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Sample records for intracellular dynamics measured

  1. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTRACELLULAR IONS TO Kv CHANNEL VOLTAGE SENSOR DYNAMICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eGoodchild

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage sensing domains of Kv channels control ionic conductance through coupling of the movement of charged residues in the S4 segment to conformational changes at the cytoplasmic region of the pore domain, that allow K+ ions to flow. Conformational transitions within the voltage sensing domain caused by changes in the applied voltage across the membrane field are coupled to the conducting pore region and the gating of ionic conductance. However, several other factors not directly linked to the voltage dependent movement of charged residues within the voltage sensor impact the dynamics of the voltage sensor, such as inactivation, ionic conductance, intracellular ion identity and block of the channel by intracellular ligands. The effect of intracellular ions on voltage sensor dynamics is of importance in the interpretation of gating current measurements and the physiology of pore/voltage sensor coupling. There is a significant amount of variability in the reported kinetics of voltage sensor deactivation kinetics of Kv channels attributed to different mechanisms such as open state stabilization, immobilization and relaxation processes of the voltage sensor. Here we separate these factors and focus on the causal role that intracellular ions can play in allosterically modulating the dynamics of Kv voltage sensor deactivation kinetics. These considerations are of critical importance in understanding the molecular determinants of the complete channel gating cycle from activation to deactivation.

  2. Collective Dynamics of Intracellular Water in Living Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orecchini, A; Sebastiani, F; Paciaroni, A; Petrillo, C; Sacchetti, F; Jasnin, M; Francesco, A De; Zaccai, G; Moulin, M; Haertlein, M

    2012-01-01

    Water dynamics plays a fundamental role for the fulfillment of biological functions in living organisms. Decades of hydrated protein powder studies have revealed the peculiar dynamical properties of hydration water with respect to pure water, due to close coupling interactions with the macromolecule. In such a framework, we have studied coherent collective dynamics in protein and DNA hydration water. State-of-the-art neutron instrumentation has allowed us to observe the propagation of coherent density fluctuations within the hydration shell of the biomolecules. The corresponding dispersion curves resulted to be only slightly affected by the coupling with the macromolecules. Nevertheless, the effects of the interaction appeared as a marked increase of the mode damping factors, which suggested a destructuring of the water hydrogen-bond network. Such results were interpreted as the signature of a 'glassy' dynamical character of macromolecule hydration water, in agreement with indications from measurements of the density of vibrational states. Extending the investigations to living organisms at physiological conditions, we present here an in-vivo study of collective dynamics of intracellular water in Escherichia coli cells. The cells and water were fully deuterated to minimise the incoherent neutron scattering background. The water dynamics observed in the living cells is discussed in terms of the dynamics of pure bulk water and that of hydration water measured in powder samples.

  3. Collective Dynamics of Intracellular Water in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchini, A.; Sebastiani, F.; Jasnin, M.; Paciaroni, A.; De Francesco, A.; Petrillo, C.; Moulin, M.; Haertlein, M.; Zaccai, G.; Sacchetti, F.

    2012-02-01

    Water dynamics plays a fundamental role for the fulfillment of biological functions in living organisms. Decades of hydrated protein powder studies have revealed the peculiar dynamical properties of hydration water with respect to pure water, due to close coupling interactions with the macromolecule. In such a framework, we have studied coherent collective dynamics in protein and DNA hydration water. State-of-the-art neutron instrumentation has allowed us to observe the propagation of coherent density fluctuations within the hydration shell of the biomolecules. The corresponding dispersion curves resulted to be only slightly affected by the coupling with the macromolecules. Nevertheless, the effects of the interaction appeared as a marked increase of the mode damping factors, which suggested a destructuring of the water hydrogen-bond network. Such results were interpreted as the signature of a "glassy" dynamical character of macromolecule hydration water, in agreement with indications from measurements of the density of vibrational states. Extending the investigations to living organisms at physiological conditions, we present here an in-vivo study of collective dynamics of intracellular water in Escherichia coli cells. The cells and water were fully deuterated to minimise the incoherent neutron scattering background. The water dynamics observed in the living cells is discussed in terms of the dynamics of pure bulk water and that of hydration water measured in powder samples.

  4. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics

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    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. PMID:26488648

  5. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells...

