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Sample records for intrauterine contraceptive device

  1. Complications associated with intrauterine contraceptive devices at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is one of the reversible methods of contraception. Its use has increased steadily worldwide. However, some women reject it based on presumed complications associated with its use. Aim: To determine the complications reported by women, action taken on the ...

  2. Misplaced intrauterine contraceptive device: an enigma

    OpenAIRE

    Aruna Nigam; Ratna Biswas; Archana Mishra

    2010-01-01

    Aruna Nigam, Ratna Biswas, Archana MishraDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) migration subsequent to uterine wall perforation is an uncommon but serious complication. Three cases of misplaced IUCD at three different sites, ie, posterior fornix, rectal wall, and mesoappendix, are reported. An IUCD thread coming through the posterior fornix is reported in the literature for the first time.Key...

  3. Vesical transmigration of an intrauterine contraceptive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wei; Zhang, Wenlei; Jia, Guifeng; Cui, Miao; Cui, Lifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Displacement of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) is a rare and serious complication of IUD insertion. Theoretically, it can migrate to anywhere in the pelvic and abdominal cavity. However, it is not usual for an IUD to migrate to the bladder. Patient concerns: In this case report, we reported a patient with chronic urinary symptoms caused by the migration of an IUD into the bladder. The displacement of the IUD led to contraception failure and IUD retention in the bladder for 5 years. Diagnoses: Pelvic ultrasonography (US), radiography, and cystoscopy examinations confirmed the migration of IUD in bladder. Interventions: The patient underwent cystoscopy. Outcomes: The MCu IUD was successfully removed without any complications. Lessons: Our study demonstrated that a missing IUD should be followed up and removed early to avoid possible serious complications. PMID:28984781

  4. Pregnancy outcome in women with an intrauterine contraceptive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganer, Hadas; Levy, Amalia; Ohel, Iris; Sheiner, Eyal

    2009-10-01

    To investigate pregnancy outcome in patients who conceived with an intrauterine contraceptive device. A retrospective study comparing the pregnancy outcome of women with retained intrauterine device (n = 98), patients after intrauterine device removal in early pregnancy (n = 194), and pregnancies without an intrauterine device (n = 141,191) was performed. A significant linear association was documented among the 3 groups and adverse outcomes such as preterm delivery (18.4% in the retained intrauterine device, 14.4 % in removed intrauterine device, and 7.3% in the no-intrauterine device group; P intrauterine device, 4.1% in removed intrauterine device and 0.7% in the no-intrauterine device group; P intrauterine device was found as an independent risk factor for both preterm delivery and chorioamnionitis in multivariable models. Women conceiving with an intrauterine device are at increased risk for adverse obstetric outcomes, whereas the risk is higher for pregnancies with retained intrauterine device compared with early intrauterine device removal.

  5. Profile Of Intrauterine Contraceptive Device Acceptors At The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Use of modern contraceptive methods has been shown to reduce unwanted pregnancy, high parity and maternal mortality. Intrauterine contraceptive devices which are among the safest and most effective reversible contraceptives available, are particularly suitable for women in developing countries as they ...

  6. Indications for removal of intrauterine contraceptive devices in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) are commonly used reversible methods of contraception. The CuT 380A is recommended for use for 10 years but common observation has shown that they are removed much earlier than the recommended duration of use. Methodology: A retrospective study of all clients ...

  7. 21 CFR 884.5360 - Contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) and introducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) and... Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5360 Contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) and introducer. (a) Identification. A contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) is a device used to prevent pregnancy. The device is...

  8. Missing Intrauterine Contraceptive Device amongst Clients in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Missing intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is a known complication of IUCD use. Objective To examine the methods of diagnosis and Management modalities of missing IUCD at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu. Materials and Method This was a retrospective review of the records of all ...

  9. Intrauterine Contraceptive Device Discontinuation Among Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In conclusion, more effort should be directed to counseling for adherence to the IUD use to ensure longer duration of use. Provision of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system which reduces bleeding and dysmenorrhoea, in our clinic may increase the continuation rate of IUD. Key words; IUD, duration of use, discontinuation, ...

  10. Vesical Calculus 10 Years Post Missing Intrauterine Contraceptive Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwahab-Ahmed, Abdullahi; Ogunleye, Oluwagbemiga Olabisi

    2013-01-01

    Intravesical migration of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is rare. Early diagnosis of this rare entity is difficult because of its non-specific manifestations and very low index of suspicion. We present this case of bladder stone following intravesical migration of IUCD found to have been missing since insertion 10 years earlier. Lower abdominal discomfort and a missing vaginal string may be the only pointer to this unfortunate event in the immediate post insertion period. It is pertinent to consider the possibility of an intravesical migration of a missing IUCD in a patient presenting with lower abdominal discomfort, urinary frequency, and missing IUCD string on vaginal examination. PMID:24470853

  11. Trend in the use of Intra-uterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD ,TCU ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the acceptance rate and trend of Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD) use in Enugu,Nigeria PATIENTS AND METHODS: A review of all new acceptors of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) over a nine year period(1999-2007) . RESULTS: A total of 133,375 clients were seen at the UNTH ...

  12. Interactions between intrauterine contraceptive device use and breast-feeding status at time of intrauterine contraceptive device insertion: analysis of TCu-380A acceptors in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, G; Rivera, R

    1992-07-01

    This paper is a reassessment of earlier findings from a preliminary analysis of data from a multicenter international trial regimen on breast-feeding and non-breast-feeding women in which events related to insertion, expulsion, and removal of the TCu-380A intrauterine contraceptive device (ParaGard 380) were investigated. Performance of the TCu-380A through 12 months after insertion was compared with life-table rate analysis, chi 2, Fisher exact test, or Student's t test. Variables were events reported during intrauterine contraceptive device insertion and events throughout the 12 months of study participation by breast-feeding status. Breast-feeding among intrauterine contraceptive device users was associated with fewer insertion-related complaints and lower removal rates for bleeding and pain. No uterine perforations were reported throughout the study. Differences in the performance of the TCu-380A intrauterine contraceptive device suggest physiologic effects associated with lactational amenorrhea. The TCu-380A intrauterine contraceptive device is a viable option for women breast-feeding at the time of intrauterine contraceptive device insertion.

  13. Long-acting reversible contraceptives: intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Ogburn, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The provision of effective contraception is fundamental to the practice of women's health care. The most effective methods of reversible contraception are the so-called long-acting reversible contraceptives, intrauterine devices and implants. These methods have multiple advantages over other reversible methods. Most importantly, once in place, they do not require maintenance and their duration of action is long, ranging from 3 to 10 years. Despite the advantages of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, they are infrequently used in the United States. Short-acting methods, specifically oral contraceptives and condoms, are by far the most commonly used reversible methods. A shift from the use of short-acting methods to long-acting reversible contraceptive methods could help reduce the high rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States. In this review of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, we discuss the intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant available in the United States, and we describe candidates for each method, noncontraceptive benefits, and management of complications.

  14. Copper Intrauterine Device for Emergency Contraception: Clinical Practice Among Contraceptive Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Cynthia C.; Speidel, J. Joseph; Drey, Eleanor A.; Trussell, James; Blum, Maya; Darney, Philip D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The copper intrauterine device (IUD) is the most effective emergency contraceptive available but is largely ignored in clinical practice. We examined clinicians’ recommendation of the copper IUD for emergency contraception in a setting with few cost obstacles. Methods We conducted a survey among clinicians (n=1,246; response rate 65%) in a California State family planning program, where U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved contraceptives are available at no cost to low-income women. We used multivariable logistic regression to measure the association of intrauterine contraceptive training and evidence-based knowledge with having recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception. Results The large majority of clinicians (85%) never recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception, and most (93%) required two or more visits for an IUD insertion. Multivariable analyses showed insertion skills were associated with having recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception, but the most significant factor was evidence-based knowledge of patient selection for IUD use. Clinicians who viewed a wide range of patients as IUD candidates were twice as likely to have recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception. While over 93% of obstetrician–gynecologists were skilled in inserting the copper IUD, they were no more likely to have recommended it for emergency contraception than other physicians or advance practice clinicians. Conclusion Recommendation of the copper IUD for emergency contraception is rare, despite its high efficacy and long-lasting contraceptive benefits. Recommendation would require clinic flow and scheduling adjustments to allow same-day IUD insertions. Patient-centered and high-quality care for emergency contraception should include a discussion of the most effective method. PMID:22270272

  15. Contraception with Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD) in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One accidental pregnancy occurred (pearl index of 0.007 per 100 woman years). IUCD is an effective method of contraception in Port Harcourt ; comparable to worldwide experience. The low uptake rate calls for concerted effort to create more awareness about it especially in the rural areas/ non literate population.

  16. Intrauterine contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonawalla, R P

    1968-01-01

    This article is presented to give an idea as to how far the IUD can fulfill the purpose of population control. For the couple, this intrauterine method is most ideal. The main drawback is the side effect of bleeding, which is the cause of the high drop out rate. The other handicaps are spontaneous expulsion and pregnancy with the IUD in situ. It is also unsuited to nulliparous women. The general practitioner needs to become concerned with the gravity of the problem of overpopulation, and he must encourage his patients into the use of contraceptives. At the moment, the IUD is the method of choice.

  17. Intrauterine Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    S HARE W ITH W OMEN INTRAUTERINE DEVICES INTRAUTERINE DEVICES What is An Intrauterine Device? An intrauterine device (IUD) is anything that is placed inside the uterus (womb) to prevent pregnancy. ...

  18. Comparison of copper intrauterine device with levonorgestrel-bearing intrauterine system for post-abortion contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgehan, Fatma; Dilbaz, Berna; Karadag, Burak; Deveci, Canan Dura

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the safety, bleeding pattern, effects, side-effects, complications and 6-month continuity rates of levonorgestrel-bearing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with conventional copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) inserted immediately after voluntary termination of pregnancy up to 10 weeks of gestation. One hundred women who underwent voluntary pregnancy termination and preferred IUD insertion as a contraceptive method after counseling were enrolled. The patients were randomly allocated to Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS and followed up at 10 days, and at 1, 3 and 6 months. The expulsion rates, continuation rates, side-effects, and bleeding patterns were compared. Fifty women in the Cu-IUD group and 44 women in the LNG-IUS group were followed up. The continuity and expulsion rate for Cu-IUD and LNG-IUS at the end of 6 months was 74%, 12%, and 75%, 11.3%, respectively. In LNG-IUS users, the incidence of amenorrhea and the number of spotting days were higher and hemoglobin increased throughout the follow-up period. The side-effects related to both methods were not different from interval insertions. Immediate post-abortion intrauterine contraception with Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS is a safe, reliable method. The incidence of side-effects is similar, and there is only a slightly higher rate of expulsion but an acceptable rate of method continuation. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Women's experience with postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device use in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Somesh; Sethi, Reena; Balasubramaniam, Sudharsanam; Charurat, Elaine; Lalchandani, Kamlesh; Semba, Richard; Sood, Bulbul

    2014-04-23

    Postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (PPIUCD) are increasingly included in many national postpartum family planning (PPFP) programs, but satisfaction of women who have adopted PPIUCD and complication rates need further characterization. Our specific aims were to describe women who accepted PPIUCD, their experience and satisfaction with their choice, and complication of expulsion or infection. We studied 2,733 married women, aged 15-49 years, who received PPIUCD in sixteen health facilities, located in eight states and the national capital territory of India, at the time of IUCD insertion and six weeks later. The satisfaction of women who received IUCD during the postpartum period and problems and complications following insertion were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Mean (SD) age of women accepting PPIUCD was 24 (4) years. Over half of women had parity of one, and nearly one-quarter had no formal schooling. Nearly all women (99.6%) reported that they were satisfied with IUCD at the time of insertion and 92% reported satisfaction at the six-week follow-up visit. The rate of expulsion of IUCD was 3.6% by six weeks of follow-up. There were large variations in rates of problems and complications that were largely attributable to the individual hospitals implementing the study. Women who receive PPIUCD show a high level of satisfaction with this choice of contraception, and the rates of expulsion were low enough such that the benefits of contraceptive protection outweigh the potential inconvenience of needing to return for care for that subset of women.

  20. Intrauterine Contraceptive Device Migration Presenting as Abdominal Wall Swelling: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Wani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of complications are reported with the use of intrauterine contraceptive devices. These may pursue asymptomatic course or present as an acute abdomen after migration into peritoneal cavity. The authors here are reporting an abdominal wall swelling caused by transuterine migration of a copper intrauterine contraceptive device in a 28-year-old female. An open approach was used, and impacted foreign body was retrieved.

  1. Training contraceptive providers to offer intrauterine devices and implants in contraceptive care: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kirsten M J; Rocca, Corinne H; Stern, Lisa; Morfesis, Johanna; Goodman, Suzan; Steinauer, Jody; Harper, Cynthia C

    2018-03-23

    US unintended pregnancy rates remain high, and contraceptive providers are not universally trained to offer intrauterine devices and implants to women who wish to use these methods. We sought to measure the impact of a provider training intervention on integration of intrauterine devices and implants into contraceptive care. We measured the impact of a continuing medical education-accredited provider training intervention on provider attitudes, knowledge, and practices in a cluster randomized trial in 40 US health centers from 2011 through 2013. Twenty clinics were randomly assigned to the intervention arm; 20 offered routine care. Clinic staff participated in baseline and 1-year surveys assessing intrauterine device and implant knowledge, attitudes, and practices. We used a difference-in-differences approach to compare changes that occurred in the intervention sites to changes in the control sites 1 year later. Prespecified outcome measures included: knowledge of patient eligibility for intrauterine devices and implants; attitudes about method safety; and counseling practices. We used multivariable regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering by clinic to examine intervention effects on provider outcomes 1 year later. Overall, we surveyed 576 clinic staff (314 intervention, 262 control) at baseline and/or 1-year follow-up. The change in proportion of providers who believed that the intrauterine device was safe was greater in intervention (60% at baseline to 76% at follow-up) than control sites (66% at both times) (adjusted odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-5.4). Likewise, for the implant, the proportion increased from 57-77% in intervention, compared to 61-65% in control sites (adjusted odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-4.59). The proportion of providers who believed they were experienced to counsel on intrauterine devices also increased in intervention (53-67%) and remained the same in control sites (60

  2. Intrauterine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilian, Xiao

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this chapter is to review the worldwide use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) for contraception and the long-term contraceptive efficacy and safety of copper-bearing IUDs. The TCu380A and Multiload Cu375 have a very low failure rate (0.2-0.5%) over 10 years. The main concerns of the use of IUDs are risk of pelvic inflammatory diseases and increased menstrual blood loss and irregular bleeding. Factors associated with an increase in risk of pelvic inflammatory diseases are discussed. Preventive measures can be taken with careful screening of eligible IUD users, technical training and adequate service facilities for provision of IUDs. Levonorgestrel-releasing IUDs have the benefit of reducing menstrual blood loss in addition to high contraceptive efficacy. The copper IUD is the most effective method for emergency contraception. It can prevent over 95% of unwanted pregnancies within 5 days of unprotected intercourse. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Intrauterine devices and other forms of contraception: thinking outside the pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Caitlin; Kolehmainen, Christine

    2015-05-01

    A variety of contraception options are available in addition to traditional combined oral contraceptive pills. Newer long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods such as intrauterine devices and subcutaneous implants are preferred because they do not depend on patient compliance. They are highly effective and appropriate for most women. Female and male sterilization are other effective but they are irreversible and require counseling to minimize regret. The contraceptive injection, patch, and ring do not require daily administration, but their typical efficacy rates are lower than LARC methods and similar to those for combined oral contraceptive pills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intravesical migration of an intrauterine device

    OpenAIRE

    Gyasi-Sarpong, Christian Kofi; Maison, Patrick Opoku Manu; Morhe, Emmanuel; Aboah, Ken; Appiah, Kwaku Addai-Arhin; Azorliade, Roland; Baah-Nyamekye, Kofi; Otu-Boateng, Kwaku; Amoah, George; Antwi, Isaac; Frimpong-Twumasi, Benjamin; Arthur, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Background Intrauterine contraceptive device is the most common method of reversible contraception in women. The intrauterine contraceptive device can perforate the uterus and can also migrate into pelvic or abdominal organs. Perforation of the urinary bladder by an intrauterine contraceptive device is not common. In West Africa, intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device has been rarely reported. In this report, we present a case of an intrauterine contraceptive device mi...

  5. Secondary Vesical Calculus Resulting from Migration of an Intrauterine Contraceptive Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna Vagholkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD is the commonest form of contraception used in view of less systemic side effects. However, there are a multitude of local complications caused by it. Of all the local complications described, migration of the device into adjacent organs is the most morbid of all complications. A patient presenting with history of loss or disappearance of the intrauterine contraceptive device accompanied by urinary symptoms should raise the doubt of a migrated device with the formation of a secondary calculus. This prompts further radiological investigations and merits surgical intervention either endourologically or by open surgery depending upon the merits of the case. A case report elucidating this fact is presented.

  6. Ureteric erosion and obstruction: A rare but dreaded complication of intrauterine contraceptive device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Though intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD is a safe and most frequently used long-term contraceptive method, it has some complications. Uterine perforation and intra-abdominal migration have been reported often, but a retroperitoneal migration is exceptional. Here, we are reporting an IUCD which perforated the uterus and migrated to the retroperitoneum; impinging into and obstructing left ureter causing severe hydroureteronephrosis due to the development of the left lower ureteric stricture.

  7. A comparison of intrauterine balloon, intrauterine contraceptive device and hyaluronic acid gel in the prevention of adhesion reformation following hysteroscopic surgery for Asherman syndrome: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaona; Wei, Minling; Li, T C; Huang, Qiongxiao; Huang, Dong; Zhou, Feng; Zhang, Songying

    2013-10-01

    To compare the efficacy of intrauterine balloon, intrauterine contraceptive device and hyaluronic acid gel in the prevention of the adhesion reformation after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis for Asherman's syndrome. Retrospective cohort study of 107 women with Asherman's syndrome who were treated with hysteroscopic division of intrauterine adhesions. After hysteroscopic adhesiolysis, 20 patients had intrauterine balloon inserted, 28 patients had intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) fitted, 18 patients had hyaluronic acid gel instilled into the uterine cavity, and 41 control subjects did not have any of the three additional treatment measures. A second-look hysteroscopy was performed in all cases, and the effect of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis was scored by the American Fertility Society classification system. Both the intrauterine balloon group and the IUD group achieved significantly (Pintrauterine balloon or intrauterine device is more effective than the use of hyaluronic acid gel in the prevention of intra-uterine adhesion reformation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intrauterine contraceptive device embedded in the omentum – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolnierczyk P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Zolnierczyk, Krzysztof Cendrowski, Wlodzimierz Sawicki Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Oncology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: This report describes the case of a 29-year-old patient, female (nulliparous who had an intrauterine device (IUD inserted in 2010 and who has had no gynecological control since then (for 4 years. After this time, the asymptomatic patient had a gynecological appointment, during which a doctor did not find the strings of IUD in the speculum. Ultrasound examination did not reveal the presence of the IUD in the uterine cavity, which led to the suspicion of its presence outside the uterus. The patient was referred to a hospital, where she underwent ultrasound and X-ray examination of the pelvis that confirmed the presence of the IUD outside the uterus. Laparoscopy was performed during which the IUD was localized as being embedded in the omentum. It was removed by performing a resection of a part of the omentum with inflammatory infiltration. The patient was discharged home on the second postoperative day in a good condition. This case confirms the need for gynecological control and ultrasound examination shortly after insertion. An ultrasound or/and X-ray is mandatory in any case of absence of IUD strings previously visible in the vagina, if the patient did not observe its expulsion. Keywords: intrauterine device, myometrium, IUD threads, uterine cavity, ultrasound examination

  9. Apparent rarity of asymptomatic herpes cervicitis in a woman with intra-uterine contraceptive device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeola Fowotade

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection with genital herpes simplex virus (HSV remains a common viral sexually transmitted disease, often subclinical and a major worldwide problem of women of reproductive age group. Herpes cervicitis is an unusual presentation of Herpes simplex virus infection in females. The finding of herpes cervicitis on routine pap smear of an asymptomatic woman on Intrauterine contraceptive device still further supports the need for increased awareness on the possibility of Herpes simplex virus infection among women, particularly those on Intrauterine contraceptive device. The index case is a 28 years old Nigerian female who was referred to our Special Treatment Clinic on account of an abnormal pap smear cytology which was in keeping with Herpes cervicitis. There was no history of genital ulcer in this patient; however ELISA for HSV 2 IgM was positive in her. We therefore describe a case of herpes cervicitis in an asymptomatic woman on intrauterine contraceptive device. This case highlights to clinicians the need to be aware of the possibility of this association and to carry out relevant investigations so as to identify and treat these patients appropriately. Therefore, there is a need to put in place adequate public health intervention strategy to prevent genital herpes in women of reproductive age group with a view to preventing the possibility of congenital herpes in subsequent pregnancy.

  10. FFPRHC Guidance (January 2004). The copper intrauterine device as long-term contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Gillian; Brechin, Susan; de Souza, Alison; Bankowska, Urszula; Belfield, Toni; Gormley, Maggie; Olliver, Mary; Hampton, Naomi; Howlett-Shipley, Ruth; Hughes, Sarah; Mack, Noel; O'Brien, Paul; Rowlands, Sam; Trewinnard, Karen

    2004-01-01

    This Guidance provides information for clinicians providing women with copper-bearing intrauterine devices as long-term contraception. A key to the grades of recommendations, based on levels of evidence, is given at the end of this document. Details of the methods used by the Clinical Effectiveness Unit (CEU) in developing this Guidance and evidence tables summarising the research basis of the recommendations are available on the Faculty website (www.ffprhc.org.uk). Abbreviations (in alphabetical order) used include: acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS); actinomyces-like organisms (ALOs); automated external defibrillator (AED); blood pressure (BP); British National Formulary (BNF); confidence interval (CI); copper-bearing intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD); emergency contraception (EC); Faculty Aid to Continuing Professional Development Topic (FACT); levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (IUS); human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA); non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); odds ratio (OR); pelvic inflammatory disease (PID); relative risk (RR); Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG); Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN); sexually transmitted infection (STI); termination of pregnancy (TOP); World Health Organization (WHO); WHO Medical Eligibility Criteria (WHOMEC); WHO Selected Practice Recommendations (WHOSPR).

  11. A large bladder stone caused by the intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, W S L; Kodithuwakku, K A S U A; Aponsu, G U E; Rathnayake, R M M; Rajasegaram, E

    2017-10-22

    A wide variety of complications due to the extrauterine migration of intrauterine contraceptive devices have been reported in the literature. Here we describe the case of a large bladder stone formed around a migrated Copper T380A device that was neglected and detected 15 years after insertion. A 48-year-old Sri Lankan woman underwent a workup for lower urinary tract symptoms and recurrent urinary tract infections over the previous 6 months. The radiographs showed a large bladder stone with an imprint of an intrauterine contraceptive device in the center of it. The device had been inserted 15 years previously. Two years after the insertion, it was considered to be missing, but our patient did not comply with the recommended follow-up. She had been completely asymptomatic until she developed lower urinary tract symptoms. After confirming the location of the stone via ultrasonography, a vesicolithotomy was performed, revealing a stone with three limbs corresponding to the shape of the Copper T380A device. The device and the threads were fully covered with the stone material. Our patient was asymptomatic following the surgery. A migrated intrauterine contraceptive device can act as the nidus for the formation of a secondary bladder stone. The detailed imprint of the device inside the stone and the laminated appearance of the stone material were characteristic of a secondary bladder stone formed around an intrauterine contraceptive device. Radiography and ultrasonography are adequate for the diagnosis of intravesical migration of intrauterine contraceptive devices.

  12. Copper T380A intrauterine device for emergency contraception: a prospective, multicentre, cohort clinical trial.

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    Wu, S; Godfrey, E M; Wojdyla, D; Dong, J; Cong, J; Wang, C; von Hertzen, H

    2010-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the Copper T380A (CuT380A) intrauterine device (IUD) as an emergency contraceptive in women. Prospective, multicentre, cohort clinical trial. Eighteen family planning clinics in China. A cohort of 1963 women, aged 18-44 years, requesting emergency contraception within 120 hours of unprotected sexual intercourse. Women requesting emergency contraception were followed at 1, 3 and 12 months after the insertion of CuT380A. Efficacy of CuT380A as emergency contraception and for up to 12 months of postinsertion use. Insertion complication rates, reported side-effects and continuation rates at 12 months were also recorded. No pregnancies occurred prior to or at the first follow-up visit, making CuT380A 100% effective as emergency contraception in this study. The pregnancy rate over the 12-month period was 0.23 per 100 women. In all, 29 (1.5%) women experienced a difficult IUD insertion process, requiring local anaesthesia or prophylactic antibiotics. No uterine perforations occurred. The main side-effects were increased menstrual bleeding and menstrual disturbances. The 12-month postinsertion continuation rate was 94.0 per 100 woman-years. CuT380A is a safe and effective method for emergency contraception. The advantages of CuT380A include its ability to provide effective, long-term contraception.

  13. Determinants of Method Switching among Social Franchise Clients Who Discontinued the Use of Intrauterine Contraceptive Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Hameed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Women who do not switch to alternate methods after contraceptive discontinuation, for reasons other than the desire to get pregnant or not needing it, are at obvious risk for unplanned pregnancies or unwanted births. This paper examines the factors that influence women to switch from Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD to other methods instead of terminating contraceptive usage altogether. Methods. The data used for this study comes from a larger cross-sectional survey conducted in nine (9 randomly selected districts of Sindh and Punjab provinces of Pakistan, during January 2011. Using Stata 11.2, we analyzed data on 333 women, who reported the removal of IUCDs due to reasons other than the desire to get pregnant. Results. We found that 39.9% of the women do not switch to another method of contraception within one month after IUCD discontinuation. Use of contraception before IUCD insertion increases the odds for method switching by 2.26 times after removal. Similarly, postremoval follow-up by community health worker doubles (OR = 2.0 the chances of method switching. Compared with women who received free IUCD service (via voucher scheme, the method switching is 2.01 times higher among women who had paid for IUCD insertion. Conclusion. To increase the likelihood of method switching among IUCD discontinuers this study emphasizes the need for postremoval client counseling, follow-up by healthcare provider, improved choices to a wider range of contraceptives for poor clients, and user satisfaction.

  14. Determinants of Method Switching among Social Franchise Clients Who Discontinued the Use of Intrauterine Contraceptive Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Waqas; Azmat, Syed Khurram; Ali, Moazzam; Hussain, Wajahat; Mustafa, Ghulam; Ishaque, Muhammad; Ali, Safdar; Ahmed, Aftab; Temmerman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Women who do not switch to alternate methods after contraceptive discontinuation, for reasons other than the desire to get pregnant or not needing it, are at obvious risk for unplanned pregnancies or unwanted births. This paper examines the factors that influence women to switch from Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD) to other methods instead of terminating contraceptive usage altogether. Methods. The data used for this study comes from a larger cross-sectional survey conducted in nine (9) randomly selected districts of Sindh and Punjab provinces of Pakistan, during January 2011. Using Stata 11.2, we analyzed data on 333 women, who reported the removal of IUCDs due to reasons other than the desire to get pregnant. Results. We found that 39.9% of the women do not switch to another method of contraception within one month after IUCD discontinuation. Use of contraception before IUCD insertion increases the odds for method switching by 2.26 times after removal. Similarly, postremoval follow-up by community health worker doubles (OR = 2.0) the chances of method switching. Compared with women who received free IUCD service (via voucher scheme), the method switching is 2.01 times higher among women who had paid for IUCD insertion. Conclusion. To increase the likelihood of method switching among IUCD discontinuers this study emphasizes the need for postremoval client counseling, follow-up by healthcare provider, improved choices to a wider range of contraceptives for poor clients, and user satisfaction.

  15. Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD) Migration to the Urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IUCD) that was discovered incidentally in the course of evaluation for secondary infertility in a woman who denied knowledge of insertion of the device. The IUCD was easily retrieved at cystoscopy as a day case procedure. Key Words ...

  16. Combined Laparoscopic and Cystoscopic Retrieval of Forgotten Translocated Intrauterine Contraceptive Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo O Alabi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used long-term reversible female contraception is intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD. Its use is however associated with documented complications. Uterine perforation, though rare, is arguably the most surgically important of all these complications. We report a case of a 48-year-old para 4+0 (4 alive woman who had IUCD insertion 17 years earlier and had forgotten she had the device having had two children thereafter. The IUCD was subsequently translocated through the dome of the bladder into the peritoneal cavity with calculus formation around the tail and thread of the IUCD in the urinary bladder causing recurrent urinary tract infection. This “Collar Stud” effect made either cystoscopic or laparoscopic retrieval alone unsuccessful necessitating a combined approach. This case report highlights the need for a combined laparoscopic and cystoscopic approach in the retrieval of the unusual presentation of translocated IUCD.

  17. Do plain plastic and copper bearing intrauterine contraceptive devices have a central mechanism of action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstuck, N D

    1987-06-01

    The notion that the intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) has a central, as well as a local action, is examined. Although the IUCD undoubtedly has a local action, certain IUCD related side effects, e.g. galactorrhoea, bloating and premenstrual syndrome and inadequate luteal function can be explained if the IUCD has some central action. The powerful postcoital anti-fertility effect of both copper-bearing and plain plastic IUCDs probably also depends to some extent on a central action. The central action of the IUCD is probably due to initiation of reflex hypothalamic activity following intrauterine reflex stimulation. The hypothalamic response to IUCD insertion consists of release of beta-endorphin accompanied by raised levels of prolactin, vasopressin and oxytocin.

  18. Vesical transmigration of an intrauterine contraceptive device: A rare case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wei; Zhang, Wenlei; Jia, Guifeng; Cui, Miao; Cui, Lifeng

    2017-10-01

    Displacement of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) is a rare and serious complication of IUD insertion. Theoretically, it can migrate to anywhere in the pelvic and abdominal cavity. However, it is not usual for an IUD to migrate to the bladder. In this case report, we reported a patient with chronic urinary symptoms caused by the migration of an IUD into the bladder. The displacement of the IUD led to contraception failure and IUD retention in the bladder for 5 years. Pelvic ultrasonography (US), radiography, and cystoscopy examinations confirmed the migration of IUD in bladder. The patient underwent cystoscopy. The MCu IUD was successfully removed without any complications. Our study demonstrated that a missing IUD should be followed up and removed early to avoid possible serious complications.

  19. Attitudes towards and knowledge about intrauterine contraceptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. One of the strategies to reduce maternal mortality includes accessible and appropriate contraceptive services to all women. The intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) has been identified as a cheap and effective means of contraception by the South African National Department of Health. Objective.

  20. A study of the copper T intrauterine contraceptive device (TCu 200) in nulliparous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishell, D R; Israel, R; Freid, N

    1973-08-15

    A study of the effectiveness and complications associated with the Model 200 copper T intrauterine device in 471 nulliparous women ranging in age from 14-33 years is reported, including 6044 woman-months of device use. 128 of the patients had had 1 or more previous abortions. This T-shaped device is made of polyethylene impregnated with barium sulfate, wound with .2 mm diameter copper wire providing a copper surface area of 200 square mm, and is inserted easily without anesthesia and with minimal pain. Continuation and failure rates were calculated for the first 12 months of use by life-table analysis. The overall continuation rate of device use was 74.2 per 100 women, the expulsion rate was 5.4, removal rate for bleeding or pain was 10.7, and pregnancy failure occurred at a rate of 1.7 per 100 women per year. These discontinuation event rates are lower than those reported for other IUDs in nulliparous women and comparable to IUD rates in multiparas. In the past, other IUD designs have been very unsatisfactory in nulliparas because of high expulsion and removal rates, but this study indicates that the TCu 200 IUD model is well accepted by nulliparas with good safety and effectiveness, and provides a promising and highly desired contraceptive alternative to oral contraception for young women.

  1. Effect of copper intrauterine device vs. injectable contraceptive on serum hormone levels and cell mitotic activity in endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtesam Moustafa Kamal

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Either copper intrauterine device or injectable contraceptive usage for more than 9 months results in significant decrease in endometrial proliferative or cell mitotic activity. While copper IUD has no effect on serum estradiol or progesterone levels, DMPA usage increased serum progesterone level with no effect on serum estradiol.

  2. Acceptability of randomization to levonorgestrel versus copper intrauterine device among women requesting IUD insertion for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, Sharon L; Chen, Beatrice A; Lee, Jessica K; Gariepy, Aileen M; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2015-12-01

    Assess feasibility of randomizing women to intrauterine device (IUD) type. Women enrolling in a 2-month study who desired an IUD for contraception were randomized 1:1 to receive a levonorgestrel-releasing 52-mg IUD (LNG-IUD) or copper T380A IUD (Cu-IUD), understanding they could switch IUD type at the end of the study. Randomization to IUD type was acceptable to 54/55 (98%) women who screened. All 32 enrolled participants completed follow-up. Two women exchanged their IUD (Cu-IUD to LNG-IUD), and two requested removal (one LNG-IUD, one Cu-IUD). Overall, 88% continued their assigned IUD. Randomization to IUD type is feasible, and few women change their IUD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lidocaine gel vs lidocaine spray in reducing pain during insertion of the intrauterine contraceptive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torky, Haitham; Moussa, Asem; El-Desouky, El-Sayed; Dief, Osama; Ahmed, Ali

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain-relieving effect of intracervical lidocaine gel with that of lidocaine spray or no local anaesthesia in decreasing pain during insertion of the intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD). In a prospective multicentre non-randomised comparative study design, 420 women were divided into three groups of 140 and fitted with the same type of IUCD. Group 1 received cervical lidocaine gel, group 2 received cervical lidocaine spray and group 3 received no topical anaesthesia. A visual analogue scale was used to measure the degree of pain experienced. There were no significant differences between the three groups with regard to baseline characteristics such as age and number of deliveries. Significantly less pain was felt during cervical traction in women using a local anaesthetic. However, there were no significant differences in pain due to IUCD insertion. Application of a local anaesthetic decreased the pain resulting from cervical traction but not that resulting from IUCD insertion.

  4. A comparative analysis of the modification of sexual desire of users of oral hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Loeches, M; Ortí, R M; Monfort, M; Ortega, E; Rius, J

    2003-09-01

    To compare the influence of oral hormonal contraceptives (OCs) and the use of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) on the modification of sexual desire. A prospective observational study of 1073 women using OCs or an IUD at the Family Planning Center 'Marina Alta' in Alicante, Spain. In order to evaluate the relative risk regarding the decrease in libido attributed to each contraceptive method, a logistic regression analysis was undertaken which considered the factors of age adjustment, level of studies, family planning information, relationship with partner, age when sexual relationships were initiated, parity, contraceptive method previously used and the duration of use of the contraceptive method. No differences in the decrease of sexual desire were observed between the use of the OC and IUD (odds ratio (OR) 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-2.49), yet differences were noted, however, in relation to age (OR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.10). Although these differences were not statistically significant, a high level of awareness regarding family planning was shown to increase sexual desire when compared to a lower level of information on this subject (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.41-1.01). Sexual desire was seen to decrease if the quality of the relationship with the partner was average (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.36-3.69) or poor (OR 4.69; 95% CI 1.93-11.4). Nulliparous women showed a greater decrease in sexual desire in relation to women who had already given birth (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.00-2.47). Sexual desire was greater if the contraceptive method had already been in use for 6-12 months (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.17-0.98). Sexual desire does not vary in relation to the use of OCs or IUDs, yet it does decrease with age, in nulliparous women and in those with an average or poor relationship with their partner. Furthermore, sexual desire shows an increase between the first 6 and 12 months of contraceptive treatment.

  5. Vesical Calculus 10 Years Post Missing Intrauterine Contraceptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesical Calculus 10 Years Post Missing Intrauterine. Contraceptive Device. Abdullahi Abdulwahab-Ahmed, Oluwagbemiga Olabisi Ogunleye. INTRODUCTION. Intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) are acceptable means of contraception world over.[1-4] There have been reports of its migration to other adjourning sites ...

  6. Problems in distribution of scientific knowledge: intrauterine contraceptive devices and drug catalogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, K

    1993-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) are a popular method of contraception worldwide. However, some serious problems have been associated with them. Finland has developed and now manufactures and exports IUDs. Therefore, drug control and the quality of drug information existing in Finland are significant for other countries, as well. This study analyzes the information in the Finnish commercial drug catalog on copper-releasing IUDs and compares it with the scientific literature, the instructions from the licensing authority, and material in its U.S. counterpart, during the last two decades. The results indicate that the distribution of scientific knowledge to the drug catalogs has often been slow. In the early 1980s Finnish manufacturers did not give any practical information on their products, and then and later the Finnish catalog was less comprehensive than the U.S. catalog. The variations in the control system in different nations were reflected in the contents of the Finnish catalog. For practitioners, drug catalogs are important sources of medical information. The results of this study demonstrate (1) that more attention should be paid to the contents of these catalogs, and (2) the continuous need for up-to-date, unbiased drug information.

  7. Medical eligibility, contraceptive choice, and intrauterine device acceptance among HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lisa B; Feldacker, Caryl; Jamieson, Denise J; Tweya, Hannock; Cwiak, Carrie; Bryant, Amy G; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Chaweza, Thomas; Mlundira, Linly; Kachale, Fanny; Stuart, Gretchen S; Hoffman, Irving; Phiri, Sam

    2014-09-01

    To determine medical eligibility for contraceptive use, contraceptive preference, and acceptance of a copper intrauterine device (IUD) among a cohort of HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). All HIV-infected women who received ART and sought contraceptive services at the Lighthouse clinic, an integrated HIV/ART clinic in Lilongwe, Malawi, between August and December 2010 were invited to participate in a structured interview. Eligibility and preference for the following contraceptive methods were assessed: combined hormonal contraceptives, progestogen-only pills, copper IUD, injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), and contraceptive implants. The final sample included 281 women; five were pregnant. The remaining 276 women were eligible for at least three contraceptive methods, with 242 (87.7%) eligible for all five methods evaluated. After counseling, 163 (58.0%) selected DMPA and 98 (34.9%) selected an IUD as their preferred contraceptive method. Regardless of their method of choice, 222 (79.0%) women agreed to have an IUD placed on the same day. Most methods of contraception are safe for use by HIV-infected women. Approximately 80% of the women were willing to receive an IUD. Efforts must be made to increase education about, and access to, long-acting reversible methods that may be acceptable and appropriate contraceptive options for HIV-infected women. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. All rights reserved.

  8. Bladder stone caused by an ectopic intrauterine contraceptive device: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atasoy, C.; Fitoz, S.; Akyar, S.

    2001-01-01

    Perforation of the uterus is a recognized complication associated with the use of an intrauterine contraceptive (IUCD). However, migration of an IUCD into the bladder, with or without stone formation, is exceptionally rare. We report the case of a patient with a displaced IUCD that acted as a nidus for bladder lithiasis. (author)

  9. Bladder stone caused by an ectopic intrauterine contraceptive device: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atasoy, C.; Fitoz, S.; Akyar, S. [Ankara Univ. School of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Ibn-i Sina Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2001-02-01

    Perforation of the uterus is a recognized complication associated with the use of an intrauterine contraceptive (IUCD). However, migration of an IUCD into the bladder, with or without stone formation, is exceptionally rare. We report the case of a patient with a displaced IUCD that acted as a nidus for bladder lithiasis. (author)

  10. Patient knowledge and intension to use the intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD at a tertiary level hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia van der Westhuizen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The intrauterine device (IUCD is a highly effective and safe method of contraception. Prevention of unwanted pregnancies has made its use a matter of national priority in certain countries.Despite numerous advantages and suitability the uptake of the IUCD is poor. Patients in South Africa seem to lack knowledge regarding this contraceptive. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the quantity and quality of knowledge of the IUCD, and to evaluate its acceptability for future use. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at Pelonomi Tertiary Hospital. 201 consecutive patients were interviewed using structured questionnaires. Results: Awareness of the IUCD was found in almost half (49%, n=95 of our patients. Its use was very low, with only one patient having used it before. Overall qualitative knowledge was poor, even among those that were aware of the IUCD. There was a significant association between level of education and knowledge, with patients having passed Grade 12 or higher significantly more likely to have knowledge of the IUCD than those at lower levels (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.08. Forty-five percent (n=86 of patients indicated a desire for future IUCD use. Conclusion: Despite the availability of the IUCD in South African clinics and hospitals, its uptake is still poor. Awareness of this method seemed to have improved over the past few years, but the qualitative knowledge still lacks considerably. Education plays a major role in the knowledge of contraception and better educational aids in all facilities will increase its use and reduce unwanted pregnancies.

  11. Intravesical migration of an intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyasi-Sarpong, Christian Kofi; Maison, Patrick Opoku Manu; Morhe, Emmanuel; Aboah, Ken; Appiah, Kwaku Addai-Arhin; Azorliade, Roland; Baah-Nyamekye, Kofi; Otu-Boateng, Kwaku; Amoah, George; Antwi, Isaac; Frimpong-Twumasi, Benjamin; Arthur, Douglas

    2016-01-02

    Intrauterine contraceptive device is the most common method of reversible contraception in women. The intrauterine contraceptive device can perforate the uterus and can also migrate into pelvic or abdominal organs. Perforation of the urinary bladder by an intrauterine contraceptive device is not common. In West Africa, intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device has been rarely reported. In this report, we present a case of an intrauterine contraceptive device migration into the urinary bladder of a 33 year old African woman at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. A 33 year old African woman presented with persistent urinary tract infection of 7 months duration despite appropriate antibiotic treatments. An abdominal ultrasonography revealed a urinary bladder calculus which was found to be an intrauterine contraceptive device on removal at cystoscopy. She got pregnant whilst having the intrauterine contraceptive device in place and delivered at term. The presence of recurrent or persistent urinary tract infection in any woman with an intrauterine contraceptive device should raise the suspicion of intravesical migration of the intrauterine contraceptive device.

  12. Hip prosthesis infection related to an unchecked intrauterine contraceptive device: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharne, G; Girard, J; Pasquier, G; Migaud, H; Senneville, E

    2013-02-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUD) used for contraception can be the source of local infections or can migrate, which justifies regular checking recommendations and limitations around the implantation period. To our knowledge, bone and joint infections related to an infected IUD have not been described in the scientific literature. This paper reports on a case of the repeated infection of a total hip prosthesis related to an infected IUD that had been forgotten after being implanted 34years previously. The arthroplasty infection revealed itself through dislocation of a dual mobility cup. Commensal bacteria that colonize the female genital tract (Streptococcus agalactiae) were identified at the site of hip arthroplasty. This led to the discovery of the IUD that was infected by the same bacterium. Despite lavage of the non-loosened arthroplasty, removal of the IUD and 2months of antibiotic treatment, the dislocation recurred and the prosthesis was again infected with the same microorganism 4months later. This recurrence of the infection, with persistence of a uterine abscess containing the same bacterium, was treated with repeated lavage of the joint, total hysterectomy and antibiotics treatment. The infection had resolved when followed-up 3years later. The occurrence of a bone and joint infection with this type of bacterium should trigger the evaluation of a possible IUD infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Rates and outcomes of planned pregnancy after use of Norplant capsules, Norplant II rods, or levonorgestrel-releasing or copper TCu 380Ag intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivin, I; Stern, J; Diaz, S; Pavéz, M; Alvarez, F; Brache, V; Mishell, D R; Lacarra, M; McCarthy, T; Holma, P

    1992-04-01

    The objectives were to measure rates of planned pregnancy and factors affecting these rates after use of very-long-acting contraceptive methods (Norplant or Norplant II implants, a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine contraceptive device, or the copper T (model TCu 380Ag) intrauterine contraceptive device. The design was a concurrent, multicenter prospective study of 372 women who stopped contraception for planned pregnancy. Analysis was by life-table, log-rank, and standard chi 2 methods. Pregnancy rates 12 and 24 months after cessation of contraceptive use were 82 and 89 per 100, respectively. Age at removal and family planning intentions at initiation of contraception were both significantly correlated with pregnancy rates (p less than 0.05), but former contraceptive regimen and duration of contraceptive use were not. Pregnancy outcomes did not deviate from normal limits and did not differ by contraceptive formerly used. Contraceptive implants releasing 30 micrograms/day of levonorgestrel or intrauterine contraceptive devices releasing 20 micrograms/day of levonorgestrel or having copper surface areas of 380 mm2 are associated with normal fertility after use for women seeking pregnancy at termination. Durations of use do not affect pregnancy rates.

  14. Randomized, controlled trial comparing the efficacy of intrauterine balloon and intrauterine contraceptive device in the prevention of adhesion reformation after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Na; Zhou, Feng; Wei, Min-Ling; Yang, Yang; Li, Ying; Li, T C; Zhang, Song-Ying

    2015-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of heart-shaped intrauterine balloon and intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) in the prevention of adhesion reformation after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. University hospital. A total of 201 women with Asherman syndrome. Women were randomized to having either a heart-shaped intrauterine balloon or an IUD fitted after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis. The devices were removed after 7 days. A second-look hysteroscopy was carried out 1 to 2 months after the surgery. Incidence of adhesion reformation and reduction of adhesion score before and after surgery. Initially 201 cases were recruited; 39 cases dropped out, resulting in 82 cases in the balloon group and 80 cases in IUD group. The age, menstrual characteristics, pregnancy history, and American Fertility Society score before surgery were comparable between the two groups. The median adhesion score reduction (balloon group, 7; IUD group, 7) and the adhesion reformation rate (balloon group, 30%; IUD group, 35%) were not significantly different between the two groups. The heart-shaped intrauterine balloon and IUD are of similar efficacy in the prevention of adhesion reformation after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis for Asherman syndrome. ISRCTN 69690272. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Trend in the use of intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUCD ,TCU 380A), in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezegwui, H U; Nwogu-Ikojo, E E; Ikeako, L C; Nweze, S

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the acceptance rate and trend of Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD) use in Enugu, Nigeria A review of all new acceptors of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) over a nine year period (1999-2007). A total of 133,375 clients were seen at the UNTH family planning clinic between 1999 and 2007. Out of 6,947 users of IUCD, during the period, 1,659 were new acceptors. The IUCD acceptance rate was 5.21%. Majority of the clients (29.7%) were aged 40 years and above. Eight hundred and forty seven (51.4%) had attained post secondary education. Majority of the clients (99.4%) were married . Twenty-six percent (26.0%) had completed their desired family size. Majority 1,359 (82.4%) did not use any method contraception prior to IUCD insertion. The commonest complication was menorrhagia (5.8%) and this was responsible for removal in 3.0% of cases. Eight (0.5%) and nine (0.6%) requested for removal for fear of causing cancer and migration to the brain or heart respectively. Two (0.1%) became pregnant while having the IUCD in-situ. Majority of the clients (50.5%) had the knowledge of lUCD through friends. This study has shown that IUCD (TCU 380A) is both safe and effective in Enugu, Nigeria. Its use is for both child spacing and limiting family size.

  16. Intrauterine devices (IUD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007635.htm Intrauterine devices (IUD) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small plastic T-shaped device ...

  17. A randomized trial of the intrauterine contraceptive device vs hormonal contraception in women who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Elizabeth M; Kaseba, Christine; Levy, Jens; Sinkala, Moses; Goldenberg, Robert L; Chi, Benjamin H; Matongo, Inutu; Vermund, Sten H; Mwanahamuntu, Mulindi; Stringer, Jeffrey S A

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) is effective and safe among women who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We randomly assigned 599 postpartum, HIV-infected women in Zambia to receive either a copper IUD or hormonal contraception and followed them for at least 2 years. Women who were assigned randomly to hormonal contraception were more likely to become pregnant than those who were assigned randomly to receive an IUD (rate, 4.6/100 vs 2.0/100 woman-years; hazards ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.7). One woman who was assigned to the IUD experienced pelvic inflammatory disease (crude rate, 0.16/100 woman-years; 95% CI, 0.004-868); there was no pelvic inflammatory disease among those women who were assigned to hormonal contraception. Clinical disease progression (death or CD4+ lymphocyte count dropping below 200 cells/microL) was more common in women who were allocated to hormonal contraception (13.2/100 woman-years) than in women who were allocated to the IUD (8.6/100 woman-years; hazard ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.04-2.1). The IUD is effective and safe in HIV-infected women. The unexpected observation that hormonal contraception was associated with more rapid HIV disease progression requires urgent further study.

  18. Use of effective contraception 6 months after emergency contraception with a copper intrauterine device or ulipristal acetate - a prospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envall, Niklas; Groes Kofoed, Nina; Kopp-Kallner, Helena

    2016-08-01

    Emergency contraception must be followed by the use of an effective method of contraception in order to reduce future risk of unintended pregnancies. Provision of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is highly effective in this regard. The aim of our study was to compare use of an effective method of contraception 6 months following insertion of a copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) or intake of ulipristal acetate (UPA) for emergency contraception (EC). Women (n = 79) presenting with need for EC at an outpatient midwifery clinic chose either Cu-IUD or UPA according to preference. Follow up was 3 and 6 months later through telephone interviews. Primary outcome was use of an effective contraceptive method at the 6-month follow up. Secondary outcomes included use of an effective contraceptive method at 3 months follow up and acceptability of Cu-IUD. A total of 30/36 (83.3%) women who opted for Cu-IUD for EC used an effective contraceptive method 6 months after their first visit compared with 18/31 (58.1%) women who opted for UPA (p = 0.03). In the Cu-IUD group 28/36 (77.8%) were still using Cu-IUD at 6 months and 31/36 (86%) stated that they would recommend the Cu-IUD to others as an EC method. Significantly more women who chose Cu-IUD for EC used an effective method for contraception at the 6-month follow up. The results of this study support increased use of Cu-IUDs for EC. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. The intrauterine device and the intrauterine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen Searle, E

    2014-08-01

    Intrauterine contraception is used by about 100 million women worldwide, making it the most popular form of fertility regulation. In UK community contraception clinics, however, long-acting reversible contraception has increased to 28% of users, and intrauterine contraception accounts for only 8% of methods used by women accessing these services. Potential exists to increase uptake of these more effective methods. In this chapter, we review the clinical advantages, disadvantages and cost-effectiveness of intrauterine contraception. We discuss the management of complications along with advice for trainers, and briefly consider issues in developing countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of human uterine epithelium influenced by the TCu intrauterine contraceptive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, O; Hagenfeldt, K

    1973-10-15

    Biopsies were taken from 3 healthy controls and 4 women who had used the Copper TCu device to determine the influence of the IUD on the secretory mechanism of the uterine epithelium. The normal endometrium possessed apical protrusions containing glycogen and its degradation products. Endometrial biopsies from women with an intrauterine Tatum-T device with copper had these protrusions infrequently. The reduction in apical protrusions was the one structural difference observed between control and TCu-influenced luminal epithelium. This finding might support the view that one effect of the TCu device is to interfere with the secretion of carbohydrates by the epithelium.

  1. Translocation of an Intrauterine Contraceptive Device: Incidental Finding in the Rectosigmoid Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vilallonga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of an intrauterine device (IUD within the colon is rare. Complications have been reported with IUDs among which uterine perforation. Translocation of IUDs to the uterine cavity, to the bladder and also through the wall of the bowel, and sigmoid colon has been reported. We believe there may be a case that surgeons should know the result of despite being a priori gynaecological complication. This paper reports on a case of colon perforation by an IUD.

  2. Two-year continuation of intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants in a mixed-payer setting: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jessica N; Turok, David K; Gawron, Lori M; Law, Amy; Wen, Lonnie; Lynen, Richard

    2017-06-01

    As the popularity of long-acting reversible contraception increases, so does the need for accurate data on method continuation in diverse clinical settings. We determined 2-year continuation rates for the levonorgestrel 52-mg intrauterine device, the copper T380A intrauterine device, and the 68-mg etonogestrel contraceptive implant in an academic healthcare system with mixed-payer reimbursement. The purpose of this study was to examine the proportion and characteristics of women who continue intrauterine device and implant use to 2 years and to relate continuation to device type when controlling for patient characteristics. This retrospective chart review assessed University of Utah Healthcare System patients who had an intrauterine device or contraceptive implant inserted between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2012. We identified users and dates of insertions and removals by querying billing, medication, and procedural data in the Electronic Data Warehouse. Multivariable Poisson regression was conducted to estimate incidence risk ratios and to relate the probability of 2-year continuous use to device type. Data on 8603 device insertions were obtained with the following distribution: levonorgestrel 52-mg intrauterine devices (6459; 75.1%), copper T380A intrauterine devices (1136; 13.2%), and 68-mg etonogestrel implant (1008; 11.7%). Two-year continuation rates were 77.8%, 73.1%, and 75.9%, respectively. There was no statistical difference in 2-year continuation between levonorgestrel 52-mg intrauterine device users (adjusted risk ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.1) and 68-mg etonogestrel implant users (adjusted risk ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.1) compared with copper device users, after we controlled for age, Hispanic ethnicity, payer type, and year of insertion. Older-age, self-pay, or public payer insurance (reference commercial payer) and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with 2-year continuation. Three-quarters of women with an

  3. Intrauterine Devices Penetrated and Migrated: CT Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia Restrepo, Jorge; Lopez, Juan Esteban; Aldana Sepulveda, Natalia; Ruiz Zabaleta, Tania; Mazzaro Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Intrauterine devices have been used for over 40 years, and they constitute the most widely accepted method of contraception among women because of the low rates of complications and low cost. Although uncommon, with the growing use of multidetector CT penetrated and migrated intrauterine devices have become a more common incidental finding. In some cases, intrauterine devices migrate to adjacent viscera, in particular the bladder and bowel and may give rise to symptoms. Consequently tomographic localization and characterization are essential for treatment planning.

  4. Choice of the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, etonogestrel implant or depot medroxyprogesterone acetate for contraception after aspiration abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinauer, Jody E; Upadhyay, Ushma D; Sokoloff, Abby; Harper, Cynthia C; Diedrich, Justin T; Drey, Eleanor A

    2015-12-01

    Women who have abortions are at high risk of contraception discontinuation and subsequent unintended pregnancy. The objective of this analysis was to identify factors associated with choice of highly effective, long-acting, progestin-only contraceptive methods after abortion. Women presenting for surgical abortion who selected the levonorgestrel intrauterine device (IUD), the progestin implant or the progestin injection (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate or DMPA) as their postabortion contraceptives were recruited to participate in a 1-year prospective cohort study. We used multivariable multinomial logistic regression to identify factors associated with choosing long-acting reversible contraceptives (IUD or implant) compared to DMPA. A total of 260 women, aged 18-45 years, enrolled in the study, 100 of whom chose the IUD, 63 the implant and 97 the DMPA. The women were 24.9 years old on average; 36% were black, and 29% were Latina. Fifty-nine percent had had a previous abortion, 66% a prior birth, and 55% were undergoing a second-trimester abortion. In multivariable analyses, compared with DMPA users, women who chose the IUD or the implant were less likely to be currently experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV); reported higher stress levels; weighed more; and were more likely to have finished high school, to have used the pill before and to report that counselors or doctors were helpful in making the decision (all significant at p<.05, see text for relative risk ratios and confidence intervals.) In addition, women who chose the IUD were less likely to be black (p<.01), and women who chose the implant were more likely to report that they would be unhappy to become pregnant within 6 months (p<.05) than DMPA users. A variety of factors including race/ethnicity, past contraceptive use, feelings towards pregnancy, stress and weight were different between LARC and DMPA users. Notably, current IPV was associated with choice of DMPA over the IUD or implant, implying

  5. Four years of experience with the TCu 380A intrauterine contraceptive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivin, I; Tatum, H J

    1981-08-01

    A study of the United States acceptors of the Copper T, model TCu 380A, initiated in 1972, was carried to the completion of 4 years of observation. The 1051 receptors, whose median age was 22.3 years, accumulated a total of 1927 years of use. At the end of 4 years, the cumulative net pregnancy rate was 1.9 per 100 women, and the gross rate was 2.8 per 100. The annual continuation rate over the 4-year interval averaged 77 per 100. The TCu 380A intrauterine device (IUD) has provided extremely effective and undiminishing protection against pregnancy through 4 years of use in a group of young women. This degree of protection has not as yet been equaled when randomized comparative trials have been carried out with other copper-bearing IUDs.

  6. A Lower-Cost Option for Intrauterine Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Kim

    2016-01-01

    In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Liletta (Actavis, Dublin, Ireland), a new intrauterine device for contraception. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) as first-line pregnancy prevention. LARC efficacy rates are similar to those of sterilization, with the possibility for quick return of fertility upon removal of the device. Despite benefits and recommendations for this form of contraception, access and high cost remain barriers to use. Liletta is the first lower-cost option for intrauterine contraception. Available to qualified clinics and health centers at a reduced rate, this device may increase availability and decrease the overall cost to women who desire intrauterine contraception. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  7. Awareness and Interest in Intrauterine Contraceptive Device Use among HIV-Positive Women in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Todd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess awareness of and interest in intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD use among HIV-positive women in Cape Town, South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Methods. HIV-positive women aged 18 through 45 years presenting for care at a primary health care clinic in Cape Town, South Africa participated in this study. Consented participants completed a staff-administered questionnaire in a private setting. Descriptive statistics were generated. Comparisons between demographic and reproductive health-related variables and IUCD awareness and interest were performed with multiple logistic regression. Analyses for IUCD interest excluded women with prior surgical sterilization. Results. Of 277 HIV-positive women, 37% were aware of the IUCD; awareness was independently associated with greater age (adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 1.15, 95%; confidence interval (CI: 1.10–1.20 and not switching contraceptive methods in the last year (AOR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.03–5.83. Following an IUCD information session, 86% of women (=206/240 were interested in IUCD use. IUCD interest was inversely associated with age (AOR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.97 and marginally positively associated with current menstrual bleeding pattern complaints (AOR = 2.14, 95% CI: 0.98–4.68. Conclusions. Despite low levels of method awareness, HIV-positive women in this setting are frequently interested in IUCD use, indicating need for programming to expand method access.

  8. Foreign body granuloma in the anterior abdominal wall mimicking an acute appendicular lump and induced by a translocated copper-T intrauterine contraceptive device: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Maulana Mohammed

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intrauterine contraceptive devices may at times perforate and migrate to adjacent organs. Such uterine perforation usually passes unnoticed with development of potentially serious complications. Case presentation A 25-year-old woman of North Indian origin presented with an acute tender lump in the right iliac fossa. The lump was initially thought to be an appendicular lump and treated conservatively. Resolution of the lump was incomplete. On exploratory laparotomy, a hard suspicious mass was found in the anterior abdominal wall of the right iliac fossa. Wide excision and bisection of the mass revealed a copper-T embedded inside. Examination of the uterus did not show any evidence of perforation. The next day, the patient gave a history of past copper-T Intrauterine contraceptive device insertion. Conclusions Copper-T insertion is one of the simplest contraceptive methods but its neglect with inadequate follow-up may lead to uterine perforation and extra-uterine migration. Regular self-examination for the "threads" supplemented with abdominal X-ray and/or ultrasound in the follow-up may detect copper-T migration early. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of intrauterine contraceptive device migration to the anterior abdominal wall of the right iliac fossa.

  9. Safety of hormonal contraception and intrauterine devices among women with depressive and bipolar disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, H Pamela; Zapata, Lauren B; Berry-Bibee, Erin N; Nanda, Kavita; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2016-12-01

    Women with depressive or bipolar disorders are at an increased risk for unintended pregnancy. To examine the safety of hormonal contraception among women with depressive and bipolar disorders. We searched for articles published through January 2016 on the safety of using any hormonal contraceptive method among women with depressive or bipolar disorders, including those who had been diagnosed clinically or scored above threshold levels on a validated screening instrument. Outcomes included changes in symptoms, hospitalization, suicide and modifications in medication regimens such as increase or decrease in dosage or changes in type of drug. Of 2376 articles, 6 met the inclusion criteria. Of three studies that examined women clinically diagnosed with depressive or bipolar disorder, one found that oral contraceptives (OCs) did not significantly change mood across the menstrual cycle among women with bipolar disorder, whereas mood did significantly change across the menstrual cycle among women not using OCs; one found no significant differences in the frequency of psychiatric hospitalizations among women with bipolar disorder who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), intrauterine devices (IUDs) or sterilization; and one found no increase in depression scale scores among women with depression using and not using OCs, for both those treated with fluoxetine and those receiving placebo. Of three studies that examined women who met a threshold for depression on a screening instrument, one found that adolescent girls using combined OCs (COCs) had significantly improved depression scores after 3 months compared with placebo, one found that OC users had similar odds of no longer being depressed at follow-up compared with nonusers, and one found that COC users were less frequently classified as depressed over 11 months than IUD users. Limited evidence from six studies found that OC, levonorgestrel-releasing IUD and DMPA use among women with depressive or bipolar

  10. A survey on abnormal uterine bleeding among radiographers with frequent MRI exposure using intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, A; Schaap, K; Kromhout, H

    2018-02-01

    Based on a previous case report of menometrorrhagia (prolonged/excessive uterine bleeding, occurring at irregular and/or frequent intervals) in MRI workers with intrauterine devices (IUDs), it was evaluated whether this association could be confirmed. A survey was performed among 381 female radiographers registered with their national association. Logistic regression was used to analyze associations of abnormal uterine bleeding with the frequency of working with MRI scanners, presence near the scanner/in the scanner room during image acquisition, and with scanner strength or type. A total of 68 women reported using IUDs, and 72 reported abnormal uterine bleeding. Compared with unexposed women not using IUDs, the odds ratio in women with IUDs working with MRI scanners was 2.09 (95% confidence interval 0.83-3.66). Associations were stronger if women working with MRI reported being present during image acquisition (odds ratio 3.43, 95% CI 1.26-9.34). Associations with scanner strength or type were not consistent. Radiographers using IUDs who are occupationally exposed to stray fields from MRI scanners report abnormal uterine bleeding more often than their co-workers without an IUD, or nonexposed co-workers with an IUD. In particular, radiographers present inside the scanner room during image acquisition showed an increased risk. Magn Reson Med 79:1083-1089, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. A porous Cu/LDPE composite for copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Xia, Xianping; Qi, Cheng; Xie, Changsheng; Cai, Shuizhou

    2012-02-01

    To improve the rates of both cupric ion release and the utilization of copper in non-porous copper/low-density polyethylene (Cu/LDPE) composite, a porous Cu/LDPE composite is proposed and developed in the present work. Here 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone was chosen as the porogen, ethyl acetate was chosen as the solvent for extraction, and the porous Cu/LDPE composite was obtained by using injection molding and the particulate leaching method. After any residual ethyl acetate remaining inside the porous Cu/LDPE composite had been removed by vacuum drying, the composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and absorption measurement. For comparison, a non-porous Cu/LDPE composite was also characterized in the same way. The results show that the porous structure was successfully introduced into the polymeric base of the non-porous Cu/LDPE composite, and the porous Cu/LDPE composite is a simple hybrid of copper particles and porous LDPE. The results also show that the introduction of a porous structure can improve the cupric ion release rate of the non-porous Cu/LDPE composite with a certain content of copper particles, indicating that the utilization rate of copper can be improved either the introduction of a porous structure, and that the porous Cu/LDPE composite is another promising material for copper-containing intrauterine devices. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Barriers and enablers to adoption of intrauterine device as a contraceptive method: A multi-stakeholder perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Promoting family planning practices aid considerably in attaining Millennium Development Goals by various mechanisms. Despite concerted health system efforts, adoption of especially reversible contraceptive methods such as intrauterine devices (IUDs has remained negatively skewed in India, which is the pioneer country to implement Family Planning programme way back in 1952. Although few studies in India have looked into the reasons for its nonacceptance, literature from Odisha was scant and hence the study was undertaken. Methodology: A cross-sectional study using qualitative methods was done in the Mahanga Tehsil of Cuttack district. In-depth interviews were conducted with women of reproductive age (WRA and focused group discussions (FGDs among health workers and health professionals were held separately. Data analysis was done using thematic framework approach supported by Atlas Ti software. Results: There were 31 in-depth interviews with WRA, two FGDs with health workers, and one FGD with health professionals. Availability of IUD services was low and wherever available, being located far away affected its physical accessibility. Most women were reluctant to ask health workers about services owing to their shyness while many women felt using IUDs breached their autonomy and privacy. The existence of fear and misconceptions regarding its use rooting from lack of knowledge and poor service quality also impeded its adoption by women. Conclusion: There is a pressing need to enhance the demand of IUDs by dispelling the myths among women through effective information, education, and communication and also to improve the availability of IUDs.

