cases of meningococcal disease between 1997 and 2008 were analyzed to determine the evolution after the introduction of a conjugated vaccine in Catalonia. In case-fatality-rate increased only in serogroup B (3% and 7.4%). Serosubtype P1.15was the most frequent in serogroup B (31%), mainly associated with serotype 4 (80%), and in serogroup C subtype P1.5 (36%), with serotype 2a (86%). During 2008, 5 apparently unrelated cases of B:2a:P1.5 were identified in the same geographic area, with a case-fatality-rate of 80%. Exhaustive surveillance of circulating meningococcal strains is essential.

  17. Risk and protective factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents: matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Joanna; Viner, Russell M; Coen, Pietro G; Stuart, James M; Zambon, Maria; Peckham, Catherine; Booth, Clare; Klein, Nigel; Kaczmarski, Ed; Booy, Robert

    2006-02-25

    To examine biological and social risk factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents. Prospective, population based, matched cohort study with controls matched for age and sex in 1:1 matching. Controls were sought from the general practitioner. Six contiguous regions of England, which represent some 65% of the country's population. 15-19 year olds with meningococcal disease recruited at hospital admission in six regions (representing 65% of the population of England) from January 1999 to June 2000, and their matched controls. Blood samples and pernasal and throat swabs were taken from case patients at admission to hospital and from cases and matched controls at interview. Data on potential risk factors were gathered by confidential interview. Data were analysed by using univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression. 144 case control pairs were recruited (74 male (51%); median age 17.6). 114 cases (79%) were confirmed microbiologically. Significant independent risk factors for meningococcal disease were history of preceding illness (matched odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 5.9), intimate kissing with multiple partners (3.7, 1.7 to 8.1), being a university student (3.4, 1.2 to 10) and preterm birth (3.7, 1.0 to 13.5). Religious observance (0.09, 0.02 to 0.6) and meningococcal vaccination (0.12, 0.04 to 0.4) were associated with protection. Activities and events increasing risk for meningococcal disease in adolescence are different from in childhood. Students are at higher risk. Altering personal behaviours could moderate the risk. However, the development of further effective meningococcal vaccines remains a key public health priority.

  18. Risk and protective factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents: matched cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Joanna; Viner, Russell M; Coen, Pietro G; Stuart, James M; Zambon, Maria; Peckham, Catherine; Booth, Clare; Klein, Nigel; Kaczmarski, Ed; Booy, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine biological and social risk factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents. Design Prospective, population based, matched cohort study with controls matched for age and sex in 1:1 matching. Controls were sought from the general practitioner. Setting Six contiguous regions of England, which represent some 65% of the country's population. Participants 15-19 year olds with meningococcal disease recruited at hospital admission in six regions (representing 65% of the population of England) from January 1999 to June 2000, and their matched controls. Methods Blood samples and pernasal and throat swabs were taken from case patients at admission to hospital and from cases and matched controls at interview. Data on potential risk factors were gathered by confidential interview. Data were analysed by using univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression. Results 144 case control pairs were recruited (74 male (51%); median age 17.6). 114 cases (79%) were confirmed microbiologically. Significant independent risk factors for meningococcal disease were history of preceding illness (matched odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 5.9), intimate kissing with multiple partners (3.7, 1.7 to 8.1), being a university student (3.4, 1.2 to 10) and preterm birth (3.7, 1.0 to 13.5). Religious observance (0.09, 0.02 to 0.6) and meningococcal vaccination (0.12, 0.04 to 0.4) were associated with protection. Conclusions Activities and events increasing risk for meningococcal disease in adolescence are different from in childhood. Students are at higher risk. Altering personal behaviours could moderate the risk. However, the development of further effective meningococcal vaccines remains a key public health priority. PMID:16473859

  19. Clonal replacement and expansion among invasive meningococcal isolates of serogroup W in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eva; Barret, Anne-Sophie; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Antona, Denise; Aouiti-Trabelsi, Myriam; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Parent du Châtelet, Isabelle; Levy-Bruhl, Daniel; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-02-01

    Neisseria meningitidis group W (NmW) belonging to the clonal complex ST-11 (NmW/cc11) spread in Europe and in France in 2000 and declined thereafter. In France, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) due to NmW increased again in 2012 and thereafter since 2015. Several sub-lineages of NmW/cc11 are circulating worldwide with successive epidemic waves. We aimed to describe recent epidemiological trends of NmW in France and to explore the microbiological and epidemiological characteristics associated with different NmW/cc11 sub-lineages. The epidemiology of NmW was described based on data collected through mandatory notification of IMD and strain typing data for culture-confirmed and PCR-confirmed cases for the period 2000-2016. All culture-confirmed cases due to NmW from the period 2010-2016 were characterised by whole genome sequencing (WGS). A detailed epidemiological analysis was performed for culture-confirmed cases on the basis of WGS data. During the period 2010-2016, genotyping was obtained for 148 cases including all the 132 culture-confirmed cases, among which 127 were matched with epidemiological data, and 16 PCR-confirmed cases (out of a total of 47 PCR-confirmed cases). An increase in IMD was observed in 2012 and was linked to isolates belonging to the "Anglo-French-Hajj" sub-lineage. These isolates have decreased significantly since 2013 and have been replaced by NmW/cc11 isolates related to the "South American - UK" sub-lineage which caused a marked increase in the number of cases of NmW in 2016. In this sub-lineage, the "original UK strain" was first detected in 2012 and increased thereafter, followed by the recently described "UK 2013-strain". Isolates related to the "South American-UK" sub-lineage represented 45% of all NmW cultured isolates from the whole period 2010-2016 but were the most frequent isolates in 2016, representing 76% of the total NmW typed isolates and 94% of the typed NmW/cc11 isolates. A changing pattern in the epidemiology of Nm

  20. Managing Meningococcal Disease (Septicaemia or Meningitis) in Higher Education Institutions. Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Students face many pressures today--pressure to be successful, financial worries and uncertainty about future career prospects. Good health is often taken for granted. It has taken publicity about recurring cases on meningococcal disease at university to bring home to students, universities and their associated doctors that students are at risk.…

  1. Outbreak of meningococcal disease caused by PorA-deficient meningococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, A.; Hopman, C. T. P.; Keijzers, W. C. M.; Spanjaard, L.; Lodder, E. B.; van Keulen, P. H. J.; Dankert, J.

    2003-01-01

    An outbreak of 7 cases of group C meningococcal disease occurred during the last week of July and the first week of August 2001 in the southwestern part of The Netherlands. Characterization of the 7 patients' isolates by various typing methods showed that the isolates were identical, except for the

  2. Host genetics and outcome in meningococcal disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Read, Robert C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Various genes regulate the intensity of the inflammatory and coagulation response to infection and therefore might determine the severity and outcome of meningococcal disease. We systematically reviewed the published work for case control studies on the influence of host genetics on severity and

  3. Vaccine prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa: Major advances, remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mustapha M; Harrison, Lee H

    2017-12-06

    Africa historically has had the highest incidence of meningococcal disease with high endemic rates and periodic epidemics. The meningitis belt, a region of sub-Saharan Africa extending from Senegal to Ethiopia, has experienced large, devastating epidemics. However, dramatic shifts in the epidemiology of meningococcal disease have occurred recently. For instance, meningococcal capsular group A (NmA) epidemics in the meningitis belt have essentially been eliminated by use of conjugate vaccine. However, NmW epidemics have emerged and spread across the continent since 2000; NmX epidemics have occurred sporadically, and NmC recently emerged in Nigeria and Niger. Outside the meningitis belt, NmB predominates in North Africa, while NmW followed by NmB predominate in South Africa. Improved surveillance is necessary to address the challenges of this changing epidemiologic picture. A low-cost, multivalent conjugate vaccine covering NmA and the emergent and prevalent meningococcal capsular groups C, W, and X in the meningitis belt is a pressing need.

  4. Meningitis - meningococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal meningitis; Gram negative - meningococcus ... Meningococcal meningitis is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis (also known as meningococcus). Meningococcus is the most common cause ...

  5. Relevance of genetically determined host factors to the prognosis of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, P; Muñiz-Diaz, E; Baraldès, M A; Arilla, M; Barquet, N; Pericas, R; Juárez, C; Madoz, P; Vázquez, G

    2004-08-01

    To assess the relevance of genetically determined host factors for the prognosis of meningococcal disease, Fc gamma receptor IIA (FcgammaRIIA), the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene promoter region, and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms were studied in 145 patients with meningococcal disease and in 290 healthy controls matched by sex. Distribution of FcgammaRIIA, TNF-alpha, and PAI-1 alleles was not significantly different between patients and controls. Patients with the FcgammaRIIA-R/R 131 allotype scored > or =1 point in the Barcelona prognostic system more frequently than patients with other allotypes (odds ratio, 18.6; 95% confidence interval, 7.1-49.0, PFc gamma receptor IIA polymorphism was associated with markers of disease severity, but TNF-alpha and PAI-1 polymorphisms were not.

  6. 2010 FIFA world cup South Africa: travel health issues and new options for protection against meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Bröker, Michael; Worth, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    The public health implications of large crowds gathering at a range of key global events should never be underestimated. This is especially the case with the upcoming 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa programme where thousands of local and travelling spectators, players and officials from all over the world will be present. Although meningococcal disease contracted whilst actually travelling is relatively rare, any travel health risk assessment should involve consideration of potential exposure to and transmission of this disease where crowding occurs. In South Africa, for reasons not completely understood, the incidence of meningococcal disease is higher than in most European countries. Whilst the currently available polysaccharide vaccines can help protect travellers against meningococcal disease there are some well recognised limitations of such vaccines. These can, however, be overcome with the use of newly developed conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccines. A quadrivalent conjugate vaccine should be the first choice for travellers to areas in which the risk of exposure to meningococcal disease is significant. The conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine should be recommended for all those attending or playing in the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa as well as similar global and regional events.

  7. Carriage of Neisseria Species in Communities with Different Rates of Meningococcal Disease

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    Nicole Le Saux

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A single clone, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (C:2a:P1.2, was isolated from seven patients during a cluster of cases of meningococcal disease in Ontario in 1989. To determine whether the clone was present in asymptomatic individuals in the same population, pharyngeal swabs were taken from 7% (644 of 9125 of residents who were vaccinated during the outbreak. Rates of isolation of Neisseria species were also compared to those in two other geographical areas which did not have an elevated incidence of meningococcal disease. The rate of carriage of N meningitidis in the asymptomatic individuals sampled was between 1.9% and 5.4%. The clone isolated from patients was not present among the carrier strains as determined by sero- and subtyping and electrophoretic analysis of metabolic enzymes. Age greater than six years was the only factor associated with colonization with N meningitidis.

  8. The case-fatality rate of meningococcal disease in Catalonia, 1990-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Angela; Cardeñosa, Neus; Pañella, Helena; Orcau, Angels; Companys, Maria; Alseda, Miquel; Oviedo, Manuel; Carmona, Glòria; Minguell, Sofia; Salleras, Lluis

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to analyse the case-fatality rate (CFR) of meningococcal disease (MD) in Catalonia, Spain. A retrospective study was carried out. Clinical histories of cases of MD reported for the period 1990-1997 in Catalonia were reviewed. For all cases, the variables gender, age, clinical type, y of presentation, province, phenotype and death by meningococcal disease were collected. The association between death and the other variables was studied by bivariate and unconditional logistic regression analysis. In the 2343 cases studied there were 146 deaths (6.2%) due to meningococcal disease. The CFR was higher in females (OR: 1.5, 95%CI: 1.1-2.1), in the 20 to 49 y (OR: 2.4, 95%CI: 1.2-4.9) and > or = 50 y (OR: 5.3, 95%CI: 2.8-10.1) age groups, in cases with septicaemia (OR: 2.4, 95%CI: 1.6-3.5), in the cases produced by serogroup A (OR: 4.7, 95%CI: 1.0-23.4) and in cases occurring during 1993 (OR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.1-4.1) or in the province of Lleida (OR: 2.9, 95%CI: 1.2-7.2). In the multivariate analysis, death was associated with the 20-49 y age group (OR: 3.9, 95%CI: 1.8-8.4), the > or = 50 y age group (OR: 7.3, 95%CI: 3.6-14.7), septicaemia (OR: 3.1; 95%CI: 2.0-4.7) and residing in the province of Lleida (OR: 3.2; 95%CI: 1.2-8.5). The CFR of meningococcal disease in Catalonia was not associated with the emergent phenotype C:2b:P1.2,5 strain, which caused an outbreak in other regions of Spain.

  9. Does Dexamethasone Helps in Meningococcal Sepsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolaj, Ilir; Ramadani, Hamdi; Mehmeti, Murat; Gashi, Hatixhe; Kasumi, Arbana; Gashi, Visar; Jashari, Haki

    2017-06-01

    Prompt recognition and aggressive early treatment are the only effective measures against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Anti-inflammatory adjunctive treatment remains controversial and difficult to assess in patients with IMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DXM) as adjunctive treatment in different clinical forms of IMD, and attempt to answer if DXM should be routinely used in the treatment of IMD. In this non-interventional clinical study (NIS), 39 patients with meningococcal septicaemia with or without of meningitis were included, and compared regarding the impact of dexamethasone (DXM), as an adjunctive treatment, on the outcome of IMD. SPSS statistics is used for statistical processing of data. Thirty (76.9%) patients with IMD had sepsis and meningitis, and 9 (23.1%) of them had sepsis alone. Dexamethasone was used in 24 (61.5%) cases, in both clinical groups. The overall mortality rate was 10.3%. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 6 patients (15.4%), arthritis in 3 of them (7.7%), and subdural effusion in one patient (2.6%). The data showed a significant statistical difference on the length of hospitalization, and WBC normalization in groups of patients treated with DXM. The use of DXM as adjunctive therapy in invasive meningococcal disease has a degree of proven benefits and no harmful effects. In fighting this very dangerous and complex infection, even a limited benefit is sufficient to recommend the use of DXM as adjunctive treatment in invasive meningococcal disease.

  10. The changing epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Quebec, Canada, 1991-2011: potential implications of emergence of new strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Gilca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to inform meningococcal disease prevention strategies, we analysed the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD in the province of Quebec, Canada, 10 years before and 10 years after the introduction of serogroup C conjugate vaccination. METHODOLOGY: IMD cases reported to the provincial notifiable disease registry in 1991-2011 and isolates submitted for laboratory surveillance in 1997-2011 were analysed. Serogrouping, PCR testing and assignment of isolates to sequence types (ST by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST were performed. RESULTS: Yearly overall IMD incidence rates ranged from 2.2-2.3/100,000 in 1991-1992 to 0.49/100,000 in 1999-2000, increasing to 1.04/100,000 in 2011. Among the 945 IMD cases identified by laboratory surveillance in 1997-2011, 68%, 20%, 8%, and 3% were due to serogroups B, C, Y, and W135, respectively. Serogroup C IMD almost disappeared following the implementation of universal childhood immunization with monovalent C conjugate vaccines in 2002. Serogroup B has been responsible for 88% of all IMD cases and 61% of all IMD deaths over the last 3 years. The number and proportion of ST-269 clonal complex has been steadily increasing among the identified clonal complexes of serogroup B IMD since its first identification in 2003, representing 65% of serogroup B IMD in 2011. This clonal complex was first introduced in adolescent and young adults, then spread to other age groups. CONCLUSION: Important changes in the epidemiology of IMD have been observed in Quebec during the last two decades. Serogroup C has been virtually eliminated. In recent years, most cases have been caused by the serogroup B ST-269 clonal complex. Although overall burden of IMD is low, the use of a vaccine with potential broad-spectrum coverage could further reduce the burden of disease. Acceptability, feasibility and cost-effectiveness studies coupled with ongoing clinical and molecular surveillance are necessary in

  11. Emerging clinical experience with vaccines against group B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, A L; Snape, M D

    2017-08-01

    The prevention of paediatric bacterial meningitis and septicaemia has recently entered a new era with the availability of two vaccines against capsular group B meningococcus (MenB). Both of these vaccines are based on sub-capsular proteins of the meningococcus, an approach that overcomes the challenges set by the poorly immunogenic MenB polysaccharide capsule but adds complexity to predicting and measuring the impact of their use. This review describes the development and use of MenB vaccines to date, from the use of outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines in MenB outbreaks around the world, to emerging evidence on the effectiveness of the newly available vaccines. While recent data from the United Kingdom supports the potential for protein-based vaccines to provide direct protection against MenB disease in immunised children, further research is required to understand the breadth and duration of this protection. A more detailed understanding of the impact of immunisation with these vaccines on nasopharyngeal carriage of the meningococcus is also required, to inform both their potential to induce herd immunity and to preferentially select for carriage of strains not susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. Although a full understanding of the potential impact of these vaccines will only be possible with this additional information, the availability of new tools to prevent the devastating effect of invasive MenB disease is a significant breakthrough in the fight against childhood sepsis and meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic meningococcemia: a rare presentation of meningococcal disease: case report

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    Antonio Adolfo Guerra Soares Brandão

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic meningococcemia is a rare clinical presentation within the spectrumof infections due to Neisseria meningitidis, which was first described in 1902.It is defined as a chronic and benign meningococcal bacteremia withoutmeningeal signs or symptoms with at least one week’s duration, characterizedby intermittent or continuous fever, polymorphic cutaneous rash, and migratoryarthropathy. The incidence is believed to be around 1:200,000 inhabitants. Itaffects predominantly young people and adults, and it is equally distributedbetween genders. Diagnosis may be challenging in the early stages of thedisease because of the difficulty in isolating Neisseria meningitidis (it reaches74% of positivity in advanced stages. Recently, the use of PCR for detectingNeisseria sp antigen in skin biopsies specimens has been considered for thoseculture-negative cases. The authors report a case of a 54-year-old femalepatient who sought medical attention for a five-day fever followed by arthralgiaand skin lesions predominantly in the lower limbs. The patient progressed toa toxemic clinical status that improved after the administration of antibiotictherapy, which consisted of oxacillin and ceftriaxone. The diagnosis of chronicmeningococcemia was performed after the isolation of Neisseria meningitidisin two different blood sample cultures. This is, to our knowledge, the firstcase of chronic meningococcemia described in Brazil (up to the writing of thisreport.

  13. Introducing vaccination against serogroup B meningococcal disease: an economic and mathematical modelling study of potential impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hannah; Hickman, Matthew; Edmunds, W John; Trotter, Caroline L

    2013-05-28

    Meningococcal disease remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The first broadly effective vaccine against group B disease (which causes considerable meningococcal disease in Europe, the Americas and Australasia) was licensed in the EU in January 2013; our objective was to estimate the potential impact of introducing such a vaccine in England. We developed two models to estimate the impact of introducing a new 'MenB' vaccine. The cohort model assumes the vaccine protects against disease only; the transmission dynamic model also allows the vaccine to protect against carriage (accounting for herd effects). We used these, and economic models, to estimate the case reduction and cost-effectiveness of a number of different vaccine strategies. We estimate 27% of meningococcal disease cases could be prevented over the lifetime of an English birth cohort by vaccinating infants at 2,3,4 and 12 months of age with a vaccine that prevents disease only; this strategy could be cost-effective at £9 per vaccine dose. Substantial reductions in disease (71%) can be produced after 10 years by routinely vaccinating infants in combination with a large-scale catch-up campaign, using a vaccine which protects against carriage as well as disease; this could be cost-effective at £17 per vaccine dose. New 'MenB' vaccines could substantially reduce disease in England and be cost-effective if competitively priced, particularly if the vaccines can prevent carriage as well as disease. These results are relevant to other countries, with a similar epidemiology to England, considering the introduction of a new 'MenB' vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of an Immunization Campaign to Control an Increased Incidence of Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease in One Region of Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wals, Philippe; Deceuninck, Geneviève; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Tsang, Raymond; Law, Dennis; De Serres, Gaston; Gilca, Vladimir; Gilca, Rodica; Boulianne, Nicole

    2017-05-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) incidence increased in Quebec, starting in 2003, and was caused by a serogroup B sequence type 269 clone. The Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ) region was particularly affected with a rate of 3.4 per 100000 person-years in 2006-2013. In May 2014, an immunization campaign was launched in SLSJ, using the 4-component protein-based meningococcal vaccine (MenB-4C). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the campaign 2 years after its initiation. Immunization registry data and serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease (B-IMD) cases notified to public health authorities and confirmed by culture or polymerase chain reaction from July 1996 to December 2016 were analyzed, including a multivariate Poisson regression model of incidence rates. By the end of the campaign, 82% of the 59000 targeted SLSJ residents between 2 months and 20 years of age had been immunized. Following the initiation of the campaign, no B-IMD case occurred among vaccinees, whereas 2 cases were reported among unvaccinated adult SLSJ residents, and a third case in an unvaccinated child who had stayed in the region during the week prior to disease onset, in 2015. B-IMD incidence decreased in all other regions in the years 2015-2016 but sporadic cases continued to occur. A multivariate analysis showed a significant effect of the campaign in the SLSJ region (relative B-IMD risk: 0.22; P = .04). Results suggest a high level of protection provided by MenB-4C following mass vaccination at regional level. This, along with reassuring safety data, supports the current recommendations for MenB-4C use for controlling outbreaks caused by clones covered by the vaccine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of alternate strategies for childhood immunization against meningococcal disease with monovalent and quadrivalent conjugate vaccines in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Delea

    Full Text Available Public health programs to prevent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD with monovalent serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV-C and quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MCV-4 in infancy and adolescence vary across Canadian provinces. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of various vaccination strategies against IMD using current and anticipated future pricing and recent epidemiology.A cohort model was developed to estimate the clinical burden and costs (CAN$2014 of IMD in the Canadian population over a 100-year time horizon for three strategies: (1 MCV-C in infants and adolescents (MCV-C/C; (2 MCV-C in infants and MCV-4 in adolescents (MCV-C/4; and (3 MCV-4 in infants (2 doses and adolescents (MCV-4/4. The source for IMD incidence was Canadian surveillance data. The effectiveness of MCV-C was based on published literature. The effectiveness of MCV-4 against all vaccination regimens was assumed to be the same as for MCV-C regimens against serogroup C. Herd effects were estimated by calibration to estimates reported in prior analyses. Costs were from published sources. Vaccines prices were projected to decline over time reflecting historical procurement trends.Over the modeling horizon there are a projected 11,438 IMD cases and 1,195 IMD deaths with MCV-C/C; expected total costs are $597.5 million. MCV-C/4 is projected to reduce cases of IMD by 1,826 (16% and IMD deaths by 161 (13%. Vaccination costs are increased by $32 million but direct and indirect IMD costs are projected to be reduced by $46 million. MCV-C/4 is therefore dominant vs. MCV-C/C in the base case. Cost-effectiveness of MCV-4/4 was $111,286 per QALY gained versus MCV-C/4 (2575/206 IMD cases/deaths prevented; incremental costs $68 million.If historical trends in Canadian vaccines prices continue, use of MCV-4 instead of MCV-C in adolescents may be cost-effective. From an economic perspective, switching to MCV-4 as the adolescent booster should be considered.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of alternate strategies for childhood immunization against meningococcal disease with monovalent and quadrivalent conjugate vaccines in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delea, Thomas E; Weycker, Derek; Atwood, Mark; Neame, Dion; Alvarez, Fabián P; Forget, Evelyn; Langley, Joanne M; Chit, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    Public health programs to prevent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) with monovalent serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV-C) and quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MCV-4) in infancy and adolescence vary across Canadian provinces. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of various vaccination strategies against IMD using current and anticipated future pricing and recent epidemiology. A cohort model was developed to estimate the clinical burden and costs (CAN$2014) of IMD in the Canadian population over a 100-year time horizon for three strategies: (1) MCV-C in infants and adolescents (MCV-C/C); (2) MCV-C in infants and MCV-4 in adolescents (MCV-C/4); and (3) MCV-4 in infants (2 doses) and adolescents (MCV-4/4). The source for IMD incidence was Canadian surveillance data. The effectiveness of MCV-C was based on published literature. The effectiveness of MCV-4 against all vaccination regimens was assumed to be the same as for MCV-C regimens against serogroup C. Herd effects were estimated by calibration to estimates reported in prior analyses. Costs were from published sources. Vaccines prices were projected to decline over time reflecting historical procurement trends. Over the modeling horizon there are a projected 11,438 IMD cases and 1,195 IMD deaths with MCV-C/C; expected total costs are $597.5 million. MCV-C/4 is projected to reduce cases of IMD by 1,826 (16%) and IMD deaths by 161 (13%). Vaccination costs are increased by $32 million but direct and indirect IMD costs are projected to be reduced by $46 million. MCV-C/4 is therefore dominant vs. MCV-C/C in the base case. Cost-effectiveness of MCV-4/4 was $111,286 per QALY gained versus MCV-C/4 (2575/206 IMD cases/deaths prevented; incremental costs $68 million). If historical trends in Canadian vaccines prices continue, use of MCV-4 instead of MCV-C in adolescents may be cost-effective. From an economic perspective, switching to MCV-4 as the adolescent booster should be considered.

  17. The next chapter for group B meningococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N Y; Pollard, A J

    2018-02-01

    The majority of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in the developed world is caused by capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis, however success with vaccination against organisms bearing this capsule has previously been restricted to control of geographically limited clonal outbreaks. As we enter a new era, with the first routine program underway to control endemic group B meningococcal disease for infants in the UK, it is timely to review the key landmarks in group B vaccine development, and discuss the issues determining whether control of endemic group B disease will be achieved. Evidence of a reduction in carriage acquisition of invasive group B meningococcal strains, after vaccination among adolescents, is imperative if routine immunization is to drive population control of disease beyond those who are vaccinated (i.e. through herd immunity). The need for multiple doses to generate a sufficiently protective response and reactogenicity remain significant problems with the new generation of vaccines. Despite these limitations, early data from the UK indicate that new group B meningococcal vaccines have the potential to have a major impact on meningococcal disease, and to provide new insight into how we might do better in the future.

  18. Meningococcal disease in children in Merseyside, England: a 31 year descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C Stanton

    Full Text Available Meningococcal disease (MCD is the leading infectious cause of death in early childhood in the United Kingdom, making it a public health priority. MCD most commonly presents as meningococcal meningitis (MM, septicaemia (MS, or as a combination of the two syndromes (MM/MS. We describe the changing epidemiology and clinical presentation of MCD, and explore associations with socioeconomic status and other risk factors. A hospital-based study of children admitted to a tertiary children's centre, Alder Hey Children's Foundation Trust, with MCD, was undertaken between 1977 to 2007 (n = 1157. Demographics, clinical presentations, microbiological confirmation and measures of deprivation were described. The majority of cases occurred in the 1-4 year age group and there was a dramatic fall in serogroup C cases observed with the introduction of the meningococcal C conjugate (MCC vaccine. The proportion of MS cases increased over the study period, from 11% in the first quarter to 35% in the final quarter. Presentation with MS (compared to MM and serogroup C disease (compared to serogroup B were demonstrated to be independent risk factors for mortality, with odds ratios of 3.5 (95% CI 1.18 to 10.08 and 2.18 (95% CI 1.26 to 3.80 respectively. Cases admitted to Alder Hey were from a relatively more deprived population (mean Townsend score 1.25, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.41 than the Merseyside reference population. Our findings represent one of the largest single-centre studies of MCD. The presentation of MS is confirmed to be a risk factor of mortality from MCD. Our study supports the association between social deprivation and MCD.

  19. Does Dexamethasone Helps in Meningococcal Sepsis?

    OpenAIRE

    Tolaj, Ilir; Ramadani, Hamdi; Mehmeti, Murat; Gashi, Hatixhe; Kasumi, Arbana; Gashi, Visar; Jashari, Haki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt recognition and aggressive early treatment are the only effective measures against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Anti-inflammatory adjunctive treatment remains controversial and difficult to assess in patients with IMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DXM) as adjunctive treatment in different clinical forms of IMD, and attempt to answer if DXM should be routinely used in the treatment of IMD. Methods: In this non-interventional cl...

  20. On the trail of preventing meningococcal disease: a survey of students planning to travel to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsien-Liang; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Lee, Long-Teng; Yao, Chien-An; Chu, Chia-Wei; Lu, Chia-Wen; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2013-01-01

    College freshmen living in dormitories are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Many students become a high-risk population when they travel to the United States. This study surveyed the knowledge, attitudes toward, and behavior surrounding the disease among Taiwanese college students planning to study in the United States, and to identify factors that may affect willingness to accept meningococcal vaccination. A cross-sectional survey of college students going to study in the United States was conducted in a medical center-based travel medicine clinic. Background information, attitudes, general knowledge, preventive or postexposure management, and individual preventive practices were collected through a structured questionnaire. A total of 358 students were included in the final analysis. More than 90% of participants believed that preventing meningococcal disease was important. However, fewer than 50% of students accurately answered six of nine questions exploring knowledge of the disease, and only 17.3% of students knew the correct management strategy after close contact with patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that students who understood the mode of transmission (odds ratio: 3.21, 95% CI = 1.117-9.229), medication management (1.88, 1.045-3.38), and epidemiology (2.735, 1.478-5.061) tended to be vaccinated. Despite an overall positive attitude toward meningococcal vaccination, there was poor knowledge about meningococcal disease. Promoting education on the mode of transmission, epidemiology, and pharmacological management of the disease could increase vaccination rates. Both the governments and travel medicine specialists should work together on developing an education program for this high-risk group other than just requiring vaccination. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  1. Strong Public Health Recommendations from Weak Evidence? Lessons Learned in Developing Guidance on the Public Health Management of Meningococcal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germaine Hanquet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evidence underpinning public health policy is often of low quality, leading to inconsistencies in recommended interventions. One example is the divergence in national policies across Europe for managing contacts of invasive meningococcal disease. Aiming to develop consistent guidance at the European level, a group of experts reviewed the literature and formulated recommendations. The group defined eight priority research questions, searched the literature, and formulated recommendations using GRADE methodology. Five of the research questions are discussed in this paper. After taking into account quality of evidence, benefit, harm, value, preference, burden on patient of the intervention, and resource implications, we made four strong recommendations and five weak recommendations for intervention. Strong recommendations related not only to one question with very low quality of evidence as well as to two questions with moderate to high quality of evidence. The weak recommendations related to two questions with low and very low quality of evidence but also to one question with moderate quality of evidence. GRADE methodology ensures a transparent process and explicit recognition of additional factors that should be considered when making recommendations for policy. This approach can be usefully applied to many areas of public health policy where evidence quality is often low.

  2. Does Dexamethasone Helps in Meningococcal Sepsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolaj, Ilir; Ramadani, Hamdi; Mehmeti, Murat; Gashi, Hatixhe; Kasumi, Arbana; Gashi, Visar; Jashari, Haki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt recognition and aggressive early treatment are the only effective measures against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Anti-inflammatory adjunctive treatment remains controversial and difficult to assess in patients with IMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DXM) as adjunctive treatment in different clinical forms of IMD, and attempt to answer if DXM should be routinely used in the treatment of IMD. Methods: In this non-interventional clinical study (NIS), 39 patients with meningococcal septicaemia with or without of meningitis were included, and compared regarding the impact of dexamethasone (DXM), as an adjunctive treatment, on the outcome of IMD. SPSS statistics is used for statistical processing of data. Results: Thirty (76.9%) patients with IMD had sepsis and meningitis, and 9 (23.1%) of them had sepsis alone. Dexamethasone was used in 24 (61.5%) cases, in both clinical groups. The overall mortality rate was 10.3%. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 6 patients (15.4%), arthritis in 3 of them (7.7%), and subdural effusion in one patient (2.6%). The data showed a significant statistical difference on the length of hospitalization, and WBC normalization in groups of patients treated with DXM. Conclusion: The use of DXM as adjunctive therapy in invasive meningococcal disease has a degree of proven benefits and no harmful effects. In fighting this very dangerous and complex infection, even a limited benefit is sufficient to recommend the use of DXM as adjunctive treatment in invasive meningococcal disease. PMID:28974828

  3. Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness of Procalcitonin Test for Prodromal Meningococcal Disease-A Meta-Analysis.

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    Jennifer M Bell

    Full Text Available Despite vaccines and improved medical intensive care, clinicians must continue to be vigilant of possible Meningococcal Disease in children. The objective was to establish if the procalcitonin test was a cost-effective adjunct for prodromal Meningococcal Disease in children presenting at emergency department with fever without source.Data to evaluate procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and white cell count tests as indicators of Meningococcal Disease were collected from six independent studies identified through a systematic literature search, applying PRISMA guidelines. The data included 881 children with fever without source in developed countries.The optimal cut-off value for the procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and white cell count tests, each as an indicator of Meningococcal Disease, was determined. Summary Receiver Operator Curve analysis determined the overall diagnostic performance of each test with 95% confidence intervals. A decision analytic model was designed to reflect realistic clinical pathways for a child presenting with fever without source by comparing two diagnostic strategies: standard testing using combined C-reactive protein and white cell count tests compared to standard testing plus procalcitonin test. The costs of each of the four diagnosis groups (true positive, false negative, true negative and false positive were assessed from a National Health Service payer perspective. The procalcitonin test was more accurate (sensitivity=0.89, 95%CI=0.76-0.96; specificity=0.74, 95%CI=0.4-0.92 for early Meningococcal Disease compared to standard testing alone (sensitivity=0.47, 95%CI=0.32-0.62; specificity=0.8, 95% CI=0.64-0.9. Decision analytic model outcomes indicated that the incremental cost effectiveness ratio for the base case was £-8,137.25 (US $ -13,371.94 per correctly treated patient.Procalcitonin plus standard recommended tests, improved the discriminatory ability for fatal Meningococcal Disease and was more cost

  4. Adolescent meningococcal serogroup A, W and Y immune responses following immunization with quadrivalent meningococcal A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine: Optimal age for vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2017-01-01

    Recently the incidence of meningococcal serogroup Y (MenY) and in particular serogroup W (MenW) invasive disease has risen in several European countries, including the Netherlands. Adolescents are a target group for primary prevention through vaccination to protect against disease and reduce

  5. Adolescent meningococcal serogroup A, W and Y immune responses following immunization with quadrivalent meningococcal A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine : Optimal age for vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B.; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Sanders, Elisabeth A.M.; Berbers, Guy A M

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently the incidence of meningococcal serogroup Y (MenY) and in particular serogroup W (MenW) invasive disease has risen in several European countries, including the Netherlands. Adolescents are a target group for primary prevention through vaccination to protect against disease and

  6. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: Potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Bos; H.C. Rüumke (Hans); K. Welte (Karl); L. Spanjaard (Lodewijk); L. van Alphen (Loek); M.J. Postma (Maarten)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the

  7. Global epidemiology of serogroup B meningococcal disease and opportunities for prevention with novel recombinant protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Rodolfo; Safadi, Marco Aurelio P; Valenzuela, María Teresa; Torres, Juan P; Finn, Adam; O'Ryan, Miguel

    2018-04-18

    Meningococcal disease (MD) is a major cause of meningitis and sepsis worldwide, with a high case fatality rate and frequent sequelae. Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, W, X and Y are responsible for most of these life-threatening infections, and its unpredictable epidemiology can cause outbreaks in communities, with significant health, social and economic impact. Currently, serogroup B is the main cause of MD in Europe and North America and one of the most prevalent serogroups in Latin America. Mass vaccination strategies using polysaccharide vaccines have been deployed since the 1970s and the use of conjugate vaccines has controlled endemic and epidemic disease caused by serogroups A, C, W and Y and more recently serogroup B using geographically-specific outer membrane vesicle based vaccines. Two novel protein-based vaccines are a significant addition to our armamentarium against N. meningitidis as they provide broad coverage against highly diverse strains in serogroup B and other groups. Early safety, effectiveness and impact data of these vaccines are encouraging. These novel serogroup B vaccines should be actively considered for individuals at increased risk of disease and to control serogroup B outbreaks occurring in institutions or specific regions, as they are likely to save lives and prevent severe sequelae. Incorporation into national programs will require thorough country-specific analysis.

  8. The influence of IS1301 in the capsule biosynthesis locus on meningococcal carriage and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Kugelberg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that insertion of IS1301 in the sia/ctr intergenic region (IGR of serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis (MenC isolates from Spain confers increased resistance against complement-mediated killing. Here we investigate the significance of IS1301 in the same location in N. meningitidis isolates from the UK. PCR and sequencing was used to screen a collection of more than 1500 meningococcal carriage and disease isolates from the UK for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR. IS1301 was not identified in the IGR among vaccine failure strains but was frequently found in serogroup B isolates (MenB from clonal complex 269 (cc269. Almost all IS1301 insertions in cc269 were associated with novel polymorphisms, and did not change capsule expression or resistance to human complement. After excluding sequence types (STs distant from the central genotype within cc269, there was no significant difference for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR of carriage isolates compared to disease isolates. Isolates with insertion of IS1301 in the IGR are not responsible for MenC disease in UK vaccine failures. Novel polymorphisms associated with IS1301 in the IGR of UK MenB isolates do not lead to the resistance phenotype seen for IS1301 in the IGR of MenC isolates.

  9. Influence of antibiotic therapy prior to admission on the efficacy of classical methods for the diagnosis of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemescu, Roxana Elena; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda; Dorneanu, Olivia Simona; Ursu, Ramona Gabriela; Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    To assess the influence of preadmission antibiotic therapy on the results of the classical methods for bacteriological confirmation of meningococcal disease (MD). Retrospective study of the MD cases diagnosed in the "St. Parascheva" Universitary Clinical Infectious Diseases Iaşi between 1994 and 2011. The etiological diagnosis was made by identifying the meningococcus in the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) in 71.9% of the 323 patients and by blood culture in 8%. Preadmission antibiotic therapy received 39% of the patients, thus the sensitivity of test was significantly reduced: direct examination from 64.6% to 43.2% (p antibiotic therapy significantly increased the ratio of cases in which meningococcus was not detected in CSF by any of the classical methods (44% compared to 17.9% in the cases without prior treatment). The proportion of cases in which meningococcal isolation was done by two methods decreased from 38.5% to 19.2%, and of those by all three methods from 16.9% to 5.6% (p antibiotic therapy also decreased the rate of positive blood cultures from 14.7% to 3.5% (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.009). Antibiotic treatment prior to admission significantly decreases the percentage of patients with MD in which meningococcal isolation can be done; this requires the use of a more sensitive diagnosis method (ex. qPCR).

  10. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... previous dose of meningococcal vaccine, to the DTaP vaccine , or to latex If your child has a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome (a disease of the nervous system that causes progressive weakness), talk to your doctor about whether the vaccines are a good idea. Caring for Your Child ...

  11. Vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal capsular group B disease: What have we recently learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a feared and devastating cause of sepsis and meningitis. Disease incidence is highest among infants and children although a significant burden of disease is experienced by adolescents, young adults and those with specific risk-factors. Prevention of disease against capsular groups A, C, W and Y; 4 of the 5 most pathogenic groups is achievable using capsular polysaccharide vaccines. It has only recently been possible to provide protection against capsular group B (MenB) strains following the licensure of a 4 component group B vaccine (4CMenB) in Europe in 2013. Following licensure, 4CMenB has been used in specific at-risk groups and in response to outbreaks of MenB disease. The largest outbreak interventions have been in students at 2 universities in the United States and for all individuals aged 2 months to 20 years of age in Quebec, Canada. The vaccine was recommended in February 2014 for implementation into the UK infant schedule at 2, 4 and 12 months of age, although it has taken over 12 months to resolve procurement discussions to enable implementation. The UK recommendation incorporates prophylactic paracetamol with infant doses when 4CMenB is administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. This is based on recent data demonstrating the ability of paracetamol to reduce fever rates to background levels without impacting immunogenicity. Post-implementation surveillance will be important to provide vaccine efficacy data as this was not possible to determine in pre-licensure studies due to the relative infrequency of MenB cases.

  12. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jasper M.; Rümke, Hans C.; Welte, Robert; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van Alphen, Loek; Postma, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases occur in

  13. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections - Potential epidemiological and economic impact in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.M.; Rumke, H.C.; Welte, R.; Spanjaard, L.; van Alphen, L.; Postma, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases

  14. Association of meningococcal serotypes with the course of disease: serotypes 2a and 2b in the Netherlands, 1959-1981

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjaard, L.; Bol, P.; de Marie, S.; Zanen, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    Case histories of 692 patients with meningococcal disease due to serogroup B, C, or W (W-135) were reviewed to study the association of the serotypes 2a and 2b with the course of disease. The case-fatality rate in group B disease was significantly associated with serotype 2b (B:2b) strains (P =

  15. Use of MenACWY-CRM vaccine in children aged 2 through 23 months at increased risk for meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Jessica R; Rubin, Lorry; McNamara, Lucy; Briere, Elizabeth C; Clark, Thomas A; Cohn, Amanda C

    2014-06-20

    During its October 2013 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended use of a third meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, Novartis), as an additional option for vaccinating infants aged 2 through 23 months at increased risk for meningococcal disease. MenACWY-CRM is the first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine licensed for use in children aged 2 through 8 months. MenACWY-D (Menactra, Sanofi Pasteur) is recommended for use in children aged 9 through 23 months who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease, and Hib-MenCY-TT (MenHibrix, GlaxoSmithKline) is recommended for use in children aged 6 weeks through 18 months at increased risk. This report summarizes information on MenACWY-CRM administration in infants and provides recommendations for vaccine use in infants aged 2 through 23 months who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Because the burden of meningococcal disease in infants is low in the United States and the majority of cases that do occur are caused by serogroup B, which is not included in any vaccine licensed in the United States, only those infants who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease are recommended to receive a meningococcal vaccine.

  16. Meningococcal disease in The Netherlands, 1958-1990: a steady increase in the incidence since 1982 partially caused by new serotypes and subtypes of Neisseria meningitidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, R. J.; Bijlmer, H. A.; Poolman, J. T.; Kuipers, B.; Caugant, D. A.; van Alphen, L.; Dankert, J.; Valkenburg, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to explain a threefold increase in the incidence of meningococcal disease in the Netherlands during the 1980s, we serotyped and subtyped Neisseria meningitidis isolates recovered between 1958 and 1990 from > 3,000 patients with systemic disease. No single strain could be held responsible

  17. The First World War years of Sydney Domville Rowland: an early case of possible laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Peter C; Hodges, A J

    2016-08-01

    Sydney Domville Rowland was a bacteriologist and staff member at the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine when the First World War broke out in 1914. Following a request to the Director of the Lister Institute to staff and equip a mobile field laboratory as quickly as possible, Rowland was appointed to take charge of No. 1 Mobile Laboratory and took up a temporary commission at the rank of Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps. On 9 October 1914, Rowland set out for the European mainland and was subsequently attached to General Headquarters in Saint-Omer, France (October 1914-June 1915), No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station in Lijssenthoek, Belgium (June 1915-February 1916, during which period he was promoted Major), and No. 26 General Hospital in Étaples, France (February 1916-March 1917). His research focused on gas gangrene, typhoid fever, trench fever, wound infection and cerebrospinal fever. In February of 1917, while engaged in identifying meningococcal carriers, Rowland contracted cerebrospinal meningitis to which he succumbed at age 44 on 6 March 1917. His untimely death might have been caused by laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease, especially since Rowland's work with Neisseria meningitidis isolates had extended beyond routine laboratory techniques and included risk procedures like immunisation of rabbits with pathogenic strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Currently, microbiology laboratory workers who are routinely exposed to N. meningitidis isolates are recognised as a population at increased risk for meningococcal disease, for which reason recommended preventive measures include vaccination and handling of isolates within a class II biosafety cabinet. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Meningococcal group B vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Jamie

    2013-06-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a devastating and feared infection with a significant morbidity and mortality profile. The successful impact of meningococcal capsular group C glyconconjugate vaccines introduced into the UK infant immunization schedule in 1999, has resulted in >80% of disease now being attributable to meningococcal capsular group B (MenB). MenB glyconconjugate vaccines are not immunogenic and hence, vaccine design has focused on sub-capsular antigens. Recently, a four component vaccine to combat MenB disease (4CMenB) has progressed through clinical development and was approved by the European Medicines Agency at the end of 2012. This vaccine has proven safe and immunogenic and has been predicted to provide protection against ~73% of the MenB disease from England and Wales. Recommendation/implementation of the vaccine into the UK infant schedule is currently being evaluated. 4CMenB has the potential to provide protection against a significant proportion of MenB disease in the UK which is currently unpreventable.

  19. Association of secondhand smoke exposure with pediatric invasive bacterial disease and bacterial carriage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of epidemiologic studies have observed an association between secondhand smoke (SHS exposure and pediatric invasive bacterial disease (IBD but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of SHS exposure and two outcomes, IBD and pharyngeal carriage of bacteria, for Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae.Two independent reviewers searched Medline, EMBASE, and selected other databases, and screened articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria. We identified 30 case-control studies on SHS and IBD, and 12 cross-sectional studies on SHS and bacterial carriage. Weighted summary odd ratios (ORs were calculated for each outcome and for studies with specific design and quality characteristics. Tests for heterogeneity and publication bias were performed. Compared with those unexposed to SHS, summary OR for SHS exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-2.69 for invasive meningococcal disease, 1.21 (95% CI 0.69-2.14 for invasive pneumococcal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.93-1.62 for invasive Hib disease. For pharyngeal carriage, summary OR was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19-2.36 for N. meningitidis, 1.66 (95% CI 1.33-2.07 for S. pneumoniae, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.48-1.95 for Hib. The association between SHS exposure and invasive meningococcal and Hib diseases was consistent regardless of outcome definitions, age groups, study designs, and publication year. The effect estimates were larger in studies among children younger than 6 years of age for all three IBDs, and in studies with the more rigorous laboratory-confirmed diagnosis for invasive meningococcal disease (summary OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.72-6.13.When considered together with evidence from direct smoking and biological mechanisms, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that SHS exposure may be associated with invasive meningococcal disease. The

  20. [Clinical features and prognostic factors of meningococcal disease: a case series study in Chile during the 2012-2013 outbreak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Isabel; Olea, Andrea; López, Darío; Loayza, Sergio; Nájera, Manuel; González, Claudia; Poffald, Lucy; Hirmas, Macarena; Delgado, Iris; Pedroni, Elena; Alfaro, Tania; Gormaz, Ana María; Sanhueza, Gabriel; Vial, Pablo; Dabanch, Jeannette; Gallegos, Doris; Aguilera, Ximena

    2015-10-01

    Meningococcal disease (MD) is a major global problem because of its case fatality rate and sequels. Since 2012 cases of serogroup W have increased in Chile, with nonspecific clinical presentation, high case fatality rate and serious consequences. To characterize the evolution and outcome of MD cases between January 2012 and March 2013 in Chile. Case series considering 149 MD cases of 7 regions. A questionnaire was applied and clinical records were reviewed, including individual, agent, clinical course and healthcare process variables. The analysis allowed to obtain estimates of the OR as likelihood of dying. 51.5% was meningococcemia, the case fatality rate reached 27%, prevailing serogroup W (46.6%). Factors that increased the probability of dying: > age, belonging to indigenous people, having lived a stressful event, having diarrhea, impaired consciousness, cardiovascular symptoms, low oxygen saturation and low Glasgow coma scale score. The case fatality rate exceeded normal levels and was higher in serogroup W. Increasing in this serogroup, associated to the increased presence of nonspecific symptoms or rapid progression to septicemia, hit a health system accustomed to more classic meningococcal disease presentation, which could partly explain the observed increased fatality rate.

  1. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  2. Risk Factors for Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease during Outbreak among Men who Have Sex with Men, New York City, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridpath, Alison; Greene, Sharon K; Robinson, Byron F; Weiss, Don

    2015-08-01

    Risk factors for illness during a serogroup C meningococcal disease outbreak among men who have sex with men in New York City, New York, USA, in 2012-2013 included methamphetamine and cocaine use and sexually transmitted infections. Outbreak investigations should consider routinely capturing information regarding drug use and sex-related risk factors.

  3. Epidemiological impact and cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination with Bexsero(®) to reduce meningococcal group B disease in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hannah; Irving, Tom; Koch, Judith; Trotter, Caroline L; Ultsch, Bernhard; Weidemann, Felix; Wichmann, Ole; Hellenbrand, Wiebke

    2016-06-17

    Bexsero, a new vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease (MenB), was licensed in Europe in January 2013. In Germany, Bexsero is recommended for persons at increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease, but not for universal childhood vaccination. To support decision making we adapted the independently developed model for England to the German setting to predict the potential health impact and cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination with Bexsero(®) against MenB disease. We used both cohort and transmission dynamic mathematical models, the latter allowing for herd effects, to consider the impact of vaccination on individuals aged 0-99 years. Vaccination strategies included infant and adolescent vaccination, alone or in combination, and with one-off catch-up programmes. German specific data were used where possible from routine surveillance data and the literature. We assessed the impact of vaccination through cases averted and quality adjusted life years (QALY) gained and calculated costs per QALY gained. Assuming 65% vaccine uptake and 82% strain coverage, infant vaccination was estimated to prevent 15% (34) of MenB cases over the lifetime of one birth cohort. Including herd effects from vaccination increased the cases averted by infant vaccination to 22%, with an estimated 8461 infants requiring vaccination to prevent one case. In the short term the greatest health benefit is achieved through routine infant vaccination with large-scale catch-up, which could reduce cases by 24.9% after 5 years and 27.9% after 10 years. In the long term (20+ years) policies including routine adolescent vaccination are most favourable if herd effects are assumed. Under base case assumptions with a vaccine list price of €96.96 the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was >€500,000 per QALY for all considered strategies. Given the current very low incidence of MenB disease in Germany, universal vaccination with Bexsero(®) would prevent only a small absolute

  4. Enfermedad por meningococo, Neisseria meningitidis: perspectiva epidemiológica, clínica y preventiva Meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis: epidemiological, clinical, and preventive perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Almeida-González

    2004-10-01

    disponibilidad de vacuna y de medicamentos para quimioprofilaxis, debido a que se ha documentado un incremento de casos de enfermedad por N. meningitidis, serogrupo C, en el país. Es por lo anterior que esta revisión está dirigida a proporcionar al personal de salud un recordatorio de los aspectos relevantes de la epidemiología, y de los clínicos y preventivos de la enfermedad meningocóccica.Bacterial meningitis constitutes a significant global public health problem. In particular, Neisseria meningitidis continues to be a public health problem among human populations in both developed and developing countries. Meningococcal infection is present as an endemic and an epidemic disease. Meningococcal disease is manifested not only as meningitis, but also as meningococcemia. The latter is usually fulminant. The global persistence of N. meningitidis is due to the significant number of carriers and the dynamics of transmission and disease. Approximately 500 million people worldwide are carriers of the bacterium in their nasopharynx. Multiple factors have been identified that predispose to the transmissibility of N. meningitidis, including active or passive inhalation tobacco smoking, upper viral respiratory tract infections, drought seasons, and overcrowding. These factors explain the frequent occurrence of outbreaks in military barracks, schools, prisons, and dormitories. Some of the determinants of invasiveness of the bacteria include nasopharyngeal mucosal damage in colonized individuals, virulence of the strains, absence of bactericidal antibodies, and deficiencies of the complement system. During both endemic and epidemic scenarios of meningococcal disease, control measures should include treating the cases with appropriate antimicrobial therapy (penicillin, ceftriaxone, or chloramphenicol; providing chemoprophylactic drugs to contacts (rifampin or ciprofloxacin, and close observation of contacts. Nevertheless, the key to effective control and prevention of meningococcal

  5. Factors contributing to the immunogenicity of meningococcal conjugate vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Various glycoprotein conjugate vaccines have been developed for the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease, having significant advantages over pure polysaccharide vaccines. One of the most important features of the conjugate vaccines is the induction of a T-cell dependent immune response, which enables both the induction of immune memory and a booster response after repeated immunization. The nature of the carrier protein to which the polysaccharides are chemically linked, is often regarded as the main component of the vaccine in determining its immunogenicity. However, other factors can have a significant impact on the vaccine's profile. In this review, we explore the physico-chemical properties of meningococcal conjugate vaccines, which can significantly contribute to the vaccine's immunogenicity. We demonstrate that the carrier is not the sole determining factor of the vaccine's profile, but, moreover, that the conjugate vaccine's immunogenicity is the result of multiple physico-chemical structures and characteristics. PMID:26934310

  6. Increase of Neisseria meningitidis W:cc11 invasive disease in Chile has no correlation with carriage in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina S Rubilar

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human exclusive pathogen that can lead to invasive meningococcal disease or may be carried in the upper respiratory tract without symptoms. The relationship between carriage and disease remains poorly understood but it is widely accepted that decreasing carriage by immunization should lead to a reduction of invasive cases. Latin America has experienced an increased incidence of serogroup W invasive cases of Neisseria meningitidis in the last decade. Specifically in Chile, despite low total incidence of invasive cases, serogroup W has become predominant since 2011 and has been associated with elevated mortality. Expecting to gain insight into the epidemiology of this disease, this study has used molecular typing schemes to compare Neisseria meningitidis isolates causing invasive disease with those isolates collected from adolescent carriers during the same period in Chile. A lower carriage of the serogroup W clonal complex ST-11/ET37 than expected was found; whereas, the same clonal complex accounted for 66% of total invasive meningococcal disease cases in the country that year. A high diversity of PorA variable regions and fHbp peptides was also ascertained in the carrier isolates compared to the invasive ones. According to the results shown here, the elevated number of serogroup W invasive cases in our country cannot be explained by a rise of carriage of pathogenic isolates. Overall, this study supports the idea that some strains, as W:cc11 found in Chile, possess an enhanced virulence to invade the host. Notwithstanding hypervirulence, this strain has not caused an epidemic in Chile. Finally, as genetic transfer occurs often, close surveillance of Neisseria meningitidis strains causing disease, and particularly hypervirulent W:cc11, should be kept as a priority in our country, in order to prepare the best response to face genetic changes that could lead to enhanced fitness of this pathogen.

  7. Atypical meningococcal meningitis with rashless presentation:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunita; Singh Manpreet; Kapoor Dheeraj

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is the major health problem in developing world. The clinical presentation is varied, ranging from transient fever and bacteraemia to fulminant disease with death ensuing within hours of the onset of clinical symptoms. The classical clinical manifestations of meningococcal disease have been well described, but atypical presentations if unrecognized, may lead to a delay in treatment and fatal outcome. We here report a case presented with atypical presentation of meningococcal meningitis without classical rash, which was diagnosed and managed successfully.

  8. In silico analysis of different generation β lactams antibiotics with penicillin binding protein-2 of Neisseria meningitidis for curing meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Tripathi, Pooja; Srivastava, Navita; Gupta, Dwijendra

    2014-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a gram negative, diplococcic pathogen responsible for the meningococcal disease and fulminant septicemia. Penicillin-binding proteins-2 (PBPs) is crucial for the cell wall biosynthesis during cell proliferation of N. meningitidis and these are the target for β-lactam antibiotics. For many years penicillin has been recognized as the antibiotic for meningococcal disease but the meningococcus has seemed to be antibiotic resistance. In the present work we have verified the molecular interaction of Penicillin binding protein-2 N. meningitidis to different generation of β-lactam antibiotics and concluded that the third generation of β-lactam antibiotics shows efficient binding with Penicillin binding protein-2 of N. meningitidis. On the basis of binding efficiency and inhibition constant, ceftazidime emerged as the most efficient antibiotic amongst the other advanced β-lactam antibiotics against Penicillin-binding protein-2 of N. meningitidis.

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  10. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline M.; Mesaros, Narcisa; Van Der Wielen, Marie; Baine, Yaela

    2011-01-01

    Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles. PMID:21991444

  11. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles.

  12. A functional single nucleotide polymorphism in the thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) gene associates with outcome of meningococcal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer Hovinga, J. A.; Franco, R. F.; Zago, M. A.; ten Cate, Hugo; Westendorp, R. G. J.; Reitsma, P. H.

    2004-01-01

    In meningococcal sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation with deposition of fibrin and formation of microthrombi occurs in various organs and enhanced inhibition of fibrinolysis is associated with adverse outcome. Recently, TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) was identified as

  13. Meningococcal Disease Caused by Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B Serotype 4 in São Paulo, Brazil, 1990 to 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchi Claudio Tavares

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A large epidemic of serogroup B meningococcal disease (MD, has been occurring in greater São Paulo, Brazil, since 1988.21 A Cuban-produced vaccine, based on outer-membrane-protein (OMP from serogroup B: serotype 4: serosubtype P1.15 (B:4:P1.15 Neisseria meningitidis, was given to about 2.4 million children aged from 3 months to 6 years during 1989 and 1990. The administration of vaccine had little or no measurable effects on this outbreak. In order to detect clonal changes that could explain the continued increase in the incidence of disease after the vaccination, we serotyped isolates recovered between 1990 and 1996 from 834 patients with systemic disease. Strains B:4:P1.15, which was detected in the area as early as 1977, has been the most prevalent phenotype since 1988. These strains are still prevalent in the area and were responsible for about 68% of 834 serogroup B cases in the last 7 years. We analyzed 438 (52% of these strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs of rRNA genes (ribotyping. The most frequent pattern obtained was referred to as Rb1 (68%. We concluded that the same clone of B:4:P1.15-Rb1 strains was the most prevalent strain and responsible for the continued increase of incidence of serogroup B MD cases in greater São Paulo during the last 7 years in spite of the vaccination trial.

  14. Serogroup B Meningococcal vaccine (MenB) - What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disabilities such as hearing loss, brain damage, kidney damage, amputations, nervous system problems, or severe scars from skin grafts. Serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccines can help prevent meningococcal disease caused by serogroup ...

  15. Temporal associations between national outbreaks of meningococcal serogroup W and C disease in the Netherlands and England: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knol, Mirjam J; Hahné, Susan J M; Lucidarme, Jay; Campbell, Helen; de Melker, Hester E; Gray, Stephen J; Borrow, Ray; Ladhani, Shamez N; Ramsay, Mary E; van der Ende, Arie

    2017-10-01

    Since 2009, the incidence of meningococcal serogroup W disease has increased rapidly in the UK because of a single strain (the so-called original UK strain) belonging to the hypervirulent sequence type-11 clonal complex (cc11), with a variant outbreak strain (the so-called 2013 strain) emerging in 2013. Subsequently, the Netherlands has had an increase in the incidence of meningococcal serogroup W disease. We assessed the temporal and phylogenetic associations between the serogroup W outbreaks in the Netherlands and England, and the historical serogroup C outbreaks in both countries. For this observational cohort study, we used national surveillance data for meningococcal serogroup W and serogroup C disease in the Netherlands and England for the epidemiological years (July to June) 1992-93 to 2015-16. We also did whole genome sequencing and core genome multilocus sequence typing (1546 loci) on serogroup W disease isolates from both countries for surveillance years 2008-09 to 2015-16. We used Poisson regression to compare the annual relative increase in the incidence of serogroup W and serogroup C between both countries. In the Netherlands, the incidence of meningococcal serogroup W disease increased substantially in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15, with an incidence rate ratio of 5·2 (95% CI 2·0-13·5) and 11% case fatality. In England, the incidence increased substantially in 2012-13 compared with 2011-12, with an incidence rate ratio of 1·8 (1·2-2·8). The relative increase in the Netherlands from 2014-15 to 2015-16 was 418% (95% CI 99-1248), which was significantly higher than the annual relative increase of 79% (61-99) per year in England from 2011-12 to 2014-15 (p=0·03). Cases due to meningococcal serogroup W cc11 (MenW:cc11) emerged in 2012-13 in the Netherlands. Of 29 MenW:cc11 cases found up to 2015-16, 26 (90%) were caused by the 2013 strain. For both the current serogroup W outbreak and the historical serogroup C outbreak, the increase in incidence

  16. Invasive Paget Disease of the Vulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Chiara; Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Scaffa, Cono; Perotto, Stefania; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Recalcati, Dario; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Extramammary Paget disease of the vulva (EPDV) is a rare occurrence with an indolent and relapsing course. Progression to invasion occurs in 4% to 19% of cases. The aim of this study is to report clinical-pathological features and outcomes of patients treated for invasive EPDV. Data of consecutive patients treated between 2000 and 2017 for invasive EPDV were reviewed. Among 79 patients with EPDV, 10 (12.7%) presented a microinvasive or invasive form at first diagnosis or during follow-up. All of them underwent upfront radical surgery; 7 (70%) received subsequent radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. The mortality rate was 40%. The recurrence rate after treatment for invasive forms was 60%, with a mean time to first recurrence of 20 (range, 5-36) months. Our study confirms that invasive EPDV remains a rare gynecological neoplasm with a poor prognosis. Multicentre trials or well-organized prospective data collection could improve the knowledge about the management of invasive EPDV.

  17. Effectiveness and impact of a reduced infant schedule of 4CMenB vaccine against group B meningococcal disease in England: a national observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Andrews, Nick J; Beebeejaun, Kazim; Campbell, Helen; Ribeiro, Sonia; Ward, Charlotte; White, Joanne M; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary E; Ladhani, Shamez N

    2016-12-03

    In September, 2015, the UK became the first country to introduce the multicomponent group B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero) into a publicly funded national immunisation programme. A reduced two-dose priming schedule was offered to infants at 2 months and 4 months, alongside an opportunistic catch-up for 3 month and 4 month olds. 4CMenB was predicted to protect against 73-88% of MenB strains. We aimed to assess the effectiveness and impact of 4CMenB in vaccine-eligible infants in England. Public Health England (PHE) undertakes enhanced surveillance of meningococcal disease through a combination of clinical, public health, and laboratory reporting. Laboratory-confirmed cases of meningococcal disease are followed up with PHE local health protection teams, general practitioners, and hospital clinicians to collect demographic data, vaccination history, clinical presentation, and outcome. For cases diagnosed between Sept 1, 2015, and June 30, 2016, vaccine effectiveness was assessed using the screening method. Impact was assessed by comparing numbers of cases of MenB in vaccine-eligible children to equivalent cohorts in the previous 4 years and to cases in vaccine-ineligible children. Coverage of 4CMenB in infants eligible for routine vaccination was high, achieving 95·5% for one dose and 88·6% for two doses by 6 months of age. Two-dose vaccine effectiveness was 82·9% (95% CI 24·1-95·2) against all MenB cases, equivalent to a vaccine effectiveness of 94·2% against the highest predicted MenB strain coverage of 88%. Compared with the prevaccine period, there was a 50% incidence rate ratio (IRR) reduction in MenB cases in the vaccine-eligible cohort (37 cases vs average 74 cases; IRR 0·50 [95% CI 0·36-0·71]; p=0·0001), irrespective of the infants' vaccination status or predicted MenB strain coverage. Similar reductions were observed even after adjustment for disease trends in vaccine-eligible and vaccine-ineligible children. The two-dose 4CMen

  18. Meningococcal Immunizations for Preteens and Teens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-11

    This podcast provides information about vaccine recommendations to help prevent meningococcal disease in preteens and teens.  Created: 8/11/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch (MVPDB).   Date Released: 8/11/2015.

  19. The Dual Role of Lipids of the Lipoproteins in Trumenba, a Self-Adjuvanting Vaccine Against Meningococcal Meningitis B Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yin; Friese, Olga V; Runnels, Herbert A; Khandke, Lakshmi; Zlotnick, Gary; Aulabaugh, Ann; Gore, Thomas; Vidunas, Eugene; Raso, Stephen W; Novikova, Elena; Byrne, Emilia; Schlittler, Michael; Stano, Donald; Dufield, Robert L; Kumar, Sandeep; Anderson, Annaliesa S; Jansen, Kathrin U; Rouse, Jason C

    2016-11-01

    Trumenba (bivalent rLP2086) is a vaccine licensed for the prevention of meningococcal meningitis disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (NmB) in individuals 10-25 years of age in the USA. The vaccine is composed of two factor H binding protein (fHbp) variants that were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli as native lipoproteins: rLP2086-A05 and rLP2086-B01. The vaccine was shown to induce potent bactericidal antibodies against a broad range of NmB isolates expressing fHbp that were different in sequence from the fHbp vaccine antigens. Here, we describe the characterization of the vaccine antigens including the elucidation of their structure which is characterized by two distinct motifs, the polypeptide domain and the N-terminal lipid moiety. In the vaccine formulation, the lipoproteins self-associate to form micelles driven by the hydrophobicity of the lipids and limited by the size of the folded polypeptides. The micelles help to increase the structural stability of the lipoproteins in the absence of bacterial cell walls. Analysis of the lipoproteins in Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation assays revealed their TLR2 agonist activity. This activity was lost with removal of the O-linked fatty acids, similar to removal of all lipids, demonstrating that this moiety plays an adjuvant role in immune activation. The thorough understanding of the structure and function of each moiety of the lipoproteins, as well as their relationship, lays the foundation for identifying critical parameters to guide vaccine development and manufacture.

  20. Meningococcal meningitis C in Tamil Nadu, public health perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; Thomas, Beeson

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has rarely been reported in Tamil Nadu. We report here two children diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, on May 2014. The causative strain was Neisseria meningitidis serotype C. The role of the primary care physician in early diagnosis, appropriate referral, and preventive measures of this disease to the immediate family and community is stressed.

  1. Meningococcal B vaccine. An immunogenic vaccine possibly useful during outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Invasive meningococcal infections can be life-threatening and cause severe sequelae. Antibiotic therapy is only partially effective. Bexsero is the first meningococcal B vaccine to be approved in the European Union. It contains four capsular antigens from various strains of group B meningococci. Clinical trials of this meningococcal B vaccine did not assess clinical protection. Two immunogenicity studies in adults, one in adolescents and six in infants, are available. They established the immunogenicity of the meningococcal B vaccine, determined age-appropriate vaccination schedules, and verified that concomitant administration of other vaccines did not undermine its immunogenicity. In the absence of relevant clinical trials, an in vitro study showed that sera from vaccinated individuals were likely to have bactericidal activity against 85% of 200 invasive meningococcal B strains isolated in France in 2007-2008. The meningococcal B vaccine provoked local adverse effects in most vaccinees, including local erythema, induration and pain. Fever occurred in about half of vaccinated children. Six cases of Kawasaki syndrome have been reported in children who received the vaccine, compared to only one case in control groups. In practice, the harm-benefit balance of this meningococcal B vaccine justify using it during outbreaks, provided the outbreak strain is covered by the vaccine antigens. Vaccinees should be enrolled in studies designed to evaluate clinical efficacy and to better determine the risk of Kawasaki syndrome.

  2. Meningococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Iraq Nigeria Somalia South Sudan Syrian Arab Republic Yemen All emergencies » Latest » By country By disease Disease ... conditions in Africa in areas with limited health infrastructure and resources, ceftriaxone is the drug of choice. \\ ...

  3. New versus old meningococcal group B vaccines: how the new ones may benefit infants & toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Cristina, M L; Domnich, A; Gasparini, R

    2013-12-01

    Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is associated with high mortality and high disability rates and mainly affects children under one year of age. Vaccination is the best way to prevent meningococcal disease, especially in infants and toddlers. The introduction of massive meningococcal serogroup C vaccination has drastically reduced the incidence of disease caused by this serogroup, and serogroup B has now become the main causative agent in several industrialized countries. The first serogroup B vaccines, which were used for more than two decades, were based on outer membrane vesicles and proved to be protective only against specific epidemic strains in Cuba, Norway, Brazil and New Zealand. Moreover, these often elicited a scant immune response in young children. Innovative genomics-based reverse vaccinology subsequently enabled researchers to identify genes encoding for surface proteins that are able to elicit a strong immune response against several B strains. This important discovery led to the development and recent approval in Europe of the four-component meningococcal serogroup B (4CMenB) vaccine. Large clinical trials have shown high immunogenicity and tolerability and acceptable safety levels of 4CMenB in infants and toddlers. This vaccine is expected to cover a large number of circulating invasive strains and may also be efficacious against other serogroups. Young children are particularly vulnerable to the devastating consequences of meningococcal disease. Given the high performance of 4CMenB and its non-interference with routine vaccinations, this age-group will be the first to benefit from the introduction of this vaccine.

  4. Invasive pests—insects and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Duerr; Paul A. Mistretta

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsNonnative pest species have increasing impacts in the South regardless of climate change, patterns of land ownership, or changes in the composition of vegetation.“New” nonnative invasive insects and diseases will have serious impacts on southern forests over the next 50 years. Some species such as emerald ash borer...

  5. A probable prehistoric case of meningococcal disease from San Francisco Bay: Next generation sequencing of Neisseria meningitidis from dental calculus and osteological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerkens, Jelmer W; Nichols, Ruth V; Murray, Gemma G R; Perez, Katherine; Murga, Engel; Kaijankoski, Phil; Rosenthal, Jeffrey S; Engbring, Laurel; Shapiro, Beth

    2018-05-25

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of ancient dental calculus samples from a prehistoric site in San Francisco Bay, CA-SCL-919, reveals a wide range of potentially pathogenic bacteria. One older adult woman, in particular, had high levels of Neisseria meningitidis and low levels of Haemophilus influenzae, species that were not observed in the calculus from three other individuals. Combined with the presence of incipient endocranial lesions and pronounced meningeal grooves, we interpret this as an ancient case of meningococcal disease. This disease afflicts millions around the globe today, but little is known about its (pre)history. With additional sampling, we suggest NGS of calculus offers an exciting new window into the evolutionary history of these bacterial species and their interactions with humans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary Meningococcal Polyarthritis in an Adult Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Celso Giordan Cavalcanti Sarinho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary joint infection caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Neisseria meningitidis is rare. Normally, joint involvement comes secondary to meningitis or severe sepsis caused by this agent. When primary arthritis is seen, monoarthritis is the most common presentation. A meningococcal polyarthritis is described in less than 10 case reports according to current literature. This case report aims to briefly review this rare clinical event in an adult woman with no previous history of rheumatological disease. Early diagnosis of polyarthritis caused by meningococcal bacteria usually present a good prognosis when properly treated.

  7. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A meningococcal serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac#x2122;) is being deployed in countries of the African meningitis belt. Experience with other polysaccharide/protein conjugate vaccines has shown that an important part of their success has been their ability to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage and hence to stop transmission and induce herd immunity. If PsA-TT is to achieve the goal of preventing epidemics, it must be able to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage as well as invasive meningococcal disease and whether PsA-TT can prevent pharyngeal carriage needs to be determined. To address this issue, a consortium (the African Meningococcal Carriage (MenAfriCar) consortium) was established in 2009 to investigate the pattern of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt prior to and after the introduction of PsA-TT. This article describes how the consortium was established, its objectives and the standardised field and laboratory methods that were used to achieve these objectives. The experience of the MenAfriCar consortium will help in planning future studies on the epidemiology of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt and elsewhere. Un vaccin conjugué contenant un polysaccharide du sérogroupe A méningococcique et une anatoxine du tétanos (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac™) est en cours de déploiement dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite. L’ expérience avec d’ autres vaccins conjugués polysaccharide/protéine a montré qu’ une partie importante de leur succès a été leur capacité à empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé et donc à arrêter la transmission et à induire une immunité de group. Si PsA-TT doit d’ atteindre l’ objectif de prévenir les épidémies, il devrait être en mesure d’ empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé ainsi que la méningococcie invasive et le fait que PsA-TT puisse emp

  8. The capsular group B meningococcal vaccine, 4CMenB : clinical experience and potential efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollier, Christine S; Dold, Christina; Marsay, Leanne; Sadarangani, Manish; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Capsular group B meningococcal disease is a leading cause of childhood meningitis and septicaemia. Up to 10% of sufferers die, and sequelae remain in > 30% of survivors. A vaccine, four component meningococcal group B ( 4CMenB ), designed with the aim to induce broad coverage against this highly variable bacterium, has been licensed in countries including in the European Union, Canada and Australia. Immunogenicity and safety data, published in peer-reviewed literature between 2004 and 2014, are presented in the context of the recent recommendation for the use of the vaccine in infants in the UK. 4CMenB induces significant reactogenicity when administered with routine infant vaccines, in particular with respect to fever rates. Fevers can be somewhat reduced using paracetamol. The efficacy of the vaccine is unknown but has been extrapolated from effectiveness data obtained from use of one of its components in New Zealand, immunogenicity data from clinical trials and estimation of coverage from in vitro studies. These data suggest that the vaccine will prevent a proportion of invasive meningococcal disease cases in infants and young children. Implementation and well-planned post-marketing surveillance will address uncertainties over field effectiveness.

  9. A large portion of meningococcal antigen typing system-negative meningococcal strains from spain is killed by sera from adolescents and infants immunized with 4CMenB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, R; Biolchi, A; Moschioni, M; Giuliani, M M; Pizza, M; Vázquez, J A

    2015-04-01

    A new vaccine (the 4CMenB 4-component protein vaccine [Bexsero], which includes PorA, factor H-binding protein [fHbp], neisserial heparin-binding antigen [NHBA], and Neisseria adhesin A [NadA]) against serogroup B meningococci has recently been approved for use in people older than age 2 months in Europe, Australia, and Canada. Preapproval clinical efficacy studies are not feasible for invasive meningococcal disease because its incidence is low/very low, and the serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer (or the human SBA [hSBA] titer when human complement is used in the assay) has been used as a surrogate marker of protection. However, the hSBA assay cannot be used on a large scale, and therefore, a meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS) was developed. MATS combines conventional PorA genotyping with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that quantifies both the expression and the cross-reactivity of antigenic variants. The assay has been used to evaluate the potential of the 4CMenB meningococcal group B vaccine to cover group B strains in several countries. Some recent data suggest that MATS is a conservative predictor of strain coverage. We used pooled sera from adolescents and infants to test by the hSBA assay 10 meningococcal group B strains isolated in Spain that were negative for the 3 antigens (n = 9) or that had very low levels of the 3 antigens (n = 1) by MATS. We found that all strains were killed by sera from adolescents and that 5 of the 10 strains were also killed, although at a low titer, by sera from infants. Our data confirm that MATS underestimates vaccine coverage. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines: What You Need to Know (VIS) Page Content ... to help protect against serogroup B . Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines There are two kinds of meningococcal vaccines licensed ...

  11. Treatment and prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Alegría, A R; Pintado, V; Barbolla, I

    2018-02-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a severe infection that mainly affects patients with associated comorbidity. The paediatric conjugate vaccination has resulted in a change in the adult vaccination strategy. The antibiotic resistance of pneumococcus is not currently a severe problem. Nevertheless, the World Health Organisation has included pneumococcus among the bacteria whose treatment requires the introduction of new drugs, such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole. Although the scientific evidence is still limited, the combination of beta-lactams and macrolides is recommended as empiric therapy for bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection...... with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Case series and experimental data have shown that the capsular serotype is involved in the pathogenesis and a determinant of disease outcome. METHODS: Retrospective review of 464 cases of invasive disease among adults diagnosed...

  13. INVASIVE AMOEBIASIS COMPLICATING IFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziglam H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONAmoebiasis, which is caused by the intestinal protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, is a ubiquitous parasitic infection affecting approximately 10% of the world’s population and causing more deaths every year (100,000 deaths than any other parasitic infection, with the exception of malaria and schistosomiasis [1–3]. Most individuals with an E. histolytica infection are asymptomatic, but some develop severe invasive disease, such as amoebic colitis. Other manifestations, such as pulmonary, cardiac or brain involvement, are rare. Intestinal amoebiasis can probably also present as a chronic, non-dysenteric syndrome of diarrhoea, weight loss, and abdominal pain that can last for years and mimic inflammatory bowel disease. Fulminant colitis with bowel necrosis leading to perforation and peritonitis occurs in only about 0.5% of cases, but it is associated with a mortality rate of more than 40%. Patients with invasive amoebiasis living in the United Kingdom and other developed countries generally acquire the infection in another country in which the pathogenic species is endemic. Areas that have high rates of amoebic infection include India, Africa, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. Infection with pathogenic E. histolytica is not a common cause of travelers’ diarrhoea, and gastrointestinal infection is uncommon in travelers who have spent less than one month in endemic areas.

  14. Polymorphisms in PARP, IL1B, IL4, IL10, C1INH, DEFB1, and DEFA4 in meningococcal disease in three populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, M.; Vermont, C.L.; Houwing-Duistermaat, J.J.; Haralambous, E.; Gaast-de Jongh, C.E. van der; Hazelzet, J.A.; Faust, S.N.; Betts, H.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Levin, M.; Groot, R. de

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of meningococcal infections involves activation of the complement system, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, antimicrobial peptides, and apoptosis. We hypothesized that variations in genes encoding these products are involved in the susceptibility to and severity of

  15. POLYMORPHISMS IN PARP, IL1B, IL4, IL10, C1INH, DEFB1, AND DEFA4 IN MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE IN THREE POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, Marieke; Vermont, Clementien L.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Haralambous, Elene; Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Hazelzet, Jan A.; Faust, Saul N.; Betts, Helen; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Levin, Michael; de Groot, Ronald

    The pathogenesis of meningococcal infections involves activation of the complement system, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, antimicrobial peptides, and apoptosis. We hypothesized that variations in genes encoding these products are involved in the susceptibility to and severity of

  16. Effect of a serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) on serogroup A meningococcal meningitis and carriage in Chad: a community study [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugla, D M; Gami, J P; Gamougam, K; Naibei, N; Mbainadji, L; Narbé, M; Toralta, J; Kodbesse, B; Ngadoua, C; Coldiron, M E; Fermon, F; Page, A-L; Djingarey, M H; Hugonnet, S; Harrison, O B; Rebbetts, L S; Tekletsion, Y; Watkins, E R; Hill, D; Caugant, D A; Chandramohan, D; Hassan-King, M; Manigart, O; Nascimento, M; Woukeu, A; Trotter, C; Stuart, J M; Maiden, McJ; Greenwood, B M

    2014-01-04

    effective at prevention of serogroup A invasive meningococcal disease and carriage in Chad. How long this protection will persist needs to be established. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and Médecins Sans Frontères. Copyright © 2014 Daugla et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Meningococcal vaccination for international travellers from Greece visiting developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Smeti, Paraskevi; Maltezou, Helena C

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a serious disease. Travel-associated infection for the general traveller is low; however regular epidemics in indigenous population, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to assess meningococcal vaccination for international travellers from Greece. A prospective questionnaire-based study was conducted during 2009-2013. A total of 5283 travellers were studied (median age: 39.2 years); Meningococcal tetravalent vaccine (A,C,W135,Y) was delivered to 1150 (21.8%) of them. Of those who travelled to the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa, 73.1% and 21.2% received meningococcal vaccine, respectively. Of those travellers who travelled to sub-Saharan Africa from November to June and from July to October, 22.1% and 20.6% were vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine, respectively. Of all travellers who travelled for travelled for recreation, and 13.8% of those who travelled for work. Of travellers who stayed in urban, in rural, and in urban and rural areas, 32%, 11.6% and 12.7% were vaccinated, respectively. Meningococcal vaccine was delivered to 29.2%, 21.1%, 19.4% and 5.1% of those who stayed in hotels, at local people's home, in camps, and on ships, respectively. The association of meningococcal vaccine administration with the destination, duration and purpose of travel, area of stay and type of accommodation was statistically significant. There is a need to improve meningococcal vaccine recommendations for travellers from Greece, particularly for high risk populations, such as VFRs, business travellers and those visiting sub-Saharan Africa especially during the dry season. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology of vaccine-preventable invasive diseases in Catalonia in the era of conjugate vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciruela, Pilar; Martínez, Ana; Izquierdo, Conchita; Hernández, Sergi; Broner, Sonia; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Domínguez, Àngela; of Catalonia Study Group, the Microbiological Reporting System

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the incidence and distribution of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) and invasive Hemophilus influenzae disease (IHiD) notified by hospital laboratories to the Microbiological Reporting System of Catalonia between 2005 and 2009. Incidence rates were compared using the rate ratio (RR) and 95% CI were calculated. A value of p cases, 6,012 were IPD, 436 IMD and 213 IHiD. The global annual incidence per 105 inhabitants was 16.62 (95% CI 16.20–17.04) for IPD, 1.21 (95% CI 1.09–1.32) for IMD and 0.59 (95% CI 0.51–0.67) for IHiD. IPD increased in 2009 compared with 2005 (RR:1.55, 95%CI: 1.43–1.70) and IMD and IHiD remained stable. Pneumonia was the most-frequent clinical manifestation of IPD (75.6%) and IHiD (44.1%) and meningoencephalitis with or without sepsis for IMD (70.6%). The male:female ratio was 1.37 for IPD, 1.0 for IMD and 1.15 for IHiD. The age groups with the highest incidence were the ≤ 2 y and 2–4 y groups for IPD (66.40 and 50.66/100,000 persons-year) and IMD (14.88 and 7.26/100,000 persons-year) and the ≤ 2 y and ≥ 65 y groups for IHiD (1.88 and 1.89/100,000 persons-year). The most-frequent serotypes were serotype 1 (19.0%) in IPD and untypeable serotypes (60.8%) in IHiD. Serogroup B (78.3%) was the most frequent in IMD. S. pneumoniae is the most-frequent agent causing invasive disease in Catalonia. The main clinical manifestations were pneumonia in IPD and IHiD and meningitis in IMD. The main causative agent of meningitis was N. meningitidis in people aged < 20 y and S. pneumoniae in people aged ≥ 20 y. Vaccination with conjugate vaccines may reduce the risk of infectious disease in our setting. PMID:23303166

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  3. Meningococcal serogroup B strain coverage of the multicomponent 4CMenB vaccine with corresponding regional distribution and clinical characteristics in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2007-08 and 2014-15: a qualitative and quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Newbold, Lynne; Slater, Stephanie; Stella, Maria; Moschioni, Monica; Lucidarme, Jay; De Paola, Rosita; Giuliani, Maria; Serino, Laura; Gray, Stephen J; Clark, Stephen A; Findlow, Jamie; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Ramsay, Mary E; Ladhani, Shamez N; Borrow, Ray

    2017-07-01

    The UK introduced 4CMenB-a multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease-into the national infant immunisation programme in September, 2015. The Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) was used to estimate coverage by 4CMenB of invasive meningococcal group B isolates obtained during 2007-08 in England and Wales (MATS coverage). We aimed to repeat the MATS survey for invasive meningococcal group B isolates obtained during 2014-15, before 4CMenB introduction; compare strain coverage between 2007-08 and 2014-15; and investigate associations between MATS coverage, age, region, and disease outcomes. Invasive serogroup B meningococcal isolates from cases in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland during 2014-15 were assayed using MATS and compared with 2007-08 data. MATS coverage was assessed by geographical region and age group. Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes were assessed according to MATS coverage for 2014-15 English cases. In 2014-15, 165 of 251 (66%; 95% CI 52-80) meningococcal group B isolates were estimated by MATS to be covered by 4CMenB, compared with 391 of 535 (73%; 95% CI 57-87) in 2007-08. The proportion of MATS-positive isolates with one vaccine antigen increased from 23% (122 of 535) in 2007-08 to 31% (78 of 251) in 2014-15, whereas the proportion with more than one antigen fell from 50% (269 of 535) to 35% (87 of 251). This effect reflected changes in circulating strains, particularly ST-269 clonal complex strains. MATS coverage increased with age, varied by geographical region, and was associated with more severe disease. In 2014-15, two-thirds of meningococcal group B isolates were predicted to be covered by 4CMenB. Temporal changes in MATS coverage underscore the need for continued monitoring of antigen expression and diversity, particularly in countries with 4CMenB programmes. Public Health England, GlaxoSmithKline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The introduction of the meningococcal B (MenB) vaccine (Bexsero®) into the national infant immunisation programme--New challenges for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Campbell, Helen; Parikh, Sydel R; Saliba, Vanessa; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary

    2015-12-01

    The United Kingdom is the first country to introduce Bexsero(®) (GSK Biologicals), a multicomponent, protein-based vaccine against meningococcal group B (MenB), into the national infant immunisation programme. This vaccine is like no other licensed vaccine and poses a number of implementation and surveillance challenges in England. From 01 September 2015, UK infants were offered a reduced two dose primary immunisation schedule at 2 and 4 months followed by a booster at 12 months. Because of high rates of fever post-vaccination, parents were advised to give their infants three doses of prophylactic paracetamol, with the first dose given as soon as possible after the primary MenB vaccination dose. Since the vaccine only protects against 73-88% of MenB strains causing invasive disease in England, clinical isolates and PCR-positive samples will require extensive characterisation by the Meningococcal Reference Unit (MRU) at Public Health England (PHE) in order to monitor vaccine effectiveness and identify potential vaccine failures. PHE is also conducting detailed clinical and epidemiological surveillance to assess the impact of the MenB immunisation programme on the morbidity and mortality associated with invasive meningococcal disease in infants and young children. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Induction of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP in the blood-brain barrier and meninges after meningococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Peter; Johansson, Linda; Wan, Hong; Jones, Allison; Gallo, Richard L; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Hökfelt, Tomas; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2006-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in most living species and constitute important effector molecules of innate immunity. Recently, we and others have detected antimicrobial peptides in the brain. This is an organ that is rarely infected, which has mainly been ascribed to the protective functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and meninges. Since the bactericidal properties of the BBB and meninges are not known, we hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides could play a role in these barriers. We addressed this hypothesis by infecting mice with the neuropathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Brains were analyzed for expression of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP by immunohistochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy. After infection, we observed induction of CRAMP in endothelial cells of the BBB and in cells of the meninges. To explore the functional role of CRAMP in meningococcal disease, we infected mice deficient of the CRAMP gene. Even though CRAMP did not appear to protect the brain from invasion of meningococci, CRAMP knockout mice were more susceptible to meningococcal infection than wild-type mice and exhibited increased meningococcal growth in blood, liver, and spleen. Moreover, we could demonstrate that carbonate, a compound that accumulates in the circulation during metabolic acidosis, makes meningococci more susceptible to CRAMP.

  6. Induction of the Antimicrobial Peptide CRAMP in the Blood-Brain Barrier and Meninges after Meningococcal Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Peter; Johansson, Linda; Wan, Hong; Jones, Allison; Gallo, Richard L.; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Hökfelt, Tomas; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in most living species and constitute important effector molecules of innate immunity. Recently, we and others have detected antimicrobial peptides in the brain. This is an organ that is rarely infected, which has mainly been ascribed to the protective functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and meninges. Since the bactericidal properties of the BBB and meninges are not known, we hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides could play a role in these barriers. We addressed this hypothesis by infecting mice with the neuropathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Brains were analyzed for expression of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP by immunohistochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy. After infection, we observed induction of CRAMP in endothelial cells of the BBB and in cells of the meninges. To explore the functional role of CRAMP in meningococcal disease, we infected mice deficient of the CRAMP gene. Even though CRAMP did not appear to protect the brain from invasion of meningococci, CRAMP knockout mice were more susceptible to meningococcal infection than wild-type mice and exhibited increased meningococcal growth in blood, liver, and spleen. Moreover, we could demonstrate that carbonate, a compound that accumulates in the circulation during metabolic acidosis, makes meningococci more susceptible to CRAMP. PMID:17030578

  7. Complement factor 5 (C5) p.A252T mutation is prevalent in, but not restricted to, sub-Saharan Africa: implications for the susceptibility to meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Jarava, C; Comas, D; Orren, A; Hernández-González, M; Colobran, R

    2017-08-01

    Complement C5 deficiency (C5D) is a rare primary immunodeficiency associated with recurrent infections, particularly meningitis, by Neisseria species. To date, studies to elucidate the molecular basis of hereditary C5D have included fewer than 40 families, and most C5 mutations (13 of 17) have been found in single families. However, the recently described C5 p.A252T mutation is reported to be associated with approximately 7% of meningococcal disease cases in South Africa. This finding raises the question of whether the mutation may be prevalent in other parts of Africa or other continental regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of C5 p.A252T in Africa and other regions and discuss the implications for prophylaxis against meningococcal disease. In total, 2710 samples from healthy donors within various populations worldwide were analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay to detect the C5 p.A252T mutation. Eleven samples were found to be heterozygous for p.A252T, and nine of these samples were from sub-Saharan African populations (allele frequency 0·94%). Interestingly, two other heterozygous samples were from individuals in populations outside Africa (Israel and Pakistan). These findings, together with data from genomic variation databases, indicate a 0·5-2% prevalence of the C5 p.A252T mutation in heterozygosity in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, this mutation may have a relevant role in meningococcal disease susceptibility in this geographical area. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Effects of meteorological factors on the incidence of meningococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Substantial climate changes have led to the emergence and re-emergence of various infectious diseases worldwide, presenting an imperative need to explore the effects of meteorological factors on serious contagious disease incidences such as that of meningococcal meningitis (MCM).

  9. Vaccine Preventability of Meningococcal Clone, Greater Aachen Region, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, Johannes; Schouls, Leo M.; van de Pol, Ingrid; Keijzers, Wendy C.; Martin, Diana R.; Glennie, Anne; Oster, Philipp; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich; van der Ende, Arie

    2010-01-01

    Emergence of serogroup B meningococci of clonal complex sequence type (ST) 41/44 can cause high levels of disease, as exemplified by a recent epidemic in New Zealand. Multiplication of annual incidence rates (3.1 cases/100,000 population) of meningococcal disease in a defined German region, the city

  10. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease. National Epidemiology and Genetic Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Infections with group A streptococci (GAS), or S. pyogenes, range from mild and superficial to very severe and lethal invasive disease. In severe invasive GAS infections, hypotension and multiorgan failure may develop rapidly resulting in the development of toxic shock-like syndrome (TSS). In the

  11. Pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia in children with meningococcal sepsis and septic shock: A prospective, observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Verhoeven (Jennifer)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of hyperglycemia and insulin response in critically ill children with meningococcal disease in the intensive care unit of an academic children's hospital.Methods: Seventy-eight children with meningococcal disease

  12. Nerve Invasion by Epithelial Cells in Benign Breast Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jan Chan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve invasion by glandular epithelial cells in a lesion is usually regarded as invasive carcinoma. However, some benign conditions in the pancreas, prostate, breast and other organs may show involvement of nerve bundles by benign epithelial cells. We report an 18-year-old female with nerve invasion in benign breast disease. The lesion in her right breast revealed fibrocystic changes with ductal hyperplasia and stromal sclerosis. Perineural and intraneural involvement by bland-looking small ducts lined by 2 layers of cells including an outer layer of myoepithelial cells were found, suggestive of benign nerve invasion. There was no evidence of malignant cells in any of the sections. The patient remains well after 31 months of follow-up. About 44 cases of nerve invasion in benign breast diseases have been reported in the literature. It is necessary to carefully evaluate nerve involvement in breast lesions to avoid over-diagnosis and inappropriate operation.

  13. Enter B and W: two new meningococcal vaccine programmes launched

    OpenAIRE

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Ramsay, Mary; Borrow, Ray; Riordan, Andrew; Watson, John M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the UK became the first country in the world to have a comprehensive routine meningococcal vaccine programme targeting all of the main capsular groups of N. meningitidis. 1 An infant vaccine programme against meningococcal capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) was launched from 1st September with an aim to reduce endemic MenB disease in early childhood. On 1st August 2015, an adolescent programme against groups A, C, W and Y meningococci (MenACWY) was rolled out to halt a gr...

  14. History of meningococcal vaccines and their serological correlates of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipond, Caroline; Care, Rory; Feavers, Ian M

    2012-05-30

    For over a hundred years Neisseria meningitidis has been known to be one of the major causes of bacterial meningitis. However, effective vaccines were not developed until the latter part of the 20th century. The first of these were based on purified high molecular weight capsular polysaccharides and more recently the development of glycoconjugate vaccines has made paediatric immunisation programmes possible. The prevention of group B meningococcal disease has remained a challenge throughout this period. This review charts the history of the development of meningococcal vaccines and the importance of serological correlates of protection in their evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  16. Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are meningococcal group B vaccines?Two serogroup B meningococcal group B vaccines (Bexsero and Trumenba) have been licensed by the Food and Drug ... Who should not get meningococcal group B vaccine or should wait?Tell the person ... you the vaccine:If you have any severe, life-threatening allergies. ...

  17. Circumvention of herd immunity during an outbreak of meningococcal disease could be correlated to escape mutation in the porA gene of Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, M K; Bichier, E; Perrocheau, A; Alonso, J M

    2001-03-01

    Meningococcal strains isolated during an outbreak were shown to belong to the ET-5 complex and to harbor a mutation in the VR2 region of the porA gene. They were less susceptible to the bactericidal effect of normal human serum than was the ET-5 wild-type strain. These results are of concern, as PorA is a potential target in vaccine design.

  18. A Rare Case of Primary Meningococcal Myopericarditis in a 71-Year-Old Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odilia I. Woudstra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of primary meningococcal C pericarditis with myocardial involvement in a 71-year-old male that is thus far the oldest patient with isolated meningococcal pericardial disease and only the third patient with primary meningococcal myopericarditis described in English literature. Our patient was successfully treated by full sternotomy and surgical drainage combined with intravenous ceftriaxone. Mild symptoms unresponsive to anti-inflammatory treatment and leukocytosis may guide clinicians towards the correct diagnosis. It is important to recognize this cause of pericarditis as the relatively mild clinical presentation may rapidly progress into tamponade and right-sided heart failure.

  19. Emergence and control of epidemic meningococcal meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Idris; Iliyasu, Garba; Habib, Abdulrazaq Garba

    2017-02-01

    For more than a century, meningitis epidemics have regularly recurred across sub-Saharan Africa, involving 19 contiguous countries that constitute a 'meningitis belt' where historically the causative agent has been serogroup A meningococcus. Attempts to control epidemic meningococcal meningitis in Africa by vaccination with meningococcal polysaccharide (PS) vaccines have not been successful. This is largely because PS vaccines are poorly immunogenic in young children, do not induce immunological memory, and have little or no effect on the pharyngeal carriage. Meningococcal PS-protein conjugate vaccines overcome these deficiencies. Conjugate meningococcal vaccine against serotype A (MenAfriVac) was developed between 2001 and 2009 and deployed in 2010. So far, 262 million individuals have been immunized across the meningitis belt. The public health benefits of MenAfriVac have already been demonstrated by a sharp decline in reported cases of meningococcal disease in the countries where it has been introduced. However, serogroup replacement following mass meningitis vaccination has been noted, and in 2015 an epidemic with a novel strain of serogroup C was recorded in Niger and Nigeria for the first time since 1975. This has posed a serious challenge toward elimination of meningococcal meningitis epidemics in the African. For an effective control of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt, there is a need for an effective surveillance system, provision of rapid antigen detection kits as well as affordable vaccine that provides protection against the main serogroups causing meningitis in the sub-region.

  20. [Invasive mould disease in haematological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are a persistent problem with high morbidity and mortality rates among patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Management of IMI in this setting has become increasingly complex with the advent of new antifungal agents and diagnostic tests, which have resulted in different therapeutic strategies (prophylactic, empirical, pre-emptive, and directed). A proper assessment of the individual risk for IMI appears to be critical in order to use the best prophylactic and therapeutic approach and increase the survival rates. Among the available antifungal drugs, the most frequently used in the hematologic patient are fluconazole, mould-active azoles (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole), candins (anidulafungin, caspofungin and micafungin), and lipid formulations of amphotericin B. Specific recommendations for their use, and criteria for selecting the antifungal agents are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  1. Meningococcal Carriage in Military Recruits and University Students during the Pre MenB Vaccination Era in Greece (2014-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryfinopoulou, Kyriaki; Kesanopoulos, Konstantinos; Xirogianni, Athanasia; Marmaras, Nektarios; Papandreou, Anastasia; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Tsolia, Maria; Jasir, Aftab; Tzanakaki, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the meningococcal carriage rate and to identify the genotypic characteristics of the strains isolated from healthy military recruits and university students in order to provide data that might increase our understanding on the epidemiology of meningococcus and obtain information which helps to evaluate the potential effects on control programs such as vaccination. A total of 1420 oropharyngeal single swab samples were collected from military recruits and university students on voluntary basis, aged 18-26 years. New York City Medium was used for culture and the suspected N. meningitidis colonies were identified by Gram stain, oxidase and rapid carbohydrate utilization tests. Further characterisation was carried out by molecular methods (multiplex PCR, MLST, WGS). The overall carriage rate was of 12.7%; 15% and 10.4% for recruits and university students respectively. MenB (39.4%) was the most prevalent followed by MenY (12.8%) and MenW (4.4%). Among the initial 76 Non Groupable (NG) isolates, Whole Genome Sequence Analysis (WGS) revealed that 8.3% belonged to MenE, 3.3% to MenX and 1.1% to MenZ, while, 53 strains (29.4%) were finally identified as capsule null. Genetic diversity was found among the MenB isolates, with 41/44 cc and 35 cc predominating. Meningococcal carriage rate in both groups was lower compared to our previous studies (25% and 18% respectively) with predominance of MenB isolates. These findings, help to further our understanding on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Greece. Although the prevalence of carriage seems to have declined compared to our earlier studies, the predominant MenB clonal complexes (including 41/44cc and 35cc) are associated with invasive meningococcal disease.

  2. MRI evaluation and follow-up of bone necrosis after meningococcal infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damry, N.; Schurmans, T.; Perlmutter, N.

    1993-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a serious complication of meningococcal septicaemia. It often results in infarction of various tissues namely the skin, adrenal glands, kidneys, brain and, much less commonly, bones. We describe a patient who presented bone lesions after meningococcal septicaemia. In addition to plain radiography and scintigraphy the lesions were evaluated with MRI and have proved to be extensive and still progressive, approxximately 18 months after the onset of the disease. (orig.)

  3. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-12

    Dr. Elizabeth Briere discusses Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae which causes a variety of infections in children and adults.  Created: 11/12/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/17/2015.

  4. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Andrew B; Joseph Woo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is in the midst of a practice revolution. Traditionally, surgery for valvular heart disease consisted of valve replacement via conventional sternotomy using cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the past 20 years, the increasing popularity of less-invasive procedures, accompanied by advancements in imaging, surgical instrumentation, and robotic technology, has motivated and enabled surgeons to develop and perform complex cardiac surgical procedures through small incisions, often eliminating the need for sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass. In addition to the benefits of improved cosmesis, minimally invasive mitral valve surgery was pioneered with the intent of reducing morbidity, postoperative pain, blood loss, hospital length of stay, and time to return to normal activity. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art of minimally invasive approaches to the surgical treatment of valvular heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Lambertsen, Lotte; Harboe, Zitta B

    2014-01-01

    %, and 78% of the cases would have been covered by the 7-, 10-, and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, respectively. Conclusions: Of children with an IPD episode, 2.4% experienced rIPD, and an underlying disease was documented in 66% of these children. Investigation of underlying conditions...... laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in children aged 0-15 y were identified from the Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark for the period 1980-2013. rIPD was defined as isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from any normally sterile site ≥ 30 days after an initial...... positive culture. Clinical data were obtained for all children with rIPD. Results: Of all children with IPD, 2.4% (59/2418) experienced at least 1 episode of rIPD, and an underlying condition was documented in 39 (66%). Immune deficiency due to transplantation (n = 9) was the most common disease; however...

  6. Preventing invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 No. 3 has been successfully used for the prevention of tetanus, influenza and pertussis in infants.[11] A trivalent GBS polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (against serotypes Ia, Ib and III) has completed phase-II evaluation among pregnant women and has the potential to prevent 70 - 80% of all invasive GBS disease.

  7. Prevalence and sequence variations of the genes encoding the five antigens included in the novel 5CVMB vaccine covering group B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Hedberg, Sara Thulin; Mölling, Paula; Unemo, Magnus; Comanducci, Maurizio; Rappuoli, Rino; Olcén, Per

    2009-03-04

    During the recent years, projects are in progress for designing broad-range non-capsular-based meningococcal vaccines, covering also serogroup B isolates. We have examined three genes encoding antigens (NadA, GNA1030 and GNA2091) included in a novel vaccine, i.e. the 5 Component Vaccine against Meningococcus B (5CVMB), in terms of gene prevalence and sequence variations. These data were combined with the results from a similar study, examining the two additional antigens included in the 5CVMB (fHbp and GNA2132). nadA and fHbp v. 1 were present in 38% (n=36), respectively 71% (n=67) of the isolates, whereas gna2132, gna1030 and gna2091 were present in all the Neisseria meningitidis isolates tested (n=95). The level of amino acid conservation was relatively high in GNA1030 (93%), GNA2091 (92%), and within the main variants of NadA and fHbp. GNA2132 (54% of the amino acids conserved) appeared to be the most diversified antigen. Consequently, the theoretical coverage of the 5CVMB antigens and the feasibility to use these in a broad-range meningococcal vaccine is appealing.

  8. Invasive Hemodynamics of Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pighi, Michele; Asgar, Anita W

    2017-07-01

    In the current era, diagnosis and follow-up of valvular heart disease is performed noninvasively using echocardiography. In some cases, the results of echocardiographic evaluation are inconclusive or discrepant with the patient's clinical symptoms. In such cases, a well-planned and executed cardiac catheterization is invaluable to clarify the clinical dilemma and assist in planning further management. This article reviews the indications, technique, and interpretation of cardiac catheterization in the setting of valvular stenosis and regurgitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, I D; Ba, A; Faye, P M; Thiongane, A; Attiyé Kane, M; Sonko, A; Diop, A; Deme Ly, I; Diouf, F N; Ndiaye, O; Leye, M M M; Cissé, M F; Ba, M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the clinical, epidemiological, and outcome characteristics of IPD case patients hospitalized at the Albert-Royer National Children's Hospital (French acronym CHNEAR) to evaluate the disease burden of IPDs in a pediatric hospital of Dakar (Senegal). All children aged 0-15 years hospitalized at the CHNEAR between January 1st, 2008 and December 31st, 2013 for a documented IPD were included in the study. Medical history, risk factors, clinical, bacteriological, and outcome data was collected. Data was then analyzed using the SPSS software, version 16 (Pearson's Chi(2) test: a P-valueSenegal. Infants<2 years of age are particularly affected. The very high case fatality (17%) was significantly associated with meningeal infection sites hence the need for better access to pneumococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. Enter B and W: two new meningococcal vaccine programmes launched.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Ramsay, Mary; Borrow, Ray; Riordan, Andrew; Watson, John M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the UK became the first country in the world to have a comprehensive routine meningococcal vaccine programme targeting all of the main capsular groups of N. meningitidis. 1 An infant vaccine programme against meningococcal capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) was launched from 1st September with an aim to reduce endemic MenB disease in early childhood. On 1st August 2015, an adolescent programme against groups A, C, W and Y meningococci (MenACWY) was rolled out to halt a growing outbreak of capsular group W disease (MenW) caused by a hypervirulent clone of N. meningitidis, in addition to maintaining control against MenC disease provided by the current adolescent programme. 2. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Minimally invasive approaches for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Zoccali; Alessandro Fichera

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in medical management of inflammatory bowel disease,many of these patients still require surgery at some point in the course of their disease.Their young age and poor general conditions,worsened by the aggressive medical treatments,make minimally invasive approaches particularly enticing to this patient population.However,the typical inflammatory changes that characterize these diseases have hindered wide diffusion of laparoscopy in this setting,currently mostly pursued in high-volume referral centers,despite accumulating evidences in the literature supporting the benefits of minimally invasive surgery.The largest body of evidence currently available for terminal ileal Crohn's disease shows improved short term outcomes after laparoscopic surgery,with prolonged operative times.For Crohn's colitis,high quality evidence supporting laparoscopic surgery is lacking.Encouraging preliminary results have been obtained with the adoption of laparoscopic restorative total proctocolectomy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.A consensus about patients' selection and the need for staging has not been reached yet.Despite the lack of conclusive evidence,a wave of enthusiasm is pushing towards less invasive strategies,to further minimize surgical trauma,with single incision laparoscopic surgery being the most realistic future development.

  12. A Perspective on Invasive Salmonella Disease in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, John A; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of community-acquired bloodstream infection in Africa. The contribution of typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars to invasive disease varies considerably in place and time, even within the same country. Nonetheless, many African countries are now thought to experience typhoid fever incidence >100 per 100,000 per year with approximately 1% of patients dying. Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease was estimated to cause 3.4 million illnesses and 681 316 deaths in 2010, with the most disease in Africa. Antimicrobial drug resistance is a growing problem in S. enterica that threatens to further compromise patient outcomes. Reservoirs for nontyphoidal Salmonella and the predominant routes of transmission for typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella are not well understood in Africa, hampering the design of evidence-based, non-vaccine- and vaccine-based prevention measures. It is difficult to distinguish clinically invasive Salmonella disease from febrile illnesses caused by other pathogens. Blood cultures are the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis, but lack sensitivity due to the low magnitude of bacteremia, do not produce results at point of care, and are not widely available in Africa. Serologic approaches to diagnosis remain inaccurate, and nucleic acid amplification tests are also compromised by low concentrations of bacteria. High-throughput whole-genome sequencing, together with a range of novel analytic pipelines, has provided new insights into the complex pattern of epidemiology, pathogenesis, and host adaptation. Concerted efforts are therefore needed to apply these new tools in the context of high-quality field surveillance to improve diagnosis, patient management, control, and prevention of invasive Salmonella infections in Africa. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Manigart

    Full Text Available The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97] and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57] on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028. Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics.