  13. A new endoscopic method of retrieval of a migrated and transmurally embedded intrauterine contraceptive device in the rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, T S; Gokul, B J; Yogesh, K Raja; Sathiamoorthy, S; Prasad, M S; Viveksandeep, T C; Ali, M Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    A 45-year-old lady presented with left lower quadrant abdominal pain and hematochezia of 1 month duration. She had Copper-T, an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) inserted in the immediate post-partum period 25 years ago elsewhere and was lost to follow up. CT abdomen done 2 weeks earlier before reporting to us revealed a migrated and translocated IUCD embedded in the right lateral wall of the rectum. On colonoscopy, an area of friable mucosal nodule was noticed in the right lateral wall 10 cm from the anal verge but the IUCD was not visible intraluminally. Fluoroscopy showed the horizontal limb lying in close approximation with the rectal wall and the vertical limb of the IUCD embedded at the site of mucosal nodule in the rectum. After a careful endoscopic mucosotomy, the vertical limb was exposed and the Copper-T in its entirety was retrieved using a polypectomy snare. The mucosal defect was closed with hemoclips. She became asymptomatic after the procedure.

  14. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 3 of 4): Chapter 7--Intrauterine Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Mansouri, Shireen

    2016-02-01

    device and the LNG-IUS significantly decrease the risk of endometrial cancer. (II-2) 4. The risk of uterine perforation decreases with inserter experience but is higher in postpartum and breastfeeding women. (II-2) 5. The risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is increased slightly in the first month after intrauterine contraceptive (IUC) insertion, but the absolute risk is low. Exposure to sexually transmitted infections and not the IUC itself is responsible for PID occurring after the first month of use. (II-2) 6. Nulliparity is not associated with an increased risk of intrauterine contraceptive expulsion. (II-2) 7. Ectopic pregnancy with an intrauterine contraceptive (IUC) is rare, but when a pregnancy occurs with an IUC in situ, it is an ectopic pregnancy in 15% to 50% of the cases. (II-2) 8. In women who conceive with an intrauterine contraceptive (IUC) in place, early IUC removal improves outcomes but does not entirely eliminate risks. (II-2) 9. Intrauterine contraceptives do not increase the risk of infertility. (II-2) 10. Immediate insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive (10 minutes postplacental to 48 hours) postpartum or post-Caesarean section is associated with a higher continuation rate compared with insertion at 6 weeks postpartum. (I) 11. Immediate insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive (IUC; 10 minutes postplacental to 48 hours) postpartum or post-Caesarean section is associated with a higher risk of expulsion. (I) The benefit of inserting an IUC immediately postpartum or post-Caesarean section outweighs the disadvantages of increased risk of perforation and expulsion. (II-C) 12. Insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive in breastfeeding women is associated with a higher risk of uterine perforation in the first postpartum year. (II-2) 13. Immediate insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive (IUC) post-abortion significantly reduces the risk of repeat abortion (II-2) and increases IUC continuation rates at 6 months. (I) 14. Antibiotic prophylaxis

  15. Chinese experience with intrauterine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilian, Xiao

    2007-06-01

    Changes in the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) for contraception in China in the past 10 years are reviewed. Replacement of the inert stainless steel ring with copper-bearing IUDs was an essential decision to improve the efficacy of the IUDs. The most commonly used, TCu380A, TCu220C and MLCu375, and those developed in China, such as the uterine-shaped UCu300 IUD and gamma Cu380 IUD, are reviewed. Studies of MLCu375 and TCu380A for emergency contraception revealed a highly effective method, which could prevent over 96% of unwanted pregnancies. Use of levonorgestrel-releasing system provides both contraceptive and therapeutic effects in the treatment of menorrhagia.

  16. Utilization of intrauterine contraceptive devices by patients of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnhill, M S

    1996-12-01

    Since 1988, IUD use by patients at Planned Parenthood of America clinics has remained constant at 0.7% of the approximately 1.8 million patients receiving contraception each year. In the past 7 years, only 18 perforations, 60 infections, and 27 difficult removals have been reported from these clinics. Moreover, there has been no evidence that the IUD poses health risks to acceptors or a major expense to the provider's malpractice insurance company. In large part, Planned Parenthood's excellent safety record associated with IUD use reflects implementation of a uniform set of IUD guidelines. These guidelines permit Planned Parenthood clinicians to provide prophylactic antibiotics in cases where an acceptor considered at low current risk of sexually transmitted diseases has a past history of pelvic inflammatory disease, gonorrhea, chlamydia infection, or mucopurulent cervicitis. Implementation of these guidelines is augmented by careful physical examination and explanation of the risks and benefits of IUD use. Planned Parenthood also distributes forms outlining the risk associated with pregnancy with an IUD in place. Finally, Planned Parenthood, unlike most other clinics, makes IUDs available to nulliparous women who clearly understand the risks.

  17. Vesical Calculus 10 Years Post Missing Intrauterine Contraceptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravesical migration of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is rare. Early diagnosis of this rare entity is difficult because of its non‑specific manifestations and very low index of suspicion. We present this case of bladder stone following intravesical migration of IUCD found to have been missing since insertion 10 years ...

  18. Health during prolonged use of levonorgestrel 20 micrograms/d and the copper TCu 380Ag intrauterine contraceptive devices: a multicenter study. International Committee for Contraception Research (ICCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivin, I; Stern, J

    1994-01-01

    To measure and compare the incidence of adverse events during use of two medicated intrauterine devices (IUDs). A multicenter prospective 7-year randomized study. Family planning clinics, primarily in developing countries. Women age 18 to 38 years at admission, desiring contraception and without contraindications to IUDs. Incidence of complaints, conditions, and rates of specific termination for each IUD. Subjects recorded menstrual events, and clinical staff registered all complaints and conditions found on examination at four first-year clinic visits and at semiannual visits thereafter. Difference in rates were analyzed by chi 2 statistics. Annual pregnancy rates for each IUD averaged 0.2/100 women whereas upper genital tract infection occurred at rates of 0.6 to 0.7 per 100 years of use. The levonorgestrel-releasing IUD significantly decreased bleeding and spotting days in comparison with historical data for noncontraceptors and with the copper-medicated IUD. Dysmenorrhea, vaginitis, and myoma in women with the levonorgestrel IUD were markedly decreased in comparison with the experience of copper IUD users. Significantly higher rates of amenorrhea, delayed ovarian follicular atresia, skin and hair conditions, and headache were observed with the steroid IUD than with the copper-releasing IUD. Rates of reported adverse effects for either IUD were highest in the first 2 years of use and among women under age 25. Long-term use of copper or levonorgestrel IUDs is characterized by very low rates of pregnancy and by a low and declining annual incidence of side effects, including pelvic infection and borderline anemia. The levonorgestrel-releasing IUD reduced the incidence of bleeding and, in the long term, of myoma and myoma-related surgery in comparison with the copper T IUD. Both IUDs proved highly acceptable and had few unanticipated side effects.

  19. Forgotten intrauterine device contributing to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel O. Igberase

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to show that long standing forgotten intrauterine device contributes to infertility, reporting three cases presented at Central Hospital Warri, Nigeria, a government tertiary health center. Three cases of forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD contributing to infertility were seen. Two were inserted for contraceptive reasons while one was inserted while being managed for uterine synechae. Health care providers should ensure proper documentation of all procedures carried out, adequate counseling which should include taking an informed consent and also ensuring both short and long term follow up of their clients. Also all patients being evaluated for infertility and clients with past history of intrauterine device must have a speculum examination and ultrasound scan carried out.

  20. Chronic Cervical Perforation by an Intrauterine Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Oruç Koltan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The intrauterine device (IUD is a widely used, highly effective method of birth control. Uterine perforation is a rare yet serious complication and is usually seen during insertion of the IUD. A regular examination is necessary for follow-up. We present a patient with an IUD that had perforated the cervix. The diagnosis was made during routine gynecological examination, and the patient was treated in a timely manner before any complications such as ectopic pregnancy, intrauterine pregnancy, infection or irreversible harm to the cervix arose. This case stresses the importance of regular visits to maintain health and diagnose possible adverse effects of intrauterine contraceptive methods.

  1. Non-contraceptive benefits of hormonal and intrauterine reversible contraceptive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, Luis; Valeria Bahamondes, M; Shulman, Lee P

    2015-01-01

    Most contraceptive methods present benefits beyond contraception; however, despite a large body of evidence, many healthcare professionals (HCPs), users and potential users are unaware of those benefits. This review evaluates the evidence for non-contraceptive benefits of hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods. We searched the medical publications in PubMed, POPLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE and LILACS for relevant articles, on non-contraceptive benefits of the use of hormonal and intrauterine reversible contraceptive methods, which were published in English between 1980 and July 2014. Articles were identified using the following search terms: 'contraceptive methods', 'benefits', 'cancer', 'anaemia', 'heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB)', 'endometrial hyperplasia', 'endometriosis' and 'leiomyoma'. We identified, through the literature search, evidence that some combined oral contraceptives have benefits in controlling HMB and anaemia, reducing the rate of endometrial, ovarian and colorectal cancer and ectopic pregnancy as well as alleviating symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Furthermore, the use of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system also controls HMB and anaemia and endometrial hyperplasia and cancer, reduces rates of endometrial polyps in users of tamoxifen and alleviates pain associated with endometriosis and adenomyosis. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate controls crises of pain associated with sickle cell disease and endometriosis. Users of the etonogestrel-releasing contraceptive implant have the benefits of a reduction of pain associated with endometriosis, and users of the copper intrauterine device have reduced rates of endometrial and cervical cancer. Despite the high contraceptive effectiveness of many hormonal and intrauterine reversible contraceptive methods, many HCPs, users and potential users are concerned mainly about side effects and safety of both hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods, and there is scarce information

  2. Use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices and tubal sterilization and cancer risk in a large prospective study, from 1996 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorjgochoo, Tsogzolmaa; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Hong-Lan; Qian, Han-Zhu; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2009-05-15

    The association of contraceptive methods, including oral contraceptives (OC), intrauterine devices (IUD) and tubal sterilization (TS), with overall and site-specific cancer were prospectively investigated in a cohort of 66,661 Chinese women in Shanghai, 76.7% of whom used contraception. During a median follow-up time of 7.5 years, 2,250 women were diagnosed with cancer. Ever-use of any contraceptive method was not associated with overall cancer risk [adjusted hazard ratio (HR(adj)) = 1.02, 95% CI, 0.92-1.12]. Use of any contraceptive method was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (HR(adj) = 1.68, 95% CI, 1.08-2.62) and reduced risk of thyroid cancer (HR(adj) = 0.63, 95% CI, 0.38-1.04). Risk of gallbladder cancer increased with ever use of OC (HR(adj) = 2.38, 95% CI, 1.26-4.49). IUD use was associated with a possible reduced risk of thyroid cancer (HR(adj) = 0.64, 95% CI, 0.38-1.07). Longer duration of IUD use decreased risk for breast, thyroid and lung cancers. Ever having a TS was associated with increased uterine body cancer (HR(adj) = 2.50, 95% CI, 1.47-4.25) and decreased risk of stomach cancer (HR(adj) = 0.59, 95% CI, 0.39-0.91). We did not find any contraceptive method to be related to the risk of ovarian cancer but the analyses were based on few events. Although chance findings are a likely explanation for some of the associations found in our study, these findings suggest that various contraceptive methods or reproductive patterns may play a role in the etiology of cancer. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Acceptance rate, probability of follow-up, and expulsion of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device offered at two primary health centers, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Shashi; Archana, S; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Ahamed, Farhad; Haldar, Partha

    2016-01-01

    Acceptance rate of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) offered through a public health approach is unknown. Our aim was to describe the acceptance rate, expulsion, and follow-up and factors associated with it when PPIUCD was offered to women delivering at two primary health centers (PHCs). We analyzed routine health data of deliveries at two PHCs in district Faridabad, India between May and December 2014, having sociodemographic variables, obstetric history, and during the follow-up check-up at 6-weeks postpartum for in situ status of intrauterine contraceptive device, side effects, and complications. The overall acceptance rate among those eligible for PPIUCD was 39% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 35.1-42.9). Independent predictor of acceptance was a monthly family income of 25 years (O.R.: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.03-4.73), gravida ≥4 (O.R.: 4.01, 95% CI: 1.28-12.56), and a living previous-child (O.R.: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.04-2.19). Acceptance rate of PPIUCD was higher than that reported in literature. Women from lower income family, having at least one living child, and having attended antenatal care clinic were more likely to accept PPIUCD.

  4. Perforation of the Rectum by a Copper-T Intrauterine Contraceptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intrauterine contraceptive devices are among the most effective forms of contraceptives available. They provide long term reversible protection from pregnancy and are currently the most popular and widely use reversible contraceptive method. Though they are associated with few side effects, perforation of the uterus ...

  5. A comparison of the expected and actual pain experienced by women during insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brima N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nataliya Brima,1 Hannat Akintomide,2 Vivian Iguyovwe,3 Susan Mann4 1Medical Statistics, Centre for Sexual Health and HIV Research, Research Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, UK; 2Sexual and Reproductive Health, CNWL Camden Provider Services, Margaret Pyke Centre, London, UK; 3Department of Sexual and Reproductive Health, Camberwell Sexual Health Centre, Denmark Hill, London, UK; 4Sexual and Reproductive Health, Kings College Hospital, London, UK Objective: To compare the expected and actual pain experienced with the insertion of intrauterine contraception in women, and to determine whether either of these are related to their personal circumstances, or affected their satisfaction with the procedure. Design: A convenience sample of 89 women aged 15–50 years attending a sexual health clinic for same day intrauterine contraception insertion were given a questionnaire that they completed following the procedure. The women were asked to rate their expectation of pain prior to insertion and to rate the actual pain they experienced immediately after insertion, on a scale of 1–10, with 10 being severe pain. Information on the women's circumstances and their level of satisfaction with the procedure was also obtained. Results: Overall, the median actual pain experienced by women during insertion (4 was significantly lower than the expected pain median (6 (P<0.001. For those women who had not had a previous vaginal delivery, actual pain was significantly higher compared with women who had had a previous vaginal delivery (median [interquartile range]: 6 [3.5–7.5] and 3 [1–5], P<0.001, respectively, but there was no significant difference between expected and actual pain experiences. In women who had a previous vaginal delivery, actual pain was much lower than expected (P<0.001. Neither actual nor expected pain experiences were linked to any other sociodemographic reproductive health or service use

  6. Long-term risk of reproductive cancer among Vietnamese women using the quinacrine hydrochloride pellet system vs. intrauterine devices or tubal ligation for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judith K; Tave, Arlene; Pezzullo, John C; Kardia, Sharon; Lippes, Jack

    2017-04-01

    To determine the long-term risk of reproductive tract cancer in women using the quinacrine hydrochloride pellet system of permanent contraception (QS) relative to the comparable risk in women using Copper T intrauterine device (IUD) or tubal ligation surgery (TL) for long-term or permanent contraception. This was a retrospective cohort study, conducted in the Northern Vietnamese provinces of Ha Nam, Nam Dinh, Ninh Binh and Thai Binh. Women who had their first QS procedure, last IUD insertion or TL between 1989 and 1996 were interviewed regarding post-procedure health outcomes, particularly reproductive tract cancers. A 95% response rate resulted in 21,040 completed interviews. Reproductive cancer incidence rates were very low (5.77/100,000 women years of follow-up time; 95%CI = 3.72-8.94). No significant excess hazard of reproductive tract cancer was associated with QS. No significant excess long-term risk of reproductive tract cancer was found after an average 16 years of follow-up among a large group of women using QS vs. IUD/TL for contraception.

  7. Anticipated pain as a predictor of discomfort with intrauterine device placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dina, Blair; Peipert, Leah J; Zhao, Qiuhong; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2018-02-01

    Intrauterine devices have been gaining popularity for the past 2 decades. Current data report that >10% of women who use contraception are using an intrauterine device. With intrauterine device is one of the most effective forms of long-acting reversible contraception, yet evidence shows that fear of pain during intrauterine device placement deters women from choosing an intrauterine device as their contraceptive method. The objective of this analysis was to estimate the association between anticipated pain with intrauterine device placement and experienced pain. We also assessed other factors associated with increased discomfort during intrauterine device placement. We hypothesized that patients with higher levels of anticipated pain would report a higher level of discomfort during placement. We performed a secondary analysis of the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. There were 9256 patients enrolled in Contraceptive CHOICE Project from the St. Louis region from 2007-2011; data for 1149 subjects who came for their first placement of either the original 52-mg levonorgestrel intrauterine system or the copper intrauterine device were analyzed in this study. Patients were asked to report their anticipated pain before intrauterine device placement and experienced pain during placement on a 10-point visual analog scale. We assessed the association of anticipated pain, patient demographics, reproductive characteristics, and intrauterine device type with experienced pain with intrauterine device placement. The mean age of Contraceptive CHOICE Project participants in this subanalysis was 26 years. Of these 1149 study subjects, 44% were black, and 53% were of low socioeconomic status. The median expected pain score was 5 for both the levonorgestrel intrauterine system and the copper intrauterine device; the median experienced pain score was 5 for the levonorgestrel intrauterine system and 4 for the copper intrauterine device. After we controlled for parity, history of

  8. Immediate postpartum intrauterine device and implant program outcomes: a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggebroten, Jennifer L; Sanders, Jessica N; Turok, David K

    2017-07-01

    In-hospital placement of intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants following vaginal and cesarean delivery is increasingly popular and responds to maternal motivation for highly effective postpartum contraception. Immediate postpartum intrauterine device insertion is associated with higher expulsion than interval placement, but emerging evidence suggests that the levonorgestrel intrauterine device may have a higher expulsion rate than the copper intrauterine device. This study evaluated in-hospital provision, expulsion, and 6-month continuation of immediate postpartum copper T380 intrauterine devices, levonorgestrel intrauterine devices, and contraceptive implants. We offered enrollment in this prospective observational trial to women presenting to the University of Utah labor and delivery unit from October 2013 through February 2016 who requested an intrauterine device or implant for postpartum contraception during prenatal care or hospitalization at the time of delivery. Following informed consent, participants completed questionnaires prior to hospital discharge and at 3 and 6 months postpartum. Data on expulsions at 6 months were validated by chart abstraction. During the study period, 639 patients requested a postpartum intrauterine device or implant and 350 patients enrolled in prospective follow-up prior to discharge from the hospital. Among enrollees, 325 (93%) received their preferred contraceptive device prior to hospital discharge: 88 (27%) copper intrauterine device users, 123 (38%) levonorgestrel intrauterine device users, and 114 (35%) implant users. Participants predominantly were Hispanic (90%), were multiparous (87%), reported a household income device recipients (89%) completed follow-up. Among levonorgestrel intrauterine device users 17% reported expulsions relative to 4% of copper intrauterine device users. The adjusted hazard ratio for expulsion was 5.8 (confidence interval, 1.3-26.4). There was no statistically significant difference in

  9. Role of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system in effective contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attia AM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abdelhamid M Attia,1 Magdy M Ibrahim,1 Ahmed M Abou-Setta21Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 2George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation, University of Manitoba/Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Winnipeg, MB, CanadaAbstract: Norgestrel, a synthetic progestin chemically derived from 19-nortestosterone, is six times more potent than progesterone, with variable binding affinity to various steroid receptors. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG IUS provides a long-acting, highly effective, and reversible form of contraception, with a pearl index of 0.18 per 100 women-years. The locally released hormone leads to endometrial concentrations that are 200–800 times those found after daily oral use and a plasma level that is lower than that with other forms of levonorgestrel-containing contraception. The contraceptive effect of the LNG IUS is achieved mainly through its local suppressive effect on the endometrium, leading to endometrial thinning, glandular atrophy, and stromal decidualization without affecting ovulation. The LNG IUS is generally well tolerated. The main side effects are related to its androgenic activity, which is usually mild and transient, resolving after the first few months. Menstrual abnormalities are also common but well tolerated, and even become desirable (eg, amenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, and oligomenorrhea with proper counseling of the patient during the choice of the method of contraception. The satisfaction rates after 3 years of insertion are high, reaching between 77% and 94%. The local effect of the LNG IUS on the endometrium and low rates of systemic adverse effects have led to its use in other conditions rather than contraception, as for the treatment of endometrial hyperplasia, benign menorrhagia, endometriosis, adenomyosis, and uterine fibroids.Keywords: levonorgestrel, intrauterine device, contraception, family planning, Mirena, Skyla

  10. Counseling Adolescents About the Intrauterine Contraceptive Device: A Comparison of Primary Care Pediatricians With Family Physicians and Obstetrician-Gynecologists in the Bronx, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Susan E; Cohen, Hillel W; Santelli, John S; McKee, M Diane

    2015-07-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is a highly effective contraceptive, yet not all primary care providers (PCPs) counsel adolescents about IUDs. We sought to describe PCPs' frequency of counseling adolescents about IUDs and identify whether different factors are associated with frequent counseling by pediatricians compared with family physicians and gynecologists. Surveyed PCPs affiliated with a Bronx, New York academic institution. Frequent counseling of female adolescents about IUDs. Frequent counseling was lower in pediatricians compared with family physicians and gynecologists (35.8% and 81.6%, respectively, P < .001). Among all PCP types, frequent counseling was associated with feeling more competent counseling and managing expected IUD side effects (P < .001). Other significant variables included inserting IUDs themselves (P < .001, family physicians and gynecologists) or having access to an inserter in their office (P = .04, pediatricians). Correlates of frequent IUD counseling differed according to PCP specialty. Our results suggest that interventions to increase IUD counseling should focus on improving PCPs' competency around counseling and side effect management as well as increasing access to IUD inserters. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The impact of physicians' communication styles on evaluation of physicians and information processing: A randomized study with simulated video consultations on contraception with an intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bientzle, Martina; Fissler, Tim; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed at examining the impact of different types of physicians' communication styles on people's subsequent evaluation of physician attributes as well as on their information processing, attitude and decision making. In a between-group experiment, 80 participants watched one of three videos in which a gynaecologist displayed a particular communication style in a consultation situation on contraception with an intrauterine device. We compared doctor-centred communication (DCC) vs patient-centred communication (PCC) vs patient-centred communication with need-orientation (PCC-N). In the PCC condition, participants perceived the physician to be more empathetic and more competent than in the DCC condition. In the DCC condition, participants showed less attitude change compared to the other conditions. In the PCC-N condition, the physician was perceived as more empathetic and more socially competent than in the other conditions. However, participants acquired less knowledge in the PCC-N condition. We conclude that appropriate application of particular communication styles depends on specific consultation goals. Our results suggest that patients' needs should be addressed if the main goal is to build a good relationship, whereas a traditional PCC style appears to be more effective in communicating factual information. © 2016 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The intrauterine device: dispelling the myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble-Haas, S L

    1998-11-01

    The worldwide popularity and usage of intrauterine devices (IUDs) plummeted in the 1970s, when grim reports of septic abortions and pelvic inflammatory disease were published. Although the Dalkon Shield ultimately was determined to be the culprit for these problems, the reputation of all IUDs was damaged, and their popularity spiraled downward. The stigma continues, despite the proven safety and efficacy of newer IUDs, particularly the ParaGard T 380A and the Progestasert, which are now the only two IUDs approved for use in the United States. This article will review how the IUD works and will focus on dispelling the misconceptions surrounding its use. Rigid patient-selection guidelines and strict aseptic insertion techniques can provide safe, long-term, cost-effective, and highly efficacious contraception for monogamous women. Practitioners who follow these guidelines should not fear prescribing IUDs as a contraceptive device in the appropriate female population.

  13. Immediate Intrauterine Device Insertion Following Surgical Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Eva; Bednarek, Paula H

    2015-12-01

    Placement of an intrauterine device (IUD) immediately after a first or second trimester surgical abortion is safe and convenient and decreases the risk of repeat unintended pregnancy. Immediate postabortion IUD placement is not recommended in the setting of postprocedure hemorrhage, uterine perforation, infection, or hematometra. Otherwise, there are few contraindications to IUD placement following surgical abortion. Sexually transmitted infection screening should follow US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. No additional antibiotics are needed beyond those used for the abortion. Placing immediate postabortion IUDs makes highly-effective long-acting reversible contraception more accessible to women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptive devices in Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The uptake of long acting reversible contraceptive was high; with Depo Provera as the most commonly used contraceptive method in The Gambia. There seemed to be an increase in the uptake of implants; with intrauterine contraceptive device being the least commonly used method. Keywords: Uptake, LARC ...

  15. [Intra-uterine device and nulliparous women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trignol-Viguier, N; Blin, E; Marret, H

    2014-06-01

    Intra-uterine device (IUD) is one of the birth control methods, which is available for nulliparous women, even though misconceptions still remain in medical or popular opinion. Only 1.3 % of nulliparous have a IUD as contraception in France while it is the second methods used by all women, after pill. The best contraception is the one chosen by women; however, the choice for a nulliparous of an IUD may be really difficult, despite the increasing number of women wishing to use it. Long-acting reversible contraceptives utilization, including IUD, is probably one of the issues to decrease the unintended pregnancies. An exhaustive and clear information about IUD is necessary to allow an informed and real choice. This prescription must consider contraindications and medical conditions for safe insertion, especially to avoid infection by screening STD (Chlamydia trachomatis and Nesseria gonorrhoeae) in nulliparous womeneffected with usual precautions and short or SL IUD preferred. Even if side effects such as expulsion, pelvic pains or dysmenorrhea are more frequent by nulliparous, IUD is a first intention choice for contraception to be consider, that women could obtain easily, including in emergency contraception situation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The antifertility effectiveness of a novel copper-containing composite used in intrauterine contraceptive devices and the releasing behavior of cupric ions contained in the composite in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiangchi; Hu, Shanshan; Meng, Tianqing; Suo, Jinping; Xiong, Chengliang

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the antifertility effectiveness of a novel copper-containing composite used in intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) that contain cupric chloride/silicon dioxide/poly(vinyl alcohol) (CuCl₂/SiO₂/PVA) and the releasing behavior of cupric ions in the composite into the serum and uterine fluid in rats. Two hundred and forty sexually mature female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups: sham-operated control group (n=20), bulk copper group (Cu group, n=40), SiO₂/PVA group (n=40), CuCl₂/SiO₂/PVA groups I (n=40, copper ion was released from IUD at a rate of 5-10 mcg/220 mm² per day) and II (n=40, copper ion was released from IUD at a rate of 10-20 mcg/220 mm² per day), and normal control group (n=20). IUD was inserted into the uterus of rats after acclimatization of 1 week. At different time points after implantation of the IUDs, cupric ion concentrations were measured in the serum and local uterine fluid in each group by flame atomic absorption, respectively. After 30 days of insertion, half of the rats in each group were mated with fertile male rats, and the antifertility rates were observed at 14 days of pregnancy. After the IUDs were removed, the remaining rats in each group were mated again to determine their fertility. Antifertility rates in the Cu group and CuCl₂/SiO₂/PVA groups I and II were 100%, and each of these rates was significantly higher than that in the other groups (p.05). No significant change in time dependence was found for the serum cupric ion concentrations in each group (p>.05), while the local uterine fluid cupric ion concentrations in the other groups were significantly lower than those in the Cu group (pcontraceptive devices (CuCl₂/SiO₂/PVA composite IUD) had a low pregnancy rate and high contraceptive efficacy without a burst release of cupric ions in the initial days of application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. IUD in first-trimester abortion: immediate intrauterine contraceptive devices insertion vs delayed insertion following the next menstruation bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Vrachnis, Nikolaos; Grapsa, Anastasia; Tsagias, Nikolaos; Pinidis, Petros; Liberis, Anastasios; Ammari, Alexandros; Grapsas, Xenofon; Galazios, Georgios; Liberis, Vasileios

    2014-07-01

    Approximately 21 days after an abortion, ovulation occurs in 50 % of women. Installation of an IUD directly after induced or spontaneous abortion offers immediate contraceptive protection. The purpose of the present study was to weigh up contraceptive safety and adverse reactions of IUD inserted directly after first-trimester abortion under general or paracervical anesthesia as against the fitting of IUD in the days of the next menstrual cycle without anesthesia. During the period May 1987 to October 2010, 73 women (Group A) underwent an immediate post-abortion insertion IUD after a first-trimester spontaneous or induced abortion under general or local paracervical anesthesia and 69 participants (Group B) received IUD during the next menstrual cycle without anesthesia. Questionnaires were completed by all the women of the study with respect to the effects of IUD. The women were examined every 3 months for 1 year after the fitting of the IUD in the out-patient department of the University Obstetrics Gynecological Department of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece. The demographic characteristics of the women of the two groups were similar. The age of the women ranged between 19 and 44 years, while 61.98 % were women with one or two children and 38.02 % were women with three or more children. During the first menstrual cycles, with the exception of vaginal hemorrhages (5 %) and adnexitis (1 %), no serious adverse reactions were noted. During the transvaginal ultrasonography checks in both groups, no observation was made of any dislocation of the IUD, except for two cases in the subgroup of those women with paracervical anesthesia and one case in the women of Group B. As concerns the questionnaire with regard to the women's subjective evaluation of IUD, satisfactory answers were given. There were no differences between the two groups either with respect to the security of the supplied contraceptive methods or to the development of side effects.

  18. A 3-year multicentre randomized controlled trial of etonogestrel- and levonorgestrel-releasing contraceptive implants, with non-randomized matched copper-intrauterine device controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, Luis; Brache, Vivian; Meirik, Olav; Ali, Moazzam; Habib, Ndema; Landoulsi, Sihem

    2015-11-01

    Is there any difference in the clinical performance of the 3-year one-rod etonogestrel (ENG)- and the 5-year two-rod levonorgestrel (LNG)-releasing contraceptive implants during 3 years of insertion, and between implant and intrauterine device (IUD) contraception, in particular complaints possibly related to hormonal contraceptives? The cumulative contraceptive effectiveness after 3 years and method continuation through 2.5 years were not significantly different between ENG and LNG implants, but both outcomes were significantly worse in the non-randomized age-matched group of IUD users than in the combined implant group. ENG- and LNG-releasing implants are safe and highly efficacious contraceptives with pregnancy rates reported to be 0.0-0.5 per 100 women-years (W-Y). No head-to-head comparative study of the two implants has been undertaken, and little information is available on comparisons of complaints of side effects of implant and copper IUD users. This was an open parallel group RCT with 1:1 allocation ratio of the ENG and the LNG implants with non-randomized control group of women choosing TCu380A IUD to address lack of reliable data on common side effects typically attributed to the use of progestogen-only contraceptives. After device(s) placement, follow-ups were at 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months, and semi-annually thereafter for 3 years or until pregnancy, removal or expulsion of the implant/IUD occurred. The study took place in family planning clinics in Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic, Hungary, Thailand, Turkey and Zimbabwe. Women seeking long-term contraception were enlisted after an eligibility check and informed consent, and 2982 women were enrolled: 1003, 1005 and 974 in the ENG-implant, LNG-implant and IUD groups, respectively; 995, 997 and 971, respectively, were included in the per protocol analysis reported here. ENG and LNG implants each had the same 3-year cumulative pregnancy rate of 0.4 per 100 W-Y [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-1.4]. A weight

  19. Temporal trends of copper-bearing intrauterine device discontinuation: a population-based birth-cohort study of contraceptive use among rural married women in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Tan, Xiaodong; Song, Xiangjing; Zhang, Kaining; Fang, Jing; Peng, Lin; Qi, Wencai; Nie, Zonghui; Li, Ming; Deng, Rui; Yan, Chaofang

    2015-03-01

    Copper-bearing intrauterine device (IUD) insertion for long-term contraceptive use is high in China, but there has been evidence that first-year discontinuation rate of copper-bearing IUD has also increased rapidly in recent years especially among rural married women. To investigate long-term use of copper-bearing IUD, the authors examined the 7-year temporal trends of copper-bearing IUD discontinuation in a population-based birth-cohort study among 720 rural married women in China, from 2004 to 2012. Women requesting contraception were followed-up twice per year after the insertion of IUD. The gross cumulative life table discontinuation rates were calculated for each of the main reasons for discontinuation as well as for all reasons combined. By the end of 7 years, 384 discontinuations were observed. With a stepped-up trend, the gross cumulative life table rate for discontinuation increased from 10.06 (95% confidence interval = 7.86-12.27) per 100 women by the first year to 52.69 (95% confidence interval = 48.94-56.44) per 100 women by the end of 7 years, which increased rapidly in the first 2 years after copper-bearing IUD insertion, flattened out gradually in the following 2 years, then increased again in the last 3 years. Among reported method failure, expulsion and side effects were the main reasons for discontinuation of the copper-bearing IUD but not pregnancy. Personal reasons, such as renewal by personal will had influenced copper-bearing IUD use since the second year and should not be neglected. Based on this study, the temporal trends of copper-bearing IUD discontinuation was in a stepped-up trend in 7 years after insertion. Both reported method failure (expulsion and side effect) and personal reason had effect on the discontinuation of copper-bearing IUD, but pregnancy was no more the most important reason affecting the use of copper-bearing IUD. © 2014 APJPH.

  20. Reasons for Intrauterine Device Use, Discontinuation and Non-Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The copper intrauterine device (IUD) is a safe, long-acting, and effective method of contraception that is under-utilized in many countries, including Malawi. A unique cohort of women who had enrolled in a trial of postpartum IUD use one year earlier gave insights into reasons for using, discontinuing, or not using the IUD.

  1. Good reasons to reconsider the copper intrauterine device for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modern Copper Intrauterine Devices [Cu IUDs] are extremely safe, highly effective, long acting yet rapidly reversible contraceptives. They are also very cost effective and suitable for use by a wide range of women, including nulliparous as well as HIV infected women. Despite a large body of scientific evidence attesting to its ...

  2. Continuation of copper and levonorgestrel intrauterine devices: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sharon J; Hofler, Lisa G; Modest, Anna M; Harvey, Lara F B; Wu, Lily H; Hacker, Michele R

    2017-07-01

    Studies conflict on whether the duration of use of the copper intrauterine device is longer than that of the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and whether women who continue using intrauterine devices differ from those who discontinue. We sought to assess continuation rates and performance of levonorgestrel intrauterine devices compared with copper intrauterine devices over a 5-year period. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 1164 individuals who underwent intrauterine device placement at an urban academic medical center. The analysis focused on a comparison of continuation rates between those using levonorgestrel intrauterine device and copper intrauterine device, factors associated with discontinuation, and intrauterine device performance. We assessed the differences in continuation at discrete time points, pregnancy, and expulsion rates using χ 2 tests and calculated hazard ratios using a multivariable Cox model. Of 1164 women who underwent contraceptive intrauterine device insertion, 956 had follow-up data available. At 2 years, 64.9% of levonorgestrel intrauterine device users continued their device, compared with 57.7% of copper intrauterine device users (P = .11). At 4 years, continuation rates were 45.1% for levonorgestrel intrauterine device and 32.6% for copper intrauterine device (P intrauterine device and 23.8% for copper intrauterine device (P = .33). Black race, primiparity, and age were positively associated with discontinuation; education was not. The hazard ratio for discontinuation of levonorgestrel intrauterine device compared with copper intrauterine device >4 years was 0.71 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.93) and >5 years was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.64-1.05) after adjusting for race, age, parity, and education. Copper intrauterine device users were more likely to experience expulsion (10.2% copper intrauterine device vs 4.9% levonorgestrel intrauterine device, P intrauterine device vs 0.1% levonorgestrel intrauterine

  3. Unprotected intercourse in the 2 weeks prior to requesting emergency intrauterine contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jessica N; Howell, Laura; Saltzman, Hanna M; Schwarz, E Bimla; Thompson, Ivana S; Turok, David K

    2016-11-01

    Previous emergency contraception studies have excluded women who report >1 episode of unprotected or underprotected intercourse. Thus, clinical recommendations are based on exposure to a single episode of underprotected intercourse. We sought to assess the prevalence and timing of underprotected intercourse episodes among women requesting emergency contraception and to examine the probability of pregnancy following an emergency contraception regimen including placement of either a copper intrauterine device or a levonorgestrel intrauterine device with simultaneous administration of an oral levonorgestrel pill in women reporting multiple underprotected intercourse episodes, including episodes beyond the Food and Drug Administration-approved emergency contraception time frame (6-14 days). Women seeking emergency contraception who had a negative pregnancy test and desired either a copper intrauterine device or levonorgestrel emergency contraception regimen enrolled in this prospective observational study. At enrollment, participants reported the number and timing of underprotected intercourse episodes in the previous 14 days. Two weeks later, participants reported the results of a self-administered home pregnancy test. Of the 176 women who presented for emergency contraception and received a same-day intrauterine device, 43% (n = 76) reported multiple underprotected intercourse episodes in the 14 days prior to presenting for emergency contraception. Women with multiple underprotected intercourse episodes reported a median of 3 events (range 2-20). Two-week pregnancy data were available for 172 (98%) participants. Only 1 participant had a positive pregnancy test. Pregnancy occurred in 0 of 97 (0%; 95% confidence interval, 0-3.7%) women with a single underprotected intercourse episode and 1 of 75 (1.3%; 95% confidence interval, 0-7.2%) women reporting multiple underprotected intercourse episodes; this includes 1 of 40 (2.5%; 95% confidence interval, 0-13.2%) women

  4. Postplacental intrauterine device expulsion by 12 weeks: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldthwaite, Lisa M; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Hyer, Jennifer; Tocce, Kristina; Teal, Stephanie B

    2017-12-01

    An intrauterine device placed immediately following a delivery can serve as an effective and safe contraceptive strategy in the postpartum period. There is limited evidence that the levonorgestrel intrauterine system may have a higher rate of expulsion compared to the copper intrauterine device; however, rates of expulsion for these 2 intrauterine device types have not been compared directly. We sought to compare expulsion rates by 12 weeks' postpartum for the levonorgestrel intrauterine system and copper intrauterine device. We enrolled women who received postplacental intrauterine devices at 2 urban hospitals. Eligible women were ≥18 years old, English- or Spanish-speaking, with singleton vaginal delivery at ≥35 weeks' gestation. Intrauterine devices were inserted within 10 minutes of placental delivery by trained providers using ring forceps or the operator's hand. Intrauterine device location was evaluated via abdominal ultrasound at 24-48 hours' postpartum, and via transvaginal ultrasound 6 and 12 weeks later, categorizing position of the intrauterine device at the fundus, below the fundus but above the internal os, any part of the intrauterine device below the internal os (partial expulsion), or no intrauterine device visualized. Outcomes included intrauterine device expulsion and method continuation. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with expulsion. We enrolled 123 women ages 18-40 years. Of these, 68 (55%) initiated levonorgestrel intrauterine system and 55 (45%) initiated copper intrauterine device. Groups were similar except more copper intrauterine device users were Hispanic (66% vs 38%) and fewer were primiparous (16% vs 31%). Among the 96 (78%) with 12-week follow-up, expulsion was higher for levonorgestrel intrauterine system users (21/55 or 38%) than for copper intrauterine device users (8/41 or 20%) (odds ratio, 2.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-6.55; P = .05). At 24 hours' postpartum, there was no

  5. Louisiana and Mississippi Family Physicians' Contraception Counseling for Adolescents with a Focus on Intrauterine Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Susan E; Coy, Lauren N; Yu, Qingzhao; Muncie, Herbert L

    2016-10-01

    The adolescent pregnancy rate in Louisiana (LA) and Mississippi (MS) is one of the highest in the United States. One approach to decrease that rate is to increase contraceptive use. We sought to characterize LA and MS family physicians' (FPs) contraception counseling for adolescents with a focus on the intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD). DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Online survey of resident and practicing physician members of the LA and MS Academy of FPs. Three hundred ninety-eight of 1616 invited FPs responded; 244 were included in our analysis. When counseling adolescents about contraception, respondents "frequently discussed" oral contraceptives and condoms 87.5% (210/240) and 83.8% (202/241) of the time, respectively. Newer and more highly effective contraceptives such as the ring, patch, IUD, and implant were "frequently discussed" only 34.6% (82/237)-39.3% (92/234) of the time. In the previous 6 months, 56% (136/243) of respondents ever discussed an IUD with an adolescent. Respondents were more likely to have discussed IUDs if they learned IUD insertion during residency, had on-site access to IUD inserters, believed they were competent and/or comfortable with IUD counseling. In 5 clinical scenarios asking whether the respondent would recommend an IUD to a 17- or a 27-year-old patient (in all scenarios patients were eligible for an IUD), respondents were restrictive overall and significantly fewer would recommend an IUD for the adolescent. Our results suggest that there are missed opportunities for full-scope contraception counseling by LA and MS FPs. When these FPs counsel adolescents about contraception they less frequently discuss newer methods and more highly effective methods. Additionally many LA and MS FPs use overly restrictive eligibility criteria when considering IUDs. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ovarian transmigration of intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovati, Marco; Raveglia, Federico; Baisi, Alessandro; De Simone, Matilde; Cioffi, Ugo

    2016-12-01

    Extrauterine translocation of intrauterine device (IUD) to peritoneal cavity is an uncommon event, moreover the ovarian embedding of a transmigrated IUD is very rare, and only two previous cases have been reported in the literature. We present a single case treated with laparoscopy. The aims of this study were to focus attention on the utility of preoperative computed tomography in planning the best surgical approach and to describe the two-port technique. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Menstrual Concerns and Intrauterine Contraception Among Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachel J.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Adolescent obesity has dramatically increased in recent decades, and along with that so have other medical comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and pseudotumor cerebri. Obesity and related comorbidites may be contraindications to hormonal contraception, making contraception counseling of morbidly obese adolescents more challenging. Obese adolescent females seeking bariatric surgery need effective contraception in the postoperative period. This study is designed to determine the acceptance rate of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) and describe common menstrual problems in obese adolescent bariatric surgery patients. Methods This is a historic cohort study of adolescent females who underwent bariatric surgery over a 2-year period at a tertiary referral center for pediatric obesity. Data were systematically abstracted. The percent of patients with menstrual problems and the acceptance rate for the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD were determined. Results Twenty-five adolescents met inclusion criteria. The mean age was 17.4 years (standard deviation [SD] 2.6), and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 51.4 (SD 6.3) kg/m2. Eighty-four percent were white. Twenty-eight percent had menorrhagia, 32% had oligomenorrhea, 40% had dysmenorrhea, and 36% had PCOS. Ninety-two percent (23 of 25) underwent IUD placement. Conclusions There was a high prevalence of menstrual problems among this sample of severely obese adolescent females. The majority accepted the IUD, indicating it is a viable option among this population. PMID:21413894

  8. Intrauterine contraception: the role of general practitioners in four Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.A.; Veldhuis, H.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) use in the Netherlands and the United States is limited to a small group of women, though the risk of infection and pregnancy is small. Therefore, it was of interest to investigate the characteristics of women who choose an IUD as contraceptive method and the influence

  9. Comparison of outcomes at 6 weeks following postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device insertions by doctors and nurses in India: a case–control study☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek; Balasubramaniam, Sudharsanam; Das, Saswati; Srivastava, Ashish; Srivastava, Ashish; Kumar, Somesh; Sood, Bulbul

    2016-01-01

    Objective As part of a strategy to revitalize postpartum family planning services, Government of India revised its policy in 2013 to permit trained nurses and midwives to insert postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (PPIUCDs). This study compares two key outcomes of PPIUCD insertions — expulsion and infection — for physicians and nurses/midwives to generate evidence for task sharing. Study design We analyzed secondary data from the PPIUCD program in seven states using a case–control study design. We included facilities where both doctors and nurses/midwives performed PPIUCD insertions and where five or more cases of expulsion and/or infection were reported during the study period (January–December 2013). For each case of expulsion and infection, we identified a time-matched control who received a PPIUCD at the same facility and had no complaints. We performed a multiple logistic regression analysis focusing on provider cadre while controlling for potential confounding factors. Results In 137 facilities, 792 expulsion and 382 infection cases were matched with 1041 controls. Provider type was not significantly associated with either expulsion [odds ratio (OR) 1.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82–4.12] or infection (OR 0.73; 95% CI: 0.39–1.37). Compared with centralized training, odds of expulsion were higher for onsite (OR 2.32, 95% CI: 1.86–2.89) and on-the-job training (OR 1.23, 95% CI: 1.11–1.36), but odds of infection were lower for onsite (OR 0.45, 95% CI: 0.27–0.75) and on-the-job training (OR 0.31, 95% CI: 0.25–0.37). Conclusion Trained nurses and midwives who conduct deliveries at public health facilities can perform PPIUCD insertions as safely as physicians. Implications Institutional deliveries are increasing in India, but most normal vaginal deliveries at public health facilities are attended by nurses and midwives due to a shortage of physicians. Task sharing with nurses and midwives can increase women's access to and the

  10. Comparison of outcomes at 6 weeks following postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device insertions by doctors and nurses in India: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek; Balasubramaniam, Sudharsanam; Das, Saswati; Srivastava, Ashish; Srivastava, Ashish; Kumar, Somesh; Sood, Bulbul

    2016-04-01

    As part of a strategy to revitalize postpartum family planning services, Government of India revised its policy in 2013 to permit trained nurses and midwives to insert postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (PPIUCDs). This study compares two key outcomes of PPIUCD insertions--expulsion and infection--for physicians and nurses/midwives to generate evidence for task sharing. We analyzed secondary data from the PPIUCD program in seven states using a case-control study design. We included facilities where both doctors and nurses/midwives performed PPIUCD insertions and where five or more cases of expulsion and/or infection were reported during the study period (January-December 2013). For each case of expulsion and infection, we identified a time-matched control who received a PPIUCD at the same facility and had no complaints. We performed a multiple logistic regression analysis focusing on provider cadre while controlling for potential confounding factors. In 137 facilities, 792 expulsion and 382 infection cases were matched with 1041 controls. Provider type was not significantly associated with either expulsion [odds ratio (OR) 1.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82-4.12] or infection (OR 0.73; 95% CI: 0.39-1.37). Compared with centralized training, odds of expulsion were higher for onsite (OR 2.32, 95% CI: 1.86-2.89) and on-the-job training (OR 1.23, 95% CI: 1.11-1.36), but odds of infection were lower for onsite (OR 0.45, 95% CI: 0.27-0.75) and on-the-job training (OR 0.31, 95% CI: 0.25-0.37). Trained nurses and midwives who conduct deliveries at public health facilities can perform PPIUCD insertions as safely as physicians. Institutional deliveries are increasing in India, but most normal vaginal deliveries at public health facilities are attended by nurses and midwives due to a shortage of physicians. Task sharing with nurses and midwives can increase women's access to and the acceptability of quality PPIUCD services. Copyright © 2016 The Authors

  11. Nonpalpable intrauterine device threads: Is it a cause for worry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, S K; Singh, M K; Grewal, D S

    2017-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device is a popular and effective method of contraception. It can be inserted either as an interval procedure or after abortion or delivery. Threads are attached to the vertical limb so that the user can find out the location of the device. Sometimes the threads are not palpable by the user; this study was conducted to find out the reasons for inability to palpate the threads. The retrospective study was conducted over a period of eight years; 110 female patients who complained of inability to feel the threads were included in the study. In most of the cases the device was in the right place. In four cases the device could not be felt on uterine sounding; this could have been due to subendometrial placement of the device. There was no case of perforation by the device. Inability to feel the threads is a common complaint by the patients who are using intrauterine contraceptive device. In most of the cases the device was in correct position and could be localized by clinical examination. Ultrasonography can help in localization of the device; if used at the time of insertion it can confirm proper insertion and location of the device. This will reassure the client and the health care providers.

  12. contraception with intrauterine contraceptive device (iucd)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    between 1st January 1997 and 31st December 2006 is presented. This was a descriptive retrospective study aimed at determining ... are much more effective than the inert first generation IUCD with less side effect profile. ..... Strict aseptic techniques at insertion and prophylactic use of antibiotics may be helpful especially.

  13. Investigation of knowledge level about intrauterine device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hediye Dagdeviren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate a level of knowledge about intrauterine device between females who were examined in our gynecology department. Metods: The study was conducted at Gynecology and Obstetric Department of Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Teaching and Research Hospital between August 2012-November 2012. The study were included 189 patients who accepted to participate. For collecting data; a form of questionnaire was used which has gived information about the intrauterine device (IUD and status of socio-demographic characteristics of the patients. The questionnaire were administered by the researchers in a separate room as a face-to-face interviews. SPSS 20.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA program was used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean age of the women in the study was 31.1 ± 9.9. 44.7% of women were not using any modern contraceptive method. IUD utilization rate was 3.2%. 1.6% of women had never heard IUD, %76.1 women heard copper IUD. 42% of respondents gave the wrong answer to IUD inserted into ovaries. Conclusion: The IUD which is a cheap, does not require patient compliance, and has high efficacy. In this study, we were not found a statisfically significant difference for answers to questions in patients with different socio-demographic characteristics. The main result of the study was; among all parcipitians ,even health care workers there was an important disability about level of knowledge for IUD. It is great importance the whole society, including health professionals must train about family planning. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 440-445

  14. Laparoscopic Retrieval Of Perforated Intrauterine Device ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of successful laparoscopic retrieval of a perforated intrauterine device (Lippes loop). The Lippes loop was inserted after manual intrauterine adhesiolysis as a treatment of uterine synaechia presenting as secondary amenorrhoea of 20 months duration. The uterine perforation in this patient did not occur at ...

  15. Endoscopic Treatment of Intrauterine Device Migration into the Bladder with Stone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Masayuki; Nemoto, Kaoru; Miura, Takafumi; Suzuki, Yasutomo

    2017-01-01

    Background: An intrauterine device is commonly used for contraception globally. Although intrauterine device placement is an effective and safe method of contraception, migration into the bladder with stone formation is a rare and serious complication. The management approaches for an intrauterine device embedded in the bladder include endoscopic procedures and open surgical removal. In this study, we report the case of a patient with recurrent urinary tract infection associated with intrauterine device migration and urolithiasis, who successfully underwent endoscopic treatment combined with laser fragmentation. Case Presentation: A 22-year-old woman presented to our hospital with a 1-month history of lower abdominal pain, hematuria, and pain on urination. Transvaginal ultrasound showed a hyperechoic lesion in the bladder. A plain abdominal radiograph showed the presence of a T-shaped intrauterine device with calculus formation in the pelvis. CT revealed a vesical stone fixed to the top of the bladder wall, and there was no vesicovaginal fistula formation. She had undergone intrauterine device insertion several years previously. Cystoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. She underwent endoscopic lithotripsy, and the intrauterine device was extracted from the bladder wall. Repair of the bladder wall and disappearance of symptoms were confirmed. Conclusion: Endoscopic treatment combined with laser fragmentation of stones surrounding a migrated intrauterine device should be considered as a minimally invasive approach, which can be performed safely.

  16. Knowledge and attitudes of Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists regarding intrauterine contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahamondes L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Luis Bahamondes,1 Maria Y Makuch,1 Ilza Monteiro,1 Victor Marin,2 Richard Lynen3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Central, Petróleos Mexicanos, México City, Mexico; 3Bayer HealthCare, Newark, NJ, USA Background: Intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs, including the copper intrauterine device and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS, are among the reversible contraceptive methods with high effectiveness. However, use is low in many settings, including some Latin American countries, mainly due to the influences of myths, fears, and negative attitudes, not only of users and potential users, but also of different cadres of health care professionals. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of a group of Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists regarding IUCs.Methods: A survey was conducted during a scientific meeting organized in Chile in 2014 to present and discuss updated information about contraception. Obstetricians and gynecologists from 12 Latin American countries, who reported that they provide daily contraception services in both the public and private sectors, participated in the meeting. Participants who agreed to take part in the survey responded to a multiple-choice questionnaire on issues regarding knowledge, use, and attitudes about IUCs.Results: Of the 210 obstetricians and gynecologists participating in the meeting, the respondents to each question varied from 168 (80.0% to 205 (97.6%. Almost 50% recognized that the failure rate of combined oral contraceptives, patches, and vaginal rings is 8%–10%. Furthermore, 10% of the participants did not recognize the high contraceptive effectiveness of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods. Additionally, almost 80% of the respondents answered that they did not offer IUCs to nulligravidas and almost 10% did

  17. Uterine Perforation with the Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device Analysis of Reports from Four National Pharmacovigilance Centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, Kees; Sachs, Bernhardt; Harrison-Woolrych, Mira; Caduff-Janosa, Pia; van Puijenbroek, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Background: Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine devices (LNG-IUD) are commonly used for contraception and other indications in many countries. National pharmacovigilance centres have been receiving reports from healthcare professionals and patients of uterine perforation associated with the use of

  18. Intrauterine device quo vadis? Why intrauterine device use should be revisited particularly in nulliparous women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Goldstuck, Norman; Hasskamp, Thomas; Jandi, Sohela; Pett, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods, including intrauterine devices (IUDs) and the contraceptive implant, are considered the best methods for preventing unintended pregnancies, rapid repeat pregnancy, and abortion in young women. An opinion paper of 2012 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends Mirena and Paragard for use in nulliparous and adolescent women. However, these IUDs are not designed for young women and are not optimal as they often lead to early discontinuation. Objective This article was written with the objective to respond to the urgent need to improve intrauterine contraception as it is likely that the objectives of LARC will not be met without significant improvement of IUD design. Anatomical variations in size and shape of the uterus are not sufficiently considered, producing harm and suffering, which often lead to early removal of the IUD. Proposed problem solving The article describes why IUDs should be revisited to meet the challenge of LARC and proposes how to solve these problems. The opinion statement presented here may be considered provocative but is based on hundreds of women with IUD problems who consult or are referred to the practices of the authors of this article due to the disproportion between the IUD and their small uterine cavity. The solution is simple but requires a revision of the current design of IUDs. One-dimensional (longitudinal) IUDs are likely to be the first option. Framed devices with shortened transverse arm and IUDs which adapt to the width of the given uterus are viewed as second best. Conclusion One of the reasons of the high unintended pregnancy rate in the USA may be the paucity of suitable IUDs. Also, the legal climate in the USA seems to be a problem for developers as many lawsuits have recently been reported. Clinical studies conducted in young nulliparous and adolescent women suggest that IUDs that fit well in the uterine cavity, like a shoe, result in

  19. Intrauterine device quo vadis? Why intrauterine device use should be revisited particularly in nulliparous women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildemeersch D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Wildemeersch,1 Norman Goldstuck,2 Thomas Hasskamp,3 Sohela Jandi,4 Ansgar Pett4 1Gynecological Outpatient Clinic and IUD Training Center, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, Western Cape, South Africa; 3GynMünster, Münster, 4Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Berlin, Germany Background: Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC methods, including intrauterine devices (IUDs and the contraceptive implant, are considered the best methods for preventing unintended pregnancies, rapid repeat pregnancy, and abortion in young women. An opinion paper of 2012 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends Mirena and Paragard for use in nulliparous and adolescent women. However, these IUDs are not designed for young women and are not optimal as they often lead to early discontinuation. Objective: This article was written with the objective to respond to the urgent need to improve intrauterine contraception as it is likely that the objectives of LARC will not be met without significant improvement of IUD design. Anatomical variations in size and shape of the uterus are not sufficiently considered, producing harm and suffering, which often lead to early removal of the IUD. Proposed problem solving: The article describes why IUDs should be revisited to meet the challenge of LARC and proposes how to solve these problems. The opinion statement presented here may be considered provocative but is based on hundreds of women with IUD problems who consult or are referred to the practices of the authors of this article due to the disproportion between the IUD and their small uterine cavity. The solution is simple but requires a revision of the current design of IUDs. One-dimensional (longitudinal IUDs are likely to be the first option. Framed devices with shortened transverse arm and IUDs which adapt to the width of the given

  20. [Intrauterine device: about a rare complication and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallat, Adil; Ibrahimi, Ahmed; Fahsi, Otheman; El Sayegh, Hachem; Iken, Ali; Benslimane, Lounis; Nouini, Yassine

    2017-01-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is the most common contraceptive method used in the world. Transuterine migration is a rare complication, accounting for 1/350 - 1/10000 insertions in the literature. We report the case of a 40-year old patient, who had had an IUD insertion 12-year before, presenting with pelvic and right lower back pain associated with intermittent hematuria and burning during urination. Radiological assessment showed calcific deposits on intra bladder IUD. The patient underwent cystostomy, without any difficulty, allowing stone and IUD extraction. A urinary catheter was left in place for 5 days and then withdrawn. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  1. Mechanisms of action of intrauterine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, M E; Croxatto, H B; Bardin, C W

    1996-12-01

    The major effect of all intrauterine devices (IUD) is to induce a local inflammatory reaction in the endometrium whose cellular and humoral components are released into the uterine cavity. This inflammatory reaction has a variable effect on the reproductive strategy of the species studied. For example, this foreign body reaction can be localized within the uterus of rodents; and in farm animals it can have striking extrauterine effects. Thus, the action of IUDs in humans cannot be discerned from animals. In humans, copper ions released from Cu-IUDs enhance the inflammatory response and reach concentrations in the luminal fluids of the genital tract that are toxic for spermatozoa and embryos. In women using the IUD, the entire genital tract seems affected, at least in part, because of luminal transmission of the fluids that accumulates in the uterine lumen. This affects the function or viability of gametes, decreasing the rate of fertilization and lowering the chances of survival of any embryo that may be formed, even before it reaches the uterus. Studies on the recovery of eggs from women using IUDs and from women not using contraception show that embryos are formed in the tubes of IUD users at a much lower rate compared with nonusers. This is believed to be the major action of IUDs. Therefore, the common belief that the major mechanism of action of IUDs in women is through destruction of embryos in the uterus (i.e., abortion) is not supported by the available evidence. In Cu-IUD users, it is likely that few spermatozoa reach the distal segment of the fallopian tube, those that encounter an egg may be in poor condition. Thus, the few eggs that are fertilized have little chance for development and their possibility for survival in the altered tubal milieu become worse as they approach the uterine cavity.

  2. Ectopic Intrauterine Device in the Bladder of a Pregnant Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdoglu, Zehra; Ceylan, Kadir; Kurdoglu, Mertihan; Guler, Ayse; Sahin, Hanim Guler

    2010-01-01

    Background. Uterine perforation and transvesical migration of an intrauterine device are rare complications. Case. A 28-year-old woman who had an intrauterine device was admitted to our outpatient clinic with complaints of amenorrhea lasting 5 weeks and pelvic pain lasting a year. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed embedding of the intrauterine device in the bladder. The misplaced device was removed by laparotomy. Conclusion. The followup of intrauterine device localization with transvaginal ultrasonography is essential for early detection of possible serious complications. PMID:20811600

  3. Complications of the intrauterine device in nulliparous and parous women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H.M.; Vos, A.G.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The intrauterine device (IUD) is still related to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), pregnancy, expulsion, perforation and menstrual problems, particularly in nulliparous women. We aimed to study the complications and symptoms of the intrauterine device in general practice, particularly

  4. Intrauterine contraception in Saint Louis: A Survey of Obstetrician and Gynecologists’ knowledge and attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Tessa; Allsworth, Jenifer E.; Hladky, Katherine J.; Secura, Gina M.; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Many obstacles to intrauterine contraception use exist, including provider and patient misinformation, high upfront cost, and clinician practice patterns. The aim of our study was to investigate knowledge and attitudes about intrauterine contraception among obstetricians and gynecologists in the area of Saint Louis. Study Design We mailed a self-administered, anonymous survey to 250 clinicians who provide obstetric and gynecologic care in Saint Louis City and County which included questions about demographics, training, family planning visits, and intrauterine contraceptive knowledge and use. Results The overall survey response rate among eligible clinicians was 73.7%. Clinicians who had recently finished training or saw higher numbers of contraceptive patients per week were more likely to insert intrauterine contraception than clinicians who completed training prior to 1989 or saw fewer contraceptive patients. Several misconceptions among clinicians were identified, including an association between intrauterine contraceptives and an elevated risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. Conclusions Physician misconceptions about the risks of intrauterine contraception continue to occur. Improved clinician education is greatly needed to facilitate the use of these highly effective, long-acting, reversible methods of contraception. PMID:20103447

  5. Do intrauterine device/intrauterine system users check their threads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Amanda; Fleming, Charlotte

    2014-04-01

    Expulsion of an intrauterine device (IUD) occurs in about 1 in 20 women and expulsion may not be noticed by the user. Current guidance recommends that users are instructed to check regularly for their threads. This is the first study to explore the reality of how women feel about checking their threads and the details surrounding how frequently checks are done. One hundred consecutive IUD users were interviewed regarding their type of device, duration of use, frequency of thread checking, prompts for checking and reasons for not checking. Only 23% checked their threads regularly and 51% had never done so. The most common reason for not checking was forgetting about it. Despite being advised to do so, the majority of users do not check their threads at all and fewer than one-quarter of them check regularly. We propose that advice offered about thread checking should be given less emphasis and suggested more for user reassurance.

  6. [Effectiveness research of medicated γ intrauterine device and medicated genefix intrauterine device inserted immediately after abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Cheng, Y; Yang, H; Tang, Y H; Jiang, J; Ji, F; Li, L B; Wu, S C

    2016-03-01

    To compare the effectiveness of medicated γ intrauterine device (IUD) and medicated genefix IUD inserted immediately after abortion. A multicenter clinical trail was performed for the study from Mar. 2012 to Jan. 2013. Totally 840 women who volunteered to participate were randomly allocated to γ-group (medicated γ IUD) or genefix-group (medicated genefix IUD) immediately after abortion. While 464 abortion women who had not used IUD or steroids contraceptive methods were chosen as control group. The effectiveness of the IUD were followed up for 1 year. All women were required to record the number of vaginal bleeding days and blood volume of vaginal bleeding within 3 months after abortion. At the 12(th) month, the expulsion was the most common reason for termination. The expulsion rates of genefix-group and γ-group were 2.48/100 women years and 3.12/100 women years, respectively (P>0.05). For the expulsion reasons, IUD moving down could account for more than seventy percent. The removal rate for IUD usage of two IUD groups were almost equal (3.91/100 women years verus 4.35/100 women years), the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05). At the 90(th) day after abortion, comparing with control group, the bleeding and (or) spotting days of genefix-group and γ-group extended by 3.9 and 2.6 days respectively, the differences had statistical significance between the three groups (P0.05). The insertion of medicated genefix IUD and medicated γ IUD immediately after abortion is safe, feasible, has slight side effects and could be effective contraception.