  14. An alternative non-invasive treatment for Peyronie's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim A. Claro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Surgical correction of the deformity and plaque caused by Peyronie's disease has some important disadvantages and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT emerged as a new promising therapy. We evaluated prospectively the efficacy and safety of the association of high dose vitamin E and ESWT as a non-invasive treatment for the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients 42 to 68 years old (mean = 54 presenting penile deviation and sexual distress caused by Peyronie's disease were treated in a non-invasive manner. The time of penile deviation ranged from 16 to 52 months (mean = 30. All patients had previous unsuccessful treatment for Peyronie's disease. The angulation's deformity of the penis was assessed by photography at home. The patients received vitamin E (l.200 mg daily during 3 months and underwent 3 to 6 sessions (mean = 3 of ESWT (3,000 to 4,000 shockwaves at a power level of l to 2 at 1-week intervals. RESULTS: From 25 patients treated, 16 (64% reported an improvement in penile angulation, with a mean reduction of 21 degrees (10 to 40. Eight patients reported improvement in their spontaneous erections. Overall, the patients presented only minimal bruising at the site of treatment and skin hematoma. Four patients presented urethral bleeding. The mean angulation after treatment in the control group was 48.67 degrees (30 - 70 and in the study group was 24.42 degrees (0 - 70, statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Considering the common complications and the unsatisfactory outcome of the surgical correction for Peyronie's disease, the association of high dose vitamin E and ESWT represents a good option for a non-invasive, effective and safe treatment of the penile deformity.

  15. Non-invasive examination method for cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    CT is superior in the diagnosis of the characteristics and the region of cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) to the examination with RI. The RI examination can only demonstrate the cerebrovascular diseases with large area disturbance of the cerebral cortex, that passed some days after the attack. Moreover, it is difficult to detect the small lesions or the lesions localized in the deep area such as the basal nucleus and the internal capsule by this method. A slight decrease and retardation in unilateral cerebral blood flow (under 20%, within 1.5 second) found by RI-angiography does not always indicate the side of the lesion of cerebrovascular diseases. It is expected that non-invasive examination method for CVD is improved more, and that more precise estimation method for regional cerebral circulation is developed. (Tsunoda, M.)

  16. Immunodeficiency among children with recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Schejbel, Lone; Lundstedt, A C

    2015-01-01

    examined. RESULTS: In total, rIPD were observed in 54 children (68 cases of rIPD of 2192 IPD cases). Children with classical risk factors for IPD were excluded, and among the remaining 22 children, 15 were eligible for analysis. Of these 6 (40%) were complement C2-deficient. Impaired vaccination response......BACKGROUND: Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (rIPD) occurs mostly in children with an underlying disease, but some cases remain unexplained. Immunodeficiency has been described in children with rIPD, but the prevalence is unknown. We used a nationwide registry of all laboratory......-confirmed cases of rIPD to identify cases of unexplained rIPD and examine them for immunodeficiency. METHODS: Cases of rIPD in children 0-15 years of age from 1980 to 2008 were identified. Children without an obvious underlying disease were screened for complement function, T-cell, B-cell, natural killer...

  17. Meningococcal Serogroup B Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine Elicits Broad and Robust Serum Bactericidal Responses in Healthy Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesikari, Timo; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Diez-Domingo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) is a leading cause of invasive meningococcal disease in adolescents and young adults. A recombinant factor H binding protein (fHBP) vaccine (Trumenba(®); bivalent rLP2086) was recently approved in the United States in individuals aged 10-25 years....... Immunogenicity and safety of 2- or 3-dose schedules of bivalent rLP2086 were assessed in adolescents. METHODS: Healthy adolescents (11 to ... bactericidal antibody assay using human complement (hSBA). Safety assessments included local and systemic reactions and adverse events. RESULTS: Bivalent rLP2086 was immunogenic when administered as 2 or 3 doses; the most robust hSBA responses occurred with 3 doses. The proportion of subjects with hSBA titers...

  18. Medical microbiology: laboratory diagnosis of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werno, Anja M; Murdoch, David R

    2008-03-15

    The laboratory diagnosis of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) continues to rely on culture-based methods that have been used for many decades. The most significant recent developments have occurred with antigen detection assays, whereas the role of nucleic acid amplification tests has yet to be fully clarified. Despite developments in laboratory diagnostics, a microbiological diagnosis is still not made in most cases of IPD, particularly for pneumococcal pneumonia. The limitations of existing diagnostic tests impact the ability to obtain accurate IPD burden data and to assess the effectiveness of control measures, such as vaccination, in addition to the ability to diagnose IPD in individual patients. There is an urgent need for improved diagnostic tests for pneumococcal disease--especially tests that are suitable for use in underresourced countries.

  19. Meningococcal Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pohnpeian (Mahsen en Pohnpei) Polish (polski) Portuguese (português) Punjabi (ਪੰਜਾਬੀ) Russian (Русский) Samoan (Gagana Samoa) Somali ( ... Portuguese) PDF Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Punjabi (ਪੰਜਾਬੀ) Expand Section Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- ...

  20. Bactericidal antibody against a representative epidemiological meningococcal serogroup B panel confirms that MATS underestimates 4CMenB vaccine strain coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosi, Giacomo; Biolchi, Alessia; Lo Sapio, Morena; Rigat, Fabio; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Lucidarme, Jay; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Medini, Duccio

    2013-10-09

    4CMenB (Bexsero), a vaccine developed against invasive meningococcal disease caused by capsular group B strains (MenB), was recently licensed for use by the European Medicines Agency. Assessment of 4CMenB strain coverage in specific epidemiologic settings is of primary importance to predict vaccination impact on the burden of disease. The Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) was developed to predict 4CMenB strain coverage, using serum bactericidal antibody assay with human complement (hSBA) data from a diverse panel of strains not representative of any specific epidemiology. To experimentally validate the accuracy of MATS-based predictions against strains representative of a specific epidemiologic setting. We used a stratified sampling method to identify a representative sample from all MenB disease isolates collected from England and Wales in 2007-2008, tested the strains in the hSBA assay with pooled sera from infant and adolescent vaccinees, and compared these results with MATS. MATS predictions and hSBA results were significantly associated (P=0.022). MATS predicted coverage of 70% (95% CI, 55-85%) was largely confirmed by 88% killing in the hSBA (95% CI, 72-95%). MATS had 78% accuracy and 96% positive predictive value against hSBA. MATS is a conservative predictor of strain coverage by the 4CMenB vaccine in infants and adolescents. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Important role for Toll-like receptor 9 in host defense against meningococcal sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Mogensen, Trine; Kilian, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    have been reported to be involved in the host response to N. meningitidis. While TLR4 has been suggested to play an important role in early containment of infection, the roles of TLR2 and TLR9 in meningococcal disease are not well described. Using a model for meningococcal sepsis, we report that TLR9...... and induction of cytokine gene expression were independent of TLR2 or TLR9 in macrophages and conventional dendritic cells. In contrast, plasmacytoid dendritic cells relied entirely on TLR9 to induce these activities. Thus, our data demonstrate an important role for TLR9 in host defense against N. meningitidis....

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal diseases in patients with severe liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZANG Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs are an important factor affecting the prognosis of patients with severe liver diseases, and their early diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians. The four most commonly seen IFDs are candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and pneumocystis pneumonia. We should pay attention to the risk of developing IFDs in patients with severe liver diseases during clinical management. Particularly, early diagnosis and proper treatment of IFDs are important in high-risk patients. These are vital to improving the prognosis of patients with severe liver diseases.

  3. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmela, Carolina; Chevarin, Caroline; Xu, Zhilu; Torres, Joana; Sevrin, Gwladys; Hirten, Robert; Barnich, Nicolas; Ng, Siew C; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal microbiome dysbiosis has been consistently described in patients with IBD. In the last decades, Escherichia coli , and the adherent-invasive E coli (AIEC) pathotype in particular, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. Since the discovery of AIEC, two decades ago, progress has been made in unravelling these bacteria characteristics and its interaction with the gut immune system. The mechanisms of adhesion of AIEC to intestinal epithelial cells (via FimH and cell adhesion molecule 6) and its ability to escape autophagy when inside macrophages are reviewed here. We also explore the existing data on the prevalence of AIEC in patients with Crohn's disease and UC, and the association between the presence of AIEC and disease location, activity and postoperative recurrence. Finally, we highlight potential therapeutic strategies targeting AIEC colonisation of gut mucosa, including the use of phage therapy, bacteriocins and antiadhesive molecules. These strategies may open new avenues for the prevention and treatment of IBD in the future. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Risk of transmitting meningococcal infection by transient contact on aircraft and other transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachael, T; Schubert, K; Hellenbrand, W; Krause, G; Stuart, J M

    2009-08-01

    Contact tracing of persons with meningococcal disease who have travelled on aeroplane or other multi-passenger transport is not consistent between countries. We searched the literature for clusters of meningococcal disease linked by transient contact on the same plane, train, bus or boat. We found reports of two clusters in children on the same school bus and one in passengers on the same plane. Cases within each of these three clusters were due to strains that were genetically indistinguishable. In the aeroplane cluster the only link between the two cases was through a single travel episode. The onset of illness (2 and 5 days after the flight) is consistent with infection from an unidentified carrier around the time of air travel. In contrast to the established risk of transmission from a case of tuberculosis, it is likely that the risk from a case of meningococcal disease to someone who is not identified as a close contact is exceedingly low. This should be considered in making international recommendations for passenger contact tracing after a case of meningococcal disease on a plane or other multi-passenger transport.

  5. The role of economic evaluation in vaccine decision making : Focus on meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R.; Trotter, C.L.; Edmunds, W.J.; Postma, Maarten; Beutels, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several countries have experienced increases in the incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease. It can be controlled with older polysaccharide vaccines and particularly the recently developed conjugate vaccines. For 21 developed countries, we investigated the role that economic

  6. Terminal Complement Blockade after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is Safe without Meningococcal Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodele, Sonata; Dandoy, Christopher E; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Myers, Kasiani C; El-Bietar, Javier; Nelson, Adam; Wallace, Gregory; Teusink-Cross, Ashley; Davies, Stella M

    2016-07-01

    Eculizumab inhibits terminal complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and is now used as a first-line therapy in these diseases. Eculizumab is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) because of an increased risk of meningococcal infections in persons without adequate functional complement. Administration of meningococcal vaccine is required at least 2 weeks before administering the first dose of eculizumab, and this advice is included in the product label. Eculizumab use for treatment of TMA in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients brings a significant dilemma regarding REMS required meningococcal vaccination. TMA after HSCT usually occurs within the first 100 days after transplantation when patients are severely immunocompromised and are not able to mount a response to vaccines. We evaluated 30 HSCT recipients treated with eculizumab for high-risk TMA without meningococcal vaccine. All patients received antimicrobial prophylaxis adequate for Neisseria meningitides during eculizumab therapy and for 8 weeks after discontinuation of the drug. Median time to TMA diagnosis was 28 days after transplant (range, 13.8 to 48.5). Study subjects received a median of 14 eculizumab doses (range, 2 to 38 doses) for HSCT-associated TMA therapy. There were no incidences of meningococcal infections. The incidences of bacterial and fungal bloodstream infections were similar in patients treated with eculizumab (n = 30) as compared with those with HSCT-associated TMA who did not receive any complement blocking therapy (n = 39). Our data indicate that terminal complement blockade in the early post-transplant period can be performed without meningococcal vaccination while using appropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis until complement

  7. Invasive Group A streptococcal disease in Ireland, 2004 to 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2011-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infections (iGAS) are a major clinical and public health challenge. iGAS is a notifiable disease in Ireland since 2004. The aim of this paper is to describe the epidemiology of iGAS in Ireland for the first time over the seven-year period from 2004 to 2010. The Irish national electronic infectious disease reporting system was used by laboratories to enter the source of iGAS isolates, and by departments of public health to enter clinical and epidemiological details. We extracted and analysed data from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. Over the study period, 400 iGAS cases were notified. The annual incidence of iGAS doubled, from 0.8 per 100,000 population in 2004 to 1.6 in 2008, and then remained the same in 2009 and 2010. The reported average annual incidence rates were highest among children up to five years of age (2.3\\/100,000) and adults aged over 60 years (3.2\\/100,000). The most common risk factors associated with iGAS were skin lesions or wounds. Of the 174 people for whom clinical syndrome information was available, 28 (16%) cases presented with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 19 (11%) with necrotising fasciitis. Of the 141 cases for whom seven-day outcomes were recorded, 11 people died with iGAS identified as the main cause of death (seven-day case fatality rate 8%). The notification rate of iGAS in Ireland was lower than that reported in the United Kingdom, Nordic countries and North America but higher than southern and eastern European countries. The reasons for lower notification rates in Ireland compared with other countries may be due to a real difference in incidence, possibly due to prescribing practices, or due to artefacts resulting from the specific Irish case definition and\\/or low reporting in the early stages of a new surveillance system. iGAS disease remains an uncommon but potentially severe disease in Ireland. Ongoing surveillance is required in order to undertake appropriate control measures and

  8. Intestinal invasion and disseminated disease associated with Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herchline Thomas E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillium sp., other than P. marneffei, is an unusual cause of invasive disease. These organisms are often identified in immunosuppressed patients, either due to human immunodeficiency virus or from immunosuppressant medications post-transplantation. They are a rarely identified cause of infection in immunocompetent hosts. Case presentation A 51 year old African-American female presented with an acute abdomen and underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed an incarcerated peristomal hernia. Her postoperative course was complicated by severe sepsis syndrome with respiratory failure, hypotension, leukocytosis, and DIC. On postoperative day 9 she was found to have an anastamotic breakdown. Pathology from the second surgery showed transmural ischemic necrosis with angioinvasion of a fungal organism. Fungal blood cultures were positive for Penicillium chrysogenum and the patient completed a 6 week course of amphotericin B lipid complex, followed by an extended course oral intraconazole. She was discharged to a nursing home without evidence of recurrent infection. Discussion Penicillium chrysogenum is a rare cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. Diagnosis can be difficult, but Penicillium sp. grows rapidly on routine fungal cultures. Prognosis remains very poor, but aggressive treatment is essential, including surgical debridement and the removal of foci of infection along with the use of amphotericin B. The clinical utility of newer antifungal agents remains to be determined.

  9. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberán, José; Mensa, José

    2014-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a common infection in immunocompromised patients with hematological malignancies or allogenic stem cell transplantation, and is less frequent in the context of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucociliary activity impairment, immunosuppression due to the inhibition of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils by steroids, and receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, play a role in the development of IPA in COPD patients. Colonized patients or those with IPA are older, with severe CODP stage (GOLD≥III), and have a higher number of comorbidities. The mortality rate is high due to the fact that having a definitive diagnosis of IPA in COPD patients is often difficult. The main clinical and radiological signs of IPA in these types of patients are non-specific, and tissue samples for definitive diagnosis are often difficult to obtain. The poor prognosis of IPA in COPD patients could perhaps be improved by faster diagnosis and prompt initiation of antifungal treatment. Some tools, such as scales and algorithms based on risk factors of IPA, may be useful for its early diagnosis in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Commentary: Impact of meningococcal group B OMV vaccines, beyond their brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen

    2017-10-19

    Meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccines have been used widely in Cuba, New Zealand, and Brazil. They are immunogenic and initially assessed largely by their ability to induce serum bactericidal activity. Measures of efficacy indicate good protection against homologous strains in older children and adults. Effectiveness appears broader than predicted by immunogenicity and efficacy studies. The recent discovery that meningococcal group B OMVs may protect against the related Neisseria species N.gonorrhoeae suggests more to these interesting antigen collections than meets the eye. Currently there are two OMV-containing group B vaccines available, the new recombinant protein-based Bexsero® developed by Novartis and VA-MENGOC-BC® developed by the Finlay institute in Cuba. Also, a third group B vaccine based on two recombinant factor H binding proteins (Trumenba®, Pfizer), has recently been licenced but it does not include OMV. This commentary explores the population impact that group B OMV vaccines have had on meningococcal and gonorrhoea diseases. Given the heterologous effect against diverse strains of the meningococcus observed in older children and adults, and recent evidence to suggest moderate protection against gonorrhoea, there may be a role for these vaccines in programmes targeting adolescents and groups high at risk for both meningococcal disease and gonorrhoea.

  11. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p < 0.001) and to have marked intensity than were ILC foci (63% IDC vs 32% ILC; p < 0.001). Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging correctly revealed all pathology-proven foci of invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p < 0.0001). Overall, direct-conversion molecular breast imaging showed all known invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular

  12. CLINICAL-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND OUTCOME OF GENERALIZED FORMS OF MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Martynova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study clinical and epidemiological features and outcomes of generalized forms of meningococcal infection in children from Krasnoyarsk and Krasnoyarsk Territory during the period from 2012 to 2016. Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis of 57 medical records of hospital patients with generalized forms of meningococcal infection was carried out in the infectious and resuscitative departments of the Krasnoyarsk Clinical Hospital No. 1 from 2012 to 2016, including 12 protocols of pathologoanatomical studies of the deceased patients and 45 medical cards of ambulatory patients – convalescents of the disease from 2012 to 2016. Results. The epidemic situation for meningococcal infection in Krasnoyarsk Territory from 2012 to 2016 is characterized by signs of inter-epidemic period. Children of the first 3 years of life are in the group of high risk for the development of GFMI, which accounts for 74% of the total number of cases of children aged 14. There are signs of meningococcal infection «aging» – in the age structure the number of children in the first year of life decreased, while the proportion of children aged 4–7 and 7–14 increased compared to previous decades. There is a tendency to a decrease in the proportion of the combined forms with an increase in the frequency of «pure» meningococcemia. In recent years there has been an «atypical» course of generalized forms of the disease, when classical hemorrhagic necrotic rashes appear only on the 3rd – 4th day of the disease. In convalescents who underwent a combined form of MI and «pure» meningitis severe residual effects leading patients to disability are possible to develop. Conclusion. The use of polyvalent conjugated vaccines in potential risk groups will allow us to reduce the morbidity and mortality from generalized forms of meningococcal infection, including younger children.

  13. Endophthalmitis in a Child with Meningococcal Meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most obvious abnormality was that the left eye, entirely normal six hours previously, was completely opaque and appeared to be filled with thick white material. A lumbar puncture was performed, yielding cloudy CSF and, based on the microscopy and Gram stain appearance, a diagno- sis of meningococcal meningitis was ...

  14. Incidence of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease in Italian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozzi, Alberto E.; Salmaso, Stefania; Atti, Marta L. Ciofi degli; Panei, Pietro; Anemona, Alessandra; Scuderi, Gabriella; Wassilak, Steven G.F.

    1997-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) invasive disease in Italian infants we performed a prospective study in a cohort of newborns enrolled for a randomized trial on safety and efficacy of three pertussis vaccines and followed for onset of serious disease or pertussis. The overall cumulative incidence observed in 15,601 children was 51.3/100,000 for all invasive Hib infections and 38.4/100,000 for Hib meningitis, over 27 months of observation. The incidence density of all invasive Hib diseases was 28.7/100,000 person-years, while meningitis occurred with an incidence of 21.5/100,000 person-years. Among the eight cases detected, six were meningitis, one sepsis, and one cellulitis. The child with sepsis died. The incidence and epidemiology of invasive Hib disease in Italy are comparable to those reported from other European countries. Cost-benefit analyses are needed for planning Italian vaccination policy

  15. Parents’ and Adolescents’ Willingness to be Vaccinated Against Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease during a Mass Vaccination in Saguenay–Lac-St-Jean (Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Dubé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mass vaccination campaign with the 4CMenB vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis Pharmaceutical Canada Inc was launched in a serogroup B endemic area in Quebec. A telephone survey was conducted to assess parental and adolescent opinions about the acceptability of the vaccine. Intent to receive the vaccine or vaccine receipt was reported by the majority of parents (93% and adolescents (75%. Meningitis was perceived as being a dangerous disease by the majority of parents and adolescents. The majority of respondents also considered the 4CMenB vaccine to be safe and effective. The main reason for positive vaccination intention or behaviour was self-protection, while a negative attitude toward vaccination in general was the main reason mentioned by parents who did not intend to have their child vaccinated. Adolescents mainly reported lack of interest, time or information, and low perceived susceptibility and disease severity as the main reasons for not intending to be vaccinated or not being vaccinated.

  16. Minimally Invasive Procedures - Direct and Video-Assisted Forms in the Treatment of Heart Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Josué Viana Neto; Melo, Emanuel Carvalho; Silva, Juliana Fernandes; Rebouças, Leonardo Lemos; Corrêa, Larissa Chagas; Germano, Amanda de Queiroz; Machado, João José Aquino

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive cardiovascular procedures have been progressively used in heart surgery. To describe the techniques and immediate results of minimally invasive procedures in 5 years. Prospective and descriptive study in which 102 patients were submitted to minimally invasive procedures in direct and video-assisted forms. Clinical and surgical variables were evaluated as well as the in hospital follow-up of the patients. Fourteen patients were operated through the direct form and 88 through the video-assisted form. Between minimally invasive procedures in direct form, 13 had aortic valve disease. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 43 had mitral valve disease, 41 atrial septal defect and four tumors. In relation to mitral valve disease, we replaced 26 and reconstructed 17 valves. Aortic clamp, extracorporeal and procedure times were, respectively, 91,6 ± 21,8, 112,7 ± 27,9 e 247,1 ± 20,3 minutes in minimally invasive procedures in direct form. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 71,6 ± 29, 99,7 ± 32,6 e 226,1 ± 42,7 minutes. Considering intensive care and hospitalization times, these were 41,1 ± 14,7 hours and 4,6 ± 2 days in minimally invasive procedures in direct and 36,8 ± 16,3 hours and 4,3 ± 1,9 days in minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms procedures. Minimally invasive procedures were used in two forms - direct and video-assisted - with safety in the surgical treatment of video-assisted, atrial septal defect and tumors of the heart. These procedures seem to result in longer surgical variables. However, hospital recuperation was faster, independent of the access or pathology

  17. Usefulness of the DNA-fingerprinting pattern and the multilocus enzyme electrophoresis profile in the assessment of outbreaks of meningococcal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, N; Lind, I

    1996-01-01

    cases were identical to the outbreak strain. None of the local serogroup C carrier strains isolated during the outbreak of serogroup C disease were identical to the outbreak strain. Both DNA-fingerprinting and MEE improved the differentiation of meningococci when compared with phenotypic......The objective of the study was to assess whether genotypic characterization by means of DNA-fingerprinting pattern (DFP) and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) profile as compared to phenotypic characterization would improve the differentiation of Neisseria meningitidis strains associated...... in each outbreak were designated the index strains. Among the remaining 55 outbreak strains 52 were either DFP-identical or DFP-indistinguishable when compared with the one relevant out of the 4 index strains. This was only the case for 17 of the 37 strains isolated from sporadic cases caused by the same...

  18. [Invasive fungal disease due to Scedosporium, Fusarium and mucorales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The number of emerging organisms causing invasive fungal infections has increased in the last decades. These etiological agents include Scedosporium, Fusarium and mucorales. All of them can cause disseminated, virulent, and difficult-to treat infections in immunosuppressed patients, the most affected, due to their resistance to most available antifungal agents. Current trends in transplantation including the use of new immunosuppressive treatments, the common prescription of antifungal agents for prophylaxis, and new ecological niches could explain the emergence of these fungal pathogens. These pathogens can also affect immunocompetent individuals, especially after natural disasters (earthquakes, floods, tsunamis), combat wounds or near drowning. All the invasive infections caused by Scedosporium, Fusarium, and mucorales are potentially lethal and a favourable outcome is associated with rapid diagnosis by direct microscopic examination of the involved tissue, wide debridement of infected material, early use of antifungal agents including combination therapy, and an improvement in host defenses, especially neutropenia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  19. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Problems associated with management of pre-invasive lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purushotham, Anand D

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) involves adequate surgical excision with adjuvant radiotherapy where appropriate. An inadequate excision margin and young age are independent risk factors for local recurrence. Routine surgery to axillary lymph nodes is not recommended in pure DCIS. In localised DCIS, adjuvant radiotherapy is recommended on the basis of tumour size, margin width and pathological subtypes. The role of adjuvant tamoxifen as systemic therapy is controversial. The treatment of atypical ductal/lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ involves surgical excision to exclude coexisting DCIS or invasive disease

  20. Application of minimally invasive technique in surgical treatment of pancreatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yixi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the rapid development of minimally invasive concept, from laparoscopic operation to three-dimension laparoscopic technique and to robotic surgical system, treatment modalities have changed a lot. Pancreatic diseases, including multiple lesions, have different prognoses. An appropriate surgical procedure should be selected while ensuring the radical treatment of disease, so as to minimize the injury to patients and the impairment of organ function. Minimally invasive technique is of great significance in the surgical treatment of pancreatic diseases.

  1. Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Invasive Candidiasis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Global Emergence ... antifungal drugs. Learn more about C. auris Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a ...

  2. Pneumococcal serotypes and mortality following invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Thomsen, Reimar W; Riis, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pneumococcal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between specific pneumococcal serotypes and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a nationwide population-based...

  3. Bacterial Meningitis in Brazil: Baseline Epidemiologic Assessment of the Decade Prior to the Introduction of Pneumococcal and Meningococcal Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Cesar Pontes Azevedo

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is associated with significant burden in Brazil. In 2010, both 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and meningococcal capsular group C conjugate vaccine were introduced into the routine vaccination schedule. Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine was previously introduced in 1999. This study presents trends in demographics, microbiological characteristics and seasonality patterns of bacterial meningitis cases in Brazil from 2000 to 2010.All meningitis cases confirmed by clinical and/or laboratory criteria notified to the national information system for notifiable diseases between 2000 and 2010 were analyzed. Proportions of bacterial meningitis cases by demographic characteristics, criteria used for confirmation and etiology were calculated. We estimated disease rates per 100,000 population and trends for the study period, with emphasis on H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae cases. In the decade, 341,805 cases of meningitis were notified in Brazil. Of the 251,853 cases with defined etiology, 110,264 (43.8% were due to bacterial meningitis (excluding tuberculosis. Of these, 34,997 (31.7% were due to meningococcal disease. The incidence of bacterial meningitis significantly decreased from 3.1/100,000 population in 2000-2002 to 2.14/100,000 in 2009-2010 (p<0.01. Among cases of meningococcal disease, the proportion of those associated with group C increased from 41% in 2007 to 61.7% in 2010, while the proportion of group B disease progressively declined. Throughout the study period, an increased number of cases occurred during winter.Despite the reduction in bacterial meningitis incidence during the last decade, it remains a significant healthcare issue in Brazil. Meningococcal disease is responsible for the majority of the cases with group C the most common capsular type. Our study demonstrates the appropriateness of introduction of meningococcal vaccination in Brazil. Furthermore, this study provides a baseline

  4. [New vaccines against group B meningococcal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietalahti, Jukka; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    There has been no efficient general vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus (MenB), since its polysialic acid capsule is of low immunogenicity and could potentially induce autoimmunity. Reverse vaccinology has revealed new promising protein candidates for vaccine development. One of them is factor H-binding protein (fHbp), which has the potential to curb the alternative pathway of human complement. As fHbp can elicit antibodies that promote complement-mediated lysis, a vaccine partly based on it has been introduced against MenB infections. FHbp has been the milestone protein for structural vaccinology to create optimal chimeric antigens for vaccine use.

  5. TGF-b2 induction regulates invasiveness of Theileria-transformed leukocytes and disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Chaussepied

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Theileria parasites invade and transform bovine leukocytes causing either East Coast fever (T. parva, or tropical theileriosis (T. annulata. Susceptible animals usually die within weeks of infection, but indigenous infected cattle show markedly reduced pathology, suggesting that host genetic factors may cause disease susceptibility. Attenuated live vaccines are widely used to control tropical theileriosis and attenuation is associated with reduced invasiveness of infected macrophages in vitro. Disease pathogenesis is therefore linked to aggressive invasiveness, rather than uncontrolled proliferation of Theileria-infected leukocytes. We show that the invasive potential of Theileria-transformed leukocytes involves TGF-b signalling. Attenuated live vaccine lines express reduced TGF-b2 and their invasiveness can be rescued with exogenous TGF-b. Importantly, infected macrophages from disease susceptible Holstein-Friesian (HF cows express more TGF-b2 and traverse Matrigel with great efficiency compared to those from disease-resistant Sahiwal cattle. Thus, TGF-b2 levels correlate with disease susceptibility. Using fluorescence and time-lapse video microscopy we show that Theileria-infected, disease-susceptible HF macrophages exhibit increased actin dynamics in their lamellipodia and podosomal adhesion structures and develop more membrane blebs. TGF-b2-associated invasiveness in HF macrophages has a transcription-independent element that relies on cytoskeleton remodelling via activation of Rho kinase (ROCK. We propose that a TGF-b autocrine loop confers an amoeboid-like motility on Theileria-infected leukocytes, which combines with MMP-dependent motility to drive invasiveness and virulence.

  6. [Meningococcal C conjugate vaccine: Impact of a vaccination program and long-term effectiveness in Navarra, Spain, 2000-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Desirée; García-Cenoz, Manuel; Moreno, Laura; Bernaola, Enrique; Barricarte, Aurelio; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    Since 2000, when the meningococcal serogroupC conjugate vaccine (MenCC) was introduced in the childhood immunization schedule in Spain, several changes in the schedule and catch-up campaigns have been performed. We aim to estimate the impact and effectiveness of this vaccine in Navarra up to 2014. The impact of the vaccination program was analysed by comparing incidence, mortality and lethality rates of disease before (1995-1999) and after (2004-2014) the introduction of the MenCC. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated using the screening method (Farrington) and the indirect cohort method (Broome). Data on cases were obtained from the active surveillance of meningococcal disease. During 1995-1999 the mean annual incidence of meningococcalC disease was 1.32 per 100,000, and 7.18 per 100,000 in children younger than 15years. The fall of meningococcalC disease incidence was significant in cohorts targeted for vaccination from the beginning and progressive in the general population. No cases were reported between 2011 and 2014. The estimated vaccine effectiveness was 96% by the screening method, and 99% by the indirect cohort method. The MenCC vaccination program has been successful in decreasing the incidence rate of serogroupC meningococcal disease in Navarra, and schedule changes have maintained high vaccine effectiveness throughout the study period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. A Case of High Mortality, Treated with Multidisciplinary Approach in Intensive Care: Meningococcal Meningitis

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    Mehtap Pehlivanlar Küçük

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcemia is a highly mortal disease that can cause septic shock and multiple organ failure, which can be accompanied by sudden onset, rapid course, purpura fulminans and diffuse intravenous coagulation tables. Mortality increases when meningococcal causes to meningitis. The fact that it is the cause of neurological sequelae and extremity losses even in the recovering cases makes the support provided by the intensive care unit quite important in the management of cases. A case with meningococcal meningitis with high mortality, who was successfully treated through the use of supportive methods, such as monitorization, mechanical ventilation practices with new modalities, plasmapheresis and sympathetic ganglion blockage, has been presented in company with the literature.

  8. Early diagnosis of fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, colonization versus invasive disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sabina; Husain, Shahid

    2018-05-21

    The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains challenging in solid organ transplants in general, and in lung transplant recipients, in particular, because of colonization. Lung transplant recipients may be over treated with antifungal drugs because of the lack of appropriate diagnostic tools. A review of the new developments of diagnostic tools and whether this help distinguishing colonization from invasive disease is presented. Efforts are being made to develop new tools that will allow us to identify which patients will develop IPA, and those who will be able to control the disease.

  9. Recurrent invasive thymoma with pleural dissemination : disease management and treatment possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecna, J; Willemse, E; Lefebvre, Y; de Wind, R; Andry, G

    2014-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common benign neoplasm of the anterior mediastinum presenting often an agressive behaviour typical for the malignants tumors. The rate of invasive thymoma recurrency is relatively high. We present the case of a 55-year old man with a recurrent invasive thymoma with a pleural dissemination, detected on CT-imaging 2 years following his primary surgery. Since the first pre-operative imaging studies showed no invasion of the adjacent organs and a thymoma was suspected, a surgical resection was decided as a first line treatment. Per-operatively a number of adjacent structures were invaded and despite a macroscopical RO resection, the margins were microscopically positive. An invasive thymoma, WHO classification B3, Masaoka stage IVb was diagnosed and the patient received adjuvant radiotherapy. We highlight the role of multimodality treatement and disscus the potential of surgical, radiotherapeutical and systemic therapy in stage IV thymoma as well as in recurrent disease. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  10. Genetic distribution of noncapsular meningococcal group B vaccine antigens in Neisseria lactamica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Newbold, Lynne S; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Richardson, Lynne; Bennett, Julia S; Maiden, Martin C J; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray

    2013-09-01

    The poor immunogenicity of the meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) capsule has led to the development of vaccines targeting subcapsular antigens, in particular the immunodominant and diverse outer membrane porin, PorA. These vaccines are largely strain specific; however, they offer limited protection against the diverse MenB-associated diseases observed in many industrialized nations. To broaden the scope of its protection, the multicomponent vaccine (4CMenB) incorporates a PorA-containing outer membrane vesicle (OMV) alongside relatively conserved recombinant protein components, including factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), and neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA). The expression of PorA is unique to meningococci (Neisseria meningitidis); however, many subcapsular antigens are shared with nonpathogenic members of the genus Neisseria that also inhabit the nasopharynx. These organisms may elicit cross-protective immunity against meningococci and/or occupy a niche that might otherwise accommodate pathogens. The potential for 4CMenB responses to impact such species (and vice versa) was investigated by determining the genetic distribution of the primary 4CMenB antigens among diverse members of the common childhood commensal, Neisseria lactamica. All the isolates possessed nhba but were devoid of fhbp and nadA. The nhba alleles were mainly distinct from but closely related to those observed among a representative panel of invasive MenB isolates from the same broad geographic region. We made similar findings for the immunogenic typing antigen, FetA, which constitutes a major part of the 4CMenB OMV. Thus, 4CMenB vaccine responses may impact or be impacted by nasopharyngeal carriage of commensal neisseriae. This highlights an area for further research and surveillance should the vaccine be routinely implemented.

  11. Myofibroblasts in interstitial lung diseases show diverse electron microscopic and invasive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvonen, Henna M; Lehtonen, Siri T; Sormunen, Raija T; Harju, Terttu H; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Bloigu, Risto S; Kaarteenaho, Riitta L

    2012-09-01

    The characteristic features of myofibroblasts in various lung disorders are poorly understood. We have evaluated the ultrastructure and invasive capacities of myofibroblasts cultured from small volumes of diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from patients with different types of lung diseases. Cells were cultured from samples of BAL fluid collected from 51 patients that had undergone bronchoscopy and BAL for diagnostic purposes. The cells were visualized by transmission electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy to achieve ultrastructural localization of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibronectin. The levels of α-SMA protein and mRNA and fibronectin mRNA were measured by western blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The invasive capacities of the cells were evaluated. The cultured cells were either fibroblasts or myofibroblasts. The structure of the fibronexus, and the amounts of intracellular actin, extracellular fibronectin and cell junctions of myofibroblasts varied in different diseases. In electron and immunoelectron microscopy, cells cultured from interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) expressed more actin filaments and α-SMA than normal lung. The invasive capacity of the cells obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was higher than that from patients with other type of ILDs. Cells expressing more actin filaments had a higher invasion capacity. It is concluded that electron and immunoelectron microscopic studies of myofibroblasts can reveal differential features in various diseases. An analysis of myofibroblasts cultured from diagnostic BAL fluid samples may represent a new kind of tool for diagnostics and research into lung diseases.

  12. Genomic Investigation Reveals Highly Conserved, Mosaic, Recombination Events Associated with Capsular Switching among Invasive Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup W Sequence Type (ST)-11 Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mustapha M; Marsh, Jane W; Krauland, Mary G; Fernandez, Jorge O; de Lemos, Ana Paula S; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W; Lawrence, Jeffrey G; Hiller, N Luisa; Harrison, Lee H

    2016-07-03

    Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of meningococcal disease globally. Sequence type (ST)-11 clonal complex (cc11) is a hypervirulent meningococcal lineage historically associated with serogroup C capsule and is believed to have acquired the W capsule through a C to W capsular switching event. We studied the sequence of capsule gene cluster (cps) and adjoining genomic regions of 524 invasive W cc11 strains isolated globally. We identified recombination breakpoints corresponding to two distinct recombination events within W cc11: A 8.4-kb recombinant region likely acquired from W cc22 including the sialic acid/glycosyl-transferase gene, csw resulted in a C→W change in capsular phenotype and a 13.7-kb recombinant segment likely acquired from Y cc23 lineage includes 4.5 kb of cps genes and 8.2 kb downstream of the cps cluster resulting in allelic changes in capsule translocation genes. A vast majority of W cc11 strains (497/524, 94.8%) retain both recombination events as evidenced by sharing identical or very closely related capsular allelic profiles. These data suggest that the W cc11 capsular switch involved two separate recombination events and that current global W cc11 meningococcal disease is caused by strains bearing this mosaic capsular switch. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Invasive fungal diseases in children with hematologic disorders

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    Ünsal Günay

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fungal infection is a significant problem, causing of infective deaths of leukemic patients. The situation in developing countries is not well documented. The purpose of this study was characterizing IFD by analyzing data retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors, diagnostic methods, efficacy of treatment, and the outcome in pediatric patients with hematological disorders. Materials and Methods: There were 160 children with leukemia (22 AML, 129 ALL and 9 with aplastic anemia (AA. The diagnostic criteria for IFD were defined according to the EORTC/MSG, 2008. IFD was classified as proven or probable. Empiric antifungal treatment with L-AmB was commenced by day 5-7 of persistent fever. Patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA who were refractory to primary treatment were commenced on voriconazole (VCZ. Salvage therapy as combination of VCZ and caspofungin was given to those with progressive infection. Results: The incidence of IFD was found 23 (14.3%. 19 with leukemia (14 ALL, 5 AML and 4 with aplastic anemia were diagnosed as IFD. IA was the dominant cause of infection (n=17 and the rest (n: 6 had candidiasis. Ten children had “proven” infection and 13 children were defined as “probable”. The most frequent site of infection was lungs. In our series, the most frequently used diagnostic methods were clinical findings (100% and radiologic methods (84%. The success rate of treatment for candidiasis and IA were found 60%, 71% respectively. IFD related death rate was found 30%.Conclusion: IFD is still a major morbidity and mortality reason in children with hematologic disorders. However, the availability of new antifungal treatments and diagnostic tests will improve the survival rates in these children.

  14. Presentation of life-threatening invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in Malawian children: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Gilchrist, James J; Pensulo, Paul; Mandala, Wilson L; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Kenny, Julia; Wilson, Lorna K; Phiri, Amos; MacLennan, Jenny M; Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Graham, Stephen M

    2017-12-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause invasive disease in African children that is often fatal. The clinical diagnosis of these infections is hampered by the absence of a clear clinical syndrome. Drug resistance means that empirical antibiotic therapy is often ineffective and currently no vaccine is available. The study objective was to identify risk factors for mortality among children presenting to hospital with invasive Salmonella disease in Africa. We conducted a prospective study enrolling consecutive children with microbiologically-confirmed invasive Salmonella disease admitted to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, in 2006. Data on clinical presentation, co-morbidities and outcome were used to identify children at risk of inpatient mortality through logistic-regression modeling. Over one calendar year, 263 consecutive children presented with invasive Salmonella disease. Median age was 16 months (range 0-15 years) and 52/256 children (20%; 95%CI 15-25%) died. Nontyphoidal serovars caused 248/263 (94%) of cases. 211/259 (81%) of isolates were multi-drug resistant. 251/263 children presented with bacteremia, 6 with meningitis and 6 with both. Respiratory symptoms were present in 184/240 (77%; 95%CI 71-82%), 123/240 (51%; 95%CI 45-58%) had gastrointestinal symptoms and 101/240 (42%; 95%CI 36-49%) had an overlapping clinical syndrome. Presentation at Salmonella disease in Malawi is characterized by high mortality and prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates, along with non-specific presentation. Young infants, children with dyspnea and HIV-infected children bear a disproportionate burden of the Salmonella-associated mortality in Malawi. Strategies to improve prevention, diagnosis and management of invasive Salmonella disease should be targeted at these children.

  15. A comparison of meningococcal carriage by pregnancy status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knudtson Eric J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neisseria meningitidis is the second leading cause of invasive meningitis. A prerequisite for infection is colonization of the nasopharynx, and asymptomatic carrier rates are widely reported in the range of 10-15%. Recent reports have indicated an increased likelihood that a pediatric admission for Neisseria meningitidis will have a mother who is pregnant in the home. We hypothesized that this association may relate to immunologic changes in pregnancy leading to higher carrier rates. We compared the carrier status by performing nasopharyngeal swabs for Neisseria meningitidis in 100 pregnant and 99 non-pregnant women. Average age of the participants was 28.9 +/- 6.7 years. The average gestational age at specimen collection was 27.5 +/- 9.4 weeks. Non pregnant women were significantly more likely to use tobacco (38% vs 24%, p The meningococcal carrier rate in our population is well below what is widely reported in the literature. Assuming a 1% carrier rate in the pregnant group and a 0.5% carrier rate in the non pregnant group, 4,763 patients would be required to detect a difference of this magnitude, given 80% power and an alpha of 0.05.

  16. Advances in invasive evaluation and treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven, Barend Leendert van der

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate new developments in the treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease, with special focus to the invasive evaluation of plaque characteristics in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and treatment of STEMI patients with

  17. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Incidence and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Dalby, Tine; Weinberger, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) at the population level is unclear. We explored PCV13's effect in reducing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD)-related morbidity and mortality, and whether serotype-specific changes were attributable to vaccination or ...

  18. Development of non-invasive ventilation treatment practice for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle M; Titlestad, Ingrid L; Huniche, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Non-invasive ventilation treatment for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is well documented. Communication with patients during treatment is inhibited because of the mask, the noise from the machine and patient distress. Assessing life expectanc...

  19. Recurrent Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Serotype 12F in a Vaccinated Splenectomized Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Anne Katrine; Schumacher, Anna Holst; Kantsø, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    This is the first case report of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), specifically, due to serotype 12F. The patient described here was vaccinated with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) due to previous splenectomy, and an anti-pneumococcal IgG test concluded...

  20. The meningococcal vaccine candidate neisserial surface protein A (NspA binds to factor H and enhances meningococcal resistance to complement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Lewis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Complement forms an important arm of innate immunity against invasive meningococcal infections. Binding of the alternative complement pathway inhibitor factor H (fH to fH-binding protein (fHbp is one mechanism meningococci employ to limit complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a leading vaccine candidate against group B Neisseria meningitidis. Novel mechanisms that meningococci employ to bind fH could undermine the efficacy of fHbp-based vaccines. We observed that fHbp deletion mutants of some meningococcal strains showed residual fH binding suggesting the presence of a second receptor for fH. Ligand overlay immunoblotting using membrane fractions from one such strain showed that fH bound to a approximately 17 kD protein, identified by MALDI-TOF analysis as Neisserial surface protein A (NspA, a meningococcal vaccine candidate whose function has not been defined. Deleting nspA, in the background of fHbp deletion mutants, abrogated fH binding and mAbs against NspA blocked fH binding, confirming NspA as a fH binding molecule on intact bacteria. NspA expression levels vary among strains and expression correlated with the level of fH binding; over-expressing NspA enhanced fH binding to bacteria. Progressive truncation of the heptose (Hep I chain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS, or sialylation of lacto-N-neotetraose LOS both increased fH binding to NspA-expressing meningococci, while expression of capsule reduced fH binding to the strains tested. Similar to fHbp, binding of NspA to fH was human-specific and occurred through fH domains 6-7. Consistent with its ability to bind fH, deleting NspA increased C3 deposition and resulted in increased complement-dependent killing. Collectively, these data identify a key complement evasion mechanism with important implications for ongoing efforts to develop meningococcal vaccines that employ fHbp as one of its components.

  1. Characterization of fHbp, nhba (gna2132), nadA, porA, and sequence type in group B meningococcal case isolates collected in England and Wales during January 2008 and potential coverage of an investigational group B meningococcal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Comanducci, Maurizio; Findlow, Jamie; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Guiver, Malcolm; Vallely, Pamela J; Oster, Philipp; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Borrow, Ray

    2010-06-01

    Invasive disease caused by meningococcal capsular groups A, C, W-135, and Y is now preventable by means of glycoconjugate vaccines that target their respective polysaccharide capsules. The capsule of group B meningococci (MenB) is poorly immunogenic and may induce autoimmunity. Vaccines based on the major immunodominant surface porin, PorA, are effective against clonal epidemics but, thus far, have a limited scope of coverage against the wider MenB population at large. In an alternative approach, the first-generation, investigational, recombinant MenB (rMenB) plus outer membrane vesicle (OMV) (rMenB-OMV) vaccine contains a number of relatively conserved surface proteins, fHBP, NHBA (previously GNA2132), and NadA, alongside PorA P1.4-containing OMVs from the New Zealand MeNZB vaccine. MenB currently accounts for approximately 90% of cases of meningococcal disease in England and Wales. To assess potential rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage of pathogenic MenB isolates within this region, all English and Welsh MenB case isolates from January 2008 (n = 87) were genetically characterized with respect to fHBP, NHBA, NadA, and PorA. Alleles for fHbp, nhba, and porA were identified in all of the isolates, of which 22% were also found to harbor nadA alleles. On the basis of genotypic data and predicted immunological cross-reactivity, the potential level of rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage in England and Wales ranges from 66% to 100%.

  2. Non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboot, Jason B; Jawad, Abbas F; McDonough, Joseph M; Bowdre, Cheryl Y; Arens, Raanan; Marcus, Carole L; Mason, Thornton B A; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Allen, Julian L

    2012-08-01

    Assessment of oxyhemoglobin saturation in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is vital for prompt recognition of hypoxemia. The accuracy of pulse oximeter measurements of blood oxygenation in SCD patients is variable, partially due to carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb), which decrease the oxygen content of blood. This study evaluated the accuracy and reliability of a non-invasive pulse co-oximeter in measuring COHb and MetHb percentages (SpCO and SpMet) in children with SCD. We hypothesized that measurements of COHb and MetHb by non-invasive pulse co-oximetry agree within acceptable clinical accuracy with those made by invasive whole blood co-oximetry. Fifty children with SCD-SS underwent pulse co-oximetry and blood co-oximetry while breathing room air. Non-invasive COHb and MetHb readings were compared to the corresponding blood measurements. The pulse co-oximeter bias was 0.1% for COHb and -0.22% for MetHb. The precision of the measured SpCO was ± 2.1% within a COHb range of 0.4-6.1%, and the precision of the measured SpMet was ± 0.33% within a MetHb range of 0.1-1.1%. Non-invasive pulse co-oximetry was useful in measuring COHb and MetHb levels in children with SCD. Although the non-invasive technique slightly overestimated the invasive COHb measurements and slightly underestimated the invasive MetHb measurements, there was close agreement between the two methods. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. MenB-FHbp Meningococcal Group B Vaccine (Trumenba®): A Review in Active Immunization in Individuals Aged ≥ 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-02-01

    MenB-FHbp (bivalent rLP2086; Trumenba ® ) is a recombinant protein-based vaccine targeting Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB), which has recently been licensed in the EU for active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by MenB in individuals ≥ 10 years of age. The vaccine, which contains a variant from each of the two identified subfamilies of the meningococcal surface protein factor H-binding protein (fHBP), has been licensed in the USA for active immunization in individuals 10-25 years of age since 2014. This article reviews the immunogenicity, reactogenicity and tolerability of MenB-FHbp, with a focus on the EU label and the European setting. As demonstrated in an extensive program of clinical trials in adolescents and young adults, a two-dose or three-dose series of MenB-FHbp elicits a strong immune response against a range of MenB test strains selected to be representative of strains prevalent in Europe and the USA. Follow-up studies investigating the persistence of the MenB-FHbp immune response and the effect of a booster dose of the vaccine indicate that a booster dose should be considered (following a primary vaccine series) in individuals at continued risk of invasive meningococcal disease. MenB-FHbp vaccine appears to be moderately reactogenic but, overall, is generally well tolerated, with most adverse reactions being mild to moderate in severity. Although post-marketing, population-based data will be required to establish the true effectiveness of the vaccine, currently available data indicate that MenB-FHbp, in a two-dose or three-dose series, is likely to provide broad protection against MenB strains circulating in Europe.

  4. Critical analysis of old and new vaccines against N. meningitidis serogroup C, considering the meningococcal disease epidemiology in Brazil Análise crítica das antigas e novas vacinas contra a N. meningitidis do sorogrupo C, considerando a epidemiologia da doença meningocócica no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, the impact of meningococcal disease is substantial, and the potential for the introduction and spread of more virulent strains of N. meningitidis or strains with increased resistance to current antibiotics causes concern, making prevention essential. OBJECTIVES: Review the indications for meningococcal disease vaccines, considering the epidemiological status in Brazil. METHODS: A critical literature review on this issue using the Medline and Lilacs databases. RESULTS: In Brazil, MenB and MenC were the most important serogroups identified in the 1990s. Polysaccharide vaccines available against those serogroups can offer only limited protection for infants, the group at highest risk for meningococcal disease. Additionally, polysaccharide vaccines may induce a hypo-responsive state to MenC. New meningococcal C conjugate vaccines could partially solve these problems, but it is unlikely that in the next few years a vaccine against MenB that can promote good protection against multiple strains of MenB responsible for endemic and epidemic diseases will become available. CONCLUSIONS: In order to make the best decision about recommendations on immunization practices, better quality surveillance data are required. In Brazil, MenC was responsible for about 2,000 cases per year during the last 10 years. New conjugate vaccines against MenC are very effective and immunogenic, and they should be recommended, especially for children less than 5 years old. Polysaccharide vaccines should be indicated only in epidemic situations and for high-risk groups. Until new vaccines against MenC and MenB are available for routine immunization programs, the most important measure for controlling meningococcal disease is early diagnosis of these infections in order to treat patients and to offer chemoprophylaxis to contacts.Em todo o mundo, o impacto das doenças meningocócicas é enorme e o potencial para a introdução e disseminação de cepas da N

  5. Prospective Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease, Fiji, 2005–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenney, Adam; Kado, Joseph; Good, Michael F.; Batzloff, Michael; Waqatakirewa, Lepani; Mullholland, E. Kim; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    We undertook a prospective active surveillance study of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) disease in Fiji over a 23-month period, 2005–2007. We identified 64 cases of invasive GAS disease, which represents an average annualized all-ages incidence of 9.9 cases/100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.6–12.6). Rates were highest in those >65 years of age and in those <5 years, particularly in infants, for whom the incidence was 44.9/100,000 (95% CI 18.1–92.5). The case-fatality rate was 32% and was associated with increasing age and underlying coexisting disease, including diabetes and renal disease. Fifty-five of the GAS isolates underwent emm sequence typing; the types were highly diverse, with 38 different emm subtypes and no particular dominant type. Our data support the view that invasive GAS disease is common in developing countries and deserves increased public health attention. PMID:19193265

  6. Recurrent severe invasive pneumococcal disease in an adult with previously unknown hyposplenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe C; Schejbel, Lone; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    was found. Despite immunization against S. pneumoniae and measurement of what was interpreted as protective levels of serotype-specific IgG antibodies after vaccination, the patient suffered from a third episode of IPD. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with predisposing medical conditions or a history of severe......BACKGROUND: The risk of life-threatening and invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria is increased in patients with hyposplenia or asplenia. We report a case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal meningitis in a woman with previous unknown hyposplenia. She was vaccinated after the first episode...... of meningitis and developed sufficient levels of pneumococcal antibodies. The pneumococcal strains isolated were serotype 7 F and 17 F. To our knowledge, there has been no previously reported case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in a pneumococcal vaccinated adult with hyposplenia and apparently...

  7. Patient with vascular disease: diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy. Which techniques for which disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, G.W.; Grenacher, L.; Bahner, M.L.; Hess, T.; Richter, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The non-invasive imaging modalities, color coded duplex sonography (CCDS), magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), and computed tomography (CT), have pushed conventional angiography out of most diagnostic fields. The experienced user will achieve fast, reliable answers with CCDS in dedicated clinical settings. MRT as well as CT are concurring imaging modalities for the most appropriate diagnostic answer. Not only pure image quality, but also patient management, and availability play a major role. Catheter based angiography will in the future still play a role in mesenteric ischemia (nonocclusive disease) and for imaging of very small vessel pathology, e.g. on panarteriitis nodosa. At the moment, peripheral leg run-offs are still best performed with conventional angiography, nevertheless, MR as well as CT seem to have the ability to perform diagnostic procedures. Ongoing studies will allow a solid judgement in the near future. The true value of catheter angiography is in the direct assessment, planning, and performance of interventional procedures, e.g. catheter based obliteration or revascularization. Implantation of stent devices and a whole range of different mechanical and pharmacological revascularization procedures have improved the interventional management of vascular stenoses and occlusions. The interventional radiologist is treating physician in the classical sense in this setting. Acute bleeding episodes, e.g. in the brain, thorax, abdomen, or pelvis, are best imaged with computed tomography. Conventional angiography still plays a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in bleeding into preformed cavities, such as the bile ducts or the intestine. In this setting, all available information including CT scans should be valued. For complex therapeutic regimens in oncology or in pure palliative situations, angiographic diagnosis followed by embolization and/or ablation therapy is established. (orig.) [de

  8. Modelling within-host spatiotemporal dynamics of invasive bacterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Grant

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic determinants of bacterial growth, death, and spread within mammalian hosts cannot be fully resolved studying a single bacterial population. They are also currently poorly understood. Here, we report on the application of sophisticated experimental approaches to map spatiotemporal population dynamics of bacteria during an infection. We analyzed heterogeneous traits of simultaneous infections with tagged Salmonella enterica populations (wild-type isogenic tagged strains [WITS] in wild-type and gene-targeted mice. WITS are phenotypically identical but can be distinguished and enumerated by quantitative PCR, making it possible, using probabilistic models, to estimate bacterial death rate based on the disappearance of strains through time. This multidisciplinary approach allowed us to establish the timing, relative occurrence, and immune control of key infection parameters in a true host-pathogen combination. Our analyses support a model in which shortly after infection, concomitant death and rapid bacterial replication lead to the establishment of independent bacterial subpopulations in different organs, a process controlled by host antimicrobial mechanisms. Later, decreased microbial mortality leads to an exponential increase in the number of bacteria that spread locally, with subsequent mixing of bacteria between organs via bacteraemia and further stochastic selection. This approach provides us with an unprecedented outlook on the pathogenesis of S. enterica infections, illustrating the complex spatial and stochastic effects that drive an infectious disease. The application of the novel method that we present in appropriate and diverse host-pathogen combinations, together with modelling of the data that result, will facilitate a comprehensive view of the spatial and stochastic nature of within-host dynamics.

  9. Optimizing Outcomes in Immunocompromised Hosts: Understanding the Role of Immunotherapy in Invasive Fungal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada eRavikumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A major global concern is the emergence and spread of systemic life –threatening fungal infections in critically ill patients. The increase in invasive fungal infections, caused most commonly by Candida and Aspergillus species, occurs in patients with impaired defenses due to a number of reasons such as underlying disease, the use of chemotherapeutic and immunosuppressive agents, broad-spectrum antibiotics, prosthetic devices and grafts, burns, neutropenia and HIV infection. The high morbidity and mortality associated with these infections is compounded by the limited therapeutic options and the emergence of drug resistant fungi. Hence, creative approaches to bridge the significant gap in antifungal drug development needs to be explored. Here, we review the potential anti-fungal targets for patient-centered therapies and immune-enhancing strategies for the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal diseases.

  10. Invasive candidosis: contrasting the perceptions of infectious disease physicians and intensive care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Schultz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction We analyze how infectious disease physicians perceive and manage invasive candidosis in Brazil, in comparison to intensive care unit specialists. Methods A 38-question survey was administered to 56 participants. Questions involved clinicians' perceptions of the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of invasive candidosis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The perception that candidemia not caused by Candida albicans occurs in less than 10% of patients is more commonly held by intensive care unit specialists (p=0.018. Infectious disease physicians almost always use antifungal drugs in the treatment of patients with candidemia, and antifungal drugs are not as frequently prescribed by intensive care unit specialists (p=0.006. Infectious disease physicians often do not use voriconazole when a patient's antifungal treatment has failed with fluconazole, which also differs from the behavior of intensive care unit specialists (p=0.019. Many intensive care unit specialists use fluconazole to treat candidemia in neutropenic patients previously exposed to fluconazole, in contrast to infectious disease physicians (p=0.024. Infectious disease physicians prefer echinocandins as a first choice in the treatment of unstable neutropenic patients more frequently than intensive care unit specialists (p=0.013. When candidemia is diagnosed, most infectious disease physicians perform fundoscopy (p=0.015, whereas intensive care unit specialists usually perform echocardiograms on all patients (p=0.054. Conclusions This study reveals a need to better educate physicians in Brazil regarding invasive candidosis. The appropriate management of this disease depends on more drug options being available in our country in addition to global coverage in private and public hospitals, thereby improving health care.

  11. Inflammation drives dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in murine models of ileal Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Craven

    Full Text Available Understanding the interplay between genetic susceptibility, the microbiome, the environment and the immune system in Crohn's Disease (CD is essential for developing optimal therapeutic strategies. We sought to examine the dynamics of the relationship between inflammation, the ileal microbiome, and host genetics in murine models of ileitis.We induced ileal inflammation of graded severity in C57BL6 mice by gavage with Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia muris, low dose indomethacin (LDI; 0.1 mg/mouse, or high dose indomethacin (HDI; 1 mg/mouse. The composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiome was evaluated by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mucosal E. coli were enumerated by quantitative PCR, and characterized by phylogroup, genotype and pathotype.Moderate to severe ileitis induced by T. gondii (day 8 and HDI caused a consistent shift from >95% gram + Firmicutes to >95% gram - Proteobacteria. This was accompanied by reduced microbial diversity and mucosal invasion by adherent and invasive E. coli, mirroring the dysbiosis of ileal CD. In contrast, dysbiosis and bacterial invasion did not develop in mice with mild ileitis induced by Giardia muris. Superimposition of genetic susceptibility and T. Gondii infection revealed greatest dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in the CD-susceptible genotype, NOD2(-/-, and reduced dysbiosis in ileitis-resistant CCR2(-/- mice. Abrogating inflammation with the CD therapeutic anti-TNF-α-mAb tempered dysbiosis and bacterial invasion.Acute ileitis induces dysbiosis and proliferation of mucosally invasive E. coli, irrespective of trigger and genotype. The identification of CCR2 as a target for therapeutic intervention, and discovery that host genotype and therapeutic blockade of inflammation impact the threshold and extent of ileal dysbiosis are of high relevance to developing effective therapies for CD.

  12. Inflammation drives dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in murine models of ileal Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Melanie; Egan, Charlotte E; Dowd, Scot E; McDonough, Sean P; Dogan, Belgin; Denkers, Eric Y; Bowman, Dwight; Scherl, Ellen J; Simpson, Kenneth W

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between genetic susceptibility, the microbiome, the environment and the immune system in Crohn's Disease (CD) is essential for developing optimal therapeutic strategies. We sought to examine the dynamics of the relationship between inflammation, the ileal microbiome, and host genetics in murine models of ileitis. We induced ileal inflammation of graded severity in C57BL6 mice by gavage with Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia muris, low dose indomethacin (LDI; 0.1 mg/mouse), or high dose indomethacin (HDI; 1 mg/mouse). The composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiome was evaluated by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mucosal E. coli were enumerated by quantitative PCR, and characterized by phylogroup, genotype and pathotype. Moderate to severe ileitis induced by T. gondii (day 8) and HDI caused a consistent shift from >95% gram + Firmicutes to >95% gram - Proteobacteria. This was accompanied by reduced microbial diversity and mucosal invasion by adherent and invasive E. coli, mirroring the dysbiosis of ileal CD. In contrast, dysbiosis and bacterial invasion did not develop in mice with mild ileitis induced by Giardia muris. Superimposition of genetic susceptibility and T. Gondii infection revealed greatest dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in the CD-susceptible genotype, NOD2(-/-), and reduced dysbiosis in ileitis-resistant CCR2(-/-) mice. Abrogating inflammation with the CD therapeutic anti-TNF-α-mAb tempered dysbiosis and bacterial invasion. Acute ileitis induces dysbiosis and proliferation of mucosally invasive E. coli, irrespective of trigger and genotype. The identification of CCR2 as a target for therapeutic intervention, and discovery that host genotype and therapeutic blockade of inflammation impact the threshold and extent of ileal dysbiosis are of high relevance to developing effective therapies for CD.

  13. Inflammation Drives Dysbiosis and Bacterial Invasion in Murine Models of Ileal Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Melanie; Egan, Charlotte E.; Dowd, Scot E.; McDonough, Sean P.; Dogan, Belgin; Denkers, Eric Y.; Bowman, Dwight; Scherl, Ellen J.; Simpson, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Understanding the interplay between genetic susceptibility, the microbiome, the environment and the immune system in Crohn’s Disease (CD) is essential for developing optimal therapeutic strategies. We sought to examine the dynamics of the relationship between inflammation, the ileal microbiome, and host genetics in murine models of ileitis. Methods We induced ileal inflammation of graded severity in C57BL6 mice by gavage with Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia muris, low dose indomethacin (LDI;0.1 mg/mouse), or high dose indomethacin (HDI;1 mg/mouse). The composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiome was evaluated by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mucosal E. coli were enumerated by quantitative PCR, and characterized by phylogroup, genotype and pathotype. Results Moderate to severe ileitis induced by T. gondii (day 8) and HDI caused a consistent shift from >95% Gram + Firmicutes to >95% Gram - Proteobacteria. This was accompanied by reduced microbial diversity and mucosal invasion by adherent and invasive E. coli, mirroring the dysbiosis of ileal CD. In contrast, dysbiosis and bacterial invasion did not develop in mice with mild ileitis induced by Giardia muris. Superimposition of genetic susceptibility and T. Gondii infection revealed greatest dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in the CD-susceptible genotype, NOD2−/−, and reduced dysbiosis in ileitis-resistant CCR2−/− mice. Abrogating inflammation with the CD therapeutic anti-TNF-α-mAb tempered dysbiosis and bacterial invasion. Conclusions Acute ileitis induces dysbiosis and proliferation of mucosally invasive E. coli, irrespective of trigger and genotype. The identification of CCR2 as a target for therapeutic intervention, and discovery that host genotype and therapeutic blockade of inflammation impact the threshold and extent of ileal dysbiosis are of high relevance to developing effective therapies for CD. PMID:22848538

  14. Non invasive diagnostic methods for better screening of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirala, Neelamshobha; Periyasamy, R; Kumar, Awanish

    2018-05-16

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to extremities usually legs. It does not receive enough blood flow to keep up with demand. This causes symptoms, most notably leg pain while walking which is known as claudication. It is a common manifestation of type II Diabetes, but the relationship between other vascular diseases and lower limb (LL)-PAD has been poorly understood and investigated. When assessing a patient with clinically LLPAD, two questions are in order to establish a diagnosis: one is non-invasive testing and other is invasive. Invasive methods are painful and get so bad that some people need to have a leg surgery. People with Diabetes are at increased risk for amputation and it is used only when the damage is very severe. Diagnosis of LLPAD begins with a physical examination, patient history, certain questionnaire and non invasive mode of diagnosis is started for the screening of patients. Clinicians check for weak pulses in the legs and then decide for further diagnosis. Paper discusses the prevalence of LLPAD worldwide and in India along with the clinical effectiveness and limitations of these methods in case of Diabetes. The focus of this review is to discuss only those non invasive methods which are widely used for screening of LLPAD like Ankle brachial index (ABI), Toe brachial Index (TBI), and use of photoplethysmogram (PPG) specially in case of Diabetic patients. Also, this paper gives an overview of the work done using ABI, TBI, and PPG for detection of LLPAD. These tests are not painful and could be performed in a cost-effective manner to avoid delays in screening/diagnosis and also reduce costs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Meningococcal groups C and Y and haemophilus B tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT; MenHibrix(®)): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Caroline M

    2013-05-01

    The meningococcal groups C and Y and Haemophilus b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) contains Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C and Y capsular polysaccharide antigens, and Hib capsular polysaccharide [polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP)]. The HibMenCY-TT vaccine is available in the USA for use as active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by N. meningitidis serogroups C (MenC) and Y (MenY), and Hib in children 6 weeks-18 months of age. HibMenCY-TT is the first meningococcal vaccine available for use in the USA that can be administered to infants as young as 6 weeks of age. In a randomized, controlled, phase III clinical trial, the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, administered to infants at 2, 4, 6 and 12-15 months of age, was immunogenic against MenC and MenY, and met the prespecified criteria for immunogenicity. Anti-PRP antibodies, which have been shown to correlate with protection against Hib invasive disease, were also induced in the infants who received the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, with induced levels of this antibody noninferior to those occurring in the control group of infants who received a Hib tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine at 2, 4, and 6 months and a single dose of Hib conjugated to N. meningitidis outer membrane protein at 12-15 months. In several randomized, controlled clinical trials, HibMenCY-TT was coadministered with vaccines that are routinely administered to infants and toddlers in the USA. These vaccines included: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B (recombinant) and inactivated poliovirus vaccine combined; 7-valent Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide conjugate vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella vaccine; and varicella vaccine. Coadministration of these vaccines did not interfere with the immunogenicity of the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. Similarly, immune responses to the coadministered vaccines were not affected by the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. The tolerability profile of the Hib

  16. Epidemiological burden of invasive pneumococcal disease in children and adolescents with predisposing risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falleiros-Arlant, Luiza Helena; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Avila-Aguero, Maria Luisa; Pirez, Maria Catalina; Gentile, Angela; Richardson, Vesta; Brea, Jose; Mariño, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Some medical conditions constitute important risk factors for the development of invasive pneumococcal diseases in children and adolescents aged from 5 to 19 years. Conjugate vaccines have potential efficacy in this scenario, but are not available in many Latin American public healthcare systems for this age group. This study aimed to estimate the preventable fraction of invasive pneumococcal diseases among individuals aged from 5 to 19 years with associated risk factors for its development. Data regarding the Latin America population, risk factors prevalence and conjugate vaccines efficacy were obtained from the literature. Total population at risk ranged from 17.3 to 64.6 million of individuals and asthma was the most impacting risk factor. According to SIREVA, PCV13 provided a 62.9% serotypes coverage in individuals from 5 to 29 years in 2012, potentially increasing the covered population from [8,338,457-31,057,620] with PCV10 to [10,906,356-40,622,078] with PCV13. To date, according to available efficacy data, the hypothetically immunized population ranged from 11.4 to 42.4 million, representing 7.0% to 26.0% of the total population in this age group. Vaccination in risk groups should be encouraged, as it potentially contributes to the reduction in the number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

  18. [Vaccinal strategies in response to new epidemiological challenges in 2010. Reasonable hope for a "B" meningococcal vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, P

    2010-08-01

    In 2010, vaccines have achieved good effectiveness against invasive meningococcal infection. Development of monovalent and bivalent polysaccharide (PS) vaccines in the 70s and later of tetravalent PS vaccine (ACWY) was followed by development in 2003 of a trivalent ACW vaccine in response to the W135 or mixed A/W135 epidemics that appeared in Africa. More recently PS-conjugated vaccines have shown numerous advantages in comparison with PS vaccines. Mass vaccination campaigns with the C-conjugated vaccine have almost completely eradicated group C meningitis in the UK. It is hoped that introduction of the A-conjugated vaccine MenAfriVac in Africa at the end of year 2010 will end group A meningococcal epidemics in the meningitis belt. The problem of group B meningococcal meningitis has not been completely resolved. For the B strain that has been implicated in hyperendemic waves, a protein vaccine has been produced from outer membrane vesicles (OMV). Use of OMV vaccines achieved good results in Norway and recently in New Zealand. The Norwegian vaccine was also used in Normandy since the strain responsible for the Norman epidemic showed the same PorA as the Norwegian strain. In this regard, a major limitation for OMV vaccines is that they are effective only against the immuno-dominant porin A protein. Current efforts to develop a vaccine against group B meningococci causing sporadic cases are promising. Research is being focused on a blend of surface proteins targeting most of circulating isolates. Field tests will be carried out in the next years, but it is probable that the efficacy of these vaccines will be short-lived since meningococcal antigens vary over time.

  19. Diagnostic and prognostic value of non-invasive imaging in known or suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuijf, J.D.; Poldermans, D.; Shaw, L.J.; Jukema, J.W.; Wall, E.E. van der; Lamb, H.J.; Roos, A. de; Wijns, W.; Bax, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The role of non-invasive imaging techniques in the evaluation of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD) has increased exponentially over the past decade. The traditionally available imaging modalities, including nuclear imaging, stress echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have relied on detection of CAD by visualisation of its functional consequences (i.e. ischaemia). However, extensive research is being invested in the development of non-invasive anatomical imaging using computed tomography or MRI to allow detection of (significant) atherosclerosis, eventually at a preclinical stage. In addition to establishing the presence of or excluding CAD, identification of patients at high risk for cardiac events is of paramount importance to determine post-test management, and the majority of non-invasive imaging tests can also be used for this purpose. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the available non-invasive imaging modalities and their merits for the diagnostic and prognostic work-up in patients with suspected or known CAD. (orig.)

  20. Safety of Combination of a Tetravalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Against Serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 With Other Vaccine Preparations: a Prospective Study of a Series of Cases Among Healthy Children and Children With Various Health Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal infection is an acute disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis, which proceeds with a diverse clinical aspect from nasopharyngitis to meningococcal meningitis and meningococcemia. Since 2014, a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine has been registered in Russia. This vaccine creates protection against serogroups A, C, W-135, Y and can be used from the age of nine months to 55 years. The actual issue is a vaccine tolerability, including when combined with other vaccine preparations.Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the safety of a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y and W-135 when it is combined with other vaccine preparations.Methods. A prospective full-design study assessed the tolerability of immunization with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with a pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine, measles-mumps-rubella, viral hepatitis A, influenza, and chicken pox vaccines.Results. 97 children aged from 9 months to 18 years were vaccinated, 20 of them were healthy and 77 had medical issues (with allergic pathology, ENT diseases, cardiovascular and nervous system diseases, lung diseases as well as orphan diseases. Among vaccinated children, general reactions were observed in 3/97 (3.1% children, local reactions — in 5 (5.2%. The post-vaccination period passed asymptomatically and uneventfully in the prevailing majority of children vaccinated with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (in 91, 93.8%.Conclusion. The immunization with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 is well tolerated, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with other vaccine preparations, in healthy children of different age groups and in patients with different health status.

  1. Breath Analysis as a Potential and Non-Invasive Frontier in Disease Diagnosis: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs, oncologic (ODs, neurodegenerative (NDDs, chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc. allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases.

  2. Breath analysis as a potential and non-invasive frontier in disease diagnosis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge; Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Cavaco, Carina; Taunk, Khushman; Rapole, Srikanth; Dhakne, Rahul; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu; Câmara, José S

    2015-01-09

    Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs), oncologic (ODs), neurodegenerative (NDDs), chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB) that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction) coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc.) allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases.

  3. The Phosphocarrier Protein HPr Contributes to Meningococcal Survival during Infection.

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    Ana Antunes

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is an exclusively human pathogen frequently carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx but it can also provoke invasive infections such as meningitis and septicemia. N. meningitidis uses a limited range of carbon sources during infection, such as glucose, that is usually transported into bacteria via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS, in which the phosphocarrier protein HPr (encoded by the ptsH gene plays a central role. Although N. meningitidis possesses an incomplete PTS, HPr was found to be required for its virulence. We explored the role of HPr using bioluminescent wild-type and ΔptsH strains in experimental infection in transgenic mice expressing the human transferrin. The wild-type MC58 strain was recovered at higher levels from the peritoneal cavity and particularly from blood compared to the ΔptsH strain. The ΔptsH strain provoked lower levels of septicemia in mice and was more susceptible to complement-mediated killing than the wild-type strain. We tested whether meningococcal structures impacted complement resistance and observed that only the capsule level was decreased in the ΔptsH mutant. We therefore compared the transcriptomic profiles of wild-type and ΔptsH strains and identified 49 differentially expressed genes. The HPr regulon contains mainly hypothetical proteins (43% and several membrane-associated proteins that could play a role during host interaction. Some other genes of the HPr regulon are involved in stress response. Indeed, the ΔptsH strain showed increased susceptibility to environmental stress conditions. Our data suggest that HPr plays a pleiotropic role in host-bacteria interactions most likely through the innate immune response that may be responsible for the enhanced clearance of the ΔptsH strain from blood.

  4. Perineural Invasion is a Marker for Pathologically Advanced Disease in Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Irwin H.; Roberts, Rebecca; Shah, Rajal B.; Wojno, Kirk J.; Wei, John T.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if perineural invasion (PNI) should be included in addition to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage for risk-stratification of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed prostatectomy findings for 1550 patients, from a prospectively collected institutional database, to determine whether PNI was a significant predictor for upgrading of Gleason score or pathologic T3 disease after patients were stratified into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups (on the basis of PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage). Results: For the overall population, PNI was associated with a significantly increased frequency of upgrading and of pathologic T3 disease. After stratification, PNI was still associated with significantly increased odds of pathologic T3 disease within each risk group. In particular, for low-risk patients, there was a markedly increased risk of extraprostatic extension (23% vs. 7%), comparable to that of intermediate-risk patients. Among high-risk patients, PNI was associated with an increased risk of seminal vesicle invasion and lymph node involvement. Furthermore, over 80% of high-risk patients with PNI were noted to have an indication for postoperative radiation. Conclusions: Perineural invasion may be useful for risk-stratification of prostate cancer. Our data suggest that low-risk patients with PNI on biopsy may benefit from treatment typically reserved for those with intermediate-risk disease. In addition, men with high-risk disease and PNI, who are contemplating surgery, should be informed of the high likelihood of having an indication for postoperative radiation therapy

  5. Population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults in Toronto.

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    Agron Plevneshi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of high-risk populations for serious infection due to S. pneumoniae will permit appropriately targeted prevention programs. METHODS: We conducted prospective, population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease and laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in homeless adults in Toronto, a Canadian city with a total population of 2.5 M, from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006. RESULTS: We identified 69 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease and 27 cases of laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in an estimated population of 5050 homeless adults. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults was 273 infections per 100,000 persons per year, compared to 9 per 100,000 persons per year in the general adult population. Homeless persons with invasive pneumococcal disease were younger than other adults (median age 46 years vs 67 years, P<.001, and more likely than other adults to be smokers (95% vs. 31%, P<.001, to abuse alcohol (62% vs 15%, P<.001, and to use intravenous drugs (42% vs 4%, P<.001. Relative to age matched controls, they were more likely to have underlying lung disease (12/69, 17% vs 17/272, 6%, P = .006, but not more likely to be HIV infected (17/69, 25% vs 58/282, 21%, P = .73. The proportion of patients with recurrent disease was five fold higher for homeless than other adults (7/58, 12% vs. 24/943, 2.5%, P<.001. In homeless adults, 28 (32% of pneumococcal isolates were of serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine, 42 (48% of serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine, and 72 (83% of serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine. Although no outbreaks of disease were identified in shelters, there was evidence of clustering of serotypes suggestive of transmission of pathogenic strains within the homeless population. CONCLUSIONS: Homeless persons are at high risk of serious pneumococcal infection. Vaccination, physical structure changes

  6. Crystal structure of an Anti-meningococcal subtype P1.4 PorA antibody provides basis for peptide-vaccine design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, Clasien J.; Hoogerhout, Peter; Kuipers, Betsy; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Alphen, Loek; Gros, Piet

    2005-01-01

    In various western countries, subtype P1.4 of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B causes the greatest incidence of meningococcal disease. To investigate the molecular recognition of this subtype, we crystallised a peptide (P1HVVVNNKVATH(P11)), corresponding to the subtype P1.4 epitope sequence of

  7. Recommendations for Risk Categorization and Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Expert Opinion (TEO-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Boğa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the last of a series of articles on invasive fungal infections prepared by opinion leaders in Turkey. The aim of these articles is to guide clinicians in managing invasive fungal diseases in hematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation based on the available best evidence in this field. The previous articles summarized the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal disease and this article aims to explain the risk categorization and guide the antifungal prophylaxis in invasive fungal disease.

  8. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISATION OF Haemophilus influenzae STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INVASIVE AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kostyanev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 175 H. influenzae strains were collected between 1994 and 2009 from all aged patient groups. The strains were isolated from patients with invasive and community-acquired respiratory tract infections. All strains were identified according to standard microbiological methods. Serotyping was done by a coagglutination test and by molecular PCR capsular genotyping. Beta-lactamase production was determined by the chromogenic cephalosporin test with nitrocephin as substrate. Most of the isolated H. influenzae strains were from children under 5 years of age (57.7%. Overall, 61 strains belonged to serotype b (34.9% by the means of PCR capsular typing, 1 strain was type f, and 113 isolates (64.6% were non-typeable (non-encapsulated H. influenzae. Among the infants and children with meningitis or other invasive infections, aged 2 month to 5 years, all strains, except one, were serotype b. In respiratory tract infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis and people with chronic pulmonary diseases - exacerbations of COPD, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis the most common - 96.5% were non-typeable strains in both groups children and adults. Overall, the prevalence of beta-lactamase production was 19.4%. But, it was much higher for invasive strains from CSF isolates - 37.7%, 25% in blood samples, and 37.5% in otitis media causative strains. Beta-lactamase production was less frequent in respiratory tract isolates - in sputum 13.3% and in URT samples - 2.3%. The rate of beta-lactamase production in CSF isolates has not changed for the last 10 years.PCR capsular genotyping method has to be performed for all non-b-type strains. The implementation of Hib vaccine in our country will be accompanied by a reduction in invasive diseases caused by H. influenzae type b in children, but it is not useful in preventing infections caused by non-typeable H. influenzae strains.

  9. Prediction of Occult Invasive Disease in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Using Deep Learning Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bibo; Grimm, Lars J; Mazurowski, Maciej A; Baker, Jay A; Marks, Jeffrey R; King, Lorraine M; Maley, Carlo C; Hwang, E Shelley; Lo, Joseph Y

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether deep features extracted from digital mammograms using a pretrained deep convolutional neural network are prognostic of occult invasive disease for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on core needle biopsy. In this retrospective study, digital mammographic magnification views were collected for 99 subjects with DCIS at biopsy, 25 of which were subsequently upstaged to invasive cancer. A deep convolutional neural network model that was pretrained on nonmedical images (eg, animals, plants, instruments) was used as the feature extractor. Through a statistical pooling strategy, deep features were extracted at different levels of convolutional layers from the lesion areas, without sacrificing the original resolution or distorting the underlying topology. A multivariate classifier was then trained to predict which tumors contain occult invasive disease. This was compared with the performance of traditional "handcrafted" computer vision (CV) features previously developed specifically to assess mammographic calcifications. The generalization performance was assessed using Monte Carlo cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Deep features were able to distinguish DCIS with occult invasion from pure DCIS, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.70 (95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.73). This performance was comparable with the handcrafted CV features (area under the curve = 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.71) that were designed with prior domain knowledge. Despite being pretrained on only nonmedical images, the deep features extracted from digital mammograms demonstrated comparable performance with handcrafted CV features for the challenging task of predicting DCIS upstaging. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. Further research is needed.

  11. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  12. [S. Pyogenes invasive disease in a paediatric hospital: 1996-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Joana Serra; Neto, Paula; Alves, Manuela Costa; Rodrigues, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    S. pyogenes is among the most common bacteria in Pediatrics, and is associated with a wide variety of infections and large range of severity. The aim was to evaluate trends of Group A Streptococcal invasive disease in a paediatric tertiary hospital. Retrospective analyses of the medical records of all children with group A streptococcal invasive disease (positive culture obtained from sterile sites), from January 1996 to December 2009 (14 years). There were 24 cases, with a maximum of four cases/year. Eighteen cases (75%) ocurred in the second half of the study. Sixty-seven percent were boys and the median age was three years. The most frequent clinical manifestations were fever (79%), rash (54%) and arthalgia/limbs' pain (46%). The diagnoses were bacteriemia (six), osteoarticular infection (five), celulitis (three), pyomyositis, mastoiditis, surgical wound infection, toxic shock syndrome (two each), necrotizing fasciitis and pneumonia (one each). Four cases occurred during the course of varicella. Other risk factors were present in six cases. Median neutrophyl count was 10.690 x 105/L (2.013-19.180 x 105/L) and median C reactive protein was 146 mg/L (3-425 mg/L). Bacteria were isolated mainly from blood (71%). The outcome was good for most cases but there were two deaths due to toxic shock syndrome. M typing and the presence of virulence factors genes were not assessed. Although the number is small, there was an increase of S. pyogenes invasive disease in the second half of the study. Several cases occurred in the course of varicela or in the presence of other risk factors. Fatal outcome was associated with two toxic shock syndrome cases. Microbiological investigation is essential to understand which M types or virulence factors genes are involved.

  13. Treatment of intervertebral disc degenerative disease using percutaneous nucleotomy–an overview of less invasive procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Jeromel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Less invasive treatment methods for intervertebral disc disease and decompression of neural structures as a consequence of contained disc herniation represent an alternative to surgical procedure. Percutaneus nucleotomy uses a percutaneous approach to the intervertebral disc. The article presents the evolution of numerous procedureds in clinical practice.Methods: Percutaneous nucleoplasty is a fluoroscopy-guided procedure which enables controlled and safe entrance into the intervertebral disc. The procedure is performed under strict aseptic conditions, using a local anaesthesia with the patient under analgosedation. Based on the principle of therapeutic intradiscal action, the procedures can be divided into three groups: chemical (chemonucleolysis with chimopapain, alcohol, ozone, mechanical (automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy – APLD, arthroscopic discectomy and thermical methods (laser, radiofrequency ablation, intradiscal electrothermal annuloplasty – IDET, Coblation®.Results: Percutaneous nucleotomy by the majority of the mentioned procedures results in a therapeutic effect (reduction of pain and decompression of neural structures. Fast recovery represents a major advantage of less invasive treatment.Conclusions: Less invasive method (nucleotomy using different procedures represents a successful alternative approach to surgical discectomy. Proper patient selection and safe technique are mandatory in order to achieve a good clinical outcome.

  14. Population genetics of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, an invasive vector of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubert, C; Minard, G; Vieira, C; Boulesteix, M

    2016-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is currently one of the most threatening invasive species in the world. Native to Southeast Asia, the species has spread throughout the world in the past 30 years and is now present in every continent but Antarctica. Because it was the main vector of recent Dengue and Chikungunya outbreaks, and because of its competency for numerous other viruses and pathogens such as the Zika virus, A. albopictus stands out as a model species for invasive diseases vector studies. A synthesis of the current knowledge about the genetic diversity of A. albopictus is needed, knowing the interplays between the vector, the pathogens, the environment and their epidemiological consequences. Such resources are also valuable for assessing the role of genetic diversity in the invasive success. We review here the large but sometimes dispersed literature about the population genetics of A. albopictus. We first debate about the experimental design of these studies and present an up-to-date assessment of the available molecular markers. We then summarize the main genetic characteristics of natural populations and synthesize the available data regarding the worldwide structuring of the vector. Finally, we pinpoint the gaps that remain to be addressed and suggest possible research directions. PMID:27273325

  15. Role of non-invasive ventilation in difficult-to-wean children with acute neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, V G; Nair, M P; Bataclan, F

    2004-05-01

    Weaning from mechanical ventilation in children could be time-consuming and on many occasions, leads to reintubation with its associate complications. We report two children with acute neuromuscular disease, in whom bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) as a mode of non-invasive ventilation was successfully used to wean the child from ventilators and prevented the need for tracheostomy. Despite the limited number of studies published in the literature suggesting BiPAP as a mode of weaning from mechanical ventilation, the technique when applied correctly seems to be safe and effective in weaning and avoiding tracheostomy.

  16. Minimally invasive surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint in patients with various rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Drobyshev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement occurs in patients with different rheumatic diseases (RDs. Pain, limitation of mouth opening can lead to significant problems in both oral hygiene and when eating. Conservative treatments for TMJ lesions are not always effective. Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of minimally invasive surgical interventions (TMJ arthrocentesis and arthroscopy in patients with RDs. Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 64 patients with different RDs (43 with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 with psoriatic arthritis, 8 with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis who were divided into three groups in relation to the severity of TMJ involvement in accordance with the Wilkes classification. All the patients underwent TMJ magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and 6 months after treatment. Also at baseline, 14 days, and 1, 6, and 12 months after surgery, the investigators assessed TMJ pain intensity by visual analogue scale and the parameters of mandibular movements. Patients with Wilkes stages IV and V TMJ involvement underwent arthroscopic intervention into the TMJ and those with III stage received TMJ arthrocentesis with arthrolavage. Results and discussion. After surgical treatment, all the groups were noted to have a significant decrease in TMJ pain intensity compared with the baseline level; moreover, the severity of TMJ pain most significantly decreased on day 7 after surgery. Later on, positive changes remained within subsequent follow-up months. There were data similar in the higher degree of mouth opening. The results of surgical treatment in patients with Wilkes stage V TMJ involvement were worse than in those with stages III and IV. Conclusion. Minimally invasive TMJ surgery in patients with RDs is effective and associated with the low frequency of postoperative complications and exacerbations of RDs. The efficiency of minimally invasive TMJ surgery is higher in patients with the

  17. Acute polyarthritis in a young patient caused by meningococcal and parvovirus B19 infections: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoipierre, Virginie; Dellyes, Anna; Aubry, Camille; Zandotti, Christine; Lafforgue, Pierre; Parola, Philippe; Lagier, Jean-Christophe

    2016-12-20

    Meningococcal infection is a multifaceted disease including acute polyarthritis. This presentation should be known by clinicians in order to prevent delay in treatment. We report what we believe to be the first case of an association of parvovirus B19 and meningococcal polyarthritis in a young adult. A 19-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with fever, intense leg pain, and a transient rash. A physical examination showed asymmetric polyarthritis and no neurological abnormalities. A parvovirus B19 polymerase chain reaction performed using a blood sample and knee fluid aspirate came back positive, but serology was negative for immunoglobulin M and positive for immunoglobulin G. A blood culture was positive for serotype C meningococcus; a polymerase chain reaction performed for Neisseria meningitidis was positive in joint fluid but negative in blood samples (performed after antibiotic treatment had begun). Our patient was treated with ceftriaxone for 15 days, associated with analgesic therapy. Hydroxychloroquine treatment was introduced 5 months after the onset of polyarthritis because of persisting inflammatory arthralgia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of polyarthritis caused by concomitant meningococcal and parvovirus B19 infections. This unusual presentation of meningococcal disease may have resulted from the persistent parvovirus B19 infection. Our experience with this case illustrates the need for a systematic approach to the diagnosis of febrile acute polyarthritis. Only long-term follow-up will reveal if this infectious polyarthritis will evolve towards an autoimmune rheumatism.

  18. 2016 guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in patients with invasive fungal diseases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Chi Kung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Infectious Diseases Society of Taiwan, Medical Foundation in Memory of Dr. Deh-Lin Cheng, Foundation of Professor Wei-Chuan Hsieh for Infectious Diseases Research and Education, and CY Lee's Research Foundation for Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Vaccines have updated the guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in adult patients with invasive fungal diseases in Taiwan. This guideline replaces the 2009 version. Recommendations are provided for Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus and Mucormycetes. The focus is based on up-to-date evidence on indications for treatment or prophylaxis of the most common clinical problems. To support the recommendations in this guideline, the committee considered the rationale, purpose, local epidemiology, and key clinical features of invasive fungal diseases to select the primary and alternative antifungal agents. This is the first guideline that explicitly describes the quality and strength of the evidence to support these recommendations. The strengths of the recommendations are the quality of the evidence, the balance between benefits and harms, resource and cost. The guidelines are not intended nor recommended as a substitute for bedside judgment in the management of individual patients, the advice of qualified health care professionals, and more recent evidence concerning therapeutic efficacy and emergence of resistance. Practical considerations for individualized selection of antifungal agents include patient factors, pathogen, site of infection and drug-related factors, such as drug–drug interaction, drug-food intervention, cost and convenience. The guidelines are published in the Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection and are also available on the Society website.

  19. Meningococcal Two-Partner Secretion Systems and Their Association with Outcome in Patients with Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piet, Jurgen R.; van Ulsen, Peter; ur Rahman, Sadeeq; Bovenkerk, Sandra; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Two-partner secretion (TPS) systems export large TpsA proteins to the surface and extracellular milieu. In meningococci, three different TPS systems exist, and of these, TPS system 2 (TPS2) and TPS3 can be detected by the host's immune system. We evaluated the distribution of TPS systems among clinical isolates from two prospective cohort studies comprising 373 patients with meningococcal meningitis. TPS system 1 was present in 91% of isolates, and system 2 and/or 3 was present in 67%. The TPS system distribution was related to clonal complexes. Infection with strains with TPS2 and/or TPS3 resulted in less severe disease and better outcomes than infection with strains without these systems. Using whole-blood stimulation experiments, we found no differences in the host cytokine response between patients infected with TPS system 2 and 3 knockout strains and patients infected with a wild-type strain. In conclusion, meningococcal TPS system 2 and/or 3 is associated with disease severity and outcome in patients with meningitis. PMID:27324486

  20. Safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) administered with routine infant vaccinations: results of an open-label, randomized, phase 3b controlled study in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Arturo; Silas, Peter E; Lamas, Marta Raquel Valdés; Aragón, Carlos Fernándo Grazioso; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Acuña, Teobaldo Herrera; Castrejón, Tirza De León; Izu, Allen; Odrljin, Tatjana; Smolenov, Igor; Hohenboken, Matthew; Dull, Peter M

    2014-02-12

    The highest risk for invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is in infants aged CRM, a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, concomitantly administered with routine vaccinations to healthy infants. Two-month-old infants were randomized 3:1 to receive MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines or routine vaccines alone at ages 2, 4, 6 and 12 months. Adverse events (AEs) that were medically attended and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected from all subjects from enrollment through 18 months of age. In a subset, detailed safety data (local and systemic solicited reactions and all AEs) were collected for 7 days post vaccination. The primary objective was a non-inferiority comparison of the percentages of subjects with ≥1 severe systemic reaction during Days 1-7 after any vaccination of MenACWY-CRM plus routine vaccinations versus routine vaccinations alone (criterion: upper limit of 95% confidence interval [CI] of group difference CRM plus routine vaccines and 13% after routine vaccines alone (group difference 3.0% (95% CI -0.8, 6.4%). Although the non-inferiority criterion was not met, post hoc analysis controlling for significant center and group-by-center differences revealed that MenACWY-CRM plus routine vaccinations was non-inferior to routine vaccinations alone (group difference -0.1% [95% CI -4.9%, 4.7%]). Rates of solicited AEs, medically attended AEs, and SAEs were similar across groups. In a large multinational safety study, a 4-dose series of MenACWY-CRM concomitantly administered with routine vaccines was clinically acceptable with a similar safety profile to routine vaccines given alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunogenicity and safety of a single dose of a CRM-conjugated meningococcal ACWY vaccine in children and adolescents aged 2-18 years in Taiwan: results of an open label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Min; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Yeh, Shu-Jen; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-09-08

    MenACWY-CRM (Menveo®, Novartis Vaccines, Siena, Italy) is a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine developed to help prevent invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W, and Y. It is approved within the European Union in persons >2 years of age and in persons from 2 months to 55 years of age in the United States, among other countries. Little is known about the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine in Taiwanese children >2 years and adolescents. This study assessed the immunogenicity and safety of a single injection of MenACWY-CRM vaccine in Taiwanese subjects aged 2-18 years old. In this phase III, multicentre, open-label study 341 subjects received one dose of MenACWY-CRM. Immunogenicity measures were rates of seroresponse (defined as the proportion of subjects with a postvaccination hSBA ≥1:8 if the prevaccination (baseline) titre was CRM vaccination at Day 29 for the serogroups A, C, W, and Y were 83%, 93%, 50%, and 65%, respectively. At Day 29 the percentages of subjects with hSBA ≥1:8 against all four serogroups A, C, W and Y were: 83%, 96%, 96% and 82%, respectively. GMTs against all serogroups rose by ≥7-fold from baseline to Day 29. The vaccine was well tolerated. A single dose of MenACWY-CRM demonstrated a robust immune response, and an acceptable safety profile in Taiwanese children and adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vickers, I

    2011-05-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.

  3. Bladder cancer: overview and disease management. Part 1: non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Beverley

    2018-05-10

    Part 1 of this two-part article provides an overview of bladder cancer and discusses its management. Since publication of a previous article entitled 'Understanding the role of smoking in the aetiology of bladder cancer' ( Anderson, 2009 ), the author has received many requests for an update. This article provides an overview of bladder cancer and its current management practices, underlining the continued role of smoking as the predominant risk factor in the disease's development. The management of bladder cancer is governed by specific guidelines. Management of non-muscle-invasive cancers, including surgical intervention with transurethral resection, and intravesical therapy using chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents, is discussed. Cystectomy (removal of the bladder), is sometimes necessary. Treatments are effective in reducing tumour recurrence, but the effects of the risks and side-effects on the individual's quality of life can be significant. The prevalence of bladder cancer, and the nature of its management make this cancer one of the most expensive for the NHS to treat. The effectiveness of health promotional strategies in increasing peoples' awareness of their risk of developing the disease, and in enabling them to change long-term health behaviours is discussed. The role of the multidisciplinary team is explored, along with that of the uro-oncology cancer nurse specialist. Part 2 will consider the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer.

  4. 201thallium myocardial scintigraphy. A non-invasive method for diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyst Madsen, J.; Utne, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with the isotope 201 thallium is a new non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease. This article presents the results of scintigraphy in four persons with presumably healthy hearts and 12 with ischaemic heart disease. In addition, some foreign works are reviewed. The method possesses only slightly greater nosographical sensitivity than the exercise ECG alone but can be employed to advantage if the results of the exercise ECG are inconclusive e.g. on account of bundle branch block, digoxin therapy etc. Another, although somewhat more special indication, is employment prior to and after coronary artery by-pass operation with subsequent control of the result. (authors)

  5. Recognition and Clinical Presentation of Invasive Fungal Disease in Neonates and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jill; Pana, Zoi-Dorothea; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Steinbach, William J; Warris, Adilia

    2017-09-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) are devastating opportunistic infections that result in significant morbidity and death in a broad range of pediatric patients, particularly those with a compromised immune system. Recognizing them can be difficult, because nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms or isolated fever are frequently the only presenting features. Therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion is necessary in patients at increased risk of IFD, which requires knowledge of the pediatric patient population at risk, additional predisposing factors within this population, and the clinical signs and symptoms of IFD. With this review, we aim to summarize current knowledge regarding the recognition and clinical presentation of IFD in neonates and children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

  6. Global invasive bacterial vaccine-preventable diseases surveillance--2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jillian; Agócs, Mary; Serhan, Fatima; Singh, Simarjit; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; O'Brien, Katherine; Mwenda, Jason M; Mihigo, Richard; Oliveira, Lucia; Teleb, Nadia; Ahmed, Hinda; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Wijesinghe, Pushpa; Thapa, Arun Bhadra; Fox, Kimberly; Paladin, Fem Julia; Hajjeh, Rana; Schwartz, Stephanie; Van Beneden, Chris; Hyde, Terri; Broome, Claire; Cherian, Thomas

    2014-12-12

    Meningitis and pneumonia are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children globally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae causing a large proportion of disease. Vaccines are available to prevent many of the common types of these infections. S. pneumoniae was estimated to have caused 11% of deaths in children aged Organization (WHO) has recommended inclusion of PCV in childhood immunization programs worldwide, especially in countries with high child mortality. As of November 26, 2014, a total of 112 (58%) of all 194 WHO member states and 44 (58%) of the 76 member states ever eligible for support from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance (Gavi), have introduced PCV. Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance that includes data on serotypes, along with meningitis and pneumonia syndromic surveillance, provides important data to guide decisions to introduce PCV and monitor its impact.

  7. Medical and surgical treatment of idiopathic granulomatous lobular mastitis: a benign inflammatory disease mimicking invasive carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurleyik, Gunay; Aktekin, Ali; Aker, Fugen; Karagulle, Hikmet; Saglamc, Abdullah

    2012-03-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous lobular mastitis (IGLM) is a rare chronic inflammatory disease of the breast with obscure etiology that mimics invasive carcinoma both clinically and radiologically. The treatment of IGLM remains controversial. The aim of proper management is to use a combination of medical and surgical treatment of this benign condition to achieve a good cosmetic result and low recurrence rate. A retrospective analysis of 19 patients with IGLM is performed based on the findings of clinical, radiological, and pathological examinations. The results of two treatments are presented: medical treatment with oral corticosteroids, and consecutive surgical excision after a follow-up period of 20 months (range, 6-75 months). The majority of patients treated in this paper were young (mean, 34 years) parous women with a history of hormonal medication use. The main clinical finding is large, irregular, and painful mass. Hypoechoic lobulated, irregular tubular or oval shaped masses had been imaged by ultrasound. Mammographic findings were an ill-defined mass, enlarged axillary lymph nodes, asymmetric density, and architectural distortion. Diagnoses of IGLM had been established by cytological or histological examination. Symptoms subside and inflammatory changes regressed with medical treatment. The remaining lesions were excised by consecutive breast conserving surgery. The disease recurred in one patient during the follow-up period. IGLM is an inflammatory breast disease found in young women who present with a large painful irregular mass, which mimics carcinoma, as a physical change. Breast imaging modalities are not helpful to differentiate IGLM from invasive cancer. The correct diagnosis is established by cytological or histological examination. Medical treatment with corticosteroids provides significant regression of the inflammatory disease, allowing more conservative surgery. Consecutive surgical excision of the remaining lesions with good cosmetic results

  8. Mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most children are transiently colonized with Streptococcus pneumoniae, but very few develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Host genetic variation of innate immunity may predispose to IPD. We investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2......, on susceptibility and disease severity of IPD in previously healthy children aged

  9. Non-invasive assessment determine the swallowing and respiration dysfunction in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Man; Shieh, Wann-Yun; Weng, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Yi-Hsuan; Wu, Yih-Ru

    2017-09-01

    Dysphagia is common among patients with Parkinson's disease. Swallowing and its coordination with respiration is extremely important to achieve safety swallowing. Different tools have been used to assess this coordination, however the results have been inconsistent. We aimed to investigate this coordination in patients with Parkinson's disease using a non-invasive method. Signals of submental muscle activity, thyroid cartilage excursion, and nasal airflow during swallowing were recorded simultaneously. Five different water boluses were swallowed three times, and the data were recorded and analyzed. Thirty-seven controls and 42 patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease were included. The rates of non-expiratory/expiratory pre- and post-swallowing respiratory phase patterns were higher in the patients than in the controls (P Parkinson's disease, and safety compensation mechanisms were used more than efficiency during swallowing. The results of this study may serve as a baseline for further research into new treatment regimens and to improve the management of swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Invasive cervical cancer accompanied by IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Rin; Yamanishi, Yukio; Uda, Satoko; Terashima, Tsuyoshi; Higashi, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2016-09-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disease that affects multiple organs and generates nodules or thickening. Discriminating these diseases from malignancy is important because glucocorticoid treatment is effective for patients with IgG4-RD. Coexistence of IgG4-RD with various malignant diseases has been reported, but there are few reports with regard to gynecologic malignant diseases. We encountered a case of invasive cervical cancer stage IIB accompanied by IgG4-RD. The patient was a 46-year-old woman. On pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography, systemic multiple lymph node swelling was seen, including in the neck and the mediastinum in addition to uterine cervix. Diagnosis (and hence, appropriate treatment choice) was achieved on pathology of the submandibular gland and uterus, and analysis of serum IgG4. IgG4-RD should be suspected in patients presenting with malignancy and unusual multiple lymph node swelling. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on serotype-specific carriage and invasive disease in England: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Flasche

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We investigated the effect of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 programme in England on serotype-specific carriage and invasive disease to help understand its role in serotype replacement and predict the impact of higher valency vaccines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from children <5 y old and family members (n=400 2 y after introduction of PCV7 into routine immunization programs. Proportions carrying Streptococcus pneumoniae and serotype distribution among carried isolates were compared with a similar population prior to PCV7 introduction. Serotype-specific case carrier ratios (CCRs were estimated using national data on invasive disease. In vaccinated children and their contacts vaccine-type (VT carriage decreased, but was offset by an increase in non-VT carriage, with no significant overall change in carriage prevalence, odds ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.76-1.49. The lower CCRs of the replacing serotypes resulted in a net reduction in invasive disease in children. The additional serotypes covered by higher valency vaccines had low carriage but high disease prevalence. Serotype 11C emerged as predominant in carriage but caused no invasive disease whereas 8, 12F, and 22F emerged in disease but had very low carriage prevalence. CONCLUSION: Because the additional serotypes included in PCV10/13 have high CCRs but low carriage prevalence, vaccinating against them is likely to significantly reduce invasive disease with less risk of serotype replacement. However, a few serotypes with high CCRs could mitigate the benefits of higher valency vaccines. Assessment of the effect of PCV on carriage as well as invasive disease should be part of enhanced surveillance activities for PCVs. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  12. The cost-effectiveness of alternative vaccination strategies for polyvalent meningococcal vaccines in Burkina Faso: A transmission dynamic modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaesoubi, Reza; Trotter, Caroline; Colijn, Caroline; Yaesoubi, Maziar; Colombini, Anaïs; Resch, Stephen; Kristiansen, Paul A; LaForce, F Marc; Cohen, Ted

    2018-01-01

    The introduction of a conjugate vaccine for serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis has dramatically reduced disease in the African meningitis belt. In this context, important questions remain about the performance of different vaccine policies that target remaining serogroups. Here, we estimate the health impact and cost associated with several alternative vaccination policies in Burkina Faso. We developed and calibrated a mathematical model of meningococcal transmission to project the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted and costs associated with the current Base policy (serogroup A conjugate vaccination at 9 months, as part of the Expanded Program on Immunization [EPI], plus district-specific reactive vaccination campaigns using polyvalent meningococcal polysaccharide [PMP] vaccine in response to outbreaks) and three alternative policies: (1) Base Prime: novel polyvalent meningococcal conjugate (PMC) vaccine replaces the serogroup A conjugate in EPI and is also used in reactive campaigns; (2) Prevention 1: PMC used in EPI and in a nationwide catch-up campaign for 1-18-year-olds; and (3) Prevention 2: Prevention 1, except the nationwide campaign includes individuals up to 29 years old. Over a 30-year simulation period, Prevention 2 would avert 78% of the meningococcal cases (95% prediction interval: 63%-90%) expected under the Base policy if serogroup A is not replaced by remaining serogroups after elimination, and would avert 87% (77%-93%) of meningococcal cases if complete strain replacement occurs. Compared to the Base policy and at the PMC vaccine price of US$4 per dose, strategies that use PMC vaccine (i.e., Base Prime and Preventions 1 and 2) are expected to be cost saving if strain replacement occurs, and would cost US$51 (-US$236, US$490), US$188 (-US$97, US$626), and US$246 (-US$53, US$703) per DALY averted, respectively, if strain replacement does not occur. An important potential limitation of our study is the simplifying assumption that all

  13. An outbreak of meningococcal meningitis in Gauteng, Spring 1996 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To describe a Neisseri.a meningitidis outbreak in Gauteng during the period 1 July to 31 December 1996. Design. A descriptive study. Setting. Patients with meningococcal meningitis in Gauteng who had been diagnosed by laboratory means, or notified during the period 1 July to 31 December 1996.

  14. Trends in Meningococcal Meningitis Over the Past Twelve Years at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the trends in the occurrence of meningococcal meningitis at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria, as well as the antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Materials and Methods: The results of all cerebrospinal fluid samples received by the microbiology laboratory (UNTH), Enugu ...