  7. Efficacy of Intrauterine Device in the Treatment of Intrauterine Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Umme; Xue, Min; Md Sayed, Ali Sheikh; Xu, Dabao

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to assess the efficacy of the use of the intrauterine device (IUD) as an adjunctive treatment modality, for intrauterine adhesions (IUAs). All eligible literatures were identified by electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science. Additional relevant articles were identified from citations in these publications. There were 28 studies included for a systematic review. Of these, 5 studies were eligible for meta-analysis and 23 for qualitative assessment only. Twenty-eight studies related to the use of IUDs as ancillary treatment following adhesiolysis were identified. Of these studies, 25 studies at least one of the following methods were carried out as ancillary treatment: Foley catheter, hyaluronic acid gel, hormonal therapy, or amnion graft in addition to the IUD. There was one study that used IUD therapy as a single ancillary treatment. In 2 studies, no adjunctive therapy was used after adhesiolysis. There was a wide range of reported menstrual and fertility outcomes which were associated with the use of IUD combined with other ancillary treatments. At present, the IUD is beneficial in patients with IUA, regardless of stage of adhesions. However, IUD needs to be combined with other ancillary treatments to obtain maximal outcomes, in particular in patients with moderate to severe IUA. PMID:25254212

  8. Efficacy of Intrauterine Device in the Treatment of Intrauterine Adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umme Salma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this paper is to assess the efficacy of the use of the intrauterine device (IUD as an adjunctive treatment modality, for intrauterine adhesions (IUAs. All eligible literatures were identified by electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science. Additional relevant articles were identified from citations in these publications. There were 28 studies included for a systematic review. Of these, 5 studies were eligible for meta-analysis and 23 for qualitative assessment only. Twenty-eight studies related to the use of IUDs as ancillary treatment following adhesiolysis were identified. Of these studies, 25 studies at least one of the following methods were carried out as ancillary treatment: Foley catheter, hyaluronic acid gel, hormonal therapy, or amnion graft in addition to the IUD. There was one study that used IUD therapy as a single ancillary treatment. In 2 studies, no adjunctive therapy was used after adhesiolysis. There was a wide range of reported menstrual and fertility outcomes which were associated with the use of IUD combined with other ancillary treatments. At present, the IUD is beneficial in patients with IUA, regardless of stage of adhesions. However, IUD needs to be combined with other ancillary treatments to obtain maximal outcomes, in particular in patients with moderate to severe IUA.

  9. Exploring Trends in Intrauterine Device (IUD) Usage among Women in the United States: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobiling, Brandye; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) have not been popular contraceptives in the US for the past 40 years. Recent evidence, however, has shown a slight rebirth in use, from a rate of approximately 2% in 2002 to over 5% in 2008 (Guttmacher Institute, 2010). Empirical evidence is favorable of IUD use in most women, but the still-low usage rate suggests…

  10. An all time low utilization of intrauterine contraceptive device as a birth spacing method- a qualitative descriptive study in district Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Amna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pakistan was among the leading countries in south Asia which started the family planning program in late 50s, forecasting the need to control the population. Despite this early intervention, fertility rate has declined but slower in Pakistan as compared to most other Asian countries. Pakistan has almost a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate for more than a decade now, perhaps owing to the inadequate performance of the family planning programs. The provision and use of long term contraceptives such as IUCD has always been low (around 2% and associated with numerous issues. Married women who want to wait before having another child, or end childbearing altogether, are not using any long term method of contraception. Methodology A descriptive qualitative study was conducted from May to July 2012, to explore and understand the perceptions of women regarding the use of IUCDs and to understand the challenges/issues at the service provider’s end. Six FGDs with community women and 12 in-depth interviews were conducted with family planning providers. The data was analyzed using the Qualitative Content Analysis approach. Results The study revealed that the family planning clients are reluctant to use IUCDs because of a number of myths and misconceptions associated with the method. They have reservations about the provider’s capability and quality of care at the facility. Private health providers are not motivated and are reluctant to provide the IUCDs because of inadequate counseling skills, lack of competence and improper supporting infrastructure. Government programs either do not have enough supplies or trained staff to promote the IUCD utilization. Conclusion Besides a well-designed community awareness campaign, providers’ communication and counseling skills have to be enhanced, as these are major contributing factors in IUCD acceptance. Ongoing training of all family planning service providers in IUCD insertion is very

  11. Intrauterine device insertion in the postpartum period: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonalkar, Sarita; Kapp, Nathalie

    2015-02-01

    Given new research on postpartum placement of levonorgestrel and copper intrauterine devices (IUDs), our objective was to update a prior systematic review of the safety and expulsion rates of postpartum IUDs. We searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, LILACS, POPLINE, Web of Science, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases for articles between the database inception until July 2013. We included studies that compared IUD insertion time intervals and routes during the postpartum period. We used standard abstract forms and the United States Preventive Services Task Force grading system to summarise and assess the quality of the evidence. We included 18 articles. New evidence suggests that a levonorgestrel releasing-intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) insertion within 48 hours of delivery is safe. Postplacental insertion and insertion between 10 minutes and 48 hours after delivery result in higher expulsion rates than insertion 4 to 6 weeks postpartum, or non-postpartum insertion. Insertion at the time of caesarean section is associated with lower expulsion rates than postplacental insertion at the time of vaginal delivery. This review supports the evidence that insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive within the first 48 hours of vaginal or caesarean delivery is safe. Expulsion rates should be further studied in larger randomised controlled trials.

  12. Immediate vs. delayed insertion of intrauterine contraception after second trimester abortion: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We describe the rationale and protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to assess whether intrauterine contraception placed immediately after a second trimester abortion will result in fewer pregnancies than current recommended practice of intended placement at 4 weeks post-abortion. Decision analysis suggests the novel strategy could substantially reduce subsequent unintended pregnancies and abortions. This paper highlights considerations of design, implementation and evaluation of a trial expected to provide rigorous evidence for appropriate insertion timing and health economics of intrauterine contraception after second trimester abortion. Methods/Design Consenting women choosing to use intrauterine contraception after abortion for a pregnancy of 12 to 24 weeks will be randomized to insertion timing groups either immediately (experimental intervention) or four weeks (recommended care) post abortion. Primary outcome measure is pregnancy rate at one year. Secondary outcomes include: cumulative pregnancy rates over five year follow-up period, comprehensive health economic analyses comparing immediate and delayed insertion groups, and device retention rates, complication rates (infection, expulsion) and, contraceptive method satisfaction. Web-based Contraception Satisfaction Questionnaires, clinical records and British Columbia linked health databases will be used to assess primary and secondary outcomes. Enrolment at all clinics in the province performing second trimester abortions began in May 2010 and is expected to complete in late 2011. Data on one year outcomes will be available for analysis in 2014. Discussion The RCT design combined with access to clinical records at all provincial abortion clinics, and to information in provincial single-payer linked administrative health databases, birth registry and hospital records, offers a unique opportunity to evaluate such an approach by determining pregnancy rate at one through five years among

  13. Immediate vs. delayed insertion of intrauterine contraception after second trimester abortion: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Judith A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the rationale and protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT to assess whether intrauterine contraception placed immediately after a second trimester abortion will result in fewer pregnancies than current recommended practice of intended placement at 4 weeks post-abortion. Decision analysis suggests the novel strategy could substantially reduce subsequent unintended pregnancies and abortions. This paper highlights considerations of design, implementation and evaluation of a trial expected to provide rigorous evidence for appropriate insertion timing and health economics of intrauterine contraception after second trimester abortion. Methods/Design Consenting women choosing to use intrauterine contraception after abortion for a pregnancy of 12 to 24 weeks will be randomized to insertion timing groups either immediately (experimental intervention or four weeks (recommended care post abortion. Primary outcome measure is pregnancy rate at one year. Secondary outcomes include: cumulative pregnancy rates over five year follow-up period, comprehensive health economic analyses comparing immediate and delayed insertion groups, and device retention rates, complication rates (infection, expulsion and, contraceptive method satisfaction. Web-based Contraception Satisfaction Questionnaires, clinical records and British Columbia linked health databases will be used to assess primary and secondary outcomes. Enrolment at all clinics in the province performing second trimester abortions began in May 2010 and is expected to complete in late 2011. Data on one year outcomes will be available for analysis in 2014. Discussion The RCT design combined with access to clinical records at all provincial abortion clinics, and to information in provincial single-payer linked administrative health databases, birth registry and hospital records, offers a unique opportunity to evaluate such an approach by determining pregnancy rate at one

  14. Intrauterine contraception with copper and with levonorgestrel: a randomized study of the TCu 380Ag and levonorgestrel 20 mcg/day devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivin, I; Alvarez, F; Diaz, J; Diaz, S; el Mahgoub, S; Coutinho, E; Brache, V; Diaz, M M; Faundes, A; Pavez, M

    1984-11-01

    First year results of a randomized study of 1509 users of the Copper T380Ag with a silver core or of an IUD releasing 20 mcg day of levonorgestrel are reported. The cumulative gross pregnancy rate for each device was 0.3 per 100 at one year, with more than 490 women having one year of use with each device. The levonorgestrel-releasing device was associated with significantly fewer bleeding days and significantly increased hemoglobin levels when compared with pre-admission values or the one year values observed among users of the TCu380Ag. Terminations attributable to amenorrhea were significantly more frequent among users of the levonorgestrel-releasing device. The TCu 380Ag was associated with increased frequency and severity of dysmenorrhea compared with pre-admission levels or with the steroid-releasing device. Hemoglobin levels were somewhat reduced among users of the TCu 380Ag device. Terminations attributable to pain were, however, not significantly different by device. Continuation rates at the end of the first year were not significantly different by device.

  15. Use of ulipristal acetate, levonorgestrel and the copper-intrauterine device for emergency contraception following the introduction of new FSRH guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Aisling Susan

    2013-10-01

    The UK Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) has recommended that for emergency contraception (EC) the health professional should discuss individual needs and inform women of the different methods, efficacy, adverse effects, interactions, eligibility and additional contraception. In our sexual and reproductive health care service (Liverpool and Knowsley, UK), revised guidance was issued in early 2012, reflecting Faculty advice. We studied (1) how our use of EC changed, (2) which methods were offered and how this changed, (3) which method was chosen by women who were offered all three UK licensed methods of EC and (4) the appropriateness of the offer of only levonorgestrel (LNG). We studied a total of 2989 case records in the 3 months before and 3 months following the adoption by our service of the 2011 FSRH guidance. This was a retrospective review of charts undertaken by interrogating our computerised Excelicare(®) system of clinical records. All EC episodes in the two 3-month periods were analysed, covering October-December 2011 and March-May 2012. Additionally, three non-probabilistic, purposeful samples of representative practitioners' charts were examined in groups of women offered all methods [and choosing either ulipristal acetate (UPA) or LNG] or who were offered LNG only. The use of LNG fell from 93.0% of EC issued to 76.0%; UPA use rose from 3.0% to 18.7%. In the second 3-month period, of the women offered all three methods, 54.9% chose LNG and 39.8% UPA. LNG-only offers in our judgement were clinically appropriate in 62.5% cases of such offers. Comparing the second period with the first, more women were offered all three methods, the use of LNG fell (93.0% to 76.0%) and that of UPA increased (3.0% to 18.7%). Women were encouraged to exercise choice. However, increasing choice in our service did not lead to a wholesale change from LNG to UPA.

  16. Intrauterine device embedded in omentum of postpartum patient with a markedly retroverted uterus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Dana A; Graversen, Joseph A; Pugh, Suzanne K

    2017-10-25

    The intrauterine device is a popular form of long-acting reversible contraception. Although generally safe, one of the most serious complications of intrauterine device use is uterine perforation. Risk factors for perforation include position of the uterus, force exerted during intrauterine device insertion, postpartum period, and breastfeeding. This case is important and needs to be reported because it highlights the need to assess risk factors for uterine perforation. It adds to the medical literature because it examines the relationship between position of the uterus and the location of uterine perforation. This case report is unusual in that it describes the mechanism and specific location of uterine perforation in relation to the position of the uterus. We present a case of an intrauterine device found in the omentum of a 30-year-old white postpartum woman with a significantly retroverted uterus after the intrauterine device threads were not visualized on speculum examination during a 6-week placement check. The intrauterine device was located and removed via laparoscopy without complication. This case report will be of interest to women's health practitioners because it illustrates the importance of identifying patients with risk factors for uterine perforation, examining the relationship between uterine position and location of perforation. This is especially significant because the true incidence of perforation may be higher than the numbers reported in the literature. There is no specific diagnostic code for uterine perforation and it is unlikely that retrospective studies can accurately identify all cases.

  17. Effects of age, parity, and device type on complications and discontinuation of intrauterine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Joelle; Dines, Virginia A; Stovall, Dale W; Mete, Mihriye; Nelson, Casey B; Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2014-03-01

    To conduct an analysis of intrauterine device (IUD)-related outcomes including expulsion, contraceptive failure, and early discontinuation and to compare these outcomes in regard to age, parity, and IUD type. This was a multicenter retrospective chart review of adolescents and women aged 13-35 years who had an IUD inserted for contraception between June 2008 and June 2011. A total of 2,523 patients' charts were reviewed. Of these, 2,138 patients were included in our analysis. After a mean follow-up of 37±11 months, the overall rates of IUD expulsion and pregnancy were 6% and 1%, respectively, and were not significantly different by age or parity. Intrauterine device discontinuation rates were 19% at 12 months and 41% after a mean follow-up of 37 months. Despite similar rates of IUD discontinuation between age groups at 12 months of use, teenagers and young women aged 13-19 years were more likely to request early discontinuation at the end of the total follow-up period. No significant difference was noted in pelvic inflammatory disease rates (2%) based on age. After adjusting for age and parity, we found that copper IUD users were more likely to experience expulsion and contraception failure compared with levonorgestrel intrauterine system users (hazard ratios 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-2.50 and hazard ratios 4.89, 95% CI 2.02-11.80, respectively). Similar to adults, IUD use in adolescents and nulliparous women is effective and associated with low rates of serious complications. Health practitioners should therefore consider IUDs for contraception in all females. Teenagers and young women are more likely to request premature discontinuation of their IUDs and may benefit from additional counseling.

  18. Predicting painful or difficult intrauterine device insertion in nulligravid women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaislasuo, Janina; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Lähteenmäki, Pekka; Suhonen, Satu

    2014-08-01

    To assess the relationship of preinsertion vaginal ultrasound assessment and menstrual and gynecologic history as predictors of difficult or painful intrauterine device insertion in nulligravid women. Nulligravid women seeking contraception were invited to participate in this nonrandomized study and given the choice between the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system or a copper-releasing intrauterine device. All 165 enrolled women were interviewed and a pelvic examination, including vaginal ultrasonography, was performed before insertion. Insertion difficulties and pain intensity were recorded and assessed against uterine measurements and background characteristics. Most insertions were assessed as easy (n=144 [89.4%]) and only two (1.2%) failed. Most women had uterine measurements smaller than the studied devices. Odds for difficulties at insertion decreased with every increasing millimeter in total uterine length (odds ratio [OR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-0.96, P=.006) and cervical length (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74-0.97, P=.02) and similarly with every decreasing degree of (straighter) flexion angle (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.99, P=.005). No absolute threshold measurements could be determined. Still, the majority of insertions in small and flexed uteri were uneventful. Severe insertion pain was common (n=94 [58.4%]). Severe dysmenorrhea was the only predictor of insertion pain (OR 8.16 95% CI 2.56-26.02, P<.001). Ultrasonographic evaluation does not give additional information compared with clinical pelvic examination and sound measure. Although smaller uterine length measurements and steeper flexion angle more often predicted difficulties, the majority of insertions were uneventful in women with small measures. Dysmenorrhea was the only predictor of pain. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01685164. II.

  19. Ectopic Intrauterine Device in the Bladder of a Pregnant Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kurdoglu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Uterine perforation and transvesical migration of an intrauterine device are rare complications. Case. A 28-year-old woman who had an intrauterine device was admitted to our outpatient clinic with complaints of amenorrhea lasting 5 weeks and pelvic pain lasting a year. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed embedding of the intrauterine device in the bladder. The misplaced device was removed by laparotomy. Conclusion. The followup of intrauterine device localization with transvaginal ultrasonography is essential for early detection of possible serious complications.

  20. Sigmoid colocolic fistula caused by intrauterine device migration: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekera, Amila; Wijesinghe, Pravin; Nugaduwa, Nilhan

    2014-03-04

    The intrauterine device is a form of contraception with a long duration of action and few systemic side effects. Migration into the abdominal cavity may occur early or years after insertion giving rise to bowel obstruction, perforation, ischemia, mesenteric injury, strictures or fistulae. Colocolic fistula formation is a rare but serious complication of intrauterine device migration, which may lead to difficulties in diagnosis and device retrieval. We report the case of a 29-year-old Sri Lankan woman who became pregnant 5 years after intrauterine device insertion. The device could not be located during pregnancy. She was asymptomatic and defaulted follow up during the antenatal period. She had an uncomplicated vaginal delivery. A subsequent laparotomy for device retrieval failed due to technical difficulties. A repeat laparotomy identified a sigmoid colocolic fistula with adhesions to the fallopian tube. The device was removed and colonic defects primarily closed following which the patient made an uneventful recovery. All translocated intrauterine devices should be removed regardless of type and location. This case illustrates that they may cause complex bowel lesions leading to serious technical difficulties during retrieval. With the increasing use of minimally invasive approaches for intrauterine device retrieval, a low threshold for open surgery in complicated cases is advocated.

  1. Two years of intrauterine contraception with levonorgestrel and with copper: a randomized comparison of the TCu 380Ag and levonorgestrel 20 mcg/day devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivin, I; Stern, J; Diaz, J; Diaz, M M; Faundes, A; el Mahgoub, S; Diaz, S; Pavez, M; Coutinho, E; Mattos, C E

    1987-03-01

    IUDs releasing 20 mcg/day of levonorgestrel (LNg20) were in randomized trial together with the Copper T, model TCu 380Ag, in seven centers involving 2244 women. Two-year (25 months) gross cumulative pregnancy rates were 0.2 +/- 0.2 and 0.9 +/- 0.3 for the levonorgestrel and copper releasing devices, respectively (P greater than 0.05). There were no ectopic pregnancies in more than 1600 woman-years of use of each device. Removal rates for bleeding and/or pain or for medical reasons other than menstrual problems did not differ significantly between devices. Oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea prompted 10.7 per hundred (gross rate, 8.4 net rate) women using the LNg 20 IUD to request removal in the two-year period, significantly above the 0.2 per hundred rate among women with the Copper IUD (P less than 0.001). At the end of two years an estimated 59.4 per 100 women were continuing use of the LNg 20 IUD, and 67.5 per 100 (P less than 0.001) with the TCu 380Ag. This difference is almost wholly ascribable to a marked reduction in bleeding episodes and days among women using the LNg 20 device with concomitant removal of device. Hemoglobin rose an average of 0.5 g/dl (P less than 0.001) for this group whereas women using the TCu 380Ag experienced a decline of 0.2 g/dl compared with baseline values (P less than 0.001).

  2. A suspicious reason for Raynaud's phenomenon: Intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diken, Adem I; Yalçınkaya, Adnan; Aksoy, Eray; Yılmaz, Seyhan; Çağlı, Kerim

    2015-06-01

    Primary Raynaud's phenomenon may be insistent in patients under medical therapy, and intrauterine devices may be an unnoticed reason in these patients. Fluctuations in female sex hormone status were reported to be associated with the emergence of primary Raynaud's phenomenon symptoms. The use of intrauterine devices was not reported to be associated with Raynaud's phenomenon previously. Intrauterine device may stimulate vascular hyperactivity regarding hormonal or unknown mechanisms that result in Raynaud's phenomenon. We present a postmenopausal patient who complained of primary Raynaud's phenomenon symptoms and had recovery after the removal of her copper intrauterine device. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Best practices to minimize risk of infection with intrauterine device insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddy, Sheila; Yudin, Mark H; Hakim, Julie; Money, Deborah M

    2014-03-01

    Intrauterine devices provide an extremely effective, long-term form of contraception that has the benefit of being reversible. Historically, the use of certain intrauterine devices was associated with increased risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. More recent evidence suggests that newer devices do not carry the same threat; however, certain risk factors can increase the possibility of infection. To review the risk of infection with the insertion of intrauterine devices and recommend strategies to prevent infection. The outcomes considered were the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease, the impact of screening for bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted infections including chlamydia and gonorrhea; and the role of prophylactic antibiotics. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, Embase, and The Cochrane Library on July 21, 2011, using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., intrauterine devices, pelvic inflammatory disease) and key words (e.g., adnexitis, endometritis, IUD). An etiological filter was applied in PubMed. The search was limited to the years 2000 forward. There were no language restrictions. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the web sites of national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (Table). Recommendations 1. All women requesting an intrauterine device should be counselled about the small increased risk of pelvic inflammatory disease in the first 20 days after insertion. (II-2A) 2. All women requesting an intrauterine device should be screened by both history and physical examination for their risk of sexually transmitted infection. Women at increased risk should be tested prior to or at the time of insertion; however, it is not necessary to delay insertion until results are returned. (II-2B) 3. Not enough current evidence is available

  4. New technologies in contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Rowlands, Sam

    2009-01-01

    New technologies in both reversible contraception and sterilisation are described. The review includes recent advances in the development of oral contraception, emergency contraception, injectable contraception, vaginal rings, subdermal implants, transdermal contraception, intrauterine devices, spermicides and barrier methods. It also covers methods of transcervical female sterilisation and more easily reversible male sterilisation. The emphasis is on the technology and its safety and effecti...

  5. Insertion of intrauterine contraceptive device post delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 17, No 1 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Immediate postpartum versus 6-week postpartum intrauterine device ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of postpartum intrauterine device insertion and to demonstrate that the postpartum intrauterine device is acceptable to women. Women attending prenatal care at a maternity hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi were recruited into a trial ...

  7. Intravesical migration of an intrauterine device detected in a pregnant woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Migraci; Celik, Handan; Yavuz, Erhan; Çetinkaya, Mehmet B.

    2010-01-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is common method of contraception among women because of its low cost and high efficacy. Perforations are possible; most perforations occur at the time of insertion, yet the complication can occur with a previously inserted IUD. Perforation of the bladder by an IUD is extremely rare. In this report, we present a case in which the IUD perforated the uterus and migrated to the bladder. At the time of the diagnosis, the patient was 8 weeks pregnant. PMID:20944794

  8. Contraceptive Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  9. Intrauterine contraception after medical abortion: factors affecting success of early insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjoranta, Elina; Suhonen, Satu; Mentula, Maarit; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2017-03-01

    To assess the success and factors affecting early intrauterine device (IUD) provision after first trimester medical termination of pregnancy (MTOP). Subgroup analysis of a randomized contraceptive trial assessing the long-term effects of early provision of intrauterine contraception following abortion. Altogether, 606 women undergoing MTOP were included and followed for 3 months. The intervention group (n=307) was offered an IUD (either the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system or copper-IUD) at a follow-up visit 1-4 weeks after MTOP. The control group (n=299) contacted primary health care for follow-up and contraceptive provision. Adverse events (infections, bleeding, residual tissue and incomplete abortion) were analyzed on intention-to-treat basis and IUD expulsions on per-protocol (PP) basis. In the intervention group, 234 women (76.2%) received the IUD as scheduled, 46 later (altogether 91.2%). In the control group, the corresponding figures were 8 (2.7%) and 64 [altogether 24.1%, Odds ratio (OR) (95% Confidence interval (CI))=32.7 (20.3-52.6)]. Eighty-five (27.7%) women in the intervention group and 38 (12.7%) in the control group received treatment (administration of antibiotics, misoprostol or surgical evacuation) because of presumed adverse event [2.63 (1.72-4.01)], mainly residual tissue. In the control group, 23 (60.5%) of these occurred during the first 2 weeks. IUD expulsion occurred in 12 (5.4%) of the 222 women in the intervention group (PP basis). When provided as part of abortion service, most early insertions following MTOP were performed as planned. The main reason for postponement was overdiagnosis of adverse events suspected at follow-up. The rate of IUD expulsion was similar to that reported previously. Early insertion following MTOP is safe, and the rate of IUD expulsion is low. Most adverse events possibly delaying IUD insertion occur early. Based on timing of adverse events in the control group, IUD insertion at approximately 2 weeks

  10. Depo-Provera: An Injectable Contraceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control: How to Use Your DiaphragmIntrauterine Device (IUD)Emergency Contraception Home Prevention and Wellness Sex and Birth Control Birth Control Depo-Provera: An Injectable Contraceptive Depo-Provera: An Injectable Contraceptive Share Print Depo- ...

  11. Accuracy of information about the intrauterine device on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Tessa; Cortez, Sarah; Kuzemchak, Marie; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Politi, Mary C

    2016-04-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are highly effective methods of contraception, but use continues to lag behind less effective methods such as oral contraceptive pills and condoms. Women who are aware of the actual effectiveness of various contraceptive methods are more likely to choose the IUD. Conversely, women who are misinformed about the safety of IUDs may be less likely to use this method. Individuals increasingly use the Internet for health information. Information about IUDs obtained through the Internet may influence attitudes about IUD use among patients. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of information about IUDs among World Wide Web sites providing contraceptive information to the public. We developed a 56-item structured questionnaire to evaluate the quality of information about IUDs available through the Internet. We then conducted an online search to identify web sites containing information about contraception and IUDs using common search engines. The search was performed in August 2013 and web sites were reviewed again in October 2015 to ensure there were no substantial changes. Our search identified >2000 web sites, of which 108 were eligible for review; 105 (97.2%) of these sites contained information about IUDs. Of sites, 86% provided at least 1 mechanism of the IUD. Most web sites accurately reported advantages of the IUD including that it is long acting (91%), highly effective (82%), and reversible (68%). However, only 30% of sites explicitly indicated that IUDs are safe. Fifty percent (n = 53) of sites contained inaccurate information about the IUD such as an increased risk of pelvic inflammatory disease beyond the insertion month (27%) or that women in nonmonogamous relationships (30%) and nulliparous women (20%) are not appropriate candidates. Among sites, 44% stated that a mechanism of IUDs is prevention of implantation of a fertilized egg. Only 3% of web sites incorrectly stated that IUDs are an abortifacient. More than a quarter of

  12. A clinical and ultrasound study on the use of postplacental intrauterine device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Henrique Araújo Fernandes

    2004-06-01

    . Conclusions: Postplacental intrauterine deviceinsertion showed to be an useful and safe contraceptive method.The ultrasound demonstrated to be a useful and reliable method tocontrol postplacental intrauterine device insertions.

  13. A viable caesarean scar pregnancy in a woman using a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device : A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Hitzerd (Emilie); H. Bogers (Hein); N.A. Kianmanesh Rad (Noush); J.J. Duvekot (Hans)

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Although the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) is one of the most reliable methods of contraception, it is associated with an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy in case of unintended pregnancy. A rare form of ectopic pregnancy is the caesarean

  14. Use of the Copper T380A intrauterine device by adolescent mothers: continuation and method failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Loral; Berggren, Erica K

    2011-04-01

    This report contributes to limited empirical data regarding use of the Copper T380A intrauterine device among adolescent mothers. We conducted a retrospective case series of adolescent mothers aged 15 to 21 years whose index delivery occurred before age 18 and met study inclusion criteria. All adolescent mothers received obstetrics and gynecology care at one urban clinical site in Washington, DC. All participated in a teen secondary pregnancy prevention program from April 2002 to November 2008 and used the Copper T380A intrauterine device. We abstracted data to evaluate intrauterine device utilization, expulsion, removal, and pregnancy diagnosis. Thirty-nine adolescent mothers met inclusion criteria. Six patients had partial or complete expulsion (15%; 95% CI, 6-29), and 10 requested removal (26%; 95% CI, 14-41) within 24 months of placement. Four users (10%; 95% CI, 3-23) became pregnant. Three had an intrauterine device in place at time of conception, while one became pregnant due to unrecognized device expulsion. In this case series, many adolescent mothers discontinued Copper T380A use within two years of placement. The numbers of patients were too limited to provide stable estimates of contraceptive effectiveness. Larger comparative studies will further evaluate both effectiveness and acceptability of this device among teen mothers. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device potentiates stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleknaviciute, Jurate; Tulen, Joke H M; De Rijke, Yolanda B; Bouwkamp, Christian G; van der Kroeg, Mark; Timmermans, Mirjam; Wester, Vincent L; Bergink, Veerle; Hoogendijk, Witte J G; Tiemeier, Henning; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; Kooiman, Cornelis G; Kushner, Steven A

    2017-06-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) is currently recommended as a first-line contraceptive with an exclusively local intrauterine influence. However, recent clinical trials have identified side effects of LNG-IUD that appear to be systemically mediated, including depressed mood and emotional lability. We performed two experimental studies and a cross-sectional study. For each study, women were included from three groups: LNG-IUD (0.02mg/24h), oral ethinylestradiol/levonorgestrel (0.03mg/0.15mg; EE30/LNG) and natural cycling (NC). Study 1-Salivary cortisol was measured at baseline and at defined intervals following the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Heart rate was monitored continuously throughout the TSST. Study 2-Salivary cortisol and serum total cortisol were evaluated relative to low-dose (1μg) adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration. Study 3-Hair cortisol was measured as a naturalistic index of long-term cortisol exposure. Women using LNG-IUD had an exaggerated salivary cortisol response to the TSST (24.95±13.45 nmol/L, 95% CI 17.49-32.40), compared to EE30/LNG (3.27±2.83 nmol/L, 95% CI 1.71-4.84) and NC (10.85±11.03nmol/L, 95% CI 6.30-15.40) (P<0.0001). Heart rate was significantly potentiated during the TSST in women using LNG-IUD (P=0.047). In response to ACTH challenge, women using LNG-IUD and EE30/LNG had a blunted salivary cortisol response, compared to NC (P<0.0001). Women using LNG-IUD had significantly elevated levels of hair cortisol compared to EE30/LNG or NC (P<0.0001). Our findings suggest that LNG-IUD contraception induces a centrally-mediated sensitization of both autonomic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsivity. LNG-IUD sensitization of HPA axis responsivity was observed acutely under standardized laboratory conditions, as well as chronically under naturalistic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Intrauterine device and pelvic inflammatory disease: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, T; Reynaud, M; Yaron, M

    2018-04-04

    Intrauterine device (IUD) is a reliable contraceptive method that is long term reversible, and well tolerated. Numerous studies prove its efficiency and report rare complications that are attributed to it. However, its use is limited due to fear that it can cause a pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This is based on historical data on infections related to the "Dalkon Shield", which was removed from the market in 1974. The analyzed articles were extracted from PUBMED database between 2000 and 2016. In total, 22 studies were retained. A meta-analysis was not possible due to the methodological diversity among the selected articles contributing to this narrative review of the literature. After analysis, the following factors influence the risk of PID linked to IUDs: an advanced age and sexually transmitted infections. The risk of PID linked to IUDs is lower than 1%. This is explained by new models of IUD, better screening tests, more frequent follow-up of the patients and the improvement of care PID patients. In the light of our results, the threat of pelvic inflammatory disease should not hinder the use of IUDs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Postplacental intrauterine device insertion at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatlaoui, Tara C; Marcus, Michele; Jamieson, Denise J; Goedken, Peggy; Cwiak, Carrie

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether postplacental intrauterine device (IUD) insertion can be safely and effectively performed within a teaching program. This was a prospective cohort of 177 subjects planning vaginal delivery enrolled antenatally who desired postplacental IUD insertion of either the copper T380A IUD or levonorgestrel IUS. Insertions were performed primarily by resident physicians following a training session. Follow-up included a 4- to 8-week visit and telephone calls at 3 and 6 months. Ninety-nine subjects underwent successful postplacental IUD insertion of 100 attempts. Seventeen expulsions (17%) were noted: 10 complete and 7 partial. The study identified no differences in outcome by training level; however, the study lacked statistical power to evaluate anything other than large differences. Postplacental IUD insertions can be safely and effectively performed within a training program. A training protocol may safely and feasibly be initiated among physicians, advanced practice clinicians or trainees with no prior experience with postplacental IUD insertion. By initiating this practice, access to highly effective contraception may increase for patients who have difficulty returning for a visit or otherwise receiving effective methods. © 2014.

  18. Sigmoid colon translocation of an intrauterine device misdiagnosed as a colonic polyp: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin-Xin; Yu, Mo-Sang; Gu, Meng-Li; Zhong, Wei-Xiang; Wu, Hong-Ru; Ji, Feng; Pan, Hang-Hai

    2018-02-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) are recommended as a means of contraception. Translocation of IUD is a rare and serious complication. Colonic inflammatory mass caused by translocated IUD initially misdiagnosed as a colonic polyp is extremely rare and has not been reported yet. This report presents a case of sigmoid colon translocation of intrauterine device on a 37-year-old female patient. Colonoscopy was performed due to her complain of repeated blood in stools and subsequently the patient was misdiagnosed as a sigmoid colon polyp. Nonetheless, the "polyp" was not able to be removed endoscopically. Sigmoid colon translocation of an intrauterine device. To further clarify the diagnosis, computed tomography (CT) scan was performed and the "polyp" was confirmed to be caused by a translocated IUD. The translocated IUD was removed easily by surgery, and the patient recovered soon after the operation. The present case indicates that an annual gynaecologic examination is necessary to determine the position of the IUD, and a CT examination may help confirm an ectopic IUD.

  19. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNeill, G

    2009-09-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  20. Intrauterine devices and risk of uterine perforation: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Sam; Oloto, Emeka; Horwell, David H

    2016-01-01

    Uterine perforation is an uncommon complication of intrauterine device insertion, with an incidence of one in 1,000 insertions. Perforation may be complete, with the device totally in the abdominal cavity, or partial, with the device to varying degrees within the uterine wall. Some studies show a positive association between lactation and perforation, but a causal relationship has not been established. Very rarely, a device may perforate into bowel or the urinary tract. Perforated intrauterine devices can generally be removed successfully at laparoscopy. PMID:29386934

  1. Forgettable contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  2. Reducing Barriers to the use of the Intrauterine Contraceptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most are based on psychological, moral and religious prejudices. These should not be allowed to interfere with the provision of LARC methods of contraception. There are also acceptor barriers which can be modified by providing education about the method. The use of the IUD as a LARC method is increasing in many ...

  3. Rectal perforation with an intrauterine device: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichengreen, Courtney; Landwehr, Haley; Goldthwaite, Lisa; Tocce, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    A 27-year-old woman presented for routine examination 1 year after intrauterine device (IUD) placement; strings were not visualized. The device was found to be penetrating through the rectal mucosa. It was removed easily through the rectum during an examination under anesthesia. Perforated IUDs with rectal involvement require thoughtful surgical planning to optimize outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcome of intrauterine pregnancies with intrauterine device in place and effects of device location on prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgu-Erdinc, A Seval; Tasdemir, Ufuk Goker; Uygur, Dilek; Aktulay, Ayla; Tasdemir, Nicel; Gulerman, H Cavidan

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the outcome of pregnancies with retained or removed intrauterine devices (IUDs) and the effect of IUD location on pregnancy outcome. In a retrospective cohort study, we searched 27,578 records of women who had CuT380 IUD inserted, and 144 pregnancies with IUD were analyzed. IUDs were removed from 114 patients and retained for 30 patients. The combined risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (miscarriage, intrauterine fetal death, intrauterine growth retardation, preterm birth and preterm premature rupture of membranes) was 36.8% in the IUD-removed group and 63.3% in the IUD-retained group [p<.01; relative risk (RR)=2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-3.3]. Newborns of the IUD-retained women had significantly lower Apgar scores and significantly higher admission rate to the neonatal intensive care unit (p=.01; RR=10.8; 95% CI 1.04-111.6 and p<.01; RR=4.5; 95% CI 1.5-12.9, respectively). There were more miscarriages and adverse pregnancy outcome when the IUD was retained (16.9% vs. 66.7%) in patients with an IUD in low-lying position (p<.01; RR=3.9; 95% CI 1.8-8.6). Women who conceived with an IUD in place and chose to continue the pregnancy without removing the IUD need close follow-up, as there appears to be higher risk of adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcome. Furthermore, when the IUD is retained in the low-lying position, there is increased risk of miscarriage and adverse pregnancy outcome compared to removal of the IUD. Future randomized controlled studies are needed to determine the outcome of pregnancies with retained or removed IUD. In this study, we have evaluated the IUD location and its effect on pregnancy outcome in women with a retained or removed IUD. This study is the first to investigate the relationship between IUD location and pregnancy outcome in women who conceived with an IUD. We need evidence from a collaborative multicenter randomized trial to answer the question of whether the IUD should be removed in case of

  5. Provision of intrauterine contraception in association with first trimester induced abortion reduces the need of repeat abortion: first-year results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjoranta, Elina; Mentula, Maarit; Gissler, Mika; Suhonen, Satu; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2015-11-01

    Can the need of subsequent abortion be reduced by providing intrauterine contraception as a part of the abortion service? Provision of intrauterine devices (IUDs) in association with first trimester abortion more than halved the incidence of repeat abortion during the first year of follow-up. Following abortion, the incidence of subsequent abortion is high, up to 30-40%. In cohort studies, intrauterine contraception has reduced the need of repeat abortion by 60-70%. A randomized controlled trial. The main outcome measure was the incidence of subsequent induced abortions during the follow-up. Altogether 751 women seeking first trimester induced abortion were recruited and randomized into two groups. Randomization was accomplished by computer-assisted permuted-block randomization with random block sizes of four to six. The investigators did not participate in randomization, which was done before commencing the study. The participants were recruited between 18 October 2010 and 21 January 2013. The inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, duration of pregnancy ≤12 weeks, accepting intrauterine contraception, residence in Helsinki and signing the informed consent form. Women with contraindications to intrauterine contraception, such as uterine anomaly, acute genital infection or pap-smear change requiring surgical treatment were ineligible to participate.This study was conducted in collaboration between the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, and Centralized family planning of the City of Helsinki.The intervention group (n = 375) was provided with intrauterine contraception (either the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system or copper-releasing intrauterine device) immediately following surgical abortion (18.1%) or at a follow-up 2-4 weeks after medical abortion (81.9%). Women in the control group were prescribed oral contraceptives and advised to contact their primary healthcare unit for a follow

  6. Contraceptive effect of intrauterine application of Lugol's solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T J; Tanaka, Y; Aznar, R; Lin, S C; Yamasaki, Y; Hori, S; Brar, H K; Kirton, K T; Little, B

    1973-05-15

    The contraceptive effect of local application of Lugol's solution (5% elemental iodine and 10% potassium iodide in aqueous solution) to the uterine cavity was evaluated in rats, 1 monkey and humans. 18 experimental rats received .1 ml Lugol's solution injected into the left uterine horn to cover the entire cavity; 2 received .05 ml solution covering two-thirds of the left uterine horn; 12 control rats received saline in the left horn; right uterine horns were left intact. Control rats had 76 pregnancies in the left horn and 70 in the right; the 18 rats treated with .1 ml solution had no pregnancies in the left horn and 121 in the right; 2 rats receiving .05 ml solution had 2 and 3 pregnancies, respectively, in the left horn. Lugol's solution prevented nidation in rats, and its action was local rather than systemic. Lugol's solution applied transvaginally to the uterine cavity of 1 Macaca mulatta adult virgin female monkey after confirmed existence of a developed Graffian follicle was followed by artificial insemination in the treated cycle and 2 cycles later. Ovulation and menstruation occurred during the treated and subsequent cycles, but conception occurred in the third cycle. Effect of Lugol's solution appears temporary. Preliminary clinical observation in a limited number of human volunteers in the U.S., Japan and Mexico who had Lugol's solution applied to the uterine cavity using a cotton-tip applicator indicates that application on Days 16 and 17 of the cycle resulted in no contraceptive effect, but on Day 20-24, resulted in no pregnancies through contraceptive or abortive effect. No irregular and/or abnormal bleeding occurred. A long-term observation and evaluation of the study is warranted to determine side effects of monthly solution application, such as endometrial changes and irregular bleeding. This procedure may be useful in cases of rape because of the endometrial effect and direct spermicidal effect of Lugol's solution if applied soon after coitus. A

  7. Immediate postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion and breast-feeding outcomes: a noninferiority randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turok, David K; Leeman, Lawrence; Sanders, Jessica N; Thaxton, Lauren; Eggebroten, Jennifer L; Yonke, Nicole; Bullock, Holly; Singh, Rameet; Gawron, Lori M; Espey, Eve

    2017-12-01

    groups fell within the noninferiority margin (95% confidence interval, -5.6 to 15%). Time to lactogenesis (mean ± SD) in the immediate group, 65.3 ± 25.7 hours, was noninferior to that of the delayed group, 63.6 ± 21.6 hours. The mean difference between groups was 1.7 hours (95% confidence interval, -4.8 to 8.2 hours), noninferior by log-rank test. A total of 24 intrauterine device expulsions occurred in the immediate group compared to 2 in the delayed group (19% vs 2%, P group. Our results of noninferior breast-feeding outcomes between women with immediate and delayed postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion suggest that immediate postpartum intrauterine device insertion is an acceptable option for women planning to breast-feed and use the levonorgestrel intrauterine device. Expulsion rates are higher with immediate postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion compared to delayed insertion, but this disadvantage may be outweighed by the advantages of immediate initiation of contraception. Providers should offer immediate postpartum intrauterine device insertion to breast-feeding women planning to use the levonorgestrel intrauterine device. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Device Placement in a Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patient with a Bicornuate Uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskew, Ashley M; Crane, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    Young women with breast cancer face contraceptive challenges. Data are limited and conflicting on the use of the levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) in this patient population. A 32-year-old nulligravid woman with a history of breast cancer on tamoxifen presented with new-onset vaginal bleeding. Further workup revealed a previously undiagnosed bicornuate uterus. She underwent hysteroscopy, dilation and curettage, and LNG-IUD placement in each uterine horn. Postoperative follow-up confirmed retention and proper placement of both IUDs. Pathology from the dilation and curettage was benign, and the abnormal uterine bleeding abated. LNG-IUD placement in a young patient with a personal history of breast cancer on tamoxifen and a bicornuate uterus is a safe and feasible alternative for contraception. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reasons for Intrauterine Device Use, Discontinuation and Non-Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC1; UNC Project,. Lilongwe, Malawi2 ... Keywords: Intrauterine Device, IUD, Africa, Malawi, Sub-Saharan Africa, Qualitative Research. Résumé ... factors affecting method choice include individuals' knowledge and beliefs as.

  10. Pelvic actinomycosis associated with intrauterine device use: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfuhaid, T. [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Univ. Health Centre and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Reinhold, C. [Radiology, Gastroenterology and Gynecology, McGill Univ. Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2003-06-01

    Pelvic actinomycosis is a rare disease that may complicate longstanding intrauterine device (IUD) use. Its timely recognition is crucial to minimize morbidity and avoid the erroneous diagnosis of malignancy with subsequent, unnecessary surgery. We describe a case of pelvic actinomycosis. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in recognizing this infectious disease process is stressed. (author)

  11. Removal of an intraabdominal levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, David; Latta, Richard

    2013-06-01

    A woman with a viable intrauterine 12-week pregnancy and an intraabdominal levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device had the device successfully removed under local anesthesia. The pregnancy continued without complication. The decision to remove an intraabdominal levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device during pregnancy remains controversial. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Is the early fragmentation of intrauterine devices caused by stress corrosion cracking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, M D; Farina, S B; Fernández Lorenzo, M

    2009-10-01

    Copper wire is the main component of a type of intrauterine device used as a contraceptive. Its contraceptive effect is attributed to the copper ions released as a result of the dissolution of copper in the uterus. Even though 10-year intrauterine device life is estimated on the basis of the dissolution rate of copper measured in vivo and in vitro, some cases of breakdown or fragmentation of the copper wire after short periods of insertion (2-3 months) have been reported. Due to the possible existence of residual stresses as a consequence of the manufacturing process, stress corrosion cracking has been previously proposed as an explanation for the early ruptures. In the present work, the susceptibility of copper wires to stress corrosion cracking in simulated uterine fluids was investigated. Results indicate that early ruptures should not be attributed to stress corrosion cracking. They could be explained by considering the increase in corrosion rate under certain conditions (pH decrease during infections; changes in the concentration of organic components along the menstrual cycle; etc.) that reduces the wire section leading to the rupture of the specimen by overloading.

  13. The promotion of intrauterine contraception in low- and middle-income countries: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, John; Ali, Moazzam; Benova, Lenka; Daniele, Marina

    2017-06-01

    The contribution of copper-bearing intrauterine devices (IUDs) to overall contraceptive protection has declined in many countries, despite their well-known advantages. In response, initiatives to promote this method have been undertaken. To review and interpret the experience of interventions to promote use of IUDs in low- and middle-income countries in order to provide strategic guidance for policies and programs. We conducted a systematic search of Medline, Popline, Embase and Global Health electronic databases for relevant journal papers, reports and gray literature since 2010. Telephone interviews were held with two donors and six international family planning organizations. We identified a total of 31 publications. Four reported the results of randomized control trials and three were derived from quasi-experiments. The majority were based on service statistics. Eight publications concerned interventions for HIV-positive women or couples, nine for postpartum or postabortion cases and 14 for general populations. Intervention approaches included vouchers, franchising of private practitioners, mobile outreach services, placement of dedicated staff in high-volume facilities and demand creation. Most publications adduced evidence of a positive impact and some reported impressively large numbers of IUD insertions. Results to date on the uptake of IUDs in postpartum interventions are modest. There is also almost no evidence of effects on IUD use at national levels. Implant uptake generally exceeded IUD uptake when both were offered. The evidence base is weak and offers few lessons on what strategies are most effective. The overall impression is that IUD use can be increased in a variety of ways but that progress is hampered by persistent adverse perceptions by both providers and potential clients. Provider enthusiasm is a key to success. The lack of a population impact stems in part from the fact that nearly all interventions are initiated by international

  14. Prevalence and factors associated with sexually transmitted infections among HIV positive women opting for intrauterine contraception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Kakaire

    Full Text Available Women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA are a high risk group for sexually transmitted infections (STIs. However, the majority of women with STIs are asymptomatic. Data on prevalence of STIs among WLHA in Uganda are limited. The objective of the study was to determine prevalence and factors associated with STIs among WLHA opting for intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD.Three hundred fifty one WLHA deemed free of STIs using a syndromic logarithm were enrolled into the study. Endo-cervical swabs were taken before IUD insertion and PCR test for Nisseria gonorrhea (NG, Trichomonas vaginalis (TV and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT infections conducted.Participants' mean age was 29.4 ± 6.2 years, 83% were under 35years, 50% had secondary education and 73% were married. The majority (69% had disclosed their HIV sero status to their spouses, 82% used Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, 70% were on antiretroviral therapy, 90% had CD4 count greater than 350, about 60% reported condoms use and 70% were of parity 2-4. Over 50% of the participants' spouses were older than 35 years and 72% had attained secondary education. STIs prevalence was 11.1%, (95% CI 7.8-14.4 and individual prevalence for TV, NG, and CT was 5.9%, 5.4% and 0.9% respectively. Factors independently associated with STI were having primary or less education (OR= 2.3, 95% CI: 1.09 - 4.85 having a spouse of primary or less education (OR= 3.3, 95% CI: 1.6 - 6.78 and muslim faith (OR= 0.2, 95% CI: 0.04 - 0.78.STI prevalence was 11.1%. TV and NG were the commonest STIs in this population. Having primary or less education for both participant and spouse was associated with increased risk while being of muslim faith was associated with reduced risk of STI.

  15. Laparoscopic removal of migrated intrauterine device embedded in intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnemai-Azar, Amir A; Apfel, Tehilla; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Cosgrove, John Morgan; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is a popular family planning method worldwide. Some of the complications associated with insertion of an IUD are well described in the literature. The frequency of IUD perforation is estimated to be between 0.05 and 13 per 1000 insertions. There are many reports of migrated intrauterine devices, but far fewer reports of IUDs which have penetrated into the small intestine. Herein we report a case of perforated intrauterine device embedded in the small intestine. By using a wound protector retraction device, and fashioning the anastomosis extra-corporeally, we were able to more easily perform this laparoscopically. This left the patient with a quicker recovery, and a better cosmetic result. IUD perforation into the peritoneal cavity is a known complication, and necessitates close follow-up. Most, if not all, should be removed at the time of diagnosis. In the majority of previously reported cases, removal was done through laparotomy. Even in cases where removal was attempted laparoscopically, many were later converted to laparotomy. Surgeons should be aware of different techniques, including using a wound protector retraction device, in order to facilitate laparoscopic removal.

  16. Extended use of the intrauterine device: a literature review and recommendations for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Justine P; Pickle, Sarah

    2014-06-01

    There are multiple advantages to "extended use" of the intrauterine device (IUD) use beyond the manufacturer-approved time period, including prolongation of contraceptive and non-contraceptive benefits. We performed a literature review of studies that have reported pregnancy outcomes associated with extended use of IUDs, including copper IUDs and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). Among parous women who are at least 25 years old at the time of IUD insertion, there is good evidence to support extended use of the following devices: the TCu380A and the TCu220 for 12 years, the Multiload Cu-375 for 10 years, the frameless GyneFix® (330 mm²) for 9 years, the levonorgestrel intrauterine system 52 mg (Mirena®) for 7 years and the Multiload Cu-250 for 4 years. Women who are at least 35 years old at the time of insertion of a TCu380A IUD can continue use until menopause with a negligible risk of pregnancy. We found no data to support use of the LNG-IUS 13.5 mg (Skyla®) beyond 3 years. When counseling about extended IUD use, clinicians should consider patient characteristics and preferences, as well as country- and community-specific factors. Future research is necessary to determine the risk of pregnancy associated with extended use of the copper IUD and the LNG-IUS among nulliparous women and women less than 25 years old at the time of IUD insertion. More data are needed on the potential effect of overweight and obesity on the long-term efficacy of the LNG-IUS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A randomized comparison of a novel nitinol-frame low-dose-copper intrauterine contraceptive and a copper T380S intrauterine contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Matthew F; Katz, Bob H; Canela, Juan M; Hathaway, Mark J; Tal, Michael G

    2017-06-01

    We sought to compare VeraCept (VC175), a novel nitinol intrauterine contraceptive (IUC) with 175 square-mm of copper surface area, to a copper T380S IUC. We enrolled parous women into a randomized subject-blinded comparison of VC175 and a copper T380S in a 2:1 fashion at a single clinic. The primary outcomes were total adverse events and continuation at 12 months. We also examined pain on insertion, ease of placement, expulsion, tolerability and pregnancy. Subjective ratings were on a 5-point Likert scale (0, no pain to 5, worst pain). We followed subjects through 24-month follow-up. We enrolled 300 women with 199 randomized to VC175 and 101 to the T380S. Insertion was successful in 198 subjects for VC175 and 100 for the T380S. Mean age was 25 years (range 18, 41), and median parity was 2 (range 1, 8), with 39% having only had Cesarean deliveries. No subjects developed clinical infection or reported serious adverse events. In the VC175 and T380S groups, mean pain at insertion was 1.4 and 2.4, respectively (p<.01). At the 12-month primary endpoint for VC175 and T380S, respectively, continuation was 84% and 68% (p<.002) with expulsions in 5.0% and 12.0% (p<.05) and removal for pain/bleeding in 3.5% and 17.0% (p<.01). At the 24-month visit for VC175 and T380S, respectively, continuation was 77% and 62% (p<.02 by log-rank). One ectopic pregnancy was identified at the 12-month follow-up in a VC175 user. No other pregnancies were diagnosed. With 297.3 and 132.4 woman-years, pregnancy rates were 0.3 and 0.0 per 100 woman-years for VC175 and T380S, respectively. VC175 resulted in less pain at insertion, fewer expulsions and higher total continuation than the T380S, with similar contraceptive efficacy. VC175 is a promising new intrauterine copper contraceptive on a nitinol frame that warrants further clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical performance of intrauterine device TCu-380 A in Benghazi, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R; al-Amari, M

    2000-01-01

    The study examined the reproductive and health profile of Benghazi women using intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) and evaluated one such device, the TCu-380 A. An historical longitudinal study was carried out using data from the Fertility Regulation Clinic, Keish Polyclinic, Benghazi. The subjects were 457 women registered for TCu-380 A insertion between 1995 and 1998, who had been under follow-up for at least 6 months. The majority were Libyan (87.8%), aged 20-29 years (63.4%), of parity 1-6 (67.1%), non-lactating (64.3%) and with normal delivery at last conception (95.1%). Half had a chronic disease. The cumulative 36-month follow-up of those using TCu-380 A revealed an effectiveness rate of 99.8%, a continuation rate of 96.1% and complications in 3.5%. TCu-380 A appears to be an effective, durable and safe IUD.

  19. Women's willingness to use emergency contraception: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to emergency contraception (EC) has little restriction in South Africa. EC is a contraceptive method that can be used by women up to 7 days after unprotected intercourse. It can be used in the following situations: when no contraceptive has been used; for condom accidents; after intrauterine contraceptive device ...

  20. Family planning and Zika virus: need for renewed and cohesive efforts to ensure availability of intrauterine contraception in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moazzam; Miller, Kelsey; Gómez Ponce de Leon, Rodolfo Federico

    2017-04-01

    The advantages of intrauterine contraception (IUC) are well established (highly effective, low discontinuation rate, easy to use, low cost, and suitable for immediate postpartum use), but low levels of use in many countries and declining use in others are causes for concern. Due to the ongoing Zika virus outbreak, public health officials are calling for the continued practice of safe sex and the delay of pregnancy. Our study was conducted to assess the current situation of IUC availability and provision in Latin America and to determine the role of national policies in meeting the contraceptive needs of the populations in these countries. A survey was conducted in Latin America and the Caribbean between December 2015 and January 2016 to assess national policies with regard to IUC provision, availability and accessibility. 18 countries participated. All responding countries had national policies on IUC. Many in the public sector provided the intrauterine device (IUD) free of charge, but the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) was generally available in the private sector. Some countries had very restrictive policies on who was permitted to carry out IUC insertions, but most permitted a range of health professionals to do so. Immediate postpartum IUC insertion was uncommon. Some countries placed restrictions on IUC use in women who were nulliparous, young, at high risk of catching a sexually transmitted infection or who had multiple sexual partners. IUC is underused in Latin America. The study reveals policy level barriers that may impede access to IUC, one of the most effective, long-acting, non-hormonal, reversible contraceptive methods. Governments should consider reviewing and rethinking their policies on contraception to ensure IUC service provision among populations at high risk of unplanned pregnancy, especially those vulnerable to Zika virus.

  1. New developments in intrauterine device use: focus on the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson AL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anita L Nelson,1 Natasha Massoudi2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Torrance, CA, USA; 2American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Cupecoy, Sint Maarten Abstract: Many more women in the US today rely upon intrauterine devices (IUDs than in the past. This increased utilization may have substantially contributed to the decline in the percentage of unintended pregnancies in the US. Evidence-based practices have increased the number of women who are medically eligible for IUDs and have enabled more rapid access to the methods. Many women enjoy freedom to use IUDs without cost, but for many the impact of the Affordable Care Act has yet to be realized. Currently, there are three hormonal IUDs and one copper IUD available in the US. Each IUD is extremely effective, convenient, and safe. The newer IUDs have been tested in populations not usually included in clinical trials and provide reassuring answers to older concerns about IUD use in these women, including information about expulsion, infection, and discontinuation. On the other hand, larger surveillance studies have provided new estimates about the risks of complications such as perforation, especially in postpartum and breastfeeding women. This article summarizes significant features of each IUD and provides a summary of the differences to aid clinicians in the US and other countries in advising women about IUD choices. Keywords: copper intrauterine device, levonorgestrel intrauterine systems, noncontraceptive benefits, same-day/quick start initiation, safety, bleeding patterns, placement pain, medical eligibility

  2. Immediate post-abortion insertion of intrauterine contraceptives (IUC) in a diverse urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, DeShawn; Connolly, Shannon; Ingles, Sue Ann; Watson, Carey; Segall-Gutierrez, Penina

    2014-06-01

    Ethnic minority women have a higher incidence of unintended pregnancy and abortion than Caucasian women, with significant individual and social implications. Post-abortion intrauterine contraceptive (IUC) use may reduce future unintended pregnancy. This was a retrospective review of 265 women undergoing abortion at a Los Angeles County Reproductive Options Clinic. Demographic factors, reproductive history, and post-abortion contraceptive choice were evaluated and analyzed. The population was predominantly Latina (73%) and single, with a mean age of 27. Immediate post-abortion IUC insertion was chosen by 48% overall and more frequently by Latinas (55%) than by African Americans (33%) or Asians (43%) (p = 0.02). IUC use increased with age, undesired future fertility, increasing gravidity, and history of previous abortion in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, IUC use increased with Latina ethnicity and increasing gravidity. In a clinic serving low-income urban women in Los Angeles, post-abortal IUC uptake is highest among Latinas and those with prior pregnancies. Future research should examine reasons for and barriers to IUC uptake in diverse communities and methods to improve post-abortion IUC uptake to prevent subsequent unintended pregnancies.

  3. The effect of intrauterine devices on acquisition and clearance of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbach, Sarah H; Ma, Yifei; Smith-McCune, Karen; Shiboski, Stephen; Moscicki, Anna B

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown a decrease in cervical cancer associated with intrauterine device use. It has been hypothesized that intrauterine device use may alter the natural history of human papillomavirus infections, preempting development of precancerous lesions of the cervix and cervical cancer, but the effect of intrauterine devices on the natural history of human papillomavirus infection and subsequent development of cervical cancer is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between intrauterine device use and cervical high-risk human papillomavirus acquisition and clearance. This is a prospective cohort study conducted from October 2000 through June 2014 among 676 sexually active young women and girls enrolled from family planning clinics in San Francisco, CA. Data were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model, including time-varying indicators of intrauterine device use, and adjusting for fixed and time-dependent predictor variables. A total of 85 women used an intrauterine device at some time during follow-up. Among 14,513 study visits, women reported intrauterine device use at 505 visits. After adjusting for potential behavioral confounders, there was no association between intrauterine device use and human papillomavirus acquisition (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-1.23; P = .13) or clearance of human papillomavirus infection (hazard ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-2.72; P = .26). Current intrauterine device use is not associated with acquisition or persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Intrauterine device use is safe among women and girls with human papillomavirus infections and at risk for human papillomavirus acquisition. Intrauterine device use may play a role further downstream in the natural history of cervical cancer by inhibiting the development of precancerous lesions of the cervix in human papillomavirus-infected women, or enhancing clearance of established

  4. Pregnancy and delivery with an intrauterine device in situ: outcomes in the National Inpatient Sample Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson Schaeffer, Sandy; Gimovsky, Alexis C; Aly, Hany; Mohamed, Mohamed A

    2017-10-26

    Pregnancy with intrauterine device in place is rare and there are limited data that exist regarding associated perinatal outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine the association between presence of an intrauterine device during pregnancy and spontaneous abortion, induced abortion, and preterm or small for gestational age delivery outcomes. The National Inpatient Sample database was analyzed for the years 2010 and 2011. Maternal records with an intrauterine device in situ during delivery were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnostic codes. Primary outcome was incidence of spontaneous abortion. Secondary outcomes were incidence of induced abortion, preterm delivery, and small for gestational age. Data were analyzed using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to calculate odds ratios (ORs) of abortion in association with intrauterine device in situ during pregnancy. Maternal birth records were further analyzed for adverse neonatal outcomes using logistic regression models, controlling for possible confounding variables. The data included 8,597,284 maternal birth records; 0.02% with an intrauterine device in situ. Patients with an intrauterine device in situ experienced a higher frequency of the pregnancy ending in spontaneous abortion (OR: 7.15; 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.06-10.09; p intrauterine device in place. Adjusted odds ratio for preterm delivery among women with an intrauterine device in situ was 2.04 (95% CI: 1.71-2.43; p intrauterine device, and adjusted odds ratio for delivery of a small for gestational age infant among intrauterine device cohort was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.34-0.92; p = .022), after controlling for associated demographic and clinical variables. The presence of an intrauterine device in situ during pregnancy was associated with increased spontaneous and induced abortions, and increased incidence of delivery of a preterm, but not small for gestational age infant.

  5. Factors Associated with Hormonal and Intrauterine Contraceptive Use among HIV-Infected Men and Women in Lilongwe, Malawi: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H. Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Understanding the factors associated with the use of hormonal and intrauterine contraception among HIV-infected men and women may lead to interventions that can help reduce high unintended pregnancy rates. Materials and Methods. This study is a subanalysis of a cross-sectional survey of 289 women and 241 men who were sexually active and HIV-infected and were attending HIV care visits in Lilongwe, Malawi. We estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs to evaluate factors associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use for men and women in separate models. Results and Discussion. 39.8% of women and 33.2% of men (p=0.117 reported that they were using hormonal or intrauterine contraception at last intercourse. Having greater than 3 children was the only factor associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use among men. Among women, younger age, not wanting a pregnancy in 2 years, being with their partner for more than 4 years, and being able to make family planning decisions by themselves were associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use. Conclusions. The men and women in our study population differed in the factors associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use. Understanding these differences may help decrease unmet FP needs among HIV-infected men and women.

  6. A retrospective evaluation of the intrauterine device in a patient population in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagroep, Sherani R; Pichardo, Margaret S; Arribas, Lia; Heredia, Graciela; Coccio, Elina; Palermo, Tia M

    2016-04-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is a long-acting reversible contraceptive method that is safe for a wide range of women, including adolescents and nulliparous women. Globally, it is often underutilised due to misperceptions among patients. Examination of characteristics associated with IUD discontinuation including adverse effects and IUD expulsion can inform provider practices to improve contraception success and patient satisfaction with this method. We studied IUD performance at a public family planning clinic in Buenos Aires, Argentina, serving a predominantly immigrant, low-income population. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of 1047 IUD insertions between 2002 and 2007 with 5 years of follow-up data. We performed bivariate and survival analysis to examine characteristics associated with IUD discontinuation: adverse outcomes including pain, bleeding, and IUD expulsion, and time to removal. Of 1047 patients, only 188 (18%) had their IUD removed within 5 years. The main causes of IUD discontinuation were involuntary (38%) reasons such as an IUD expulsion and personal choice (34%) such as desiring pregnancy. Findings suggest overall good long-term performance with IUD insertion, with minimal complaints or adverse outcomes. These findings may help to support providers serving similar populations in promoting this method. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Continuation of a Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Device During Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paula C; Soiffer, Robert J; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2017-04-01

    During treatment of hematologic malignancies in premenopausal women, both menstrual suppression and contraception are crucial. Continuation of hormonal intrauterine devices (IUDs) - widely used and highly effective contraceptives that also decrease menstrual flow - is controversial during hematopoietic stem cell transplants (SCTs) due to infectious and vaginal bleeding concerns. A 23-year-old nulligravid female was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, positive for FLT3-ITD, DNMT3A and RUNX1, with normal cytogenetics). She elected to retain her existing levonorgestrel-containing IUD during chemotherapy and SCT. During and following treatment, she remained amenorrheic without infection, despite severe neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Eight months later, she remains in remission without IUD-related complications. This is the first report of levonorgestrel IUD retention during hematopoietic SCT. Despite severe neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, the patient developed neither pelvic infection by retaining her IUD nor significant vaginal bleeding. Future studies are needed to confirm the safety of levonorgestrel IUDs in women undergoing SCT. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative analysis of copper intrauterine device impact on female sexual dysfunction subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakinci, Mehmet; Ercan, Cihangir Mutlu; Olgan, Safak; Coksuer, Hakan; Karasahin, Kazim Emre; Kuru, Oguzhan

    2016-02-01

    To examine the effect of copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) on female sexual dysfunction (FSD) subtypes. There were 159 sexually active women (ninety Cu-IUD users and sixty-nine women with no contraception) who attended the gynecology clinic for routine gynecologic control informed about the study and asked to fill Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and Beck Depression Inventory questionnaires. The prevalence of FSD was 41.1% (n=37) and 37.7% (n=26) in Cu-IUD users and control groups, respectively (p > 0.05). In analyses of mean overall and subgroup scores of FSFI, significantly lower scores for arousal (p=0.021), lubrication (p=0.021), orgasm (p=0.040), pain (p < 0.001), and overall FSFI (p=0.031) were noted in Cu-IUD users. When the results for FSFI domains were considered for Cu-IUD users separately, the only difference to reach statistical significance, using a Bonferroni adjustment, was found to be the pain domain. Finally, we determined that Cu-IUD status made the strongest unique contribution to explaining the dependent variable pain in multiple logistic regression model (β = -0.26, p=0.001). Cu-IUD users have increased sexual pain compared to women with no contraception, which in turn possibly causes decreased sexual arousal, lubrication, and orgasm in these women. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Pelvic abscess complicating sigmoid colon perforation by migrating intrauterine device: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumi, Omar; Ammar, Houssem; Ghdira, Abdessalem; Chhaidar, Amine; Trimech, Wided; Gupta, Rahul; Salem, Randa; Saad, Jamel; Korbi, Ibtissem; Nasr, Mohamed; Noomen, Faouzi; Golli, Mondher; Zouari, Khadija

    2018-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are commonly used as a contraceptive method. However, they may cause rare but potentially serious complications such as migration through the uterine wall and gastrointestinal perforation. We report a case of a 26-year woman, carrying an IUD for 2 years, who presented to the emergency with pelvic pain with breakthrough bleeding. Abdominal imaging revealed the presence of two devices the first of which was located in the uterine cavity and the other in the wall of the sigmoid colon associated with a 5-centimeter pelvic collection. Intraoperatively, the IUD was found to be embedded in the wall of the sigmoid colon which was removed by wedge resection of the involved segment followed by a closure of the puncture with drainage. The Intrauterine Device (IUD) is an effective method of contraception, relatively well tolerated, reversible, inexpensive and widely used. However, it is not without risk. Indeed, serious complications can occur such as uterine perforation and migration to adjacent abdomino-pelvic structures. Our observation illustrates its rarity given the fact that this complication has been observed the first time in our department over the last ten years. The migration of IUD must be treated even in asymptomatic patients due to the risk of severe complications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. [Diagnosis and management of uterine perforations after intrauterine device insertion: a report of 11 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyon, C; Giraudet, G; Guérin Du Masgenêt, B; Lucot, J-P; Goeusse, P; Vinatier, D

    2013-05-01

    Intrauterine device insertion is common. It is however not harmless and uterine perforation can be serious. Eleven cases of uterine perforation after intrauterine device insertion were listed at Tourcoing hospital between 2005 and 2009. They were analyzed to identify risk factors of uterine perforation and specify management. The main symptom was pelvic pain (4 cases), pregnancy occurrence (3 cases) or inability to remove the IUD (2 cases). The intrauterine device was set during the first 9 months of post-partum in 7 cases, 2 patients were still breastfeeding. Seven patients underwent laparoscopy, 2 needed switch for laparotomy, one was treated by laparotomy only and one was lost of follow-up. Incidence of uterine perforation after IUD insertion ranges from 0,1 to 3/1000. Pelvic pain is the most revealing symptom. Fifteen percent of perforations complicate with adjacent organ lesion. Perforation incidence seems greater if the intrauterine device is set during the 6 first weeks of post-partum and breastfeeding, but non influenced by operator practical experience. Ultrasound follow-up of patients carrying intrauterine device is controversial. Facing a suspicion of ectopic intrauterine device, pelvic ultrasound examination is the first step imaging modality and using 3D could be useful. If it fails to localize the intrauterine device, an abdominal X-ray must be performed. Ectopic intrauterine device removal is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Contraception coverage and methods used among women in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two-thirds had an unintended pregnancy in the past 5 years, a quarter of which were contraceptive failures. Most knew of injectable (92.0%) and oral contraception (89.9%), but fewer of intrauterine devices (56.1%) and emergency contraception (47.3%). Contraceptive prevalence was 49.1%, and 41.8% women used ...