  15. Immunogenicity of meningococcal PorA antigens in OMV vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    For the prevention of meningococcal infection caused by group B meningococci, the Netherlands Vaccine Institute (NVI) has developed a hexavalent Porin A (PorA) based Outer Membrane Vesicle (OMV) vaccine (Hexamen). In various clinical studies with HexaMen, differences in the immune responses to the

  16. Immunological properties of meningococcal lipopolysaccharide from serogroups A, B & C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T J; Kharazmi, A; Shand, G

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure and compare the oxidative burst, chemotaxis and cytokine production of human white blood cells, stimulated with meningococcal lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from three different serogroups (A, B and C) of Neisseria meningitidis, and to evaluate whether...

  17. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis. Case 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeerleder, S.; Zürcher Zenklusen, R.; Hack, C. E.; Wuillemin, W. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a man (age: 49 years), who died from severe meningococcal sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and extended skin necrosis. We discuss in detail the pathophysiology of the activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during sepsis.

  18. Homozygosity and risk of childhood death due to invasive bacterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Thomas N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic heterozygosity is increasingly being shown to be a key predictor of fitness in natural populations, both through inbreeding depression, inbred individuals having low heterozygosity, and also through chance linkage between a marker and a gene under balancing selection. One important component of fitness that is often highlighted is resistance to parasites and other pathogens. However, the significance of equivalent loci in human populations remains unclear. Consequently, we performed a case-control study of fatal invasive bacterial disease in Kenyan children using a genome-wide screen with microsatellite markers. Methods 148 cases, comprising children aged Results At five markers homozygosity was strongly associated with mortality (odds ratio range 4.7 – 12.2 with evidence of interactions between some markers. Mortality was associated with different non-overlapping marker groups in Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial disease. Homozygosity at susceptibility markers was common (prevalence 19–49% and, with the large effect sizes, this suggests that bacterial disease mortality may be strongly genetically determined. Conclusion Balanced polymorphisms appear to be more widespread in humans than previously appreciated and play a critical role in modulating susceptibility to infectious disease. The effect sizes we report, coupled with the stochasticity of exposure to pathogens suggests that infection and mortality are far from random due to a strong genetic basis.

  19. Imperfect pathogen detection from non-invasive skin swabs biases disease inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiRenzo, Graziella V.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Longo, Ana; Che-Castaldo, Christian; Zamudio, Kelly R.; Lips, Karen

    2018-01-01

    1. Conservation managers rely on accurate estimates of disease parameters, such as pathogen prevalence and infection intensity, to assess disease status of a host population. However, these disease metrics may be biased if low-level infection intensities are missed by sampling methods or laboratory diagnostic tests. These false negatives underestimate pathogen prevalence and overestimate mean infection intensity of infected individuals. 2. Our objectives were two-fold. First, we quantified false negative error rates of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis on non-invasive skin swabs collected from an amphibian community in El Copé, Panama. We swabbed amphibians twice in sequence, and we used a recently developed hierarchical Bayesian estimator to assess disease status of the population. Second, we developed a novel hierarchical Bayesian model to simultaneously account for imperfect pathogen detection from field sampling and laboratory diagnostic testing. We evaluated the performance of the model using simulations and varying sampling design to quantify the magnitude of bias in estimates of pathogen prevalence and infection intensity. 3. We show that Bd detection probability from skin swabs was related to host infection intensity, where Bd infections information in advance, we advocate that the most cautious approach is to assume all errors are possible and to accommodate them by adjusting sampling designs. The modeling framework presented here improves the accuracy in estimating pathogen prevalence and infection intensity.

  20. Invasive extramammary Paget's disease and the risk for secondary tumours in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, J M; Siesling, S; Blokx, W A M; Pierie, J P E N; Capocaccia, R

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and survival of Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) and to describe the possible increased risk of tumours after EMPD. All invasive cases diagnosed between 1990 and 2002 were selected from the RARECARE database. Incidence was expressed in European standardized rates. Relative survival was calculated for the period 1995-1999, with a follow-up until 31st December 2003. Standardized incidence ratios of second primary tumours were calculated to reveal possible increased risk after EMPD. European age standardized Incidence of EMPD within Europe is 0.6 per 1000,000 person years. Five-year relative survival for invasive EMPD was 91.2% (95%CI; 83.5-95.4), 8.6 percent of the EMPD patients developed other malignancies. The highest increased risk of developing a second primary tumour was found in the first year of follow-up (SIR:2.0 95%CI; 1.3-2.9), living in the South European region (SIR:2.3 95%CI; 1.5-3.5) or being female (SIR:1.5 95%CI; 1.1-1.9). Female genital organs displayed greatest increased risk of developing a second primary tumour after EMPD (SIR:15,1 95%CI; 0.38-84.23). Due to the increased risk of a second primary tumour after EMPD a thorough search for other tumours during their follow-up is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-invasive brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Current concepts and outlook 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, David H; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses a therapeutic challenge. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in non-invasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, though whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of non-invasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the primary motor cortex and cortical areas of the motor circuit. Published studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential of rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible regarding functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS, including increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters, derive their rationale from studies of brain physiology. These novel parameters simulate normal firing patterns or act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia in motor control. There may also be diagnostic potential of TMS in characterizing individual traits for personalized medicine.

  2. Pelvic inflammatory disease and risk of invasive ovarian cancer and ovarian borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina B; Faber, Mette T; Jensen, Allan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to examine the potential association between a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer or ovarian borderline tumors. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study in Denmark, we included 554 women with invasive ovarian...... cancer, 202 with ovarian borderline tumors, and 1,564 controls aged 35-79 years. The analyses were performed in multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: We found a significantly increased risk of ovarian borderline tumors among women with a history of PID (OR = 1.50; 95% CI 1.......08-2.08) but no apparent association between PID and risk of invasive ovarian cancer (OR = 0.83; 95% CI 0.65-1.05). We found no effect of age at time of first PID or time since first PID on the risk for either condition. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a history of PID is associated with an increased risk of ovarian...

  3. Somatic hospital contacts, invasive cardiac procedures, and mortality from heart disease in patients with severe mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Gasse, Christiane; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2009-07-01

    Excess mortality from heart disease is observed in patients with severe mental disorder. This excess mortality may be rooted in adverse effects of pharmacological or psychotropic treatment, lifestyle factors, or inadequate somatic care. To examine whether persons with severe mental disorder, defined as persons admitted to a psychiatric hospital with bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophrenia, are in contact with hospitals and undergoing invasive procedures for heart disease to the same degree as the nonpsychiatric general population, and to determine whether they have higher mortality rates of heart disease. A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons born in Denmark was followed up from 1994 to 2007. Rates of mortality, somatic contacts, and invasive procedures were estimated by survival analysis. Incidence rate ratios of heart disease admissions and heart disease mortality as well as probability of invasive cardiac procedures. The incidence rate ratio of heart disease contacts in persons with severe mental disorder compared with the rate for the nonpsychiatric general population was only slightly increased, at 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.14). In contrast, their excess mortality rate ratio from heart disease was 2.90 (95% confidence interval, 2.71-3.10). Five years after the first contact for somatic heart disease, the risk of dying of heart disease was 8.26% for persons with severe mental disorder (aged mental disorder as compared with the nonpsychiatric general population (7.04% vs 12.27%, respectively). Individuals with severe mental disorder had only negligible excess rates of contact for heart disease. Given their excess mortality from heart disease and lower rates of invasive procedures after first contact, it would seem that the treatment for heart disease offered to these individuals in Denmark is neither sufficiently efficient nor sufficiently intensive. This undertreatment may explain part of their excess

  4. INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES USED FOR THE TREATMENT OF VARIOUS DISEASES IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE, SOUTH AFRICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maema, Lesibana Peter; Potgieter, Martin; Mahlo, Salome Mamokone

    2016-01-01

    Invasive alien plant species (IAPs) are plants that have migrated from one geographical region to non-native region either intentional or unintentional. The general view of IAPs in environment is regarded as destructive to the ecosystem and they pose threat to native vegetation and species. However, some of these IAPS are utilized by local inhabitants as a substitute for scarce indigenous plants. The aim of the study is to conduct ethnobotanical survey on medicinal usage of invasive plant species in Waterberg District, Limpopo Province, South Africa. An ethnobotanical survey on invasive plant species was conducted to distinguish species used for the treatment of various ailments in the Waterberg, District in the area dominated by Bapedi traditional healers. About thirty Bapedi traditional healers (30) were randomly selected via the snowball method. A guided field work by traditional healers and a semi-structured questionnaire was used to gather information from the traditional healers. The questionnaire was designed to gather information on the local name of plants, plant parts used and methods of preparation which is administered by the traditional healers. The study revealed that Schinus molle L., Catharanthus roseus (L.), Datura stramonium L., Opuntia stricta (Haw.) Haw., Opuntia ficus- indica, Sambucus canadensis L., Ricinus communis L., Melia azedarch L., Argemone ochroleuca and Eriobotrya japónica are used for treatment of various diseases such as chest complaint, blood purification, asthma, hypertension and infertility. The most plant parts that were used are 57.6% leaves, followed by 33.3% roots, and whole plant, seeds and bark at 3% each. Noticeably, most of these plants are cultivated (38%), followed by 28% that are common to the study area, 20% abundant, 12% wild, and 3% occasionally. Schinus molle is the most frequently used plant species for the treatment of various ailments in the study area. National Environmental Management Biodiversity Act (NEMBA

  5. Non-invasive imaging technics for diagnosis in children with surgical abdominal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Koonosuke; Sato, Yutaka; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Kim, Yoshitaka; Ishikawa, Misao

    1984-01-01

    The usefullness of non-invasive imaging technics namely CT and ultrasonography was evaluated in pediatric surgical abdominal diseases, under the categoly of A) inflammatory masses (10), B) biliary abnormalities (6), C) neoplasms (12), and D) blunt abdominal traumas (8), which were experienced at St. Marianna University Hospital from April 1978 to January 1982. According to the results of the clinical study, the plan of useful diagnostic approaches in each group by means of several imaging technics was outlined. In group A and B, ultrasonography is usually suffice for diagnosis and therapy planning, whereas in group C and D, in addition to the ultrasound, CT is sometimes required for evaluating the involvement of vascular structures and sorrounding vital structures in cases of neoplasm, and coexisting injuries in the traumas. (author)

  6. Update on Pharmaceutical and Minimally Invasive Management Strategies for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokhsara Rafii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a debilitating pulmonary disorder with systemic effects, and it is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. COPD patients not only develop respiratory limitations, but can also demonstrate systemic wasting, features of depression, and can succumb to social isolation. Smoking cessation is crucial, and pharmacotherapy with bronchodilators is helpful in symptom management. Inhaled corticosteroids may be beneficial in some patients. In addition, pulmonary rehabilitation and palliative care are important components under the right clinical circumstance. This review highlights current guidelines and management strategies for COPD and emphasizes novel pharmacotherapy and minimally invasive (nonsurgical lung-volume reduction interventions that may prove to be of significant benefit in the future.

  7. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT angiography in stable coronary disease: a new standard in non-invasive testing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noergaard, B.L.; Jensen, J.M.; Leipsic, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for lesion-specific decisions on coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Current guidelines recommend non-invasive functional or anatomic testing as a gatekeeper to the catheterization laboratory. However, the ''holy grail'' in non-invasive testing of CAD is to establish a single test that quantifies both coronary lesion severity and the associated ischemia. Most evidence to date of such a test is based on the addition of computational analysis of FFR to the anatomic information obtained from standard-acquired coronary CTA data sets at rest (FFR CT ). This review summarizes the clinical evidence for the use of FFR CT in stable CAD in context to the diagnostic performance of other non-invasive testing modalities. (orig.)

  8. Minimally invasive surgical treatment options for patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durny, P.

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of reduced activity in working people is degenerative disc disease and spondylosis of lumbar spine. The variety of clinical findings such as segmental lumbago or severe form of mixed radicular compression syndromes can be occurred. Neurosurgical intervention is indicated in case of failure of conservative treatment and graphical findings correlating with a clinical picture. Large decompressive surgical procedures can destabilize segments previously affected. Recommendations from recent years suggested the functional reconstruction of damaged parts of the vertebrae, intervertebral discs and joints. Continuously improving surgical procedures and instrumentations, intended for operative treatment of lumbar spine degenerative diseases is primarily an effort to improve the properties of implants while minimizing tissue damage during the approach to the target structure. To protect functions of active spine stabilizer and paraspinal muscles is an important factor for the final outcome of the operation. Depend on the nature and extent of the disease the approaches to the spine can be an anterior, lateral and posterior as open surgery or minimally invasive procedures. (author)

  9. Clinical outcomes of two minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yonghao; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-10-01

    There are two modified TLIF, including MIS-TLIF and TLIF through Wiltse approach (W-TLIF). Although both of the two minimally invasive surgical procedures can be effective in the treatment for lumbar degenerative diseases, no comparative analysis has been made so far regarding their clinical outcomes. To compare the clinical outcomes of MIS-TLIF and W-TLIF for the treatment for single-segment degenerative lumbar diseases. Ninety-seven patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disorders were included in this study. Forty-seven underwent MIS-TLIF surgery (group A). For group B, fifty patients underwent W-TLIF. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, the visual analog scale (VAS) of low back pain (LBP) and leg pain, MRI score and atrophy rate of CSA, interbody fusion rate were assessed during the postoperative follow-up. Incision length, blood loss, operative time, CPK, and postoperative incision pain VAS were better in group A (P degenerative disease. MIS-TLIF has less blood loss, shorter surgical incision, and less lower postoperative back pain, while W-TLIF is less expensive for hospital stay with lower exposure to X-rays.

  10. Non-invasive detection of periodontal disease using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Subhash, Narayanan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Prasanthila, Janam

    2012-03-01

    In clinical diagnostic procedures, gingival inflammation is considered as the initial stage of periodontal breakdown. This is often detected clinically by bleeding on probing as it is an objective measure of inflammation. Since conventional diagnostic procedures have several inherent drawbacks, development of novel non-invasive diagnostic techniques assumes significance. This clinical study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy for quantification and discrimination of various stages of inflammatory conditions in periodontal disease. The DR spectra of diseased lesions recorded using a point monitoring system consisting of a tungsten halogen lamp and a fiber-optic spectrometer showed oxygenated hemoglobin absorption dips at 545 and 575 nm. Mean DR spectra on normalization shows marked differences between healthy and different stages of gingival inflammation. Among the various DR intensity ratios investigated, involving oxy Hb absorption peaks, the R620/R575 ratio was found to be a good parameter of gingival inflammation. In order to screen the entire diseased area and its surroundings instantaneously, DR images were recorded with an EMCCD camera at 620 and 575 nm. We have observed that using the DR image intensity ratio R620/R575 mild inflammatory tissues could be discriminated from healthy with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%, and from moderate with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 96%. The sensitivity and specificity obtained between moderate and severe inflammation are 82% and 76% respectively.

  11. Pneumococcal serotypes and serogroups causing invasive disease in Pakistan, 2005-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Shakoor

    Full Text Available While pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been implemented in most countries worldwide, use in Asia has lagged in part because of a lack of data on the amount of disease that is vaccine preventable in the region. We describe pneumococcal serotypes elicited from 111 episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD from 2005 to 2013 among children and adults in Pakistan. Seventy-three percent (n = 81 of 111 IPD episodes were cases of meningitis (n = 76 in children 0-15 years and n = 5 among adults. Serotypes were determined by target amplification of DNA extracted from pneumococcal isolates (n = 52 or CSF specimens (n = 59. Serogroup 18 was the most common serogroup causing meningitis in children <5 years, accounting for 21% of cases (n = 13. The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV 10 or PCV10- related serotypes were found in 61% (n = 47 of childhood (age 0-15 years meningitis episodes. PCV-13 increased this coverage to 63% (one additional serotype 19A; n = 48. Our data indicate that use of PCVs would prevent a large proportion of serious pneumococcal disease.

  12. Pediatric Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Guatemala City: Importance of Serotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensbauer, James T; Asturias, Edwin J; Soto, Monica; Holt, Elizabeth; Olson, Daniel; Halsey, Neal A

    2016-05-01

    To inform estimations of the potential impact of recently introduced pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), we report results of 11 years of pre-PCV surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children in Guatemala City. Cases of IPD in children younger than 5 years were identified by active surveillance at 3 referral hospitals in Guatemala City from October 1996 through 2007. Clinical and demographic data were obtained, and isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from normally sterile sites were serotyped using latex agglutination and confirmed by Quellung reaction. Four hundred fifty-two cases of IPD were identified with a case fatality rate of 21%. Meningitis was the most common cause of death (77% of all deaths) and occurred more often in infancy (median age 5 months) than other clinical syndromes. Of the 137 isolates serotyped, type 1 (26 cases, 17%), type 2 (25 cases, 16%) and type 5 (18 cases, 12%) were the most common. Serotype 2 was associated with a higher case fatality rate (28%), higher rate of meningitis (68%) and occurred in younger infants (median age, 3.5 months) than other common serotypes. Recently introduced PCV13 includes 73% of observed serotypes in the study. Infants with IPD presented at a young age. Serotype 2, rarely reported as a significant cause of IPD and not included in available PCVs, was a common cause of disease in this population. PCV13 introduction in Guatemala, begun in 2013, may not have as great an impact in disease reduction as has been observed in other countries.

  13. Host Factors and Biomarkers Associated with Poor Outcomes in Adults with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Hanada

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD causes considerable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify host factors and biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in adult patients with IPD in Japan, which has a rapidly-aging population.In a large-scale surveillance study of 506 Japanese adults with IPD, we investigated the role of host factors, disease severity, biomarkers based on clinical laboratory data, treatment regimens, and bacterial factors on 28-day mortality.Overall mortality was 24.1%, and the mortality rate increased from 10.0% in patients aged ˂50 years to 33.1% in patients aged ≥80 years. Disease severity also increased 28-day mortality, from 12.5% among patients with bacteraemia without sepsis to 35.0% in patients with severe sepsis and 56.9% with septic shock. The death rate within 48 hours after admission was high at 54.9%. Risk factors for mortality identified by multivariate analysis were as follows: white blood cell (WBC count <4000 cells/μL (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-12.8, p < .001; age ≥80 years (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.0-21.6, p = .002; serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.5-8.1, p < .001; underlying liver disease (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6-7.8, p = .002; mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.6, p < .001; and lactate dehydrogenase ≥300 IU/L (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.0, p = .001. Pneumococcal serotype and drug resistance were not associated with poor outcomes.Host factors, disease severity, and biomarkers, especially WBC counts and serum creatinine, were more important determinants of mortality than bacterial factors.

  14. Safety and immunogenicity of meningococcal A and C polysaccharide conjugate vaccine in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, E L; Bowers, T; Mink, C M; Kennedy, D J; Belshe, R B; Harakeh, H; Pais, L; Holder, P; Carlone, G M

    1994-01-01

    A meningococcal vaccine containing group A and C polysaccharides conjugated to CRM197 was evaluated in 50 adults. Vaccinees were entered into one of five groups: 30 adults received a single dose of either 22, 11, or 5.5 micrograms of the conjugated A-C vaccine; 10 received an approved meningococcal vaccine; and 10 received saline injections. Local and systemic reactions to vaccines were recorded, and immune responses were determined. The experimental meningococcal vaccine was well tolerated, ...

  15. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of unusual manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Adrian; Pérez-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa; Nodar, Andrés; Martínez-Lamas, Lucía; Vasallo, Francisco Jose; Álvarez-Fernández, Maximiliano; Crespo, Manuel

    2017-06-22

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically presents as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia. However, Streptococcus pneumoniae can produce infection at any level of the body (endocarditis, arthritis, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc.), which is also known as unusual IPD (uIPD). There are very limited data available about the clinical and microbiological profile of these uncommon manifestations of pneumococcal disease. Our aim was to analyse clinical forms, microbiological profile, epidemiology and prognosis of a cohort of patients with unusual invasive pneumococcal disease (uIPD). We present a retrospective study of 389 patients (all adult and paediatric patients diagnosed during the period) diagnosed with IPD at our hospital (Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo) between 1992 and 2014. We performed an analysis of clinical, microbiological and demographical characteristics of patients comparing the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) period with the post-vaccination phase. IPD and uIPD were defined as follows; IPD: infection confirmed by the isolation of S. pneumoniae from a normally sterile site, which classically presented as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia; uIPD: any case of IPD excluding pneumonia, meningitis, otitis media, rhinosinusitis or primary bacteraemia. A total of 22 patients (6%) met the criteria of uIPD. A Charlson index >2 was more prevalent in uIPD patients than IPD patients (45% vs 24%; p=0.08). The most common clinical presentation of uIPD was osteoarticular infection (8 patients, 36%), followed by gastrointestinal disease (4 patients, 18%). Infection with serotypes included in PCV-13 was significantly higher in IPD patients (65%) than in patients with uIPD, 35% (p=0.018). Conversely, infection with multidrug-resistant strains was higher among patient with uIPD (27% vs 9%; p=0.014). The all-cause mortality rate was 15%, 13% in the IPD group and 32% among patients with uIPD (p=0

  16. Prevalence of invasive fungal disease in hematological patients at a tertiary university hospital in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Liang-Piu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of newer azoles as prophylaxis in hematological patients undergoing stem cell transplantation or immunosuppressive chemotherapy has been shown to decrease the risk of developing invasive fungal disease (IFD. However, the cost-effectiveness of such a strategy is dependent on the local epidemiology of IFD. We conducted an audit of hematological patients with IFD in our institution in order to derive the prevalence and types of IFD that occur locally. Findings We conducted a retrospective chart review of all hematological patients who developed possible, probable or definite IFD according to EORTC/MSG criteria in the period from Oct 2007 to Apr 2010. The prevalence of IFD was determined via correlation with institutional database records of all hematological patients treated at our institution over the same time period. There were 39 cases of IFD diagnosed during the study period, with 8 (20.5% possible, 19 (48.7% probable and 12 (30.8% definite cases of IFD. Aspergillus spp. accounted for 83.9% of all probable and definite infections. There was 1 case each of Rhinocladelia spp., Coprinopsis cinerea, Exserohilum spp. sinusitis and Rhizopus spp. sinusitis. IFD occurred in 12 of 124 (9.7% AML and 4 of 103 (3.9% ALL patients treated at our institution respectively. There were 10 (16.1% infections among 62 allogeneic HSCT recipients, six of whom were having concurrent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Five other cases occurred after allogeneic HSCT failure, following salvage chemotherapy for disease relapse. The prevalence of IFD during induction chemotherapy was 8.9% (11 of 124 cases for AML and 1.0% (1 of 103 cases for ALL. Fluconazole prophylaxis had been provided for 28 out of the 39 (71.8% cases, while 4 (10.3% were on itraconazole prophylaxis. The in-hospital mortality was 28.2% (11 of 39 cases, of which 5 (12.8% deaths were attributed to IFD. Conclusions The burden of IFD is high in our institution, especially in

  17. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Unilateral Fixation for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Wang; Hu, Yong-Cheng; Wu, Zhan-Yong; Wu, Hua-Rong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Suo; Xu, Wei-Kun; Fan, Hui-Long; Cai, Jin-Sheng; Ma, Jian-Qing

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of the minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation using a tubular retractor in the management of degenerative lumbar disease. A retrospective analysis was conducted to analyze the clinical outcome of 58 degenerative lumbar disease patients who were treated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation during December 2012 to January 2015. The spine was unilaterally approached through a 3.0-cm skin incision centered on the disc space, located 2.5 cm lateral to the midline, and the multifidus muscles and longissimus dorsi were stripped off. After transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion the unilateral pedicle screw fixation was performed. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the MacNab score were applied to evaluate clinical effects. The operation time, peri-operative bleeding, postoperative time in bed, hospitalization costs, and the change in the intervertebral height were analyzed. Radiological fusion based on the Bridwell grading system was also assessed at the last follow-up. The quality of life of the patients before and after the operation was assessed using the short form-36 scale (SF-36). Fifty-eight operations were successfully performed, and no nerve root injury or dural tear occurred. The average operation time was 138 ± 33 min, intraoperative blood loss was 126 ± 50 mL, the duration from surgery to getting out of bed was 46 ± 8 h, and hospitalization cost was 1.6 ± 0.2 ten thousand yuan. All of the 58 patients were followed up for 7-31 months, with an average of 14.6 months. The postoperative VAS scores and ODI score were significantly improved compared with preoperative data (P degenerative lumbar disease, and the short-term clinical outcome is satisfactory

  18. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde N; Kristensen, Tim D; Kaltoft, Margit S

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to document the epidemiology, microbiology and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children vaccine (PCV7) into the Danish routine...... children vaccination....... immunization programme October 2007. Methods: Clinical and microbiological records on cases of IPD in children children

  19. A risk prediction score for invasive mold disease in patients with hematological malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Stanzani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A risk score for invasive mold disease (IMD in patients with hematological malignancies could facilitate patient screening and improve the targeted use of antifungal prophylaxis. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 1,709 hospital admissions of 840 patients with hematological malignancies (2005-2008 to collect data on 17 epidemiological and treatment-related risk factors for IMD. Multivariate regression was used to develop a weighted risk score based on independent risk factors associated with proven or probable IMD, which was prospectively validated during 1,746 hospital admissions of 855 patients from 2009-2012. RESULTS: Of the 17 candidate variables analyzed, 11 correlated with IMD by univariate analysis, but only 4 risk factors (neutropenia, lymphocytopenia or lymphocyte dysfunction in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, malignancy status, and prior IMD were retained in the final multivariate model, resulting in a weighted risk score 0-13. A risk score of 5% of IMD, with a negative predictive value (NPV of 0.99, (95% CI 0.98-0.99. During 2009-2012, patients with a calculated risk score at admission of 6 (0.9% vs. 10.6%, P <0.001. CONCLUSION: An objective, weighted risk score for IMD can accurately discriminate patients with hematological malignancies at low risk for developing mold disease, and could possibly facilitate "screening-out" of low risk patients less likely to benefit from intensive diagnostic monitoring or mold-directed antifungal prophylaxis.

  20. Progression of an Invasive ACTH Pituitary Macroadenoma with Cushing’s Disease to Pituitary Carcinoma

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    Clarissa Groberio Borba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary carcinomas are very rare tumors that in most cases produce prolactin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH. It is a challenge to diagnosis of a pituitary carcinoma before disclosed symptomatic metastasis. We report the case of a female patient with Cushing’s disease who underwent three transsphenoidal surgeries, with pathological findings of common ACTH pituitary adenoma including Ki-67 expression <3%. She achieved hypocortisolism after the 3rd surgery although ACTH levels remained slightly elevated. The patient returned some time later with fast worsening of hypercortisolism. Magnetic resonance imaging showed clivus invasion, which led to a fourth surgery and radiation. This time, immunohistochemistry revealed strong Ki-67 (10% to 15% and p53 expression. Liver and lumbar spine metastases were found on workup. The patient died after few months due to lung infection. Pituitary carcinomas are rare, and the transformation of an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma into a carcinoma is exceptional. The difficulty of defining markers for the diagnosis of carcinoma, before metastasis diagnosis, in order to change the management of the disease, is a challenge.

  1. [Biological factors influencing infectious diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boštíková, Vanda; Pasdiorová, Markéta; Marek, Jan; Prášil, Petr; Salavec, Miloslav; Sleha, Radek; Střtítecká, Hana; Blažek, Pavel; Hanovcová, Irena; Šošovičková, Renáta; Špliňo, Milan; Smetana, Jan; Chlíbek, Roman; Hytych, Václav; Kuča, Kamil; Boštík, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Studies focused on arbovirus diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes have become increasingly significant in recent years, due to the fact that these vectors have successfully migrated to Europe and become established in the region. Mosquitoes, represented by more than 3 200 species, occur naturally worldwide, except in Antarctica. They feed on the blood of warm-blooded animals and by this route, they are capable of transmitting dangerous diseases. Some species can travel a distance of 10 km per night and can fly continuously for up to 4 hours at a speed of 1-2 km/h. Most species are active at night, in the evening or morning. It usually takes a mosquito female about 50 seconds to penetrate the skin of mammals and the subsequent blood meal usually takes about 2.5 minutes. Mosquitoes live for several weeks or months, depending on the environmental conditions. The VectorNet project is a European network of information exchange and sharing of data relating to the geographical distribution of arthropod vectors and transmission of infectious agents between human populations and animals. It aims at the development of strategic plans and vaccination policies which are the main tasks of this time, as well as the development and application of new disinfectants to control vector populations.

  2. Non-invasive evaluation for pulmonary circulatory impairment during exercise in patients with chronic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was performed at rest and during exercise on sixteen patients with chronic lung disease to evaluate the secondary pulmonary hypertension during exercise with non-invasive technique. An inverse significant correlation was found between thallium activity ratio (TAR) of left ventricle plus ventricular septum to right ventricle and both of pulmonary vascular resistance and right to left ventricular work index ratio during exercise. The patients were divided into three groups according to mean pulmonary arterial pressure (P-bar PA ) at rest and during exercise: the first group consisted of six patients with pulmonary hypertension during exercise (P-bar PA : below 25 mmHg at rest and above 30 mmHg during exercise), the second group consisted of four patients with pulmonary hypertension at rest (P-bar PA above 25 mmHg at rest), and the third group consisted of six patients without pulmonary hypertension (P-bar PA below 25 mmHg at rest, below 30 mmHg during exercise). In the first group, TAR during exercise was lowered than at rest in four patients, and in the second group TAR during exercise was lowered than at rest in all, while in the third group TAR during exercise was increased than at rest in five patients. These results suggest that thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy can reflect pulmonary hemodynamics during exercise in patients with chronic lung disease and it is of great use to predict the patients with pulmonary hypertension during exercise. (author)

  3. Non-invasive brain stimulation to assess and modulate neuroplasticity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Paulo Sérgio; Valasek, Claudia Aparecida; Campanhã, Camila; Giglio, Ana Carolina Alem; Baptista, Nathalia Ishikawa; Lapenta, Olivia Morgan; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative and progressive disease related to a gradual decline in cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perceptual-spatial abilities, language, and executive functions. Recent evidence has suggested that interventions promoting neural plasticity can induce significant cognitive gains especially in subjects at risk of or with mild AD. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are non-invasive techniques that can induce significant and long-lasting changes in focal and non-focal neuroplasticity. In this review, we present initial preliminary evidence that TMS and tDCS can enhance performance in cognitive functions typically impaired in AD. Also, we reviewed the initial six studies on AD that presented early findings showing cognitive gains such as in recognition memory and language associated with TMS and tDCS treatment. In addition, we showed that TMS has also been used to assess neuroplasticity changes in AD supporting the notion that cortical excitability is changed in AD due to the neurodegenerative process. Due to the safe profile, cost of these tools, and initial clinical trials results, further studies are warranted in order to replicate and extend the initial findings of rTMS and tDCS as cognitive enhancers in AD. Further trials should explore different targets of stimulation along with different paradigms of stimulation including combination with behavioural interventions.

  4. Immunology, epidemiology and mathematical modelling towards a better understanding of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella disease and rational vaccination approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroeni, Pietro; Rossi, Omar

    2016-12-01

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) infections cause a high burden of lethal sepsis in young children and HIV patients, often associated with malaria, anaemia, malnutrition and sickle-cell disease. Vaccines against iNTS are urgently needed but none are licensed yet. Areas covered: This review illustrates how immunology, epidemiology and within-host pathogen behaviour affect invasive Salmonella infections and highlights how this knowledge can assist the improvement and choice of vaccines. Expert Commentary: Control of iNTS disease requires approaches that reduce transmission and improve diagnosis and treatment. These are often difficult to implement due to the fragile ecology and economies in endemic countries. Vaccines will be key tools in the fight against iNTS disease. To optimise vaccine design, we need to better define protective antigens and mechanisms of resistance to disease in susceptible populations even in those individuals where innate immunity may be impaired by widespread comorbidities.

  5. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mussi, Thais C.; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  6. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  7. Non-invasive separation of alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease with predictive modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Peter Sowa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Currently, a major clinical challenge is to distinguish between chronic liver disease caused by metabolic syndrome (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD from that caused by long term or excessive alcohol consumption (ALD. The etiology of severe liver disease affects treatment options and priorities for liver transplantation and organ allocation. Thus we compared physiologically similar NAFLD and ALD patients to detect biochemical differences for improved separation of these mechanistically overlapping etiologies. METHODS: In a cohort of 31 NAFLD patients with BMI below 30 and a cohort of ALD patient with (ALDC n = 51 or without cirrhosis (ALDNC n = 51 serum transaminases, cell death markers and (adipo-cytokines were assessed. Groups were compared with One-way ANOVA and Tukey's correction. Predictive models were built by machine learning techniques. RESULTS: NAFLD, ALDNC or ALDC patients did not differ in demographic parameters. The ratio of alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase--common serum parameters for liver damage--was significantly higher in the NAFLD group compared to both ALD groups (each p<0.0001. Adiponectin and tumor necrosis factor(TNF-alpha were significantly lower in NAFLD than in ALDNC (p<0.05 or ALDC patients (p<0.0001. Significantly higher serum concentrations of cell death markers, hyaluronic acid, adiponectin, and TNF-alpha (each p<0.0001 were found in ALDC compared to ALDNC. Using machine learning techniques we were able to discern NAFLD and ALDNC (up to an AUC of 0.9118±0.0056 or ALDC and ALDNC (up to an AUC of 0.9846±0.0018, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Machine learning techniques relying on ALT/AST ratio, adipokines and cytokines distinguish NAFLD and ALD. In addition, severity of ALD may be non-invasively diagnosed via serum cytokine concentrations.

  8. Use of non-invasive ventilation is increasing in patients admitted with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A nationwide chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) quality improvement programme - DrCOPD - was initiated in Denmark in 2008. We examined subsequent national and regional trends in the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and trends in mortality following NIV and invasive...... the launch of a national COPD quality programme in 2008. However, regional variation remains and no substantial improvements in mortality have been observed. Continued efforts are warranted to ensure appropriate implementation of NIV. FUNDING: The study was supported financially by University of Copenhagen...

  9. Meningococcal factor H binding proteins in epidemic strains from Africa: implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Pajon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (fHbp is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH, which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains.We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81% had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates, 9 (W-135, or 74 (X in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135 in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine.NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine recently introduced in some sub

  10. UK parents' attitudes towards meningococcal group B (MenB) vaccination: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Cath; Yarwood, Joanne; Saliba, Vanessa; Bedford, Helen

    2017-05-04

    (1) To explore existing knowledge of, and attitudes, to group B meningococcal disease and serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine among parents of young children. (2) To seek views on their information needs. Cross-sectional qualitative study using individual and group interviews conducted in February and March 2015, prior to the introduction of MenB vaccine (Bexsero) into the UK childhood immunisation schedule. Community centres, mother and toddler groups, parents' homes and workplaces in London and Yorkshire. 60 parents of children under 2 years of age recruited via mother and baby groups and via an advert posted to a midwife-led Facebook group. Although recognising the severity of meningitis and septicaemia, parents' knowledge of group B meningococcal disease and MenB vaccine was poor. While nervous about fever, most said they would take their child for MenB vaccination despite its link to fever. Most parents had liquid paracetamol at home. Many were willing to administer it after MenB vaccination as a preventive measure, although some had concerns. There were mixed views on the acceptability of four vaccinations at the 12-month booster visit; some preferred one visit, while others favoured spreading the vaccines over two visits. Parents were clear on the information they required before attending the immunisation appointment. The successful implementation of the MenB vaccination programme depends on its acceptance by parents. In view of parents' recognition of the severity of meningitis and septicaemia, and successful introduction of other vaccines to prevent bacterial meningitis and septicaemia, the MenB vaccination programme is likely to be successful. However, the need for additional injections, the likelihood of post-immunisation fever and its management are issues about which parents will need information and reassurance from healthcare professionals. Public Health England has developed written information for parents, informed by these findings.

  11. Effect of a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY glycoconjugate or a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine on meningococcal carriage: an observer-blind, phase 3 randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Robert C; Baxter, David; Chadwick, David R; Faust, Saul N; Finn, Adam; Gordon, Stephen B; Heath, Paul T; Lewis, David J M; Pollard, Andrew J; Turner, David P J; Bazaz, Rohit; Ganguli, Amitava; Havelock, Tom; Neal, Keith R; Okike, Ifeanyichukwu O; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Patel, Kamlesh; Snape, Matthew D; Williams, John; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Gray, Steve J; Maiden, Martin C J; Toneatto, Daniela; Wang, Huajun; McCarthy, Maggie; Dull, Peter M; Borrow, Ray

    2014-12-13

    Meningococcal conjugate vaccines protect individuals directly, but can also confer herd protection by interrupting carriage transmission. We assessed the effects of meningococcal quadrivalent glycoconjugate (MenACWY-CRM) or serogroup B (4CMenB) vaccination on meningococcal carriage rates in 18-24-year-olds. In this phase 3, observer-blind, randomised controlled trial, university students aged 18-24 years from ten sites in England were randomly assigned (1:1:1, block size of three) to receive two doses 1 month apart of Japanese Encephalitis vaccine (controls), 4CMenB, or one dose of MenACWY-CRM then placebo. Participants were randomised with a validated computer-generated random allocation list. Participants and outcome-assessors were masked to the treatment group. Meningococci were isolated from oropharyngeal swabs collected before vaccination and at five scheduled intervals over 1 year. Primary outcomes were cross-sectional carriage 1 month after each vaccine course. Secondary outcomes included comparisons of carriage at any timepoint after primary analysis until study termination. Reactogenicity and adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Analysis was done on the modified intention-to-treat population, which included all enrolled participants who received a study vaccination and provided at least one assessable swab after baseline. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number NCT01214850. Between Sept 21 and Dec 21, 2010, 2954 participants were randomly assigned (987 assigned to control [984 analysed], 979 assigned to 4CMenB [974 analysed], 988 assigned to MenACWY-CRM [983 analysed]); 33% of the 4CMenB group, 34% of the MenACWY-CRM group, and 31% of the control group were positive for meningococcal carriage at study entry. By 1 month, there was no significant difference in carriage between controls and 4CMenB (odds ratio 1·2, 95% CI 0·8-1·7) or MenACWY-CRM (0·9, [0·6-1·3]) groups. From 3 months after dose two, 4CMen

  12. Correlation of group C meningococcal conjugate vaccine response with B- and T-lymphocyte activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Wing

    Full Text Available Despite the success of conjugate vaccination against meningococcal group C (MenC disease, post-vaccination, some individuals still exhibit rapid waning of initially protective bactericidal antibody levels. The mechanism of this relative loss of humoral protection remains undetermined. In this report we have investigated the relationship between T- and B-cell activation and co-stimulation and the loss of protective antibody titers. We have found that healthy volunteers who lose protective MenC antibody levels one year after receipt of glycoconjugate vaccine exhibit no detectable cellular defect in polyclonal B- or T-cell activation, proliferation or the B-memory pool. This suggests that the processes underlying the more rapid loss of antibody levels are independent of defects in either initial T- or B-cell activation.

  13. [Study on immunogenicity of group A and group C meningococcal conjugate vaccine with coupling group B meningococcal outer membrane protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fu-Bao; Tao, Hong; Wang, Hong-Jun

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the Immunogenicity of Group A and Group C Meningococcal conjugate Vaccine with coupling Group B Meningococcal Outer Membrane Protein (Men B-OMP). 458 healthy children aged 3-5 months, 6-23 months, 2-6 years and 7-24 years were given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP or other vaccine as control group to measure the pre-and post-vaccination Men A and C and B by Serum Bactericidal Assay (SBA) in the double-blind randomized controlled trial. 97.65%-100% were 4 times or greater increase in SBA titer for the healthy children given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP, The geometric mean titer of SBA were 1:194-1:420, which significantly higber than controls. The Group A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP was safe and well immunogenic.

  14. Invasive pulmonary fungal infections in patients with connective tissue disease: a retrospective study from northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.F. Ge

    Full Text Available Invasive pulmonary fungal infection (IPFI is a potentially fatal complication in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD. The current study aimed to uncover the clinical characteristics and risk factors of patients with IPFI-CTD. The files of 2186 CTD patients admitted to a single center in northern China between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 47 CTD patients with IPFI were enrolled into this study and assigned to the CTD-IPFI group, while 47 uninfected CTD patients were assigned to the control group. Clinical manifestations were recorded, and risk factors of IPFI were calculated by stepwise logistical regression analysis. Forty-seven (2.15% CTD patients developed IPFI. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients were responsible for the highest proportion (36.17% of cases with IPFI. Candida albicans (72.3% accounted for the most common fungal species. CTD-IPFI patients had significantly elevated white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and fasting glucose values compared to controls (P<0.05. Cough, sputum and blood in phlegm were the most common symptoms. Risk factors of IPFI in CTD included maximum prednisone dose ≥30 mg/day within 3 months prior to infection, anti-microbial drug therapy, and interstitial pneumonia. CTD patients who have underlying interstitial pneumonia, prior prednisone or multiple antibiotics, were more likely to develop IPFI.

  15. Molecular diagnostic methods for invasive fungal disease: the horizon draws nearer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, C L; Kidd, S E; Sorrell, T C; Chen, S C-A

    2015-04-01

    Rapid, accurate diagnostic laboratory tests are needed to improve clinical outcomes of invasive fungal disease (IFD). Traditional direct microscopy, culture and histological techniques constitute the 'gold standard' against which newer tests are judged. Molecular diagnostic methods, whether broad-range or fungal-specific, have great potential to enhance sensitivity and speed of IFD diagnosis, but have varying specificities. The use of PCR-based assays, DNA sequencing, and other molecular methods including those incorporating proteomic approaches such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS) have shown promising results. These are used mainly to complement conventional methods since they require standardisation before widespread implementation can be recommended. None are incorporated into diagnostic criteria for defining IFD. Commercial assays may assist standardisation. This review provides an update of molecular-based diagnostic approaches applicable to biological specimens and fungal cultures in microbiology laboratories. We focus on the most common pathogens, Candida and Aspergillus, and the mucormycetes. The position of molecular-based approaches in the detection of azole and echinocandin antifungal resistance is also discussed.

  16. Drinking yerba mate infusion: a potential risk factor for invasive fungal diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, N O; Peres, A; Aquino, V R; Pasqualotto, A C

    2010-12-01

    Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) infusion is a very popular drink in South America. Although several studies have evaluated the potential for fungal contamination in foodstuff, very few investigations have been conducted with yerba mate samples. In order to evaluate for the presence of potentially pathogenic fungi, here we studied 8 brands of yerba mate commercially available in Southern Brazil. Fungal survival in adverse conditions such as gastric pH was determined by incubating samples at pH 1.5. Because hot water is generally used to prepare yerba mate infusion, the effect of several temperatures on fungal growth was also investigated. All but 1 yerba mate brand showed substantial fungal growth, in the range of <10–4900 colony-forming units per gram. Some of these fungi were able to survive extreme variations in pH and temperature. Because of the potential for yerba mate to carry pathogenic fungi, immunocompromised patients may be at risk of acquiring invasive fungal diseases by drinking yerba mate infusion.

  17. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  18. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

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    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  19. Invasive placental disease: the impact of a multi-disciplinary team approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulian, John C; Pascual, Ana-Liza; Hesham, Helai; Qureshey, Emma; Bijoy Thomas, M; Depuy, Amy M; Flicker, Amanda B; Scorza, William E

    2017-06-01

    To determine the impact of a structured multi-disciplinary management strategy on clinical outcomes in women with invasive placental disease (IPD). This was a retrospective cohort study of consecutive women having peripartum hysterectomies with IPD over seven years. For the most recent three years, a structured multidisciplinary team (MDT) reviewed each suspected case, created a management plan, and implemented that plan. Outcomes were compared between cases delivered prior to and after the MDT process was started. There were 47 pregnancies with IPD, of which 31 (66.0%) were suspected antenatally and 40 (85.1%) had a prior uterine surgery. An MDT approach was performed in 19 (40.4%) cases. In the MDT group, there were longer operative times (260 min versus 181 min, p = 0.0001), less blood loss (1200 mL versus 2500 mL, p = 0.009), less administration of blood products (47.4% versus 85.7%, p = 0.005), and higher intraoperative lowest mean arterial pressures (MAPs) (57 mmHg versus 48 mmHg, p = 0.002, when compared to the No-MDT (n = 28) approach. No differences were found for other outcomes. Clinically meaningful improvements of less blood loss, fewer transfusions, and higher intraoperative MAPs suggest that MDT cases were more stable intraoperatively, which over a larger number of patients, should translate into improved outcomes.

  20. Effect of minimally invasive surgery on related serum factors in patients with lumbar degenerative disease

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    Yi-Zhong Sun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of minimally invasive surgery and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF on the related serum factors in patients with lumbar degenerative disease. Methods: A total of 100 patients with lumbar degenerative disease who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2014 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group according to different surgical methods. The patients in the observation group were given MIS-TLIF, while the patients in the control group were given the traditional TLIF. The peripheral venous blood before operation, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 24 h after operation in the two groups was collected, and centrifuged for the serum. ELISA was used to detect the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels. The peripheral venous blood before operation, 1 h, 3 h, 5 h and 7 d after operation in the two groups was collected. DGKC velocity method was used to detect CK activity and fusion rate. The fusion grade was evaluated 6 months after operation according to Bridwell fusion grading standard. Results: The serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 24 h after operation in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before operation, and the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels at each timing point after operation in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. CK activity 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, and 7d after operation in the two groups was significantly elevated when compared with before operation, and CK activity at each timing point after operation in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Conclusions: MISTLIF has a small damage on the tissues, can effectively alleviate the inflammatory reaction, and preferably retain the stable structure of posterior column, whose advantage is significantly superior to that by the traditional TLIF.

  1. Safety of Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Children 2-10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartof, Sara Yee; Sy, Lina S; Ackerson, Bradley K; Hechter, Rulin C; Haag, Mendel; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Luo, Yi; Fischetti, Christine A; Takhar, Harp S; Miao, Yan; Solano, Zendi; Jacobsen, Steven J; Tseng, Hung-Fu

    2017-11-01

    Quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine is recommended for children, adolescents and adults at increased risk of meningococcal disease. In 2011, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, GSK, Siena, Italy) was approved for children 2-10 years of age in the United States. Although no safety concerns arose from clinical trials, it remains important to monitor its safety in routine clinical settings. Kaiser Permanente Southern California members 2-10 years old who received MenACWY-CRM between September 2011 and September 2014 were included. Electronic health records were searched using a validated algorithm to identify 26 prespecified events of interests (EOIs) and serious medically attended events (SMAEs) from inpatient or emergency settings up to 1 year after MenACWY-CRM vaccination. SMAEs were categorized by International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision diagnostic categories. All events were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis and symptom onset date. The study was descriptive (NCT01452438); no statistical tests were performed. Among 387 vaccinated children, 327 with ≥6 months membership before vaccination were analyzed. Among EOIs, 9 asthma cases and 1 myasthenia gravis case underwent chart review which confirmed 1 incident asthma case occurring 237 days after concomitant vaccination with MenACWY-CRM and typhoid vaccine. Thirty-one children experienced SMAEs, most commonly because of unrelated injury and poisoning. The remaining events occurred sporadically after vaccination and most were unlikely related to vaccination based on medical record review. One incident EOI of asthma late in the 1-year observation period and sporadic distribution of SMAEs were observed. These data do not suggest safety concerns associated with MenACWY-CRM vaccination in children 2-10 years old.

  2. Differential expression of hemoglobin receptor, HmbR, between carriage and invasive isolates of Neisseria meningitidis contributes to virulence: lessons from a clonal outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevestre, Julien; Diene, Seydina M; Aouiti-Trabelsi, Myriam; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Tournier, Isabelle; François, Patrice; Caron, François; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-04-11

    Carriage and invasion balance in the pathogenesis of Neisseria meningitidis was analyzed during a recent clonal outbreak of meningococcal B in Normandy, France, that offered the opportunity to compare six isolates undistinguable by conventional typing (B:P1.7,16:F3-3/ST-32) isolated from invasive disease or pharyngeal asymptomatic carriage. Data from animal model (transgenic mice rendered susceptible to N. meningitidis infection) showed an absence of virulence for two non-capsulated carriage isolates, an intermediate virulence for two capsulated carriage isolates and a marked virulence for two capsulated invasive isolates. This differential pathogenesis well correlated with whole genome sequencing analysis that clustered together both isolates of each group together, forming their own arm within the Norman cluster. Gene-by-gene analysis specified that genes involved in iron acquisition were among the elements differentially represented in cluster of invasive isolates compared to cluster of capsulated carriage isolates. The hemoglobin receptor encoding gene hmbR was in an ON-phase in the capsulated invasive isolates while carriage capsulated isolates were in an OFF-phase. An ON-phase variant of a capsulated carriage isolate showed enhanced virulence. These data underline the role of phase variation (ON/OFF) of HmbR in the balance between disease isolates/carriage isolates.

  3. Meningococcal serogroup A, C, W₁₃₅ and Y conjugated vaccine: a cost-effectiveness analysis in the Netherlands.

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    Hiltsje Hepkema

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W135,Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY was licensed for use in subjects of 12 months of age and above. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal vaccination at 14 months and an additional vaccination at the age of 12 years, both with the MenACWY vaccine. METHODS: A decision analysis cohort model, with 185,000 Dutch newborns, was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different immunization strategies. For strategies including a vaccination at 12 years of age, an additional cohort with adolescents aged 12 years was followed. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was estimated for the current disease incidence and for a scenario when herd immunity is lost. RESULTS: Vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months is cost-saving. Vaccinating with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would prevent 7 additional cases of meningococcal serogroup A,C,W135,Y disease in the birth cohort and adolescent cohort followed for 99 years compared to the current vaccine schedule of a single vaccination with MenC at 14 months. With the current incidence, this strategy resulted in an ICER of €635,334 per quality adjusted life year. When serogroup C disease incidence returns to pre-vaccination levels due to a loss of vaccine-induced herd-immunity, vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would be cost-saving. CONCLUSIONS: Routine vaccination with MenACWY is cost-saving. With the current epidemiology, a booster-dose with MenACWY is not likely cost-effective. When herd immunity is lost, a booster-dose has the potential of being cost-effective. A dynamic model should be developed for more precise estimation of the cost-effectiveness of the prevention of disappearance of herd immunity.

  4. Detection of Volatile Compounds Emitted from Nasal Secretions and Serum: Towards Non-Invasive Identification of Diseased Cattle Biomarkers

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    Devin L. Maurer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive diagnostics and finding biomarkers of disease in humans have been a very active research area. Some of the analytical technologies used for finding biomarkers of human disease are finding their use in livestock. Non-invasive sample collection from diseased cattle using breath and headspace of fecal samples have been reported. In this work, we explore the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from bovine nasal secretions and serum for finding biomarkers for bovine respiratory disease (BRD. One hundred nasal swabs and 100 serum samples (n = 50 for both ‘sick’ and ‘healthy’ were collected at the time of treatment for suspected BRD. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME was used to collect headspace samples that were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. It was possible to separate sick cattle using non-invasive analyses of nasal swabs and also serum samples by analyzing and comparing volatiles emitted from each group of samples. Four volatile compounds were found to be statistically significantly different between ‘sick’ and ‘normal’ cattle nasal swabs samples. Five volatile compounds were found to be significantly different between ‘sick’ and ‘normal’ cattle serum samples, with phenol being the common marker. Future studies are warranted to improve the extraction efficiency targeting VOCs preliminarily identified in this study. These findings bring us closer to the long-term goal of real-time, animal-side detection and separation of sick cattle.

  5. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  6. Utility of transient elastography in the non-invasive evaluation of cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitson, Matthew T; Kemp, William W; Iser, David M; Paul, Eldho; Wilson, John W; Roberts, Stuart K

    2013-05-01

    Liver disease frequently complicates cystic fibrosis (CF), with CF liver disease (CFLD) a leading cause of death. Liver biopsy is rarely performed because of the patchy nature of the disease. Transient elastography can reliably stage liver fibrosis via liver stiffness measurement (LSM). To evaluate LSM as a diagnostic tool in adults with CFLD. Fifty adult patients with CF were prospectively studied: 25 with CFLD and 25 without CFLD. The presence of CFLD and portal hypertension (PHT) was assessed according to strict established criteria based on serial biochemistry and imaging. All patients underwent LSM; APRI, Hepascore(®) and Forns score were calculated. Median LSM was higher in those with CFLD [8.1 kPa (IQR 6.8-9.5) vs. 5.0 kPa (IQR 4.1-5.6); P < 0.001]. On multivariate analysis, LSM was the only variable associated with CFLD (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.53-4.89; P = 0.001). AUROC for LSM predicting CFLD was 0.87 (95% CI 0.77-0.98) and an LSM ≥ 6.8 kPa predicted CFLD with 76.0% sensitivity and 92.0% specificity. Median LSM was higher in those with PHT [15.7 kPa (IQR 9.2-17.2) vs. 5.4 kPa (IQR 4.3-6.8); P < 0.001]. The AUROC for LSM predicting the presence of PHT was 0.96 (95% CI 0.92-1.00). An LSM cut-off of ≥ 8.9 kPa predicted the presence of PHT with 87.5% sensitivity, 90.5% specificity, 63.6% positive predictive value and 92.9% negative predictive value. LSM is an accurate and reliable non-invasive tool in assessing CFLD and PHT. An LSM ≥ 6.8 kPa is highly suggestive of CFLD and an LSM <8.9 kPa reliably excludes PHT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. [Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Community of Valencia. Six years of surveillance (2007-2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancotti Oliver, Lucía Rosa; Huertas Zarco, Isabel; Pérez Pérez, Elvira; Carmona Martí, Esther; Carbó Malonda, Rosa; Gil Bru, Ana; González Moran, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of conjugated anti-pneumonia vaccines has led to a change in the epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD). The aim of this study is to describe the trends in IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012. A retrospective, descriptive and longitudinal study was conducted on IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012, The information sources used were the Epidemiological Surveillance Analysis (Análisis de la Vigilancia Epidemiológica (AVE)) and the Valencian Microbiology Network (Red Microbiológica Valenciana (RedMIVA)) of the Valencia Health Department. The incidence of IPD decreased between 2007 and 2012 in all age groups, mainly in the under 5 year-olds, dropping from 30.5 cases to 12.3 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). Pneumonia was the principal presentation of the disease, with a decrease in its rates from 6.9 to 4.1 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). A gradual, non-significant, reduction from 26% to 12% (p=.23) was observed in the proportion of cases due to the serotypes contained in the heptavalent vaccine (PCV7), mainly in the under 5 year-olds. The cases due to additional serotypes in 13-valent conjugated vaccine (1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F and 19A) also showed a decreasing trend, mainly in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (52.6% vs 14.3%; p=.03), while the cases due to non-vaccine serotypes significantly increased from 42.3% to 56.7% in the general population (p=.002), and from 47.4% to 78.6% in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (p=.08). The results of this study show a reduction in the incidence of IPD, with a decrease in the proportion of cases produced by vaccine serotypes, and an increase in the proportion of those not vaccinated. Epidemiological Surveillance is necessary to monitor the trends in the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Pyrophosphate scintigraphy and other non-invasive methods in the detection of cardiac involvement in some systemic connective tissue diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duska, F.; Bradna, P.; Pospisil, M.; Kubicek, J.; Vizda, J.; Kafka, P.; Palicka, V.; Mazurova, Y.

    1987-02-01

    Thirteen patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 patients with polymyositis, and 6 patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica (Bechterew's disease) underwent clinical cardiologic examination and scintigraphy of the myocardium (/sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate), ECG, echocardiography, polygraphy, and their blood pressure was taken. The aim of the study was to ascertain how such a combination of non-invasive examinations can help in recognizing a cardiac involvement. In systemic lupus erythematosus cases one or more positive findings were revealed in 9 patients (69%), in 4 patients all examinations were negative (31%). Four patients (50%) with polymyosits had positive findings. In patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica positive findings occurred in 2 cases (33%). The study has shown that a combination of non-invasive cardiologic methods increases the probability of detecting cardiac involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases.

  9. Pyrophosphate scintigraphy and other non-invasive methods in the detection of cardiac involvement in some systemic connective tissue diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duska, F; Bradna, P; Pospisil, M; Kubicek, J; Vizda, J; Kafka, P; Palicka, V; Mazurova, Y

    1987-02-01

    Thirteen patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 patients with polymyositis, and 6 patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica (Bechterew's disease) underwent clinical cardiologic examination and scintigraphy of the myocardium (/sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate), ECG, echocardiography, polygraphy, and their blood pressure was taken. The aim of the study was to ascertain how such a combination of non-invasive examinations can help in recognizing a cardiac involvement. In systemic lupus erythematosus cases one or more positive findings were revealed in 9 patients (69%), in 4 patients all examinations were negative (31%). Four patients (50%) with polymyosits had positive findings. In patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica positive findings occurred in 2 cases (33%). The study has shown that a combination of non-invasive cardiologic methods increases the probability of detecting cardiac involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases.

  10. Annual vaccine-preventable disease report for New South Wales, Australia, 2014

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    Nathan Saul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This report provides an epidemiological description of selected vaccine-preventable diseases in New South Wales (NSW, Australia, for 2014 to inform ongoing disease monitoring and control efforts. A trend of increasing pertussis notifications was observed, beginning midway through 2014 with the highest disease rates in the 5–9 year age group. Measles notifications increased to 67 cases in 2014 from 34 cases in 2013. Measles cases were associated with travel-related importations—predominantly from the Philippines—and secondary transmission increased compared to 2013 involving three main disease clusters. Notifications of invasive meningococcal disease continued to decline across the state with meningococcal B remaining the most common serogroup in NSW. Increasing rates of pertussis notifications from mid-2014 may indicate the beginning of an epidemic, ending the period of low transmission observed in 2013 and the first half of 2014. An increase in measles notifications in 2014, including secondary transmission, indicates the continued need for public health actions including robust follow-up and awareness campaigns.

  11. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Cystic Fibrosis Related Liver Disease in Adults with ARFI, Transient Elastography and Different Fibrosis Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Karlas, Thomas; Neuschulz, Marie; Oltmanns, Annett; Güttler, Andrea; Petroff, David; Wirtz, Hubert; Mainz, Jochen G.; Mössner, Joachim; Berg, Thomas; Tröltzsch, Michael; Keim, Volker; Wiegand, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease (CFLD) is present in up to 30% of cystic fibrosis patients and can result in progressive liver failure. Diagnosis of CFLD is challenging. Non-invasive methods for staging of liver fibrosis display an interesting diagnostic approach for CFLD detection. AIM: We evaluated transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI), and fibrosis indices for CFLD detection. METHODS: TE and ARFI were performed in 55 adult CF patient...

  12. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde N; Kristensen, Tim D; Kaltoft, Margit S

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to document the epidemiology, microbiology and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children introduction of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into the Danish routine...... immunization programme October 2007. Methods: Clinical and microbiological records on cases of IPD in children Hospital, Denmark 1996-2007, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: We identified 106 cases of IPD. The annual incidence of IPD was 11 per 100 000 in children

  13. PSGL-1 on Leukocytes is a Critical Component of the Host Immune Response against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

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    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial uptake by phagocytic cells is a vital event in the clearance of invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. A major role of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 on leukocytes against invasive pneumococcal disease is described in this study. Phagocytosis experiments using different serotypes demonstrated that PSGL-1 is involved in the recognition, uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae. Co-localization of several clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with PSGL-1 was demonstrated, observing a rapid and active phagocytosis in the presence of PSGL-1. Furthermore, the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide and the main autolysin of the bacterium--the amidase LytA--were identified as bacterial ligands for PSGL-1. Experimental models of pneumococcal disease including invasive pneumonia and systemic infection showed that bacterial levels were markedly increased in the blood of PSGL-1-/- mice. During pneumonia, PSGL-1 controls the severity of pneumococcal dissemination from the lung to the bloodstream. In systemic infection, a major role of PSGL-1 in host defense is to clear the bacteria in the systemic circulation controlling bacterial replication. These results confirmed the importance of this receptor in the recognition and clearance of S. pneumoniae during invasive pneumococcal disease. Histological and cellular analysis demonstrated that PSGL-1-/- mice have increased levels of T cells migrating to the lung than the corresponding wild-type mice. In contrast, during systemic infection, PSGL-1-/- mice had increased numbers of neutrophils and macrophages in blood, but were less effective controlling the infection process due to the lack of this functional receptor. Overall, this study demonstrates that PSGL-1 is a novel receptor for S. pneumoniae that contributes to protection against invasive pneumococcal disease.

  14. Impact of pneumococcal vaccines use on invasive pneumococcal disease in Nunavik (Quebec from 1997 to 2010

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    Jean-Baptiste Le Meur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2000, an outbreak of severe pneumonia caused by a virulent clone of serotype 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae was detected in the Nunavik region of Quebec. A mass immunization campaign was implemented in the spring of 2002, targeting persons ≥5 years of age and using the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23. At the same time, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced into the routine immunization programme of infants, with catch-up for children up to 4 years of age. Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in relation to PPSV23 and PCV7 use. Study design and methods: Retrospective analysis of IPD cases identified by the Quebec public health laboratory during the period 1997–2010. Results: A total of 82 IPD cases were identified during the study period. In adults, serotype 1 incidence decreased following the 2002 PPSV23 mass campaign but breakthrough cases continued to occur. Following PCV7 use in children, there was a decrease in the incidence of vaccine-type IPD and replacement by other serotypes in adults. In children, a marked decrease in the annual incidence of serotypes included in PCV7 was observed following PCV7 introduction: 162/100,000 in 1997–2001 vs. 10/100,000 in 2004–2010 (p<0.01. Concomitantly, the incidence of IPD caused by serotypes not included in PCV7 increased from 29/100,000 to 109/100,000 (p=0.11. Conclusion: The mass immunization campaign using the PPSV23 in 2002 and the introduction of PCV7 for the routine immunization of infants induced important modifications in the epidemiology of IPD. IPD rates in Nunavik remain much higher than in the southern part of the province both in children and adults. More effective pneumococcal vaccines are needed to eliminate geographic disparities in IPD risk.

  15. Lights and shadows of non-invasive mechanical ventilation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations

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    Jose Luis Lopez-Campos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the overwhelming evidence justifying the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV for providing ventilatory support in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations, recent studies demonstrated that its application in real-life settings remains suboptimal. European clinical audits have shown that 1 NIV is not invariably available, 2 its availability depends on countries and hospital sizes, and 3 numerous centers declare their inability to provide NIV to all of the eligible patients presenting throughout the year. Even with an established indication, the use of NIV in acute respiratory failure due to COPD exacerbations faces important challenges. First, the location and personnel using NIV should be carefully selected. Second, the use of NIV is not straightforward despite the availability of technologically advanced ventilators. Third, NIV therapy of critically ill patients requires a thorough knowledge of both respiratory physiology and existing ventilatory devices. Accordingly, an optimal team-training experience, the careful selection of patients, and special attention to the selection of devices are critical for optimizing NIV outcomes. Additionally, when applied, NIV should be closely monitored, and endotracheal intubation should be promptly available in the case of failure. Another topic that merits careful consideration is the use of NIV in the elderly. This patient population is particularly fragile, with several physiological and social characteristics requiring specific attention in relation to NIV. Several other novel indications should also be critically examined, including the use of NIV during fiberoptic bronchoscopy or transesophageal echocardiography, as well as in interventional cardiology and pulmonology. The present narrative review aims to provide updated information on the use of NIV in acute settings to improve the clinical outcomes of patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations.

  16. A doença meningocócica na região de Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brasil, no período de 1999 a 2008 Meningococcal disease in the Sorocaba region, São Paulo State, Brazil, 1999-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Vannucchi Leme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi descrever a ocorrência da doença meningocócica notificada no Departamento Regional de Saúde XVI, Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brasil, no período de 1999 a 2008. Em Sorocaba, a incidência anual da doença foi de cerca de dois casos por 100 mil habitantes, com aumento entre 2006 e 2008. As incidências anuais foram maiores entre 0 a 4 anos de idade. A letalidade no período foi de 21,8%, maior nas faixas etárias de 0 a 4 anos (26,4%, na qual se deu a maior incidência da doença, e com idade superior a 30 anos (28%. A confirmação diagnóstica foi laboratorial em 71% dos casos (cultura em 45,3% e por critérios clínico-epidemiológicos em 22%. O sorogrupo B ocorreu em 45,7%; o C, em 47,3%; o W135, em 3,7%; e o Y, em 1,5% dos casos identificados, com predomínio do sorogrupo B, entre 1999 e 2003, e do C, entre 2004 e 2008. Os fenótipos B:4,7:P1.19,15 e C:23:P1.14-6 predominaram. Os resultados reforçam a necessidade de acompanhamento, de forma regional, da tendência da doença para a detecção de surtos precocemente e monitoramento de cepas circulantes.The objective of this study was to describe the occurrence of meningococcal disease reported to the Regional Health Department in Sorocaba, São Paulo State, Brazil, from 1999 to 2008. Annual incidence of the disease was two cases per 100,000 inhabitants, with an increase from 2006 to 2008. Annual incidence rates were highest in the 0 to 4 year age bracket. Case-fatality was 21.8%, higher in the 0 to 4 year age bracket (26.4%, which also showed the highest incidence of the disease, and in the over 30-year age bracket (28%. Diagnosis was confirmed by laboratory test in 71% of cases (culture in 45.3% and by clinical and epidemiological criteria in 22%. Serological groups were B in 45.7%, C in 47.3%, W135 in 3.7%, and Y in 1.5% of the identified cases, with a predominance of B from 1999 to 2003 and C from 2004 to 2008. The most frequent phenotypes were B:4,7:P1.19,15 and C

  17. A phase 2 randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prymula, Roman; Esposito, Susanna; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Xie, Fang; Toneatto, Daniela; Kohl, Igor; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The novel meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero(®)), recently approved in Europe and Australia, may soon be included in routine infant immunization schedules, subject to guidance from national or regional recommending bodies. In the development of 4CMenB and consistent with other newly introduced vaccines, clinical studies have shown concomitant administration with routine infant vaccines induces an incremental increase in some reactions, including fever. As this may hinder acceptability, we examined the impact of prophylactic paracetamol on the occurrence of fever and other solicited reactions, as well as the immune responses to study vaccines, in a prospectively designed study. 4CMenB was administered as a 4-dose series at 2, 3, 4, and 12 months of age concomitantly with routine infant vaccines: DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and PCV7, with or without prophylactic paracetamol; a third group received MenC vaccine. Immune responses to 4CMenB were not decreased by the use of paracetamol prophylaxis and there were no clinically relevant effects on immune responses to routine vaccines. Occurrence of fever was higher in infants co-administered with 4CMenB compared with those given MenC vaccine, but was significantly decreased by prophylactic paracetamol, as were other solicited reactions to vaccination, both local and systemic. Co-administration of 4CMenB had an acceptable tolerability profile, with no withdrawals due to vaccination-related adverse events. Inclusion of 4CMenB in routine infant immunization schedules will be a major advance in the control of meningococcal disease, and our study indicates that by using paracetamol prophylaxis, post-vaccination reactions are reduced without clinically relevant negative consequences on vaccine immunogenicity.

  18. Diversity of prophage DNA regions of Streptococcus agalactiae clonal lineages from adults and neonates with invasive infectious disease.

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    Mazen Salloum

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic position and prophage DNA content of the genomes of 142 S. agalactiae (group-B streptococcus, GBS isolates responsible for bacteremia and meningitis in adults and neonates were studied and compared. The distribution of the invasive isolates between the various serotypes, sequence types (STs and clonal complexes (CCs differed significantly between adult and neonatal isolates. Use of the neighbor-net algorithm with the PHI test revealed evidence for recombination in the population studied (PHI, P = 2.01 × 10(-6, and the recombination-mutation ratio (R/M was 6:7. Nevertheless, the estimated R/M ratio differed between CCs. Analysis of the prophage DNA regions of the genomes of the isolates assigned 90% of the isolates to five major prophage DNA groups: A to E. The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified per isolate varied from 2.6 for the isolates of prophage DNA group E to 4.0 for the isolates of prophage DNA group C. The isolates from adults and neonates with invasive diseases were distributed differently between the various prophage DNA groups (P < 0.00001. Group C prophage DNA fragments were found in 52% of adult invasive isolates, whereas 74% of neonatal invasive isolates had prophage DNA fragments of groups A and B. Differences in prophage DNA content were also found between serotypes, STs and CCs (P < 0.00001. All the ST-1 and CC1 isolates, mostly of serotype V, belonged to the prophage DNA group C, whereas 84% of the ST-17 and CC17 isolates, all of serotype III, belonged to prophage DNA groups A and B. These data indicate that the transduction mechanisms, i.e., gene transfer from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage, underlying genetic recombination in S. agalactiae species, are specific to each intraspecies lineage and population of strains responsible for invasive diseases in adults and neonates.

  19. Validation of non-invasive haemodynamic methods in patients with liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittain, Jane M; Busk, Troels M; Møller, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Patients with advanced cirrhosis often present a hyperdynamic circulation characterized by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), and an increase in heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (CO). Accurate assessment of the altered circulation can be performed invasively......; however, due to the disadvantages of this approach, non-invasive methods are warranted. The purpose of this study was to compare continuous non-invasive measurements of haemodynamic variables by the Finometer and the Task Force Monitor with simultaneous invasive measurements. In 25 patients with cirrhosis......, respectively; and CO: 0·1 ± 1·6 and -1·0 ± 2·0 L min(-1) , respectively. The study demonstrates that the overall performances of the Finometer and the Task Force Monitor in estimating absolute values of SBP, DBP, HR and CO in patients with cirrhosis are not equivalent to the gold standard, but may have...

  20. Indirect effects of childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Tinevimbo Shiri, DrPhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: The full extent to which childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV can indirectly reduce illness in unvaccinated populations is not known. We aimed to estimate the magnitude and timing of indirect effects of PCVs on invasive pneumococcal disease. Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched bibliographic databases for non-randomised quasi-experimental or observational studies reporting invasive pneumococcal disease changes following PCV introduction in unvaccinated populations (studies published Sept 1, 2010, to Jan 6, 2016, updating the previous systematic review of the same topic (studies published Jan 1, 1994, to Sept 30, 2010. Two reviewers extracted summary data by consensus. We used a Bayesian mixed-effects model to account for between-study heterogeneity to estimate temporal indirect effects by pooling of invasive pneumococcal disease changes by serotype and serogroup. Findings: Data were extracted from 70 studies included in the previous review and 172 additional studies, covering 27 high-income and seven middle-income countries. The predicted mean times to attaining a 90% reduction in invasive pneumococcal disease were 8·9 years (95% credible interval [CrI] 7·8–10·3 for grouped serotypes contained in the seven-valent PCV (PCV7, and 9·5 years (6·1–16·6 for the grouped six additional serotypes contained in the 13-valent PCV (PCV13 but not in PCV7. Disease due to grouped serotypes contained in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23 decreased at similar rates per year in adults aged 19–64 years (relative risk [RR] 0·85, 95% CrI 0·75–0·95 and 65 years and older (0·87, 0·84–0·90. However, we noted no changes in either group in invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the additional 11 serotypes covered by PPV23 but not PCV13. Interpretation: Population childhood PCV programmes will lead, on average, to substantial protection across the whole population

  1. [Implementation of meningococcal B vaccination (Bexsero®) in France: Physicians' perceptions and experiences of a few months after marketing approval].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, C; Bechet, S; Cohen, R

    2016-01-01

    In December 2013, the French public health authorities recommended the use of Bexsero® (meningococcus B vaccine) in areas with endemic risk and for patients at risk for invasive meningococcal B disease. In this context, InfoVac-France performed a national survey a few months after the implementation of the vaccine to evaluate physicians' perceptions and experiences with this new vaccine. This survey was proposed by email in April 2014 to the InfoVac network. An initial email explained the purpose of this study and proposed an online questionnaire. Between April 29 and May 16, 2014, 1502 physicians answered online: 502 GPs (33%), 939 pediatricians (63%), and 61 other specialists (4%). In response, 91% of physicians would like to use this vaccine and 87% of pediatricians versus 50% of GPs knew that the vaccine was marketed. Physicians had been informed of the vaccine mostly via the InfoVac network (61%). The immunization schedules for all ages were slightly known by physicians (9% for GPs and 43% of pediatricians). This vaccination was still rarely proposed (18%) more often because it was not reimbursed to patients (62%). Although 39% of physicians were planning to propose the vaccine to their patients, 54% remained undecided. A total of 9% of pediatricians and 2% of GPs had already used this vaccination. This InfoVac-France survey shows that physicians would support the implementation of this vaccine, but questions persist as to its effectiveness, impact on carriage, and duration of protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized, phase 1/2 trial of the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of bivalent rLP2086 meningococcal B vaccine in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinon-Torres, Federico; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Bernaola-Iturbe, Enrique; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Jiang, Qin; Perez, John L

    2014-09-08

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) is a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease in infants. A conserved, surface-exposed lipoprotein, LP2086 (a factor H-binding protein [fHBP]), is a promising MnB vaccine target. A bivalent, recombinant vaccine targeting the fHBP (rLP2086) of MnB was developed. This phase 1/2 clinical study was designed to assess the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of a 4-dose series of the rLP2086 vaccine at 20-, 60-, 120-, or 200-μg dose levels in vaccine-naive infants when given with routine childhood vaccines. The study was to consist of two phases: a single-blind sentinel phase and an open-label full enrollment phase. During the sentinel phase, randomization of subjects to the next higher dose was delayed pending a 14-day safety review of dose 1 of the preceding dose cohort. The full enrollment phase was to occur after completion of the sentinel phase. Local reactions were generally mild and adverse events infrequent; however, after only 46 infants were randomized into the study, fever rates were 64% and 90% in subjects receiving one 20- or 60-μg rLP2086 dose, respectively. Most fevers were group and 1 subject in the 60-μg group experienced fevers >39.0°C; no fevers were >40.0°C. Due to these high fever rates, the study was terminated early. No immunogenicity data were collected. This report discusses the safety and acceptability of rLP2086 in infants after one 20- or 60-μg dose. Due to the high fever rate experienced in the 20- and 60-μg groups, rLP2086 in the current formulation may not be acceptable for infants. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Meningococcal serogroup C immunogenicity, antibody persistence and memory B-cells induced by the monovalent meningococcal serogroup C versus quadrivalent meningococcal serogroup ACWY conjugate booster vaccine: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Knol, Mirjam J; Stoof, Susanne P; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2017-08-24

    Adolescents are considered the key transmitters of meningococci in the population. Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) antibody levels wane rapidly after MenC conjugate vaccination in young children, leaving adolescents with low antibody levels. In this study, we compared MenC immune responses after booster vaccination in adolescence with either tetanus toxoid conjugated MenC (MenC-TT) or MenACWY (MenACWY-TT) vaccine, and aimed to establish an optimal age for this booster. Healthy 10-, 12-, and 15-year-olds, who received a single dose of MenC-TT vaccine in early childhood, were randomized to receive MenC-TT or MenACWY-TT vaccine. MenC serum bactericidal antibody (rSBA) titers, MenC polysaccharide (PS) specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 and MenC-specific IgG and IgA memory B-cells were determined before, one month and one year after the booster. Non-inferiority was tested by comparing geometric mean titers (GMTs) between vaccinees at one year. Of 501 participants, 464 (92.6%) were included in the 'according to protocol' cohort analysis. At one month, all participants developed high MenC rSBA titers (>24,000 in all groups) and MenC-PS-specific IgG levels. Non-inferiority was not demonstrated one year after the booster with higher MenC GMTs after the monovalent vaccine, but 462/464 (99.6%) participants maintained protective MenC rSBA titers. IgG levels mainly consisted of IgG1, but similar levels of increase were observed for IgG1 and IgG2. Both vaccines induced a clear increase in the number of circulating MenC-PS specific IgG and IgA memory B-cells. Between one month and one year, the highest antibody decay rate was observed in the 10-year-olds. Both MenC-TT and MenACWY-TT vaccines induced robust protective MenC immune responses after the booster vaccination, although non-inferiority could not be demonstrated for the MenACWY-TT vaccine after one year. Our results underline the importance of optimal timing of a meningococcal booster vaccination to protect against MenC disease

  4. The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in the Canadian North from 1999 to 2010

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    Melissa Helferty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . The International Circumpolar Surveillance network is a population-based surveillance system that collects data on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in Northern Canada. A 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was first introduced in some regions of Northern Canada in 2002, followed by 10-valent (2009 and 13-valent (PCV-13 vaccines (2010. A 23-valent polysaccharide (PPV-23 vaccine was first introduced in 1988 for special populations and adults aged 65 years and older. To describe the epidemiology in the context of pneumococcal vaccination programs, we analysed surveillance data from Northern Canada from 1999 to 2010. Methods . A standardized case report form capturing demographic and clinical information was completed for all IPD cases in Northern Canada meeting the national case definition. Isolates were sent to a reference laboratory for confirmation, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance testing. Both laboratory and epidemiological data were sent to the Public Health Agency of Canada for analysis. Population denominators were obtained from Statistics Canada. Results . From 1999 to 2010, 433 IPD cases were reported (average 36 cases per year. Incidence was greatest among infants aged <2 years and among those aged 65 years and older, with an average annual incidence of 133 and 67 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. After a peak in incidence in 2008, rates among infants have declined. Incidence rates varied from 2 to 16 times greater, depending on the year, among Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. Hospitalization was reported in 89% of all cases and the case fatality ratio was 6.0%. Clinical manifestations varied, with some patients reporting >1 manifestation. Pneumonia was the most common (70%, followed by bacteremia/septicaemia (30% and meningitis (8%. Approximately, 42% of cases aged <2 years in 2009 and 2010 had serotypes covered by the PCV-13. In addition, the majority (89% of serotypes isolated in cases

  5. Learning better deep features for the prediction of occult invasive disease in ductal carcinoma in situ through transfer learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bibo; Hou, Rui; Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Grimm, Lars J.; Ren, Yinhao; Marks, Jeffrey R.; King, Lorraine M.; Maley, Carlo C.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2018-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether domain transfer learning can improve the performance of deep features extracted from digital mammograms using a pre-trained deep convolutional neural network (CNN) in the prediction of occult invasive disease for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on core needle biopsy. Method: In this study, we collected digital mammography magnification views for 140 patients with DCIS at biopsy, 35 of which were subsequently upstaged to invasive cancer. We utilized a deep CNN model that was pre-trained on two natural image data sets (ImageNet and DTD) and one mammographic data set (INbreast) as the feature extractor, hypothesizing that these data sets are increasingly more similar to our target task and will lead to better representations of deep features to describe DCIS lesions. Through a statistical pooling strategy, three sets of deep features were extracted using the CNNs at different levels of convolutional layers from the lesion areas. A logistic regression classifier was then trained to predict which tumors contain occult invasive disease. The generalization performance was assessed and compared using repeated random sub-sampling validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Result: The best performance of deep features was from CNN model pre-trained on INbreast, and the proposed classifier using this set of deep features was able to achieve a median classification performance of ROC-AUC equal to 0.75, which is significantly better (p<=0.05) than the performance of deep features extracted using ImageNet data set (ROCAUC = 0.68). Conclusion: Transfer learning is helpful for learning a better representation of deep features, and improves the prediction of occult invasive disease in DCIS.

  6. Lactobacillus paracasei feeding improves the control of secondary experimental meningococcal infection in flu-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacem, Nouria; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; Taha, Muhamed-Kkeir

    2018-04-10

    The use of probiotics to improve anti-microbial defence, such as for influenza infections, is increasingly recommended. However, no data are available on the effect of probiotics on flu-associated secondary bacterial infections. There is strong evidence of a spatiotemporal association between influenza virus infection and invasive Neisseria meningitidis. We thus investigated the effect of feeding mice Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-1518 in a mouse model of sequential influenza-meningococcal infection. We intranasally infected BALB/c mice with a strain of influenza A virus (IAV) H3N2 that was first adapted to mice. Seven days later, a secondary bacterial infection was induced by intranasal administration of bioluminescent N. meningitidis. During the experiment, mice orally received either L. paracasei CNCM I-1518 or PBS as a control. The effect of L. paracasei administration on secondary bacterial infection by N. meningitidis was evaluated. Oral consumption of L. paracasei CNCM I-1518 reduced the weight loss of infected mice and lowered the bioluminescent signal of infecting meningococci. This improvement was associated with higher recruitment of inflammatory myeloid cells, such as interstitial monocytes and dendritic cells, to the lungs. Our data highlight the role of the gut-lung axis. L. paracasei CNCM I-1518 may boost the defence against IAV infection and secondary bacterial infection, which should be further studied and validated in clinical trials.

  7. A simultaneous minimally invasive approach to treat a patient with coronary artery disease and metastatic lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Lufeng; Ji, Ling; Xu, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent lung cancer and coronary artery disease requiring treatment with percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting is not rare. An individualized perioperative anticoagulation regimen and minimal surgical trauma will benefit the patient's postoperative recovery. We successfully treated a 68-year-old female patient with a lesion in the left anterior descending artery and metastatic right lung carcinoma by simultaneous minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting via a small left thoracotomy and thoracoscopic wedge resection of the lung lesion. She recovered and was discharged on the eighth postoperative day. The patient showed no symptoms of myocardial ischemia postoperatively. Computed tomography scan did not indicate metastatic lesion of lung carcinoma at 1-year follow-up. In conclusion, minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting combined with thoracoscopic wedge resection is an effective minimally invasive treatment for concurrent lung cancer and coronary artery disease. This technique eliminates the risk of perioperative bleeding and provides satisfactory mid-term follow-up results.

  8. Prevention and diagnosis of invasive fungal disease in high-risk patients within an integrative care pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rosemary A; Stocking, Kate; Bowden, Sarah; Poynton, Matthew H; White, P Lewis

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of enhanced diagnostics on the management of invasive fungal disease in high risk patients within an integrated care pathway and to audit compliance and efficacy of antifungal prophylaxis. A cohort of 549 high risk haematology and stem-cell transplant recipients was followed over a 5 year period. The routine standard of care involved the use of antimould prophylaxis and a neutropenic care pathway utilizing twice weekly antigen and PCR testing. Prophylaxis with itraconazole was poorly tolerated and therapeutic levels could not be maintained. Antigen testing and PCR showed good clinical utility in the management of invasive aspergilosis with high sensitivity (98%) and negative predictive value (99.6%) when both tests were used together, allowing a diagnosis IA to be excluded and obviating the need for empirical antifungal agents. When used serially, multiple positive PCR and antigen test results enabled accurate diagnosis of IA with a specificity of 95% and a positive likelihood ratio of 11. Biomarkers preceded clinical signs in 85% of proven and probable invasive disease. The combination of both tests showed optimum clinical utility for the diagnosis and management of IA in this high risk group. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A doença meningocócica em São Paulo, Brasil, no século XX: características epidemiológicas Meningococcal disease in São Paulo, Brazil, in the 20th century: epidemiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cássio de Moraes

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisa o comportamento epidemiológico da doença meningocócica na cidade de São Paulo, Brasil, ao longo do século XX. Utilizando dados de prontuários, atestados de óbito e do sistema de vigilância epidemiológica os autores descrevem a tendência secular da doença, sua variação sazonal, a distribuição espacial e por idade e sexo. A tendência secular mostra incidência constante nos períodos endêmicos, interrompida pela presença de epidemias. As quatro epidemias registradas durante o século XX ocorreram em momentos de graves perturbações sociais e foram produzidas pelos sorogrupos A, A e C, e B e C. A variação sazonal com exacerbação no outono/inverno mantém-se constante durante todo o século. A distribuição espacial acompanha os deslocamentos da população pobre no espaço urbano. A distribuição por idade e sexo mantém-se inalterada em todos os períodos endêmicos, mostrando maior risco entre os menores de um ano e decréscimos acentuados à proporção que aumenta a idade. Os períodos epidêmicos, com exceção do último, mostram alteração significante na distribuição etária, com aumento do risco entre jovens e adultos jovens, e ocorrência de casos em todas as faixas etárias.This study analyzes the epidemiological behavior of meningococcal disease in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, over the course of the 20th century. Applying data from patient records, death certificates, and epidemiological surveillance, the authors describe trends in the disease throughout the century, seasonal variations, and incidence distribution by area, age, and gender. The temporal trends show constant incidence during endemic periods, interrupted by epidemic events. Four epidemic events during the last century occurred in circumstances of serious social disturbances and were caused by serogroups A (the first two, A and C, and B and C, respectively. Seasonal variations involved aggravation during autumn and winter

  10. Doppler ultrasonography combined with transient elastography improves the non-invasive assessment of fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Zec, Simon; Nikolic, Vladimir; Veljkovic, Aleksandar; Stojanovic, Zoran; Matovic, Vera; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2017-01-31

    Accurate clinical assessment of liver fibrosis is essential and the aim of our study was to compare and combine hemodynamic Doppler ultrasonography, liver stiffness by transient elastography, and non-invasive serum biomarkers with the degree of fibrosis confirmed by liver biopsy, and thereby to determine the value of combining non-invasive method in the prediction significant liver fibrosis. We included 102 patients with chronic liver disease of various etiology. Each patient was evaluated using Doppler ultrasonography measurements of the velocity and flow pattern at portal trunk, hepatic and splenic artery, serum fibrosis biomarkers, and transient elastography. These parameters were then input into a multilayer perceptron artificial neural network with two hidden layers, and used to create models for predicting significant fibrosis. According to METAVIR score, clinically significant fibrosis (≥F2) was detected in 57.8% of patients. A model based only on Doppler parameters (hepatic artery diameter, hepatic artery systolic and diastolic velocity, splenic artery systolic velocity and splenic artery Resistance Index), predicted significant liver fibrosis with a sensitivity and specificity of75.0% and 60.0%. The addition of unrelated non-invasive tests improved the diagnostic accuracy of Doppler examination. The best model for prediction of significant fibrosis was obtained by combining Doppler parameters, non-invasive markers (APRI, ASPRI, and FIB-4) and transient elastography, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88.9% and 100%. Doppler parameters alone predict the presence of ≥F2 fibrosis with fair accuracy. Better prediction rates are achieved by combining Doppler variables with non-invasive markers and liver stiffness by transient elastography.

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, compared with licensed vaccines in adults in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamboulian, D; Lopardo, G; Lopez, P; Cortes-Barbosa, C; Valencia, A; Bedell, L; Karsten, A; Dull, P M

    2010-10-01

    This study compared the investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, with licensed quadrivalent polysaccharide (MPSV4) and conjugate (MenACWY-D) meningococcal vaccines. In this phase III multicenter study, 2505 adults (aged 19-55 years) were randomized to receive either MenACWY-CRM or MenACWY-D, and 326 adults (aged 56-65 years) were randomized to receive either MenACWY-CRM or MPSV4. Sera obtained pre-vaccination and at 1-month post-vaccination were tested for serogroup-specific serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA) for immunogenicity non-inferiority and superiority analyses. The vaccines in all groups were well tolerated. In the 19-55 years age group, post-vaccination geometric mean titers (GMTs) were consistently higher for MenACWY-CRM than for MenACWY-D for all four serogroups. MenACWY-CRM was non-inferior to MenACWY-D for all serogroups, and superior for serogroup Y. In the 56-65 years age group, post-vaccination GMTs were 1.2- to 5.4-fold higher for MenACWY-CRM than for MPSV4 for the four serogroups. MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated and immunogenic in adults aged 19-65 years, with at least non-inferior immunogenicity compared with the currently licensed meningococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Seasonal changes of invasive pneumococcal disease in children and association with day care attendance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kousaku; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Aya; Uchida, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Go; Chang, Bin; Wada, Akihito

    2012-01-01

    To determine seasonal changes in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children, we retrospectively analyzed 69 children with 72 episodes of IPD, admitted to a regional center in Kobe, Japan, between July 1994 and June 2011. IPD episodes involved occult bacteremia (n = 48), pneumonia (n = 10), meningitis (n = 10), periorbital cellulitis (n = 3), and mastoiditis (n = 1), including 3 cases of two IPD recurrences. We analyzed 5 IPD-associated factors previously documented in Europe and North Amrica with inconsistent results--1) age at onset, 2) sibling number, 3) preschool sibling number, 4) subjects' day care attendance, and 5) siblings' day care attendance. We collected information on these factors by reviewing medical charts or contacting subjects' parents or guardians by telephone. IPD peaked bimodally in April and May (n = 21) and in November and December (n = 20), decreasing prominently between July and September (n = 8). Subjects with IPD attending day care formed a significantly higher propotion during April and May than did those developing IPD during other months: 12/21 [57.1%] vs. 12/51 [23.5%], odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence interval, 1.5-12.8; p = 0.006. Combined day care attendance among subjects with IPD and/or their siblings also differed significantly between these two groups: 17/21 [80.9%] vs. 27/51 [52.9%], odds ratio 3.8, 95% confidence interval, 1.1-12.8; p = 0.027. Not significant differences were seen in age at onset, sibling number, or preschool sibling number. In contrast, however children with IPD onset during November and December showed no significant difference in association with any of the 5 factors, compared to children with IPD onset in other months. Our findings showed a bimodal peak in IPD in children, the first and highest of which occurred in April and May and was significantly associated with day care attendance by those with IPD and/or their siblings. This first peak may, however, be related to circumstances in

  13. Conservative versus invasive stable ischemic heart disease management strategies: what do we plan to learn from the ISCHEMIA trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Torres, Kathleen A; Desai, Karan P; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Maron, David J; Boden, William E

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, landmark randomized clinical trials comparing initial management strategies in stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) have demonstrated no significant reduction in 'hard' end points (all-cause mortality, cardiac death or myocardial infarction) with one strategy versus another. The main advantage derived from early revascularization is improved short-term quality of life. Nonetheless, questions remain regarding how best to manage SIHD patients, such as whether a high-risk subgroup can be identified that may experience a survival or myocardial infarction benefit from early revascularization, and if not, when should diagnostic catheterization and revascularization be performed. The International Study of Comparative Health Effectiveness with Medical and Invasive Approaches trial is designed to address these questions by randomizing SIHD patients with at least moderate ischemia to an initial conservative strategy of optimal medical therapy or an initial invasive strategy of optimal medical therapy plus cardiac catheterization and revascularization.

  14. Prediction of meningococcal meningitis epidemics in western Africa by using climate information

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAKA, D. P.; Sultan, B.; Tarbangdo, F.; Thiaw, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The variations of certain climatic parameters and the degradation of ecosystems, can affect human's health by influencing the transmission, the spatiotemporal repartition and the intensity of infectious diseases. It is mainly the case of meningococcal meningitis (MCM) whose epidemics occur particularly in Sahelo-Soudanian climatic area of Western Africa under quite particular climatic conditions. Meningococcal Meningitis (MCM) is a contagious infection disease due to the bacteria Neisseria meningitis. MCM epidemics occur worldwide but the highest incidence is observed in the "meningitis belt" of sub-Saharan Africa, stretching from Senegal to Ethiopia. In spite of standards, strategies of prevention and control of MCS epidemic from World Health Organization (WHO) and States, African Sahelo-Soudanian countries remain frequently afflicted by disastrous epidemics. In fact, each year, during the dry season (February-April), 25 to 250 thousands of cases are observed. Children under 15 are particularly affected. Among favourable conditions for the resurgence and dispersion of the disease, climatic conditions may be important inducing seasonal fluctuations in disease incidence and contributing to explain the spatial pattern of the disease roughly circumscribed to the ecological Sahelo-Sudanian band. In this study, we tried to analyse the relationships between climatic factors, ecosystems degradation and MCM for a better understanding of MCM epidemic dynamic and their prediction. We have shown that MCM epidemics, whether at the regional, national or local level, occur in a specific period of the year, mainly from January to May characterised by a dry, hot and sandy weather. We have identified both in situ (meteorological synoptic stations) and satellitales climatic variables (NCEP reanalysis dataset) whose seasonal variability is dominating in MCM seasonal transmission. Statistical analysis have measured the links between seasonal variation of certain climatic parameters

  15. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Promise of new technologies in understanding pre-invasive breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Pollack, Jonathan R

    2003-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization, RNA expression profiling, and proteomic analyses are new molecular technologies used to study breast cancer. Invasive breast cancers were originally evaluated because they provided ample quantities of DNA, RNA, and protein. The application of these technologies to pre-invasive breast lesions is discussed, including methods that facilitate their implementation. Data indicate that atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ are precursor lesions molecularly similar to adjacent invasive breast cancer. It is expected that molecular technologies will identify breast tissue at risk for the development of unfavorable subtypes of invasive breast cancer and reveal strategies for targeted chemoprevention or eradication

  16. Atypical clinical presentation of meningococcal meningitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Ilaria; Pileri, Paola; Merello, Maria; Gnesin, Paolo; Cogi, Enrico; Aggiusti, Carlo; Giacomelli, Laura; Ettori, Stefano; Colombini, Paolo; Collidá, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    A young woman was examined in the Emergency Department for fever, pharyngitis and widespread petechial rash. Physical examination, including neurological evaluation, did not show any other abnormalities. Chest X-ray was negative. Blood exams showed leukocytosis and CPR 20 mg/dL (nvpetechial rash evidence, lumbar puncture was performed. CSF was opalescent; physico-chemical examination showed: total proteins 2.8 (nv 0.15-0.45), glucose 5 (nv 59-80), WBC 7600/μL (nv 0-4/ μL). In the hypothesis of meningococcal meningitis, antimicrobial therapy was started. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for N. meningitidis. During the first hours the patient experienced hallucinations and mild psychomotor agitation, making a spontaneous recovery. A brain MRI showed minimal extra-axial inflammatory exudates. She was discharged after 10 days in good condition. We underline the need to consider meningococcal meningitis diagnosis when any suggestive symptom or sign is present, even in the absence of the classic meningitis triad, to obtain earlier diagnosis and an improved prognosis.

  17. Olfactory nerve--a novel invasion route of Neisseria meningitidis to reach the meninges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sjölinder

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival.

  18. Olfactory nerve--a novel invasion route of Neisseria meningitidis to reach the meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2010-11-18

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival.

  19. Olfactory Nerve—A Novel Invasion Route of Neisseria meningitidis to Reach the Meninges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2010-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival. PMID:21124975

  20. Clinical use of fungal PCR from deep tissue samples in the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Houhala, M; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Antikainen, J; Valve, J; Kirveskari, J; Anttila, V-J

    2018-03-01

    To assess the clinical use of panfungal PCR for diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases (IFDs). We focused on the deep tissue samples. We first described the design of panfungal PCR, which is in clinical use at Helsinki University Hospital. Next we retrospectively evaluated the results of 307 fungal PCR tests performed from 2013 to 2015. Samples were taken from normally sterile tissues and fluids. The patient population was nonselected. We classified the likelihood of IFD according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG), comparing the fungal PCR results to the likelihood of IFD along with culture and microscopy results. There were 48 positive (16%) and 259 negative (84%) PCR results. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for diagnosing IFDs were 60.5% and 91.7%, respectively, while the negative predictive value and positive predictive value were 93.4% and 54.2%, respectively. The concordance between the PCR and the culture results was 86% and 87% between PCR and microscopy, respectively. Of the 48 patients with positive PCR results, 23 had a proven or probable IFD. Fungal PCR can be useful for diagnosing IFDs in deep tissue samples. It is beneficial to combine fungal PCR with culture and microscopy. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmaceutical Approval Update

    OpenAIRE

    Gohil, Kunj

    2015-01-01

    Meningococcal group B vaccine (Trumenba) to prevent more types of invasive meningococcal disease; antihemophilic factor (recombinant), porcine sequence (Obizur) to treat bleeding from acquired hemophilia A; and pirfenidone (Esbriet) and nintedanib (Ofev) for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

  2. Meningococcal serogroup B-specific responses after vaccination with bivalent rLP2086: 4 year follow-up of a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen S; Richmond, Peter C; Beeslaar, Johannes; Jiang, Qin; Jansen, Kathrin U; Garcés-Sánchez, Maria; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Szenborn, Leszek; Wysocki, Jacek; Eiden, Joseph; Harris, Shannon L; Jones, Thomas R; Lee, Su-San; Perez, John L

    2017-01-01

    test strain, compared with 0% (n=0/25) to 35% (n=8/23) of control recipients. Despite initial declines in seroprotective hSBA titres for all four test strains, for three test strains (A22, A56, and B24), more than 50% of bivalent rLP2086 recipients continued to achieve titres equal to or greater than the lower limit of quantification at months 6 (57% [n=93/163] to 89% [n=42/47]), 12 (54% [n=84/155] to 69% [n=33/48]), 24 (53% [n=26/49] to 54% [n=82/152]), and 48 (51% [n=24/47] to 59% [n=79/134]); corresponding values in the control group were 14% (n=11/80) to 22% (n=5/23) at month 6, 13% (n=10/78) to 29% (n=22/76) at month 12, 16% (n=12/74) to 36% (n=8/22) at month 24, and 24% (n=16/68) to 35% (n=8/23) at month 48. For test strain B44, hSBA titres equal to or greater than the lower limit of quantification were shown in 37% (n=18/49) of vaccine recipients at 6 months, in 29% (n=14/48) at 12 months, in 22% (n=11/49) at 24 months, and in 20% (n=10/49) at 48 months, compared with 0% (n=0/25) of control recipients at month 6, 4% (n=1/25) at months 12 and 24, and 12% (n=3/25) at month 48. Adverse events were reported in seven (4%) of 170 participants in the bivalent rLP2086 group and two (3%) of 80 participants in the control group; no event was deemed related to vaccine. After three doses of bivalent rLP2086, protective hSBA titres above the correlate of protection (≥1/4) were elicited up to 4 years in more than 50% of participants for three of four meningococcal serogroup B test strains representative of disease-causing meningococci expressing vaccine-heterologous antigens. Further studies will be needed to assess possible herd immunity effects with meningococcal serogroup B vaccines and the need for a booster dose to sustain individual protection against invasive meningococcal disease. Pfizer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Host heterogeneity influences the impact of a non-native disease invasion on populations of a foundation tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Erik S.; Carroll, Allyson L.; Garcia, Andrea M.; Steenbock, Christopher M.; Kauffman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

     P. lateralis causes profound impacts to population structure and the invasion outcome will be governed by the heterogeneity found in host size and location. Models of disease invasion will require an understanding of how heterogeneity influences spread dynamics to adequately predict the outcome for host populations.

  4. Decreased expression of serum and microvascular vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in meningococcal sepsis*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Baerveldt, E.M.; Miedema, A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Emonts, M.; Groot, R. de; Prens, E.P.; Vught, A.J. van; Jansen, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skin microvessel expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and serum-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 levels in children with meningococcal sepsis. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Two tertiary academic children hospital PICUs.

  5. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle composition-dependent activation of the innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, Afshin; Beskers, Joep; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Bindels, Tim H E; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P M; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated and successfully implemented as vaccines. They contain pathogen associated molecular patterns including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capable of triggering innate immunity. However, Neisseria meningitidis contains an

  6. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. Objective The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. Methods At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Results Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project’s Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620

  7. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-12-02

    The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project's Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620% (95% CI 176%-1777%) for the website

  8. Safety, immunogenicity, and tolerability of meningococcal serogroup B bivalent recombinant lipoprotein 2086 vaccine in healthy adolescents: a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Peter C; Marshall, Helen S; Nissen, Michael D; Jiang, Qin; Jansen, Kathrin U; Garcés-Sánchez, Maria; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Beeslaar, Johannes; Szenborn, Leszek; Wysocki, Jacek; Eiden, Joseph; Harris, Shannon L; Jones, Thomas R; Perez, John L

    2012-08-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease, but a broadly protective vaccine is not currently licensed. A bivalent recombinant factor H-binding protein vaccine (recombinant lipoprotein 2086) has been developed to provide broad coverage against diverse invasive meningococcus serogroup B strains. Our aim was to test the immune response of this vaccine. This randomised, placebo-controlled trial enrolled healthy adolescents from 25 sites in Australia, Poland, and Spain. Exclusion criteria were previous invasive meningococcal disease or serogroup B vaccination, previous adverse reaction or known hypersensitivity to the vaccine, any significant comorbidities, and immunosuppressive therapy or receipt of blood products in the past 6 months. Participants were randomly assigned with a computerised block randomisation scheme to receive ascending doses of vaccine (60, 120, or 200 μg) or placebo at 0, 2, and 6 months. Principal investigators, participants and their guardians, and laboratory personnel were masked to the allocation; dispensing staff were not. Immunogenicity was measured by serum bactericidal assays using human complement (hSBA) against eight diverse meningococcus serogroup B strains. The co-primary endpoints were seroconversion for the two indicator strains (PMB1745 and PMB17) analysed by the Clopper-Pearson method. Local and systemic reactions and adverse events were recorded. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00808028. 539 participants were enrolled and 511 received all three study vaccinations--116 in the placebo group, 21 in the 60 μg group, 191 in the 120 μg group, and 183 in the 200 μg group. The proportion of participants responding with an hSBA titre equal to or greater than the lower limit of quantitation of the hSBA assays (reciprcocal titres of 7 to 18, depending on test strain) was similar for the two largest doses and ranged from 75·6 to 100·0% for the 120 μg dose and 67·9 to

  9. [Approximation to the dynamics of meningococcal meningitis through dynamic systems and time series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, M

    1996-02-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is subjected to epidemiological surveillance due to its severity and the occasional presentation of epidemic outbreaks. This work analyses previous disease models, generate new ones and analyses monthly cases using ARIMA time series models. The results show that disease dynamics for closed populations is epidemic and the epidemic size is related to the proportion of carriers and the transmissiveness of the agent. In open populations, disease dynamics depends on the admission rate of susceptible and the relative admission of infected individuals. Our model considers a logistic populational growth and carrier admission proportional to populational size, generating an endemic dynamics. Considering a non-instantaneous system response, a greater realism is obtained establishing that the endemic situation may present a dynamics highly sensitive to initial conditions, depending on the transmissiveness and proportion of susceptible individuals in the population. Time series model showed an adequate predictive capacity in terms no longer than 10 months. The lack of long term predictability was attributed to local changes in the proportion of carriers or on transmissiveness that lead to chaotic dynamics over a seasonal pattern. Predictions for 1995 and 1996 were obtained.

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of meningococcal ACWY CRM197-conjugate vaccine in children, adolescents and adults in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyina, Natalia; Kharit, Susanna; Namazova-Baranova, Leila; Asatryan, Asmik; Benashvili, Mayya; Tkhostova, Elmira; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is the leading cause of bacterial invasive infections in people aged safety of the quadrivalent meningococcal CRM197-conjugate vaccine MenACWY when administered to healthy Russian subjects aged 2 years and above. A total of 197 subjects were immunized with a single dose of the vaccine, and serogroup-specific serum bactericidal activity was measured pre and 1-month post-vaccination with human complement (hSBA) serum titers. Regardless of baseline serostatus, 1 month after a single dose of MenACWY-CRM197 85% (95%CI, 79-90%) of subjects showed serologic response against serogroup A, 74% (67-80%) against serogroup C, 60% (53-67%) against serogroup W, and 83% (77-88%) against serogroup Y. The percentage of subjects with hSBA titers ≥ 1:8 1 month after vaccination was 89% (83-93%) against serogroup A, 84% (78-89%) against serogroup C, 97% (93-99%) against serogroup W, and 88% (82-92%) against serogroup Y. Comparable results were obtained across all subjects: children (2 to 10 years), adolescents (11 to 17 years), and adults (≥18 years). The MenACWY-CRM197 vaccine showed an acceptable safety profile and was well tolerated across all age groups, with no serious adverse events or deaths reported during the study. In conclusion, a single dose of meningococcal MenACWY-CRM197 vaccine is immunogenic and has an acceptable safety profile, provides a broad protection against the most frequent epidemic serogroups, and is a suitable alternative to currently available unconjugated monovalent or bivalent polysaccharide vaccines in Russia.