  12. A CASE OF PELVIC ACTINOMYCOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH AN INTRAUTERINE DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Pirš

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Actinomycosis is a rare slowly progressive infection caused by Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria from the genus Actinomyces. The disease is characterized by the formation of the abscesses surrounded by dense fibrosis that extend slowly across natural anatomic boundaries.Patients and methods. The case of a 49-year-old patient with pelvic actinomycosis associated with an intrauterine device is presented. The patient was successfully treated with the combination of antibiotic and surgical therapy.Conclusions. Pelvic actinomycosis is a rare disorder. The infection may occur as a consequence of an abdominal disease or an ascending infection from the genito-urinary tract. Diagnosis of the actinomycosis can be difficult, malignant disease if often suspected. The diagnosis is frequently not established until after surgery.

  13. Lack of Association between Cu T-380A Intrauterine Device and Secondary Infertility in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdinasab, Mahnaz; Dehghani Firouzabadi, Razieh; Farajkhoda, Tahmineh; Abdoli, Ali Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background The appropriate choice of a contraceptive method has been a major issue in reproductive health research. Cu T intrauterine device (Cu T IUD) has been introduced as one of the most effective contraceptive methods in the world, however, the relationship between prior use of Cu T IUD and secondary infertility has not been evaluated in Iran. To examine the association of Cu T-380A IUD and secondary infertility in Iran. Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted from December 2010 to September 2011 in the Research and Clinical Center for Infertility, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran. A total of 750 married women (15-49 years old) with at least one parity, whom were referred to four educational healthcare centers of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, were selected as participants. They were divided into two groups (case and control) based on previous history of using Cu T-380A IUD. Data were gathered using a standard reliable questionnaire along with a face-to-face interview and were analyzed with descriptive and analytical (χ²) tests. Results Mean period of Cu T-380A IUD usage in the case group was 57.46 ± 47.74 months and mean time length from Cu T-380A IUD removal to pregnancy was 14.87 ± 5.18 months in this group. We observed no relationship between the use of Cu T-380A IUD and frequency of secondary infertility (3.5% in the case group versus 2.7% in the control group, P=0.52). Conclusion Given the relatively large sample size studied here, it is unlikely that Cu T-380A IUD results in secondary infertility and may be used by Iranian women as a safe contraceptive method. PMID:28042414

  14. Five-year review of copper T intrauterine device use at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iklaki CU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher U Iklaki, Anthony U Agbakwuru, Atim E Udo, Sylvester E Abeshi Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria Background: The intrauterine devices (IUDs are widely used contraceptive methods all over the world today. They are effective and recommended for use up to 10 years. They are not without side effects, which often prompt the users to request for removal. Objective: To determine the utilization rate of copper T intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD, side effects, and request for removal at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. Methods: The data on usage of the various forms of temporary contraception provided by the Family Planning Clinic of this center from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010 were collated. The records of usage of IUCD during same period were carefully studied. Results: During this period, a total of 10,880 users were provided with various forms of contraceptives. Copper T IUD was the commonest form of contraception used at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital Family Planning Unit over the period under review (2006–2010 with a rate of 4,069 (37.40%. There was a yearly higher request for IUCD over other forms of contraceptives over the period. Of a total of 4,069 users of the copper T IUD method over the period, 1,410 (34.65% belonged to the age group of 25–29 years. Eleven (4.61% of the users requested for its removal due to abnormal vaginal bleeding, while five (2.08% removed theirs due to abnormal vaginal discharge. The major reason for removal was the desire for pregnancy that accounted for 165 (70.26%, while one (0.51% was removed due to dysmenorrhea. Conclusion: The copper T380A was very effective, safe with fewer side effects, and easily available in this study. The request for removal is also low in our environment. Keywords: copper T380A, contraception, request for removal

  15. Early versus delayed insertion of intrauterine contraception after medical abortion - a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Sääv

    Full Text Available Today, a large proportion of early abortions are medical terminations, in accordance to the woman's choice. Intrauterine contraceptives (IUC provide highly effective, reversible, long-acting contraception. However, the effects of timing of IUC insertion after medical abortion are not known.Women undergoing medical abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol up to 63 days gestation and opting for IUC were randomised to early insertion (day 5-9 after mifepristone or delayed (routine insertion (at 3-4 weeks after mifepristone. The primary outcome was the rate of IUC expulsion at six months after IUC insertion.A total of 129 women were randomized, and 116 women had a successful IUC insertion. There was no difference in expulsion rate between early (9.7% vs. delayed (7.4% IUC insertion (risk difference -9.2-13.4. Furthermore, 1.5% of women randomized to early and 11.5% to delayed insertion did not attend the follow up (proportion difference 10.0%, 95% CI: 1.8-20.6%, p = 0.015, and a higher proportion of women (41% had had unprotected intercourse prior to returning for insertion in the delayed group compared with the early group (16% (p = 0.015. Adverse events were rare and did not differ between the groups.Early insertion of IUC after medical abortion was safe and well tolerated with no increased incidence for expulsions or complications. Women were more likely to return for the IUC insertion if scheduled early after the abortion, and less likely to have had an unprotected intercourse prior to the IUC insertion. Early insertion should be offered as a routine for women undergoing first trimester medical abortion.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01537562.

  16. Contraception for Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Hess, Rachel; Trussell, James

    2009-01-01

    Women who have survived cancer may need guidance in choosing a method of contraception. This paper reviews the evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of available methods of contraception for cancer survivors and concludes that the Copper T380A intrauterine device (IUD), a highly effective, reversible, long-acting, hormone-free method should be considered a first-line contraceptive option for women with a history of a hormonally mediated cancer. However, the levonorgestrel-containing IUD...

  17. Knowledge, Attitude And Practice Of Contraception Amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    barrier methods 38.3 %( 97), intrauterine contraceptive device. 18.6 %( 47), others are as shown in Table 2. Attitude to contraception. There were 51.2 %( 130) of respondents who .... Ultimately, this will bring about the gains of contraception and reduce the complication arising from multiple child births both in the mother and ...

  18. Weight variation in users of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and a copper intrauterine device for up to ten years of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Waleska; de Nazaré Silva dos Santos, Priscila; Correia, Vinicius Machado; Borges, Luiza; Bahamondes, Luis

    2015-02-01

    Data on record regarding weight variation in depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) users are controversial. To date, no studies have yet evaluated weight variation in DMPA and LNG-IUS users in up to ten years of use compared to non-hormonal contraceptive users. A retrospective study analysed weight variations in 2138 women using uninterruptedly DMPA (150 mg intramuscularly, three-monthly; n = 714), the LNG-IUS (n = 701) or a copper-intrauterine device (Cu-IUD; n = 723). At the end of the first year of use, there was a mean weight increase of 1.3 kg, 0.7 kg and 0.2 kg among the DMPA-, LNG-IUS- and Cu-IUD users, respectively, compared to weight at baseline (p < 0.0001). After ten years of use, the mean weight had risen by 6.6 kg, 4.0 and 4.9 kg among the DMPA-, LNG-IUS- and Cu-IUD users, respectively. DMPA-users had gained more weight than LNG-IUS- (p = 0.0197) and than Cu-IUD users (p = 0.0294), with the latter two groups not differing significantly from each other in this respect (p = 0.5532). Users of hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods gained a significant amount of weight over the years. DMPA users gained more weight over the treatment period of up to ten years than women fitted with either a LNG-IUS or a Cu-IUD.

  19. Predictors of non-use of intrauterine contraception among women aged 18–49 years in a general practice setting in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker SH

    2016-10-01

    women, tailored to specifically address these concerns, is needed.Implications: Clinicians should provide more reassurance and information to potential users of IUC to increase their confidence about the possibility of removing IUC early or on request. They should also specifically seek to alleviate concerns about internal damage, damage to the womb, or damage to future fertility from using the methods. Keywords: intrauterine device, intrauterine contraception, intrauterine system, general ­practice, UK 

  20. An Estimation of the Risk of Pseudotumor Cerebri among Users of the Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valenzuela, Reuben M; Rai, Ruju; Kirk, Brian H

    2017-01-01

    Because of a previous association of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) with levonorgestrel, we wished to evaluate the use of levonorgestrel-eluting intrauterine devices ("levonorgestrel intrauterine systems", LNG-IUS) in our University of Utah and Rigshospitalet PTC patients. In our retrospective series...

  1. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pantić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception refers to any device or drug that is used as an emergency procedure to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse.The first method of emergency contraception was high dose of estrogen. Concern about side effects led to subsequent development of the so-called Yuzpe regimen which combined ethinil estradiol with levonorgestrel and levonorgestrel alone. Less convenient to use is the copper intauterine contraceptive device.It is known that in some women sexual steroids may inhibit or delay ovulation and may interfere with ovum and sperm transport and implantation. Copper intrauterine device causes a foreign-body effect on the endometrium and a direct toxic effect to sperm and blastocyst.The Yuzpe regimen reduces the risk of pregnancy after a single act of sexual intercourse by about 75% and the levonorgestrel alone by about 85%. The copper intrauterine device is an extremely effective method for selected patients.Nausea and vomiting are common among women using the Yuzpe regimen and considerably less common among women using levonorgestrel alone regimen.Emergency contraception is relatively safe with no contraindications except pregnancy. It is ineffective if a woman is pregnant. There is no need for a medical hystory or a phisical examination before providing emergency contraceptive pills. They are taken long before organogenesis starts, so they should not have a teratogenic effect.Counseling should include information about correct use of the method, possible side effects and her preferences for regular contraception.Unintended pregnancy is a great problem. Several safe, effective and inexpensive methods of emergency contraception are available including Yuzpe regimen, levonorges-trel-only regimen and copper intrauterine device.

  2. profile of intrauterine contraceptive device acceptors at the university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANNALS

    motherhood initiative in Kenya in 1987 and the prevention of maternal mortality program sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, maternal mortality in the .... held rumors, myths, misconceptions and lack of current scientific information have been identified as the biggest barrier to IUCD use and acceptance and.

  3. Intrauterine bone contraceptive device: an accident of nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajani, Y.F.; Khalaf, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonography and hysterosalpingography led to discovery of four bony plates retained in the uterine fundus after an abortion 33 months earlier and which had apparently led to secondary infertility in a 26-year-old woman. Removal of the bony plates was soon followed by a successful pregnancy

  4. The migrant intrauterine contraceptive device: An uncommon cause ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Port Harcourt Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Simultaneous laparoscopic cholecystectomy and removal of an intrauterine device translocated to the right subdiaphragmal region: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Salih; Ahmeti, Elvis; Hoxha, Sejdullah A; Ymeri, Halit; Shaqiri, Ismet; Kastrati-Spahija, Nexhmije B; Krasniqi, Avdyl S

    2009-08-25

    Intrauterine devices are often accompanied by various complications, of which the uterine perforation constitutes the most dangerous one. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman complaining of right upper quadrant pain. She had an intrauterine device inserted 12 years earlier without regular follow-up. Abdominal plain X-ray revealed the intrauterine device trans-located into the right subdiaphragmal area. Abdominal ultrasound showed gallbladder stones without any other sonographic pathologic finding. Patient underwent simultaneous laparoscopic cholecystectomy and removal of the intrauterine device from the right subdiaphragmal area. Laparoscopy is an appropriate method for removal of intrauterine device translocated to the right subdiaphragmatic region.

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates: cytoadherence and adherence to polystyrene, intrauterine device, and vaginal ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Odelta; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2017-12-01

    The parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis is complex and in part is mediated by cytoadherence accomplished via five surface proteins named adhesins and a glycoconjugate called lipophosphoglycan (TvLPG). In this study, we evaluated the ability of T. vaginalis isolates to adhere to cells, plastic (polystyrene microplates), intrauterine device (IUD), and vaginal ring. Of 32 T. vaginalis isolates, 4 (12.5%) were strong adherent. The T. vaginalis isolates TV-LACM6 and TV-LACM14 (strong polystyrene-adherent) were also able to adhere to IUD and vaginal ring. Following chemical treatments, results demonstrated that the T. vaginalis components, lipophosphoglycan, cytoskeletal proteins, and surface molecules, were involved in both adherence to polystyrene and cytoadherence. The gene expression level from four adhesion proteins was highest in trophozoites adhered to cells than trophozoites adhered to the abiotic surface (polystyrene microplate). Our data indicate the major involvement of TvLPG in adherence to polystyrene, and that adhesins are important for cytoadherence. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first report showing the T. vaginalis adherence to contraceptive devices, reaffirming its importance as pathogen among women in reproductive age.

  7. Intravesical Migration of a Failed and Forgotten Intrauterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is a commonly utilized reversible contraceptive technique especially in the developing world. Though effective, it is not immune to complications. Migration of the device is a rare but serious complication which may be symptomatic or asymptomatic. We report a case of a 45yr old ...

  8. New developments in intrauterine device use: focus on the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Anita L; Massoudi, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Many more women in the US today rely upon intrauterine devices (IUDs) than in the past. This increased utilization may have substantially contributed to the decline in the percentage of unintended pregnancies in the US. Evidence-based practices have increased the number of women who are medically eligible for IUDs and have enabled more rapid access to the methods. Many women enjoy freedom to use IUDs without cost, but for many the impact of the Affordable Care Act has yet to be realized. Currently, there are three hormonal IUDs and one copper IUD available in the US. Each IUD is extremely effective, convenient, and safe. The newer IUDs have been tested in populations not usually included in clinical trials and provide reassuring answers to older concerns about IUD use in these women, including information about expulsion, infection, and discontinuation. On the other hand, larger surveillance studies have provided new estimates about the risks of complications such as perforation, especially in postpartum and breastfeeding women. This article summarizes significant features of each IUD and provides a summary of the differences to aid clinicians in the US and other countries in advising women about IUD choices. PMID:29386944

  9. Uterine doughnut by intrauterine device-induced photon attenuation on three-phase bone scintigraphy: artifact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    A 44-year-old female underwent three-phase bone scintigraphy for an evaluation of right hip joint pain. The blood-flow and blood-pool images show a pelvic blush with a photopenic center (doughnut) prior to bladder filling. On the three hour delayed image, the pelvic uptake disappeared. The scintigraphic findings indicated the possibility of an early pregnancy. However, plain radiography demonstrated an intrauterine device. A uterine doughnut developed as a result of photon attenuation of intrauterine device.

  10. Three-dimensional ultrasonography versus two-dimensional ultrasonography for the diagnosis of intrauterine device malposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiu-ying; Guo, Qing-yun; Wang, Wen; Huang, Li-li

    2015-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) versus three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography for the diagnosis of intrauterine device (IUD) malposition. In a prospective study, women with a history of failed IUD removal and/or ultrasonography results indicating malposition were recruited at a center in Hangzhou, China, between March 1, 2009, and September 30, 2011. All patients underwent 2D and 3D ultrasonography. Hysteroscopy, laparoscopy, or laparotomy was carried out to remove the IUDs and was considered the gold standard for diagnosing malposition. Among 130 participants, 128 (98.5%) were diagnosed with IUD malposition by hysteroscopy, laparoscopy, or laparotomy. Malposition had been correctly identified with 2D ultrasonography in 83 (64.8%) cases, and with 3D ultrasonography in 107 (83.6%) cases. The diagnostic accuracy of 3D ultrasonography was significantly better than was that of 2D ultrasonography (P<0.001). The use of 2D ultrasonography is recommended for the follow-up of women who use IUDs as a contraceptive method. However, 3D ultrasonography should be used when malposition is suspected. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 884.5380 - Contraceptive tubal occlusion device (TOD) and introducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contraceptive tubal occlusion device (TOD) and... Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5380 Contraceptive tubal occlusion device (TOD) and introducer. (a) Identification. A contraceptive tubal occlusion device (TOD) and introducer is a device designed to close a...

  12. Six-week retention after postplacental copper intrauterine device placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwill, Alyssa Covelli; Schreiber, Courtney A; Sammel, Mary D; Sonalkar, Sarita

    2018-03-01

    We sought to evaluate the 6-week clinical outcomes (intrauterine device [IUD] retention, recognized expulsions, ability to visualize or palpate strings, and need for ultrasound evaluation) in women who received a TCu380A postplacental IUD (PPIUD) after vaginal (VD) or cesarean delivery (CD). We conducted a retrospective cohort study to examine the 6-week retention of TCu380A IUDs placed within 10 min of placental delivery in VD (n=137) and CD (n=73). We used Student's t test and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous data and Pearson χ 2 test and Fisher's Exact Test for categorical data. Of the 169 women who had follow-up, 151 (89.3%) retained their IUD at 6 weeks (95% CI 84.7%-93.9%). All women who underwent CD retained their IUD at 6 weeks postpartum (56/56), whereas 95/113 (84% [95% CI 76.0%-90.3%]) who underwent VD retained their original IUD (p<.01). Strings were detected more frequently in women who had a VD (93.1% [95% CI 85.6-97.4]) compared to those who delivered by CD (44.2% [95% CI 30.5-58.7]; p<.01). Women who underwent CD had an ultrasound to evaluate IUD location more frequently (42.9% [95% CI 29.7-56.8]) compared to women who underwent VD (13.7% [95% CI 7.5-22.3]; p<.01). Women are more likely to retain a PPIUD after CD compared to a VD (p<.01); however, women who have a PPIUD placed after CD are more likely to have nonvisible strings with a pelvic exam (p<.01) and undergo pelvic ultrasound evaluation (p<.01) compared to a PPIUD placed at the time of a VD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Medications to ease intrauterine device insertion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Lauren B; Jatlaoui, Tara C; Marchbanks, Polly A; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2016-12-01

    Potential barriers to intrauterine device (IUD) use include provider concern about difficult insertion, particularly for nulliparous women. This study aims to evaluate the evidence on the effectiveness of medications to ease IUD insertion on provider outcomes (i.e., ease of insertion, need for adjunctive insertion measures, insertion success). We searched the PubMed database for peer-reviewed articles published in any language from database inception through February 2016. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined medications to ease interval insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing IUDs and copper T IUDs. From 1855 articles, we identified 15 RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. Most evidence suggested that misoprostol did not improve provider ease of insertion, reduce the need for adjunctive insertion measures or improve insertion success among general samples of women seeking an IUD (evidence Level I, good to fair). However, one RCT found significantly higher insertion success among women receiving misoprostol prior to a second IUD insertion attempt after failed attempt versus placebo (evidence Level I, good). Two RCTs on 2% intracervical lidocaine as a topical gel or injection suggested no positive effect on provider ease of insertion (evidence Level I, good to poor), and one RCT on diclofenac plus 2% intracervical lidocaine as a topical gel suggested no positive effect on provider ease of insertion (evidence Level I, good). Limited evidence from two RCTs on nitric oxide donors, specifically nitroprusside or nitroglycerin gel, suggested no positive effect on provider ease of insertion or need for adjunctive insertion measures (evidence Level I, fair). Overall, most studies found no significant differences between women receiving interventions to ease IUD insertion versus controls. Among women with a recent failed insertion who underwent a second insertion attempt, one RCT found improved insertion success among women using misoprostol versus

  14. Loop electrosurgical excision procedure with an intrauterine device in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Amelia P; Darracott, Mixon M

    2010-09-01

    Patients using an intrauterine device (IUD) who require a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) for cervical dysplasia have traditionally had the IUD removed prior to the procedure. The only other options have been methods that lead to suboptimal sampling or risk cutting the strings. Our study suggests a procedure for performing the LEEP without removing the IUD, and review of the literature suggests that this method has not been reported before. The LEEP is performed using a conization electrode or a cone biopsy excisor. After noting that the IUD strings are of adequate length, a 0-polyglactin free tie is secured around the visible portion of the IUD strings without applying tension on the strings. A large, sterile absorbent-tipped applicator with a hollow handle becomes an 8 cm hollow plastic tube by removing the cotton tip with sterile scissors. The long end of the suture is threaded through the sterile tube. Without pulling on the IUD, the tube is then passed over the strings into the cervical canal approximately 2.5 cm to protect the strings from the excisor well into the cervical canal. Then, the LEEP is performed. After the specimen is removed, hemostasis can be obtained using a ball cautery electrode, keeping the protecting tube with the enclosed IUD strings out of the way. The tube is then carefully removed. The suture is now cut close to the polyglactin knot around the IUD strings, making certain not to shorten the IUD strings and making certain the visible length of the strings is the same as before the procedure. Ferric subsulfate is applied to the operative area to provide continued hemostasis. Follow-up for the LEEP is unchanged. This procedure may be performed on either levonorgestrel-releasing or copper IUDs. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) 13.5 mg in contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, James; Hassan, Fareen; Henry, Nathaniel; Pocoski, Jennifer; Law, Amy; Filonenko, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) 13.5 mg (total content) is a low-dose levonorgestrel intrauterine system for up to 3 years of use. This analysis evaluated the cost-effectiveness of LNG-IUS 13.5 mg in comparison with short-acting reversible contraceptive (SARC) methods in a cohort of young women in the United States from a third-party payer's perspective. A state transition model consisting of three mutually exclusive health states -- initial method, unintended pregnancy (UP) and subsequent method -- was developed. Cost-effectiveness of LNG-IUS 13.5 mg was assessed vs. SARC methods in a cohort of 1000 women aged 20-29 years. SARC methods comprise oral contraceptives (OC), ring, patch and injections, which are the methods commonly used by this cohort. Failure and discontinuation probabilities were based on published literature, contraceptive uptake was determined by the most recent data from the National Survey of Family Growth, and costs were taken from standard US databases. One-way sensitivity analysis was conducted around key inputs, while scenario analysis assessed a comparison between LNG-IUS 13.5 mg and the existing IUS, LNG-IUS 20 mcg/24 h. The key model output was cost per UP avoided. Compared to SARC methods, initiating contraception with LNG-IUS 13.5 mg resulted in fewer UP (64 UP vs. 276 UP) and lower total costs ($1,283,479 USD vs. $1,862,633 USD, a 31% saving) over the 3-year time horizon. Results were most sensitive to the probability of failure on OC, the probability of LNG-IUS 13.5 mg discontinuation and the cost of live births. Scenario analysis suggests that further cost savings may be generated with the initiation of LNG-IUS 20 mcg/24 h in place of SARC methods. From a third-party payer perspective, LNG-IUS 13.5 mg is a more cost-effective contraceptive option than SARC. Therefore, women switching from current SARC use to LNG-IUS 13.5 mg are likely to generate cost savings to third-party health care payers, driven

  16. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Atsuko Koyama; Laura Hagopian; Judith Linden

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others...

  17. Five years' experience with a small intracervical/intrauterine levonorgestrel-releasing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, Päivi; Luukkainen, Tapani

    2005-11-01

    A randomized study was performed to compare the efficacy, safety and acceptability of a new model of an intracervical/intrauterine contraceptive device (ICD) releasing 20 microg of levonorgestrel (LNG) per day. The LNG-ICD was inserted in Group I into the cervical canal and in Group II into the uterine cavity. Group I included 151 women (age, 18-43 years) whereas Group II included 147 (age, 19-43 years). The number of nulliparous women was 145. The 5-year results are presented here. The results showed a total continuation rate of 50%; the continuation rate in the cervical group and that in the uterine group were 53.6% and 46.3%, respectively--the difference being statistically insignificant (p=.3593). The main reason for termination was a wish for pregnancy, which is explained by the relatively young age and degree of nulliparity of the study population. During the first year, two pregnancies occurred in both groups. Two of these were ectopic, one in each group. The other two occurred after unnoticed expulsions. Thereafter, no pregnancies occurred. The cumulative gross rate for pregnancy was 1.3 and the Pearl index at 5 years was 0.425. The total expulsion rate was relatively high (11.1%). Expulsions occurring during the first few months of the first year were related to insertion. Removals because of bleeding and because of amenorrhea were low, the combined gross rate being 5.7 and the Pearl rate 1.8 at 5 years. Also, the gross rate of infection was low (0.7). The continuation was high in spite of a high rate of removals for planning pregnancy (15.4). The method is safe and effective. There were only minor differences between the groups. There were no perforations and the incidence of infection was low. The device can also be used by young nulliparous women.

  18. Intrauterine devices and endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis of the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Ashley S.; Gaudet, Mia M.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Nagle, Christina M.; Ou Shu, Xiao; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Olov Adami, Hans; Beresford, Shirley; Bernstein, Leslie; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Hill, Dierdre; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Lacey, James V.; Levi, Fabio; Liang, Xiaolin; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony; McCann, Susan E.; Negri, Eva; Olson, Sara H.; Palmer, Julie R.; Patel, Alpa V.; Petruzella, Stacey; Prescott, Jennifer; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosenberg, Lynn; Sherman, Mark E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Webb, Penelope M.; Wise, Lauren A.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Wanghong; Yang, Hannah P.; Yu, Herbert; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Brinton, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs), long-acting and reversible contraceptives, induce a number of immunological and biochemical changes in the uterine environment that could affect endometrial cancer (EC) risk. We addressed this relationship through a pooled analysis of data collected in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. We combined individual-level data from 4 cohort and 14 case-control studies, in total 8,801 EC cases and 15,357 controls. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated pooled odds ratios (pooled-ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for EC risk associated with ever use, type of device, ages at first and last use, duration of use, and time since last use, stratified by study and adjusted for confounders. Ever use of IUDs was inversely related to EC risk (pooled-OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.74–0.90). Compared with never use, reduced risk of EC was observed for inert IUDs (pooled-OR=0.69, 95% CI=0.58–0.82), older age at first use (≥35 years pooled-OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.43–0.67), older age at last use (≥45 years pooled-OR=0.60, 95% CI=0.50–0.72), longer duration of use (≥10 years pooled-OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.52–0.71), and recent use (within 1 year of study entry pooled-OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.30–0.49). Future studies are needed to assess the respective roles of detection biases and biologic effects related to foreign body responses in the endometrium, heavier bleeding (and increased clearance of carcinogenic cells), and localized hormonal changes. PMID:25242594

  19. Effect of vaginal administration of misoprostol before intrauterine contraceptive insertion following previous insertion failure: a double blind RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, M Valeria; Espejo-Arce, Ximena; Bahamondes, Luis

    2015-08-01

    Is pretreatment with misoprostol useful in insertion of intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs) after insertion failure at the first attempt? Pretreatment with intravaginal administration of 200 mcg of misoprostol after IUC insertion failure 10 and 4 h before the second attempt of IUC placement was significantly better than placebo at facilitating the insertion of an IUC. One of the reasons for low use of IUCs is the concept that insertion is difficult. Misoprostol was used in several randomized clinical trials (RCT) before IUC insertion to facilitate the insertion. In general, the results showed no significant differences when compared with placebo. However, most previous studies have been carried out among unselected women whereas the present study is among women with previous insertion failure. This was a double blind RCT conducted between February 2013 and October 2014. Participants were 104 women who requested an insertion of an IUC and the insertion failed at the first attempt. After insertion failure, the women received a sealed envelope with misoprostol or placebo. The randomization system (1: 1) in one block size was computer-generated. The study was conducted at a tertiary care centre. The women were instructed to insert vaginally one tablet of misoprostol 200 µg (Prostokos, Hebron, Cariacica, PE, Brazil) or placebo 10 and 4 h before the woman returned to the clinic for a new insertion attempt. The outcomes were successful IUC insertion and the use of a cervical dilator immediately prior to the insertion procedure. A total of 2639 women requested the insertion of an IUC during the study period. The IUC was inserted at the first attempt in 2535 women (96%) and 104 women in whom we were unable to insert the device were eligible to participate in the RCT. Four women declined and 100 women were randomized (55 for the misoprostol group and 45 for the placebo group). From the 100 participating women, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) was

  20. Introduction of the GyneFix intra-uterine device into the UK: client satisfaction survey and casenotes review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, J; Webb, A; Kishen, M

    2001-07-01

    To assess the first year's use with the GyneFix intra-uterine device. This has been used in Liverpool since early 1997. It is offered mainly to nulliparous women wishing to use an effective non-hormonal method and parous women who have had pain with, or expulsion of, a framed device previously. It is also used as emergency contraception. Retrospective study, by means of casenote review and client questionnaire. All GyneFix users from February 1997 to January 1998; 215 women in total. Data were extracted from casenotes to determine reasons for choice of GyneFix, parity, whether the insertion was planned or as an emergency measure, problems reported at follow-up and reasons for removal. Users were asked by questionnaire to comment on insertion procedure, menstrual or other changes since insertion and to state their overall satisfaction. Over half of the users (57%) were nulliparous and a quarter of insertions were for emergency contraceptive use. A third reported that insertion was 'very painful'. Half reported that their periods had become heavier since insertion, but only 8% said that they were now unmanageable. Unacceptable bleeding was the most common reason for removal. Some reported intermenstrual bleeding and dysmenorrhoea. Satisfaction with the GyneFix was high; 86% of questionnaire responders said that they would recommend it to a friend. The GyneFix is well accepted in Liverpool inappropriately selected clients, and is an effective non-hormonal method for nulliparous as well as parous women.

  1. Prolonged use of the etonogestrel implant and levonorgestrel intrauterine device: 2 years beyond Food and Drug Administration-approved duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, Colleen; Swor, Erin; Wan, Leping; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2017-06-01

    The subdermal contraceptive implant and the 52-mg levonorgestrel intrauterine device are currently Food and Drug Administration approved for 3 and 5 years of use, respectively. Limited available data suggested both of these methods are effective beyond that time. Demonstration of prolonged effectiveness will improve the cost-effectiveness of the device, and potentially patient continuation and satisfaction. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the contraceptive implant and the 52-mg hormonal intrauterine device in women using the method for 2 years beyond the current Food and Drug Administration-approved duration. We initiated this ongoing prospective cohort study in January 2012. We are enrolling women using the contraceptive implant or 52-mg levonorgestrel intrauterine device for a minimum of 3 and 5 years, respectively (started intrauterine device in ≥2007 or implant in ≥2009). Demographic and reproductive health histories, as well as objective body mass index, were collected. Implant users were offered periodic venipuncture for analysis of serum etonogestrel levels. The primary outcome, unintended pregnancy rate, was calculated per 100 woman-years. We analyzed baseline demographic characteristics using χ 2 test and Fisher exact test, and compared serum etonogestrel levels stratified by body mass index using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Implant users (n = 291) have contributed 444.0 woman-years of follow-up. There have been no documented pregnancies in implant users during the 2 years of postexpiration follow-up. Calculated failure rates in the fourth and fifth years for the implant are calculated as 0 (1-sided 97.5% confidence interval, 0-1.48) per 100 woman-years at 4 years and 0 (1-sided 97.5% confidence interval, 0-2.65) per 100 woman-years at 5 years. Among 496 levonorgestrel intrauterine device users, 696.9 woman-years of follow-up have been completed. Two pregnancies have been reported. The failure rate in the sixth year of use of the

  2. Intrauterine device placement at 3 versus 6 weeks postpartum: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Maureen K; Edelman, Alison B; Lim, Jeong Y; Nichols, Mark D; Bednarek, Paula H; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether early placement of an intrauterine device (IUD) at 3 weeks after delivery, compared to placement at 6 weeks, is associated with greater use at 3 months postpartum. This prospective randomized, controlled trial enrolled inpatient postpartum women intending to use intrauterine contraception. Participants were assigned to an early (3 week) or standard (6 week) postpartum visit with IUD placement and were followed for 6 months. We used transvaginal ultrasonography to confirm placement and measure uterine dimensions. We measured pain with IUD insertion and satisfaction with IUD timing using 100-mm visual analog scales. Data were analyzed based on randomization and actual timing of insertion (18-24 vs. 39-45 days). Between February 2012 and December 2013, 201 subjects were enrolled (early=101; standard=100). Most participants returned for IUD placement as scheduled; 70.1% (53/75) in the early group, 74.3% (58/78) in the standard group (p=.06). IUD use did not differ between groups at 3 months (73/100, 73.0% and 73/97, 75.3%, respectively, p=.72) or 6 months (80.3% and 82.8%, p=.71) amongst those women for whom follow-up was available. Women randomized to 6-week insertion were more likely to have resumed intercourse prior to the IUD appointment (15/64, 23.4% vs. 5/68, 7.3%, p=.01). Pain with insertion (19.9 vs. 25.1, respectively, p=.21) and satisfaction (89.6 vs. 93.4, respectively, p=.23) did not vary based on actual timing of insertion. Offering IUD placement at 3 weeks postpartum compared to standard scheduling at 6 weeks does not result in increased use at 3 months. However, early IUD placement is acceptable to women and without increased pain. This study demonstrates that IUD placement as early as 3 weeks postpartum is feasible. Larger studies are needed to evaluate risks and benefits of IUD placement at this early interval. While earlier timing does not result in increased IUD uptake, early placement should be explored as an option since many

  3. Risk-based screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae prior to intrauterine device insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grentzer, Jaclyn M; Peipert, Jeffrey F; Zhao, Qiuhong; McNicholas, Colleen; Secura, Gina M; Madden, Tessa

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to compare three strategies for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae screening prior to intrauterine device (IUD) insertion. This was a secondary analysis of the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. We measured the prevalence of C. trachomatis and/or N. gonorrhoeae at the time of IUD insertion. We then compared sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values, and likelihood ratios for three screening strategies for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae prior to IUD insertion: (a) "age-based" — age ≤25 years alone; (b) "age/partner-based" — age ≤25 and/or multiple sexual partners; and (c) "risk-based" — age ≤25, multiple sexual partners, inconsistent condom use and/or history of prior sexually transmitted infection (STI). Among 5087 IUD users, 140 (2.8%) tested positive for C. trachomatis, 16 (0.3%) tested positive for N. gonorrhoeae, and 6 (0.1%) were positive for both at the time of IUD insertion. The "risk-based" screening strategy had the highest sensitivity (99.3%) compared to "age-based" and "age/partner-based" screening (80.7% and 84.7%, respectively.) Only one (0.7%) woman with a chlamydia or gonorrhea infection would not have been screened using "risk-based" screening. A risk-based strategy to screen for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae prior to IUD insertion has higher sensitivity than screening based on age alone or age and multiple sexual partners. Using a risk-based screening strategy (age≤25, multiple sexual partners, inconsistent condom use and/or history of an STI) to determine who should be screened for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae prior to IUD insertion will miss very few cases of infection and obviates the need for universal screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of emergency contraception options over 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Brandon K; Tak, Casey R; Sanders, Jessica N; Turok, David K; Schwarz, Eleanor B

    2018-02-01

    The copper intrauterine device is the most effective form of emergency contraception and can also provide long-term contraception. The levonorgestrel intrauterine device has also been studied in combination with oral levonorgestrel for women seeking emergency contraception. However, intrauterine devices have higher up-front costs than oral methods, such as ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel. Health care payers and decision makers (eg, health care insurers, government programs) with financial constraints must determine if the increased effectiveness of intrauterine device emergency contraception methods are worth the additional costs. We sought to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 emergency contraception strategies-ulipristal acetate, oral levonorgestrel, copper intrauterine device, and oral levonorgestrel plus same-day levonorgestrel intrauterine device-over 1 year from a US payer perspective. Costs (2017 US dollars) and pregnancies were estimated over 1 year using a Markov model of 1000 women seeking emergency contraception. Every 28-day cycle, the model estimated the predicted number of pregnancy outcomes (ie, live birth, ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, or induced abortion) resulting from emergency contraception failure and subsequent contraception use. Model inputs were derived from published literature and national sources. An emergency contraception strategy was considered cost-effective if the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ie, the cost to prevent 1 additional pregnancy) was less than the weighted average cost of pregnancy outcomes in the United States ($5167). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and probability of being the most cost-effective emergency contraception strategy were calculated from 1000 probabilistic model iterations. One-way sensitivity analyses were used to examine uncertainty in the cost of emergency contraception, subsequent contraception, and pregnancy outcomes as well as the model probabilities. In 1000 women

  5. Use of frameless intrauterine devices and systems in young nulliparous and adolescent women: results of a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildemeersch D

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Wildemeersch,1 Sohela Jandi,2 Ansgar Pett,2 Kilian Nolte,3 Thomas Hasskamp,4 Marc Vrijens5 1Gynecological Outpatient Clinic and IUD Training Center, Ghent, Belgium; 2Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Berlin, 3Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Uetze, 4GynMünster, Münster, Germany; 5Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Ghent, Belgium Background: The purpose of this study was to provide additional data on the experience with frameless copper and levonorgestrel (LNG intrauterine devices (IUDs in nulliparous and adolescent women. Methods: Nulliparous and adolescent women, 25 years of age or younger, using the frameless copper IUD or the frameless LNG-releasing intrauterine system (IUS, were selected from previous studies and a current multicenter post-marketing study with the frameless copper IUD. The small copper-releasing GyneFix® 200 IUD consists of four copper cylinders, each 5 mm long and only 2.2 mm wide. The frameless FibroPlant® LNG-IUS consists of a fibrous delivery system releasing the hormone levonorgestrel (LNG-IUS. The main features of these intrauterine contraceptives are that they are frameless, flexible, and anchored to the fundus of the uterus. Results: One hundred and fifty-four nulliparous and adolescent women participated in the combined study. One pregnancy occurred with the GyneFix 200 IUD after unnoticed early expulsion of the device (cumulative pregnancy rate 1.1 at one year. Two further expulsions were reported, one with the GyneFix 200 IUD and the other with the FibroPlant LNG-IUS. The cumulative expulsion rate at one year was 1.1 with the copper IUD and 2.2 with the LNG-IUS. The total discontinuation rate at one year was low (3.3 and 4.3 with the copper IUD and LNG-IUS, respectively and resulted in a high rate of continuation of use at one year (96.7 with the copper IUD and 95.7 with the LNG-IUS, respectively. Continuation rates for both frameless copper IUD and frameless LNG-IUS remained high at 3 years (>90%. There

  6. The safety of intrauterine devices among young women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatlaoui, Tara C; Riley, Halley E M; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to determine the association between use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) by young women and risk of adverse outcomes. We searched Pubmed, CINAHL, Embase, Popline and the Cochrane Library for articles from inception of database through December 2015. For outcomes specific to IUD use (IUD expulsion and perforation), we examined effect measures for IUD users generally aged 25 years or younger compared with older IUD users. For outcomes of pregnancy, infection, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), and heavy bleeding or anemia, we examined young IUD users compared with young users of other contraceptive methods or no method. We identified 3169 articles of which 16 articles from 14 studies met our inclusion criteria. Six studies (Level II-2, good to poor) reported increased risk of expulsion among younger age groups compared with older age groups using copper-bearing (Cu-) IUDs. Two studies (Level II-2, fair) examined risks of expulsion among younger compared with older women using levonorgestrel-releasing (LNG-) IUDs; one reported no difference in expulsion, while the other reported increased odds for younger women. Four studies (Level II-2, good to poor) examined risk of expulsion among Cu- and LNG-IUD users combined and reported no significant differences between younger and older women. For perforation, four studies (Level II-2, fair to poor) found very low perforation rates (range, 0%-0.1%), with no significant differences between younger and older women. Pregnancies were generally rare among young IUD users in nine studies (Level I to II-2, fair to poor), and no differences were reported for young IUD users compared with young combined oral contraceptive (COC) or etonogestrel (ENG) implant users. PID was rare among young IUD users; one study reported no cases among COC or IUD users, and one reported no difference in PID among LNG-IUD users compared with ENG implant users from nationwide insurance claims data (Level I to II-2, fair). One study

  7. Expanding Access to the Intrauterine Device in Public Health Facilities in Ethiopia: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Yewondwossen; Mehta, Sarah; Zerihun, Habtamu; Lew, Candace; Brooks, Mohamad I; Nigatu, Tariku; Hagos, Kidest Lulu; Asnake, Mengistu; Tasissa, Adeba; Ali, Seid; Desalegn, Ketsela; Adane, Girmay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Ethiopia, modern contraceptive prevalence among currently married women nearly tripled over the last decade, but the method mix remains skewed toward short-acting methods. Since 2011, the Integrated Family Health Program (IFHP+), jointly implemented by Pathfinder International and John Snow Inc., has supported the Federal Ministry of Health to introduce intrauterine devices (IUDs) in more than 800 health centers across 4 regions to improve access to a wider range of methods. Between March and August 2014, Pathfinder conducted a mixed-methods study in 40 purposively selected health centers to assess shifts in the contraceptive method mix following introduction of IUDs using data from family planning registers; determine the characteristics of IUD users through a cross-sectional survey of 2,943 family planning clients who accepted the IUD; explore reasons for method discontinuation among 165 clients seeking IUD removal services; and identify facilitators and barriers to IUD use through focus group discussions (N = 115 clients) and key informant interviews (N = 36 providers, facility heads, and health office heads). Introduction of IUDs into the 40 health centers participating in the study was correlated with a statistically significant increase in the contribution of all long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)—both IUDs and implants—to the method mix, from 6.9% in 2011 to 20.5% in 2014 (P<.001). Our study found that latent demand for the IUD was more prevalent than anticipated and that the method was acceptable to a broad cross-section of women. Of the 2,943 women who sought IUDs during the 6-month study period, 18.0% were new contraceptive users (i.e., those using a contraceptive method for the first time ever), 44.7% reported no educational attainment, 62.5% were from rural areas, and 59.3% were younger than 30 years old, with almost 3 in 10 (27.7%) under the age of 25. The most commonly cited reason for seeking IUD removal services

  8. Emergency contraception: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rebecca H; Goldberg, Alisa B

    2007-12-01

    Emergency contraception is defined as a drug or device used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse (including sexual assault) or after a recognized contraceptive failure. In the United States, 1.5 mg of levonorgestrel, packaged as Plan B, and the Copper T 380A intrauterine device are the most common emergency contraceptives available to women and are effective up to 5 days after unprotected sexual intercourse. In August 2006, Plan B was approved for over-the-counter sale to women aged 18 and older in the United States. It is not yet known whether the increased availability of emergency contraception will decrease unintended pregnancy and induced abortion rates.

  9. Reasons for Intrauterine Device Use, Discontinuation and Non-Use in Malawi: A Qualitative Study of Women and their Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Amy G; Hamela, Gloria; Gotter, Ann; Stuart, Gretchen S; Kamanga, Gift

    2015-12-01

    The copper intrauterine device (IUD) is a safe, long-acting, and effective method of contraception that is under-utilized in many countries, including Malawi. A unique cohort of women who had enrolled in a trial of postpartum IUD use one year earlier gave insights into reasons for using, discontinuing, or not using the IUD. We conducted in-depth interviews with 18 women one year after they participated in a pilot study of a randomized controlled trial of postpartum IUD insertion, and 10 of their male partners. Women and their partners expressed a strong desire for family planning, and perceived numerous benefits of the IUD. However, fear of the IUD was common among successful users and non-users alike. This fear arose from rumours from friends and neighbors who were non-users. How women and their partners responded to this fear affected IUD adoption and continuation. Key themes included (1) Trust in information received from health care providers versus rumours from community members; (2) Partner involvement in IUD decision-making; and (3) Experience with side effects from short-term hormonal contraceptive methods. Broad community education about the IUD's benefits and safety, and proactive counseling to address couples' specific fears, may be needed to increase uptake of the method.

  10. Decrease in cytotoxicity of copper-based intrauterine devices (IUD) pretreated with 6-mercaptopurine and pterin as biocompatible corrosion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Florencia; Grillo, Claudiaa; Schilardi, Patricial; Rubert, Aldo; Benítez, Guillermo; Lorente, Carolina; de Mele, Mónica Fernández Lorenzo

    2013-01-23

    The copper intrauterine device (IUD) based its contraceptive action on the release of cupric ions from a copper wire. Immediately after the insertion, a burst release of copper ions occurs, which may be associated to a variety of side effects. 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) and pterin (PT) have been proposed as corrosion inhibitors to reduce this harmful release. Pretreatments with 1 × 10(-4) M 6-MP and 1 × 10(-4) M PT solutions with 1h and 3h immersion times were tested. Conventional electrochemical techniques, EDX and XPS analysis, and cytotoxicity assays with HeLa cell line were employed to investigate the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of copper with and without treatments. Results showed that copper samples treated with PT and 6-MP solutions for 3 and 1 h, respectively, are more biocompatible than those without treatment. Besides, the treatment reduces the burst release effect of copper in simulated uterine solutions during the first week after the insertion. It was concluded that PT and 6-MP treatments are promising strategies able to reduce the side effects related to the "burst release" of copper-based IUD without altering the contraceptive action.

  11. Female contraception over 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    is insufficient for contraceptive purposes. Thus a family planning method is needed. Sterilization is by far the most common method in several countries. Copper intrauterine devices and hormone intrauterine systems have similar effectiveness, with fewer than 1% failures in the first year of typical use. Special...... of an unexpected pregnancy are potentially detrimental. No contraceptive method is contraindicated by advanced reproductive age alone; thus there is a need to discuss the effectiveness, risks and non-contraceptive benefits of all family planning methods for women in this age group. METHODS: MEDLINE searches were......BACKGROUND: The majority of women 40-49 years of age need an effective method of contraception because the decline in fertility with age is an insufficient protection against unwanted pregnancy. Although pregnancy is less likely after the age of 40 years, the clinical and social consequences...

  12. [Uterovesical perforation secondary to intrauterine device with vesical lithiasis formation: a report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti Jaca, N; Urresola Olabarrieta, A; Ibáñez, S; Atilano Santos, L; Aguinaga Alexanco, A; Larrea Bilbao, L

    2007-01-01

    Uterovesical perforation is an uncommon complication in patients with intrauterine devices (IUD). When this complication occurs, intravesical lithiasis is often associated. We present two cases of uterovesical perforation with a description of the radiological findings and a review of the literature.

  13. Case Report: Extrauterine Translocated Contraceptive Device: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common presenting symptom was inability to feel the device's string (in three patients). Four of the patients presented within one month of the insertion. Three of the five translocated intraperitoneal devices were recovered by laparotomy and the forth by laparoscopy. The fifth patient, pregnant, defaulted with the ...

  14. Update on emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Wing Kay; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-12-01

    Emergency contraception provides a critical and time-sensitive opportunity for women to prevent undesired pregnancy after intercourse. Both access and available options for emergency contraception have changed over the last several years. Emergency contraceptive pills can be less effective in obese women. The maximum achieved serum concentration of levonorgestrel (LNG) is lower in obese women than women of normal BMI, and doubling the dose of LNG (3 mg) increases its concentration maximum, approximating the level in normal BMI women receiving one dose of LNG. Repeated use of both LNG and ulipristal acetate (UPA) is well tolerated. Hormonal contraception can be immediately started following LNG use, but should be delayed for 5 days after UPA use to avoid dampening the efficacy of UPA. The copper intrauterine device (IUD) is the only IUD approved for emergency contraception (and the most effective method of emergency contraception), but use of LNG IUD as emergency contraception is currently being investigated. Accurate knowledge about emergency contraception remains low both for patients and healthcare providers. Emergency contraception is an important yet underutilized tool available to women to prevent pregnancy. Current options including copper IUD and emergency contraceptive pills are safe and well tolerated. Significant gaps in knowledge of emergency contraception on both the provider and user level exist, as do barriers to expedient access of emergency contraception.

  15. Comparison of genital microbial isolates between intrauterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In the past, the use of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD), in particular, Dalkon Shield was found to be associated with increased risk of pelvic infection. Recent literature illustrates that the risk of pelvic infection after insertion of an IUCD is low and that the risk peaks in the 1st month after insertion. We set ...

  16. Immediate postpartum versus 6-week postpartum intrauterine device insertion: a feasibility study of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Amy G; Kamanga, Gift; Stuart, Gretchen S; Haddad, Lisa B; Meguid, Tarek; Mhango, Chisale

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of postpartum intrauterine device insertion and to demonstrate that the postpartum intrauterine device is acceptable to women. Women attending prenatal care at a maternity hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi were recruited into a trial comparing immediate (10 minutes to 48 hours) to 6 week postpartum insertion. Feasibility of recruiting and consenting 140 women and randomizing 70% of them was evaluated. Satisfaction with the intrauterine device was also assessed. One hundred fifteen women consented and 49 (61%) were randomized. Twenty-six women were assigned to immediate insertion, and 23 to insertion at 6 weeks postpartum. Thirty (24%) women received the device as part of the study protocol, and 28 (93%) had the device in place at 12 weeks postpartum. The intrauterine device is acceptable to some postpartum women in Malawi, but conducting a randomized clinical trial may not be feasible.

  17. Oxidized, Regenerated Cellulose Adhesion Barrier Plus Intrauterine Device Prevents Recurrence After Adhesiolysis for Moderate to Severe Intrauterine Adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huihua; Qiao, Lin; Song, KaiJing; He, Yuanli

    2017-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of an oxidized, regenerated cellulose adhesion barrier (Interceed; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) combined with an intrauterine device (IUD) versus an IUD alone for preventing adhesion recurrence following hysteroscopic adhesiolysis for moderate to severe intrauterine adhesions (IUAs). Retrospective case series (Canadian Task Force classification III). Tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients undergoing treatment for moderate to severe IUAs. The severity of IUA was determined based on the American Fertility Society scoring system (mild, moderate, or severe). All cases of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis were reviewed. Seventy-six women with moderate to severe IUAs treated between March 2009 and August 2015 were included. After hysteroscopic adhesiolysis, 35 patients were treated with an IUD alone (group 1), and 41 patients were treated with Interceed plus an IUD (group 2). A second hysteroscopy was performed in all cases three months after the initial hysteroscopy and both groups achieved significant reduction in adhesion scores and grade, especially in group 2 (scores, p < .001; grade, p = .039). Compared with group 1, menstruation dysfunction, pregnancy rate, and live birth rate in group 2 improved with no statistical difference (menstruation improvement, p = .764; pregnancy rate, p = .310; live birth rate, p = .068). However, an adhesion-free uterine cavity was regained significantly owing to the fewer operations in group 2 compared with group 1 (median, 3 vs 4; p = .001). The interval from initial hysteroscopy to conception was significantly shorter in group 2 (median, 12 months vs 51 months; p < .001). For moderate to severe IUAs, Interceed combined with an IUD may be an alternative approach for reducing adhesion recurrence after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinicians' knowledge and practices regarding family planning and intrauterine devices in China, Kazakhstan, Laos and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steven J; Guindon, G Emmanuel; Lavis, John N; Randhawa, Harkanwal; Becerra-Posada, Francisco; Boupha, Boungnong; Shi, Guang; Turdaliyeva, Botagoz S

    2016-06-10

    It is widely agreed that the practices of clinicians should be based on the best available research evidence, but too often this evidence is not reliably disseminated to people who can make use of it. This "know-do" gap leads to ineffective resource use and suboptimal provision of services, which is especially problematic in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) which face greater resource limitations. Family planning, including intrauterine device (IUD) use, represents an important area to evaluate clinicians' knowledge and practices in order to make improvements. A questionnaire was developed, tested and administered to 438 individuals in China (n = 115), Kazakhstan (n = 110), Laos (n = 105), and Mexico (n = 108). The participants responded to ten questions assessing knowledge and practices relating to contraception and IUDs, and a series of questions used to determine their individual characteristics and working context. Ordinal logistic regressions were conducted with knowledge and practices as dependent variables. Overall, a 96 % response rate was achieved (n = 438/458). Only 2.8 % of respondents were able to correctly answer all five knowledge-testing questions, and only 0.9 % self-reported "often" undertaking all four recommended clinical practices and "never" performing the one practice that was contrary to recommendation. Statistically significant factors associated with knowledge scores included: 1) having a masters or doctorate degree; and 2) often reading scientific journals from high-income countries. Significant factors associated with recommended practices included: 1) training in critically appraising systematic reviews; 2) training in the care of patients with IUDs; 3) believing that research performed in their own country is above average or excellent in quality; 4) being based in a facility operated by an NGO; and 5) having the view that higher quality available research is important to improving their work. This

  19. An evaluation of commissioning arrangements for intrauterine and subdermal contraception services from general practitioners in London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Richard; Brown, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) in the UK may be commissioned to provide long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), which may have a role in reducing rates of abortion and unintended pregnancies. Primary care trusts (PCTs) in England had commissioning arrangements with GPs to provide LARC but little is known about such contractual arrangements. We studied the commissioning arrangements in some London PCTs to evaluate the cost and clinical governance of these contracts. We requested commissioning contract specifications and activities for intrauterine contraception (IUC) and subdermal implants (SDI) from responsible officers in each PCT in London relating to activities in three financial years, namely 2009/2010 to 2011/2012. We evaluated each contract using a structure, process and outcome approach. Half (15/31) the PCTs responded and submitted 20 contracts used to commission their GPs to provide IUC, SDI or a combination of these with testing for sexually transmitted infections. The information regarding service activity was inadequate and inconsistent so had to be abandoned. Information from 20 contracts suggested there was a variation in clinical governance and quality assurance mechanisms; there was also a range in the reimbursement for IUC insertion (£77.50 to £105.00), SDI insertion (£25.00 to £81.31) and SDI removal (£30.00 to £100.00) at 2011 prices. It was not clear from non-responders if these PCTs had a service in place. Of those that did commission IUC and SDI services, some specifications were lacking in detail regarding aspects of clinical governance. New commissioners should make explicit references to quality and safety criteria as poor-quality specifications can give rise to serious untoward incidents and litigation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. [Use of modified intrauterine device (IUD) TCu 380 with chromium filaments in the immediate postpartum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Valencia, M; Becerril Flores, L C

    2000-02-01

    Postpartum insertion of the intrauterine device (IUD) can provide an effective and convenient means of contraception. As a result, the use of IUD's has steadily increased, and the Family Planning Program recommends it because it offers many advantages. However, a major risk associated with the use of IUD's is the possibility of its expulsion, which ranges from 4 to 60%. Furthermore, 20% of women who expelled IUD's were unaware that it occurred, thus increasing their susceptibility to unwanted pregnancies. IUD's modified by the addition of biodegradable strands of chromic suture at time of implantation are thought to be less likely to be expelled, as the sutures anchor the IUD more firmly to the endometrium, and it is possible that the use of these sutures may decrease the risk of expulsion. Therefore we determined if the chromic extension to IUD enhance retention and decreased the rate of expulsion. In one year of study, 150 women received a modified IUD (TCu 380) with chromic catgut number 0 (ccO) in the transversal arm within 10 minutes of delivery of the placenta. However, only 84 women completed the follow-up study. To evaluate IUD expulsion, exploratory examinations were conducted during the immediate postpartum, at 7 days postpartum and at 6 weeks after delivery. We determined the presence or expulsion of the IUD in these three periods postpartum. Other parameters such as parity, age and marital status were also considered. A total of 14 modified IUD's (16.6%) were expelled. This represents a similar frequency of expulsion both during the immediate postpartum and the 7 days postpartum period. There was no significant difference in the rate of expulsion between the two periods. Moreover, there was no expulsion at 6 weeks postpartum. The primiparity women had the highest percentage of expulsion (22.8%). Single mothers either living with or without their sexual partner had expulsion rates of 20.6 and 20.5%, respectively. The highest rate of expulsion when we

  1. Bladder stone formation over a partially migrated intrauterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for the past 3 years and cyclical haematuria for the past 6 months. Menstrual cycles were regular. She had undergone puerperal sterilisation 20 years ago. Vaginal speculum examination revealed threads of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD). The threads snapped during attempts to remove the device. The patient ...

  2. Treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding: patient preferences for endometrial ablation, a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device, or hysterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourdrez, Petra; Bongers, Marlies Y.; Mol, Ben W. J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patient preferences for endometrial ablation and a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) as alternatives to hysterectomy in the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. DESIGN: Comparative study based on structured interviews. SETTING: A large teaching

  3. Effect of the copper-intrauterine device (TCu 380A) on subendometrial microvascularization and uterine artery blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Mirela F; Passos, Eduardo P; Fagundes, Paulo A P; de Freitas, Fernando M; Arbo, Elisangela; Cunha-Filho, João S L

    2006-12-01

    During this cohort study, the copper-intrauterine device (IUD) did not modify subendometrial microvascularization. However, subendometrial blood flow increased in patients who experienced IUD-induced side effects.

  4. Laparoscopic Removal of An Ectopic Intrauterine Device From The Anterior Abdominal Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaprak Engin Üstün

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The intrauterine devices (IUDs have been used widely by women of childbearing years. In this report, we presented a case of a 25-year-old gravida 4, parity 3 woman with an abdominal wall penetration by an IUD. She had an IUD (TCu-380A inserted immediately after dilatation & curettage. The IUD was removed laparoscopically.

  5. User characteristics, experiences and continuation rates of copper intrauterine device use in a cohort of Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Deborah; Harvey, Caroline; Trinh, Lieu; Stewart, Mary; Black, Kirsten I

    2016-12-01

    Copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) use in Australia is low despite being a highly effective, cost effective non-hormonal contraceptive with reported 12-month continuation rates of 85% compared to 59% for oral contraception. To describe the characteristics of Cu-IUD users in the Australian context, their experiences of side effects, continuation rates and reasons for discontinuation. Between August 2009 and January 2012 we undertook a prospective cohort study of consecutive women presenting for Cu-IUD insertion to three family planning clinics in Queensland and New South Wales. We used survival analysis for continuation rates and univariate and multivariable analyses to characterise users, their experiences up to three years and reasons for discontinuation. Of the 211 enrolled women, a third (36.0%) were aged under 30 and a third were nulliparous (36.5%). Efficacy and lack of hormones were the most frequently cited reasons to choose the method. Four women were lost to follow-up. Overall continuation rates were 79.1% at one year and 61.3% at three years. Early discontinuation was reduced in those with two or more children (adjusted hazards ratio 0.22, 95% CI 0.09-0.50). Heavy menstrual bleeding was the commonest reason for removal in 28 of 59 (47.5%) discontinuations due to complications or side effects. One uterine perforation and one method failure resulting in an ectopic pregnancy occurred. Cu-IUDs were chosen for their efficacy and lack of hormones by a range of Australian women, including young and nulliparous women. While bleeding-related side effects were relatively common, overall continuation rates were high. Serious complications and failures were rare. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Lidocaine 10% spray to the cervix reduces pain during intrauterine device insertion: a double-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Hüseyin; Aksoy, Ülkü; Ozyurt, Sezin; Açmaz, Gökhan; Babayigit, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Fear of pain during intrauterine device (IUD) insertion can be a barrier to widespread use of this safe and highly effective contraceptive method. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of topical 10% lidocaine spray for pain control during IUD insertion. A total of 200 subjects with the request for IUD insertion were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: lidocaine spray (n=100) and placebo (n=100). The pain experienced during the procedure was measured immediately after insertion by a standard Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) administered by a separate researcher with maintenance of allocation concealment. The mean pain score during the procedure was 1.01±1.20 in the lidocaine spray group and 3.23±1.60 in the placebo spray group (pLidocaine spray treatment significantly lowered the overall procedural pain score compared with placebo. Significant pain reduction during IUD insertion can be achieved by using 10% lidocaine spray alone. Lidocaine spray can be accepted as a non-invasive, easy to apply and more comfortable local anaesthetic method for IUD insertion. NCT02020551. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. A viable caesarean scar pregnancy in a woman using a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzerd, Emilie; Bogers, Hein; Kianmanesh Rad, Noush A; Duvekot, Johannes J

    2018-03-27

    Although the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) is one of the most reliable methods of contraception, it is associated with an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy in case of unintended pregnancy. A rare form of ectopic pregnancy is the caesarean scar pregnancy (CSP), with a high risk of serious maternal morbidity, such as uterine rupture, massive haemorrhage and resulting infertility. This report describes the first case of a viable CSP at 13 weeks of gestation in association with the use of a LNG-IUD. Case-presentation: A 36-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to our outpatient clinic because of suspicion of a CSP. The pregnancy was unintended and was diagnosed during replacement of the LNG-IUD after five years. The patient had undergone two caesarean sections in the past. Ultrasound investigation showed an intact pregnancy of approximately 13 weeks of gestation located in the uterine scar. Because of the size of the gestational sac, a laparotomy was performed under general anaesthesia using a Joel-Cohen incision. The procedure was complicated by a total blood loss of 1500 mL, mostly caused by diffuse bleeding from the placental bed. Unintended pregnancies in women using a LNG-IUD are frequently ectopic pregnancies with a preponderance to nidate outside the fallopian tube. Therefore, early diagnosis and location of the pregnancy in women using a LNG-IUD is essential.

  8. A facility birth can be the time to start family planning: postpartum intrauterine device experiences from six countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzer, Anne; Mackenzie, Devon; Blanchard, Holly; Hyjazi, Yolande; Kumar, Somesh; Lisanework Kassa, Serawit; Marinduque, Bernabe; Mateo, Marie Grace; Mukarugwiro, Beata; Ngabo, Fidele; Zaeem, Shabana; Zafar, Zonobia; Smith, Jeffrey Michael

    2015-06-01

    Initiation of family planning at the time of birth is opportune, since few women in low-resource settings who give birth in a facility return for further care. Postpartum family planning (PPFP) and postpartum intrauterine device (PPIUD) services were integrated into maternal care in six low- and middle-income countries, applying an insertion technique developed in Paraguay. Facilities with high delivery volume were selected to integrate PPFP/PPIUD services into routine care. Effective PPFP/PPIUD integration requires training and mentoring those providers assisting women at the time of birth. Ongoing monitoring generated data for advocacy. The percentages of PPIUD acceptors ranged from 2.3% of women counseled in Pakistan to 5.8% in the Philippines. Rates of complications among women returning for follow-up were low. Expulsion rates were 3.7% in Pakistan, 3.6% in Ethiopia, and 1.7% in Guinea and the Philippines. Infection rates did not exceed 1.3%, and three countries recorded no cases. Offering PPFP/PPIUD at birth improves access to contraception. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Understanding benefits and addressing misperceptions and barriers to intrauterine device access among populations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoost, Jennie

    2014-01-01

    Three intrauterine devices (IUDs), one copper and two containing the progestin levonorgestrel, are available for use in the United States. IUDs offer higher rates of contraceptive efficacy than nonlong-acting methods, and several studies have demonstrated higher satisfaction rates and continuation rates of any birth control method. This efficacy is not affected by age or parity. The safety of IUDs is well studied, and the risks of pelvic inflammatory disease, perforation, expulsion, and ectopic pregnancy are all of very low incidence. Noncontraceptive benefits include decreased menstrual blood loss, improved dysmenorrhea, improved pelvic pain associated with endometriosis, and protection of the endometrium from hyperplasia. The use of IUDs is accepted in patients with multiple medical problems who may have contraindications to other birth control methods. Yet despite well-published data, concerns and misperceptions still persist, especially among younger populations and nulliparous women. Medical governing bodies advocate for use of IUDs in these populations, as safety and efficacy is unchanged, and IUDs have been shown to decrease unintended pregnancies. Dispersion of accurate information among patients and practitioners is needed to further increase the acceptability and use of IUDs. PMID:25050062

  10. Contraception during perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailas, N A; Sifakis, S; Koumantakis, E

    2005-03-01

    Perimenopause marks the transition from normal ovulation to anovulation and ultimately to permanent loss of ovarian function. Fecundity, the average monthly probability of conception, declines by half as early as the mid-forties, however women during the perimenopause still need effective contraception. Issues arising at this period such as menstrual cycle abnormalities, vasomotor instability, the need for osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease prevention, as well as the increased risk of gynecological cancer, should be taken into consideration before the initiation of a specific method of contraception. Various contraceptive options may be offered to perimenopausal women, including oral contraceptives, tubal ligation, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, hormonal injectables and implants. Recently, new methods of contraception have been introduced presenting high efficacy rates and minor side-effects, such as the monthly injectable system, the contraceptive vaginal ring and the transdermal contraceptive system. However, these new methods have to be further tested in perimenopausal women, and more definite data are required to confirm their advantages as effective contraceptive alternatives in this specific age group. The use of the various contraceptive methods during perimenopause holds special benefits and risks that should be carefully balanced, after a thorough consultation and according to each woman's contraceptive needs.

  11. Contraception in the Context of HIV/AIDS: A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    pregnancies, limit their families, or avoid pregnancy. The effective use of contraception by HIV-positive clients can contribute significantly to reduction in both sexual and vertical transmission of the virus. HIV-positive clients can use most of the available contraception methods including barrier, hormonal, intrauterine devices ...

  12. Perception and Practice of Emergency Contraception by Post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of 1500 students in post-secondary institutions in south west Nigeria showed that the concept of emergency contraception (EC) was well known. Respectively, 32.4%, 20.4% and 19.8% knew that combined pills, progesterone only pills and intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) were usable for EC, while 56.7% ...

  13. Contraceptive Use among Women Seeking Repeat Abortion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    aPills, condoms, emergency contraception. bInjectable, implant, intrauterine device. As shown in Table 4, after controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, the type of contraceptive method used last was a significant predictor of repeat abortion, with women who last used short-term methods facing twice the odds.

  14. A three-year evaluation of TCu 380 Ag and multiload Cu 375 intrauterine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C B; Behlilovic, B; Arosemena, J M; Randic, L; Cole, L P; Wilkens, L R

    1988-12-01

    A randomized, comparative, multicenter clinical trial of TCu 380Ag and Multiload Cu 375 intrauterine devices (IUDs) was conducted. Safety and acceptability were evaluated through three years following insertion in 884 patients. The two IUDs were similar with respect to all event rates. Thirty-six month life table pregnancy rates were 0.6 per 100 TCu 380Ag users and 1.8 per 100 Multiload Cu 375 users. Continuation rates were 67.4 and 61.4 per 100 users of the respective devices at three years after insertion.

  15. An evaluation of the simultaneous use of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUS, Mirena®) combined with endometrial ablation in the management of menorrhagia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vaughan, D

    2012-05-01

    The objective of our study was to document the efficacy and possible complications in women who were treated for menorrhagia with the simultaneous use of endometrial ablation and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device. Women were offered this combined treatment if they complained of menorrhagia and needed contraception. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 150 women who had undergone this combined treatment; 105 (70%) returned a completed questionnaire. The mean duration of follow-up was 25 months (range 6-54 months). Following treatment, 53 women (50.5%) described their periods as being lighter than normal and 49 (46%) had become amenorrhoeic. Overall, 101 (96%) stated that they were satisfied with the treatment. Of the women, 95 (90.5%) said that the treatment had been a \\'complete success\\'; eight (7.6%) \\'partly successful\\' and two women (1.9%) said the treatment had been a \\'failure\\'. One woman subsequently required a hysterectomy. This observational study supports the hypothesis that combined endometrial ablation and insertion of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device is an effective treatment for menorrhagia and has some advantages when compared with the individual use of these treatments.

  16. Complications and continuation of intrauterine device use among commercially insured teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Abbey B; Tan, Alai; Hirth, Jacqueline M; Wilkinson, Gregg S

    2013-05-01

    Many U.S. health care providers remain reluctant to prescribe intrauterine devices (IUDs) to teenagers as a result of concerns about serious complications. This study examined whether 15-19-year-old IUD users were more likely to experience complications, failure, or early discontinuation than adult users aged 20-24 years and 25-44 years and whether there were differences in these outcomes between users of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems and copper IUDs. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using health insurance claims obtained from a private insurance company of 90,489 women who had an IUD inserted between 2002 and 2009. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of experiencing complications, method failure, or early discontinuation within 12 months of insertion by age group and type of IUD inserted. Serious complications, including ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease, occurred in less than 1% of patients regardless of age or IUD type. Women aged 15-19 years were more likely than those aged 25-44 years to have a claim for dysmenorrhea (odds ratio [OR] 1.4, confidence interval [CI] 1.1-1.6), amenorrhea (OR 1.3, CI 1.1-1.5), or normal pregnancy (OR 1.4, CI 1.1-1.8). Overall, early discontinuation did not differ between teenagers and women aged 25-44 years (13% compared with 11%, P>.05). However, use of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system was associated with fewer complications and less early discontinuation than the copper IUD in all age groups. The IUD is as appropriate for teenagers to use as it is for older women, with serious complications occurring infrequently in all groups. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system may be a better choice than the copper IUD as a result of lower odds of complications, discontinuation, and failure. II.

  17. [Contraception in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, M

    1978-04-13

    It is discussed how the adult type contraception fits the divergent needs of the youngsters. Oral contraceptives are suitable from the 16th year of life. Vaginal globuli and foams have also proved to be an effective means of contraception over that period of life. For anatomical reasons pessaries are not recommended, insertion of intrauterine devices is contraindicated because of their possible adverse effects. Experiences with university students taking d-Norgestrel as "morning-after-pill" have been favorable. The therapeutic abortion is regarded as an emergency measure to be employed only if anticonception failed. Adaequate education at the proper age and the importance of preventive measures are stressed.

  18. Migration of a Levonorgestrel - Releasing Intrauterine Device (Lng-Iud: Can We Trust on Ultrasound Image?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena von Eye Corleta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a nulliparous 33-year-old woman who had a uneventful insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; Mirena, Schering, Brazil inserted on august/2005. She was amenorrheic from august 2005 to may 2006, when she referred the beginning of an intermittent spotting. On september/2006, she had a normal transvaginal ultrasound, showing a well-placed device. One year later, she informed the occurrence of regular menstrual cycles, but with menorrhagia. At that time, during the physical examination, the retrieval thread was not visible at the cervix. Another ultrasound was then performed, showing a device outside the uterine cavity, probably in the uterine serosa

  19. Bladder stone formation over a partially migrated intrauterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of a 42-year-old woman with a forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) presenting with irritative bladder symptoms and cyclical haematuria is reported. The threads of the IUCD were seen in the vagina during speculum examination. Partial migration of the IUCD into the bladder and formation of a large ...

  20. Intrauterine retained fetal bones as a cause of secondary infertility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is believed that bones re-tained freely in the endometrial cavity behave as an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD). Be-cause of the many complications associated with mid-trimester dilatation and evacuation of the uterus, its role in modern gynaecology should be limited. It is suggested that retained fetal bones should ...

  1. [Random comparative study between intrauterine device Multiload Cu375 and TCu 380a inserted in the postpartum period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara Ricalde, Roger; Menocal Tobías, Gerardo; Ramos Pérez, Carlos; Velázquez Ramírez, Norma

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate safety and effectiveness of the intrauterine device Multiload Cu375 compared with the TCu 380A inserted in the postpartum period. In a randomized comparative study carried out in the National Perinatology Institute, intrauterine devices MLCu 375 and Tcu 380A were inserted to 157 patients who voluntary accepted, and previously signed informed consent. There were four instances for the intrauterine devices insertion: within 10 minutes after vaginal delivery, during cesarean section (immediate postplacental insertion) and postpartum-postcesarean insertion (in the time range of 10 min to 48 h). All insertions were made with ring forceps. From 1 h to 24 h later, abdominal ultrasound examinations were performed to assess the distances between the upper part of the device to the fundus of uterine cavity. Follow up visits were scheduled at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Net cumulative life table event rates of discontinuations were estimated at one year. The expulsion rates were 10.4 for the MLCu 375 and 7.7 for the TCu 380A and they were not influenced by the moment of the intrauterine device insertion, not by the cervical dilatation, neither by the distance of the intrauterine device to the fundus of uterine cavity. The removal rates for bleeding and pain were 4.9 and 4.8, the removal rates for non medical reasons were 3.7 and 4.9 respectively. There was one case of genital infection in the MLCu 375 group. There were no pregnancies, nor uterine perforation. The one year continuation rates were 77.1 and 82.6 respectively. There were no statistical significant differences in the comparative rates. The intrauterine device MLCu 375 is as safe and effective as the TCu380A when they are inserted in the postpartum period.

  2. Assessment of a high-fidelity mobile simulator for intrauterine contraception training in ambulatory reproductive health centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Dodge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Little is known about the utility of simulation-based training in office gynaecology. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the self-reported effectiveness and acceptability of the PelvicSim™ (VirtaMed, a high-fidelity mobile simulator, to train clinicians in intrauterine device (IUD insertion. Methods. Clinicians at ambulatory healthcare centres participated in a PelvicSim IUD training programme and completed a self-administered survey. The survey assessed prior experience with IUD insertion, pre- and post-training competency and comfort and opinions regarding the acceptability of the PelvicSim. Results. The 237 participants were primarily female (97.5% nurse practitioners (71.3%. Most had experience inserting the levonorgestrel LNG20 IUD and the copper T380A device, but only 4.1% had ever inserted the LNG14 IUD. For all three devices, participants felt more competent following training, with the most striking change reported for insertion of the LNG14 IUD. The majority of participants reported increased comfort with uterine sounding (57.7%, IUD insertion on a live patient (69.8%, and minimizing patient pain (72.8% following training. Of the respondents, 89.6% reported the PelvicSim IUD insertion activities as “valuable” or “very valuable.” All participants would recommend the PelvicSim for IUD training, and nearly all (97.2% reported that the PelvicSim was a better method to teach IUD insertion than the simple plastic models supplied by IUD manufacturers. Conclusions. These findings support the use of the PelvicSim for IUD training, though whether it is superior to traditional methods and improves patient outcomes requires evaluation.

  3. Postplacental insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine device after cesarean delivery vs. delayed insertion: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Amy K; Endres, Loraine K; Mistretta, Stephanie Q; Gilliam, Melissa L

    2014-06-01

    This trial was designed to compare levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) use at 1 year after delivery between women randomized to postplacental insertion at the time of cesarean delivery and delayed insertion 4-8 weeks after delivery. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at two urban medical centers. Eligible pregnant women with planned cesarean deliveries were randomized to immediate postplacental insertion during cesarean or delayed insertion after 4-8 weeks. We used intention-to-treat analysis for the primary outcome of LNG-IUD use 12 months after delivery. Forty-two women were randomized, 20 into the postplacental group and 22 in the delayed group. Although confirmed use of the LNG-IUD 12 months after delivery was higher in the postplacental group (60.0% vs. 40.9%, p=.35), this difference was not statistically significance. Expulsion was significantly more common in the postplacental group (20.0% vs. 0%, p=.04). There were significant differences between the two sites in baseline population characteristics, follow-up and expulsion. The trial did not answer the intended question as it was halted early due to slow enrollment. Our results show higher expulsion after postplacental insertion compared to delayed insertion but suggest similar IUD use at 12 months. Moreover, it provides valuable lessons regarding a randomized controlled trial of postplacental LNG-IUD placement due to the challenges of estimating effect size and the nature of the population who might benefit from immediate insertion. Postplacental insertion of an IUD may improve use of highly effective contraception during the postpartum period. While our results suggest higher expulsion after postplacental insertion compared to delayed insertion and similar IUD use at 12 months, our trial was insufficient to definitively test our hypothesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of daily text messages versus monthly paper diaries to collect bleeding data after intrauterine device insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippita, Siripanth; Oviedo, Johana D; Velasco, Margarita G; Westhoff, Carolyn L; Davis, Anne R; Castaño, Paula M

    2015-12-01

    Bleeding data in contraceptive trials are often collected using daily diaries, but data quality may vary due to compliance and recall bias. Text messaging is a widespread and promising modality for data collection. This trial randomized participants 1:1 to use text messages or paper diaries to report on bleeding experienced during the 90 days after intrauterine device (IUD) insertion. Participants chose either the copper T380A or the 52-mg levonorgestrel IUD. Our primary outcome was number of days of reported bleeding data. We hypothesized that data gathered with daily text messages would have fewer missing values than paper diaries. Intention to treat analyses used the rank-sum test to compare medians. Two hundred thirty women enrolled, and randomization yielded groups similar in baseline characteristics. Twenty percent of participants provided no bleeding data; of these, 77% were assigned to paper diaries. With 90 days of reporting, approximately 20% in each group provided complete bleeding data. The text group reported a median of 82 days [interquartile range (IQR) 40-89] and the paper group reported a median of 36 days (IQR 0-88) (p≤.001). The number of responses received decreased gradually over the 90-day period but was always higher in the text group. Women who had attained higher levels of education did well regardless of data collection modality, while response rates of text messages were greater among those with a high school education or less (p<.01). Participants reporting bleeding via text messages provided more complete data than women using paper diaries. Depending on resources and population of interest, text messages may be a useful modality to improve data collection for patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of genital tract infection with Entamoeba gingivalis among copper T 380A intrauterine device users in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Ashraf A; El-Malky, Mohamed M

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to study the prevalence and potential pathogenicity of E. gingivalis in the genital tracts of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) users. A prospective study conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department and Fertility Care Unit, Mansoura University Hospital, Egypt. The study was carried out on 87 IUD users and 87 nonusers. The copper T 380A IUD was removed from each woman and washed with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) pH 7.4; the IUD wash was centrifuged. The sediment was resuspended in 2 ml PBS and divided into two portions. One portion was used for preparation of direct and iron hematoxylin-stained smears. Direct smears and stained smears were examined for detailed morphology. The second portion of the sediment was used for DNA extraction and subsequent PCR amplification targeting the small subunit ribosomal RNA of E. gingivalis. The parasite was found in 12.64% of IUD users and in 6.9% of non users (p>.3). It was found that 90.9% of those harboring E. gingivalis in their genital tract had the parasite in their oral cavity. The percentage of genital infection in IUD users increased with low level of education, rural areas, insertion in primary health-care center and among those not washing hands before checking the strings. In the infected cases, vaginal discharge was more common (81.8%) than in noninfected cases (32.9%), such difference was statistically significant (p<.05). Also, excessive vaginal discharge is more common than backache and menorrhagia in the infected cases. Higher incidence of E. gingivalis infection in IUD users is related to oral cavity infection, residence, the facility where they inserted their IUD and washing hands attitude before checking the strings. We recommend treatment of gingival infection, proper counseling and medical education on oral and genital tract hygiene for IUD users. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Contraception and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  7. Endometrial cancer treated with levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device for almost three years in an elderly woman with comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lisbeth Anita; Antonsen, Sofie Leisby; Settnes, Annette

    2016-01-01

    but with a minimum of symptoms and side effects. At the final examination there were no signs of extra uterine disease. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device may be an acceptable alternative to surgery in severely comorbid patients, or if the patient refuses surgical treatment. © 2016, Springer......In this case report we describe the treatment of a 95-year-old woman with endometrioid adenocarcinoma. She suffered from cardiovascular comorbidity and did not want surgical treatment. Instead a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (Mirena) was inserted. She had progression of the tumor...

  8. Update on emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patricia Aikins

    2012-01-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is any method used after sexual intercourse to prevent pregnancy. This article provides an overview of the history of EC methods and describes the current availability of oral and intrauterine EC. Oral forms include the Yuzpe regimen (combining ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel), levonorgestrel-only pills, and ulipristal acetate, which is a new emergency contraceptive drug recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The copper T-380A intrauterine device can also be used for EC. Information about dosing, timing, access, and other considerations in the provision of EC is covered. Clinicians should be aware of all available options in order to counsel women in need of EC appropriately. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  9. Safety and efficacy in parous women of a 52-mg levonorgestrel-medicated intrauterine device: a 7-year randomized comparative study with the TCu380A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Patrick; Farley, Tim; Peregoudov, Alexandre; Piaggio, Gilda; Boccard, Simone; Landoulsi, Sihem; Meirik, Olav

    2016-06-01

    To compare rates of unintended pregnancy, method continuation and reasons for removal among women using the 52-mg levonorgestrel (daily release 20 microg) levonorgestrel IUD (LNG-IUD) or the copper T 380A (TCu380A) intrauterine device. This was an open-label 7-year randomized controlled trial in 20 centres, 11 of which in China. Data on 1884 women with interval insertion of the LNG-IUD and 1871 of the TCu380A were analysed using life tables with 30-day intervals and Cox proportional hazards models. The cumulative 7-year pregnancy rate of the LNG-IUD was 0.5 (standard error 0.2) per 100, significantly lower than 2.5 (0.4) per 100 of the TCu380A, cumulative method discontinuation rates at 7 years were 70.6 (1.2) and 40.8 (1.3) per 100, respectively. Dominant reasons for discontinuing the LNG-IUD were amenorrhea (26.1 [1.3] per 100) and reduced bleeding (12.5 [1.1] per 100), particularly in Chinese women and, for the TCu380A, increased bleeding (9.9 [0.9] per 100), especially among non-Chinese women. Removal rates for pain were similar for the two intrauterine devices (IUDs). Cumulative rates of removal for symptoms compatible with hormonal side effects were 5.7 (0.7) and 0.4 (0.2) per 100 for the LNG-IUD and TCu380A, respectively, and cumulative losses to follow-up at 7 years were 26.0 (1.4) and 36.9 (1.3) per 100, respectively. The LNG-IUD and the TCu380A have very high contraceptive efficacy, with the LNG-IUD significantly higher than the TCu380A. Overall rates of IUD removals were higher among LNG-IUD users than TCu380A users. Removals for amenorrhea appeared culturally associated. The 52-mg LNG-IUD and the TCu380A have very high contraceptive efficacy through 7 years. As an IUD, the unique side effects of the LNG-IUD are reduced bleeding, amenorrhea and symptoms compatible with hormonal contraceptives. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Role of uterine forces in intrauterine device embedment, perforation, and expulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstuck, Norman D; Wildemeersch, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that could help reduce primary perforation during insertion of a framed intrauterine device (IUD) and to determine factors that contribute in generating enough uterine muscle force to cause embedment and secondary perforation of an IUD. The objective was also to evaluate the main underlying mechanism of IUD expulsion. We compared known IUD insertion forces for "framed" devices with known perforation forces in vitro (hysterectomy specimens) and known IUD removal forces and calculated a range of possible intrauterine forces using pressure and surface area. These were compared with known perforation forces. IUD insertion forces range from 1.5 N to 6.5 N. Removal forces range from 1 N to 5.8 N and fracture forces from 8.7 N to 30 N depending upon device. Measured perforation forces are from 20 N to 54 N, and calculations show the uterus is capable of generating up to 50 N of myometrial force depending on internal pressure and surface area. Primary perforation with conventional framed IUDs may occur if the insertion pressure exceeds the perforation resistance of the uterine fundus. This is more likely to occur if the front end of the inserter/IUD is narrow, the passage through the cervix is difficult, and the procedure is complex. IUD embedment and secondary perforation and IUD expulsion may be due to imbalance between the size of the IUD and that of the uterine cavity, causing production of asymmetrical uterine forces. The uterine muscle seems capable of generating enough force to cause an IUD to perforate the myometrium provided it is applied asymmetrically. A physical theory for IUD expulsion and secondary IUD perforation is given.

  11. Role of uterine forces in intrauterine device embedment, perforation, and expulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstuck, Norman D; Wildemeersch, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine factors that could help reduce primary perforation during insertion of a framed intrauterine device (IUD) and to determine factors that contribute in generating enough uterine muscle force to cause embedment and secondary perforation of an IUD. The objective was also to evaluate the main underlying mechanism of IUD expulsion. Methods We compared known IUD insertion forces for “framed” devices with known perforation forces in vitro (hysterectomy specimens) and known IUD removal forces and calculated a range of possible intrauterine forces using pressure and surface area. These were compared with known perforation forces. Results IUD insertion forces range from 1.5 N to 6.5 N. Removal forces range from 1 N to 5.8 N and fracture forces from 8.7 N to 30 N depending upon device. Measured perforation forces are from 20 N to 54 N, and calculations show the uterus is capable of generating up to 50 N of myometrial force depending on internal pressure and surface area. Conclusion Primary perforation with conventional framed IUDs may occur if the insertion pressure exceeds the perforation resistance of the uterine fundus. This is more likely to occur if the front end of the inserter/IUD is narrow, the passage through the cervix is difficult, and the procedure is complex. IUD embedment and secondary perforation and IUD expulsion may be due to imbalance between the size of the IUD and that of the uterine cavity, causing production of asymmetrical uterine forces. The uterine muscle seems capable of generating enough force to cause an IUD to perforate the myometrium provided it is applied asymmetrically. A physical theory for IUD expulsion and secondary IUD perforation is given. PMID:25143756

  12. Use of IUDs for emergency contraception: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKay R

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca McKay,1 Lynne Gilbert2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom; 2Department of Contraception and Sexual Health, Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom Abstract: Emergency contraception is an essential intervention for the prevention of unplanned pregnancy worldwide. The copper intrauterine device (IUD is highly effective at preventing pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. Unfortunately, its usage in this context is low and far exceeded by hormonal forms of emergency contraception. These have higher failure rates and, unlike the IUD, are not effective post-fertilization. This review aims to summarize the literature surrounding IUD use as emergency contraception, contrast it with the hormonal options, and provide suggestions for increased usage. Keywords: levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, copper intrauterine device

  13. Gender Differences in Perception of Contraception Alternatives by Never-Married College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Robert J.; Gold, Robert S.

    A study examined the perceptions of college students regarding 10 contraceptive methods, including the condom, douche, oral contraceptive, withdrawal, diaphragm, female sterilization, spermicidal foam, rhythm, male sterilization, and intrauterine device. A total of 285 females and 316 males responded to a questionnaire which had students rank each…

  14. Chitosan/alginate multilayer film for controlled release of IDM on Cu/LDPE composite intrauterine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kuan; Xie, Changsheng; Xia, Xianping

    2013-09-01

    To reduce such side effects as pain and bleeding caused by copper-containing intrauterine device (Cu-IUD), a novel medicated intrauterine device, which is coated with an indomethacin (IDM) delivery system on the surface of copper/low-density polyethylene (Cu/LDPE) composite intrauterine device, has been proposed and developed in the present work. The IDM delivery system is a polyelectrolyte multilayer film, which is composed of IDM containing chitosan and alginate layer by layer, is prepared by using self-assembled polyelectrolyte multilayer method, and the number of the layers of this IDM containing chitosan/alginate multilayer film can be tailored by controlling the cyclic repetition of the deposition process. After the IDM containing chitosan/alginate multilayer film is obtained on the surface of Cu/LDPE composite intrauterine device, its release behavior of both IDM and cupric ion has been studied in vitro. The results show that the release duration of IDM increase with the increasing of thickness of the IDM containing chitosan/alginate multilayer film, and the initial burst release of cupric ion cannot be found in this novel medicated Cu/LDPE composite IUD. These results can be applied to guide the design of novel medicated Cu-IUD with minimal side effects for the future clinical use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device on the immune microenvironment of the human cervix and endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Uma; Hilton, Joan F; Critchfield, J William; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Giudice, Linda C; Averbach, Sarah; Seidman, Dominika; Shacklett, Barbara L; Smith-McCune, Karen

    2016-08-01

    There is little information regarding the impact of the intrauterine device on immune parameters of the upper female reproductive tract related to risk of HIV acquisition. We collected cervical and endometrial samples from women using the hormonal intrauterine device to study its effects on endocervical cytokines/chemokine concentrations, phenotypic markers of T cells, responses of endometrial T cells to activation, and alterations of endometrial cellular infiltrates. Hormonal intrauterine device use was associated with: increased concentrations of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines (endocervix); increased coexpression of CXCR4 and CCR5 (endocervix and endometrium); increased coexpression of CD38 and HLADR (endocervix and endometrium); increased intracellular IL-10 production after T-cell stimulation (endometrium); and increased density of T cells, most notably regulatory T cells (endometrium). Hormonal intrauterine device use resulted in both inflammatory and immunosuppressive alterations. Further research is needed to determine the significance of these changes for HIV risk. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Treatment of Women With an Endometrial Polyp and Heavy Menstrual Bleeding: A Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device or Hysteroscopic Polypectomy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Myrthe M.; van Hanegem, Nehalennia; de Lange, Maria E.; Timmermans, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature review of reports comparing a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) with transcervical polyp resection (TCRP) as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). Our second objective was to investigate the effectiveness of LNG-IUD and TCRP in reducing

  17. Hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism: national follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Svendsen, Anne Louise

    2009-01-01

    .03) or with 75 mug desogestrel was 1.12 (0.36 to 3.49), and for hormone releasing intrauterine devices was 0.90 (0.64 to 1.26). CONCLUSION: The risk of venous thrombosis in current users of combined oral contraceptives decreases with duration of use and decreasing oestrogen dose. For the same dose of oestrogen...... and the same length of use, oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone were associated with a significantly higher risk of venous thrombosis than oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. Progestogen only pills and hormone releasing intrauterine devices were not associated with any...

  18. Social media and the intrauterine device: a YouTube content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Brian T; Allen, Allison J

    2017-11-23

    YouTube's online archive of video testimonials related to health information are more commonly viewed than those developed by clinicians and professional groups, suggesting the importance of the patient experience to viewers. We specifically sought to examine the accuracy of information on, and projected acceptability of, the intrauterine device (IUD) from these YouTube testimonials. We searched YouTube for videos about individual uploaders' IUD experiences, using the search terms 'intrauterine device', 'IUD', 'Mirena' and 'Paragard'. Given interest in user testimonials, we excluded professional and instructional videos belonging to commercial or non-profit entities. Two reviewers independently analysed the videos using a structured guide, with attention to inaccurate information. Of 86 identified videos, four videos featured clinicians and were excluded; 62 met inclusion criteria. Interrater agreement on IUD portrayal was good (K=0.73). Young (mean age 25, range 19-38, years), white (75%), nulliparous (61%) women primarily uploaded content. Most described placement of the LNG-IUS (65%), were posted within 1 month of insertion (45%), and mentioned side effects (66%) - bleeding, pain, and partner sensation of the strings. About one-third of videos contained inaccurate information (34%) and were thought to project an overall negative experience (30%). Videos portraying IUDs negatively were associated with inaccurate information and/or mention of side effects. While one-third of IUD user testimonials on YouTube contained inaccurate information, the majority of IUD experiences were perceived by our study viewers to be positive. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Intrauterine Device Placement During Cesarean Delivery and Continued Use 6 Months Postpartum: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Erika E; Stuart, Gretchen S; Zerden, Matthew L; Garrett, Joanne M; Bryant, Amy G

    2015-07-01

    To compare intrauterine device (IUD) use at 6 months postpartum among women who underwent intracesarean delivery (during cesarean delivery) IUD placement compared with women who planned for interval IUD placement 6 or more weeks postpartum. In this nonblinded randomized trial, women who were undergoing a cesarean delivery and desired an IUD were randomized to intracesarean delivery or interval IUD placement. The primary outcome was IUD use at 6 months postpartum. A sample size of 112 (56 in each group) was planned to detect a 15% difference in IUD use at 6 months postpartum between groups. From March 2012 to June 2014, 172 women were screened and 112 women were randomized into the trial. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Data regarding IUD use at 6 months postpartum were available for 98 women, 48 and 50 women in the intracesarean delivery and interval groups, respectively. A larger proportion of the women in the intracesarean delivery group were using an IUD at 6 months postpartum (40/48 [83%]) compared with those in the interval group (32/50 [64%], relative risk 1.3, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.66). Among the 56 women randomized to interval IUD insertion, 22 (39%) of them never received an IUD; 14 (25%) never returned for IUD placement, five (9%) women declined an IUD, and three (5%) had a failed IUD placement. Intrauterine device placement at the time of cesarean delivery leads to a higher proportion of IUD use at 6 months postpartum when compared with interval IUD placement. I.

  20. Intrauterine device use and the risk of pre-eclampsia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, S E; Jick, S S; Werler, M M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the association between intrauterine device (IUD) use, timing of removal prior to pregnancy, and the risk of pre-eclampsia. A case-control study within the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, UK. Medical record database in the UK. Cases of pre-eclampsia (n = 2744) were identified among pregnancies resulting in singleton deliveries from 1993 to 2010. Four controls, or pregnancies unaffected by pre-eclampsia, were matched to each case on maternal age, general practice, and year of delivery. Data on IUD use were obtained from patient records. The odds ratios (ORs) for the association between IUD and pre-eclampsia were adjusted for covariates identified a priori, and analyses were stratified by BMI and number of prior deliveries. Odds ratios (95% confidence intervals, 95% CIs) of pre-eclampsia in pregnancies among women with a history of IUD use, compared with women without a history of IUD use. Prior IUD use was associated with a reduced risk of pre-eclampsia (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.58-0.98). The timing of removal in relation to the start of pregnancy showed an inverse association, with shorter intervals associated with a larger decrease in risk of pre-eclampsia. IUD removal within a year prior to pregnancy had an OR of 0.68 (95% CI 0.46-1.00). Among women with a prior delivery, the association between IUD use and pre-eclampsia was null. Intrauterine device use is associated with a small decreased risk of pre-eclampsia, specifically if removed within the year prior to conception. A case-control study of pregnancies in the UK suggests a reduced risk of pre-eclampsia for former IUD users. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. Safe and cost-effective ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Usha; Astudillo-Dávalos, Fausto E; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and difference in cost of ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device (IUD). A total of 23 women underwent ultrasound-guided retrieval of retained IUDs between January 2013 and March 2014. Transvaginal ultrasound was performed in all cases to assess the localization of the IUD. Under transabdominal ultrasound guidance, either the crochet type IUD hook (Gyneas, Goussainville, France) or Alligator forceps were used to grasp the IUD and remove it from the uterine cavity. The costs of the ultrasound guided procedure and the hysteroscopic removal of the IUD were compared. Twenty-three patients who failed IUD removal in the clinic were referred to our department for ultrasound-guided removal. All patients had an IUD present in the uterine cavity. Eleven patients had Paragard IUDs (48%), eight had Mirena IUDs (35%), three had Lippes loop (13%), and one had a ring IUD (4%). The patients' ages ranged from 20-56 years. The IUDs were in place for 8 months to 23 years. Of the 23 patients with retained IUDs, 19 were successfully removed (83%), and 4 underwent hysteroscopic removal of IUD. The IUD removal cost in the operating room on average was $3562 US dollars and the cost of ultrasound-guided removal was $465 US dollars. Retained intrauterine devices with or without strings can often be safely removed in an office-based setting under ultrasound guidance at less cost than in the operating room, even in cases with embedded IUDs. Our experience leads us to propose in-office IUD removal under ultrasound guidance as the first line in management of retained IUDs after failed removal by conventional practices. Ultrasound provides numerous advantages including direct visualization in a less invasive manner than hysteroscopy. Three-dimensional imaging can also be used for enhanced perspective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, G L

    1967-01-01

    Contraception is discussed in this article. Abstinence is the only certain method of contraception. The normal pregnancy rate in the normal unprotected population would be somewhere between 60 to 80 pregnancies per 100 woman-years. Contraceptive methods vary in effectiveness. The failure rate of the safe period method is between 10-50 per 100 woman-years while the failure rate of spermicidal pessaries and creams is somewhere between 20 and 80 per 100 woman-years. Occlusive diaphragms fit over the anterior vaginal wall, such as the Dutch cap, or over the cervix itself, such as the cervical or Dumas cap. The failure rate of the Dumas cap is about 4 per 100 woman-years and the Dutch cap 6 per 100 woman-years. Perhaps the ideal female contraceptive is just around the corner in the alteration of cervical mucus by changing its pH or other constituents so that it becomes a spermicidal barrier or causes either sperm agglutination or a reduction of sperm motility. Between 8% and 15% of plastic IUDs are extruded spontaneously and a further 10% may be removed because of pain, intermenstrual bleeding, or menorrhagia. They are well tolerated in about 80% of patients, in whom the failure rate is about 2 per 100 woman years. The douche and sponge are unacceptable and unreliable methods of contraception. The main advance in contraceptive technique over the past 10 years has been the introduction of the oral contraceptives. The combined type of pill was developed first, followed by the sequential type. It has been estimated that between half a million and 1 million women in this country now take oral contraceptive pills and nothing detrimental has so far been proved about the method in spite of persistent and widely published doubts about its possible dangers. The failure rate of the oral contraceptives is less than 1 per 100 woman years.

  3. Contraception choices in women with underlying medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnema, Rachel A; McNamara, Megan C; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-09-15

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective contraceptive counseling requires an understanding of a woman's preferences and medical history, as well as the risks, benefits, adverse effects, and contraindications of each method. Noncontraceptive benefits of combined hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptive pills, include regulated menses, decreased dysmenorrhea, and diminished premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Oral contraceptive pills may be used safely in women with a range of medical conditions, including well-controlled hypertension, uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, depression, and uncomplicated valvular heart disease. However, women older than 35 years who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills. Contraceptives containing estrogen, which can increase thrombotic risk, should be avoided in women with a history of venous thromboembolism, stroke, cardiovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Progestin-only contraceptives are recommended for women with contraindications to estrogen. Depo-Provera, a long-acting injectable contraceptive, may be preferred in women with sickle cell disease because it reduces the frequency of painful crises. Because of the interaction between antiepileptics and oral contraceptive pills, Depo-Provera may also be considered in women with epilepsy. Implanon, the single-rod implantable contraceptive device, may reduce symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Mirena, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine contraceptive system, is an option for women with menorrhagia, endometriosis, or chronic pelvic pain.

  4. Controlled release of copper from an intrauterine device using a biodegradable polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Reshmi; B, Bharaniraja; Aprem, Abi Santhosh

    2015-12-01

    The adverse effects of copper intrauterine devices (IUDs) such as abnormal bleeding, pain and cramps may be due in part to the burst release of copper ions during the first few months of usage. This study focuses on controlling the initial burst release of copper ions. This study evaluated in vitro release rates of copper for a period of 1 year from standard CuT380 IUDs (n=6) and from CuT380 IUDs coated with poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) films (n=6). This study characterized the coated device for its morphological changes during degradation of film by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CuT380 IUDs coated with PLGA film with a thickness of 0.10±0.02 mm showed a reduced initial copper release (40-80 mcg/day) compared with uncoated CuT380 IUDs (150-200 mcg/day). Statistically significant (p<.05) results were obtained at different time intervals during the overall study period of 1 year. SEM images showed degradation of coating. Coating a CuT380 IUD with biodegradable polymer reduced the initial copper release without affecting release at 1 year. Clinical trials are required to determine whether this could reduce side effects such as bleeding and pain associated with copper containing IUDs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Randomized comparative study of GyneFix IN and TCu 380A intrauterine devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S; Hu, J; Wu, M

    1998-06-01

    To observe the clinical performances of the new intrauterine device (IUD)-GyneFix IN. The present study is a randomized comparative clinical trial. 607 healthy parous women were randomly allocated into GyneFix IN group (n = 302) or TCu 380A group (n = 305). IUD was inserted during the menstrual interval by the trained investigators. Follow-up were arranged at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after insertion. The discontinuation rates were calculated by life table method. At the end of the first year, there was no pregnancy occurred in GyneFix IN group. Its expulsion rate and removal rate for medical reasons were 2.67 and 1.02 per 100 women respectively. The use-related discontinuation rates was 3.66, which was significantly lower than that in the TCu 380A group (7.88, P < 0.05). The number of women with complaint of pain was also less in GyneFix IN group. The excellent performance of the new IUD which is a frameless device with high copper surface and anchoring system was confirmed by this multicentre trial. Due to lower expulsion rate and less side effect of pain, it could be recommended.

  6. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system: Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan N Beatty

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Megan N Beatty, Paul D BlumenthalDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS is a safe, effective and acceptable form of contraception used by over 150 million women worldwide. It also has a variety of noncontraceptive benefits including treatment for menorrhagia, endometriosis, and endometrial hyperplasia. The LNG-IUS has also been used in combination with estrogen for hormone replacement therapy and as an alternative to hysterectomy. Overall, the system is very well tolerated and patient satisfaction is quite high when proper education regarding possible side effects is provided. However, despite all of the obvious benefits of the LNG-IUS, utilization rates remain quite low in the developed countries, especially in the United States. This is thought to be largely secondary to the persistent negative impressions from the Dalkon Shield intrauterine experience in the 1970s. This history continues to negatively influence the opinions of both patients and health care providers with regards to intrauterine devices. Providers should resolve to educate themselves and their patients on the current indications and uses for this device, as it, and intrauterine contraception in general, remains a largely underutilized approach to a variety of women’s health issues.Keywords: Mirena®, levonorgestrel-releasing, intrauterine system, intrauterine contraceptive device

  7. Expulsion of Nova-T380, Multiload 375, and Copper-T380A contraceptive devices inserted during cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Ahmed; Hamed, Hossam O; Alsammani, Mohamed A; Shalaby, Hend; Nabeil, Hanan; Barakat, Rafik; Fetih, Ahmed N

    2015-08-01

    To compare the expulsion rate of Nova-T380, Multiload 375, and Copper-T380A intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs) inserted during cesarean delivery. A comparative randomized study was conducted between January 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, in three maternity centers in Egypt and Saudi Arabia. All women scheduled for an elective cesarean and accepting intraoperative insertion of an IUCD were randomly allocated to receive the Nova-T380 (group 1), Multiload 375 (group 2), or Cu-T380A (group 3) using a computer-generated table. Researchers and participants were not masked to the type of IUCD. Follow-up was for 1 year. The primary outcome was IUCD expulsion (complete or partial [i.e. displacement]). Each group contained 40 participants. At 1 year, expulsion had been reported for 5 (13%) women in group 1, 2 (5%) in group 2, and 6 (15%) in group 3 (P>0.05 for all). The frequency of displacement was significantly lower in group 2 (5 [13%] participants) than in group 1 (15 [38%]; P=0.001) and group 3 (14 [35%]; P=0.008). Despite a comparable risk of expulsion following IUCD insertion during cesarean delivery, the Multiload 375 device showed the lowest risk of displacement. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device in the treatment of adenomyosis associated heavy menstrual bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uysal, A.; Taner, C.E.; Mun, S.; Celimli, F.H.; Uysal, F.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device in the treatment of adenomyosis associated with heavy menstrual bleeding. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary referral hospital in Izmir, Turkey, and comprised data on adenomyosis patients who were implanted with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device for heavy menstrual bleeding between December 2004 and January 2008. After the insertion of the device, all patients were followed up by transvaginal ultrasonography and serum haemoglobin levels and menstrual patterns were determined at the 6th and 12th month. Data was analysed using SPSS 10. Results: The mean age of the 42 women in the study was 43.2+-0.8 years. At the sixth month, amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea, spotting and regular menstrual flow were 9.5% (n=4), 7% (n=3), 19% (n=8), and 64% (n=27), respectively. At the 12th month, the same parametres were 9.5% (n=4), 7% (n=3), 12% (n=5), and 71% (n=30), respectively. Haemoglobin levels had increased and endometrial thickness had decreased, and these differences were statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: The easy-to-use levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device can be added to the treatment options as a well-tolerated alternative in cases where a woman who has completed her fertility and does not request a hysterectomy has anaemia associated with adenomyosis. (author)

  9. Use of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device in the treatment of adenomyosis associated heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Taner, Cüneyt Eftal; Mun, Semih; Uysal, Fatma; Celimli, Fatma Horasan

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device in the treatment of adenomyosis associated with heavy menstrual bleeding. The retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary referral hospital in Izmir, Turkey, and comprised data on adenomyosis patients who were implanted with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device for heavy menstrual bleeding between December 2004 and January 2008. After the insertion of the device, all patients were followed up by transvaginal ultrasonography and serum haemoglobin levels and menstrual patterns were determined at the 6th and 12th month. Data was analysed using SPSS 10. The mean age of the 42 women in the study was 43.2 +/- 0.8 years. At the sixth month, amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea, spotting and regular menstrual flow were 9.5% (n = 4), 7% (n = 3), 19% (n = 8), and 64% (n = 27), respectively. At the 12th month, the same parametres were 9.5% (n = 4), 7% (n = 3), 12% (n = 5), and 71% (n = 30), respectively. Haemoglobin levels had increased and endometrial thickness had decreased, and these differences were statistically significant (p intrauterine device can be added to the treatment options as a well-tolerated alternative in cases where a woman who has completed her fertility and does not request a hysterectomy has anaemia associated with adenomyosis.

  10. Women's knowledge of commonly used contraceptive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrager, Sarina; Hoffmann, Sarah

    2008-11-01

    Despite the availability of reliable contraceptive methods in this country, half of all pregnancies are unintended. There is a scarcity of research in a primary care population that measures women's knowledge about commonly used contraceptive methods. All women between 18 and 40 in the waiting room at 2 different family practice clinics were approached over a 2-week period. Women were asked to complete a short written questionnaire that included demographics, reproductive information, and 9 true/false questions about common contraceptive methods. Two hundred fifty-two surveys were completed. Half of all women believed that condoms are 99% effective and only 57% knew that condoms were not as effective as oral contraceptive pills. Close to half of all the women received their contraceptive information from the clinic. Only 42% of the women knew that oral contraceptive pills can reduce the incidence of some types of cancer. There was not correlation between number of questions answered correctly and number of children, type of contraceptive used, age, or race/ethnicity. Twenty-six percent of the respondents were not using any contraception. Overall, the women surveyed demonstrated fairly good knowledge of contraception methods. More women surveyed were aware that oral contraceptive pills can reduce the rate of uterine and ovarian cancer than in previous similar studies. Also, women in this survey were more likely to use intrauterine devices than the general population. Health care professionals should develop more effective education about contraceptive methods.

  11. Contraception for adolescents with lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Weiner Linda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sexually active adolescents, including young women with lupus, are at high risk for unplanned pregnancy. Unplanned pregnancy among teens with lupus is associated with an elevated risk of poor maternal and fetal outcomes. The provision of effective contraception is a crucial element of care for a sexually-active young woman with lupus. Unfortunately, providers may be hesitant to prescribe contraception to this group due to concerns about increasing the risk of lupus complications. This article reviews the risks and benefits of currently-available contraceptives for young women with lupus. Providers are encouraged to consider long-term, highly-effective contraception, such as implantables and intrauterine devices, for appropriately selected adolescents with lupus.

  12. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  13. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Koyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency post-coital contraception (EC is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method, and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference.

  14. Intra- and Extra-abdominal Actinomycosis Mimicking Urachal Tumor in an Intrauterine Device Carrier: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Lin Hsiao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a rare, chronic suppurative infection caused by the Gram-positive anaerobic filamentous bacterium, Actinomyces Israeli. In most cases, the diagnosis is made postoperatively because of its unusual clinical presentation. Abdominal actinomycosis is the second most common site of the disease and may mimic abdominal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease or diverticulitis. The abdominal-pelvic form of this disease mostly results from the prolonged use of an intrauterine device. We report a rare case of combined intra- and extra-abdominal actinomycosis mimicking urachal tumor that was diagnosed by computed tomography, which presented as two tender abdominal palpable masses following long-term intrauterine device use. The disease was confirmed by postoperative histopathologic examination, which revealed sulfur granules microscopically, and was successfully treated by complete surgical resection following a period of appropriate antibiotic treatment.

  15. [Post-abortion contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohannessian, A; Jamin, C

    2016-12-01

    To establish guidelines of the French National College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians about post-abortion contraception. A systematic review of the literature about post-abortion contraception was performed on Medline and Cochrane Database between 1978 and March 2016. The guidelines of the French and foreign scientific societies were also consulted. After an abortion, if the woman wishes to use a contraception, it should be started as soon as possible because of the very early ovulation resumption. The contraception choice must be done in accordance with the woman's expectations and lifestyle. The contraindications of each contraception must be respected. The long-acting reversible contraception, intra-uterine device (IUD) and implant, could be preferred (grade C) as the efficacy is not dependent on compliance. Thus, they could better prevent repeat abortion (LE3). In case of surgical abortion, IUD should be proposed and inserted immediately after the procedure (grade A), as well as the implant (grade B). In case of medical abortion, the implant can be inserted from the day of mifépristone, the IUD after an ultrasound examination confirming the success of the abortion (no continuing pregnancy or retained sac) (grade C). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptive devices in Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-01

    Jul 1, 2015 ... Demand for long acting contraceptive methods and associated factors among family planning service users, Northwest. Ethiopia: BMC Research Notes; 2015, 8:29. 3. The Republic of Gambia. National Demographic and. Health Survey: Gambia Bureau of Statistics Banjul; Min- istry of Interior, September ...

  17. Intracervical lidocaine gel for intrauterine device insertion: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Karla; Davis, Anne; Rosario Tejeda, Linette; Westhoff, Carolyn

    2012-09-01

    Pain during intrauterine device (IUD) insertion can be a barrier to initiation. Clinical trials have found misoprostol and nonsteroidal drugs to be ineffective (Am J Obstet Gynecol 2006;195:1272-1277, Hum Reprod 2011;26:323-329, Hum Reprod 2007;22:2647-2652). One study suggested that 2% lidocaine gel decreased pain; however, study design problems limit its validity (Brit J Fam Plann 1996;22:177-180). We tested whether intracervical 2% lidocaine gel decreased insertion pain compared to placebo. We planned a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial of 200 women. We placed 2% lidocaine gel or placebo in the cervix prior to uterine sounding. Participants rated pain by marking a 100-mm visual analogue scale at four time points. We randomized 200 participants and placed 197 IUDs. Pain was greatest at uterine sounding and similar between groups: placebo group mean 51.6 mm (SD 25), lidocaine group mean 55.5 mm (SD 30, p=.33). Stratified analyses accounting for parity showed no treatment effect. Multivariable analyses identified longer time since last pregnancy, lower parity and higher anticipated pain as predictors of pain during sounding, and dysmenorrhea and the levonorgestrel IUD as additional predictors during IUD insertion. Intracervical 2% lidocaine gel does not decrease IUD insertion pain. Understanding predictors of increased pain may help providers with preprocedure counseling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventive treatment of intrauterine device-induced menstrual blood loss with tranexamic acid in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X; Gao, E S; Li, D; Zhang, M; Dou, L X; Yuan, W

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether tranexamic acid (Transamin) therapy reduces the amount of menstrual blood loss (MBL) and occurrence of menorrhagia after intrauterine device (IUD) insertion. Some 175 Chinese women attending for IUD insertion were equally assigned into 2 Transamin groups (1,000 and 500 mg, twice daily) and a placebo group. Their MBL was recorded with a pictorial chart in 3 subsequent menstrual cycles after insertion, while the MBL of 64 patients, collecting used sanitary towels, was also measured by an alkaline hematin method. A significant decline in post-insertion MBL and occurrence of menorrhagia was found in the 2 Transamin groups compared with the placebo group (p<0.05), whereas the difference in the results from the pictorial chart score was not statistically significant between the 1 g group and placebo group. Transamin treatment with a generally recommended dosage can effectively reduce the amount of IUD-induced MBL and prevent menorrhagia in Chinese women. A lower dosage than recommended (50% of recommended dosage) may have a similar preventive effect.

  19. A randomized controlled trial of nitrous oxide for intrauterine device insertion in nulliparous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rameet H; Thaxton, Lauren; Carr, Shannon; Leeman, Lawrence; Schneider, Emily; Espey, Eve

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of inhaled nitrous oxide for pain management among nulliparous women undergoing intrauterine device (IUD) insertion. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted among nulliparous women aged 13-45years who underwent IUD insertion at a US center between October 1, 2013, and August 31, 2014. Using a computer-generated randomization sequence, participants were randomly assigned to inhale either oxygen (O 2 ) or a mixture of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen (N 2 O/O 2 ) through a nasal mask for 2minutes before insertion. Only the person administering the inhalation agent was aware of group assignment. The primary outcome was maximum pain assessed 2minutes after insertion via a 100-mm visual analog scale. Analyses were by intention to treat. Forty women were assigned to each group. Mean maximum pain score at the time of insertion was 54.3±24.8mm for the N 2 O/O 2 group and 55.3±20.9mm for the O 2 group (P=0.86). Adverse effects were reported for 6 (15%) women in the N 2 O/O 2 group and 7 (18%) in the O 2 group (P=0.32). N 2 O/O 2 did not reduce the pain of IUD insertion among nulliparous women. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02391714. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Aspiration Abortion With Immediate Intrauterine Device Insertion: Comparing Outcomes of Advanced Practice Clinicians and Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Eva; Darney, Blair; Orme-Evans, Kaebah; Beckley, Ethan H; Bergander, Linn; Nichols, Mark; Bednarek, Paula H

    2016-05-01

    Immediate postabortion intrauterine device (IUD) insertion is a safe, effective strategy to prevent subsequent unplanned pregnancy. Oregon is one of 5 US states where advanced practice clinicians perform aspiration abortions. This study compares outcomes of first-trimester aspiration abortion with immediate IUD insertion between advanced practice clinicians and physicians. We conducted a historical cohort study of first-trimester aspiration abortions with immediate IUD insertion performed at our center from 2009 to 2011. We extracted demographic and clinical data from patient charts. Immediate complications including excessive blood loss, perforation, and reaspirations were recorded at the time of procedure. We used descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression to test for differences in outcomes by clinician type. Data were available on 669 of the 1134 combined procedures. Advanced practice clinicians performed 224 of these. There were no significant differences in immediate outcomes. The only immediate complications were reaspirations; 1.8% (4/224) in the advanced practice clinician group, and 2.0% (9/445) in the physician group (P = .83). We found no differences in outcomes between provider type for immediate IUD insertion after first-trimester aspiration abortion. This study helps reinforce that advanced practice clinicians can provide immediate postaspiration abortion IUD insertions with similar outcomes to those of physicians. Many countries do not allow advanced practice clinicians to perform this service, but a change in policy could help address family planning provider shortages. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  1. Women's willingness and ability to feel the strings of their intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Juliana; Tschann, Mary; Soon, Reni; Kuwahara, Melissa; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2017-06-01

    To determine how many intrauterine device (IUD) users are willing and able to palpate their IUD strings. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among IUD users presenting for their 6-week follow-up visit after insertion at the University of Hawaii, USA, between January 2011 and January 2012. Participants were asked whether they had previously felt the strings and whether they were willing to do so during the visit. Bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regression were performed. Previous attempts to palpate IUD strings were reported by 74 (58.7%) of 126 participants, of whom 49 (66.2%) could feel the strings. At the study visit, 60 (47.6%) participants were willing to try to feel their strings; 33 (55.0%) were successful. Overall, 58 (46.0%) participants were willing and able to palpate their IUD strings at home and/or at the study visit. Fewer women who self-identified as native Hawaiian than women of other races reported previous attempts (P=0.005). Previous instruction to check IUD strings was associated with willingness to palpate them before and after controlling for native Hawaiian race (odds ratio 8.78, 95% CI 3.43-22.43; adjusted odds ratio 9.64, 95% CI 3.57-26.04). Approximately half the participants were willing and able to palpate their IUD strings. Routinely counseling women to check their IUD strings could have limited clinical utility. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  2. Association of oral contraceptive use, other contraceptive methods, and infertility with ovarian cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworoger, Shelley S; Fairfield, Kathleen M; Colditz, Graham A; Rosner, Bernard A; Hankinson, Susan E

    2007-10-15

    Although oral contraceptives are protective for ovarian cancer, it is unclear how long this protection persists. The authors prospectively assessed this question as well as associations of other, less studied contraceptive methods (tubal ligation, rhythm method, diaphragm, condoms, intrauterine device, foam, spousal vasectomy) and infertility with ovarian cancer risk among 107,900 participants in the US Nurses' Health Study. During 28 years of follow-up (1976-2004), 612 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were confirmed. Duration of oral contraceptive use was inversely associated with risk (p-trend = 0.02), but no clear trend was observed for years since last use. However, for women using oral contraceptives for >5 years, the rate ratio for ovarian cancer for 20 years since last use (rate ratio (RR) = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.61, 1.39). Tubal ligation (RR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.50, 0.87) was associated with decreased ovarian cancer risk, whereas intrauterine device use (RR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.85) and infertility (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.75) were associated with an increased risk. Results suggest that the beneficial effect of oral contraceptives on ovarian cancer risk attenuates after 20 years since last use. Furthermore, tubal ligation, intrauterine device use, and infertility were associated with ovarian cancer risk.

  3. Ultrastructural studies on the endometrium of women wearing TCu-200 intrauterine devices by means of transmission and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray dispersive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Angulo, A; Aznar-Ramos, R

    1976-05-15

    Endometrial biopsies obtained from 12 young women wearing TCu-200 intrauterine contraceptive devices from six to 12 months were studied by means of transmission and scanning electron microscopes as well as with the use of rubeanic acid stains and x-ray dispersive analysis. Six biopsies were taken at Day 10 and six were taken at Day 20 of the menstrual cycle. The aim was to investigate epithelial and stromal changes possibly related to copper deposition. The main changes were located in the cell organelles at Day 10 of the cycle. The mitochondria disclosed vacuolization of the matrix and myelin figure formation in 70 to 80% of the epithelial cells. There were also increased numbers of lysosomes. There were similar alterations of secretory endometrium in only a few cases. Instead, there was an increased number of mitochondria, and most of them were dividing. Rubeanic acid stains as well as energy-dispersive x-ray analysis failed to reveal significant amounts of copper in the various cell organelles studied. The above observations seem to indicate that there is a definite alteration of the mitochondria of epithelial cells which may result in impairment of respiratory mechanisms and energy production, rendering the endometrial environment inhospitable to the fertilized egg. These changes are thought to be reversible. The absence of copper is explained on the basis of a rapid turnover of the endometrium or to a problem in sampling common to this methodology.

  4. Effects of the etonogestrel-releasing implant Implanon and a nonmedicated intrauterine device on the growth of breast-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Reinprayoon, Damrong; Thaithumyanon, Pimolratn; Praisuwanna, Pramote; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Dieben, Thom

    2006-04-01

    The study objectives were to compare the effects of an etonogestrel-releasing implant (Implanon) and a nonmedicated intrauterine device (IUD) on parameters of lactation in breast-feeding women and on the growth of their breast-fed infants over a 3-year period. Healthy lactating women (28-56 days postpartum) chose either the implant (n=42) or the IUD (n=38). Infant growth during a 3-year follow-up period is reported here. Total duration of breast-feeding coinciding with the mothers' treatment was 421.0 and 423.4 days in the Implanon and IUD groups, respectively. There were no differences between the infant groups in terms of body length, biparietal head circumference and body weight. No abnormalities were reported in psychomotor development or during physical examination. No treatment-related side effects were observed in either group. In conclusion, there were no differences in the growth of breast-fed infants of women treated with Implanon or a nonmedicated IUD. Implanon, therefore, appears to be a safe contraceptive option for breast-feeding women and their infants.

  5. Long-acting hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Gabelnick, Henry; Brosens, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Today, a new category of fertility-regulating agents has been created: long-acting, reversible hormonal contraceptives; they minimize compliance, while maximize effectiveness. They comprise subdermal implants and intrauterine devices. Other long-acting agents exist, such as Depo Provera and Noristerat. Use of Depo Provera and Noristerat carries great effectiveness, good clinical safety and usefulness in developing countries. They cause no significant increase in breast cancer risk, but they may carry an increased risk of HIV. Subcutaneous delivery systems have two common features: prolongation of effect is obtained by a drug reservoir and for most of their duration of action they provide a continuous, sustained release of the active hormone. Finally, the intrauterine system Mirena represents both a very effective contraceptive and a specific treatment for menorrhagia.

  6. Comparison of two cohorts of women who expulsed either a copper-intrauterine device or a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonatto, Paula; Bahamondes, Maria Valeria; Fernandes, Arlete; Silveira, Carolina; Bahamondes, Luis

    2016-05-01

    To assess if there is a difference in the characteristics of the women who expelled a copper-intrauterine device (TCu-IUD) or the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and the frequency of expulsions over different periods of observation. We retrospectively analyzed 19 697 medical charts of women consulting between January 1980 and December 2013 who requested a TCu-IUD or a LNG-IUS. The medical records of 17 644 Cu-IUD and 2053 LNG-IUS users returning to the clinic for a follow-up visit after insertion of an IUC were reviewed. Of these, 1532 Cu-IUD and 254 LNG-IUS parous users were found to have expelled the IUC for a first time. The mean age at insertion (± standard deviation) was 26.3 ± 6.6 years (range 16-49) for Cu-IUD users and 31.7 ± 7.6 years (range 18-48) for LNG-IUS users (P < 0.001). A total of 263 (13.4%) and 12 (4.3%) of the Cu-IUD and the LNG-IUS users were ≤19 years old, and 49.1% and 54.1% of the expulsions among the Cu-IUD and LNG-IUS users, respectively, were reported in the first six months after placement. A regression model showed that the variables significantly associated with an expulsion of either a Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS were age < 25 years, less than two deliveries and using a Cu-IUD. Our findings showed that the characteristics associated with IUC expulsion were age under 25 years, having had less than two deliveries and being users of Cu-IUD. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception for Adolescents: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Jenny K R; Gold, Melanie A

    2017-07-01

    Adolescents have higher rates of unintended pregnancies than any other age group. Contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices (IUDs) are long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) that are known to be highly effective in preventing pregnancy. New devices have recently been approved for use in adolescents, yet pediatricians may be less familiar with how to counsel adolescents about implants and IUDs. LARC methods should be described in basic terms to adolescents, including hormone dose, method of insertion, and method of pregnancy prevention. Clinicians should appreciate the developmental stages of adolescents, discuss the most effective methods of contraception, and ensure confidentiality from their parents. Short-acting contraception methods (eg, oral contraceptives) can be used as a temporary bridge to provide coverage until a LARC method can be placed. The most common adverse effect of LARC is nuisance bleeding, which can be managed with short courses of oral contraceptives or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. LARC devices constitute first-line contraceptive methods for adolescents. All clinicians, including pediatricians, can counsel about LARC even before suggesting an oral contraceptive or another less effective contraceptive method. Effective, confidential communication with sensitive language to inform adolescents of the different types of LARC is necessary to normalize offering LARC as a contraceptive option and improve its uptake among adolescents. Special clinical populations can also be offered appropriate contraceptive options inclusive of LARC.

  8. Comparing the Effect of Mefenamic Acid and Vitex Agnus on Intrauterine Device Induced Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Yavarikia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increased bleeding is the most common cause of intrauterine device (IUD removal. The use of alternative therapies to treat bleeding has increased due to the complications of medications. But most alternative therapies are not accepted by women. Therefore, conducting studies to find the right treatment with fewer complications and being acceptable is necessary. This study aimed to compare the effect of mefenamic acid and vitex agnus castus on IUD induced bleeding.Methods: This was a double blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. It was conducted on 84 women with random allocation in to two groups of 42 treated with mefenamic acid and vitex agnus capsules taking three times a day during menstruation for four months. Data were collected by demographic questionnaire and Higham 5 stage chart (1 month before the treatment and 4 months during the treatment., Paired t-test, independent t-test, chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA with repeated measurements, and SPSS software were used to determine the results.Results: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus significantly decreased bleeding. This decrease in month 4 was 52% in the mefenamic acid group and 47.6% in the vitex agnus group. The mean bleeding score changes was statistically significant between the two groups in the first three months and before the intervention. In the mefenamic acid group, the decreased bleeding was significantly more than the vitex agnus group. However, during the 4th month, the mean change was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus were both effective on IUD induced bleeding; however, mefenamic acid was more effective.

  9. Comparing the effect of mefenamic Acid and vitex agnus on intrauterine device induced bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavarikia, Parisa; Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Hadavand Mirzaie, Samira; Javadzadeh, Yousef; Lutfi, Razieh

    2013-09-01

    Increased bleeding is the most common cause of intrauterine device (IUD) removal. The use of alternative therapies to treat bleeding has increased due to the complications of medications. But most alternative therapies are not accepted by women. Therefore, conducting studies to find the right treatment with fewer complications and being acceptable is necessary. This study aimed to compare the effect of mefenamic acid and vitex agnus castus on IUD induced bleeding. This was a double blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. It was conducted on 84 women with random allocation in to two groups of 42 treated with mefenamic acid and vitex agnus capsules taking three times a day during menstruation for four months. Data were collected by demographic questionnaire and Higham 5 stage chart (1 month before the treatment and 4 months during the treatment)., Paired t-test, independent t-test, chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measurements, and SPSS software were used to determine the results. Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus significantly decreased bleeding. This decrease in month 4 was 52% in the mefenamic acid group and 47.6% in the vitex agnus group. The mean bleeding score changes was statistically significant between the two groups in the first three months and before the intervention. In the mefenamic acid group, the decreased bleeding was significantly more than the vitex agnus group. However, during the 4(th) month, the mean change was not statistically significant. Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus were both effective on IUD induced bleeding; however, mefenamic acid was more effective.