  11. Is a single dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine sufficient for protection? experience from the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaaijk Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first meningococcal serogroup C (MenC conjugate vaccine was licensed in 1999 and introduced in the United Kingdom. Countries that have implemented the MenC vaccine since then in their national immunisation programmes use different schedules. Nevertheless, all involved countries seem to experience substantial declines in the incidence of MenC disease. Discussion Since 2001, the MenC conjugate vaccine has been implemented in the Netherlands by offering a single dose to all children aged 14 months. Prior to the introduction of the vaccine into the national immunisation programme, a catch-up vaccination campaign was initiated in which a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine was offered to all children aged from 14 months up to and including 18 years. Since then, there has been no report of any case of MenC disease among immunocompetent vaccinees. Administration of a single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine after infancy could be beneficial considering the already complex immunisation schedules with large numbers of vaccinations in the first year of life. The present paper deals with the advantages and critical aspects of a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine. Summary A single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine at the age of 14 months in combination with a catch up vaccine campaign appeared to be a successful strategy to prevent MenC disease in the Netherlands, thereby confirming that a single dose of the vaccine could sufficiently protect against disease. Nevertheless, this approach can only be justified in countries with a relatively low incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the first year of life. Furthermore, a good surveillance programme is recommended for timely detection of vaccine breakthroughs and outbreaks among non-vaccinees, since long-term protection after a single dose in the second year of life cannot currently be guaranteed.

  12. Trends in the epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in Queensland, Australia from 2000 to 2013: what is the impact of an increase in invasive non-typable H. influenzae (NTHi)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Sai Cheong, J; Smith, H; Heney, C; Robson, J; Schlebusch, S; Fu, J; Nourse, C

    2015-10-01

    Following the introduction of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), cases of invasive encapsulated Hib disease have decreased markedly. This study aimed to examine subsequent epidemiological trends in invasive H. influenzae disease in Queensland, Australia and in particular, assess the clinical impact and public health implications of invasive non-typable H. influenzae (NTHi) strains. A multicentre retrospective study was conducted from July 2000 to June 2013. Databases of major laboratories in Queensland including Queensland Forensic and Scientific Services (jurisdictional referral laboratory for isolate typing) were examined to identify cases. Demographic, infection site, Indigenous status, serotype, and mortality data were collected. In total, 737 invasive isolates were identified, of which 586 (79·5%) were serotyped. Hib, NTHi and encapsulated non-b strains, respectively, constituted 12·1%, 69·1% and 18·8% of isolates. The predominant encapsulated non-b strains were f (45·5%) and a (27·3%) serotypes. Of isolates causing meningitis, 48·9% were NTHi, 14·9% Hib, 14·9% Hie, 10·6% Hif, 6·4% Hia and 4·3% were untyped. During the study period, there was an increase in the incidence of invasive NTHi disease (P = 0·007) with seasonal peaks in winter and spring (P 0·001) and Hib (P = 0·039) than non-Indigenous patients. In Queensland, invasive H. influenzae disease is now predominantly encountered in adults and most commonly caused by NTHi strains with demonstrated pathogenicity extending to otherwise young or immunocompetent individuals. Routine public health notification of these strains is recommended and recent available immunization options should be considered.

  13. Computed Tomography Fractional Flow Reserve Can Identify Culprit Lesions in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease Using Minimally Invasive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Erin P; Shiavazzi, Daniele; Sood, Divya; Marsden, Allison; Lane, John; Owens, Erik; Barleben, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the gold standard diagnostic examination for significant aortoiliac lesions is angiography. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has a growing body of literature in coronary artery disease as a minimally invasive diagnostic procedure. Improvements in numerical hemodynamics have allowed for an accurate and minimally invasive approach to estimating FFR, utilizing cross-sectional imaging. We aim to demonstrate a similar approach to aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD). A retrospective review evaluated 7 patients with claudication and cross-sectional imaging showing AIOD. FFR was subsequently measured during conventional angiogram with pull-back pressures in a retrograde fashion. To estimate computed tomography (CT) FFR, CT angiography (CTA) image data were analyzed using the SimVascular software suite to create a computational fluid dynamics model of the aortoiliac system. Inlet flow conditions were derived based on cardiac output, while 3-element Windkessel outlet boundary conditions were optimized to match the expected systolic and diastolic pressures, with outlet resistance distributed based on Murray's law. The data were evaluated with a Student's t-test and receiver operating characteristic curve. All patients had evidence of AIOD on CT and FFR was successfully measured during angiography. The modeled data were found to have high sensitivity and specificity between the measured and CT FFR (P = 0.986, area under the curve = 1). The average difference between the measured and calculated FFRs was 0.136, with a range from 0.03 to 0.30. CT FFR successfully identified aortoiliac lesions with significant pressure drops that were identified with angiographically measured FFR. CT FFR has the potential to provide a minimally invasive approach to identify flow-limiting stenosis for AIOD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2014 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae PspC Subgroup Prevalence in Invasive Disease and Differences in Contribution to Complement Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maten, Erika; van den Broek, Bryan; de Jonge, Marien I; Rensen, Kim J W; Eleveld, Marc J; Zomer, Aldert L; Cremers, Amelieke J H; Ferwerda, Gerben; de Groot, Ronald; Langereis, Jeroen D; van der Flier, Michiel

    2018-04-01

    The pneumococcal capsular serotype is an important determinant of complement resistance and invasive disease potential, but other virulence factors have also been found to contribute. Pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC), a highly variable virulence protein that binds complement factor H to evade C3 opsonization, is divided into two subgroups: choline-bound subgroup I and LPxTG-anchored subgroup II. The prevalence of different PspC subgroups in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and functional differences in complement evasion are unknown. The prevalence of PspC subgroups in IPD isolates was determined in a collection of 349 sequenced strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from adult patients. pspC deletion mutants and isogenic pspC switch mutants were constructed to study differences in factor H binding and complement evasion in relation to capsule thickness. Subgroup I pspC was far more prevalent in IPD isolates than subgroup II pspC The presence of capsule was associated with a greater ability of bound factor H to reduce complement opsonization. Pneumococcal subgroup I PspC bound significantly more factor H and showed more effective complement evasion than subgroup II PspC in isogenic encapsulated pneumococci. We conclude that variation in the PspC subgroups, independent of capsule serotypes, affects pneumococcal factor H binding and its ability to evade complement deposition. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Molecular markers in disease detection and follow-up of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Moritz; Walz, Simon; Stühler, Viktoria; Aufderklamm, Stefan; Rausch, Steffen; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2018-05-01

    Diagnosis and surveillance of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is mainly based on endoscopic bladder evaluation and urine cytology. Several assays for determining additional molecular markers (urine-, tissue- or blood-based) have been developed in recent years but have not been included in clinical guidelines so far. Areas covered: This review gives an update on different molecular markers in the urine and evaluates their role in patients with NMIBC in disease detection and surveillance. Moreover, the potential of recent approaches such as DNA methylation assays, multi-panel RNA gene expression assays and cell-free DNA analysis is assessed. Expert commentary: Most studies on various molecular urine markers have mainly focused on a potential replacement of cystoscopy. New developments in high throughput technologies and urine markers may offer further advantages as they may represent a non-invasive approach for molecular characterization of the disease. This opens new options for individualized surveillance strategies and may help to choose the best therapeutic option. The implementation of these technologies in well-designed clinical trials is essential to further promote the use of urine diagnostics in the management of patients with NMIBC.

  17. Invasive Haemophilus Influenzae Disease, Europe, 1996–2006

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast describes monitoring of Haemophilus influenzae disease in Europe from 1996 through 2006. CDC epidemiologist Stacey Martin discusses what researchers learned about the effect of vaccination on disease prevalence.

  18. Invasive Haemophilus Influenzae Disease, Europe, 1996–2006

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-15

    This podcast describes monitoring of Haemophilus influenzae disease in Europe from 1996 through 2006. CDC epidemiologist Stacey Martin discusses what researchers learned about the effect of vaccination on disease prevalence.  Created: 3/15/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID); National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 4/5/2010.

  19. Meningococcal Infection in Children in the Krasnoyarsk Territory: Analysis of Fatal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Martynova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal infection (MI for many years has occupied one of the most important places in the structure of acute neuroinfections in children. Some decline in MI morbidity in recent years has reduced the alertness of doctors to early detection of the disease that in some cases becomes the cause of late hospitalization, developmentof decompensated shock and ineffective resuscitation. The purpose of the given research is to identify the causes of deaths from generalized forms of MI and the prospects of mortality reduction. The paper gives the expert analysis of 22 medical histories of children who died of generalized forms of MI during the period from 2005 to 2014 in Krasnoyarsk. The work describes the features of the clinical picture of MI generalized forms in children at the present stage, reveals the causes of deaths during the period of sporadic morbidity in the Krasnoyarsk Territory and determines the adverse prognostic features that indicate the particular severity and the development of fulminant course of the disease.

  20. Phagocytosis and Epithelial Cell Invasion by Crohn’s Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Are Inhibited by the Anti-inflammatory Drug 6-Mercaptopurine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliore

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC strains are overrepresented in the dysbiotic microbiota of Crohn’s disease (CD patients, and contribute to the onset of the chronic inflammation typical of the disease. However, the effects of anti-inflammatory drugs used for CD treatment on AIEC virulence have not yet been investigated. In this report, we show that exposure of AIEC LF82 strain to amino-6-mercaptopurine (6-MP riboside, one of the most widely used anti-inflammatory drugs in CD, impairs its ability to adhere to, and consequently to invade, human epithelial cells. Notably, phagocytosis of LF82 treated with 6-MP by human macrophages is also reduced, suggesting that 6-MP affects AIEC cell surface determinants involved both in interaction with epithelial cells and in uptake by macrophages. Since a main target of 6-MP in bacterial cells is the inhibition of the important signal molecule c-di-GMP, we also tested whether perturbations in cAMP, another major signaling pathway in E. coli, might have similar effects on interactions with human cells. To this aim, we grew LF82 in the presence of glucose, which leads to inhibition of cAMP synthesis. Growth in glucose-supplemented medium resulted in a reduction in AIEC adhesion to epithelial cells and uptake by macrophages. Consistent with these results, both 6-MP and glucose can affect expression of cell adhesion-related genes, such as the csg genes, encoding thin aggregative fimbriae (curli. In addition, glucose strongly inhibits expression of the fim operon, encoding type 1 pili, a known AIEC determinant for adhesion to human cells. To further investigate whether 6-MP can indeed inhibit c-di-GMP signaling in AIEC, we performed biofilm and motility assays and determination of extracellular polysaccharides. 6-MP clearly affected biofilm formation and cellulose production, but also, unexpectedly, reduced cell motility, itself an important virulence factor for AIEC. Our results provide strong evidence

  1. A Bivalent Meningococcal B Vaccine in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Vesikari, Timo; Absalon, Judith; Beeslaar, Johannes; Ward, Brian J; Senders, Shelly; Eiden, Joseph J; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S; York, Laura J; Jones, Thomas R; Harris, Shannon L; O'Neill, Robert; Radley, David; Maansson, Roger; Prégaldien, Jean-Louis; Ginis, John; Staerke, Nina B; Perez, John L

    2017-12-14

    MenB-FHbp is a licensed meningococcal B vaccine targeting factor H-binding protein. Two phase 3 studies assessed the safety of the vaccine and its immunogenicity against diverse strains of group B meningococcus. We randomly assigned 3596 adolescents (10 to 18 years of age) to receive MenB-FHbp or hepatitis A virus vaccine and saline and assigned 3304 young adults (18 to 25 years of age) to receive MenB-FHbp or saline at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months. Immunogenicity was assessed in serum bactericidal assays that included human complement (hSBAs). We used 14 meningococcal B test strains that expressed vaccine-heterologous factor H-binding proteins representative of meningococcal B epidemiologic diversity; an hSBA titer of at least 1:4 is the accepted correlate of protection. The five primary end points were the proportion of participants who had an increase in their hSBA titer for each of 4 primary strains by a factor of 4 or more and the proportion of those who had an hSBA titer at least as high as the lower limit of quantitation (1:8 or 1:16) for all 4 strains combined after dose 3. We also assessed the hSBA responses to the primary strains after dose 2; hSBA responses to the 10 additional strains after doses 2 and 3 were assessed in a subgroup of participants only. Safety was assessed in participants who received at least one dose. In the modified intention-to-treat population, the percentage of adolescents who had an increase in the hSBA titer by a factor of 4 or more against each primary strain ranged from 56.0 to 85.3% after dose 2 and from 78.8 to 90.2% after dose 3; the percentages of young adults ranged from 54.6 to 85.6% and 78.9 to 89.7%, after doses 2 and 3, respectively. Composite responses after doses 2 and 3 in adolescents were 53.7% and 82.7%, respectively, and those in young adults were 63.3% and 84.5%, respectively. Responses to the 4 primary strains were predictive of responses to the 10 additional strains. Most of those who received Men

  2. Parents' perceived vulnerability and perceived control in preventing Meningococcal C infection: a large-scale interview study about vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents' reported ambivalence toward large-scale vaccination programs for childhood diseases may be related to their perception of the risks of side-effects or safety of vaccination and the risk of contracting the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate parents' perceptions of their child's risk contracting a Meningococcal C infection and parents' perceived control in preventing infection in relation to their evaluation of the safety, effectiveness and usefulness of vaccination. Methods In a large-scale interview study, a random sample of parents was interviewed after their children had received vaccination against Meningococcal C in a catch-up campaign. Questions were asked about the perceived relative vulnerability of their child contracting an infection, perceived control in preventing an infection, and parents' evaluation of the safety, usefulness and effectiveness of vaccination. Results 61% of 2910 (N = 1763 parents who were approached participated. A higher perceived relative vulnerability of their own child contracting the disease was related to a more positive evaluation of the vaccination campaign, while a lower perceived vulnerability did not result in a more negative evaluation. A higher perceived control in being able to prevent an infection was, however, related to a more critical attitude toward the safety, usefulness and effectiveness of vaccination. Conclusion Perceived relative vulnerability contracting an infection and parents' perceived control in preventing an infection seem to influence parents' evaluation of the vaccination programme. Future studies should determine if, and under which circumstances, these perceptions also affect parents' vaccination behaviour and would be relevant to be taken into account when educating parents about vaccination.

  3. Non-invasive assessment of right ventricular function at rest and on exercise in obstructive airways disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweddel, A.; Martin, W.; McGhie, I.; Neilly, B.; Stevenson, R.; Hutton, I.

    1985-01-01

    Non-invasive assessment of right ventricular function is of clinical interest in the patient with obstructive airways disease. Gated Xenon 133 scanning allows right ventricular function to be evaluated in isolation from the left ventricle, and with rapid clearance from the lungs, scans may be repeated within 5 minutes. 400mBq of Xenon 133 were injected intravenously over 20 seconds and images were obtained using a mobile gamma camera. Maximal symptom limited exercise was performed on a supine bicycle ergometer. The normal range for right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) was obtained from 10 volunteers - 40-55% at rest rising by 5-15% during exercise. In 10 patients with acute obstructive airways disease, all had reduced RVEF 21 +- 3%. In chronic obstructive airways disease, if resting RVEF was greater than 30%, ejection fraction increased on exercise. If resting ejection fraction was abnormal than RVEF was reduced or unchanged on exercise (mean 15 +- 9%), and this was associated with dilatation of both the right ventricle and atrium. In conclusion, gated Xenon 133 offers a simple method of assessing right ventricular function at rest and on exercise in the patient with obstructive airways disease

  4. Exercise, stress or what. The non-invasive detection of latent coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltart, J.; Robinson, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    This communication discusses the methods of detecting latent coronary artery disease in an entirely asymptomatic individual with no previous symptoms or signs suggestive of coronary artery disease. Isotope techniques are being increasingly employed in the detection and assessment of coronary artery disease in that they may enable the confirmation of the presence of ischaemia, the extent and location of the underlying coronary artery disease and the effect of ischaemia on overall and regional left ventricular function. Three groups of techniques are commonly employed: 1. assessment of myocardial perfusion; 2. labelling of acute myocardial infarction; 3. overall and regional left ventricular function studies. Isotopes of potassium were initially studied, and, despite technical problems with imaging, 43 K has proved a useful agent in that over a range of coronary flow rates from normal to severely reduced flow, myocardial uptake parallels myocardial blood flow. Myocardial perfusion imaging should enhance the sensitivity and specificity of exercise testing in the symptomatic population and should also be helpful in the asymptomatic population although data on such populations are as yet extremely limited. Acute infarct labelling has little relevance to the very early detection of coronary artery disease. Assessment of overall and regional left ventricular function using gated blood pool scanning at rest and possibly also during exercise has potentially very wide applications in ischaemic heart disease and in combination with myocardial perfusion scanning in the assessment of symptomatic ischaemic heart disease and the detection of ischaemia and coronary artery disease in the asymptomatic population. (Auth.)

  5. From tailor-made to ready-to-wear meningococcal B vaccines: longitudinal study of a clonal meningococcal B outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, François; du Châtelet, Isabelle Parent; Leroy, Jean-Philippe; Ruckly, Corinne; Blanchard, Myriam; Bohic, Nicole; Massy, Nathalie; Morer, Isabelle; Floret, Daniel; Delbos, Valérie; Hong, Eva; Révillion, Martin; Berthelot, Gilles; Lemée, Ludovic; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Bénichou, Jacques; Lévy-Bruhl, Daniel; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2011-06-01

    Outer-membrane-vesicle vaccines for meningococcal B outbreaks are complex and time consuming to develop. We studied the use of already available vaccine to control an outbreak caused by a genetically close strain. From 2006 to 2009, all individuals younger than 20 years living in the region of Normandy, France, in which an outbreak caused by a B:14:P1.7,16 strain occurred, were eligible to receive MenBvac, a Norwegian vaccine designed 20 years earlier against a strain sharing the same serosubtype (B:15:P1.7,16). The immunogenicity (in a randomly selected cohort of 400 children aged 1-5 years), safety, and epidemiological effect of the vaccination were assessed. 26,014 individuals were eligible to receive the vaccine. Shortage of vaccine production prompted start of the campaign in the highest incidence groups (1-5 years). 16,709 (64%) received a complete vaccination schedule of whom 13,589 (81%) received a 2+1 dose schedule (week 0, week 6, and month 8). At 6 weeks after the third dose, of 235 vaccinees for whom samples were available, 206 (88%) had a seroresponse, and 108 (56 %) of 193 had a seroresponse at 15 months. These results were similar to those described for tailor-made vaccines and their homologous strain. Only previously described adverse effects occurred. The incidence of B:14:P1.7,16 cases decreased significantly in the vaccine targeted population after the primary vaccination period (from 31·6 per 100,000 to 5·9 per 100,000; p=0·001). The ready-to-wear approach is reliable if epidemic and vaccine strains are genetically close. Other meningococcal B clonal outbreaks might benefit from this strategy; and previously described outer-membrane-vesicle vaccines can be effective against various strains. French Ministry of Health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A prospective study of fungal biomarkers to improve management of invasive fungal diseases in a mixed specialty critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento, Alida Fe; Dunne, Katie; Joyce, Eimear Ann; Palmer, Michael; Johnson, Elizabeth; White, P Lewis; Springer, Jan; Loeffler, Juergen; Ryan, Thomas; Collins, Daniel; Rogers, Thomas R

    2017-08-01

    The diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases (IFD) in critical care patients (CrCP) is difficult. The study investigated the performance of a set of biomarkers for diagnosis of IFD in a mixed specialty critical care unit (CrCU). A prospective observational study in patients receiving critical care for ≥7days was performed. Serum samples were tested for the presence of: (1-3) - β-d-glucan (BDG), galactomannan (GM), and Aspergillus fumigatus DNA. GM antigen detection was also performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. The patients were classified using published definitions for IFD and a diagnostic algorithm for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Performance parameters of the assays were determined. In patients with proven and probable IFD, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of a single positive BDG were 63%, 83%, 65% and 83% respectively. Specificity increased to 86% with 2 consecutive positive results. The mean BDG value of patients with proven and probable IFD was significantly higher compared to those with fungal colonization and no IFD (p value<0.0001). New diagnostic criteria which incorporate these biomarkers, in particular BDG, and host factors unique to critical care patients should enhance diagnosis of IFD and positively impact antifungal stewardship programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Overcoming the Odds: Long-term psychosocial outcomes in survivors of meningococcal septic shock in childhood, and in their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.A.C. Vermunt (Lindy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSeptic shock, caused by Neisseria meningitidis with petechiae and/or purpura, also called Meningococcal Septic Shock (MSS), is the most serious form of meningococcal infection in early childhood. MSS is a life-threatening illness in mostly previously healthy children, with an unexpected

  8. Meningococcal serogroup A, C, W₁₃₅ and Y conjugated vaccine: a cost-effectiveness analysis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepkema, Hiltsje; Pouwels, Koen B.; van der Ende, Arie; Westra, Tjalke A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W135,Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was licensed for use in

  9. Meningococcal Serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y Conjugated Vaccine : A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepkema, Hiltsje; Pouwels, Koen B.; van der Ende, Arie; Westra, Tjalke A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W-135, Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was

  10. Long-term prognosis of chronic kidney disease in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome treated with invasive strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán Torres, Ildefonso; Salvador Mercader, Inmaculada; Cabadés Rumbeu, Claudia; Díez Gil, José Luis; Ferrando Cervelló, José; Monteagudo Viana, Marta; Fernández Galera, Rubén; Mora Llabata, Vicente

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes after non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS). However, the information available on this specific population, is scarce. We evaluate the impact of CKD on long-term prognosis in patients with NSTEACS managed with invasive strategy. We conduct a prospective registry of patients with NSTEACS and coronary angiography. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate < 60ml/min/1,73m 2 . The composite primary end-point was cardiac death and non fatal cardiovascular readmission. We estimated the cumulative probability and hazard rate (HR) of combined primary end-point at 3-years according to the presence or absence of CKD. We included 248 p with mean age of 66.9 years, 25% women. CKD was present at baseline in 67 patients (27%). Patients with CKD were older (74.9 vs. 63.9 years; P<.0001) with more prevalence of hypertension (89.6 vs. 66.3%; P<.0001), diabetes (53.7 vs. 35.9%; P=.011), history of heart failure (13.4 vs. 3.9%; P=.006) and anemia (47.8 vs. 16%; P<.0001). No differences in the extent of coronary artery disease. CKD was associated with higher cumulative probability (49.3 vs. 28.2%; log-rank P=.001) and HR of the primary combined end-point (HR: 1.94; CI95%: 1.12-3.27; P=.012). CKD was an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes at 3-years (HR: 1.66; CI95%: 1.05-2.61; P=.03). In NSTEACS patients treated with invasive strategie CKD is associated independently with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes at 3years. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative economic impact assessment of an invasive plant disease under uncertainty - a case study for potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) invasion into the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soliman, T.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Werf, van der W.

    2012-01-01

    International treaties require that phytosanitary measures against introduction and spread of invasive plant pests are justified by a science-based pest risk analysis, including an assessment of potential economic consequences. This study evaluates the economic justification of the currently applied

  12. Functional role of an endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in enhancing growth and disease protection of invasive English ivy (Hedera helix L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marcos Antonio; Li, Jai-Yan; Bergen, Marshall; da Silva, Joaquim Manoel; Kowalski, Kurt P.; White, James Francis

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundWe hypothesize that invasive English ivy (Hedera helix) harbors endophytic microbes that promote plant growth and survival. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined endophytic bacteria in English ivy and evaluated effects on the host plant.MethodsEndophytic bacteria were isolated from multiple populations of English ivy in New Brunswick, NJ. Bacteria were identified as a single species Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. One strain of B. amyloliquefaciens, strain C6c, was characterized for indoleacetic acid (IAA) production, secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, phosphate solubilization, and antibiosis against pathogens. PCR was used to amplify lipopeptide genes and their secretion into culture media was detected by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Capability to promote growth of English ivy was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. The capacity of C6c to protect plants from disease was evaluated by exposing B+ (bacterium inoculated) and B− (non-inoculated) plants to the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria tenuissima.ResultsB. amyloliquefaciens C6c systemically colonized leaves, petioles, and seeds of English ivy. C6c synthesized IAA and inhibited plant pathogens. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis revealed secretion of antifungal lipopeptides surfactin, iturin, bacillomycin, and fengycin. C6c promoted the growth of English ivy in low and high soil nitrogen conditions. This endophytic bacterium efficiently controlled disease caused by Alternaria tenuissima.ConclusionsThis study suggests that B. amyloliquefaciens plays an important role in enhancing growth and disease protection of English ivy.

  13. Disease protection and allelopathic interactions of seed-transmitted endophytic pseudomonads of invasive reed grass (Phragmites australis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James F.; Kingsley, Katheryn I; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Irizarry, Ivelisse; Micci, April; Soares, Marcos Antonio; Bergen, Marshall S.

    2018-01-01

    Background and aimsNon-native Phragmites australis (haplotype M) is an invasive grass that decreases biodiversity and produces dense stands. We hypothesized that seeds of Phragmites carry microbes that improve seedling growth, defend against pathogens and maximize capacity of seedlings to compete with other plants.MethodsWe isolated bacteria from seeds of Phragmites, then evaluated representatives for their capacities to become intracellular in root cells, and their effects on: 1.) germination rates and seedling growth, 2.) susceptibility to damping-off disease, and 3.) mortality and growth of competitor plant seedlings (dandelion (Taraxacum officionale F. H. Wigg) and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.)).ResultsTen strains (of 23 total) were identified and characterized; seven were identified as Pseudomonas spp. Strains Sandy LB4 (Pseudomonas fluorescens) and West 9 (Pseudomonas sp.) entered root meristems and became intracellular. These bacteria improved seed germination in Phragmites and increased seedling root branching in Poa annua. They increased plant growth and protected plants from damping off disease. Sandy LB4 increased mortality and reduced growth rates in seedlings of dandelion and curly dock.ConclusionsPhragmites plants associate with endophytes to increase growth and disease resistance, and release bacteria into the soil to create an environment that is favorable to their seedlings and less favorable to competitor plants.

  14. Deep learning-based features of breast MRI for prediction of occult invasive disease following a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ: preliminary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhe; Harowicz, Michael; Zhang, Jun; Saha, Ashirbani; Grimm, Lars J.; Hwang, Shelley; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2018-02-01

    Approximately 25% of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed from core needle biopsy are subsequently upstaged to invasive cancer at surgical excision. Identifying patients with occult invasive disease is important as it changes treatment and precludes enrollment in active surveillance for DCIS. In this study, we investigated upstaging of DCIS to invasive disease using deep features. While deep neural networks require large amounts of training data, the available data to predict DCIS upstaging is sparse and thus directly training a neural network is unlikely to be successful. In this work, a pre-trained neural network is used as a feature extractor and a support vector machine (SVM) is trained on the extracted features. We used the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRIs of patients at our institution from January 1, 2000, through March 23, 2014 who underwent MRI following a diagnosis of DCIS. Among the 131 DCIS patients, there were 35 patients who were upstaged to invasive cancer. Area under the ROC curve within the 10-fold cross-validation scheme was used for validation of our predictive model. The use of deep features was able to achieve an AUC of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.56-0.78) to predict occult invasive disease. This preliminary work demonstrates the promise of deep features to predict surgical upstaging following a diagnosis of DCIS.

  15. Incidence of invasive salmonella disease in sub-Saharan Africa: a multicentre population-based surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Florian; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Aaby, Peter; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; El Tayeb, Muna Ahmed; Ali, Mohammad; Aseffa, Abraham; Baker, Stephen; Biggs, Holly M; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Breiman, Robert F; Campbell, James I; Cosmas, Leonard; Crump, John A; Espinoza, Ligia Maria Cruz; Deerin, Jessica Fung; Dekker, Denise Myriam; Fields, Barry S; Gasmelseed, Nagla; Hertz, Julian T; Van Minh Hoang, Nguyen; Im, Justin; Jaeger, Anna; Jeon, Hyon Jin; Kabore, Leon Parfait; Keddy, Karen H; Konings, Frank; Krumkamp, Ralf; Ley, Benedikt; Løfberg, Sandra Valborg; May, Jürgen; Meyer, Christian G; Mintz, Eric D; Montgomery, Joel M; Niang, Aissatou Ahmet; Nichols, Chelsea; Olack, Beatrice; Pak, Gi Deok; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Jin Kyung; Park, Se Eun; Rabezanahary, Henintsoa; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphaël; Raminosoa, Tiana Mirana; Razafindrabe, Tsiriniaina Jean Luco; Sampo, Emmanuel; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Sow, Amy Gassama; Sarpong, Nimako; Seo, Hye Jin; Sooka, Arvinda; Soura, Abdramane Bassiahi; Tall, Adama; Teferi, Mekonnen; Thriemer, Kamala; Warren, Michelle R; Yeshitela, Biruk; Clemens, John D; Wierzba, Thomas F

    2017-03-01

    Available incidence data for invasive salmonella disease in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. Standardised, multicountry data are required to better understand the nature and burden of disease in Africa. We aimed to measure the adjusted incidence estimates of typhoid fever and invasive non-typhoidal salmonella (iNTS) disease in sub-Saharan Africa, and the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the causative agents. We established a systematic, standardised surveillance of blood culture-based febrile illness in 13 African sentinel sites with previous reports of typhoid fever: Burkina Faso (two sites), Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Madagascar (two sites), Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, and Tanzania (two sites). We used census data and health-care records to define study catchment areas and populations. Eligible participants were either inpatients or outpatients who resided within the catchment area and presented with tympanic (≥38·0°C) or axillary temperature (≥37·5°C). Inpatients with a reported history of fever for 72 h or longer were excluded. We also implemented a health-care utilisation survey in a sample of households randomly selected from each study area to investigate health-seeking behaviour in cases of self-reported fever lasting less than 3 days. Typhoid fever and iNTS disease incidences were corrected for health-care-seeking behaviour and recruitment. Between March 1, 2010, and Jan 31, 2014, 135 Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S Typhi) and 94 iNTS isolates were cultured from the blood of 13 431 febrile patients. Salmonella spp accounted for 33% or more of all bacterial pathogens at nine sites. The adjusted incidence rate (AIR) of S Typhi per 100 000 person-years of observation ranged from 0 (95% CI 0-0) in Sudan to 383 (274-535) at one site in Burkina Faso; the AIR of iNTS ranged from 0 in Sudan, Ethiopia, Madagascar (Isotry site), and South Africa to 237 (178-316) at the second site in Burkina Faso. The AIR of iNTS and typhoid

  16. Longitudinal non-invasive perilymphatic pressure measurement in patients with Meniere's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosingh, HJ; Wit, HP; Sulter, AM; Albers, FWJ

    1997-01-01

    The homeostasis of inner-ear fluids is essential for the functions of hearing and equilibrium. Inner-ear disorders, such as Meniere's disease, are affected by inner-ear pressure. The displacement of the human tympanic membrane can be studied by means of the MMS-10 Tympanic Displacement Analyser

  17. Invasive lobular carcinoma of the male breast: A rare histology of an uncommon disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, R.; Kumar, P.; Sharma, D.N.; Haresh, K.P.; Gupta, S.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.; Bhankar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Male breast carcinoma is a rare malignancy comprising less than 1% of all breast cancers. It is a serious disease with most patients presenting in advanced stages. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most common histology while lobular carcinoma represents less than 1% of all these tumors. We report a case of locally advanced lobular carcinoma of breast in a 60 year old male

  18. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  19. Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid reveals a predictive model for differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis, and novel putative therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges in response to infection or chemical agents. While aseptic meningitis, most frequently caused by enteroviruses, is usually benign with a self-limiting course, bacterial meningitis remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and intensive care. Fast and accurate differential diagnosis is crucial for assertive choice of the appropriate therapeutic approach for each form of meningitis. Methods We used 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry to identify the cerebrospinal fluid proteome specifically related to the host response to pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis. The disease-specific proteome signatures were inspected by pathway analysis. Results Unique cerebrospinal fluid proteome signatures were found to the three aetiological forms of meningitis investigated, and a qualitative predictive model with four protein markers was developed for the differential diagnosis of these diseases. Nevertheless, pathway analysis of the disease-specific proteomes unveiled that Kallikrein-kinin system may play a crucial role in the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. Proteins taking part in this cellular process are proposed as putative targets to novel adjunctive therapies. Conclusions Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid disclosed candidate biomarkers, which were combined in a qualitative and sequential predictive model with potential to improve the differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal and enteroviral meningitis. Moreover, we present the first evidence of the possible implication of Kallikrein-kinin system in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26040285

  20. Invasive bacterial disease trends and characterization of group B streptococcal isolates among young infants in southern Mozambique, 2001-2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betuel Sigaúque

    Full Text Available Maternal group B streptococcal (GBS vaccines under development hold promise to prevent GBS disease in young infants. Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest estimated disease burden, although data on incidence and circulating strains are limited. We described invasive bacterial disease (IBD trends among infants <90 days in rural Mozambique during 2001-2015, with a focus on GBS epidemiology and strain characteristics.Community-level birth and mortality data were obtained from Manhiça's demographic surveillance system. IBD cases were captured through ongoing surveillance at Manhiça district hospital. Stored GBS isolates from cases underwent serotyping by multiplex PCR, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and whole genome sequencing.There were 437 IBD cases, including 57 GBS cases. Significant declines in overall IBD, neonatal mortality, and stillbirth rates were observed (P<0.0001, but not for GBS (P = 0.17. In 2015, GBS was the leading cause of young infant IBD (2.7 per 1,000 live births. Among 35 GBS isolates available for testing, 31 (88.6% were highly related serotype III isolates within multilocus sequence types (STs 17 (68.6% or 109 (20.0%. All seven ST109 isolates (21.9% had elevated minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC to penicillin (≥0.12 μg/mL associated with penicillin-binding protein (PBP 2x substitution G398A. Epidemiologic and molecular data suggest this is a well-established clone.A notable young infant GBS disease burden persisted despite improvements in overall maternal and neonatal health. We report an established strain with pbp2x point mutation, a first-step mutation associated with reduced penicillin susceptibility within a well-known virulent lineage in rural Mozambique. Our findings further underscores the need for non-antibiotic GBS prevention strategies.

  1. Meningococcal meningitis: clinical and laboratorial characteristics, fatality rate and variables associated with in-hospital mortality

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    Vanessa L. Strelow

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meningococcal meningitis is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with meningococcal meningitis, and to identify associated factors with mortality. This was a retrospective study, between 2006 and 2011, at a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mortality. We included 316 patients. The median age was 16 years (IQR: 7–27 and 60% were male. The clinical triad: fever, headache and neck stiffness was observed in 89% of the patients. The cerebrospinal triad: pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and low glucose levels was present in 79% of patients. Factors associated with mortality in the multivariate model were age above 50 years, seizures, tachycardia, hypotension and neck stiffness. The classic clinical and laboratory triads of meningococcal meningitis were variable. The fatality rate was low. Age, seizures and shock signs were independently associated with mortality.

  2. An Invasive Vector of Zoonotic Disease Sustained by Anthropogenic Resources: The Raccoon Dog in Northern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Süld, Karmen; Valdmann, Harri; Laurimaa, Leidi; Soe, Egle; Davison, John; Saarma, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an introduced species in Europe with a continually expanding range. Since the species is capable of affecting local ecosystems and is a vector for a number of severe zoonotic diseases, it is important to understand its food habits. Raccoon dog diet was studied in Estonia by examining the contents of 223 stomach samples collected during the coldest period of the year, August to March, in 2010-2012. The most frequently consumed food categories were ...

  3. Non-Invasive Gene Therapy of Experimental Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    11. Naeser P. Insulin receptors in human ocular tissues. Immunohis- tochemical demonstration in normal and diabetic eyes. Ups J Med Sci 1997; 102:35-40...Sly) GUSB NM_000181 Fabry disease GLA NM_000169 Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL1) PPT NM_000310 NCL2, late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky) CLN2...immunohistochemical demonstration in normal and diabetic eyes. Upsala J Med Sci 1997; 102: 35–40. 16. Haruta M, Kosaka M, Kanegae Y, et al. Induction of

  4. Non-Invasive Mapping of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota Identifies Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, Eliseo; Docktor, Michael; Smillie, Christopher; Weber, Sarah; Preheim, Sarah P.; Gevers, Dirk; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Ingram, Jay; Schauer, David B.; Ward, Doyle V.; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Bousvaros, Athos

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota o...

  5. Concomitant administration of a fully liquid, ready-to-use DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T hexavalent vaccine with a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Borrow, Ray; Da Costa, Xavier; Richard, Patrick; Eymin, Cécile; Boisnard, Florence; Lockhart, Stephen

    2017-01-11

    DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T or hexavalent vaccines are indicated for primary and booster vaccination of infants and toddlers against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis and invasive diseases caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). The present study evaluates the safety and immunogenicity of a ready-to-use hexavalent vaccine when co-administered with a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MenC) vaccine in infants. This was a phase III, open-label, randomised, multicentre study conducted in Finland. Healthy infants, aged 46-74days (n=350), were randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to receive DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine at two, three and four months, either with a MenC vaccine co-administered at two and four months (Group 1; n=175) or without MenC vaccine (Group 2; n=175). All infants also received routine rotavirus and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The proportion of participants with an anti-HBs concentration ⩾10mIU/mL assessed one month after the third dose of DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine was 97.5% [95%CI: 93.1-99.3] in the coadministration group and 96.1% [95%CI: 91.8-98.6] in the group without MenC vaccine. The proportion of participants with an anti-MenC SBA titre ⩾8 assessed one month after the second dose of MenC vaccine was 100% in the coadministration group. Both primary objectives were achieved. Secondary immunogenicity and safety analyses showed that co-administration of DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T and MenC vaccines did not impact the immune response to the antigens of each of the two vaccines. All vaccines were well tolerated and the safety profile of DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine was similar in both groups. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01839175; EudraCT number: 2012-005547-24. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term psychological distress, and styles of coping, in parents of children and adolescents who underwent invasive treatment for congenital cardiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerboer, Alinda W.; Helbing, Willem A.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; van Domburg, Ron T.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the level of psychological distress and styles of coping in both mothers and fathers of children who underwent invasive treatment for congenital cardiac disease at least 7 years and 6 months ago. The General Health Questionnaire and the Utrecht Coping List were completed by parents of

  7. A case report of symptomatic gallbladder disease in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis originating from invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Brinkman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Symptomatic gallbladder disease in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis secondary to invasive lobular carcinoma is an uncommon presentation to surgeons. A diagnostic laparoscopy is the preferred initial evaluation. If deemed feasible, and if the surgeon has the required experience, a laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be undertaken selectively.

  8. Progress towards non-invasive diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease in children : a prospective multicentre study to the usefulness of plasma I-FABP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, Marlou P. M.; Mubarak, A; Riedl, R G; Ten Kate, F J W; Damoiseaux, J G M C; Buurman, Wim A.; Houwen, R H J; Vreugdenhil, A C E

    2017-01-01

    This prospective study investigates whether measurement of plasma intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a sensitive marker for small intestinal epithelial damage, improves non-invasive diagnosing of celiac disease (CD), and whether I-FABP levels are useful to evaluate mucosal healing in

  9. Ultrasonography as a non-invasive tool for detection of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in overweight/obese Egyptian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koofy, Nehal; El-Karaksy, Hanaa; El-Akel, Wafaa; Helmy, Heba; Anwar, Ghada; El-Sayed, Rokaya; El-Hennawy, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Liver biopsy, although a gold standard in diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is an invasive and expensive tool. Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal ultrasound in detecting NAFLD among a group of overweight/obese children having one or more liver abnormality (clinical hepatomegaly, raised ALT or echogenic liver parenchyma by ultrasound). Methods: Seventy-eight overweight/obese children were referred to the Pediatric Hepatology Unit, Cairo University Pediatric Hospital, Egypt, for assessment for hepatic abnormalities. Out of the 78 children, 34 had one or more abnormality in the form of clinical hepatomegaly, raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and/or echogenic liver parenchyma by ultrasound. All 34 cases underwent liver biopsy for evaluation for NAFLD. Results: Histological NAFLD was detected in 15 cases; 8 simple steatosis and 7 nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Sonographic evaluation of hepatic parenchymal echogenicity revealed: 11 with grade 1 echogenicity, 12 with grade 2 and 9 with grade 3 while only 2 had normal liver echopattern. Ultrasonography was 100% sensitive and 100% specific in detecting histological NAFLD, while the positive predictive value (PPV) was 47% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 11%. After consolidating the included children into 2 groups: the first including normal and grade 1 echogenicity and the second including grades 2 and 3, the sensitivity of ultrasonography in detecting histological NAFLD was still 100%, while negative predictive value increased to 100% with an accuracy of 82%. Conclusion: We conclude that ultrasonography is an important non invasive tool in assessment for NAFLD. Normal or grade 1 hepatic echogenicity can soundly exclude histological NAFLD and obviates the need for liver biopsy.

  10. Ultrasonography as a non-invasive tool for detection of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in overweight/obese Egyptian children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Koofy, Nehal [Department of Pediatrics, Cairo University (Egypt); El-Karaksy, Hanaa, E-mail: hanaakaraksy@yahoo.com [Department of Pediatrics, Cairo University (Egypt); El-Akel, Wafaa [Tropical Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Helmy, Heba; Anwar, Ghada; El-Sayed, Rokaya [Department of Pediatrics, Cairo University (Egypt); El-Hennawy, Ahmad [Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2012-11-15

    Introduction: Liver biopsy, although a gold standard in diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is an invasive and expensive tool. Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal ultrasound in detecting NAFLD among a group of overweight/obese children having one or more liver abnormality (clinical hepatomegaly, raised ALT or echogenic liver parenchyma by ultrasound). Methods: Seventy-eight overweight/obese children were referred to the Pediatric Hepatology Unit, Cairo University Pediatric Hospital, Egypt, for assessment for hepatic abnormalities. Out of the 78 children, 34 had one or more abnormality in the form of clinical hepatomegaly, raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and/or echogenic liver parenchyma by ultrasound. All 34 cases underwent liver biopsy for evaluation for NAFLD. Results: Histological NAFLD was detected in 15 cases; 8 simple steatosis and 7 nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Sonographic evaluation of hepatic parenchymal echogenicity revealed: 11 with grade 1 echogenicity, 12 with grade 2 and 9 with grade 3 while only 2 had normal liver echopattern. Ultrasonography was 100% sensitive and 100% specific in detecting histological NAFLD, while the positive predictive value (PPV) was 47% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 11%. After consolidating the included children into 2 groups: the first including normal and grade 1 echogenicity and the second including grades 2 and 3, the sensitivity of ultrasonography in detecting histological NAFLD was still 100%, while negative predictive value increased to 100% with an accuracy of 82%. Conclusion: We conclude that ultrasonography is an important non invasive tool in assessment for NAFLD. Normal or grade 1 hepatic echogenicity can soundly exclude histological NAFLD and obviates the need for liver biopsy.

  11. Effectiveness of the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine against invasive pneumococcal disease in people 60 years or older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salsench Elisabet

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV is currently recommended in elderly and high-risk adults. However, its efficacy in preventing pneumococcal infections remains controversial. This study assessed the clinical effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD among people over 60 years. Methods Population-based case-control study that included 88 case patients over 60 years-old with a laboratory-confirmed IPD (bacteraemic pneumonia, meningitis or sepsis and 176 outpatient control subjects who were matched by primary care centre, age, sex and risk stratum. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs for vaccination were calculated using conditional logistic regression, controlling for underlying conditions. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1 - OR ×100. Results Pneumococcal vaccination rate was significantly lower in cases than in control subjects (38.6% vs 59.1%; p = 0.002. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness was 72% (OR: 0.28; 95% CI: 0.15-0.54 against all IPD and 77% (OR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.08-0.60 against vaccine-type IPD. Vaccination was significantly effective against all IPD in both age groups: 60-79 years-old (OR 0.32; 95% CI: 0.14-0.74 and people 80 years or older (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.09-0.91. Vaccination appears significantly effective as for high-risk immunocompetent subjects (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.11-0.79 as well as for immunocompromised subjects (OR: 0.12; 95% CI: 0.03-0.53. Conclusion These findings confirm the effectiveness of the 23-valent PPV against IPD, and they also support the benefit of vaccination in preventing invasive infections among high-risk and older people.

  12. Effectiveness of a group B outer membrane vesicle meningococcal vaccine against gonorrhoea in New Zealand: a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Paynter, Janine; Morgan, Jane; Saxton, Peter; McArdle, Barbara; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Black, Steven

    2017-09-30

    Gonorrhoea is a major global public health problem that is exacerbated by drug resistance. Effective vaccine development has been unsuccessful, but surveillance data suggest that outer membrane vesicle meningococcal group B vaccines affect the incidence of gonorrhoea. We assessed vaccine effectiveness of the outer membrane vesicle meningococcal B vaccine (MeNZB) against gonorrhoea in young adults aged 15-30 years in New Zealand. We did a retrospective case-control study of patients at sexual health clinics aged 15-30 years who were born between Jan 1, 1984, and Dec 31, 1998, eligible to receive MeNZB, and diagnosed with gonorrhoea or chlamydia, or both. Demographic data, sexual health clinic data, and National Immunisation Register data were linked via patients' unique personal identifier. For primary analysis, cases were confirmed by laboratory isolation or detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae only from a clinical specimen, and controls were individuals with a positive chlamydia test only. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) comparing disease outcomes in vaccinated versus unvaccinated participants via multivariable logistic regression. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated as 100×(1-OR). 11 of 24 clinics nationally provided records. There were 14 730 cases and controls for analyses: 1241 incidences of gonorrhoea, 12 487 incidences of chlamydia, and 1002 incidences of co-infection. Vaccinated individuals were significantly less likely to be cases than controls (511 [41%] vs 6424 [51%]; adjusted OR 0·69 [95% CI 0·61-0·79]; pvaccine effectiveness of MeNZB against gonorrhoea after adjustment for ethnicity, deprivation, geographical area, and sex was 31% (95% CI 21-39). Exposure to MeNZB was associated with reduced rates of gonorrhoea diagnosis, the first time a vaccine has shown any protection against gonorrhoea. These results provide a proof of principle that can inform prospective vaccine development not only for gonorrhoea but also for meningococcal vaccines. GSK

  13. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in relation to inflammation, myocardial necrosis, and the effect of an invasive strategy in unstable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernberg, Tomas; Lindahl, Bertil; Siegbahn, Agneta; Andren, Bertil; Frostfeldt, Gunnar; Lagerqvist, Bo; Stridsberg, Mats; Venge, Per; Wallentin, Lars

    2003-12-03

    We sought to examine whether measurements of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), in addition to cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), improve the ability to identify high-risk patients who benefit from an early invasive strategy. Biochemical indicators of cardiac performance (e.g., NT-proBNP), inflammation (e.g., IL-6), and myocardial damage (e.g., cTnT) predict mortality in unstable coronary artery disease (UCAD) (i.e., unstable angina or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [MI]). In these patients, an early invasive treatment strategy improves the outcome. Levels of NT-proBNP, cTnT, and IL-6 were measured in 2,019 patients with UCAD randomized to an invasive or non-invasive strategy in the FRagmin and fast revascularization during InStability in Coronary artery disease (FRISC-II) trial. Patients were followed up for two years to determine death and MI. Patients in the third NT-proBNP tertile had a 4.1-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4 to 7.2) and 3.5-fold (95% CI 1.8 to 6.8) increased mortality in the non-invasive and invasive groups, respectively. An increased NT-proBNP level was independently associated with mortality. In patients with increased levels of both NT-proBNP and IL-6, an early invasive strategy reduced mortality by 7.3% (risk ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.00). In patients with lower NT-proBNP or IL-6 levels, the mortality was not reduced. Only elevated cTnT was independently associated with future MI and a reduction of MI by means of an invasive strategy. N-terminal proBNP is independently associated with mortality. The combination of NT-proBNP and IL-6 seems to be a useful tool in the identification of patients with a definite survival benefit from an early invasive strategy. Only cTnT is independently associated with future MI and a reduction of MI by an invasive strategy.

  14. Ditection of coronary artery disease: accuracy of 64- slice computed tomography versus converntional invasive angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghizadeh M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Multislice computed tomography (MSCT is a noninvasive method of detecting coronary artery disease (CAD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of 64-slice MSCT (64-MSCT in daily practice, without patient selection. "nMethods: Sixty-four consecutive suspected CAD patients underwent both 64-MSCT and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA. The CT system The mean time span between MSCT and QCA was 7.2±3.9 days. For the 64-MSCT, detection or exclusion of CAD, defined as one or more areas of >50% stenosis within major epicardial coronary arteries, the sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV were evaluated both per patient and per segment. "nResults: Sixty-one of the 64 coronary CT angiograms (95% were of diagnostic image quality. QCA showed significant CAD in 64% (39/61 of the patients, with the other 36% (22/61 showing nonsignificant disease or no disease. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV of 64-MSCT per patient were 92%, 86%, 90%, 92% and 96%, respectively. By the per-segment analysis, 695 of 791 coronary artery segments were assessable (88%. Of these, 64-MSCT showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 92%, accuracy of 90%, PPV of 65%, and NPV of 96%, respectively, in detecting CAD. "nConclusions: Both per patient and per segment analyses for coronary 64-MSCT showed a higher diagnostic accuracy than QCA. This suggests 64-MSCT should primarily be used for risk stratification on a per patient basis as a noninvasive gate-keeper diagnostic method.

  15. Non-invasive mapping of the gastrointestinal microbiota identifies children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Eliseo; Docktor, Michael; Smillie, Christopher; Weber, Sarah; Preheim, Sarah P; Gevers, Dirk; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Ingram, Jay; Schauer, David B; Ward, Doyle V; Korzenik, Joshua R; Xavier, Ramnik J; Bousvaros, Athos; Alm, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota of children with IBD and other gastrointestinal disorders. We applied synthetic learning in microbial ecology (SLiME) analysis to 16S sequencing data obtained from i) published surveys of microbiota diversity in IBD and ii) fecal samples from 91 children and young adults who were treated in the gastroenterology program of Children's Hospital (Boston, USA). The developed method accurately distinguished control samples from those of patients with IBD; the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC) value was 0.83 (corresponding to 80.3% sensitivity and 69.7% specificity at a set threshold). The accuracy was maintained among data sets collected by different sampling and sequencing methods. The method identified taxa associated with disease states and distinguished patients with Crohn's disease from those with ulcerative colitis with reasonable accuracy. The findings were validated using samples from an additional group of 68 patients; the validation test identified patients with IBD with an AUC value of 0.84 (e.g. 92% sensitivity, 58.5% specificity). Microbiome-based diagnostics can distinguish pediatric patients with IBD from patients with similar symptoms. Although this test can not replace endoscopy and histological examination as diagnostic tools, classification based on microbial diversity is an effective complementary technique for IBD detection in pediatric patients.

  16. Non-invasive mapping of the gastrointestinal microbiota identifies children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Papa

    Full Text Available Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota of children with IBD and other gastrointestinal disorders.We applied synthetic learning in microbial ecology (SLiME analysis to 16S sequencing data obtained from i published surveys of microbiota diversity in IBD and ii fecal samples from 91 children and young adults who were treated in the gastroenterology program of Children's Hospital (Boston, USA. The developed method accurately distinguished control samples from those of patients with IBD; the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC value was 0.83 (corresponding to 80.3% sensitivity and 69.7% specificity at a set threshold. The accuracy was maintained among data sets collected by different sampling and sequencing methods. The method identified taxa associated with disease states and distinguished patients with Crohn's disease from those with ulcerative colitis with reasonable accuracy. The findings were validated using samples from an additional group of 68 patients; the validation test identified patients with IBD with an AUC value of 0.84 (e.g. 92% sensitivity, 58.5% specificity.Microbiome-based diagnostics can distinguish pediatric patients with IBD from patients with similar symptoms. Although this test can not replace endoscopy and histological examination as diagnostic tools, classification based on microbial diversity is an effective complementary technique for IBD detection in pediatric patients.