  10. Influences on women's decision making about intrauterine device use in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottert, Ann; Jacquin, Karin; Rahaivondrafahitra, Bakoly; Moracco, Kathryn; Maman, Suzanne

    2015-04-01

    We explored influences on decision making about intrauterine device (IUD) use among women in the Women's Health Project (WHP), managed by Population Services International in Madagascar. We conducted six small group photonarrative discussions (n=18 individuals) and 12 individual in-depth interviews with women who were IUD users and nonusers. All participants had had contact with WHP counselors in three sites in Madagascar. Data analysis involved creating summaries of each transcript, coding in Atlas.ti and then synthesizing findings in a conceptual model. We identified three stages of women's decision making about IUD use, and specific forms of social support that seemed helpful at each stage. During the first stage, receiving correct information from a trusted source such as a counselor conveys IUD benefits and corrects misinformation, but lingering fears about the method often appeared to delay method adoption among interested women. During the second stage, hearing testimony from satisfied users and receiving ongoing emotional support appeared to help alleviate these fears. During the third stage, accompaniment by a counselor or peer seemed to help some women gain confidence to go to the clinic to receive the IUD. Identifying and supplying the types of social support women find helpful at different stages of the decision-making process could help program managers better respond to women's staged decision-making process about IUD use. This qualitative study suggests that women in Madagascar perceive multiple IUD benefits but also fear the method even after misinformation is corrected, leading to a staged decision-making process about IUD use. Programs should identify and supply the types of social support that women find helpful at each stage of decision making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ketorolac for Pain Control With Intrauterine Device Placement: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Lynn L.; Ward, Kristy K.; Mody, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intramuscular ketorolac compared to placebo saline injection for pain control with intrauterine device (IUD) placement. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients received ketorolac 30mg or placebo saline intramuscular injection 30 minutes prior to IUD placement. The primary outcome was pain with IUD placement on a 10cm visual analog scale (VAS). Sample size was calculated to provide 80% power to show a 2.0cm difference (α=0.05) in the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included pain with study drug injection, speculum insertion, tenaculum placement, uterine sounding, and at 5 and 15 minutes after IUD placement. Results A total of 67 women participated in the study, 33 in the ketorolac arm and 34 in the placebo arm. There were no differences in baseline demographics including age, BMI, and race. There were no differences in median pain scores for IUD placement in the placebo versus ketorolac groups (5.2cm vs 3.6cm, p=0.99). There was a decrease in median pain scores at 5 minutes (2.2cm vs 0.3cm, p=<0.001) and 15 minutes (1.6cm vs 0.1cm, p=<0.001) after IUD placement but no difference for all other time points. Nulliparous participants (n=16, 8 per arm) had a decrease in pain scores with IUD placement (8.1cm vs 5.4cm, p=0.02). In this study, 22% of participants in the placebo group and 18% in the ketorolac group reported injection pain was as painful as IUD placement. Conclusions Ketorolac does not reduce pain with IUD placement but does reduce pain at 5 and 15 minutes after placement. PMID:26241253

  12. Intrauterine Device Use and Cervical Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortessis, Victoria K; Barrett, Malcolm; Brown Wade, Niquelle; Enebish, Temuulen; Perrigo, Judith L; Tobin, Jessica; Zhong, Charlie; Zink, Jennifer; Isiaka, Vanessa; Muderspach, Laila I; Natavio, Melissa; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the association between use of an intrauterine device (IUD) and risk of cervical cancer by subjecting existing data to critical review, quantitative synthesis, and interpretation. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and catalogs of scientific meetings and abstracts, theses, and dissertations queried from inception through July 2016. Examination of abstracts from 225 reports identified 34 studies with individual-level measures of use of an IUD and incident cervical cancer. By critically assessing the full text of these reports, independent reviewers identified 17 studies conducted without recognized sources of systematic error, of which 16 could be harmonized for meta-analysis. Point and interval estimates of the association between use of an IUD and incident cervical cancer were extracted from original reports into a structured database along with key features of study design and implementation. A random-effects meta-analysis was implemented to quantitatively synthesize extracted estimates and assess likely influence of publication bias, residual confounding, heterogeneity of true effect size, and human papillomavirus prevalence and cervical cancer incidence in source populations. Women who used an IUD experienced less cervical cancer (summary odds ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77). Neither confounding by recognized risk factors nor publication bias seems a plausible explanation for the apparent protective effect, which may be stronger in populations with higher cervical cancer incidence. Invasive cervical cancer may be approximately one third less frequent in women who have used an IUD. This possible noncontraceptive benefit could be most beneficial in populations with severely limited access to screening and concomitantly high cervical cancer incidence.

  13. Impact of etonogestrel-releasing implant and copper intrauterine device on carbohydrate metabolism: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderich, Carolina L; Wender, Maria Celeste O; Lubianca, Jaqueline N; Santos, Letícia M; de Mello, Grasiele C

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the influence of an etonogestrel-releasing (ETG) implant and copper intrauterine device (IUD) on carbohydrate metabolism. In this nonrandomized, open-label, prospective controlled trial, 40 healthy women received an implant or IUD (20 per group). Outcome measures were fasting glucose, fasting insulin, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and glycosylated hemoglobin A(1)C (HbA(1)C) levels at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. The groups were similar in age, body mass index and laboratory parameters at baseline. Carbohydrate metabolism was not modified by the ETG implant at baseline and at 6 and 12 months (mean ± SD) (fasting glucose: 85.9 ± 5.13, 87.05 ± 5.36, 88.19 ± 5.05; insulin: 7.77 ± 2.42, 10.64 ± 9.4, 8.82 ± 3.73; OGTT: 94.8 ± 25.28, 96.5 ± 19.67, 99.47 ± 24.6; HbA(1)C: 5.27 ± .34, 5.55 ± .39, 5.7 ± 0.37). The same was true for the IUD (fasting glucose: 88.87 ± 7.2, 89.65 ± 5.86, 88.75 ± 4.79; insulin: 7.94 ± 3.6, 8.3 ± 4.1, 7.34 ± 3.02; OGTT: 96.85 ± 15.16, 97.48 ± 13.42, 91.3 ± 22.16; HbA(1)C: 5.41 ± .49, 5.75 ± .41, 5.9 ± 0.73). The ETG-releasing implant did not affect carbohydrate metabolism in normal women after 12 months. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent. Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE.

  15. Intrauterin graviditet efter Cavatermbehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouh-Amiri, Ali; Kjaergaard, Niels

    2009-01-01

    A case of intrauterine pregnancy occurring after successful balloon thermal endometrial ablation is described. Although rare, pregnancy after endometrial ablation is possible, and use of a supplemental contraceptive method should be planned. In case of pregnancy after endometrial ablation......, the woman should be informed of the high risk of pregnancy complications, and termination of the pregnancy should be discussed. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Feb-16...

  16. Use of the Etonogestrel Implant and Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Device Beyond the U.S. Food and Drug Administration–Approved Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, Colleen; Maddipati, Ragini; Zhao, Qiuhong; Swor, Erin; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the contraceptive implant and the 52mg hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) in women using the method beyond the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved duration of 3 and 5 years respectively. Methods Women willing to continue using their implant or 52mg levonorgestrel IUD (LNG-IUD) beyond the FDA-approved duration were followed prospectively for contraceptive effectiveness. Unintended pregnancy rate per 100 women-years was calculated. Implant users are offered periodic venipuncture for analysis of serum etonogestrel levels. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the etonogestrel levels across BMI groups. Results Implant users (n=237) have contributed 229.4 women-years of follow-up, with 123 using the etonogestrel implant for 4 years, and 34 using it for 5 years. Zero pregnancies have been documented, for a failure rate of 0 (one-sided 97.5% CI: 0, 1.61) per 100 women-years. Among 263 LNG-IUD users, 197.7 women-years of follow-up have been completed. One pregnancy was confirmed, for a failure rate of 0.51 (95% CI: 0.01, 2.82) per 100 women-years. Among implant users with serum etonogestrel results, the median and range of etonogestrel level at 3 years of use was 188.8 pg/mL (range 63.8, 802.6) and 177.0 pg/mL (67.9, 470.5) at 4 years of use. Etonogestrel levels did not differ by BMI at either time point (3 years: p=0.79; 4 years: p=0.47). Conclusion Preliminary findings indicate the contraceptive implant and 52mg hormonal IUD continue to be highly-effective for an additional year, beyond the FDA approved 3 and 5 years.. Serum etonogestrel levels indicate the implant contains adequate hormone for ovulation suppression at the end of both 3 and 4 years of use. PMID:25730221

  17. Use of the etonogestrel implant and levonorgestrel intrauterine device beyond the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, Colleen; Maddipati, Ragini; Zhao, Qiuhong; Swor, Erin; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the contraceptive implant and the 52-mg hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) in women using the method beyond the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved duration of 3 and 5 years, respectively. Women willing to continue using their implant or 52-mg levonorgestrel IUD beyond the FDA-approved duration were followed prospectively for contraceptive effectiveness. Unintended pregnancy rate per 100 women-years was calculated. Implant users are offered periodic venipuncture for analysis of serum etonogestrel levels. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the etonogestrel levels across body mass index (BMI) groups. Implant users (n=237) have contributed 229.4 women-years of follow-up, with 123 using the etonogestrel implant for 4 years and 34 using it for 5 years. Zero pregnancies have been documented, for a failure rate of 0 (one-sided 97.5% confidence interval [CI] 0-1.61) per 100 women-years. Among 263 levonorgestrel IUD users, 197.7 women-years of follow-up have been completed. One pregnancy was confirmed, for a failure rate of 0.51 (95% CI 0.01-2.82) per 100 women-years. Among implant users with serum etonogestrel results, the median and range of etonogestrel level at 3 years of use was 188.8 pg/mL (range 63.8-802.6 pg/mL) and 177.0 pg/mL (67.9-470.5 pg/mL) at 4 years of use. Etonogestrel levels did not differ by BMI at either time point (3 years: P=.79; 4 years: P=.47). Preliminary findings indicate the contraceptive implant and 52-mg hormonal IUD continue to be highly effective for an additional year beyond the FDA-approved 3 and 5 years. Serum etonogestrel levels indicate the implant contains adequate hormone for ovulation suppression at the end of both 3 and 4 years of use. II.

  18. The return of the pharmaceutical industry to the market of contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, E D

    2000-01-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s, the litigious climate in the US had a catastrophic effect on sales of many major contraceptives. Although oral contraceptives escaped controversy, the intrauterine device (IUD) and Norplant(R) were two targets of damaging litigation. The IUD was withdrawn from the market in 1985. Since 1994 when the attacks began against Norplant, its US sales have dramatically declined, even though no fault has been found in the method or its development. In general, pharmaceutical companies were extremely hesitant to develop new contraceptives during this period. The bleak outlook, however, began to shift in the late 1990s, as fertility rates began to decrease worldwide and contraceptive users increased. By 2025, 2500 million women will comprise the customer base for contraception. Global pharmaceutical companies are now participating in expanding markets overseas and have launched and continue to develop a range of new long-term reversible, and highly effective, contraceptive products outside the traditional oral contraceptive field. Two new contraceptives on the way to the US market are: Mirena, a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system manufactured by Schering-Leiras; and Implanon, a single implant system manufactured by Organon of the Netherlands. Other birth control methods soon to be launched include: emergency contraceptives, the contraceptive patch, monthly contraceptive injections, mifepristone for medical abortion, and modified oral contraceptives.

  19. Current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44: United States, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Kimberly; Daugherty, Jill; Jones, Jo

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all women use contraception at some point in their lifetimes, although at any given time they may not be using contraception for reasons such as seeking pregnancy, being pregnant, or not being sexually active. Using data from the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) on contraceptive use in the month of the interview, this report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44 in the United States. In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and educational attainment, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: the oral contraceptive pill, female sterilization, the male condom, and long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  20. Comparing the effectiveness of copper intrauterine devices available in Canada. Is FlexiT non-inferior to NovaT when inserted immediately after first-trimester abortion? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Wendy V

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the rationale and protocol for a randomized noninferiority controlled trial (RCT to determine if the Flexi-T380(+ copper intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD is comparable in terms of effectiveness and expulsion rates to the most common Canadian IUD currently in use, NovaT-200, when placed immediately after a first-trimester abortion. Methods/Design Consenting women choosing to use an IUD after an abortion for a pregnancy of less than 12 weeks of gestation will be randomized to device-type groups to receive immediate post-abortion placement of either a Flexi-T380(+ IUD, a device for which no current evidence on expulsion or effectiveness rates is available, or the Nova-T200 IUD, the only other brand of copper IUD available in Canada at the time of study initiation. The primary outcome measure is IUD expulsion rate at 1 year. Secondary outcomes include: pregnancy rate, method continuation rate, complication rates (infection, perforation, and satisfaction with contraceptive method. A non-intervention group of consenting women choosing a range of other post-abortion contraception methods, including no contraception, will be included for comparison of secondary outcomes. Web-based contraception satisfaction questionnaires, clinical records, and government-linked health administrative databases will be used to assess primary and secondary outcomes. Discussion The RCT design, combined with access to clinical records at all provincial abortion clinics, and to information in provincial single-payer linked administrative health databases, birth registry, and hospital records, offers a unique opportunity to determine if a novel IUD has a comparable expulsion rate to that of the current standard IUD in Canada, in addition to the first opportunity to determine pregnancy rate and method satisfaction at 1 year post-abortion for women choosing a range of post-abortion contraceptive options. We highlight considerations of

  1. Hormonal Contraception and Risk of Thromboembolism in Women With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H; Koch, Terah; Vesely, Sara K; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2017-02-01

    To investigate safety of hormonal contraception with regard to thromboembolic events in women with type 1 or 2 diabetes. We used data from 2002-2011 in Clinformatics Data Mart to identify women in the U.S., 14-44 years of age, with an ICD-9-CM code for diabetes and a prescription for a diabetic medication or device. We examined contraceptive claims and compared time to thromboembolism (venous thrombosis, stroke, or myocardial infarction) among women with diabetes dispensed hormonal contraception using a modification of Cox regression to control for age, smoking, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetic complications, and history of cancer; we excluded data for 3 months after women gave birth. We identified 146,080 women with diabetes who experienced 3,012 thromboembolic events. Only 28% of reproductive-aged women with diabetes had any claims for hormonal contraception, with the majority receiving estrogen-containing oral contraceptives. Rates of thromboembolism were highest among women who used the contraceptive patch (16 per 1,000 woman-years) and lowest among women who used intrauterine (3.4 per 1,000 woman-years) and subdermal (0 per 163 woman-years) contraceptives. Compared with use of intrauterine contraception, progestin-only injectable contraception was associated with increased risk of thromboembolism (12.5 per 1,000 woman-years; adjusted hazard ratio 4.69 [95% CI 2.51-8.77]). The absolute risk of thromboembolism among women with type 1 or 2 diabetes using hormonal contraception is low. Highly effective, intrauterine and subdermal contraceptives are excellent options for women with diabetes who hope to avoid the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia by carefully planning their pregnancies. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Effects of a copper-bearing intrauterine device on the ovarian function, body weight gain and pregnancy rate of nulliparous heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turin, E M; Nagle, C A; Lahoz, M; Torres, M; Turin, M; Mendizabal, A F; Escofet, M B

    1997-05-01

    A copper-bearing intrauterine device (IUD), designed to cause a slight distention of the uterus, was inserted through the cervix into each uterine horn of 230 heifers; an additional 230 heifers served as the control group. Blood was drawn at 0, 1, 2, 20 and 120 d for progesterone and testosterone assays. The heifers were checked twice daily for estrus and examined at 0, 60 and 120 d for weight gain. Thereafter they were bred over a 120-d period. The IUD caused anestrus in 98% of the heifers, with a daily weight gain 25.5 % higher than in the control heifers. Moreover, the device was 100% effective in preventing pregnancy. At 20 and 120 d after IUD insertion progesterone levels averaged 0.7 ng/ml, which was 4 to 5 times lower than in the control animals, suggesting a failure in ovulation or in corpus luteum (CL) formation due to the IUD. Simultaneously, testosterone values were increased up to 8 times in IUD-treated heifers, reaching a mean concentration of 163 pg/ml. Associated histological evaluations of the ovaries from UD-treated heifers revealed the presence of 2 or more cysts per ovary, with marked hyperthecosis in many antral follicles in which the granulosa cell layers were either thinned or lacking. The results suggest that the action of the copper-releasing IUD used in this study resulted in high contraceptive efficiency but also in disturbance of ovarian function. Our findings further raise the possibility of a cause and effect relationship between hyperandrogenism and the higher body weight gain observed in heifers treated with the IUD.

  3. Pyometra caused by carrying of an intrauterine device for a period of forty years and chronic endometritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović Nada 1

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyometra is the accumulation of pus in the uterine cavity, thus streaching its walls and thinning and enlarging the uterus. This change is characteristic of the senium period of life, when the uterus is atrophie with a stenotic cervical canal. It most frequently occurs as a result of secondary infection of the cancerogenic tissue of the uterus and additional stenosation and clogging up of cervical canal by a malignant process. Apart from carcinomas of the body and uterus cervix, pyometra less often can occur in other illnesses such as senile endometritis and senile colpitis. As pyometra most frequently occurs in uterine carcinomas, in detection of this state, we must think of malignancy and direct our examination to this direction. In this paper we present a patient in whom pyometra developed because she carried an intrauterine device for forty years that resulted in chronic endometritis. The main symptoms for which the patient was admited to hospital were abdominal pain and intensive suppurative vaginal excretion a month after removal of intrauterine device. The diagnosis of pyometra was made by gynaecological and ultrasound examinations, and also on the basis of gynecological and ultrasound examinations one month after chronic endometritis was confirmed. On the basis of this finding we suspected that chronic endometritis was caused by this state. By cytological, PAP and histopathological examinations of samples obtained by explorative curettage and biopsy of the uterine cervix, malignant changes were eliminated a possible cause. By laboratory analysis and bacteriological examination of the uterine cavity and vaginal excretion, inflammatory changes of the uterine mocous membrane were confirmed as a cause of the pyometra. This conditions was due to carrying the intrauterine device for more decades. The therapy consisted of dilatation of the cervical canal and evacuation of accumulated suppurative contents and irrigation of uterine cavity with 3

  4. A Dedicated Postpartum Intrauterine Device Inserter: Pilot Experience and Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sharad; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Dewan, Rupali; Mittal, Pratima; Bhamrah, Renita; Lerma, Klaira; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-03-01

    To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and safety of a dedicated postpartum intrauterine device (PPIUD) inserter specifically designed for the post-delivery setting. Primary objectives of fundal placement and expulsion rates were assessed. Secondary objectives were participant satisfaction and IUD retention. In this pilot proof of concept, we enrolled 80 women who presented for PPIUD insertion at 2 government hospitals in Delhi and Lucknow, India, between March and July 2015. PPIUD insertion was completed with the dedicated inserter in all cases, by trained providers with no prior experience in PPIUD insertion, followed immediately by ultrasound to assess location and fundal placement of the IUD. Follow-up took place at 6 to 8 weeks post-insertion, and ultrasound was used to assess IUD location. Providers and participants also completed satisfaction surveys. High fundal placement (≤10 mm from uterine fundus) was achieved with the dedicated PPIUD inserter in 82% of cases (n = 65). There were no perforations or infections among the participants and no other complications associated with use of the dedicated inserter. The mean distance between the IUD and the endometrial verge immediately post-insertion was 5.8 mm (range, 0-31; N = 80); this distance at follow-up was also 5.8 mm (range, 0-25; n = 50). Complete expulsion was observed in 6 cases (7.5%), and asymptomatic partial expulsion in 8 cases (10%). Providers reported the majority (93%, n = 74) of insertions to be easy. The majority (74%, n = 59) of participants reported the same level of pain before and after insertion. This dedicated PPIUD inserter performed as intended and was found to be safe, with high acceptability among the participants and providers. Further study and use of the dedicated inserter may reveal reduced risk of infection among PPIUD users as well as increased convenience compared with standard PPIUD insertion techniques, and could improve acceptability of postpartum

  5. Postpartum contraception: needs vs. reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Ariella B; Wolf, Abigail; Gorby, Nicolle

    2011-03-01

    The postpartum time is a unique time to address patient's contraceptive needs and provide education. There are little data to suggest the best approach to provide information about contraception after delivery. Postpartum patients in an urban university hospital were asked to complete a written survey on postpartum contraception. Participants were asked about contraception counseling offered both antepartum and postpartum. Participants were also asked if they would have elected to have an intrauterine device (IUD) inserted immediately after delivery. Participants were contacted 4-6 months after delivery regarding ongoing contraceptive use. One hundred seventy-five surveys were completed; 77% (134) reported discussing contraception antepartum, and 87% (153), postpartum. Thirty percent of women reported discussing IUD insertion at an antepartum visit and 31% reported discussing it in the hospital prior to discharge. Twenty-three percent (39) of women would have elected immediate post-placental IUD placement if available. Of the 59 patients who were able to be contacted 4-6 months after delivery, 5% reported using an IUD. Twenty-two percent (13) of the participants contacted at follow-up still desired an IUD, of which 62% would have elected postplacental placement, if available. Twenty-nine percent of women reported using no contraceptive method and 32% reported using a method which is not highly effective. Prenatal visits and postpartum contact with providers create an opportunity to discuss family planning and contraception and most patients report receiving counseling. However, significantly fewer reported continued contraceptive use at 4-6 months postpartum. Initiation of postplacental IUD placement would be acceptable and would increase contraceptive use at 6 months postpartum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. New and emerging contraceptives: a state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahamondes L

    2014-02-01

    modulators and new delivery systems are being used. In addition, research is being conducted into methods that offer dual protection (contraception and protection against human immunodeficiency virus transmission, and contraceptives for use "on demand." Studies are also investigating non-hormonal contraceptive methods that have additional, non-contraceptive benefits. Conclusion: The most pressing need worldwide is, first, that the highly effective contraceptive methods already available should be affordable to most of the population and also that these methods should fulfill the needs of women of different ages and with different reproductive requirements. The development of new contraceptive methods should also take advantage of the knowledge obtained over the past 30 years on gamete physiology and gamete interaction to avoid the use of steroid compounds. Keywords: emerging contraceptives, patch, vaginal ring, intrauterine devices, spray, emergency contraceptives

  7. Oral Contraceptives, Depression, and Libido

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Brenda N.; Draper, Katharine C.; Johnson, Anthony L.; Nicol, Gillian C.

    1971-01-01

    Depression, headaches, and libido were rated in 272 women before starting a contraceptive method and at intervals during the first year of use—54 were fitted with an intrauterine device (I.U.D.) and 218 used one of three oral contraceptives. Side effects caused 25% of the oral contraceptive group and 13% of the I.U.D. group to stop the method. Depression, headaches, and loss of libido were the most common reasons for stopping oral contraceptives and breakthrough bleeding was the most common reason for stopping the I.U.D. The group of women who stopped or changed their oral contraceptives during the survey were compared with the group who remained on the same oral contraceptive throughout. The former had higher mean depression and neuroticism scores at the first clinic visit and contained more women with a history of premenstrual weepiness, depression during pregnancy, outpatient psychiatric treatment, and treatment with antidepressants. Changes in the depression, headache, and libido ratings throughout the survey are presented. PMID:5565516

  8. Progestin-releasing intrauterine device insertion plus palliative radiotherapy in frail, elderly uterine cancer patients unfit for radical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Legge, Francesco; Carone, Vito; Chiantera, Vito; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the combination of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) insertion and palliative radiotherapy (RT) as a potential approach for treating frail, elderly endometrial cancer (EC) patients considered unfit for curative oncological treatments. The inclusion criteria were an age of ≥65 years, pathological confirmation of a uterine neoplasm, a Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) value of ≥4 and the presence of vaginal bleeding. Patients underwent intrauterine insertion of an LNG-IUD, and thereafter, received a total dose of 30 Gy at 3 Gy per fraction, over 10 days. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the uterus and disease-involved tissues in the pelvis plus a 1-cm margin. The planning target volume was obtained by adding a 1-cm isotropic margin to the CTV. A total of 9 patients with EC (median age, 85 years; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2, ≥88.8%; obesity, 55.5%; median CCI, 5) received an LNG-IUD plus RT. An early complete resolution of bleeding was documented in 8 patients (88.8%), while the remaining patient experienced a marked improvement. The median duration of bleeding control was 18 months, while the 2-year actuarial rate of bleeding-free survival was 53.3% (median follow-up time, 20 months; range, 9-60 months). No LNG-IUD- or severe RT-related complications were documented. Overall, a high rate of bleeding remission, durable bleeding-free survival in face of the easy intrauterine insertion of an LNG-IUD and a negligible toxicity profile of the complete treatment were documented in this study, indicating a requirement for further investigation in a larger series.

  9. Prescribing contraceptives for women with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V; Ross, Ruth

    2011-07-01

    Although women with serious mental illness have high rates of lifetime sexual partners, they infrequently use contraception. Consequently, the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections is high in this population. In addition, while the overall rate of pregnancy in women with schizophrenia of child-bearing age is lower than in the general population, the percentage of pregnancies that are unwanted is higher than that in the general population. The objective of this paper is to help clinicians explore knowledge of appropriate methods of contraception for women who suffer from schizophrenia. The authors reviewed recent literature on the use of contraceptive methods by women with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic and adjunctive medications. Contraceptive counseling to women and their partners is an important part of comprehensive care for women with serious and persistent mental illness. Women with schizophrenia who smoke, are overweight, or have diabetes, migraine, cardiovascular disease, or a family history of breast cancer should be offered non-hormonal contraception. Women with more than one sexual partner should be advised on barrier methods in addition to any other contraceptive measures they are using. Clinicians should be alert for potential interactions among oral hormonal contraceptives, smoking, and therapeutic drugs. Long-lasting contraceptive methods, such as intrauterine devices, progesterone depot injections, or tubal ligation are reasonable options for women having no wish to further expand their families.

  10. Chronic vulvovaginal candidiasis in patients using a levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yvonne; Fischer, Gayle

    2018-02-01

    Chronic vulvovaginal candidiasis is usually responsive to therapy with oral antifungals. We present a case series of 13 patients with this condition who were also using a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). All cases responded to ongoing oral fluconazole therapy while the LNG-IUS was in situ. The LNG-IUS was removed in six patients and of these, two experienced clinical improvement with lower fluconazole dosage requirements and three experienced complete resolution of symptoms. One remains on fluconazole 100 mg daily. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  11. Contraceptive discontinuation and switching among couples receiving integrated HIV and family planning services in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lisa; Wall, Kristin M; Vwalika, Bellington; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Kilembe, William; Stephenson, Rob; Chomba, Elwyn; Vwalika, Cheswa; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2013-10-01

    To describe predictors of contraceptive method discontinuation and switching behaviours among HIV-positive couples receiving couples' voluntary HIV counselling and testing services in Lusaka, Zambia. Couples were randomized in a factorial design to two-family planning educational intervention videos, received comprehensive family planning services and were assessed every 3 months for contraceptive initiation, discontinuation and switching. We modelled factors associated with contraceptive method upgrading and downgrading via multivariate Andersen-Gill models. Most women continued the initial method selected after randomization. The highest rates of discontinuation/switching were observed for injectable contraceptive and intrauterine device users. Time to discontinuing the more effective contraceptive methods or downgrading to oral contraceptives or condoms was associated with the women's younger age, desire for more children within the next year, heavy menstrual bleeding, bleeding between periods and cystitis/dysuria. Health concerns among women about contraceptive implants and male partners not wanting more children were associated with upgrading from oral contraceptives or condoms. HIV status of the woman or the couple was not predictive of switching or stopping. We found complicated patterns of contraceptive use. The predictors of contraception switching indicate that interventions targeted to younger couples that address common contraception-related misconceptions could improve effective family planning utilization. We recommend these findings be used to increase the uptake and continuation of contraception, especially long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods, and that fertility goal based, LARC-focused family planning be offered as an integral part of HIV prevention services.

  12. Contraceptive discontinuation and switching among couples receiving integrated HIV and family planning services in Lusaka, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lisa; Wall, Kristin M; Vwalika, Bellington; Htee Khu, Naw; Brill, Ilene; Kilembe, William; Stephenson, Rob; Chomba, Elwyn; Vwalika, Cheswa; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe predictors of contraceptive method discontinuation and switching behaviors among HIV positive couples receiving couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing services in Lusaka, Zambia. Design Couples were randomized in a factorial design to two family planning educational intervention videos, received comprehensive family planning services, and were assessed every 3-months for contraceptive initiation, discontinuation and switching. Methods We modeled factors associated with contraceptive method upgrading and downgrading via multivariate Andersen-Gill models. Results Most women continued the initial method selected after randomization. The highest rates of discontinuation/switching were observed for injectable contraceptive and intrauterine device users. Time to discontinuing the more effective contraceptive methods or downgrading to oral contraceptives or condoms was associated with the women's younger age, desire for more children within the next year, heavy menstrual bleeding, bleeding between periods, and cystitis/dysuria. Health concerns among women about contraceptive implants and male partners not wanting more children were associated with upgrading from oral contraceptives or condoms. HIV status of the woman or the couple was not predictive of switching or stopping. Conclusions We found complicated patterns of contraceptive use. The predictors of contraception switching indicate that interventions targeted to younger couples that address common contraception-related misconceptions could improve effective family planning utilization. We recommend these findings be used to increase the uptake and continuation of contraception, especially long acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods, and that fertility-goal based, LARC-focused family planning be offered as an integral part of HIV prevention services. PMID:24088689

  13. IDM release behavior and surface characteristics of the novel Cu/IDM/LDPE nanocomposite for intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihong; Xie, Changsheng; Xiang, Hua; Feng, Jinqing; Xia, Xianping; Cai, Shuizhou

    2009-03-01

    Copper/indomethacin/low-density polyethylene (Cu/IDM/LDPE) nanocomposite was prepared as a novel material for intra-uterine device (IUD). IDM release profile of the nanocomposite was investigated by using spectrophotometer. The results show that IDM release rate of Cu/IDM/LDPE nanocomposite is higher in simulated uterine solution than that in methanol, confirming that the release process of IDM is dominated mainly by pore diffusion. The decrease in copper particle size and the increase in copper mass content all accelerate IDM release, indicating that IDM release rate can be adjusted by changing copper loading or copper particle size. The surface of the incubated nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. A few deposits composed of P, Cl, Ca, Cu and O were observed on the nanocomposite surface, which may be related to the presence of IDM particles with large particle size.

  14. Twelve-month comparative multicenter study of the TCu 380A and ML 250 intrauterine devices in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinprayoon, D; Gilmore, C; Farr, G; Amatya, R

    1998-10-01

    The long-term effectiveness of the copper-bearing intrauterine device (IUD) has been documented. This paper reports 12-month results from a multiyear comparative study of the Copper T (TCu) 380A and Multiload (ML) 250 IUD in Bangkok, Thailand, among 1396 women. Continuation of the assigned IUD was relatively high after 12 months of use, with continuation rates of 90.17 and 87.54 per 100 women, respectively. Whereas the accidental pregnancy rate was higher for the ML 250 IUD than for the TCu 380A IUD (1.0 and 0.2 per 100 women, respectively), this difference was not considered statistically significant (p TCu 380A IUD (4.61 and 2.40 per 100 women, respectively, p = 0.05).

  15. A study on the use of Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device (Metraplant) in the treatment of Perimenopausal Dysfunctional Menorrhagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, Mohamed-Ezz-Eldin A.; Hemaly, Abdu-El-Karim; Kandil, Ahmad K.; Ahmed, Saeed A. I.; Ahmoudo, H.

    2006-01-01

    The role of Metraplant as a levonogrestrel releasing intrauterine device in the treatment of dysfunctional menorrhagia was evaluated. Fifty women with a failed trial of medical therapy and awaiting hysterectomy were treated with Metraplant. Menstrual blood loss was estimated using bleeding index (BI) and total bleeding score/month (TBS/mo) together with estimation of haemoglobin concentration and serum feritin preinsertion and at 6 and 12 months. The bleeding patterns in the form of mean BI and mean TBS/mo decreased significantly (p<0.001) one year after the device was used in the responded group (38) of the regularly followed up women. The mean haemoblobin concentration and mean serum ferritin were increased significantly one after the device was used (p<0.001 and p, 0.05 respectively). The mean endometrial thickness increased significantly (p<0.001) one year after using the device. Metraplant was found to be a good alternative to the oral therapy and hysterectomy in the treatment of perimenopausal dysfunctional menorrhagia. (author)

  16. Three-dimensional versus two-dimensional ultrasound for assessing levonorgestrel intrauterine device location: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Carla Maria Araujo; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Torloni, Maria Regina; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Guazzelli, Cristina Aparecida Falbo

    2016-02-01

    To compare the rates of success of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) sonographic (US) examinations in locating and adequately visualizing levonorgestrel intrauterine devices (IUDs) and to explore factors associated with the unsuccessful viewing on 2D US. Transvaginal 2D and 3D US examinations were performed on all patients 1 month after insertion of levonorgestrel IUDs. The devices were considered adequately visualized on 2D US if both the vertical (shadow, upper and lower extremities) and the horizontal (two echogenic lines) shafts were identified. 3D volumes were also captured to assess the location of levonorgestrel IUDs on 3D US. Thirty women were included. The rates of adequate device visualization were 40% on 2D US (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.6; 57.7) and 100% on 3D US (95% CI, 88.6; 100.0). The device was not adequately visualized in all six women who had a retroflexed uterus, but it was adequately visualized in 12 of the 24 women (50%) who had a nonretroflexed uterus (95% CI, -68.6; -6.8). We found that 3D US is better than 2D US for locating and adequately visualizing levonorgestrel IUDs. Other well-designed studies with adequate power should be conducted to confirm this finding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Conservative management in ureteric hydronephrosis due to deep endometriosis: Could the levonorgestrel-intrauterine device be an option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, Elisa; Tejerizo, Álvaro; Muñoz, José Luis; Álvarez, Carmen; Marqueta, Laura; Jiménez, Jesús S

    2017-07-01

    Endometriosis can affect up to 10% of women of reproductive age, in a wide range of clinical presentations that vary from mild to severe or deep endometriosis. Deep endometriosis can affect the urinary tract in 1-5% to 15-25% cases. Even though deep endometriosis' surgeries are usually complex with higher rate of complications, conservative management is not always considered as an option because of its high failure rates. This paper describes two cases of deep endometriosis with ureteric involvement (hydronephrosis) treated conservatively with a double-pigtail stent plus a Levonorgestrel intrauterine device, after conservative surgery, who remained symptom free with no evidence of recurrence at 3 years follow-up, avoiding radical high-risk surgery. Impact statement Several treatments have been described for endometriosis. From a symptomatic perspective, conservative medical management has been proposed with a variable response. Concerning deep endometriosis (affecting the urinary or digestive tract), the definitive treatment has always been thought to be radical surgery. However, this can lead to several complications. To illustrate a possible more conservative approach this paper describes two cases of deep infiltrating endometriosis affecting the ureter, treated conservatively with a temporary pigtail ureter stent plus a Levonorgestrel intrauterine device. The management demonstrates that, in a selected population, conservative treatment solves the urinary disease avoiding the surgical complications and, what is more, improving patients' symptoms in a permanent way. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm whether the introduction of this management in clinical practice would reduce the need for surgery thereby, avoiding high-risk surgery and improving the success rate of conservative management.

  18. Immunologic evaluation of the endometrium with a levonorgestrel intrauterine device in solid organ transplant women and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Caron R; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Magpantay, Larry; Magyar, Clara; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Rible, Radhika; Sullivan, Peggy

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to describe the endometrial milieu of stable transplant patients and healthy women before and after levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) insertion. Women between 18 and 45 years of age desiring LNG-IUS insertion were enrolled with a 2:1 ratio of healthy to stable solid organ transplant patients. The first visit entailed a blood draw, uterine lavage and endometrial biopsy followed by LNG-IUS insertion. Follow-up visit involved a repeat serum draw, uterine lavage and endometrial biopsy. Cytokine levels were measured in the uterine lavage and serum by quantifying inflammatory biomarkers. Immunohistochemistry staining was performed on the endometrial tissue to measure macrophage levels. Statistical analysis included a nonparametric analysis that compared medians of the marker levels before and after intrauterine device (IUD) insertion within the group and between the two groups. Sixteen participants completed the study: 5 solid organ transplant patients and 11 healthy patients. For the serum, there were no marked changes in the cytokines or soluble receptor levels in either group after IUD insertion. However, in the uterine lavage, there was an increase in cytokine levels post-IUD insertion for both healthy and transplant women. For the endometrial tissue, there was evidence of macrophage activity in both groups after device insertion. This pilot study investigated the uterine environment of the transplant patient population. Findings have pointed to the strong local inflammatory response following LNG-IUS insertion for the transplant recipients. In addition, these preliminary findings will help power a larger study that can investigate the safety and effectiveness of the IUD in this patient population. Findings from this pilot study suggest that the IUD is inducing a local inflammatory reaction in the uterus of the transplant patient as in the healthy control. A larger study can build on these preliminary results to pursue the efficacy and

  19. Contraception Delivery in Pediatric and Specialist Pediatric Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskowitz, Alexa; Quint, Elisabeth; Zochowski, Melissa; Caldwell, Amy; Vinekar, Kavita; Dalton, Vanessa K

    2017-04-01

    To characterize pediatricians' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy around contraception. Cross-sectional survey. United States. National sample of pediatricians. Assessment of behaviors of providing contraception. Reproductive health practice score. Two hundred twenty-three usable surveys were received, from 163 contraceptive prescribers and 60 nonprescribers. The mean reproductive health practice score was 43.1 (SD, 8.2; total possible score, 84). Prescribers differed in their mean reproductive health score (46.0; SD, 7.0) from nonprescribers (34.0; SD, 4.5; P contraception. More prescribers believed it was their responsibility to ask about patients' need for birth control, were confident in their ability to prescribe contraception options, and provided contraception to minors despite parental disapproval. Neither group was confident in their ability to place intrauterine devices or believed that the literature supports intrauterine device placement in adolescents. Only efficacy was related to prescribing contraception in a multivariate regression analysis (odds ratio, 1.7; P contraception prescribers but the overall reproductive health score was low for prescribers and nonprescribers. The odds of prescribing contraception increased with higher self-efficacy scores rather than knowledge alone. Many prescribers and nonprescribers would not prescribe birth control if parents disapproved and do not believe it is their responsibility to assess patients' need for birth control. In addition very few pediatricians have training in long-acting reversible contraception, despite being the recommended method for adolescents. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Intrauterine Device in Women with Diabetes Mellitus Type I and II: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstuck, Norman D; Steyn, Petrus S

    2013-12-11

    Background. Women with diabetes mellitus type I and type II need effective contraception for personal and medical reasons. Long acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods are among the most efficient and cost-effective methods. Study Design. We searched the Popline, PubMed, and clinicaltrials.gov databases from 1961 to March 2013 for studies on the efficacy of the IUD in diabetic women and the possible changes it may produce in laboratory parameters. Studies of at least 30 subjects with DM1 or DM2 who were studied for 6 to 12 months depending on the method of analysis were eligible. Results. The search produced seven articles which gave event rate efficacy evaluable results and three which evaluated the effect of the IUD on laboratory parameters. One of the earlier efficacy studies showed an abnormally high pregnancy rate which sparked a controversy which is discussed in the Introduction section. The remaining 6 studies produced acceptable pregnancy rates. The three laboratory studies showed that the copper and levonorgestrel releasing IUD/IUS do not affect the diabetic state in any way. Conclusions. The copper bearing and levonorgestrel releasing IUDs are safe and effective in women with diabetes type I and diabetes type II although the evidence in the latter is limited.

  1. INTRAUTERINE DEVICE (TCU 380 A: EFFICACY AND COMPLICATIONS AMONG IT'S USERS (ISFAHAN, 1996 - 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B KHANI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Modern IUDs are as effective as surgical contraception long acting, reversible and medically safe. This study was performed to evaluate efficacy and complications of IUD TCU 380 among users of this IUO in referred women to Isfahan health centers. Methods. In this study, we inserted IUD TCU 380 A in 767 porous women who get their health cares in Isfahan health centers. They were followed for one year in four visits (1 week, 1, 6 and 12 months after insertion. Findings. Success rate was 99.3 percent. The most frequent complication was hyper menorrhea (44.4 percent, and the majority of complications occurred 7 to 8 months after IUD insertion. Pap smears were normal in 55.3 percent of women. Removal rate was 13.8 percent and the most frequent cause of it, was hyper menorrhea. Expulsion rate was 3.4 percent and PID was seen in 0.4 percent of them. The major recommended sources for putting IUD were health centers (76.7 percent, and 90 percent of couples were satisfied with this method. Conclusion. IUD TCU 380 A is safe and effective and represents a suitable contraceptive method for the appropriate patient.

  2. Oral contraceptives, other methods of contraception, and risk reduction for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, R B; Grisso, J A; Vergona, R; Klapper, J; Morgan, M; Wheeler, J E

    2001-05-01

    Oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the impact of other methods of contraception has not been fully explored. This population-based, case-control study involved women 20-69 years of age who had ever had intercourse. We compared cases with a recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer (N = 727) with community controls (N = 1,360). All methods of contraception evaluated were associated with a reduced risk for ovarian cancer. After adjustment for age, race, pregnancies, and family history of ovarian cancer, the odds ratios for ever-use of each method as compared with never-use were: oral contraceptives for contraception, 0.6 (95% confidence interval = 0.5-0.8); intrauterine device, 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-1.0); barrier methods, 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-0.9); tubal ligation, 0.5 (95% confidence interval 0.4-0.7); and vasectomy, 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-1.1). Nulligravid women were not protected by any of these contraceptive methods. Multigravid women, however, were protected by all methods. We conclude that various methods of contraception reduce ovarian cancer risk. This effect does not appear to result from contraceptive use being a nonspecific marker of fertility. The results imply mechanisms other than hormonal or ovulatory by which ovarian cancer risk is reduced.

  3. Nonoperative management of atypical endometrial hyperplasia and grade 1 endometrial cancer with the levonorgestrel intrauterine device in medically ill post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William D; Pierce, Stuart R; Mills, Anne M; Gehrig, Paola A; Duska, Linda R

    2017-07-01

    To assess the endometrial response rates to treatment with the levonorgestrel intrauterine device in post-menopausal women with atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia and grade 1 endometrioid (AH/EC) endometrial carcinoma who are not surgical candidates. Chart review was undertaken of patients with AH/EC who underwent levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion by a gynecologic oncologist within two academic health systems between 2002 and 2013. When available, tissue blocks were evaluated with immunohistochemical staining for progesterone receptor expression. A total of 41 patients received treatment for AH/EC with the levonorgestrel intrauterine device. Follow up sufficient to assess response occurred in 36 women (88%). Complete response was documented in 18 of 36 women (50%), no response in 8 patients (22%), partial response in 3 women (8%) and progression of disease in 7 patients (19%). Four of 18 patients with complete response (22%) later experienced relapse of hyperplasia or cancer. Four patients (10%) died during the study period: none had evidence of metastatic disease and 1 of the 4 woman died of perioperative complications following hysterectomy for stage I disease. Patients responding to treatment had significantly lower progesterone receptor expression on post-treatment biopsies. Intrauterine levonorgestrel is a viable treatment option for post-menopausal women with AH/EC who are poor candidates for standard surgical management. The response rate in this series is similar to published reports in premenopausal patients and includes cases of disease recurrence following conversion to benign endometrium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Contraceptive choices of women in rural Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbu, B; Onwere, S; Aluka, C; Kamanu, C; Okoro, O; Feyi-Waboso, P

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the contraceptive choices and usage of women in rural Aba, Southeastern Nigeria, and identify factors influencing their choice and usage of modern contraceptive methods. The records of new and old acceptors of family planning methods between 1 November 2005 and 31 October 2007 at the reproductive health clinic of a primary health care center in Osisioma Ngwa local government area in the suburb ofAba, were reviewed and analyzed. Qualitative data was collected by in-depth interviews (IDIs) of 88 out of 188 clients whose records were analyzed. Majority of the clients (71.8%) accepted injectable hormonal contraceptives followed by the intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) (14.4%). Sub-dermal contraceptive implants were accepted by 6.9% of the women and female sterilization by 3.2%. The oral contraceptive pills and the male condom were the least accepted by the clients. Only 2.1% of the contraceptive acceptors were adolescents. The modal age of the acceptors was 30 years and the average age 33.4 years while the age range was 18-51 years. The average parity was 4.7 while the modal parity was 5. The indication for contraception was child spacing in 30% of the clients and permanent limitation of the family size in 70% of the clients. Attitude of the women to the various methods of contraception was an important factor influencing contraceptive choices of the women interviewed. The study has shown that the most commonly used contraceptive method in rural Southeastern Nigeria is the injectable hormonal contraceptives. Strategies to increase contraceptive use in rural Nigeria must include improving delivery of correct and adequate information about the available contraceptive methods.

  5. Short-term copper intrauterine device placement improves the implantation and pregnancy rates in women with repeated implantation failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Qiuju; Kuang, Yanping; Zhang, Shaozhen

    2017-07-01

    To study if hysteroscopy and short-term copper intrauterine device placement (Cu-IUD) improves the pregnancy rates of women with repeated implantation failure (RIF) undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET). Retrospective study. Medical university hospital. Infertile women with at least two implantation failures with the use of at least one good-quality embryo. All patients received operative hysteroscopy in the follicular cycle, and if endometrial polyps, polypoid endometrium, or intrauterine adhesions were found they were removed. In some patients, a Cu-IUD was inserted immediately after hysteroscopy and removed after two menstrual periods before embryo implantation. All patients underwent in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection and FET. Clinical pregnancy and implantation rates. A total of 440 women with a mean age of 33.42 ± 4.45 years (range 23-47 y) were included. There were 382 patients (554 cycles) in the IUD group and 58 patients (87 cycles) in the non-IUD group. The two groups were similar regarding age, body mass index, and infertility factors. The IUD group had a significantly higher implantation rate (29.29% vs. 16.56%), chemical pregnancy rate (53.25 vs. 41.38%), and clinical pregnancy rate (45.13% vs. 26.44%) than the non-IUD group. Multivariable regression analysis indicated that the odds of a chemical pregnancy was significantly increased with IUD usage. Cu-IUD placement for two menstrual cycles at the time of hysteroscopy can improve the implantation and pregnancy rates in women with RIF. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Contraception coverage and methods used among women in South Africa: A national household survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M F Chersich

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Globally, family planning services are being strengthened and the range of contraceptive choices expanded. Data on contraceptive coverage and service gaps could help to shape these initiatives. Objective. To assess contraception coverage in South Africa (SA and identify underserved populations and aspects of programming that require strengthening. Methods. Data from a 2012 SA household survey assessed contraception coverage among 6 296 women aged 15 - 49 years and identified underserved populations. Results. Two-thirds had an unintended pregnancy in the past 5 years, a quarter of which were contraceptive failures. Most knew of injectable (92.0% and oral contraception (89.9%, but fewer of intrauterine devices (56.1% and emergency contraception (47.3%. Contraceptive prevalence was 49.1%, and 41.8% women used modern non-barrier methods. About half had ever used injectable contraception. Contraception was lower in black Africans and younger women, who used a limited range of methods. Conclusion. Contraception coverage is higher than many previous estimates. Rates of unintended pregnancy, contraceptive failure and knowledge gaps, however, demonstrate high levels of unmet need, especially among black Africans and young women.

  7. Post-insertional pain following intrauterine device placement among nulliparous adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinning, K M; Jude, D C; Yoost, J L

    2018-02-17

    To quantify the "normal" adolescent experience after IUD insertion, in order to provide appropriate counseling for future adolescents. Prospective cohort study. Marshall University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology generalist and adolescent gynecology clinics. Nulliparous adolescents age 13-18 and parous adults ≥18 years receiving a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). Visual analog scale pain score (VAS) and medication log was used for data collection for two weeks after LNG-IUS. A separate chart review was completed for demographic factors and indications for procedure. VAS pain scores and medication use was compared between groups. 93 subjects returned the VAS record and medication log (46 adolescents and 47 adults). There was no difference in the incidence of endometriosis or dysmenorrhea, but there was a higher prevalence of menorrhagia among adolescents (65.2% vs 21.3%, p= 5 during the first three days, p=0.022. A statistical difference in amount of ibuprofen recorded was only noted on day 1 (p=.023) and day 4 (p=.046). Nulliparous adolescents undergoing LNG-IUS placement experience more post-insertional discomfort compared to parous adults; however, this method should still be considered first-line in this age group. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Current issues in contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnach, Mary L; Long, Margaret E; Casey, Petra M

    2013-03-01

    Contraceptive management in women should take into account patient lifestyle and coexisting medical issues as well as method safety, efficacy, and noncontraceptive benefits. This review focuses on common and timely issues related to contraception encountered in clinical practice, including migraine headaches and associated risk of ischemic stroke, the use of combined hormonal contraception along with citalopram and escitalopram, contraceptive efficacy and safety in the setting of obesity, contraceptives for treatment of menorrhagia, the association of intrauterine contraception and decreased risk of cervical cancer, and the association of venous thromboembolism and combined hormonal contraception. Recent trends supporting the use of long-acting reversible contraception are also reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in copper and zinc serum levels in women wearing a copper TCu-380A intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Somaieh; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Roudbar-Mohammadi, Shahla; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of the copper intrauterine device (IUD) TCu-380A, on copper and zinc serum levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS This longitudinal study enrolled 121 women attending Health Centres in Tehran between November 2011 and August 2012. A blood sample was obtained before use and three months after insertion of a TCu-380A IUD. Serum levels of copper and zinc were measured for the 101 women who had completed three months with the device in situ. Analyses of change included paired t-tests, McNemar tests and linear regression. RESULTS Significant elevations in mean serum levels were found for both copper (170.22 μg/dl at three months vs.160.40 μg/dl at baseline, p = 0.034) and zinc (107.67 μg/dl at three months vs. 94.61 μg/dl at baseline, p TCu-380A IUD insertion. Zinc levels too had risen significantly, which was quite unexpected, and warrants further investigation.

  10. Emergency contraception – a neglected option for birth control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka R. Gunardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception (EC is any method of contraception which is used after intercourse and before the potential time of implantation, in order to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected sexual intercourse, or cases of rape. Use of emergency contraception could halve the number of unintended pregnancies and the consequent need for abortion, but unfortunately many medical professionals and the public are not aware of it. Two methods are available for emergency contraception, namely emergency contraception pills (ECPs and copper-bearing intrauterine devices (Cu-IUDs. There are two regimens of ECP, the levonorgestrel regimen and combined regimen. The levonorgestrel regimen is preferred as it is more effective and causes less side effects. ECPs should be administered as soon as possible after unprotected or inadequately protected sex, being most effective if initiated within 24 hours. Cu-IUDs can be inserted up to 5 days after unprotected sexual intercourse. Emergency contraception mainly works by preventing fertilization, and does not interrupt and established pregnancy. Emergency contraception is very safe, therefore can be offered to women who have had unprotected intercourse and wish to prevent pregnancy. It must only be used as a backup method of birth control. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:248-52. doi: 10.13181/mji.v22i4.609Keywords: Birth control, copper-IUD, emergency contraception, emergency contraceptive pills, levonorgestrel

  11. Advances in contraception: new options for postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Rebecca L; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2017-05-01

    short interval repeat pregnancy increases maternal and neonatal morbidity, and provision of postpartum contraception provides primary protection against these adverse outcomes. Confusion regarding effects on breast feeding and thrombosis risk delaying initiation of contraception in the immediate post-partum interval. Delaying contraception provision until the 6-week postpartum visit misses many women who either do not attend or have resumed ovulation and/or intercourse prior to this visit. Because of this, recent studies have looked into initiation of highly effective contraceptive methods at earlier intervals including immediately postpartum. These data provide strong evidence for immediate post-partum initiation of the most effective long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods, intrauterine devices and implants. Areas covered: We review the data for safety and efficacy, timing of initiation, and continuation rates of various contraceptive methods in the postpartum period. We also evaluate effects on initiation and continuation of breastfeeding for each contraceptive method discussed. Expert opinion: It is important to counsel patients antenatally regarding the full spectrum of contraceptive options available with a focus on long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods. When a woman chooses a LARC method, her provider should consider placement in the immediate postpartum period.

  12. Sometimes You Do Get a Second Chance: Emergency Contraception for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Ellen S; Issac, Veronica

    2017-04-01

    Unplanned or unintended pregnancy remains a significant challenge for adolescents; many teens who plan ahead but opt not to choose long-acting reversible contraceptive methods have high failure rates with condom usage, oral contraceptives, and other less long-acting methods. Emergency contraception (EC) remains a necessity for those adolescents seeking a second chance to prevent the unintended consequences of unplanned sexual activity. At present, 5 postcoital methods remain available as EC globally: intrauterine devices, ulipristal acetate, a selective progesterone modulator, mifepristone; levonorgestrel, and ethinyl estradiol plus levonorgestrel or norgestrel (rarely used now that progestin only methods are more readily available). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Intra-uterine Device in Soweto and Other Townships | Spilhaus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uterine device (IUD) is discussed against a background of well over 25000 insertions, A Lippes loop series and a Dalkon Shield evaluation are presented. Insertions into nulliparous young women, and post-Caesarean cases are discussed, and the ...

  14. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device in the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding: a 6- and 12-month morphological and clinical follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmara, Vittorio; Sturlese, Emanuele; Villari, Daniela; Giacobbe, Valentina; Retto, Annalisa; Santoro, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is defined as any alteration in the pattern or volume of menstrual blood flow, and it is preferably treated using hysterectomy, endometrial destruction or the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (Mirena(®) ). Recently, it has been demonstrated that studies of Mirena(®) were generally small and consequently imprecise. Our study was aimed at assessing the effects of a slow-release levonorgestrel (20 μg/day) intrauterine device in fertile and postmenopausal women experiencing abnormal uterine bleeding that did not respond to traditional medical management. A total of 40 women, of whom 24 were of reproductive capacity and 16 were postmenopausal, were enrolled in the trial. Removal of the intrauterine device was required for only 2 of the 24 fertile women and for only 3 of the 16 postmenopausal women. After 6 and 12 months of treatment, the remaining women were clinically evaluated and underwent ultrasound and hysteroscopy using biopsy specimens as a control. The EuroQol Group EQ-5D questionnaire was used for evaluation of quality of life. The device showed good tolerability and efficacy. It resulted in a reduction in the endometrial mucosal thickness with a regression of bleeding and collateral effects, which were more evident after 12 months of treatment. A positive effect of the device on the woman's quality of life was demonstrated. The slow-release levonorgestrel intrauterine device may be a valid therapeutic tool for treating basic symptomatology and increasing quality of life in women with abnormal uterine bleeding. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Low Knowledge of Contraceptive Methods Among Pregnant Teens in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Milena Bastos; Alves, Fernanda Scoppetta Sampaio; Souza, Marlene Quadro; Requião, Samara Rezende

    2017-12-30

    To describe knowledge and use of contraceptive methods among pregnant teens in Brazil. A cross-sectional survey. A tertiary care center in Bahia, Brazil. Pregnant teens 10-19 years old INTERVENTION: Participants were asked about contraceptive knowledge and previous contraceptive use. Contraceptive knowledge; previous contraceptive use; and contraceptive intentions for after pregnancy. Other survey topics included demographic characteristics, school attendance and sexual history. A total of 90 participants were included in the study, with an average age of 15.4 ± 1.7 years, and a mean age at first sexual intercourse of 13.8 ± 1.2 years. A majority of participants were unmarried (65%), of mixed race (63%), had a household income below minimum wage (63%), lived with their parents (60%), and unemployment (90%). More than 80% were not using contraception or were using it irregularly when they became pregnant. A majority of participants reported knowledge of condoms (91%), of the combined oral contraceptive pill (83%) and of injectable contraceptives (76%). However, less than half (42%) reported knowledge of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods (LARCs). In terms of contraceptive intentions after pregnancy, the most commonly cited methods were the contraceptive injection (40%), the intrauterine device (19%) and the combined pill (10%). This study found low knowledge of contraceptive methods, and especially of LARCs, among pregnant teens in Northeast Brazil. Low socioeconomic status and high rates of unplanned pregnancy may be reasons for insufficient sexual and reproductive health counseling in this population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Effect of counseling on contraceptive uptake in Nigeria | Balogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The commonest preferred contraceptive pre- and post-counseling was intrauterine device (36.5% vs. 53.5%); increased post-counseling desire was reported for injectables (28.8% vs. 35.4%) and implant (0% vs. 3.1%). Preferences increased post-counseling for highly effective methods (38.1% vs. 60.4%; p<0.0001), long ...

  17. Attitudes of physicians providing family planning services in Egypt about recommending intrauterine device for family planning clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Mirette; Ahmed, Sabra; Ahmed, Boshra

    2017-12-01

    To assess the attitudes of physicians providing family planning services at the public sector in Egypt about recommending intrauterine device (IUD) for family planning clients, and to identify the factors that could affect their attitudes. A descriptive cross sectional study, in which all the physicians providing family planning services in Assiut Governorate were invited to complete self-administered questionnaires. The study participants were recruited at the family planning sector monthly meetings of the 13 health directorates of Assiut Governorate, Upper Egypt. 250 physicians accepted to participate in the study. Bivariate and Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the most important predictors of recommending IUD to family planning clients when appropriate. Less than 50% of physicians would recommend IUD for clients with proper eligibility criteria; women younger than 20 years old (49.2%), women with history of ectopic pregnancy (34%), history of pelvic inflammatory diseases (40%) or sexually transmitted diseases (18.4%) and nulliparous women (22.8%). Receiving family planning formal training within the year preceding data collection and working in urban areas were the significant predictors of recommending IUD insertion for appropriate clients. Physicians providing family planning services in Upper Egypt have negative attitudes about recommending IUD for family planning clients. Continuous education and in-service training about the updated medical eligibility criteria, especially for physicians working in rural areas may reduce the unfounded medical restrictions for IUD use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic field interactions of copper-containing intrauterine devices in 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  19. Treatment of Women With an Endometrial Polyp and Heavy Menstrual Bleeding: A Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device or Hysteroscopic Polypectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Myrthe M; van Hanegem, Nehalennia; de Lange, Maria E; Timmermans, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature review of reports comparing a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) with transcervical polyp resection (TCRP) as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). Our second objective was to investigate the effectiveness of LNG-IUD and TCRP in reducing menstrual bleeding and the patient satisfaction with each technique. No previously reported studies have compared TCRP and LNG-IUD as treatment for HMB in premenopausal women with an endometrial polyp. Likewise, no studies are available on LNG-IUD as a treatment for HMB in the presence of an endometrial polyp. Several studies have found the LNG-IUD to be an effective treatment option for HMB, with high patient satisfaction rates. Evidence of the effectiveness of TCRP as treatment of HMB is scarce. Patient satisfaction is reported relatively good, although persistent or recurrent symptoms appear to be frequent. We conclude that no evidence is available on LNG-IUD as treatment for HMB in women with an endometrial polyp. We hypothesize that LNG-IUD could be a good alternative to TCRP for treating HMB in premenopausal women with a polyp; however, further evidence is needed, and a randomized controlled trial should be performed. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary uterine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in a patient with prolonged insertion of intrauterine device (IUD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takuya; Hatanaka, Kazuo; Kaneko, Hitomi; Shimada, Toshihide; Imada, Kazunori

    2017-07-01

    A 49-year-old female from China was referred to our hospital after endocervical polypectomy. Twenty years before admission, after the birth of her first child, an intrauterine device (IUD) had been inserted due to the one-child policy in China. She had noticed abnormal vaginal bleeding with a foul smell 3 years before admission. Then the IUD was removed and a polyp was found at the IUD contact site. Two months before admission, endocervical polypectomy was performed. Lymphoma was suspected by histological examination and she was referred to our hospital. Further examination confirmed the diagnosis of primary uterine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Subsequently, a combination of three cycles of R-CHOP regimen and involved-field radiation therapy was performed, followed by maintenance therapy with five cycles of rituximab. She has remained in complete remission for over 1 year. This case suggests that chronic inflammation induced by prolonged IUD insertion may contribute to the development of primary uterine lymphoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of DLBCL associated with prolonged IUD insertion.

  1. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Hachemian, Nilouparak [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  2. Contraceptive choice and acceptability: the future for STI risk in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiely, Frances; Saifuddin, Mohammed Syafiek

    2014-03-01

    More than 150 million women become pregnant in developing countries annually and an estimated 287,000 die from pregnancy-related causes. Contraception is vital to prevent unnecessary maternal deaths, as well as sexually transmitted infections. The objective of this study was to investigate preferred contraceptive methods and the factors that influence contraceptive choice among women in Kelantan, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study using interview-based questionnaires was conducted, during July and August 2009, in local family planning clinics in Kelantan. The questionnaire was administered to adult women (age 20-50). Prevalence of unplanned pregnancies was high (48%). Contraceptive preference was Depo contraceptive injection (32%), oral contraceptive pills (27%), intrauterine devices (15%) and contraceptive implants (12%); 9% used condoms. Only 2% used contraception to protect against sexually transmitted infections or HIV/AIDS. Younger women (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.807-0.993) were more likely to use contraception. In conclusion, non-interrupted contraceptive methods were preferred. More than 60% would stop using contraception if it interrupted intercourse. From both a public health and infectious disease perspective, this is extremely worrying.

  3. Migration of a contraceptive subcutaneous device into the pulmonary artery. Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Heudes

    2015-10-01

    Significant migration of a contraceptive implant is uncommon, and only one case of migration far from the insertion limb has been reported. Using radiopaque contraceptive implants like Nexplanon could locate them easier if a migration occurs.

  4. Contraceptive practice in China: 1970-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuntong

    2015-03-01

    Using large-scale data from the national conventional statistics and nationally representative sample surveys, the current study aims to assess the level, mode, and determinants of modern contraceptive use from 1970 to 2004 among married couples aged 20 to 49 years in China. A relatively stable Chinese mode of contraception has been established and maintained since the 1980s, characterized by prominent, long-acting contraceptive use and the highest overall prevalence in the world during the past 3 decades. In recent years, the composition of contraceptive use has changed, characterized by the increasing use of the intrauterine device and short-acting methods and a drastic decrease in male and female sterilization. However, the dominance of the long-acting methods has not undergone substantial change. The results from a multinomial logit model employed in this study indicate that family planning policy and socioeconomic and demographic factors jointly influence contraceptive choice. In particular, contraceptive choice is closely associated with the strength of family planning policy in China. © 2011 APJPH.

  5. Stagnant contraceptive sales after the Zika epidemic in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, Luis; Ali, Moazzam; Monteiro, Ilza; Fernandes, Arlete

    2017-10-01

    Our aim was to assess national hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive sales in Brazil after the Zika virus outbreak. Pharmaceutical companies based in Brazil provided data on monthly sales from September 2016 to June 2017. Data from both the public and private sectors were obtained about sales of registered, available modern contraceptive methods: combined oral contraceptive pill; progestin-only pill; vaginal and transdermal contraceptives; injectable contraceptives; long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods, including the copper-releasing intrauterine device, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and the etonogestrel-releasing subdermal implant; and emergency contraceptive pills. Seventy-eight percent of sales comprised pills, patches and vaginal rings (11.1-13.8 million cycles/units per month), followed by emergency contraceptive pills (1.8-2.6 million pills), injectables (1.2-1.4 million ampoules) and LARC methods (6500-17,000 devices). The data showed much higher sales of short-acting methods compared with more effective LARC methods. The public sector needs to strengthen its focus on ensuring better access to LARC methods through a systematic approach ensuring regular supply, improved professional skills and better demand generation to couples wishing to avoid or delay pregnancy. In Zika virus-affected areas, many women of reproductive age may want to delay or postpone pregnancy by using an effective LARC method. The public sector should review its policies on LARC, as the need for these methods especially in Zika virus endemic areas may increase. A clear emphasis on quality in services, access and use is warranted.

  6. Knowledge and choices of postpartum contraception among pregnant teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-González, Karla M; Benabe, Erika; Rivera-Rosa, Edgardo; Negrón, Ivette; Romaguera, Josefina

    2014-09-01

    To describe the general knowledge and choices of postpartum contraception among pregnant teens who, at the time of the study, ranged in age from 13 to 19 years old and were receiving prenatal care at a hospital-based prenatal clinic. Questionnaires to obtain information regarding demographic characteristics and to explore contraception knowledge and choices were voluntarily completed by 44 pregnant teens, ranging in age from 13 to 19 years old. The frequency and distribution of the variables under study were analyzed and are presented herein. Forty-four teens participated in the study. They had a mean age of 17.5 years. A significant proportion of the participants, 20 (45.5%), claimed not to know where to find information about contraception. All the participants acknowledged knowing about the male condom; as to other methods of contraception, 41 (93.2%) knew about oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), 31 (70.5%) knew about the patch, 30 (68.2%) knew about Depo-Provera, and 25 (56.8%) knew about intrauterine devices (IUD). The contraception methods about which the participants reported having the least knowledge were the sponge, the diaphragm, implants, the vaginal ring, and various natural methods. The majority (90.0%) of the participants agreed that they would prefer to use postpartum contraception. The contraceptive method of choice for postpartum contraception was the IUD (40%), which was followed in terms of preference by OCPs (17.5%), the patch (12.5%), and Depo-Provera (12.5%). The majority of the pregnant teens who participated in the study professed the desire to use some sort of contraceptive method to ensure that they would not become pregnant again in the near future. To that end, most of them expressed a preference for the IUD, one of the most effective contraceptive methods available today. Nevertheless, they need more access to and information about available contraceptive methods.

  7. Current contraceptive awareness and use in Greek dental school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinas, Konstantinos; Ahiropoulos, Vasilis; Mavromatidis, Georgios; Chatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Zepiridis, Leonidas; Theodoridis, Theodoros; Gkoutzioulis, Fotios; Delkos, Dimitrios; Rousso, David

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a pilot study in female dental school students in Northern Greece in order to assess their awareness and practice of contraception. The study population consisted of 88 female graduating students of the dental school. A self-administered, anonymous questionnaire was designed to explore students' awareness and use of contraceptive methods. Condoms were the most widely used contraceptive method (they were used by 52.3% of the students); 20.5% of the students were using condoms in alternation or together with coitus interruptus, and 6.8% were using only coitus interruptus. The oral contraceptive pill (OC) was used as the only contraceptive method by 4.5% of the students and in combination with condoms by 9.1% of them. The majority (53.4%) considered condoms as the most effective contraceptive method; 9.1% of the students answered "sterilization" and the same percentage stated "intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD)." Overall, 20.5% of the students believed that the OC increases the risk of cancer, and 36.4% did not know if there is an association between OC use and risk of cancer. Among students not using OC, the respective percentages were 23.7% and 42.1%. among the students, 59.1% had asked their gynecologist about contraception. The contraceptive method used and the perception regarding the most effective contraceptive method did not differ significantly between those who had consulted their gynecologist and those who had not. Dental school students in Greece appear to have inaccurate knowledge on important contraceptive issues, and this is reflected in their contraceptive practices. There is a pressing need to provide scientifically based sexual education if we are to avoid unwanted pregnancies.

  8. National network television news coverage of contraception - a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Elizabeth W; Moniz, Michelle H; Hughes, Lauren S; Buis, Lorraine; Howell, Joel

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to describe and analyze national network television news framing of contraception, recognizing that onscreen news can influence the public's knowledge and beliefs. We used the Vanderbilt Television News Archives and LexisNexis Database to obtain video and print transcripts of all relevant national network television news segments covering contraception from January 2010 to June 2014. We conducted a content analysis of 116 TV news segments covering contraception during the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. Segments were quantitatively coded for contraceptive methods covered, story sources used, and inclusion of medical and nonmedical content (intercoder reliability using Krippendorf's alpha ranged 0.6-1 for coded categories). Most (55%) news stories focused on contraception in general rather than specific methods. The most effective contraceptive methods were rarely discussed (implant, 1%; intrauterine device, 4%). The most frequently used sources were political figures (40%), advocates (25%), the general public (25%) and Catholic Church leaders (16%); medical professionals (11%) and health researchers (4%) appeared in a minority of stories. A minority of stories (31%) featured medical content. National network news coverage of contraception frequently focuses on contraception in political and social terms and uses nonmedical figures such as politicians and church leaders as sources. This focus deemphasizes the public health aspect of contraception, leading medical professionals and health content to be rarely featured. Media coverage of contraception may influence patients' views about contraception. Understanding the content, sources and medical accuracy of current media portrayals of contraception may enable health care professionals to dispel popular misperceptions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Use of the bio-active intrauterine devices TCu 200 and IPCS 52 during the post-partum period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, P; Bravo, C; Waskaz, C; Andrade, M I; Bravo, M; Caceres, R; Castro, J; Miranda, L; Namur, L; Olmos, G

    1984-03-01

    The author presents a comparative analysis of results obtained in a follow-up study of the 1st 12 months following insertion immediately postpartum (following delivery) of the TCu200 and IPCS 52 IUDs in a group of 400 women. The devices were inserted either manually or by using a plastic insertion aid at the maternity unit of the Barros Luco-Trudeau Hospital, Santiago, Chile, between November 1978-February 1980. The devices were retained during the 1st 12 months in 86.1% of the cases in which the TCu200 was inserted manually, 86.3% of cases in which they were inserted using the plastic aid, 59.3% of those cases in which the IPCS devices were inserted manually, and 57.2% of cases in which the IPCS was inserted using the aid. The different levels of retention among the 2 groups was due mainly to the high levels of expulsion in the IPCS 52 patients. The expulsion levels in the TCu200 groups were 9.2 and 8.1% respectively and 35.8 and 35.2% in the IPCS 52 groups. Although an IUD contraceptive system involving progesterone was selected in order to reduce bleeding and pain associated with the IUD, the incidence of such reactions was no lower in the IPCS 52 groups than in the others. However, specific levels of dysmenorrhea were significantly lower (p0.05) among IPCS 52 groups than among TCu200 groups. In general, results obtained with the TCu200 were better than those obtained with the IPCS 52, and the insertion method had no influence on the recorded reactions. (author's modified)

  10. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-01-01

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls.

  11. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadir, Y.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Tromberg, B.J.

    1995-12-26

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls. 5 figs.

  12. Clinical versus laboratory screening for sexually transmitted infections prior to insertion of intrauterine contraception among women living with HIV/AIDS: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaire, Othman; Byamugisha, Josaphat Kayogoza; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Does laboratory testing after syndromic screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) reduce the rate of intrauterine contraception (IUC) removal among women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA)? Additional laboratory testing after syndromic screening for STIs did not affect the likelihood that a woman would remove an IUC immediately or within 1 year of IUC use or the frequency of post-insertion unscheduled clinic visits. In low-risk WLHA, the incidence rate of IUC removal is low with or without laboratory testing. Fear of infectious morbidity remains an obstacle to uptake of IUC by WLHA. The value of laboratory testing after syndromic screening for STI before the insertion of IUC remains uncertain. We enrolled WLHA from 2 September to 6 December 2013 and followed them up to 31 December 2014. After syndromic screening, 703 women free of STIs were randomized to either additional laboratory screening or no additional screening for STI before IUC insertion. The randomization sequence was generated by an independent statistician and randomization numbers placed in opaque sequentially numbered sealed envelopes. All women randomized had an IUC inserted and in all 672 participants completed the 1-year follow-up. The study staff who followed up the participants were blinded to the study allocation groups. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were used to compare the incidence rates of IUC removal, unscheduled clinic attendance and IUC continuation between the two groups. Women eligible to participate were 18-49 years old at study entry, in a relationship with a male partner, wanted to avoid pregnancy for at least 1 year and were undergoing HIV/AIDS care at Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire and up to four follow-up questionnaires until discontinuation of IUC, loss to follow-up or end of study observation after 12 months. The rate of IUC removal was 8.8% (29/331) in the no additional screening group and 8.0% (27/341) in the additional laboratory

  13. Knowledge and utilization of contraceptive devices among unmarried undergraduate students of a tertiary institution in Kano State, Nigeria 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zainab Datti; Sule, Ibrahim Baffa; Abolaji, Mohammed Lukman; Mohammed, Yahaya; Nguku, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Students in the universities mostly live independently from their parents or guardians, some of them for the first time. This gives them freedom and opportunity for high risk behavior such as unplanned and unprotected sex. The results of such sexual experimentation may include unplanned and or unwanted pregnancies that may lead to unsafe abortions and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV/AIDS. Contraception has the potential to prevent unwanted pregnancies, abortion, and STIs. This study aimed at assessing the general knowledge on contraceptives, sexual practices, and level of utilization of contraceptives devices among unmarried students of the Bayero University Kano. We did an institutional based cross-sectional descriptive study. We administered a pretested, self-administered, structured questionnaire to randomly selected unmarried undergraduate students of the institution. We analyzed data using Microsoft Excel 2016 and Epi-info7. A total of 300 students were interviewed. The median age for respondents was 23 years with an age range of 16-25 years. Male respondents made up 61.3% (184) while the females made up the remaining 38.7% (116). Also, 158(47.33%) of respondents lived outside the school campus, while 158(52.67%) lived in the school hostels. Knowledge on contraception was 87.7% among respondents with internet (91%) and media (89.3%) as the commonest sources of knowledge. Proportion of sexually active students was 10.67%, while prevalence of contraceptive utilization among sexually active students was 15.63%. About 8(25%) had their sexual debut at contraceptive used was high among the respondents, utilization of contraceptives among sexually active students was low, thus creating a window for possible unintended and unwanted pregnancies among these group of students.

  14. Utilization and discontinuation of contraceptive methods: the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njoku CO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contraception has an important role to play in reducing the high rate of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Objective: The objective is to determine the prevalence rate, methods and reasons for discontinuation of contraceptive methods at UCTH, Calabar. Method: This was a retrospective study of all clients that utilised different forms of contraceptives at UCTH, Calabar from 1st January, 2009 to 31st December, 2013. Results: A total of 5,381 clients used various methods of contraception while 13,492 live births were recorded giving the prevalence rate of 39.9% of total live birth. Common methods were intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD 1,745(32.8% and injectable contraceptives 1,268(23.8%. Most clients 1,876(35.2% were graduates while 81(1.5% had no formal education. A total of 535(10.1% clients discontinued different family planning method commonly due to desire for pregnancy and side effects. IUCD had the highest discontinuation rate. Conclusion: The study revealed low prevalence rate of contraceptive use which was more among teenagers and illiterate women. The main reasons for discontinuation of different methods were desire for pregnancy, side effects and menopause. Creating more contraceptive awareness, improvement in contraceptive counselling and female education will help to improve contraceptive utilisation rate and reduce discontinuation rate.

  15. Intrauterine Morcellator Devices: The Icon of Hysteroscopic Future or Merely a Marketing Image? A Systematic Review Regarding Safety, Efficacy, Advantages, and Contraindications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noventa, Marco; Ancona, Emanuele; Quaranta, Michela; Vitagliano, Amerigo; Cosmi, Erich; D'Antona, Donato; Gizzo, Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze all available evidence regarding the use of intrauterine morcellator (IUM), for treatment of the most prevalent intrauterine benign lesions, compared to both traditional resectoscopy and conventional outpatient operative hysteroscopy in terms of safety, efficacy, contraindications, perioperative complications, operating time, and estimated learning curve. We reported data regarding a total of 1185 patients. Concerning polypectomy and myomectomy procedures, IUM systems demonstrated a better outcome in terms of operative time and fluid deficit compared to standard surgical procedures. Complication rates in the inpatient setting were as follows: 0.02% for IUM using Truclear 8.0 (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, Massachusetts) and 0.4% for resectoscopic hysteroscopy. No complications were described using Versapoint devices. Office polipectomy reported a total complication rate of 10.1% using Versapoint device (Ethicon Women's Health and Urology, Somerville, New Jersey) and 1.6% using Truclear 5.0 (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy). The reported recurrence rate after polypectomy was 9.8% using Versapoint device and 2.6% using Truclear 8.0. Finally, the reported intraoperative and postoperative complication rate of IUM related to removal of placental remnants using Truclear 8.0 and MyoSure (Hologic, Marlborough, Massachusetts) was 12.3%. The available evidence allows us to consider IUM devices as a safe, effective, and cost-effective tool for the removal of intrauterine lesions such as polyps, myomas (type 0 and type 1), and placental remnants. Evidence regarding Truclear 5.0 suggests that it may represent the best choice for office hysteroscopy. Further studies are needed to confirm the available evidence and to validate the long-term safety of IUM in procedures for which current data are not exhaustive (placental remnants removal). © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Contraceptive knowledge, attitude and practice among rural women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, R.; Hashmi, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitude regarding family planning and the practice of contraceptives among rural women. One-hundred women between the ages 15-45, living with their husbands and coming from rural area (villages) were interviewed. Women who were pregnant, had a child younger than 2 years, or had any medical disorder were excluded. Their knowledge, attitude and practice on contraceptives were evaluated with the help of a predesigned questionnaire. The other variables used were the age of women, parity and educational status. Descriptive analysis was conducted to obtain percentages. Out of 100 interviewed women with mean age of 29.7 years, 81(81%) had some knowledge about family planning methods. The media provided information of contraceptives in 52 out of 81 (64%) women. Regarding the usage of contraceptive methods, only 53 (53%) of the respondents were using some sort of contraception. Barrier method (condoms) was in practice by 18 (33.9%) and 12 (22.6%) of women had already undergone tubal ligation. The women using injectables and intrauterine contraceptive devices were 10 (18.8%) and 7 (13.2%) respectively. Six were using oral contraceptive pills (11.3%). Positive attitude towards contraception was shown by 76 (76%) of them, while 41(41%) stated their husbands positive attitude towards contraception. In the present study, there was a low contraceptive use among women of rural origin despite good knowledge. Motivation of couples through media and health personnel can help to achieve positive attitude of husbands for effective use of contraceptives. (author)

  17. Three-dimensional ultrasound versus office hysteroscopy in assessment of pain and bleeding with intrauterine contraceptive device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Aboulghar

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Patients with abnormal bleeding and pain with IUCD have frequent abnormally positioned IUCD and associated ovarian pathology. 3D US has high diagnostic accuracy and should be the first line of investigation. Office hysteroscopy should be performed only in suspected embedded IUCD or other endometrial abnormality.

  18. Women Saw Large Decrease In Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Contraceptives After ACA Mandate Removed Cost Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nora V; Polsky, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The Affordable Care Act mandates that private health insurance plans cover prescription contraceptives with no consumer cost sharing. The positive financial impact of this new provision on consumers who purchase contraceptives could be substantial, but it has not yet been estimated. Using a large administrative claims data set from a national insurer, we estimated out-of-pocket spending before and after the mandate. We found that mean and median per prescription out-of-pocket expenses have decreased for almost all reversible contraceptive methods on the market. The average percentages of out-of-pocket spending for oral contraceptive pill prescriptions and intrauterine device insertions by women using those methods both dropped by 20 percentage points after implementation of the ACA mandate. We estimated average out-of-pocket savings per contraceptive user to be $248 for the intrauterine device and $255 annually for the oral contraceptive pill. Our results suggest that the mandate has led to large reductions in total out-of-pocket spending on contraceptives and that these price changes are likely to be salient for women with private health insurance. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. Adherence to dual method contraceptive use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipert, Jeffrey F.; Zhao, Qiuhong; Meints, Laura; Peipert, Benjamin J.; Redding, Colleen A.; Allsworth, Jenifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient characteristics associated with adherence to dual method contraceptive use are not known. Study Design Project PROTECT was a 24-month long randomized trial designed to promote the use of dual methods of contraception using an individualized computer-based intervention or enhanced standard care counseling intervention. We analyzed 463 women with follow-up data and examined sustained dual method use (reported at 2+ interviews). Results While 32% initiated dual method contraceptive use, only 9% reported sustained use. Education increased (RRadj = 4.42; 95%CI 1.19-16.42), substance abuse decreased (RRadj = 0.49; 95%CI 0.24-0.97), no contraceptive use at baseline decreased (RRadj = 0.32; 95%CI 0.11-0.92), and contraceptive stage of change increased (RRadj =5.04; 95%CI 1.09-23.4) adherence to dual method use. Conclusion To effectively prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) and unplanned pregnancies, dual method use must be consistent and sustained. Future interventions to promote dual method use should focus on high-risk groups and additional dual method combinations (e.g., barrier plus intrauterine devices or implants). PMID:21843690

  20. IUD (Intrauterine Device)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... she has an infection, it could lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) . Abstinence (not having sex) is the only ... the uterus while it is being put in. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) . There's a very low risk of infection ...

  1. Factors associated with the use of irreversible contraception and continuous use of reversible contraception in a cohort of HIV-positive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva Landolt, Nadia; Ramautarsing, Reshmie Ashmanie; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Rodbamrung, Piyanee; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-07-01

    Effective contraception can be lifesaving by reducing maternal mortality linked to childbirth and unsafe abortion and by reducing vertical and horizontal transmission of HIV, in the case of an HIV-positive woman. This study is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. We assessed factors associated with the use of irreversible contraception and the continuous use of reversible contraception in HIV-positive Thai women. We used descriptive statistics to present baseline characteristics and logistic regression to assess the association between contraceptive use and factors in the study. Of 196 women included in the analysis, 87% self-reported always using male condoms and 56% continuously using another effective contraceptive method during the period of the study (12-18 months). The choice of effective contraceptive methods was suboptimal--42% were sterilized, 14% used hormonal contraception and no participant reported the use of an intrauterine device. Sexual activity and past contraceptive use were factors associated positively with current continuous contraceptive use. Live births and lower levels of education were additional factors associated positively with sterilization. Despite high contraceptive use, there are still uncovered contraceptive needs among HIV-positive women in Thailand. HIV-positive women need established specialized family planning services, offering an optimal variety of contraceptive choices and tailored to their individual needs. As sterilization is an irreversible choice, it cannot be a viable alternative for every woman. Due to the positive trend between current and past contraceptive use, we consider that it may be possible to improve family planning programs if they start as early as possible in a woman's life and are continued throughout her sexually active and reproductive years. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Contraceptive use and the role of contraceptive counseling in reproductive-aged women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Bat-Sheva L; Morse, Christopher B; Schanne, Allison; Loren, Alison; Domchek, Susan M; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2014-07-01

    Few data on contraceptive choices in women with cancer exist. Contraception is challenging for women with cancer, particularly those with breast cancer, who are limited to nonhormonal methods. This study characterized contraceptive use during cancer treatment in a group of reproductive-aged women with a recent cancer diagnosis and assessed the impact of contraceptive counseling on the methods they selected. Cross-sectional, survey study of reproductive-aged women at a large tertiary care health system with a recent cancer diagnosis. A total of 107 women completed the survey. Eighty-two women reported 101 contraceptive choices. Twenty-seven percent (27/101) of all methods selected were Tier I/II, and 35% (35/101) were Tier III/IV. Only 4 used an intrauterine device (IUD). Among women reporting sexual activity after diagnosis, 19 (27%) of 71 reported using Tier I/II methods, 21 (30%) of 71 reported using Tier III/IV methods, 16 (23%) of 71 reported abstinence and 10 (14%) of 71 reported using no method. Factors significantly associated with Tier I/II use in the multivariable model included not having a college degree [odds ratio (OR) 0.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05-0.92, p=.038], intercourse during treatment (OR 5.92, 95% CI 1.48-23.66, p=.012) and non-breast cancer (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.03-12.64, p=.046). Report of contraceptive counseling was positively associated with Tier I/II contraceptive use during cancer treatment (OR 6.92, 95% CI 1.14-42.11, p=.036). Reproductive-aged women diagnosed with cancer underutilized Tier I/II contraceptive agents, especially IUDs. Contraceptive counseling by physicians increases contraceptive use, particularly methods most effective at preventing pregnancy. The study uniquely described the contraceptive practices of over 100 women with cancer. The study sample commonly reported abstinence and use of contraceptive methods with high failure rates. Our data suggest that contraceptive counseling from a health care provider may

  3. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of secondary school girls towards contraception in Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorah U. Ramathuba

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unplanned teenage pregnancy constitutes an important health problem, whilst contraceptive services are free throughout South Africa and the number of Termination of Pregnancy (TOP services is increasing. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of secondary school girls towards contraception in Thulamela Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. A quantitative descriptive study design was used and respondents were selected by convenience sampling from a population of secondary school girls, the sample consisting of 273 girls in Grades 10–12. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data and analysed by computing frequencies and percentages using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Findings showed that respondents were aware of different contraceptive methods that can prevent pregnancy. However, most did not have knowledge of the emergency contraceptive, intra-uterine device and female condom. Pressure from male partners, fear of parental reaction to the use of contraceptives, reluctance to use contraceptives, poor contraceptive education and lack of counselling were seen as the main causes of ineffective contraceptive use and non-utilisation. Possible modalities of intervention deal with providing contraceptive counselling and care to empower these school girls to make informed choices on reproductive health. 

  4. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of secondary school girls towards contraception in Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorah U. Ramathuba

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unplanned teenage pregnancy constitutes an important health problem, whilst contraceptive services are free throughout South Africa and the number of Termination of Pregnancy (TOP services is increasing. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of secondary school girls towards contraception in Thulamela Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. A quantitative descriptive study design was used and respondents were selected by convenience sampling from a population of secondary school girls, the sample consisting of 273 girls in Grades 10–12. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data and analysed by computing frequencies and percentages using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Findings showed that respondents were aware of different contraceptive methods that can prevent pregnancy. However, most did not have knowledge of the emergency contraceptive, intra-uterine device and female condom. Pressure from male partners, fear of parental reaction to the use of contraceptives, reluctance to use contraceptives, poor contraceptive education and lack of counselling were seen as the main causes of ineffective contraceptive use and non-utilisation. Possible modalities of intervention deal with providing contraceptive counselling and care to empower these school girls to make informed choices on reproductive health.

  5. Contraceptive considerations in obese women: release date 1 September 2009, SFP Guideline 20091.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Susan

    2009-12-01

    Contraceptive failure is the primary cause of unintended pregnancy in the United States. With obesity rates at epidemic proportions, any association between obesity and strategies that prevent undesired pregnancies constitutes a significant public health and economic concern. Unfortunately, the relationship between obesity and contraception has not been extensively studied. Evidence from several epidemiological studies suggests that obesity may increase failure of some hormonal contraceptives resulting in unplanned pregnancies. Obesity may make procedure-dependent contraceptive methods (i.e., sterilization and intrauterine devices) more technically challenging for the provider to perform. Hormonal contraceptives, on the whole, do not appear to adversely affect body weight and provide important noncontraceptive benefits (i.e., cancer protection). Some surgical interventions to treat bariatric issues may compromise the efficacy of orally dosed contraceptive methods. Overall, the Society of Family Planning strongly encourages the use of both hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception in obese women desiring pregnancy prevention with very few restrictions. Further studies are needed to determine the interrelationship between obesity and contraception. In addition, future contraceptive efficacy studies need to include women of differing BMIs to better reflect the population of women using these methods.

  6. Urinary estrogen levels in women on contraceptives in Enugu, South-East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius C Maduka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substantial evidence supports a causal relationship between the risk of human breast cancer and levels of endogenous estrogens. Aim: To evaluate the urinary estrogen of women on contraceptives and also compare the levels in two different classes of contraceptives; hence, the possible predisposition of such women to the risk of breast cancer. Setting and Design: Urinary estrogen level was evaluated in 84 women attending family planning clinic in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu, Nigeria, who have been on contraceptive device for 10 years or less (≤10 years. They were aged between 21 and 50 years and were divide into three groups (21-30 years, 31-40 years, and >40 years. The control group consisted of 30 age-matched apparently-healthy women who were not on any contraceptive device. Materials and Methods: Estrogen was analyzed using Ecologenia; Estrogen (E1/E2/E3 microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit, Batch No. T2GR4, from Japan Envirochemicals Ltd, Japan. Statistical Analysis Used: Significant differences between means were determined by two-tailed Student′s t-test using graph pad prism computer software program. Result: There was a statistically significant increase (P=0.0462, in the mean urinary estrogen level of women on contraceptives when compared with the control. The highest amount of estrogen was excreted by the women in the 21-30 years age group. When the contraceptive devices were divided into two classes of intra-uterine device and oral/injectables, there was no statistical difference (P=0.8112 in the mean urinary estrogen output of the women. Conclusion: The synthetic estrogen content of contraceptive device most probably contributed to the level excreted in the urine. The increased estrogen output observed in women on contraceptive device was not dependent on the class of contraceptive device used.

  7. Immediate postpartum provision of long-acting reversible contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldthwaite, Lisa M; Shaw, Kate A

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this review is to describe current literature regarding the role and characteristics of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) used immediately postpartum. Copper and levonorgestrel intrauterine devices (IUDs) inserted immediately postpartum at the time of both vaginal and cesarean deliveries are associated with higher rates of continuation at 6-12 months when compared with IUDs placed at the postpartum visit (4-8 weeks after delivery), despite higher rates of expulsion. IUDs and contraceptive implants are cost-effective when used immediately postpartum, and they are associated with longer interpregnancy intervals. There is limited evidence regarding the effects of immediate postpartum LARC on breastfeeding. Use of LARC methods in the immediate postpartum period is both effective and safe, and could reduce unmet need for contraception during this time. More research is needed to explore various immediate postpartum IUD insertion methods and the effects of immediate postpartum progestin-containing LARC on breastfeeding.

  8. Contraception methods, beyond oral contraceptives and tubal ligation, and risk of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Roberta B; Dodge, Rhiannon C; Edwards, Robert P; Baker, Julie A; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2011-03-01

    Few studies have examined methods of contraception, beyond oral contraceptives (OCs) and tubal ligation, in relation to ovarian cancer risk. Nine hundred two cases with incident ovarian/peritoneal/tubal cancer were compared with 1800 population-based control subjects. Women self-reported all methods of contraception by using life calendars. Each of the contraceptive methods examined reduced the risk of ovarian cancer as compared with use of no artificial contraception. Comparing ever versus never use, after adjustment for potentially confounding factors and all other methods of contraception, the methods of contraception that emerged as protective were OCs (adjusted odds ratio [adj OR] 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.93); tubal ligation (adj OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.51-0.77); intrauterine devices (IUDs) (adj OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59-0.95); and vasectomy (adj OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.99). Although for OCs and tubal ligation we found that the longer the duration of use, the greater the effect, for IUDs the pattern was reversed: significant protection occurred with short duration and progressively greater risk (albeit nonsignificant) was seen with longer duration of use. In the largest case-control study to date, a range of effective methods of contraception reduced the risk for ovarian cancer. OCs and tubal ligation reduced ovarian cancer risk with lower odds ratios with longer duration of use, whereas IUDs reduced risk overall, having the greatest impact with short duration of use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thyroid function, activated protein C resistance and the risk of venous thrombosis in users of hormonal contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raps, M; Curvers, J; Helmerhorst, F M; Ballieux, B E P B; Rosing, J; Thomassen, S; Rosendaal, F R; van Vliet, H A A M

    2014-04-01

    Use of combined hormonal contraceptives is associated with a three- to eight-fold increased risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use. The thrombotic risk depends on the estrogen dose as well as the progestogen type. Use of hormonal contraceptives leads to resistance to activated protein C (APC), which may serve as marker for the risk of venous thrombosis. Hyperthyroidism is also associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis, due to increased free Thyroxine (FT4) levels which cause a hypercoagulable state. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hormonal contraceptives on levels of FT4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), and to investigate the effects on APC resistance per contraceptive group. We measured FT4, TBG and TSH levels and APC resistance in 231 users of oral contraceptives. Users of the most thrombogenic hormonal contraceptives, i.e. containing desogestrel, cyproterone acetate or drospirenone, had higher TBG levels than users of less thrombogenic hormonal contraceptives, i.e. the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine device. TSH levels were not significantly elevated and FT4 levels did not change. TBG levels were also associated with APC resistance. Use of hormonal contraceptives lead to elevated TBG levels, slightly elevated TSH levels and unchanged FT4 levels without causing a hyperthyroid state. Thus, the increased thrombotic risk during the use of hormonal contraceptives cannot be explained by a hyperthyroid state caused by use of these hormonal contraceptives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Intracervical and fundal administration of levonorgestrel for contraception: endometrial thickness, patterns of bleeding, and persisting ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, P I; Suvisaari, J; Luukkainen, T; Lähteenmäki, P

    1997-07-01

    To study the prevalence of persisting ovarian follicles and to assess the endometrial changes and patterns of vaginal bleeding over 1 year of use of a 20 micrograms/24 h levonorgestrel-releasing intracervical contraceptive device. Prospective, randomized study. Two family planning clinics in Helsinki, Finland. Women requesting intrauterine hormonal contraception. Insertion of a levonorgestrel-releasing intracervical contraceptive device into the cervical canal (group 1, n = 151) or fundally into the uterine cavity (group 2, n = 147) for contraception. Transvaginal ultrasonography of the ovaries and endometrium at insertion and 3, 6, and 12 months after insertion. Data on bleeding were collected using menstrual diary cards. Persisting ovarian follicles were found in intracervical insertion, fundal insertion resulted in more uniform endometrial suppression and fewer days of bleeding and spotting.

  12. Prenatal contraceptive counseling and method provision after childbirth

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    Nelson AL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anita L Nelson Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA Abstract: Postpartum contraception is undergoing major changes, not only in timing, but also in content. Failure to provide immediate postpartum contraception contributes to the problems of unintended pregnancies and rapid repeat pregnancy because often the highest-risk women do not return for postpartum care. If they do attend that visit, they have often lost the insurance coverage that would enable them to use the most effective forms of birth control. Most of the issues surrounding early initiation of progestin-only methods and breastfeeding have been favorably resolved. In some cases, insurance coverage for delivery has been expanded to cover the costs of providing intrauterine devices and implants before the woman is discharged home. All of these new opportunities shift the burden of counseling about postpartum contraception onto the shoulders of the prenatal care provider. This article provides information about the advantages and disadvantages of providing immediate postpartum contraception with each of the eligible methods so clinicians can provide the needed counseling both during pregnancy and during hospitalization for delivery. It also provides guidance for initiation of bridging contraception, if needed, to initiate a method for a woman later in the postpartum period. Keywords: postpartum contraception, counseling, breastfeeding, implants, IUDs, hormonal methods

  13. [Sociologic problems of contraception in the opinion of women from urban and rural areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowska, A; Skurzok, H; Krystian, T

    1989-02-01

    The paper, having a diagnostic character, discusses the problems of birth control, family planning and contraception methods. The methods of the investigation were a questionnaire, interview and analysis of documentation. The investigation was carried out in two areas: urban--Katowice and rural--Istebna. The investigation was carried out among a group of 100 women between 20 and 55 years of age. All the women questioned have been married for 1-30 years. Most of them have two children--30%. Most women from both the urban and rural areas use natural methods of contraception, in. the town--Billings method and in the country--conjugal diary. Thermal method is less popular as it is time-consuming. The main reasons for choosing a natural method of contraception control are moral, religious and biological aspects, which give the women a psychic comfort and a strong feeling of attachment to the husband. Women from the urban area say that they started to use contraceptive methods after getting married whereas women from the rural area--after giving birth to a child. Contraceptive devices are used by about 30% of women. The most popular are: among women from the town--coitus interruptus, artificial abortion and less popular contraceptive devices such as oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices and chemical substances. Among women from the rural area the most common is coitus interruptus and then 2-1 cases of each of the remaining methods. Women applying contraceptive devices are aware of their harmful effects, their unreliability, immorality and violating nature. Women in the country face a lot of difficulties in buying contraceptive devices and they also (22%) use artificial abortion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Impact of the federal contraceptive coverage guarantee on out-of-pocket payments for contraceptives: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonfield, Adam; Tapales, Athena; Jones, Rachel K; Finer, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act requires most private health plans to cover contraceptive methods, services and counseling, without any out-of-pocket costs to patients; that requirement took effect for millions of Americans in January 2013. Data for this study come from a subset of the 1842 women aged 18-39 years who responded to all four waves of a national longitudinal survey. This analysis focuses on the 892 women who had private health insurance and who used a prescription contraceptive method during any of the four study periods. Women were asked about the amount they paid out of pocket in an average month for their method of choice. Between fall 2012 and spring 2014, the proportion of privately insured women paying zero dollars out of pocket for oral contraceptives increased substantially, from 15% to 67%. Similar changes occurred among privately insured women using injectable contraception, the vaginal ring and the intrauterine device. The implementation of the federal contraceptive coverage requirement appears to have had a notable impact on the out-of-pocket costs paid by privately insured women, and that impact has increased over time. This study measures the out-of-pocket costs for women with private insurance prior to the federal contraceptive coverage requirement and after it took effect; in doing so, it highlights areas of progress in eliminating these costs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. "I love my ECPs": challenges to bridging emergency contraceptive users to more effective contraceptive methods in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Engle, Kelly Ladin; Hinson, Laura; Chin-Quee, Dawn

    2011-07-01

    Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) are becoming more popular, yet little is known about the contraceptive preferences of women who take ECPs. Women purchasing ECPs were recruited from pharmacies in Accra, Ghana. A total of 24 semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted in May 2008. Nearly all participants preferred ECPs to other contraceptive methods. Although fear of side effects from oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), intrauterine devices and injectables were deterrents to use of those methods, side effects from ECPs were acceptable to this small and highly self-selected group of ECP users. Participants had little knowledge about how other contraceptive methods work and expressed a strong distrust and dislike of condoms. Study participants loved their ECPs, despite minor discomforts like bleeding, and most had no concerns about repeated use, though these findings may not apply to women outside Accra or women who obtain ECPs from non-pharmacy settings. Future interventions should work to dispel myths about OCPs, condoms and other modern methods, and focus on basic contraception education.

  16. Factors influencing the contraceptive method choice: a university hospital experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Korhan; Göç, Göksu; Taşkın, Salih; Haznedar, Pınar; Karagözlü, Selen; Kale, Burak; Kurtipek, Zeynep; Özmen, Batuhan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the factors influencing behavior of women in choosing contraceptive methods. Material and Methods A total of 4022 women who were admitted to our clinic in a year, were the subjects in this current study for contraception choices. Relationship between the current contraceptive choice and the age, marital status, educational level, gravidity and induced abortions were evaluated. Results Current users of any contraceptive methods were found to make up thirty-three percent of the entire study population. The most preferred method of contraception was an intrauterine device (46.4%), followed by, condom (19.2%), coitus interruptus (16.4%), tubal sterilization (11%), oral contraceptives (5.7%) and lastly the “other methods” that consisted of depot injectables and implants (1.2%). Among other contraceptive methods, the condom was found to be used mostly by the younger age group (OR:0.956, 95% CI:0.936–0.976, p<0.001), while tubal sterilization was preferred mainly by the elderly population (p<0.001, OR:1.091, 95% CI:1.062–1.122). Women that have a higher educational level, were found to use OC (76.3%, OR:5.970, 95% CI:3.233–11.022), tubal sterilization (59.6%, OR:4.110, 95% CI:2.694–6.271) and other methods (62.5%, OR:3.279, 95% CI:1.033–10.402) more commonly than the low educational group (p<0.001). Conclusion These results demonstrated that the rates of both contraception utilization and the usage of more effective methods of contraception need to be increased by providing better family planning systems and counselling opportunities. PMID:24592017

  17. The Effect of Age, Parity and Body Mass Index on the Efficacy, Safety, Placement and User Satisfaction Associated With Two Low-Dose Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Contraceptive Systems: Subgroup Analyses of Data From a Phase III Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson

    Full Text Available Two low-dose levonorgestrel intrauterine contraceptive systems (LNG-IUSs; total content 13.5 mg [average approx. 8 μg/24 hours over the first year; LNG-IUS 8] and total content 19.5 mg [average approx. 13 μg/24 hours over the first year; LNG-IUS 13] have previously been shown to be highly effective (3-year Pearl Indices: 0.33 and 0.31, respectively, safe and well tolerated. The present subgroup analyses evaluated whether or not outcomes were affected by parity, age (18-25 vs 26-35 years, or body mass index (BMI, <30 vs ≥30 kg/m2.Nulliparous and parous women aged 18‒35 years with regular menstrual cycles (21‒35 days requesting contraception were randomized to 3 years of LNG-IUS 8 or LNG-IUS 13 use.In the LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 groups, 1432 and 1452 women, respectively, had a placement attempted and were included in the full analysis set; 39.2%, 39.2% and 17.1% were 18-25 years old, nulliparous and had a BMI ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Both systems were similarly effective regardless of age, parity or BMI; the subgroup Pearl Indices had widely overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Placement of LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 was easier (p < 0.0001 and less painful (p < 0.0001 in women who had delivered vaginally than in women who had not. The complete/partial expulsion rate was 2.2-4.2% across all age and parity subgroups and higher in parous than in nulliparous women (p = 0.004. The incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease was 0.1-0.6% across all age and parity subgroups: nulliparous and younger women were not at higher risk than parous and older women, respectively. The ectopic pregnancy rate was 0.3-0.4% across all age and parity subgroups. Across all age and parity subgroups, the 3-year completion rate was 50.9-61.3% for LNG-IUS 8 and 57.9-61.1% for LNG-IUS 13, and was higher (p = 0.0001 among older than younger women in the LNG-IUS 8 group only.LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 were highly effective, safe and well tolerated regardless of age or

  18. Linking Changes in Contraceptive Use to Declines in Teen Pregnancy Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Manlove

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a unique microsimulation tool, Teen FamilyScape, the present study explores how changes in the mix of contraceptive methods used by teens contributed to the decline in the U.S. teen pregnancy rate between 2002 and 2010. Results indicate that changes in contraceptive use contributed to approximately half of the decline in the teen pregnancy rate during this time period (48% and that a little more than half of this “contraceptive effect” was due to an increase in teen condom use (58%. The remaining share of the contraceptive effect can be attributed to an increase in the use of more effective hormonal (pill, patch, ring and long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC/injectable methods (Intrauterine Devices (IUD, implant and injectable. Results from an additional counterfactual analysis suggest that the contraceptive effect was driven by the fact that the percentage of teens using no birth control fell during the study time period, rather than by the fact that some teens switched from less effective methods (condoms to more effective hormonal and LARC/injectable methods. However, very high typical use failure rates for teen condom users suggest the need for a two-pronged approach for continuing reductions in teen pregnancy for sexually active teens: first, targeting the youth most at risk of not using contraception and helping them choose contraception, and second, increasing the effectiveness of method use among existing contraceptors.

  19. Contraceptive counselling of women seeking abortion - a qualitative interview study of health professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilander, Helena; Salomonsson, Birgitta; Thor, Johan; Brynhildsen, Jan; Alehagen, Siw

    2017-02-01

    A substantial proportion of women who undergo an abortion continue afterwards without switching to more effective contraceptive use. Many subsequently have repeat unintended pregnancies. This study, therefore, aimed to identify and describe health professionalś experiences of providing contraceptive counselling to women seeking an abortion. We interviewed 21 health professionals (HPs), involved in contraceptive counselling of women seeking abortion at three differently sized hospitals in Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using conventional qualitative content analysis. Three clusters were identified: 'Complex counselling', 'Elements of counselling' and 'Finding a method'. HPs often experienced consultations including contraceptive counselling at the time of an abortion as complex, covering both pregnancy termination and contraceptive counselling. Women with vulnerabilities placed even greater demands on the HPs providing counselling. The HPs varied in their approaches when providing contraceptive counselling but also in their knowledge about certain contraception methods. HPs described challenges in finding out if women had found an effective method and in the practicalities of arranging intrauterine device (IUD) insertion post-abortion, when a woman asked for this method. HPs found it challenging to provide contraceptive counselling at the time of an abortion and to arrange access to IUDs post-abortion. There is a need to improve their counselling, their skills and their knowledge to prevent repeat unintended pregnancies.

  20. An exploratory analysis of contraceptive method choice and symptoms of depression in adolescent females initiating prescription contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Jenny; Presser, Liandra; Malbon, Katherine; Braun-Courville, Debra; Linares, Lourdes Oriana

    2015-04-01

    We examine the association between depressive symptoms and contraceptive method choice among adolescents initiating prescription contraception. This cross-sectional study analyzes baseline data of 220 urban, minority adolescent females (ages 15-19 years) presenting for prescription contraceptive initiation at a comprehensive, free-of-cost, adolescent health center in New York City. All participants met with a health care provider who provided standard contraception counseling before initiating contraception. Each participant then selected a short- or long-acting contraceptive: a 3-month supply of the pill, patch, ring or a medroxyprogesterone acetate depot injection (short-acting), or placement/referral for an intrauterine device (IUD; long-acting). We assess the independent association between contraceptive method selection and symptoms of depression [assessed by the Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression (CES-D) scale]. Ten percent (n=21/220) of adolescent females selected an IUD. Bivariate analysis revealed that those with elevated levels of depressive symptoms were more likely to select an IUD as compared to those with minimal symptoms (mean CES-D score 20 vs. 13; t=3.052, p=.003). In multivariate logistic regressions, adolescent females had increased odds of selecting an IUD if they reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio=4.93; confidence interval, 1.53-15.83; p=.007) after controlling for ethnicity/race, education, number of lifetime partners and gravidity. Inner-city, minority adolescents with elevated symptoms of depression who present for prescription contraceptive initiation may be more likely to select an IUD rather than shorter-acting methods. By recognizing adolescent females with depressive symptoms, providers can strategize their approach to effective contraception counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategies for communicating contraceptive effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Steiner, Markus; Grimes, David A; Hilgenberg, Deborah; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2013-04-30

    the expanded program were more likely to choose sterilization (OR 4.26; 95% CI 2.46 to 7.37) or use a modern contraceptive method (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.82 to 3.03), i.e., sterilization, pills, injectable, intrauterine device or barrier method. For the other study, the groups received educational interventions with differing format and intensity. Both groups reportedly had increases in contraceptive use, but they did not differ significantly by six months in consistent use of an effective contraceptive, i.e., sterilization, IUD, injectable, implant, and consistent use of oral contraceptives, diaphragm, or male condoms.Five trials provided one session and focused on testing educational material or media. In one study, knowledge gain favored a slide-and-sound presentation versus a physician's oral presentation (MD -19.00; 95% CI -27.52 to -10.48). In another trial, a table with contraceptive effectiveness categories led to more correct answers than a table based on pregnancy numbers [ORs were 2.42 (95% CI 1.43 to 4.12) and 2.19 (95% CI 1.21 to 3.97)] or a table with effectiveness categories and pregnancy numbers [ORs were 2.58 (95% CI 1.5 to 4.42) and 2.03 (95% CI 1.13 to 3.64)]. Still another trial provided structured counseling with a flipchart on contraceptive methods. The intervention and usual-care groups did not differ significantly in choice of contraceptive method (by effectiveness category) or in continuation of the chosen method at three months. Lastly, a study with couples used videos to communicate contraceptive information (control, motivational, contraceptive methods, and both motivational and methods videos). The analyses showed no significant difference between the groups in the types of contraceptives chosen. These trials varied greatly in the types of participants and interventions to communicate contraceptive effectiveness. Therefore, we cannot say overall what would help consumers choose an appropriate contraceptive method. For presenting pregnancy risk

  2. Practical Advice for Emergency IUD Contraception in Young Women

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    Norman D. Goldstuck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Too few women are aware of the very high efficacy of intrauterine copper devices (IUDs to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. Women who frequently engage in unprotected intercourse or seek emergency contraception (EC are at high risk of unplanned pregnancy and possible abortion. It is therefore important that these women receive precise and accurate information about intrauterine devices as they may benefit from using an IUD for EC as continuing contraception. Copper IUDs should be used as first choice options given their rapid onset of action and their long-term contraceptive action which require minimal thought or intervention on the part of the user. In the United States, there is only one copper IUD presently available which limits treatment options. There are numerous copper IUDs available for use in EC, however, their designs and size are not always optimal for use in nulliparous women or women with smaller or narrower uteruses. Utilization of frameless IUDs which do not require a larger transverse arm for uterine retention may have distinct advantages, particularly in young women, as they will be suitable for use in all women irrespective of uterine size. This paper provides practical information on EC use with emphasis on the use of the frameless IUD.

  3. Practical Advice for Emergency IUD Contraception in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstuck, Norman D; Wildemeersch, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Too few women are aware of the very high efficacy of intrauterine copper devices (IUDs) to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. Women who frequently engage in unprotected intercourse or seek emergency contraception (EC) are at high risk of unplanned pregnancy and possible abortion. It is therefore important that these women receive precise and accurate information about intrauterine devices as they may benefit from using an IUD for EC as continuing contraception. Copper IUDs should be used as first choice options given their rapid onset of action and their long-term contraceptive action which require minimal thought or intervention on the part of the user. In the United States, there is only one copper IUD presently available which limits treatment options. There are numerous copper IUDs available for use in EC, however, their designs and size are not always optimal for use in nulliparous women or women with smaller or narrower uteruses. Utilization of frameless IUDs which do not require a larger transverse arm for uterine retention may have distinct advantages, particularly in young women, as they will be suitable for use in all women irrespective of uterine size. This paper provides practical information on EC use with emphasis on the use of the frameless IUD.

  4. Contraception: the Need for Expansion of Counsel in Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridgen, Olivia; Sehovic, Ivana; Bowman, Meghan L; Reed, Damon; Tamargo, Christina; Vadaparampil, Susan; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about oncology provider recommendations regarding best practices in contraception use during cancer treatment and through survivorship for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. This review examined the literature to identify related studies on contraception recommendations, counseling discussions, and methods of contraception in the AYA oncology population. A literature review was conducted using PubMed, including all peer-reviewed journals with no publication date exclusions. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using combinations of the following phrases or keywords: "oncology OR cancer" AND "contraception, family planning, contraceptive devices, contraceptive agents, intrauterine devices OR IUD, vaccines, spermatocidal agents, postcoital, immunologic, family planning, vasectomy, tubal ligation, sterilization" AND "young adult OR adolescent" AND "young adult AND adolescent". Reviewers assessed articles using the "Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies" which considers: (1) selection bias; (2) study design; (3) confounders; (4) blinding; (5) data collection methods; and (6) withdrawals and dropouts. A total of five articles were included and all studies were quantitative. Results showed no consistent recommendations among providers, references to guidelines, or methods of contraceptive types. Provider guidelines for discussions with AYA patients should be expanded to provide comprehensive, consistent, and quality cancer care in the AYA population.

  5. Intrauterine device use in an urban university clinic: safety of use in a population at high risk for sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Robin W; Martins, Summer L; Whitaker, Amy K

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to describe infection rates after intrauterine device (IUD) placement at an urban teaching hospital that did not restrict IUD eligibility based on risk factors for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We reviewed charts of patients undergoing IUD placement at the University of Chicago obstetrics and gynecology resident clinic from July 2007 to June 2008 (n=283). The primary outcome was diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) within 12 months. Almost half (49.5%) of patients reported a history of any STI. Two patients (0.7%) were diagnosed with PID. Postplacement infection in this unrestricted population was infrequent and comparable to reported rates in previous studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hormonal contraception in adolescents: special considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Rollyn M; Fisher, Martin M

    2006-01-01

    insertion of the vaginal ring. When regular contraceptive modalities fail, emergency contraception is available. Choices include combination oral contraceptives, progestogen-only pills, mifepristone, or placement of a copper-releasing intrauterine device. These methods can be very useful for preventing pregnancy in adolescents as long as adolescents are aware of their existence and have easy access to them.

  7. THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE NIŠ UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

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    Milena Veljković

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception is a treatment that used as an emergency procedure to prevent unwanted pregnancy after an unprotected sexual intercourse or contraception failure regardless of the point in the menstrual cycle. The most common method is the treatment with sexual steroids and the second-line form is the copper intrauterine device. A considerable number of female students of Nis were informed about the existence of emergency contraception. Younger generations (I/II years of sudy were better informed than older generations (III/IV years of study: 81.6% vs. 57.5%. The difference was statistically significant (χ2 =7.91;p<0.005. The students of medicine were better informed than the students of art and science: 87.9% vs. 78.2% vs. 70.0% but there was not statistical difference. It is expected that adequate usage of emergency contraception will significantly reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies. It is only emergency treatment and is not a substitution for regular contraception. Students are very important in the population of youth and it is expected that they could be optimally informed about this method of fertility control.

  8. Current status of contraceptive use among rural married women in Anhui Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-J; Wang, G-Y; Shen, Q; Yu, Y-L; Sun, Y-H; Yu, G-B; Zhao, D; Ye, D-Q

    2009-11-01

    This study aims to explore the current status of married women in regard of their use of contraceptive methods (permanent methods versus non-permanent methods) and to find out factors that affect the use of contraceptive methods in rural areas of Anhui Province of China. Survey. Anhui, China. A total of 53,652 married women aged 18-49 years. A multistage probability sampling method was used to identify a representative sample of 53,652 married women aged 18-49 years. All women were asked to provide detailed information by completing detailed questionnaires. Contraceptive prevalence and influence factors. The total birth control rate of the sample was 95.2%. Samples choosing the permanent and nonpermanent contraceptive methods have taken up 46.7 and 48.5% respectively. Female sterilisation was the first choice with a usage rate of 43.6%, followed by intrauterine device (IUD), which was used by 41.1% of samples. Single-variable analysis showed that the choice of contraceptive methods was associated with age, education level, parity, frequency of sex intercourses in a month, contraceptive knowledge, RTI symptom and the gender of the last child of rural married women. A significant increase in contraceptive use of rural married women in Anhui Province of China. Female sterilisation and IUD still play the dominant role. Effective family planning methods should be advocated through adequate counselling on the correct use and proper management, with consideration of the background of custom and belief.

  9. The impact of combined oral contraceptives on ocular tissues: a review of ocular effects

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    Marilita M. Moschos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this manuscript is to review the action and adverse effects of combined oral contraceptives (COCs on ocular tissues. The percentage of unwanted pregnancies and the subsequent abortions make contraception crucial worldwide. Over 100 million women around the world use common contraceptive methods, including intrauterine devices, combined estrogen and progestin oral contraceptives, as well as progestin only preparations (oral contraceptives, implants or injections. COCs are widely used for contraception, but they are also indicated in menorrhagia, endometriosis, acne and hirsutism, fibroid uterus and premenstrual syndrome. However, they have been associated with high rates of cardiovascular events, venous thromboembolic disease, ischemic strokes and breast cancer. The incidence of COCs-related ocular complications is estimated to be 1 in 230 000, including dry eye symptoms, corneal edema, lens opacities and retinal neuro-ophthalmologic or vascular complications. We may infer that the serious ocular complications of COCs can be prevented by eliminating the estrogen dosage and choosing third-generation progestins. In any case, doctors should take into consideration the systemic and ocular history of the patients before selecting any method of contraception.

  10. Cancer and contraception. Release date May 2012. SFP Guideline #20121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashlesha; Schwarz, E Bimla

    2012-09-01

    As a result of advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment, young women within the reproductive-aged group are now more likely to survive cancer. Reproductive-aged women with cancer may be interested in deferring pregnancy either temporarily or permanently at cancer diagnosis, during therapy or after treatment. Currently, there are limited guidelines to aide clinicians in managing the contraceptive needs in this special population. After reviewing the evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of available methods of contraception for women who have been diagnosed with cancer, the Society of Family Planning recommends that women of childbearing age who are being treated for cancer avoid combined hormonal contraceptive methods (containing estrogen and progestin) when possible because they may further increase the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) (Level A). The copper T380A intrauterine device, a highly effective, reversible, long-acting, hormone-free method, should be considered the first-line contraceptive option for women with a history of breast cancer (Level A), although for women being treated with tamoxifen, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine system (IUS) which decreases endometrial proliferation may be preferable (Level B). Women who develop anemia may benefit from use of a progestin-containing contraceptive (Level A). Women who develop osteopenia or osteoporosis following chemotherapy should avoid the progestin-only contraceptive injection (Level B). More information is needed in many areas. There are insufficient data to evaluate the risk of VTE when progestin-only contraceptives are used by women at high risk of VTE. Information is also needed on whether the levonorgestrel-containing IUS affects the risk of breast cancer recurrence and whether hormonal contraceptives affect the risk of breast cancer among women who have received chest wall, or "mantle field," radiation. Finally, studies of the safety and effectiveness of IUS use by women who are

  11. Postcoital contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, H C

    1977-02-05

    My colleague Dr. C.L. Brewer (January 15, p. 169) is within his rights to ask for a precise definition of abortion and contraception. I define abortion as the deliberate destruction of the embryo once it is embedded in the uterus. The absolutist on the abortion issue, until he is sure that an IUD never works by destroying an embedded embryo, must logically eschew this technique, advising his patient as to his ethical objections. She may then seek other advice once she has the facts. However, to insist that those who advise an IUD with the motive of contraception cannot herefore object to, say, intrauterine saline aimed at the destruction of a moving 27-week fetus is, in my view, stretching his argument. With further stretching it could be carried to absurdity in the rubella-early pregnancy dilemma: why not deliver the child, examine it carefully, and then if imperfect kill it with a silver hammer? Unthinkable, even if logical. Still, Dr. Brewer has a point and (with me) no doubt he will sympathize with Pope John and his advisers in their support for family spacing only by the avoidance of the fertile days - esthetically admirable but, alas, not always effective. How absurd the Catholic Church would now look if 10 years ago it had blessed the IUD only to find that it may operate not only by preventing the embedding of the zygot but by destroying it in situ - by definition an abortion. The future may settle the debate with hormones which convert the endometrium to a nonreceptive state so that a fetus is never embedded in the womb. Even better, we may develop a male hormone which prevents sperm from penetrating the ovum. Meantime, motive is important: contraception is not abortion and our abortionists should not dress up as delayed contraceptors. (Editor's note: This correspondence is now closed.)

  12. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Initiation With a 2- to 3-Week Compared With a 6-Week Postpartum Visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Melissa J; Hou, Melody Y; Hsia, Jennifer K; Cansino, Catherine D; Melo, Juliana; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate whether a department policy changing the scheduling of the postpartum visit from 6 weeks to 2-3 weeks after delivery is associated with higher long-acting reversible contraception initiation at the postpartum visit. We conducted a quasiexperimental before-after study to evaluate long-acting reversible contraception initiation, specifically an intrauterine device or contraceptive implant, at the postpartum visit between women scheduled for follow-up at 6 weeks (before policy change) and 2-3 weeks after delivery (after policy change). Secondary outcomes included postpartum visit completion, overall contraception initiation at the postpartum visit, overall contraceptive use at 6 months after delivery, and repeat pregnancies by 6 months postpartum. We obtained delivery and postpartum information using the electronic medical record and contacted participants 3 and 6 months after delivery to assess contraception use and repeat pregnancies. We enrolled 586 participants between December 2014 and November 2015, of whom 512 women (256 in each cohort) continued to meet eligibility criteria after delivery. Long-acting reversible contraception initiation rates at the postpartum visit were lower in the 2- to 3-week (16.5%, 95% CI 12.2-21.8) compared with the 6-week group (31.1%, 95% CI 25.2-37.7, Pcontraception initiation was higher in the 2- to 3-week group (27.3%, 95% CI 21.9-33.4) compared with the 6-week group (15.8%, 95% CI 11.5-21.4, Pcontraceptive use patterns at 6 months postpartum. No intrauterine device perforations or expulsions were observed in women who underwent insertion at 2-3 weeks postpartum. Five pregnancies were reported in each cohort by 6 months after delivery. Scheduling a visit at 2-3 weeks after delivery was not associated with increased long-acting reversible contraception initiation at this visit despite higher postpartum visit attendance.

  13. Knowledge and attitudes about intrauterine devices among women's health care providers in El Salvador Conocimientos y actitudes de los prestadores de atención de salud de la mujer en El Salvador acerca de los dispositivos intrauterinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Lyn Hohmann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain an understanding of Salvadoran health care providers' clinical knowledge, attitudes, and practice toward the intrauterine device (IUD, Ministry of Health providers completed a self-administered, anonymous survey. Surveys were completed by 135 participants. The majority (94.7% and 97.0% agreed the IUD is a safe and effective form of contraception. Only 46.6% of participants had ever received training in IUD placement, and 32.0% of them had ever inserted more than 10 IUDs. The majority of providers (54.2% believed that the IUD was associated with a higher rate of infection than is described in the literature. Lack of formal training and knowledge about persistent infection rates associated with IUDs may contribute to low IUD placement by Salvadoran providers. Health care providers surveyed are open to learning more about the IUD and sharing the information with their patients.A fin de evaluar el conocimiento, las actitudes y las prácticas clínicas de los prestadores de atención de salud salvadoreños en torno al dispositivo intrauterino (DIU, se solicitó a un grupo de prestadores del Ministerio de Salud que respondiera un cuestionario anónimo autoadministrado. Se recibieron 135 respuestas. La mayoría manifestó que el DIU es un método anticonceptivo seguro (94,7% y eficaz (97,0%. Solo 46,6% de los participantes habían recibido algún tipo de capacitación acerca de la colocación del DIU y 32,0% habían colocado más de 10 dispositivos. La mayoría de los prestadores (54,2% consideraron que el DIU está asociado a una incidencia de infecciones más alta que la descrita en la bibliografía. La escasa frecuencia con que los prestadores salvadoreños colocan el DIU probablemente sea atribuible, en cierta medida, a la falta de capacitación formal y de conocimiento acerca de los índices de infección persistente asociados a los DIU. Los prestadores de servicios de salud encuestados refirieron estar dispuestos a instruirse m

  14. Counseling by epileptologists affects contraceptive choices of women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinera, Alyssa R; Gavvala, Jay; Bellinski, Irena; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Macken, Micheal P; Narechania, Aditi; Templer, Jessica; VanHaerents, Stephen; Schuele, Stephan U; Gerard, Elizabeth E

    2016-12-01

    There are several important interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraception that need to be carefully considered by women with epilepsy (WWE) and their practitioners. Many AEDs induce hepatic enzymes and decrease the efficacy of hormonal contraception. In addition, estrogen-containing hormonal contraception can increase the metabolism of lamotrigine, the most commonly prescribed AED in women of childbearing age. The intrauterine device (IUD) is a highly effective form of reversible contraception without AED drug interactions that is considered by many to be the contraceptive of choice for WWE. Women with epilepsy not planning pregnancy require effective contraceptive counseling that should include discussion of an IUD. There are no guidelines, however, on who should deliver these recommendations. The objective of this study was to explore the hypothesis that contraceptive counseling by a neurologist can influence the contraceptive choices of WWE. In particular, we explored the relationship between contraceptive counseling in the epilepsy clinic and the likelihood that patients would obtain an IUD. We conducted a retrospective chart review of female patients age 18-45 seen at our institution for an initial visit between 2010 and 2014 to ascertain the type of contraceptive counseling each patient received as well as AED use and contraceptive methods. Patients who were pregnant or planning pregnancy at the first visit were excluded from further analyses as were patients with surgical sterilization. We also examined a subgroup of 95 patients with at least 4 follow-up visits to evaluate the efficacy of epileptologists' counseling. Specifically, we looked at the likelihood a patient obtained an IUD based on the type of counseling she had received. Fisher exact tests assessed associations between counseling type and whether patients had obtained an IUD. Three hundred and ninety-seven women met criteria for inclusion. Only 35% of female patients

  15. Twelve-month contraceptive continuation among women initiating short- and long-acting reversible contraceptives in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Sara E; Cannon, Amy; Mushagalusa Balikubirhi, Benjamin; Muyisa, Jean-Bosco; Amsalu, Ribka; Tsolka, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Despite the inclusion of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the minimum standards of health care in humanitarian settings, access to SRH services, and especially to contraception, is often compromised in war. Very little is known about continuation and switching of contraceptive methods in these settings. An evaluation of a contraceptive services program in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) was conducted to measure 12-month contraceptive continuation by type of contraceptive method (short-acting or long-acting). A stratified systematic sample of women who initiated a contraceptive method 12-18 months prior to data collection was selected retrospectively from facility registers. A total of 548 women was interviewed about their contraceptive use: 304 who began a short-acting method (pills, injectables) and 244 who began a long-acting method (intra-uterine devices, implants). Key characteristics of short-acting method versus long-acting method acceptors were compared using chi-square statistics for categorical data and t-tests for continuous data. Unadjusted and adjusted Cox proportional hazard ratios were estimated to assess factors associated with discontinuation. At 12 months, 81.6% women reported using their baseline contraceptive method continuously, with more long-acting than short-acting contraceptive acceptors (86.1% versus 78.0%, p = .02) continuing contraceptive use. Use of a short-acting method (Hazard ratio (HR) 1.74 [95%CI 1.13-2.67]) and desiring a child within two years (HR 2.58 [95%CI 1.45-4.54]) were associated with discontinuation within the first 12 months of use. The vast majority (88.3%) of women reported no prior contraceptive use. This is the first study of contraceptive continuation in a humanitarian setting. The high percentages of women continuing contraceptive use found here demonstrates that women will choose to initiate and continue use of their desired contraceptive method, even in a difficult, unstable and

  16. Provider self-disclosure during contraceptive counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Merritt; Steinauer, Jody; Schmittdiel, Julie; Chan, Pamela; Dehlendorf, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Provider self-disclosure (PSD) - defined as providers making statements regarding personal information to patients - has not been well characterized in the context of contraceptive counseling. In this study, we describe the incidence, content and context of contraceptive PSD. This mixed methods analysis used data from the Provider-Patient Contraceptive Counseling study, for which 349 family planning patients were recruited from 2009 to 2012 from six clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area. Audio-recordings from their visits were analyzed for the presence or absence of PSD, and those visits with evidence of PSD were analyzed using qualitative methods. The associations of patient and provider demographics and patient satisfaction measures, obtained from survey data, with PSD were analyzed using bivariable and multivariable analyses. Thirty-seven percent of providers showed evidence of PSD during at least one visit, and PSD occurred in 9% of clinic visits. Fifty-four percent of PSD statements were about intrauterine devices. About half of PSD statements occurred prior to the final selection of the contraceptive method and appeared to influence the choice of method. In post-visit surveys, all patients who reported receiving PSD considered it to be appropriate, and patient-reported PSD was not statistically associated with measures of patient satisfaction. This study provides some support for the appropriateness of PSD during family planning encounters, at least as practiced during the sampled visits. Further research could explore whether this counseling strategy has an impact on patients' ability to identify the best contraceptive methods for them. In this study, PSD did not have a demonstrated negative effect on the provider-patient relationship. In almost half of visits, PSD appeared to influence patients' choice of a method; whether this influence is beneficial needs further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perceived racial, socioeconomic and gender discrimination and its impact on contraceptive choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossler, Karla; Kuroki, Lindsay M; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Secura, Gina M; Roehl, Kimberly A; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2011-09-01

    The study was conducted to determine whether perceived racial, economic and gender discrimination has an impact on contraception use and choice of method. We analyzed the first 2,500 women aged 14-45 years enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project, a prospective cohort study aimed to reduce barriers to obtaining long-acting reversible contraception. Items from the "Experiences of Discrimination" (EOD) scale measured experienced race-, gender- and economic-based discrimination. Overall, 57% of women reported a history of discrimination. Thirty-three percent reported gender- or race-based discrimination, and 24% reported discrimination attributed to socioeconomic status (SES). Prior to study enrollment, women reporting discrimination were more likely to report any contraception use (61% vs. 52%, pgender-, race- or SES-based discrimination were associated with increased current use of less effective methods [adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.41; aRR 1.25, CI 1.08-1.45; aRR 1.23, CI 1.06-1.43, respectively]. After enrollment, 66% of women with a history of experience of discrimination chose a long-acting reversible contraceptive method (intrauterine device or implantable) and 35% chose a depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate or contraceptive pill, patch or ring. Discrimination negatively impacts a woman's use of contraception. However, after financial and structural barriers to contraceptive use were eliminated, women with EOD overwhelmingly selected effective methods of contraception. Future interventions to improve access and utilization of contraception should focus on eliminating barriers and targeting interventions that encompass race-, gender- and economic-based discrimination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Contraception after medication abortion in the United States: results from a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Corinne H; Goodman, Suzan; Grossman, Daniel; Cadwallader, Kara; Thompson, Kirsten M J; Talmont, Elizabeth; Speidel, J Joseph; Harper, Cynthia C

    2018-01-01

    Understanding how contraceptive choices and access differ for women having medication abortions compared to aspiration procedures can help to identify priorities for improved patient-centered postabortion contraceptive care. The objective of this study was to investigate the differences in contraceptive counseling, method choices, and use between medication and aspiration abortion patients. This subanalysis examines data from 643 abortion patients from 17 reproductive health centers in a cluster, randomized trial across the United States. We recruited participants aged 18-25 years who did not desire pregnancy and followed them for 1 year. We measured the effect of a full-staff contraceptive training and abortion type on contraceptive counseling, choice, and use with multivariable regression models, using generalized estimating equations for clustering. We used survival analysis with shared frailty to model actual intrauterine device and subdermal implant initiation over 1 year. Overall, 26% of participants (n = 166) had a medication abortion and 74% (n = 477) had an aspiration abortion at the enrollment visit. Women obtaining medication abortions were as likely as those having aspiration abortions to receive counseling on intrauterine devices or the implant (55%) and on a short-acting hormonal method (79%). The proportions of women choosing to use these methods (29% intrauterine device or implant, 58% short-acting hormonal) were also similar by abortion type. The proportions of women who actually used short-acting hormonal methods (71% medication vs 57% aspiration) and condoms or no method (20% vs 22%) within 3 months were not significantly different by abortion type. However, intrauterine device initiation over a year was significantly lower after the medication than the aspiration abortion (11 per 100 person-years vs 20 per 100 person-years, adjusted hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.89). Implant initiation rates were low and similar by

  19. Committee Opinion No. 670: Immediate Postpartum Long-Acting Reversible Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) has the potential to reduce unintended and short-interval pregnancy. Women should be counseled about all forms of postpartum contraception in a context that allows informed decision making. Immediate postpartum LARC should be offered as an effective option for postpartum contraception; there are few contraindications to postpartum intrauterine devices and implants. Obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should discuss LARC during the antepartum period and counsel all pregnant women about options for immediate postpartum initiation. Education and institutional protocols are needed to raise clinician awareness and to improve access to immediate postpartum LARC insertion. Obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should incorporate immediate postpartum LARC into their practices, counsel women appropriately about advantages and risks, and advocate for institutional and payment policy changes to support provision.