  17. A case report of symptomatic gallbladder disease in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis originating from invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David; Misra, Subhasis; Aydin, Nail

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma is the second most common type of breast cancer, responsible for 5-15 percent of all cases. Peritoneal carcinomatosis secondary to breast cancer is a rare event, frequently resulting in morbidity and mortality. Symptomatic gallbladder disease in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis originating from invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast is a very rare event and is not well covered in literature. A 44year old female patient previously diagnosed with stage IV invasive lobular carcinoma of the left breast with widespread systemic metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis presented with a three week history of right upper quadrant pain trigged by food intake only, greatly diminishing her quality of life. She had spent almost a year in a progression free disease status but was now suffering from debilitating symptomatic gallbladder disease. Despite the extent of her peritoneal carcinomatosis, she elected to undergo a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We are presenting a rare case of symptomatic gallbladder disease in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis secondary to invasive lobular carcinoma. A major concern is tumor load within nearby portal structures. Even though laparoscopic cholecystectomy could be a viable option to treat the condition, it needs to be applied selectively and very cautiously in the respective patient population. Symptomatic gallbladder disease in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis secondary to invasive lobular carcinoma is an uncommon presentation to surgeons. A diagnostic laparoscopy is the preferred initial evaluation. If deemed feasible, and if the surgeon has the required experience, a laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be undertaken selectively. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Direct costs and cost-effectiveness of dual-source computed tomography and invasive coronary angiography in patients with an intermediate pretest likelihood for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Marc; Bonaventura, Klaus; Sohns, Christian; Becker, Christoph R; Leber, Alexander W

    2012-03-01

    The study aims to determine the direct costs and comparative cost-effectiveness of latest-generation dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) and invasive coronary angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients suspected of having this disease. The study was based on a previously elaborated cohort with an intermediate pretest likelihood for CAD and on complementary clinical data. Cost calculations were based on a detailed analysis of direct costs, and generally accepted accounting principles were applied. Based on Bayes' theorem, a mathematical model was used to compare the cost-effectiveness of both diagnostic approaches. Total costs included direct costs, induced costs and costs of complications. Effectiveness was defined as the ability of a diagnostic test to accurately identify a patient with CAD. Direct costs amounted to €98.60 for DSCT and to €317.75 for invasive coronary angiography. Analysis of model calculations indicated that cost-effectiveness grew hyperbolically with increasing prevalence of CAD. Given the prevalence of CAD in the study cohort (24%), DSCT was found to be more cost-effective than invasive coronary angiography (€970 vs €1354 for one patient correctly diagnosed as having CAD). At a disease prevalence of 49%, DSCT and invasive angiography were equally effective with costs of €633. Above a threshold value of disease prevalence of 55%, proceeding directly to invasive coronary angiography was more cost-effective than DSCT. With proper patient selection and consideration of disease prevalence, DSCT coronary angiography is cost-effective for diagnosing CAD in patients with an intermediate pretest likelihood for it. However, the range of eligible patients may be smaller than previously reported.

  19. The role of pre-invasive disease in overdiagnosis: A microsimulation study comparing mass screening for breast cancer and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijt, Paula A; Rozemeijer, Kirsten; Naber, Steffie K; Heijnsdijk, Eveline Am; van Rosmalen, Joost; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; de Koning, Harry J

    2016-12-01

    Although early detection of cancer through screening can prevent cancer deaths, a drawback of screening is overdiagnosis. Overdiagnosis has been much debated in breast cancer screening, but less so in cervical cancer screening. We examined the impact of overdiagnosis by comparing two screening programmes in the Netherlands. We estimated overdiagnosis rates by microsimulation for breast cancer screening and cervical cancer screening, using a cohort of women born in 1982 with lifelong follow-up. Overdiagnosis estimates were made analogous to two definitions formed by the UK 2012 breast screening review. Pre-invasive disease was included in both definitions. Screening prevented 921 cervical cancers (-55%) and 378 cervical cancer deaths (-59%), and 169 (-1.3%) breast cancer cases and 970 breast cancer deaths (-21%). The cervical cancer overdiagnosis rate was 74.8% (including pre-invasive disease). Breast cancer overdiagnosis was estimated at 2.5% (including pre-invasive disease). For women of all ages in breast cancer screening, an excess of 207 diagnoses/100,000 women was found, compared with an excess of 3999 diagnoses/100,000 women in cervical cancer screening. For breast cancer, the frequency of overdiagnosis in screening is relatively low, but consequences are evident. For cervical cancer, the frequency of overdiagnosis in screening is high, because of detection of pre-invasive disease, but the consequences per case are relatively small due to less invasive treatment. This illustrates that it is necessary to present overdiagnosis in relation to disease stage and consequences. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Invasive assessment of renal artery atherosclerotic disease and resistant hypertension before renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribichini, Flavio; Pighi, Michele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Gambaro, Alessia; Valvo, Enrico; Lupo, Antonio; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is emerging as a new therapeutic option for patients with severe hypertension refractory to medical therapy. The presence of a renal artery stenosis may be both a cause of secondary hypertension and a contraindication to RSD if a renal artery stent is implanted; therefore, the definition of the functional importance of a renal artery stenosis in a patient with refractory hypertension is crucial. We describe the imaging and functional intravascular assessment of an angiographically severe stenosis of the renal artery in a patient with severe refractory hypertension, by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and measurement of the translesional pressure gradient with a pressure wire. Pressure wire examination excluded any severity of the stenosis, and IVUS showed the presence of a dissected plaque that resolved spontaneously after 3 months of intensive medical therapy and high-dose statin. Subsequently the patient was treated with RSD, achieving a significant effect on blood pressure control. Intravascular imaging and functional assessment of renal artery anatomy in patients with atherosclerotic disease may prove particularly suited to patients with refractory hypertension and multilevel vascular disease who are considered for endovascular therapies, either renal artery stenting or RSD.

  1. [Surveillance of Neisseria meningitidis in Argentina, 1993-2005: distribution of serogroups, serotypes and serosubtypes isolated from invasive disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiávetta, L; Chávez, E; Ruzic, A; Mollerach, M; Regueira, M

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of meningitis, bacteremia and septic shock syndrome. We herein present the distribution of serogroups, serotypes and serosubtypes of 2244 isolates of N. meningitidis from patients with meningitis or meningococcemia, received within the period 1993-2005, in the National Reference Laboratory, INEI-ANLIS "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán", from 33 Argentine hospitals that are included in a National Network devoted to for the study of bacterial meningitis. Between 1993-1995, serogroup B was prevalent (66%) whereas in the period from 1995-2001, serogroup C prevailed (65%). However, following but after that period, the prevalence of serogroup B was recovered. In the last 5 years of the studied period, the serogroups Y and W135 represented as a whole a 15.6% as a whole whereas up to the year 2000 during the first 6 years they accounted for it was of 4.7%. Higher diversity in the distribution of serotypes and serosubtypes was observed within serogroup B. The nonsubtypable isolates throughout the period of study represented the 52.8%, this high percentage demonstrates the limited capacity of the serotyping for the determination of meningococcal/meningococcus subtypes. of meningococco.

  2. Risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome after meningococcal conjugate vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velentgas, Priscilla; Amato, Anthony A; Bohn, Rhonda L; Chan, K Arnold; Cochrane, Thomas; Funch, Donnie P; Dashevsky, Inna; Duddy, April L; Gladowski, Patricia; Greenberg, Steven A; Kramer, Judith M; McMahill-Walraven, Cheryl; Nakasato, Cynthia; Spettell, Claire M; Syat, Beth L; Wahl, Peter M; Walker, Alexander M; Zhang, Fang; Brown, Jeffrey S; Platt, Richard

    2012-12-01

    A new meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) was introduced in 2005. Shortly after, case reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a serious demyelinating disease, began to be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration requested the evaluation of GBS risk after MCV4 vaccination. We conducted a study to assess the risk of GBS after MCV4 vaccination using health plan administrative and claims data together with the review of primary medical records of potential cases. Retrospective cohort study among 12.6 million 11- to 21-year-old members of five US health plans with a total membership of 50 million. Automated enrollment and medical claims data from March 2005 through August 2008 were used to identify the population, the vaccinations administered, and the medical services associated with possible GBS. Medical records were reviewed and adjudicated by a neurologist panel to confirm cases of GBS. The study used distributed data analysis methods that minimized sharing of protected health information. We confirmed 99 GBS cases during 18,322,800 person-years (5.4/1,000,000 person-years). More than 1.4 million MCV4 vaccinations were observed. No confirmed cases of GBS occurred within 6 weeks after vaccination. The upper 95% CI for the attributable risk of GBS associated with MCV4 is estimated as 1.5 cases per 1,000,000 doses. Among members of five US health plans, MCV4 vaccination was not associated with increased GBS risk. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Non-invasive brain stimulation for the treatment of brain diseases in childhood and adolescence: state of the art, current limits and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Mario Vicario

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades interest in application of non-invasive brain stimulation for enhancing neural functions is growing continuously. However, the use of such techniques in pediatric populations remains rather limited and mainly confined to the treatment of severe neurological and psychiatric diseases. In this article we provide a complete review of non-invasive brain stimulation studies conducted in pediatric populations. We also provide a brief discussion about the current limitations and future directions in a field of research still very young and full of issues to be explored.

  4. Intrauterine transfusion and non-invasive treatment options for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn - review on current management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Carolien; van Kamp, Inge; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) remains a serious pregnancy complication which can lead to severe fetal anemia, hydrops and perinatal death. Areas covered: This review focusses on the current prenatal management, treatment with intrauterine transfusion (IUT) and promising non-invasive treatment options for HDFN. Expert commentary: IUTs are the cornerstone in prenatal management of HDFN and have significantly improved perinatal outcome in the past decades. IUT is now a relatively safe procedure, however the risk of complications is still high when performed early in the second trimester. Non-invasive management using intravenous immunoglobulin may be a safe alternative and requires further investigation.

  5. An invasive vector of zoonotic disease sustained by anthropogenic resources: the raccoon dog in northern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Süld

    Full Text Available The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides is an introduced species in Europe with a continually expanding range. Since the species is capable of affecting local ecosystems and is a vector for a number of severe zoonotic diseases, it is important to understand its food habits. Raccoon dog diet was studied in Estonia by examining the contents of 223 stomach samples collected during the coldest period of the year, August to March, in 2010-2012. The most frequently consumed food categories were anthropogenic plants (e.g. cereals, fruits; FO = 56.1% and carrion (e.g. carcasses of artiodactyls and carnivores; FO = 48.4%. Carrion was also the only food category that was consumed significantly more frequently by raccoon dogs exhibiting symptoms of sarcoptic mange than by uninfected animals. Small mammals, which represent intermediate hosts for the zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, were more commonly recorded in samples also containing anthropogenic plants than expected by chance. Comparison of raccoon dog and red fox (Vulpes vulpes diet in Estonia revealed higher overlap than found elsewhere in Europe, with 'carrion' and 'anthropogenic plants' making up the bulk of both species' diet; however, raccoon dogs were more omnivorous than red foxes. Our results suggest that while the use of most food categories reflects the phenology of natural food sources, 'anthropogenic plants' and 'carrion' provide an essential resource for raccoon dogs during the coldest period of the year, with the latter resource especially important for individuals infected with sarcoptic mange. Since both of these food categories and small mammals are often found at supplementary feeding sites for wild boar (Sus scrofa, this game management practice may facilitate high densities of mesocarnivores and promote the spread of some severe zoonotic diseases, including alveolar echinococcosis, trichinellosis, rabies and sarcoptic mange.

  6. An invasive vector of zoonotic disease sustained by anthropogenic resources: the raccoon dog in northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süld, Karmen; Valdmann, Harri; Laurimaa, Leidi; Soe, Egle; Davison, John; Saarma, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an introduced species in Europe with a continually expanding range. Since the species is capable of affecting local ecosystems and is a vector for a number of severe zoonotic diseases, it is important to understand its food habits. Raccoon dog diet was studied in Estonia by examining the contents of 223 stomach samples collected during the coldest period of the year, August to March, in 2010-2012. The most frequently consumed food categories were anthropogenic plants (e.g. cereals, fruits; FO = 56.1%) and carrion (e.g. carcasses of artiodactyls and carnivores; FO = 48.4%). Carrion was also the only food category that was consumed significantly more frequently by raccoon dogs exhibiting symptoms of sarcoptic mange than by uninfected animals. Small mammals, which represent intermediate hosts for the zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, were more commonly recorded in samples also containing anthropogenic plants than expected by chance. Comparison of raccoon dog and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) diet in Estonia revealed higher overlap than found elsewhere in Europe, with 'carrion' and 'anthropogenic plants' making up the bulk of both species' diet; however, raccoon dogs were more omnivorous than red foxes. Our results suggest that while the use of most food categories reflects the phenology of natural food sources, 'anthropogenic plants' and 'carrion' provide an essential resource for raccoon dogs during the coldest period of the year, with the latter resource especially important for individuals infected with sarcoptic mange. Since both of these food categories and small mammals are often found at supplementary feeding sites for wild boar (Sus scrofa), this game management practice may facilitate high densities of mesocarnivores and promote the spread of some severe zoonotic diseases, including alveolar echinococcosis, trichinellosis, rabies and sarcoptic mange.

  7. Non-invasive management of fetal goiter during maternal treatment of hyperthyroidism in Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembet, Arda; Eroglu, Derya; Kinik, Sibel Tulgar; Gurakan, Berkan; Kuscu, Esra

    2005-01-01

    There is an increased risk of fetal goiter in patients who have a history of Grave's disease and undergo propylthiouracil (PTU) treatment during pregnancy. In this report, we describe a case of a fetal goiter detected by antenatal ultrasound at the 26th week of gestation in a mother treated with PTU for Grave's disease. A 32 x 38 x 20 mm fetal goiter was detected, each lobe measured 30 x 18 x 18 mm and estimated volume was 10 cm3. Subsequently, fetal thyroid function was assessed by umbilical fetal blood sampling. Cord blood showed elevated serum TSH (40.2 mU/l) and normal concentrations of free T4 (9.5 pmol/l) and free T3 (2.6 pmol/l). There were no other ultrasonographic signs of fetal hypothyroidism. Based on the above findings, the mother's PTU dosage was reduced to 50 mg daily from a total of 150 mg and weekly ultrasonographic examinations were performed. Six weeks after the initial ultrasound, a complete regression of the fetal goiter was noted. At the 34th week of gestation, the patient was delivered due to intrauterine growth restriction and oligohydramnios and gave birth to a male, weighing 1,920 g. The newborn thyroid was not palpable and thyroid ultrasonography was normal. Cord blood TSH was normal (8.4 mU/l) and free T4 was within lower normal limit (9.03 pmol/l). Ten days later, newborn thyroid function was normal and the baby did well afterwards. In conclusion, after the evaluation of fetal thyroid status, selected cases with fetal goiter can be initially managed without intrauterine treatment. (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Modeling the Potential for Vaccination to Diminish the Burden of Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella Disease in Young Children in Mali, West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Bornstein

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa, systematic surveillance of young children with suspected invasive bacterial disease (e.g., septicemia, meningitis has revealed non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS to be a major pathogen exhibiting high case fatality (~20%. Where infant vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and Streptococcus pneumoniae has been introduced to prevent invasive disease caused by these pathogens, as in Bamako, Mali, their burden has decreased markedly. In parallel, NTS has become the predominant invasive bacterial pathogen in children aged <5 years. While NTS is believed to be acquired orally via contaminated food/water, epidemiologic studies have failed to identify the reservoir of infection or vehicles of transmission. This has precluded targeting food chain interventions to diminish disease transmission but conversely has fostered the development of vaccines to prevent invasive NTS (iNTS disease. We developed a mathematical model to estimate the potential impact of NTS vaccination programs in Bamako.A Markov chain transmission model was developed utilizing age-specific Bamako demographic data and hospital surveillance data for iNTS disease in children aged <5 years and assuming vaccine coverage and efficacy similar to the existing, successfully implemented, Hib vaccine. Annual iNTS hospitalizations and deaths in children <5 years, with and without a Salmonella Enteritidis/Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine, were the model's outcomes of interest. Per the model, high coverage/high efficacy iNTS vaccination programs would drastically diminish iNTS disease except among infants age <8 weeks.The public health impact of NTS vaccination shifts as disease burden, vaccine coverage, and serovar distribution vary. Our model shows that implementing an iNTS vaccine through an analogous strategy to the Hib vaccination program in Bamako would markedly reduce cases and deaths due to iNTS among the pediatric population. The model can be adjusted for

  9. Deeply invasive candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Rex, J.H.; Bennett, J.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of invasive candidiasis is on the rise because of increasing numbers of immunocompromised hosts and more invasive medical technology. Recovery of Candida spp from several body sites in a critically ill or immunocompromised patient should raise the question of disseminated disease.

  10. About the non-invasive nuclearmedical assessment of the left ventricular function in coronary heart disease - a comparison with right heart catheterization by floating catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, P.

    1985-09-15

    In this paper there has been analysed the diagnostic value of the parameters of the diastolic function (Peak Filling Rate, PFR and Time to Peak Filling Rate, TPFR) which are not to be covered by invasive methods. To this examination we applied a recently discovered nuclearmedical method: we used the Nuclear Stethoscope and with it were able to investigate not only the systolic function (Ejection Fraction) but also the diastolic function (PFR, TPFR). In addition to this we undertook a floating catheter during exercise for the critical examination of the left ventricle. The examined patients consisted of 28 patients, suffering from Coronary Heart Disease, the majority of them after myocardial infarction. In patients suffering from CHD there may be found relations between the nuclearmedical parameters of the diastolic function and the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure as far as in all patients who showed a functional disturbance with the aids of invasive methods this could also be proved non-invasively. (Author).

  11. About the non-invasive nuclearmedical assessment of the left ventricular function in coronary heart disease - a comparison with right heart catheterization by floating catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, P.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper there has been analysed the diagnostic value of the parameters of the diastolic function (Peak Filling Rate, PFR and Time to Peak Filling Rate, TPFR) which are not to be covered by invasive methods. To this examination we applied a recently discovered nuclearmedical method: we used the Nuclear Stethoscope and with it were able to investigate not only the systolic function (Ejection Fraction) but also the diastolic function (PFR, TPFR). In addition to this we undertook a floating catheter during exercise for the critical examination of the left ventricle. The examined patients consisted of 28 patients, suffering from Coronary Heart Disease, the majority of them after myocardial infarction. In patients suffering from CHD there may be found relations between the nuclearmedical parameters of the diastolic function and the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure as far as in all patients who showed a functional disturbance with the aids of invasive methods this could also be proved non-invasively. (Author)

  12. A randomized study to assess the immunogenicity, antibody persistence and safety of a tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in children aged 2–10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forstén, Aino; Boutriau, Dominique; Bianco, Véronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Incidence of meningococcal diseases is high in children, and effective vaccines are needed for this age group. In this phase II, open, controlled study, 309 children aged 2–10 y from Finland were randomized (3:1) into two parallel groups to receive one dose of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT group; n = 231) or a licensed meningococcal ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS group; n = 78). Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was evaluated up to three years post-vaccination. Exploratory comparisons suggested that rSBA vaccine response rates and geometric mean titers (GMTs) for each serogroup at one month post-vaccination and rSBA GMTs for serogroups A, W-135 and Y up to three years post-vaccination were higher in the ACWY-TT compared with Men-PS group, but did not detect any difference between groups in terms of rSBA-MenC GMTs at three years post-vaccination; this is explained by the higher proportion of children from the Men-PS group who were excluded because they were re-vaccinated with a monovalent meningococcal serogroup C vaccine due to loss of protective antibody levels against this serogroup. Although there was a higher incidence of local reactogenicity in the ACWY-TT group, general and unsolicited symptoms reporting rates were comparable in both groups. This study showed that MenACWY-TT was immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in children aged 2–10 y. MenACWY-TT induced higher functional antibody titers for all serogroups, which persisted longer for serogroups A, W-135 and Y, than the MenACWY polysaccharide vaccine. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00427908. PMID:23032168

  13. Primary extramammary invasive Paget’s vulvar disease: what is the standard, what are the challenges and what is the future for radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolia, Maria; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Sofoudis, Chrisostomos; Giaginis, Constantinos; Spyropoulou, Despoina; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Kouloulias, Vasileios; Kyrgias, George

    2016-01-01

    Primary invasive Extramammary Paget’s vulvar disease is a rare tumor that is challenging to control. Wide surgical excision represents the standard treatment approach for Primary invasive Extramammary Paget’s vulvar disease. The goal of the current study was to analyze the appropriate indications of radiotherapy in Primary invasive Extramammary Paget's vulvar disease because they are still controversial. We searched the Cochrane Gynecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE database up to September 2015. Radiotherapy was delivered as a treatment in various settings: i) Radical in 28 cases (range: 60–63 Gy), ii) Adjuvant in 25 cases (range: 39–60 Gy), iii) Salvage in recurrence of 3 patients (63 Gy) and iv) Neoadjuvant in one patient (43.3 Gy). A radiotherapy field that covered the gross tumor site with a 2–5 cm margin for the microscopic disease has been used. Radiotherapy of the inguinal, pelvic or para-aortic lymph node should be considered only for the cases with lymph node metastases within these areas. Radiotherapy alone is an alternative therapeutic approach for patients with extensive inoperable disease or medical contraindications. Definitive radiotherapy can be used in elderly patients and/or with medical contraindications. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be considered in presence of risk factors associated with local recurrence as dermal invasion, lymph node metastasis, close or positive surgical margins, perineal, large tumor diameter, multifocal lesions, extensive disease, coexisting histology of adenocarcinoma or vulvar carcinoma, high Ki-67 expression, adnexal involvement and probably in overexpression of HER-2/neu. Salvage radiotherapy can be given in inoperable loco-regional recurrence and to those who refused additional surgery

  14. Expert risk perceptions and the social amplification of risk: A case study in invasive tree pests and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Julie; Potter, Clive; Barnett, Julie; Fellenor, John; Mumford, John; Quine, Christopher P

    2017-11-01

    The Social Amplification of Risk Framework (SARF) is often used as a conceptual tool for studying diverse risk perceptions associated with environmental hazards. While widely applied, it has been criticised for implying that it is possible to define a benchmark 'real' risk that is determined by experts and around which public risk perceptions can subsequently become amplified. It has been argued that this objectification of risk is particularly problematic when there are high levels of scientific uncertainty and a lack of expert consensus about the nature of a risk and its impacts. In order to explore this further, this paper examines how 'experts' - defined in this case as scientists, policy makers, outbreak managers and key stakeholders - construct and assemble their understanding of the risks associated with two invasive tree pest and disease outbreaks in the UK, ash dieback and oak processionary moth. Through semi-structured interviews with experts in each of the case study outbreaks, the paper aims to better understand the nature of information sources drawn on to construct perceptions of tree health risks, especially when uncertainty is prevalent. A key conclusion is that risk assessment is a socially-mediated, relational and incremental process with experts drawing on a range of official, anecdotal and experiential sources of information, as well as reference to past events in order to assemble the risk case. Aligned with this, experts make attributions about public concern, especially when the evidence base is incomplete and there is a need to justify policy and management actions and safeguard reputation.

  15. Experience of long-term use of non-invasive ventilation in motor neuron disease: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hikari; Chakrabarti, Biswajit; Angus, Robert M; Cousins, Rosanna; Thornton, Everard W; Young, Carolyn A

    2014-03-01

    Although non-invasive ventilation (NIV) can promote quality of life in motor neuron disease (MND), previous studies have disregarded the impact of progression of illness. This study explored how patients' perceptions of NIV treatment evolve over time and how this was reflected in their adherence to NIV. Five patients with MND (male=4, mean age=59 years), from a bigger cohort who were prospectively followed, had multiple post-NIV semistructured interviews, covering more than 12 months, along with ventilator interaction data. The transcribed phenomenological data were analysed using qualitative methodology. Three themes emerged: experience of NIV, influence on attitudes and perceived impact of NIV on prognosis. The ventilator interaction data identified regular use of NIV by four participants who each gave positive account of their experience of NIV treatment, and irregular use by one participant who at interview revealed a negative attitude to NIV treatment and in whom MND induced feelings of hopelessness. This exploratory study suggests that a positive coping style, adaptation and hope are key factors for psychological well-being and better adherence to NIV. More studies are needed to determine these relationships.

  16. Label-free SPR detection of gluten peptides in urine for non-invasive celiac disease follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Moreno, Maria de Lourdes; Cebolla, Angel; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-05-15

    Motivated by the necessity of new and efficient methods for dietary gluten control of celiac patients, we have developed a simple and highly sensitive SPR biosensor for the detection of gluten peptides in urine. The sensing methodology enables rapid and label-free quantification of the gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) by using G12 mAb. The overall performance of the biosensor has been in-depth optimized and evaluated in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility, reaching a limit of detection of 0.33 ng mL(-1). Besides, the robustness and stability of the methodology permit the continuous use of the biosensor for more than 100 cycles with excellent repeatability. Special efforts have been focused on preventing and minimizing possible interferences coming from urine matrix enabling a direct analysis in this fluid without requiring extraction or purification procedures. Our SPR biosensor has proven to detect and identify gluten consumption by evaluating urine samples from healthy and celiac individuals with different dietary gluten conditions. This novel biosensor methodology represents a novel approach to quantify the digested gluten peptides in human urine with outstanding sensitivity in a rapid and non-invasive manner. Our technique should be considered as a promising opportunity to develop Point-of-Care (POC) devices for an efficient, simple and accurate gluten free diet (GFD) monitoring as well as therapy follow-up of celiac disease patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-invasive Investigations for the Diagnosis of Fontan-Associated Liver Disease in Pediatric and Adult Fontan Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amyna Fidai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fontan-associated liver disease (FALD is a serious complication related to the chronically elevated venous pressure and low cardiac output of this abnormal circulation. However, diagnostic markers for this condition are limited. We hypothesized that specific tests for fibrosis developed for other chronic liver diseases would identify a higher prevalence of FALD than ultrasound and standard laboratory tests and that identified abnormalities would correlate with time post-Fontan. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed 19 children (average age 8.4 ± 4.3 and 5.4 ± 4.1 years post-Fontan and 8 adults (average age 31.5 ± 8.9 and 21.1 ± 4 years post-Fontan using standard serum laboratory investigations assessing hepatic integrity and function, the FibroTest, liver ultrasound, and transient elastography (FibroScan. In adult Fontan patients, hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase were significantly increased, and white blood cell and platelet counts were significantly decreased in comparison to the pediatric cohort. International normalized ratio was mildly elevated in both children and adults. FibroTest results were suggestive of fibrosis regardless of time post-Fontan. FibroScan measurements were significantly correlated with time post-Fontan, but the incidence of ultrasound-detected liver abnormalities was variable. No cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were identified. Abnormalities suggestive of FALD occur in both children and adults post-Fontan. Select laboratory tests, and possibly ultrasound and FibroScan in some patients, appear to have the most promise for the non-invasive detection of FALD.

  18. Haemophilus responses to nutritional immunity: epigenetic and morphological contribution to biofilm architecture, invasion, persistence and disease severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake R Szelestey

    Full Text Available In an effort to suppress microbial outgrowth, the host sequesters essential nutrients in a process termed nutritional immunity. However, inflammatory responses to bacterial insult can restore nutritional resources. Given that nutrient availability modulates virulence factor production and biofilm formation by other bacterial species, we hypothesized that fluctuations in heme-iron availability, particularly at privileged sites, would similarly influence Haemophilus biofilm formation and pathogenesis. Thus, we cultured Haemophilus through sequential heme-iron deplete and heme-iron replete media to determine the effect of transient depletion of internal stores of heme-iron on multiple pathogenic phenotypes. We observed that prior heme-iron restriction potentiates biofilm changes for at least 72 hours that include increased peak height and architectural complexity as compared to biofilms initiated from heme-iron replete bacteria, suggesting a mechanism for epigenetic responses that participate in the changes observed. Additionally, in a co-infection model for human otitis media, heme-iron restricted Haemophilus, although accounting for only 10% of the inoculum (90% heme-iron replete, represented up to 99% of the organisms recovered at 4 days. These data indicate that fluctuations in heme-iron availability promote a survival advantage during disease. Filamentation mediated by a SulA-related ortholog was required for optimal biofilm peak height and persistence during experimental otitis media. Moreover, severity of disease in response to heme-iron restricted Haemophilus was reduced as evidenced by lack of mucosal destruction, decreased erythema, hemorrhagic foci and vasodilatation. Transient restriction of heme-iron also promoted productive invasion events leading to the development of intracellular bacterial communities. Taken together, these data suggest that nutritional immunity, may, in fact, foster long-term phenotypic changes that better equip

  19. A Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Incorporating Genetically Attenuated Endotoxin Dissociates Inflammation From Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Dowling

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Group B Neisseria meningitidis, an endotoxin-producing gram-negative bacterium, causes the highest incidence of group B meningococcus (MenB disease in the first year of life. The Bexsero vaccine is indicated in Europe from 8 weeks of age. Endotoxin components of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs or soluble lipopolysaccharide (LPS represent a potential source of inflammation and residual reactogenicity. The purpose of this study was to compare novel candidate MenB vaccine formulations with licensed vaccines, including Bexsero, using age-specific in vitro culture systems.Methods. OMVs from wild type and inactivated lpxL1 gene mutant N. meningitidis strains were characterized in human neonatal and adult in vitro whole blood assays and dendritic cell arrays. OMVs were benchmarked against licensed vaccines, including Bexsero and whole cell pertussis formulations, with respect to Th-polarizing cytokine and PGE2 production, as well as cell surface activation markers (HLA-DR, CD86, CCR7. OMV immunogenicity was assessed in mice.Results. ΔlpxLI native OMVs demonstrated significantly less cytokine induction in human blood and DCs than Bexsero and most of the other pediatric vaccines (e.g., PedvaxHib, EasyFive, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG tested. Despite a much lower inflammatory profile in vitro than Bexsero, ΔlpxLI native OMVs still had moderate DC maturing ability and induced robust anti-N. meningitidis antibody responses after murine immunization.Conclusions. A meningococcal vaccine comprised of attenuated LPS-based OMVs with a limited inflammatory profile in vitro induces robust antigen-specific immunogenicity in vivo.

  20. Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella Infections in Asia: Clinical Observations, Disease Outcome and Dominant Serovars from an Infectious Disease Hospital in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Phu Huong Lan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS infections are now a well-described cause of morbidity and mortality in children and HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. In contrast, the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of iNTS disease in Asia are not well documented. We retrospectively identified >100 cases of iNTS infections in an infectious disease hospital in Southern Vietnam between 2008 and 2013. Clinical records were accessed to evaluate demographic and clinical factors associated with iNTS infection and to identify risk factors associated with death. Multi-locus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all organisms. Of 102 iNTS patients, 71% were HIV-infected, >90% were adults, 71% were male and 33% reported intravenous drug use. Twenty-six/92 (28% patients with a known outcome died; HIV infection was significantly associated with death (p = 0.039. S. Enteritidis (Sequence Types (ST11 (48%, 43/89 and S. Typhimurium (ST19, 34 and 1544 (26%, 23/89 were the most commonly identified serovars; S. Typhimurium was significantly more common in HIV-infected individuals (p = 0.003. Isolates from HIV-infected patients were more likely to exhibit reduced susceptibility against trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than HIV-negative patients (p = 0.037. We conclude that iNTS disease is a severe infection in Vietnam with a high mortality rate. As in sub-Saharan Africa, HIV infection was a risk factor for death, with the majority of the burden in this population found in HIV-infected adult men.

  1. Disease Burden of 32 Infectious Diseases in the Netherlands, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Alies; McDonald, Scott A; Bouwknegt, Martijn; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E; Havelaar, Arie H; Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Wallinga, Jacco; de Melker, Hester E

    2016-01-01

    Infectious disease burden estimates provided by a composite health measure give a balanced view of the true impact of a disease on a population, allowing the relative impact of diseases that differ in severity and mortality to be monitored over time. This article presents the first national disease burden estimates for a comprehensive set of 32 infectious diseases in the Netherlands. The average annual disease burden was computed for the period 2007-2011 for selected infectious diseases in the Netherlands using the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) measure. The pathogen- and incidence-based approach was adopted to quantify the burden due to both morbidity and premature mortality associated with all short and long-term consequences of infection. Natural history models, disease progression probabilities, disability weights, and other parameters were adapted from previous research. Annual incidence was obtained from statutory notification and other surveillance systems, which was corrected for under-ascertainment and under-reporting. The highest average annual disease burden was estimated for invasive pneumococcal disease (9444 DALYs/year; 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 8911-9961) and influenza (8670 DALYs/year; 95% UI: 8468-8874), which represents 16% and 15% of the total burden of all 32 diseases, respectively. The remaining 30 diseases ranked by number of DALYs/year from high to low were: HIV infection, legionellosis, toxoplasmosis, chlamydia, campylobacteriosis, pertussis, tuberculosis, hepatitis C infection, Q fever, norovirus infection, salmonellosis, gonorrhoea, invasive meningococcal disease, hepatitis B infection, invasive Haemophilus influenzae infection, shigellosis, listeriosis, giardiasis, hepatitis A infection, infection with STEC O157, measles, cryptosporidiosis, syphilis, rabies, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tetanus, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, and poliomyelitis. The very low burden for the latter five diseases can be attributed to the

  2. Disease Burden of 32 Infectious Diseases in the Netherlands, 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwknegt, Martijn; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E.; Mangen, Marie-Josée J.; Wallinga, Jacco; de Melker, Hester E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infectious disease burden estimates provided by a composite health measure give a balanced view of the true impact of a disease on a population, allowing the relative impact of diseases that differ in severity and mortality to be monitored over time. This article presents the first national disease burden estimates for a comprehensive set of 32 infectious diseases in the Netherlands. Methods and Findings The average annual disease burden was computed for the period 2007–2011 for selected infectious diseases in the Netherlands using the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) measure. The pathogen- and incidence-based approach was adopted to quantify the burden due to both morbidity and premature mortality associated with all short and long-term consequences of infection. Natural history models, disease progression probabilities, disability weights, and other parameters were adapted from previous research. Annual incidence was obtained from statutory notification and other surveillance systems, which was corrected for under-ascertainment and under-reporting. The highest average annual disease burden was estimated for invasive pneumococcal disease (9444 DALYs/year; 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 8911–9961) and influenza (8670 DALYs/year; 95% UI: 8468–8874), which represents 16% and 15% of the total burden of all 32 diseases, respectively. The remaining 30 diseases ranked by number of DALYs/year from high to low were: HIV infection, legionellosis, toxoplasmosis, chlamydia, campylobacteriosis, pertussis, tuberculosis, hepatitis C infection, Q fever, norovirus infection, salmonellosis, gonorrhoea, invasive meningococcal disease, hepatitis B infection, invasive Haemophilus influenzae infection, shigellosis, listeriosis, giardiasis, hepatitis A infection, infection with STEC O157, measles, cryptosporidiosis, syphilis, rabies, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tetanus, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, and poliomyelitis. The very low burden for the latter five

  3. Disease Burden of 32 Infectious Diseases in the Netherlands, 2007-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alies van Lier

    Full Text Available Infectious disease burden estimates provided by a composite health measure give a balanced view of the true impact of a disease on a population, allowing the relative impact of diseases that differ in severity and mortality to be monitored over time. This article presents the first national disease burden estimates for a comprehensive set of 32 infectious diseases in the Netherlands.The average annual disease burden was computed for the period 2007-2011 for selected infectious diseases in the Netherlands using the disability-adjusted life years (DALY measure. The pathogen- and incidence-based approach was adopted to quantify the burden due to both morbidity and premature mortality associated with all short and long-term consequences of infection. Natural history models, disease progression probabilities, disability weights, and other parameters were adapted from previous research. Annual incidence was obtained from statutory notification and other surveillance systems, which was corrected for under-ascertainment and under-reporting. The highest average annual disease burden was estimated for invasive pneumococcal disease (9444 DALYs/year; 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 8911-9961 and influenza (8670 DALYs/year; 95% UI: 8468-8874, which represents 16% and 15% of the total burden of all 32 diseases, respectively. The remaining 30 diseases ranked by number of DALYs/year from high to low were: HIV infection, legionellosis, toxoplasmosis, chlamydia, campylobacteriosis, pertussis, tuberculosis, hepatitis C infection, Q fever, norovirus infection, salmonellosis, gonorrhoea, invasive meningococcal disease, hepatitis B infection, invasive Haemophilus influenzae infection, shigellosis, listeriosis, giardiasis, hepatitis A infection, infection with STEC O157, measles, cryptosporidiosis, syphilis, rabies, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tetanus, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, and poliomyelitis. The very low burden for the latter five diseases can be

  4. Invasive pneumococcal disease in healthy adults: increase of empyema associated with the clonal-type Sweden(1-ST306.

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    Imma Grau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD occurs mainly in the elderly and patients with co-morbidities. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, serotypes and genotypes causing IPD in healthy adults. METHODS: We studied 745 culture-proven cases of IPD in adult patients aged 18-64 years (1996-2010. Patients were included in two groups: 1. adults with co-morbidities, and 2. healthy adults, who had no prior or coincident diagnosis of a chronic or immunosuppressive underlying disease. Microbiological studies included pneumococcal serotyping and genotyping. RESULTS: Of 745 IPD episodes, 525 (70% occurred in patients with co-morbidities and 220 (30% in healthy adults. The healthy adults with IPD were often smokers (56% or alcohol abusers (18%. As compared to patients with co-morbidities, the healthy adults had (P<0.05: younger age (43.5+/-13.1 vs. 48.7+/-11.3 years; higher proportions of women (45% vs. 24%, pneumonia with empyema (15% vs. 7% and infection with non-PCV7 serotypes including serotypes 1 (25% vs. 5%, 7F (13% vs. 4%, and 5 (7% vs. 2%; and lower mortality (5% vs. 20%. Empyema was more frequently caused by serotype 1. No death occurred among 79 patients with serotype 1 IPD. There was an emergence of virulent clonal-types Sweden(1-ST306 and Netherlands(7F-ST191. The vaccine serotype coverage with the PCV13 was higher in healthy adults than in patients with co-morbidities: 82% and 56%, respectively, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: In this clinical study, one-third of adults with IPD had no underlying chronic or immunosuppressive diseases (healthy adults. They were often smokers and alcohol abusers, and frequently presents with pneumonia and empyema caused by virulent clones of non-PCV7 serotypes such as the Sweden(1-ST306. Thus, implementing tobacco and alcohol abuse-cessation measures and a proper pneumococcal vaccination, such as PCV13 policy, in active smokers and alcohol abusers may diminish the burden of IPD in adults.

  5. Safety and Immunogenicity Testing of an Intranasal Group B Meningococcal Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine in Healthy Volunteers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drabick, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An intranasal vaccine composed of native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) not exposed to detergent or denaturing agents was prepared from the group B meningococcal strain and tested in 32 healthy adult volunteers...

  6. Invasive potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto ospC type L strains increases the possible disease risk to humans in the regions of their distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Golovchenko, Maryna; Šíma, Radek; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Grubhoffer, Libor; Oliver, J. H., Jr.; Rudenko, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, NOV 28 2014 (2014), s. 538 ISSN 1756-3305 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-27630P; GA ČR GP13-12816P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : B. burgdorferi ospC type * Invasive potential * Lyme disease * Southeastern U.S.A. * Tick vector * Vertebrate host Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.430, year: 2014

  7. Non-invasive evaluation of cystic fibrosis related liver disease in adults with ARFI, transient elastography and different fibrosis scores.

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    Thomas Karlas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease (CFLD is present in up to 30% of cystic fibrosis patients and can result in progressive liver failure. Diagnosis of CFLD is challenging. Non-invasive methods for staging of liver fibrosis display an interesting diagnostic approach for CFLD detection. AIM: We evaluated transient elastography (TE, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI, and fibrosis indices for CFLD detection. METHODS: TE and ARFI were performed in 55 adult CF patients. In addition, AST/Platelets-Ratio-Index (APRI, and Forns' score were calculated. Healthy probands and patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis served as controls. RESULTS: Fourteen CF patients met CFLD criteria, six had liver cirrhosis. Elastography acquisition was successful in >89% of cases. Non-cirrhotic CFLD individuals showed elastography values similar to CF patients without liver involvement. Cases with liver cirrhosis differed significantly from other CFLD patients (ARFI: 1.49 vs. 1.13 m/s; p = 0.031; TE: 7.95 vs. 4.16 kPa; p = 0.020 and had significantly lower results than individuals with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ARFI: 1.49 vs. 2.99 m/s; p = 0.002. APRI showed the best diagnostic performance for CFLD detection (AUROC 0.815; sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 70.7%. CONCLUSIONS: ARFI, TE, and laboratory based fibrosis indices correlate with each other and reliably detect CFLD related liver cirrhosis in adult CF patients. CF specific cut-off values for cirrhosis in adults are lower than in alcoholic cirrhosis.

  8. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Cystic Fibrosis Related Liver Disease in Adults with ARFI, Transient Elastography and Different Fibrosis Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmanns, Annett; Güttler, Andrea; Petroff, David; Wirtz, Hubert; Mainz, Jochen G.; Mössner, Joachim; Berg, Thomas; Tröltzsch, Michael; Keim, Volker; Wiegand, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease (CFLD) is present in up to 30% of cystic fibrosis patients and can result in progressive liver failure. Diagnosis of CFLD is challenging. Non-invasive methods for staging of liver fibrosis display an interesting diagnostic approach for CFLD detection. Aim We evaluated transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI), and fibrosis indices for CFLD detection. Methods TE and ARFI were performed in 55 adult CF patients. In addition, AST/Platelets-Ratio-Index (APRI), and Forns' score were calculated. Healthy probands and patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis served as controls. Results Fourteen CF patients met CFLD criteria, six had liver cirrhosis. Elastography acquisition was successful in >89% of cases. Non-cirrhotic CFLD individuals showed elastography values similar to CF patients without liver involvement. Cases with liver cirrhosis differed significantly from other CFLD patients (ARFI: 1.49 vs. 1.13 m/s; p = 0.031; TE: 7.95 vs. 4.16 kPa; p = 0.020) and had significantly lower results than individuals with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ARFI: 1.49 vs. 2.99 m/s; p = 0.002). APRI showed the best diagnostic performance for CFLD detection (AUROC 0.815; sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 70.7%). Conclusions ARFI, TE, and laboratory based fibrosis indices correlate with each other and reliably detect CFLD related liver cirrhosis in adult CF patients. CF specific cut-off values for cirrhosis in adults are lower than in alcoholic cirrhosis. PMID:22848732

  9. Paediatric invasive pneumococcal disease on the island of Gran Canaria: 16-year prospective study (2001-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Hernández, Milagrosa; Aguiar-Santana, Ione Ahedey; Artiles Campelo, Fernando; Colino Gil, Elena

    2017-11-24

    To calculate the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the paediatric population of Gran Canaria (Spain), its clinical and epidemiological characteristics, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance, and variations in these variables before and after the introduction of the PCV13 vaccine. Prospective hospital-based study including all patients (190) aged 0-14 years admitted with confirmed IPD between January 2001-May 2010 (152 cases) and June 2010-December 2016 (38 cases). Patients were divided into 3 age groups (5 years). Clinical symptoms were mutually-exclusively classified as meningitis, bacteraemic pneumonia, pleural effusion (PE), empyema or bacteraemia without a focus. Most cases occurred in boys (59.47%), during autumn-winter (65.79%), in children aged <2 years (55.79%) and with mean age increasing from the pre-PCV13 to the post-PCV13 period (2.5 vs 3.1 years). Incidence between periods reduced by 66.4% (p<0.001): from 13.1/100,000 to 4.4/100,000. PEs (3.9% vs 18.4%, p<0.005) and empyemas (1.5% vs 16.7%, p=NS) increased in the post-PCV13 period whereas all other symptoms decreased, although this was not statistically significant. Vaccine serotypes (77% vs 40.6%, p=0.000), particularly serotypes 19A (23.9% vs 12.5%) and 14 (14.2% vs 9.4%), as well as erythromycin resistance (57.2% vs 7.9%, p=0.000) decreased in the post-PCV13 period. IPD incidence, vaccine serotypes and erythromycin resistance decreased in the post-PCV13 period whereas PEs increased. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. Economic Comparison of an Empirical Versus Diagnostic-Driven Strategy for Treating Invasive Fungal Disease in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rosemary; Earnshaw, Stephanie; Herbrecht, Raoul; Morrissey, Orla; Slavin, Monica; Bow, Eric; McDade, Cheryl; Charbonneau, Claudie; Weinstein, David; Kantecki, Michal; Schlamm, Haran; Maertens, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Patients with persistent or recurrent neutropenic fevers at risk of invasive fungal disease (IFD) are treated empirically with antifungal therapy (AFT). Early treatment using a diagnostic-driven (DD) strategy may reduce clinical and economic burdens. We compared costs and outcomes of both strategies from a UK perspective. An empirical strategy with conventional amphotericin B deoxycholate (C-AmB), liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB), or caspofungin was compared with a DD strategy (initiated based on positive ELISA results for galactomannan antigen) and/or positive results for Aspergillus species on polymerase chain reaction assay) using C-AmB, voriconazole, or L-AmB in a decision-analytic model. Rates of IFD incidence, overall mortality, and IFD-related mortality in adults expected to be neutropenic for ≥10 days were obtained. The empirical strategy was assumed to identify 30% of IFD and targeted AFT to improve survival by a hazard ratio of 0.589. AFT-specific adverse events were obtained from a summary of product characteristics. Resource use was obtained, and costs were estimated by using standard UK costing sources. All costs are presented in 2012 British pounds sterling. Total costs were 32% lower for the DD strategy (£1561.29) versus the empirical strategy (£2301.93) due to a reduced incidence of adverse events and decreased use of AFT. Administration of AFT was reduced by 41% (DD strategy, 74 of 1000; empirical strategy, 125 of 1000), with similar survival rates. This study suggests that a DD strategy is likely to be cost-saving versus empirical treatment for immunocompromised patients with persistent or recurrent neutropenic fevers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Determinants of accepting non-invasive ventilation treatment in motor neurone disease: a quantitative analysis at point of need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Rosanna; Ando, Hikari; Thornton, Everard; Chakrabarti, Biswajit; Angus, Robert; Young, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Objectives : Motor neurone disease (MND) progressively damages the nervous system causing wasting to muscles, including those used for breathing. There is robust evidence that non-invasive ventilation (NIV) relieves respiratory symptoms and improves quality of life in MND. Nevertheless, about a third of those who would benefit from NIV decline the treatment. The purpose of the study was to understand this phenomenon. Design : A cross-sectional quantitative analysis. Methods : Data including age, sex, MND symptomatology, general physical and mental health and psychological measures were collected from 27 patients and their family caregivers at the point of being offered ventilatory support based on physiological markers. Results : Quantitative analyses indicated no difference in patient characteristics or symptomatology between those who tolerated ( n  = 17) and those who declined ( n  = 10) NIV treatment. A comparison of family caregivers found no differences in physical or mental health or in caregiving distress, emphasising that this was high in both groups; however, family caregivers supporting NIV treatment were significantly more resilient, less neurotic and less anxious than family caregivers who did not. Regression analyses, forcing MND symptoms to enter the equation first, found caregiver resilience:commitment the strongest predictor of uptake of NIV treatment adding 22% to the 56% explained variance. Conclusion : Patients who tolerated NIV treatment had family caregivers who cope through finding meaning and purpose in their situation. Psychological support and proactive involvement for family caregivers in the management of the illness situation is indicated if acceptance of NIV treatment is to be maximised in MND.

  12. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedibone M Ndlangisa

    Full Text Available We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60% from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ≥5 years was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%], some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]. In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively. Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12 and 64% (9/14 of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of emergent Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 22F causing invasive pneumococcal disease using whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H B Demczuk

    Full Text Available Since implementation of the 13-valent polyvalent conjugate vaccine (PCV13 in Canada during 2010, the proportion of PCV13 serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has declined from 55% (n = 1492 in 2010 to 31% (n = 764 in 2014. A concurrent increase of non-PCV13 serotypes has occurred and 22F has become the most prevalent serotype in Canada increasing from 7% (n = 183 to 11% (n = 283. Core single nucleotide variant phylogenetic analysis was performed on 137 Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 22F isolates collected across Canada from 2005-2015. Six phylogenetic lineages (n = 117 were identified among a serotype 22F/ST433 clonal complex (CC, including a recently expanding erythromycin-resistant clone. Erythromycin-resistance was observed in 25 isolates possessing ermB, mef or a 23S rRNA A2061G point mutation; 2 penicillin-resistant isolates had recombinant pbp1a, pbp2a and/or pbp2x; 3 tetracycline-resistant isolates contained tetM; and 1 isolate was multidrug-resistant. Virulence factor analysis indicated a high level of homogeneity among the 22F/ST433 clonal complex strains. A group of 6 phylogenetic outlier strains had differing MLST, antimicrobial resistance and molecular profiles suggestive of capsule switching events. While capsule switch events among S. pneumoniae serotype 22F has been observed, increasing prevalence of S. pneumoniae serotype 22F can be attributed to an evolving homogenous clone expanding nationally through local transmission events.

  14. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis using two-dimensional shear wave elastography in patients with autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Huang, Ze-Ping; Zheng, Jian; Wu, Tao; Zheng, Rong-Qin

    2017-07-14

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE) for the non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) using liver biopsy as the reference standard. Patients with AILD who underwent liver biopsy and 2D-SWE were consecutively enrolled. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to assess the overall accuracy and to identify optimal cut-off values. The characteristics of the diagnostic performance were determined for 114 patients with AILD. The areas under the ROC curves for significant fibrosis, severe fibrosis, and cirrhosis were 0.85, 0.85, and 0.86, respectively, and the optimal cut-off values associated with significant fibrosis (≥ F2), severe fibrosis (≥ F3), and cirrhosis (F4) were 9.7 kPa, 13.2 kPa and 16.3 kPa, respectively. 2D-SWE showed sensitivity values of 81.7% for significant fibrosis, 83.0% for severe fibrosis, and 87.0% for cirrhosis, and the respective specificity values were 81.3%, 74.6%, and 80.2%. The overall concordance rate of the liver stiffness measurements obtained using 2D-SWE vs fibrosis stages was 53.5%. 2D-SWE showed promising diagnostic performance for assessing liver fibrosis stages and exhibited high cut-off values in patients with AILD. Low overall concordance rate was observed in the liver stiffness measurements obtained using 2D-SWE vs fibrosis stages.

  15. [Emergence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes in the era of the 7-valent conjugate vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, F; Navarro Gómez, M L; Saavedra Lozano, J; Santos Sebastián, M M; Rodríguez Fernández, R; González Sanchéz, M; Cercenado Mansilla, E; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T

    2014-03-01

    There has been an increased incidence in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) produced by non-vaccine serotype (NVS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae after the introduction of PCV7. Our objective was to describe the epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics of IPD caused by NVS in a tertiary hospital in Madrid. Retrospective (1998-2004) and prospective (2005-2009) study evaluating IPD caused by NVS in children. The study was divided into three periods: P1 (1998-2001) when PCV7 was not commercialized; P2 (2002-2005) with 40% vaccine coverage among children; and P3 (2006-2009) when the vaccine was added to the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Madrid. We analyzed 155 cases of IPD. One hundred and fifty of these isolates were serotyped (100 were NVS). There was an increase in the prevalence of IPD from P1 (31%) to P2 (54%) and P3 (91%). The most relevant emerging serotypes were 19A, 7F, 1, 5, 3 and 15C. The most significant clinical syndromes produced by some specific serotypes were as follows: lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) by serotypes 1, 3, 5 and 15C; LRTI, primary bacteremia and meningitis by serotype 19A; and primary bacteremia by serotype 7F (66%). The large majority (83.8%) of NVS were sensitive to penicillin. There has been an increased prevalence of IPD caused by NVS since the introduction of PCV7. These changes should prompt the introduction of new pneumococcal vaccines, which include most of the NVS, in the childhood immunization calendar to prevent IPD in children. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of non-invasive models for liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B virus related liver disease patients in resource limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rakesh; Sen, Sourav; Banerji, Debabrata; Praharaj, Ashok K; Chopra, Gurvinder Singh; Gill, Satyajit Singh

    2013-01-01

    A total of 350 million individuals are affected by chronic hepatitis B virus infection world-wide. Historically, liver biopsy has been instrumental in adequately assessing patients with chronic liver disease. A number of non-invasive models have been studied world-wide. The aim of this study is to assess the utility of non-invasive mathematical models of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Indian patients in a resource limited setting using routinely performed non-invasive laboratory investigations. A cross-sectional study carried out at a tertiary care center. A total of 52 consecutive chronic liver disease patients who underwent percutaneous liver biopsy and 25 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Routine laboratory investigations included serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Gama glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total bilirubin, total cholesterol, prothrombin time and platelet count. Three non-invasive models for namely aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI), Fibrosis 4 (FIB-4) and Forn's index were calculated. Outcomes were compared for the assessment of best predictor of fibrosis by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of each index. Medcalc online software and by Microsoft Excel Worksheet. Chi-square test was used for significance. P value value of all 3 indices were significantly higher in patients group as compare with the controls (P model for excluding significant liver fibrosis while FIB-4 with a PPV of 61