  20. Committee Opinion No. 670 Summary: Immediate Postpartum Long-Acting Reversible Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) has the potential to reduce unintended and short-interval pregnancy. Women should be counseled about all forms of postpartum contraception in a context that allows informed decision making. Immediate postpartum LARC should be offered as an effective option for postpartum contraception; there are few contraindications to postpartum intrauterine devices and implants. Obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should discuss LARC during the antepartum period and counsel all pregnant women about options for immediate postpartum initiation. Education and institutional protocols are needed to raise clinician awareness and to improve access to immediate postpartum LARC insertion. Obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should incorporate immediate postpartum LARC into their practices, counsel women appropriately about advantages and risks, and advocate for institutional and payment policy changes to support provision.

  1. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) – Reimbursement of contraception and sterilisation

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2016-01-01

    In line with the practice in many Member States and in other international organisations based in Geneva, the CHIS will, as of 1 March 2016, reimburse upon presentation of a medical prescription:   contraceptive medicine (e.g. oral medicine or implant); intrauterine contraceptive devices; and medical sterilisation operations (vasectomy, tubal ligations). These methods of contraception will be considered as pharmaceutical costs or medical treatments, to which the reimbursement rate according to the general rule and the reimbursement bonus apply. Treatment undertaken, or paid for, before March 2016 will not be reimbursed. For more information, do not hesitate to contact the third-party administrator of the CHIS: UNIQA (Tel.: 72730 / uniqa-assurance@cern.ch).

  2. ESC expert statement on the effects on mood of the natural cycle and progestin-only contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merki-Feld, G. S.; Apter, D.; Bartfai, G.

    2017-01-01

    Hormonal fluctuations during the natural cycle, as well as progestins used for hormonal contraception, can exert effects on mood especially in vulnerable women. Negative effects of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine contraception on mood are rare....

  3. ESC expert statement on the effects on mood of the natural cycle and progestin-only contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merki-Feld, G S; Apter, D; Bartfai, G; Grandi, G; Haldre, K; Lech, M; Lertxundi, R; Lete, I; Lobo Abascal, P; Raine, S; Roumen, F; Serfaty, D; Shulman, L P; Skouby, S; Bitzer, J

    2017-08-01

    Hormonal fluctuations during the natural cycle, as well as progestins used for hormonal contraception, can exert effects on mood especially in vulnerable women. Negative effects of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine contraception on mood are rare.

  4. [The morphometric study of endometrial spiral arterioles before and after insertion of gamma CuI and TCu 220C intrauterine devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Chen, Q; Ni, X

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the morphologic changes of endometrial spiral arterioles and its relationship with bleeding pattern after insertion of gamma-shape copper indomethacin-medicated (gamma CuI) and T-shape copper (TCu 220C) intrauterine devices (IUD). Endometrium specimens of late secretory phase were obtained from fertile age women: 10 from preinsertion, 10 obtained after insertion of TCu 220C IUD, and 9 obtained after insertion of gamma CuI IUD. Samples were sectioned serially and morphometric analysis of endometrial spiral arterioles was performed under light microscope. The average cross section area (Area), maximum diameter (Dmax) and minimum diameter (Dmin) of spiral arterioles in both spongeous and dense layers of endometrium increased significantly after insertion of TCu 220C IUD. After insertion of gamma CuI IUD, the Area and Dmax increased in dense layer only, though less obviously than that occurred in TCu 220C group. However, the Dmin increased more obviously in both spongeous and dense layers than after insertion of TCu 220C IUD, implying that the shape of spiral arterioles was more regular in gamma CuI group. gamma CuI IUD has less effects on the morphological changes of endometrial spiral arterioles, and this may relate to its indomethacin-contained which causes less bleeding.

  5. [Comparison of two techniques used in immediate postplacental insertion of TCu 380A intrauterine device: 12 month follow-up of 910 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Zhuang, L; Yu, G

    1997-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of hand-insertion and ring forceps-insertion of TCu 380A intrauterine device (IUD) in immediate postplacental insertion (IPPI). 910 vaginal delivery women in Shanghai received a TCu 380A IUD inserted within 10 minutes after delivery of the placenta. Among them, 97.7% were primipara. The women were randomly divided into two groups: 470 cases in hand-insertion group and 440 in ring forceps-insertion group. Using life-tale method and X2 test, we compared the expulsion rates and other causes of removal after follow-up for 12 months in the two groups. The follow-up rate at 6 and 12 months were 95.16% and 92.64%, respectively. No uterine perforation and infection occurred in the 910 cases, and only one pregnancy in the hand-insertion group. Expulsions were the main reason for discontinuation. The 12-month gross cumulative expulsion rates were 15.86 and 15.88 per 100 women in the hand-insertion group and ring forceps-insertion group, respectively, and the removal rates due to bleeding and (or) pain were 2.11 and 1.57, respectively. No difference was statistically significant (P > 0.05). The two different insertion techniques do not significantly affect discontinuation rates in vaginal IPPI using the TCu 38)A IUD; the TCu 380A IUD appears to be suitable for postpartum insertion in Chinese women.

  6. The width of the uterine cavity is narrower in patients with an embedded intrauterine device (IUD) compared to a normally positioned IUD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Thomas D; Bromley, Bryann; Benacerraf, Beryl R

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether women with intrauterine devices (IUDs) embedded in the myometrium or cervix have a narrower fundal transverse endometrial diameter as seen on 3-dimensional (3D) sonography compared to women whose IUDs are in a normal location. A sonographer blinded to the study hypothesis retrospectively evaluated the 3D images and reconstructed coronal views of the uterine cavity in 172 consecutive women who had an IUD in the uterus. The width of the endometrial cavity at the fundus of the uterus was measured transversely on the rendered coronal sonogram using the calipers on a picture archiving and communications system. The measurements obtained from women who had nonembedded IUDs were compared to those with embedded IUDs. Measurement of the width of the endometrial cavity at the fundus was successfully performed in 132 patients with nonembedded IUDs and 29 with embedded IUDs. The mean ± SD values of the fundal uterine cavity for the nonembedded and embedded IUDs were 32 ± 1.0 and 25 ± 0.8 mm, [corrected] respectively (P = .0003). Patients with embedded IUDs have a smaller fundal endometrial cavity diameter compared to those with normally placed IUDs as documented using 3D rendering of the uterus. Whether preprocedural 3D sonography for women who are IUD candidates would be useful deserves further study.

  7. Unmet demand for highly effective postpartum contraception in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Joseph E; Hopkins, Kristine; Aiken, Abigail R A; Hubert, Celia; Stevenson, Amanda J; White, Kari; Grossman, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to assess women's contraceptive preferences and use in the first 6 months after delivery. The postpartum period represents a key opportunity for women to learn about and obtain effective contraception, especially since 50% of unintended pregnancies to parous women occur within 2 years of a previous birth. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 800 postpartum women recruited from three hospitals in Austin and El Paso, TX. Women aged 18-44 who wanted to delay childbearing for at least 24 months were eligible for the study and completed interviews following delivery and at 3 and 6 months postpartum. Participants were asked about the contraceptive method they were currently using and the method they would prefer to use at 6 months after delivery. At 6 months postpartum, 13% of women were using an intrauterine device or implant, and 17% were sterilized or had a partner who had had a vasectomy. Twenty-four percent were using hormonal methods, and 45% relied on less effective methods, mainly condoms and withdrawal. Yet 44% reported that they would prefer to be using sterilization, and 34% would prefer to be using long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). This study shows a considerable preference for LARC and permanent methods at 6 months postpartum. However, there is a marked discordance between women's method preference and actual use, indicating substantial unmet demand for highly effective methods of contraception. In two Texas cities, many more women preferred long-acting and permanent contraceptive methods (LAPM) than were able to access these methods at 6 months postpartum. Women's contraceptive needs could be better met by counseling about all methods, by reducing cost barriers and by making LAPM available at more sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of previous induced abortions on postabortion contraception selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Melissa; Roston, Alicia; Keith, Louis; Patel, Ashlesha

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to compare contraceptive method selection in women undergoing their first pregnancy termination versus women undergoing repeat pregnancy termination in an urban abortion clinic. We hypothesized that women undergoing repeat abortions will select highly effective contraceptives (intrauterine device, subdermal implant, tubal ligation) more often than patients undergoing their first abortion. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all women undergoing first-trimester surgical abortion at John H. Stroger, Jr., Hospital of Cook County from October 1, 2009, to October 31, 2011. We compared contraceptive method selection in the postabortion period after receipt of contraceptive counseling for 7466 women, stratifying women by history of no prior abortion versus one or more abortions. Of the 7466 women, 48.6% (3625) had no history of previous abortion. After controlling for age, race and number of living children, women with a history of abortion were more likely to select a highly effective method [odds ratio (OR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.33]. Most significantly, having living children was the strongest predictor of a highly effective method with an OR of 3.17 (95% CI 2.69-3.75). In women having a first-trimester abortion, the factors most predictive of selecting a highly effective method for postabortion contraception include history of previous abortion and having living children. The latter holds true independent of abortion history. This paper is unique in its ability to demonstrate the high interest in highly effective contraceptive selection in high-risk, low-income women with prior abortion history. Efforts to integrate provision of highly effective methods of contraception for postabortion care are essential for the reduction of future unintended pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Laboratory screening prior to initiating contraception: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naomi K; Steenland, Maria W; Marchbanks, Polly A; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2013-05-01

    Certain contraceptive methods may increase the risk of adverse events for women with certain medical conditions, including some women with diabetes, hyperlipidemia, liver disease, cervical cancer, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This review was conducted to evaluate the evidence regarding health outcomes among women with and without laboratory testing to identify certain medical conditions prior to initiating contraceptives. The PubMed database was searched from database inception through April 2012 for all peer-reviewed articles in any language evaluating health outcomes among women who initiated certain contraceptive methods and who had or had not received glucose, lipid, liver enzyme, cervical cytology, STI or HIV screening. The systematic review did not identify any relevant direct evidence. While certain methods of hormonal contraception may not be safe for use by some women with diabetes, hyperlipidemia or liver disease, there is little value in screening for these conditions in asymptomatic women prior to initiation of contraceptive methods due to the low prevalence of these conditions among women of reproductive age. Although intrauterine devices (IUDs) and cervical caps should not be initiated in women with cervical cancer, the high rates of cervical screening and low incidence of cervical cancer in the United States make this scenario unlikely. Although some women at risk for, or infected with, STIs or HIV should not undergo IUD insertion, if women have been screened for STIs or HIV according to guidelines, additional screening at the time of IUD insertion is not warranted. Requiring unnecessary laboratory screening prior to initiation of contraceptive methods may impose barriers to contraceptive access, and efforts to remove such barriers are critical in reducing unintended pregnancy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Choice of Postpartum Contraception: Factors Predisposing Pregnant Adolescents to Choose Less Effective Methods Over Long-Acting Reversible Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Mariam R; Wiemann, Constance M; Buzi, Ruth S; Kozinetz, Claudia A; Peskin, Melissa; Smith, Peggy B

    2016-06-01

    The purposes were to determine contraceptive methods pregnant adolescents intend to use postpartum and to understand factors that predispose intention to use less effective birth control than long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). Participants were 247 pregnant minority adolescents in a prenatal program. Intention was assessed by asking "Which of the following methods of preventing pregnancy do you intend to use after you deliver?" Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with intent to use nonhormonal (NH) contraception (male/female condoms, abstinence, withdrawal and no method) or short-/medium-acting hormonal (SMH) contraception (birth control pill, patch, vaginal ring, injectable medroxyprogesterone acetate) compared with LARC (implant and intrauterine device) postpartum. Twenty-three percent intended to use LARC, 53% an SMH method, and 24% an NH method. Participants who intended to use NH or SMH contraceptive methods over LARC were significantly more likely to believe that LARC is not effective at preventing pregnancy, to report that they do not make decisions to help reach their goals and that partners are not important when making contraceptive decisions. Other important factors were having a mother who was aged >19 years at first birth and had not graduated from high school, not having experienced a prior pregnancy or talked with parents about birth control options, and the perception of having limited financial resources. Distinct profiles of factors associated with intending to use NH or SMH contraceptive methods over LARC postpartum were identified and may inform future interventions to promote the use of LARC to prevent repeat pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Attitudes towards and knowledge about intrauterine contraceptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abortion or electively when the woman wishes.[8]. Objective. To evaluate knowledge about and attitudes towards the IUCD among women in the reproductive age group in a resource- constrained setting. Methods. We performed a survey of women attending antenatal/postnatal clinics at Northdale Hospital (NDH) and East ...

  12. Consequences of emergency contraceptives: the adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomin, Anne; Keller, Valentin; Daraï, Emile; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) offers women an important strategy to prevent unintended pregnancy following intercourse. Despite the constant improvement of availability of different molecules and techniques already existing (Yuzpe regimen, levonorgestrel, intrauterine device) and the emergence of ulipristal acetate, the numbers of unintended pregnancies and unplanned births could still be reduced. This review will evaluate all the information about the potential adverse effects and tolerability of each method of EC by putting them in balance with their safety and effectiveness. A literature search until December 2013 was performed to identify all trials studying the safety data available concerning EC. Different means of EC have been demonstrated to be generally safe and well tolerated. These data support women information in order to improve use and efficacy of EC.

  13. Hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism: national follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Svendsen, Anne Louise; Agger, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of venous thrombosis in current users of different types of hormonal contraception, focusing on regimen, oestrogen dose, type of progestogen, and route of administration. Design National cohort study. Setting Denmark, 1995-2005. Participants Danish women aged 15-49 with no history of cardiovascular or malignant disease. Main outcome measures Adjusted rate ratios for all first time deep venous thrombosis, portal thrombosis, thrombosis of caval vein, thrombosis of renal vein, unspecified deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism during the study period. Results 10.4 million woman years were recorded, 3.3 million woman years in receipt of oral contraceptives. In total, 4213 venous thrombotic events were observed, 2045 in current users of oral contraceptives. The overall absolute risk of venous thrombosis per 10 000 woman years in non-users of oral contraceptives was 3.01 and in current users was 6.29. Compared with non-users of combined oral contraceptives the rate ratio of venous thrombembolism in current users decreased with duration of use (4 years 2.76, 2.53 to 3.02; Pgestodene 1.86 (1.59 to 2.18), with drospirenone 1.64 (1.27 to 2.10), and with cyproterone 1.88 (1.47 to 2.42). Compared with non-users of oral contraceptives, the rate ratio for venous thromboembolism in users of progestogen only oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel or norethisterone was 0.59 (0.33 to 1.03) or with 75 μg desogestrel was 1.12 (0.36 to 3.49), and for hormone releasing intrauterine devices was 0.90 (0.64 to 1.26). Conclusion The risk of venous thrombosis in current users of combined oral contraceptives decreases with duration of use and decreasing oestrogen dose. For the same dose of oestrogen and the same length of use, oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone were associated with a significantly higher risk of venous thrombosis than oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. Progestogen only pills and hormone releasing

  14. Increasing Contraceptive Access for Hard-to-Reach Populations With Vouchers and Social Franchising in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Benjamin; Mackay, Anna; Dingle, Antonia; Tuyiragize, Richard; Nnyombi, William; Dasgupta, Aisha

    2017-09-27

    From 2001 to 2011, modern contraceptive prevalence in Uganda increased from 18% to 26%. However, modern method use, in particular use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and permanent methods (PMs), remained low. In the 2011 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey, only 1 of 5 married women used a LARC or PM even though 34% indicated an unmet need for contraception. Between 2011 and 2014, a social franchise and family planning voucher program, supporting 400 private facilities to provide family planning counseling and broaden contraceptive choice by adding LARCs and PMs to the service mix, offered a voucher to enable poor women to access family planning services at franchised facilities. This study analyzes service trends and voucher client demographics and estimates the contribution of the program to increasing contraceptive prevalence in Uganda, using the Impact 2 model developed by Marie Stopes International. Between March 2011 and December 2014, 330,826 women received a family planning service using the voucher, of which 70% of voucher clients chose an implant and 25% chose an intrauterine device. The median age of voucher users was 28 years; 79% had no education or only a primary education; and 48% reported they were unemployed or a housewife. We estimated that by 2014, 280,000 of the approximately 8,600,000 women of reproductive age in Uganda were using a contraceptive method provided by the program and that 120,000 of the clients were "additional users" of contraception, contributing 1.4 percentage points to the national modern contraceptive prevalence rate. The combination of family planning vouchers and a franchise-based quality improvement initiative can leverage existing private health infrastructure to substantially expand family planning access and choice for disadvantaged populations and potentially improve contraceptive prevalence when scaled nationally. © Bellows et al.

  15. Pharmacology update in adolescents: contraception and human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Cynthia; VandenBussche, Heather

    2013-04-01

    The ideal contraceptive agent remains elusive for the adolescent population. Contraceptive failure is often caused by inappropriate or inconsistent use, and discontinuation within the first year is not uncommon. Various methods have been explored within the adolescent population to increase efficacy rates, minimize side effects, and prevent unwanted pregnancies. The use of intrauterine devices and continuous use of combined oral contraceptives may lead to greater efficacy because of the ease of use and reduction in menstrual symptoms. Recent literature supports the continued use of medroxyprogesterone for adolescents without time limits, and advances in emergency contraception have increased access and use, but have not affected pregnancy rates. Human papillomavirus infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection and is associated with genital warts and the risk for cervical, penile, anal, and vulvovaginal cancer caused by persistent infection. A quadrivalent vaccine is indicated for both males and females to prevent genital warts and cancer, whereas the bivalent vaccine is indicated only for females and cancer prevention. Vaccination rates remain low among adolescents, and except in Virginia and the District of Columbia, vaccination is not a requirement for school entry. Research is ongoing for a 2-dose vaccine to improve vaccination rates while maintaining efficacy. Education is critical to prevent future infections and enhance vaccination rates.

  16. Diabetes mellitus and fertility control: contraception management issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestman, J H; Schmidt-Sarosi, C

    1993-06-01

    The need to prevent complications in the woman and fetus mandates that pregnancies in diabetic women always be planned and that safe and effective contraceptives be used at all times until it is determined that pregnancy is a safe and desired option. Pregnancy may aggravate complications of diabetes such as retinopathy and coronary artery disease. A pregnant diabetic woman is also more likely to experience such complications as hypertension, urinary tract infection, polyhydramnios, and cesarean section. Her fetus is at increased risk for congenital malformations, prematurity, stillbirth, neonatal morbidity, and diabetes later in life. Good diabetic control must be maintained before and throughout the pregnancy to minimize the risk of these and other complications. Until such time as good control is achieved and the woman desires pregnancy, a reliable method of contraception should be used. Most recent research supports the use of barrier methods, low-dose monophasic or triphasic oral contraceptives, or progestin-only methods, at least for the short-term. Under some circumstances the intrauterine device may be an appropriate option. Long-term data regarding the use of these methods is lacking. The decision regarding which method of contraception is used should be made by the woman in consultation with her physician.

  17. Trends in contraceptive use and determinants of choice in China: 1980-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuntong

    2012-06-01

    In China, contraception is the most commonly used practice adopted by couples seeking to limit their number of children and to determine the time interval between births. Since 1980, the implementation of mandatory contraceptive strategy has reduced the fertility rate. Using large-scale data from national statistics and nationally representative sample surveys, the current study aims to assess Chinese trends in contraceptive use and determinants of choice from 1980 to 2010 among married women and men aged 20-49 years. Since 1980, national data on contraceptive methods utilization have been gathered by the National Population and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China (NPFPC). Additionally, data from three roughly representative decennial samples (1988, 1997, 2006) of Chinese women of aged 20 to 57 years have been gathered by the NPFPC through the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Surveys in China. A relatively stable Chinese mode of contraception has been established and maintained since the 1980s. This is characterized by long-term contraceptive use which is still dominant in current China. In addition, China's total contraceptive prevalence rates remain at the highest level across the globe from 1980 to 2010. However, the overall method composition of contraceptive use within China has changed since the mid-1990s. Over the study period, the prevalence rate of sterilization increased from 30.21% in 1980 to 46.47% of married women of reproductive age (20-49 years) in 1994 and then declined to 31.7% in 2010. At the same time, intrauterine device usage increased (39.83% in 1980 to 48.15% in 2010), as did oral contraception (0.3% in 1980 to 0.98% in 2010) and condom usage (2.35% in 1980 to 9.32% in 2010). The results from the multinomial logit model show that an individual's contraceptive choice depends not only on individual characteristics, including ethnicity, age, education level, household registration, region, number of

  18. Optimizing the delivery of contraceptives in low- and middle-income countries through task shifting: a systematic review of effectiveness and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polus, Stephanie; Lewin, Simon; Glenton, Claire; Lerberg, Priya M; Rehfuess, Eva; Gülmezoglu, A Metin

    2015-04-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of task shifting for the delivery of injectable contraceptives, contraceptive implants, intrauterine devices (IUDs), tubal ligation and vasectomy in low- and middle-income countries. Multiple electronic databases were searched up to 25 May 2012 for studies which had assessed the delivery of contraceptives by health workers with lower levels of training, compared to delivery by health workers usually assigned this role, or compared to no organized provision of contraceptives. We included randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials, controlled before-after studies, and interrupted time series. Data were extracted using a standard form and the certainty of the evidence found was assessed using GRADE. We identified six randomized controlled trials published between 1977 and 1995 that assessed the safety and effectiveness of task shifting for the delivery of long-term contraceptives. Two studies assessed IUD insertion by nurses compared to doctors, two assessed IUD insertion by auxiliary nurse-midwives compared to doctors, one assessed tubal ligation by midwives compared to doctors, and one assessed the delivery of vasectomy by medical students compared to doctors. In general, little or no difference was found in contraceptive outcomes between cadres. Study design limitations and the low number of eligible studies, however, allow only limited conclusions to be drawn. The findings indicate that task shifting for the delivery of long-term contraceptives may be a safe and effective approach to increasing access to contraception. Further research is needed because the certainty of the evidence identified is variable.

  19. Vaginal misoprostol prior to intrauterine device insertion in women delivered only by elective cesarean section: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Mohamed S; Abbas, Ahmed M; Hegazy, Aml M; El-Nashar, Ihab M

    2017-06-01

    The current study aims to evaluate if vaginal misoprostol (400 mcg) administered prior to intrauterine device (IUD) insertion increases the ease and success of insertion among women who had delivered only by elective cesarean delivery (CD). The current study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in Assiut Women's Health Hospital, Egypt, between the 1st of April 2015 and the 31st of March 2016 and included women who delivered only by elective CD. One hundred forty women were randomized into two groups; misoprostol group received two misoprostol 400-mcg tablets vaginally, and placebo group received two placebo tablets 3 h before a copper T380A IUD insertion. The primary outcome measure was the difference in the ease of insertion score using a 10-cm visual analog scale between both groups with 0=very easy insertion, and 10=terribly difficult insertion. The ease of insertion score was lower in the misoprostol group (2.2±0.5 vs. 4.2±0.5, p=.0001) with higher number of successful IUD insertions than the placebo group (69 [98.6%] vs. 61 [87.1%], p=.009). The mean pain score reported by the women was lower in misoprostol group (2.7±0.6 vs. 4.3±0.8) with higher level of satisfaction from the whole procedure (8.9±0.4 vs. 7.9±0.2) with p=.001 for both. Misoprostol 400 mcg vaginally prior to IUD insertion eases and increase the success of insertion with reduction of pain among women who had delivered only by elective CD. The use of vaginal misoprostol before IUD insertion in women who had never delivered vaginally before may increase the ease and success of insertion. Moreover, it may reduce the pain felt by women during the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Family Physicians and Provision of Immediate Postpartum Contraception: A CERA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniz, Michelle H; McEvoy, Anna K; Hofmeister, Michelle; Plegue, Missy; Chang, Tammy

    2017-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) support the provision of intrauterine devices (IUDs) and the contraceptive implant to women immediately after childbirth. We aimed to assess perceived training needs and barriers to immediate postpartum contraceptive service delivery among US family physicians. We contributed items regarding postpartum contraception to the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) omnibus survey of a national cohort of family medicine educators. We assessed self-estimated adequacy of training to insert IUDs and implants immediately postpartum, how often these services are provided, and barriers to service provision. Our sample of 409 respondents who provide labor and delivery maternity care was primarily Caucasian (79.9%) and female (56.0%). Significantly fewer respondents felt comfortable counseling about long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), inserting an IUD, and inserting an implant immediately postpartum compared to at 6+ weeks postpartum (all comparisons Pimmediate postpartum IUD (36.4%) than an implant (58.7%; Pimmediate postpartum IUD (81.17%) or implant (80.1%). Device unavailability was the most commonly cited reason for never having placed an immediate postpartum IUD (67.8%) or implant (71.2%) at one's institution. As reimbursement for immediate postpartum contraception becomes more common, family physicians are on the front lines to make these services available to patients who desire them. Training is necessary to enable family physicians to provide this evidence-based option to women.

  1. The influence of partnership on contraceptive use among HIV-infected women accessing antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Christina I; Kaida, Angela; Seage, George R; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Muyindike, Winnie; Boum, Yap; Mocello, A Rain; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Haberer, Jessica E; Bangsberg, David R; Matthews, Lynn T

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to determine individual and dyadic factors associated with effective contraceptive use among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in rural Uganda. HIV-infected women enrolled in the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort completed questionnaires (detailing sociobehavioral characteristics, sexual and reproductive history, contraceptive use, fertility desires) and phlebotomy (October 2011-March 2013). We describe prevalence of effective contraceptive use (i.e., consistent condom use and/or oral contraceptives, injectable hormonal contraception, intrauterine device, female sterilization) in the previous 6 months among sexually active, nonpregnant women (18-40 years). We assessed covariates of contraceptive use using multivariable logistic regression. A total of 362 women (median values: age 30 years, CD4 count 397 cells/mm(3), 4.0 years since ART initiation) were included. Among 284 sexually active women, 50% did not desire a(nother) child, and 51% had a seroconcordant partner. Forty-five percent (n=127) reported effective contraceptive use, of whom 57% (n=72) used condoms, 42% (n=53) injectables, 12% (n=15) oral contraceptives and 11% (n=14) other effective methods. Dual contraception was reported by 6% (n=8). Only "partnership fertility desire" was independently associated with contraceptive use; women who reported that neither partner desired a child had significantly increased odds of contraceptive use (adjusted odds ratio: 2.40, 95% confidence interval: 1.07-5.35) compared with women in partnerships where at least one partner desired a child. Less than half of sexually active HIV-infected women accessing ART used effective contraception, of which 44% (n=56) relied exclusively on male condoms, highlighting a continued need to expand access to a wider range of longer-acting female-controlled contraceptive methods. Association with partnership fertility desire underscores the need to include

  2. Oral contraceptive use is associated with prostate cancer: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margel, David; Fleshner, Neil E

    2011-01-01

    Background Several recent studies have suggested that oestrogen exposure may increase the risk of prostate cancer (PCa). Objectives To examine associations between PCa incidence and mortality and population-based use of oral contraceptives (OCs). It was hypothesised that OC by-products may cause environmental contamination, leading to an increased low level oestrogen exposure and therefore higher PCa incidence and mortality. Methods The hypothesis was tested in an ecological study. Data from the International Agency for Research on Cancer were used to retrieve age-standardised rates of prostate cancer in 2007, and data from the United Nations World Contraceptive Use 2007 report were used to retrieve data on contraceptive use. A Pearson correlation and multivariable linear regression were used to associate the percentage of women using OCs, intrauterine devices, condoms or vaginal barriers to the age standardised prostate cancer incidence and mortality. These analyses were performed by individual nations and by continents worldwide. Results OC use was significantly associated with prostate cancer incidence and mortality in the individual nations worldwide (r=0.61 and r=0.53, respectively; pcontraceptives (ie, intra-uterine devices, condoms or vaginal barriers) were not correlated with prostate cancer incidence or mortality. On multivariable analysis the correlation with OC was independent of a nation's wealth. Conclusion A significant association between OCs and PCa has been shown. It is hypothesised that the OC effect may be mediated through environmental oestrogen levels; this novel concept is worth further investigation.

  3. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the uterus CHOICES FOR EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION Two emergency contraceptive pills may be bought without a prescription. Plan ... to provide ongoing birth control. MORE ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVE PILLS Women of any age can buy Plan ...

  4. Mortality in relation to oral contraceptive use and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, Martin; Painter, Rosemary; Yeates, David

    2003-07-19

    As part of the Oxford Family Planning Association study, we compared mortality in relation to oral contraceptive use and smoking to highlight the differences between them from the perspective of public health. The study consisted of 17032 women, aged 25-39 years at entry, recruited between May 1, 1968, and July 31, 1974, who had used oral contraceptives, a diaphragm, or an intrauterine device. We assessed mortality from follow-up data recorded until Dec 31, 2000. The analysis is based on woman-years of observation. We analysed 889 deaths. Women who had ever used oral contraceptives had increased mortality from cervical cancer (rate ratio 7.2, 95% CI 1.1-303), and decreased mortality from other uterine (0.2, 0.0-0.8) and ovarian cancers (0.4, 0.2-0.7). Oral contraceptives had some adverse effect on deaths from ischaemic heart disease in women who smoked 15 or more cigarettes per day. For all causes of mortality, the rate ratio for death in women who ever used oral contraceptives was 0.89 (95% CI 0.77-1.02). By contrast, this rate ratio was 1.24 (1.03-1.49) in those who smoked one to 14 cigarettes per day, and 2.14 (1.81-2.53) in those who smoked 15 or more cigarettes per day. There was no harmful effect of oral contraceptive use on overall mortality. By contrast, death from all causes was more than twice as high in smokers of 15 or more cigarettes a day as in non-smokers. The harmful effect was already apparent in women aged 35-44 years.

  5. Contraceptives as possible risk factors for postpartum depression: A retrospective study of the food and drug administration adverse event reporting system, 2004-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibe, Megumi; Hane, Yuuki; Abe, Junko; Matsui, Toshinobu; Kato, Yamato; Ueda, Natsumi; Sasaoka, Sayaka; Motooka, Yumi; Hatahira, Haruna; Hasegawa, Shiori; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Hara, Hideaki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2018-04-01

    Postpartum depression is a mood disorder that commonly affects women during the early postpartum period. The objective of this study was to analyse the association of postpartum depression with drugs (including contraceptive devices and implants) with spontaneously reported adverse events reported in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database. Retrospective study. Reports of postpartum depression events between 2004-2015 were analysed with a reporting odds ratio (ROR) algorithm. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities was used to identify postpartum depression. The reporting odds ratios (95% confidence intervals, CI) of levonorgestrel (an intrauterine device with progestogen), etonogestrel (a hormonal contraceptive implant), sertraline and drospirenone (an oral contraceptive) were 12.5 (8.7-18.0), 14.0 (8.5-22.8), 12.2 (6.5-23.1) and 5.4 (2.7-10.9) respectively. Among the drugs in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database, the use of contraceptives or an intrauterine device with progestogen might convey risk for postpartum depression.

  6. Combined hormonal contraception use in reproductive-age women with contraindications to estrogen use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauring, Julianne R; Lehman, Erik B; Deimling, Timothy A; Legro, Richard S; Chuang, Cynthia H

    2016-09-01

    contraindications to estrogen use. The MyNewOptions baseline study sample included 987 adult women who were mostly young (46% were 18-25 years), white (94%), employed (70%), and married or cohabiting (54%). Thirteen percent (n = 130) of the sample had a medical contraindication to estrogen-containing contraceptive use: migraine with aura (81%) was the most common contraindication, followed by smokers older than age 35 years (7%), hypertension (11%), history of venous thromboembolism (4%), and diabetes with complications (2%). High use of combined hormonal contraceptives was reported among the women with medical contraindications to estrogen at 39% (n = 51). This was not statistically different from women without a medical contraindication (47%, P = .1). Among the 130 women with a contraindication, whether they did or did not use an estrogen-containing contraceptive did not vary by education level, income, or weight category. With respect to their contraceptive prescribers, there were no differences in prescriber specialty, provider type, or clinic type comparing women using and not using an estrogen-containing contraceptive. Among this study sample of reproductive-age women, there was a high rate of combined hormonal contraceptive use in women with a medical contraindication to estrogen use. These women may be at an increased risk for cardiovascular events. Processes need to be improved to ensure that women with medical contraindications to estrogen-containing contraception are being offered the safest and most effective methods, including long-acting reversible contraceptives, such as intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Choices on contraceptive methods in post-abortion family planning clinic in the northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga Cynthia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Brazil, a Ministry of Health report revealed women who underwent an abortion were predominantly in the use of contraceptive methods, but mentioned inconsistent or erroneously contraceptive use. Promoting the use of contraceptive methods to prevent unwanted pregnancies is one of the most effective strategies to reduce abortion rates and maternal morbidity and mortality. Therefore, providing post-abortion family planning services that include structured contraceptive counseling with free and easy access to contraceptive methods can be suitable. So the objective of this study is to determine the acceptance and selection of contraceptive methods followed by a post-abortion family planning counseling. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2008, enrolling 150 low income women to receive post-abortion care at a family planning clinic in a public hospital located in Recife, Brazil. The subjects were invited to take part of the study before receiving hospital leave from five different public maternities. An appointment was made for them at a family planning clinic at IMIP from the 8th to the 15th day after they had undergone an abortion. Every woman received information on contraceptive methods, side effects and fertility. Counseling was individualized and addressed them about feelings, expectations and motivations regarding contraception as well as pregnancy intention. Results Of all women enrolled in this study, 97.4% accepted at least one contraceptive method. Most of them (73.4% had no previous abortion history. Forty of the women who had undergone a previous abortion, 47.5% reported undergoing unsafe abortion. Slightly more than half of the pregnancies (52% were unwanted. All women had knowledge of the use of condoms, oral contraceptives and injectables. The most chosen method was injectables, followed by oral contraceptives and condoms. Only one woman chose an intrauterine device. Conclusion The

  8. Cervical dysplasia and cancer and the use of hormonal contraceptives in Jamaican women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smikle Monica

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conducted to determine whether use of hormonal contraceptives is associated with cervical dysplasia and cancer in a population where there is widespread use of hormonal contraception and the rates of cervical cancer remain high at 27.5/100,000. Methods A case-control study was conducted among women visiting the colposcopy and gynaelogical clinics at a tertiary referral hospital. Two hundred and thirty six cases CIN I (72, II (59, III (54, cancer (51 and 102 controls, consented and were interviewed on use of contraceptives using a structured questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to determine odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs associated with use of hormonal contraception in cases and controls and in low and high risk cases. Recruitment was carried out from 2001–2002. Results Contraceptives used were: oral contraceptives – 35%, injections (depot medroxy progesterone acetate (Depo-provera – 10%, Intrauterine devices – 2%, combinations of these and tubal ligation – 30%. 23% reported use of 'other' methods, barrier contraceptives or no form of contraception. Barrier contraceptive use was not significantly different between cases and controls. Current and/or past exposure to hormonal contraceptives (HC by use of the pill or injection, alone or in combination with other methods was significantly higher in the cases. In multivariate analysis with age and number of sexual partners as co-variates, use of hormonal contraception was associated both with disease, [OR, 1.92 (CI 1.11, 3.34; p = 0.02] and severity of the disease [OR, 2.22 (CI 1.05, 4.66 p = 0.036]. When parity and alcohol consumption were added to the model, hormonal contraception was no longer significant. The significant association with high risk disease was retained when the model was controlled for age and number of sexual partners. Depo-provera use (with age and number of sexual partners as covariates was also associated

  9. Effect of cervical lidocaine-prilocaine cream on pain perception during copper T380A intrauterine device insertion among parous women: A randomized double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ahmed M; Abdellah, Mohamed S; Khalaf, Mohamed; Bahloul, Mustafa; Abdellah, Noura H; Ali, Mohamed K; Abdelmagied, Ahmed M

    2017-03-01

    The objective was to investigate the analgesic effect of cervical lidocaine-prilocaine (LP) cream in alleviating pain during copper T380A intrauterine device (IUD) insertion among parous women. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial at Assiut Women's Health Hospital, Egypt, from October 2015 to April 2016 of parous women desiring copper IUD insertion. We randomized the subjects in a 1:1 ratio to LP cream or placebo. Seven minutes prior to IUD insertion, women received 2 ml of LP cream or placebo to the anterior cervical lip, followed by 2 ml placed in the cervical canal using a Q-tip applicator. The study end point was the subjects' self-reported pain using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) during cervical tenaculum placement, sound insertion, IUD insertion and 5 min postprocedure. We considered a 2-cm difference in VAS scores between study groups as clinically significant. Also, the difference in the ease of insertion score using a 10-cm VAS with 0=very easy insertion and 10=terribly difficult insertion was assessed. The study included 120 women (n=60 in each group). LP cream reduces the median VAS pain scores during tenaculum placement (2 vs. 4), sound insertion (3 vs. 6) and IUD insertion (3 vs. 6.5) with p=.0001 at all steps. A lower ease of insertion score was also determined among LP women (2.5±0.98 vs. 4.5±2.7, p=.001). Participants reported no side effects. Use of cervical LP cream prior to copper T380A IUD insertion may alleviate the IUD insertion pain among parous women. Cervical LP cream could be effective as an analgesic prior to copper T380A IUD insertion with no side effects. Further studies are needed to assess the women's satisfaction from lying with a speculum in place for 7 min while waiting for the cream to be effective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency contraception: update and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Aileen

    2010-03-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is the postcoital method of pregnancy prevention. Three methods of EC are used in the United States: (1) levonorgestrel-only pills, Plan B (Barr Pharmaceuticals, LLC, New Jersey) (2) combined estrogen and progestin pills, and (3) the copper intrauterine device. Used within 120 hours after unprotected sexual intercourse, EC reduces the risk of pregnancy by 60 to 94%. EC is a critical component of medical care for sexual assault survivors, and several states have laws mandating this standard of care. Levonorgestrel-only EC is available to women >or=17 years of age without a prescription. Women who were counseled by their clinician about EC were 11 times more likely to use EC in the following 12 months. Advance provision of EC to women has not been found to decrease rates of unintended pregnancy compared with routine pharmacy access; however, women routinely prefer advance provision. The newly approved by the Food and Drug Administration single-dose EC, Plan B One-Step (Barr Pharmaceuticals, LLC), may affect unintended pregnancy rates among EC users by simplifying use. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  11. Oral contraception for women of middle age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiangyan; Mueck, Alfred O

    2015-11-01

    Women at middle age have decreased fertility and their pregnancies are higher risk. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are effective but confer increased risk of age-related diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. These risks are lower, however, with progestogen-only pills (POP). Therefore, other than the levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUD), POP are usually the first choice, even though they do often lead to bleeding problems, which are already frequent in the perimenopause. However, the main risk of COC, venous thromboembolism, seems not to be relevant in (non-hospitalized) Chinese women and perhaps also other Asian women. COC may therefore be in fact a better choice than POP for these groups. In contrast to POP and IUDs, they have a variety of benefits especially important for middle-aged women, including a large decrease of the risk of ovarian, endometrial and colorectal cancer, an improvement in bleeding irregularities, a reduction of climacteric symptoms and some protection against bone loss. Further research is needed into individualized and safe contraception that takes into account ethnicity, as well as other factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A randomized, controlled, multicenter contraceptive efficacy clinical trial of the intravas device, a nonocclusive surgical male sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Wei; Gu, Yi-Qun; Wu, Wei-Xiong; Bo, Li-Wei; Zheng, Tian-Gui; Chen, Zhen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Because of unavoidable complications of vasectomy, this study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of male sterilization with a nonobstructive intravas device (IVD) implanted into the vas lumen by a mini-surgical method compared with no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV). IVDs were categorized into two types: IVD-B has a tail used for fixing to the vas deferens (fixed wing) whereas IVD-A does not. A multicenter prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in China. The study was comprised of 1459 male volunteers seeking vasectomy who were randomly assigned to the IVD-A (n = 487), IVD-B (n = 485) or NSV (n = 487) groups and underwent operation. Follow-up included visits at the 3rd–6th and 12th postoperative months. The assessments of the subjects involved regular physical examinations (including general and andrological examinations) and semen analysis. The subjects’ partners also underwent monitoring for pregnancy by monthly interviews regarding menstruation and if necessary, urine tests. There were no significant differences in pregnancy rates (0.65% for IVD-A, 0 for IVD-B and 0.21% for NSV) among the three groups (P > 0.05). The cumulative rates of complications at the 12th postoperative month were zero, 0.9% and 1.7% in the three groups, respectively. In conclusion, IVD male sterilization exhibits a low risk of long-term adverse events and was found to be effective as a male sterilization method, similar to the NSV technique. IVD male sterilization is expected to be a novel contraceptive method. PMID:24589454

  13. A randomized, controlled, multicenter contraceptive efficacy clinical trial of the intravas device, a nonocclusive surgical male sterilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hong Lu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of unavoidable complications of vasectomy, this study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of male sterilization with a nonobstructive intravas device (IVD implanted into the vas lumen by a mini-surgical method compared with no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV. IVDs were categorized into two types: IVD-B has a tail used for fixing to the vas deferens (fixed wing whereas IVD-A does not. A multicenter prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in China. The study was comprised of 1459 male volunteers seeking vasectomy who were randomly assigned to the IVD-A (n = 487, IVD-B (n = 485 or NSV (n = 487 groups and underwent operation. Follow-up included visits at the 3 rd -6 th and 12 th postoperative months. The assessments of the subjects involved regular physical examinations (including general and andrological examinations and semen analysis. The subjects' partners also underwent monitoring for pregnancy by monthly interviews regarding menstruation and if necessary, urine tests. There were no significant differences in pregnancy rates (0.65% for IVD-A, 0 for IVD-B and 0.21% for NSV among the three groups (P > 0.05. The cumulative rates of complications at the 12 th postoperative month were zero, 0.9% and 1.7% in the three groups, respectively. In conclusion, IVD male sterilization exhibits a low risk of long-term adverse events and was found to be effective as a male sterilization method, similar to the NSV technique. IVD male sterilization is expected to be a novel contraceptive method.

  14. A randomized, controlled, multicenter contraceptive efficacy clinical trial of the intravas device, a nonocclusive surgical male sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Wei; Gu, Yi-Qun; Wu, Wei-Xiong; Bo, Li-Wei; Zheng, Tian-Gui; Chen, Zhen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Because of unavoidable complications of vasectomy, this study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of male sterilization with a nonobstructive intravas device (IVD) implanted into the vas lumen by a mini-surgical method compared with no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV). IVDs were categorized into two types: IVD-B has a tail used for fixing to the vas deferens (fixed wing) whereas IVD-A does not. A multicenter prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in China. The study was comprised of 1459 male volunteers seeking vasectomy who were randomly assigned to the IVD-A (n = 487), IVD-B (n = 485) or NSV (n = 487) groups and underwent operation. Follow-up included visits at the 3 rd -6 th and 12 th postoperative months. The assessments of the subjects involved regular physical examinations (including general and andrological examinations) and semen analysis. The subjects' partners also underwent monitoring for pregnancy by monthly interviews regarding menstruation and if necessary, urine tests. There were no significant differences in pregnancy rates (0.65% for IVD-A, 0 for IVD-B and 0.21% for NSV) among the three groups (P > 0.05). The cumulative rates of complications at the 12 th postoperative month were zero, 0.9% and 1.7% in the three groups, respectively. In conclusion, IVD male sterilization exhibits a low risk of long-term adverse events and was found to be effective as a male sterilization method, similar to the NSV technique. IVD male sterilization is expected to be a novel contraceptive method.

  15. Male contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Vivek; Bantwal, Ganapathi

    2012-01-01

    Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the curren...

  16. Contraception after breast cancer: a retrospective review of the practice among French gynecologists in the 2000's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamy, A S; Abuellellah, H; Hocini, H; Coussy, F; Gorins, A; Serfaty, D; Tournant, B; Perret, F; Bonfils, S; Giacchetti, S; Cuvier, C; Espie, M

    2014-01-01

    To describe the French practices regarding contraception after breast cancer in the 2000's. A total of 2,500 forms were sent to gynecologists practicing in France. Inclusion criteria were premenopausal patients who had a history of breast cancer and who had been prescribed contraception after diagnosis. Between June 1, 2002 and January 1, 2003, 197 evaluable responses were retrieved. The median age of the sample was 38.5 years. The most commonly used form of contraception was an intrauterine device (n = 144, 73.1%). Hormonal contraception was prescribed for 42 patients (21.3%), and other methods were used in 29 patients (14.7%) (Condoms n = 14, tubal sterilization n = 7, and others n = 8). Recurrence occurred in 27 patients (13%); 2.9% in the progestin group, 16.3% in the IUD group, and 14.8% with the other methods). It is necessary to evaluate current contraception practices after breast cancer to evaluate the efficacy and safety of contraception in these patients.

  17. Likelihood of repeat abortion in a Swedish cohort according to the choice of post-abortion contraception: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilander, Helena; Alehagen, Siw; Svedlund, Linnea; Westlund, Karin; Thor, Johan; Brynhildsen, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Despite high access to contraceptive services, 42% of the women who seek an abortion in Sweden have a history of previous abortion(s). The reasons for this high repeat abortion rate remain obscure. The objective of this study was to study the choice of contraceptive method after abortion and related odds of repeat abortions within 3-4 years. This is a retrospective cohort study based on a medical record review at three hospitals in Sweden. We included 987 women who had an abortion during 2009. We reviewed medical records from the date of the index abortion until the end of 2012 to establish the choice of contraception following the index abortion and the occurrence of repeat abortions. We calculated odds ratios (OR) with 95% CI. While 46% of the women chose oral contraceptives, 34% chose long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC). LARC was chosen more commonly by women with a previous pregnancy, childbirth and/or abortion. During the follow-up period, 24% of the study population requested one or more repeat abortion(s). Choosing LARC at the time of the index abortion was associated with fewer repeat abortions compared with choosing oral contraceptives (13% vs. 26%, OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.24-0.52). Subdermal implant was as effective as intrauterine device in preventing repeat abortions beyond 3 years. Choosing LARC was associated with fewer repeat abortions over more than 3 years of follow up. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Knowledge about emergency contraception among women referred for treatment at a university hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Neves Lubianca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate knowledge about emergency contraception (EC in women who are referred for treatment at the HCPA. The study investigated prevalence of use and of knowledge about correct use of the method. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Settings: The study was conducted with patients admitted at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, from 2009 to 2010. Patients: Sexually active women, age range 18 to 50 years. Interventions: Patients answered a questionnaire about the use and knowledge about emergency contraception. Main Outcome Measures:  Primary outcome: prevalence of knowledge about the correct use of EC. Secondary outcome: prevalence of use of emergency contraception. Results: 61.2% of women reported using regular birth control pills, 18.7% used condoms, 9.0% used other methods, 3.0% used intrauterine device and 8.2% did not use a contraceptive method. Emergency contraception: 86.5% of interviewees reported having knowledge about the method, and 43.1% of those interviewees reported knowing how to use EC. In our study, 12.0% of interviewees correctly reported how to use EC. The prevalence of the use of EC in our sample was 19.4%. Conclusions: Though most interviewees reported having some knowledge about EC, only a small number were able to accurately describe its proper use.

  19. Racial and ethnic differences in men's knowledge and attitudes about contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, Sonya; Farkas, Amy; Dehlendorf, Christine; Rocca, Corinne H

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in men's contraceptive knowledge and attitudes. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine racial/ethnic differences in contraceptive knowledge and attitudes among 903 men aged 18-29 in the 2009 National Survey of Reproductive and Contraceptive Knowledge. Black and Hispanic men were less likely than Whites to have heard of most contraceptive methods, including female and male sterilization, and also had lower knowledge about hormonal and long-acting reversible methods. They were less likely to know that pills are ineffective when 2-3 pills are missed [Blacks: adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=0.42; Hispanics: aOR=0.53] and that fertility was not delayed after stopping the pill (Blacks: aOR=0.52; Hispanics: aOR=0.27). Hispanics were less likely to know that nulliparous women can use the intrauterine device (aOR=0.47). Condom knowledge was similar by race/ethnicity, but Blacks were less likely to view condoms as a hassle than Whites (aOR=0.46). Efforts to educate men, especially men of color, about contraceptive methods are needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Contraception access and use among U.S. servicewomen during deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Kate; Grossman, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 12% of active duty US servicewomen have an unintended pregnancy each year; however, little is known about contraception use during deployment. From April to November 2010, we conducted an online survey with a convenience sample of 281 servicewomen who had been deployed overseas to assess access to and use of contraception for deployment. Sixty-three percent of respondents used birth control for part or all of their last deployment. Although military health insurance covers most contraceptive methods, one third reported that they were unable to access a method they might want for deployment, and 59% did not speak with a military provider about contraceptive options prior to deployment. Certain methods were reportedly discouraged or not available for some women, including intrauterine devices and sterilization, and 41% of women requiring refills found them difficult to obtain. Given the high prevalence of unintended pregnancy among servicewomen, efforts should focus on improving contraceptive counseling prior to deployment and ensuring refill access during deployment, as well as expanding access to long-acting reversible methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Uptake and correlates of contraception among postpartum women in Kenya: results from a national cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achwoka, Dunstan; Pintye, Jillian; McGrath, Christine J; Kinuthia, John; Unger, Jennifer A; Obudho, Norah; Langat, Agnes; John-Stewart, Grace; Drake, Alison L

    2018-03-01

    The objective was to characterize uptake and correlates of effective contraceptive use postpartum. We analyzed data from a national, cross-sectional evaluation of prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs that enrolled women attending 6-week or 9-month infant immunization visits at 120 Kenyan maternal and child health clinics. We classified women who resumed sexual activity postpartum and did not desire a child within 2 years as having a need for family planning (FP). We included 955 (94%) of 1012 women 8-10 months postpartum in the analysis. Mean age was 25.8 years and 36% were primigravidas. By 9 months postpartum, 62% of all women used contraception and 59% used effective contraception [injectables, implants, intrauterine devices [IUDs], oral contraceptives [OCs] and tubal ligations]. Most contraceptive users (61%) used injectables, followed by implants (10%), OCs (6%), IUDs (4%) and condoms alone (2%). The majority (n=733, 77%) had a need for FP, and 67% of 733 women with FP need used effective contraception. Among women with a need for FP, effective contraception use was higher among those who discussed FP in postnatal care (PNC) than who did not discuss FP in PNC [prevalence ratio (PR) for PNC alone: 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-1.58; PR for PNC and antenatal care (ANC): 1.42, 95% CI: 1.21-1.67; p=.001 for both]. Two thirds of postpartum women with a need for FP used effective contraception at 9 months postpartum, and use was associated with discussing FP during PNC. Integrating FP counseling in ANC/PNC could be an effective strategy to increase effective contraception use. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Is there any association between hormonal contraceptives and cervical neoplasia in a poor Nigerian setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajah LO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Leonard Ogbonna Ajah,1,2 Chibuike Ogwuegbu Chigbu,2 Benjamin Chukwuma Ozumba,2 Theophilus Chimezie Oguanuo,2 Paul Olisaemeka Ezeonu1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria Background: The association between hormonal contraception and cervical cancer is controversial. These controversies may hamper the uptake of hormonal contraceptives. Objective: To determine the association between hormonal contraceptives and cervical neoplasia. Materials and methods: This was a case-control study in which Pap-smear results of 156 participants on hormonal contraceptives were compared with those of 156 participants on no form of modern contraception. Modern contraception is defined as the use of such contraceptives as condoms, pills, injectables, intrauterine devices, implants, and female or male sterilization. Those found to have abnormal cervical smear cytology results were subjected further to colposcopy. Biopsy specimens for histology were collected from the participants with obvious cervical lesions or those with suspicious lesions on colposcopy. The results were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics at a 95% level of confidence. Results: A total of 71 (45.5%, 60 (38.5%, and 25 (16.0% of the participants on hormonal contraceptives were using oral contraceptives, injectable contraceptives, and implants, respectively. Cervical neoplasia was significantly more common among participants who were ≥35 years old (6% versus 1%, P<0.0001, rural dwellers (6% versus 3.5%, P<0.0001, unmarried (7.6% versus 3.5%, P<0.0001, unemployed (6.8% versus 3.5%, P<0.0001, less educated (6% versus 3.8%, P<0.0001, and had high parity (6.8% versus 3.6%, P<0.0001. There was no statistical significant difference in cervical neoplasia between the two groups of participants (7 [4.5%] versus 6 [3.8%], P=1.0. Conclusion

  3. Contraceptive use by Palestine refugee mothers of young children attending UNRWA clinics: a cross-sectional follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hababeh, Majed; Zeidan, Wafaa; El-Kader, Mariam Abdel; Thaher, Anwar Al; Kassim, Nimer; Habash, Elias; Arab, Hasan; Khader, Ali; Seita, Akihiro

    2018-02-21

    UNRWA introduced family planning services in 1994 as an integral part of its expanded maternal and child health-care programme. The main objective of UNRWA's family planning programme is to promote the health of mothers, children, and their families. The aim of this follow-up study was to assess contraceptive practices in the target population 5 years after the 2010 follow-up study and to identify future programme needs. This cross-sectional survey was a done by trained nurses from June 1 to Dec 31, 2015. Participants were Palestinian refugee mothers who attended Well Baby Clinics at all UNRWA health centres with their youngest child (aged 2 months to 5 years). A sample size of 10 478 participants was calculated on the basis of contraceptive use in 2010, using Epi Info sample size calculation. Women were interviewed, and retrospective data from health records were used as supplementary data. We did a multiple logistic regression to test if maternal age and parity predicted contraceptive use. We used the χ 2 test to analyse the relation between previous contraceptive use and birth interval, birth weight, and gestational age. All participants provided verbal informed consent. The study was approved by the ethical committee in the UNRWA Health Department. Data were obtained from 9860 mothers (mean age 29·8 years [range 29·4-30·1]). 5849 (59%) women were using modern contraceptives at the time of the survey, 1745 (18%) were using traditional methods, and 2265 (23%) were not using any contraceptive method. The most common modern contraceptive was an intrauterine device (2186 [37%] women), and UNRWA was the main provider for 4827 (83%) women using modern contraceptives. The most common reasons for not using contraceptives were a wish to have a child (873 [22%] women), pregnancy (747 [19%]), and a husband's opposition (775 [20%]). Using women with less than three pregnancies as the reference category, use of contraceptives was most likely in women with three to six

  4. Attitudes toward long-acting reversible contraception among young women seeking abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Sally B; Cooper, Annette J; Baker, Naomi K; Lawton, Beverley

    2011-11-01

    Use of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods can reduce rates of unplanned pregnancy and abortion, but for a range of reasons, these methods are underused by young women. A third of women seeking abortion return for a subsequent abortion during their reproductive years and could benefit from using effective long-acting methods. We aimed to explore the attitudes of women seeking abortion toward contraception, with a focus on long-acting methods. Thirty women aged 16-25 (of Maori, Pacific Island, and European ethnicities) were recruited at a public hospital abortion clinic to participate in a semistructured interview. Participants were asked about past use of contraception, their understanding of pregnancy risk, reasons for method choice; and views on long-acting methods. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. There was a lack of prior knowledge about LARC methods (particularly intrauterine devices [IUD] and implants). Once information was provided, these methods were generally viewed favorably. Cost was a key factor in contraceptive choice, prohibiting choice of the Mirena® levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) or an implant for many women. Other important factors that determined method use and choice were familiarity with methods, whether or not they contained hormones, likely effect on periods, and other side effects. Access issues relating to LARC methods (including cost and awareness) need to be urgently addressed. When discussing postabortion contraceptive options, women would benefit from simple explanations about LARC: their appropriateness for women of all reproductive ages, reversible nature, mechanisms of action, impact on menstruation, and other potential side effects.

  5. Avaliação do desempenho de novilhas nelore implantadas com dispositivo intra-uterino (DIU recebendo ou não mistura mineral Evaluation of Nelore heifers performance with intrauterine devices with or without mineral mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Maria Zeoula

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e duas novilhas nelore (208,3kg foram distribuídas em 16 baias (duas/baia, em um delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado, sendo analisado em parcela sub-subdividida. Os tratamentos com sal comum ou mistura mineral constituíram as parcelas, o implante ou não do DIU as subparcelas e os períodos as sub-subparcelas. A ração concentrada participou em média 40% do total da matéria seca fornecida. Os tratamentos estudados não afetaram (P > 0,05 o ganho de peso e o rendimento de carcaça. Independentemente de tratamento, houve um ganho compensatório (P 0,05 comparado ao dos animais sem DIU.Thirty-two Nelore heifers (208.3kg were allocated into 16 pens (two/pen in randomized design, analyzed as split-splitplot. The treatments with salt or mineral mixture were considered plot, with or without intrauterine devices as split plots and periods as split-split plots. The concentrated ration participated with 40% of the total dry matter offered. There was no effect of the treatments (P > 0.05 on live weight gain or carcass yield. Apart from treatments, a compensatory growth (P 0.05 between animals using intrauterine devices and control groups.

  6. Reassessing the importance of long-acting contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpilow, Quentin C; Thomas, Adam T

    2017-02-01

    Several recent studies have highlighted the need for greater use of long-acting contraception. The most influential of these studies is the Contraceptive CHOICE Project, which was credited with substantially reducing participants' pregnancy risk by increasing their use of long-acting methods such as intrauterine devices and subdermal implants. However, because participants' rates of nonuse and condom use fell to zero at the outset of the intervention, it is possible that sizable pregnancy reductions could still have been achieved if enrollees had chosen shorter-acting, female-controlled methods such as oral contraception. The objective of the study was to estimate the proportion of the CHOICE Project's fertility impacts that could have been achieved without any increase in long-acting method use. The FamilyScape 3.0 microsimulation model was used to estimate CHOICE's impact on pregnancy risk and to simulate the counterfactual effect of moving all nonusers and condom users onto shorter-acting, female-controlled methods. FamilyScape models the sexual and contraceptive behaviors of women in the United States between 2006 and 2010, which is the period when CHOICE was implemented. Nearly three quarters of the CHOICE intervention's effects on pregnancy risk could have been achieved if participants had chosen shorter-acting, female-controlled methods over long-acting methods. Prioritizing the adoption of long-acting contraception may not be the most advisable strategy for reducing unintended pregnancy. The most impactful interventions will likely be those that increase the use of female-controlled methods, long-acting or otherwise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatricians' Knowledge And Practices Related To Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives For Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridy, Risa L; Maslyanskaya, Sofya; Lim, Sylvia; Coupey, Susan M

    2018-01-31

    A 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Statement identified long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) as first-line choices for adolescents, but pediatricians' current knowledge and practices about intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal contraceptive implants (Implants) is unknown. We aimed to characterize pediatricians' knowledge and practices about LARCs for adolescents. Cross-sectional online survey emailed to a convenience sample of AAP member pediatricians in New York, Utah, Illinois, and Kansas in 2015 & 2016. The study included 561 practicing pediatricians. We measured knowledge about the suitability of IUDs and Implants for adolescents using two 7-item scales; a score of 7 indicates all correct. We dichotomized participants' scores as high and low knowledge if they scored ≥85% correct or pediatricians. Almost all, 88%, counsel about contraception; 64% counsel about IUDs and Implants, but only 4.1% insert them; 70% prescribe short-acting hormonal contraceptives; 44% had read the AAP Policy Statement. Mean score on the knowledge scale was lower for IUDs than for Implants [4.2 vs. 5.1, respectively, ppediatricians, adolescent medicine subspecialists, agreeing that pregnancy is a serious problem for adolescents in their practice, and having read the AAP Policy Statement predicted high knowledge about both IUDs and Implants for adolescents. Most pediatrician respondents provided reproductive health care for adolescents and counseled about LARCs, but few inserted the devices. We identified knowledge deficits about suitability of IUDs for adolescents. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Contraceptive failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    , and 2614 received antenatal care. The variables studied comprise age, partner relationship, number of births, occupational and economical situation, and contraceptive use.Contraceptive failure, defined as contraceptive use (condom, diaphragm, IUD, oral contraception, or another modern method...... to use of condom and oral contraception than women aged 25-34 years. In addition, contraceptive failure was found to be associated with being single, a student, and having given birth twice or more previously. Regarding pregnancy acceptance, being 25-34 years of age was positively associated, whereas...

  9. U.S. Men's Perceptions and Experiences of Emergency Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rachel L; Fawson, Peter R; Frost, Caren J; Turok, David K

    2017-05-01

    Research suggests that men should be included in reproductive health decision making to help enhance positive health outcomes for their partners. Men affect the use of contraception and what method is used. Men's decisions may be affected by different factors such as gender, education, and the nature of their sexual relationship. A qualitative study was conducted to explore males' experiences and perceptions about emergency contraception (EC), and the meanings males assign to EC. Semistructured in-depth focus groups were held with 15 men who engage in heterosexual activity recruited from a university setting in the United States. Participants expressed egalitarian views of the contraception decision-making processes, a sense of responsibility regarding reproductive decision making, and that society has a negative stigma toward those who use EC. However, there was a lack of knowledge regarding the copper intrauterine device, which was not viewed as a method of EC. Exploring the role and needs of men in reproductive health care discussions and research is an important and growing area. Recommendations are provided for health care practitioners, policy, and future research around men and EC.

  10. Sources of information related to contraceptive methods and their relationship with unwanted pregnancies in women in a district of Eastern Anatolia