  7. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

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    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  8. Dynamic intracellular localization of Dazl protein during Xenopus germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Haru; Orii, Hidefumi

    2015-08-01

    Xenopus dazl encoding an RNA-binding protein has been identified as a component of the germ plasm and is involved in the migration and differentiation of the primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here, we investigated the intracellular localization of Dazl in germline cells throughout the lifetime of Xenopus. In early embryogenesis, Dazl was detected initially in the germ plasm and then translocated to a perinuclear region. Then, it was detected within the nucleus in PGCs. Dazl was observed only in the cytoplasm in PGCs when sex differentiation began in the gonads. Dazl was distributed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of the primary oogonium and spermatogonium, but only in the cytoplasm of the secondary oogonium and spermatogonium. In spermatocytes, Dazl was distributed throughout cytoplasm and localized at the spindles and cytoplasm during meiosis. Then, it was detected as speckles in the nucleus in the round spermatid. The dynamic intracellular localization suggests that Dazl is a multifunctional protein regulating RNA metabolism required for Xenopus germline development.

  9. A Miniature Graphene-based Biosensor for Intracellular Glucose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Kamran ul; Asif, Muhammad H.; Hassan, Muhammad Umair; Sandberg, Mats O.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Fagerholm, Siri; Strålfors, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report on a small and simple graphene-based potentiometric sensor for the measurement of intracellular glucose concentration. A fine borosilicate glass capillary coated with graphene and subsequently immobilized with glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme is inserted into the intracellular environment of a single human cell. The functional groups on the edge plane of graphene assist the attachment with the free amine terminals of GOD enzyme, resulting in a better immobilization. The sensor exhibits a glucose-dependent electrochemical potential against an Ag/AgCl reference microelectrode which is linear across the whole concentration range of interest (10 – 1000 μM). Glucose concentration in human fat cell measured by our graphene-based sensor is in good agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

  10. Monitoring intracellular oxidative events using dynamic spectral unmixing microscopy

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    There is increasing interest in using live-cell imaging to monitor not just individual intracellular endpoints, but to investigate the interplay between multiple molecular events as they unfold in real time within the cell. A major impediment to simultaneous acquisition of multip...

  11. Investigation of Intracellular Free Ca2+ Concentration Dynamics with Fluorescence Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Cicek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the extracellular stimulus arrive to the cell membrane result with the increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i. Because of the huge Ca2+ concentration differences between the cytoplasm ( and #8776;10-7 M and extracellular fluid and endoplasmic reticulum (ER - which is the major Ca2+ storage organelle in especially non electrically excitable cells ( and #8776;10-3 M, a large electro-chemical gradient repel Ca2+ to the plasma or ER. Therefore a signal which temporarily opens Ca2+ channels, induce a fast influx of Ca2+ through the cytosol and increase the its concentration about 10-20 fold. At this organization free Ca2+ functions as a intracellular signalling molecule and a second messenger. In this way many intracellular signalling proteins activated and cellular functions like gene expression, secretion, cell proliferation and division, apoptosis, and also myocyte contraction, endocrine cell degranulation and neuronal transmission are regulated. Thus, the key role of Ca2+ in many intracellular process, makes the dynamic measurements necessary for an understanding of the signalling mechanisms. Fluorescence imaging techniques make possible of monitoring the spatiotemporal Ca2+ response patterns in cytoplasm. In the last decades, especially their ease of loading, and minimum manipulations to the cell homeostasis, make these techniques unique with respect to the other methods. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 319-334

  12. The intracellular cholesterol landscape: dynamic integrator of the immune response

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    Fessler, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol has typically been considered an exogenous, disease-related factor in immunity; however, recent literature suggests that a paradigm shift is in order. Sterols are now recognized to ligate several immune receptors. Altered flux through the mevalonic acid synthesis pathway also appears to be a required event in the antiviral interferon response of macrophages and in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of T cells. In this review, evidence is discussed that suggests an intrinsic, ‘professional’ role for sterols and oxysterols in macrophage and T cell immunity. Host defense may have been the original selection pressure behind the development of mechanisms for intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Functional coupling between sterol metabolism and immunity has fundamental implications for health and disease. PMID:27692616

  13. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, S; Pozzi, D; De Sanctis, S Candeloro; Caracciolo, G; Digman, M A; Gratton, E

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP–DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol–DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ≈ 0.003 μm 2 s −1 ). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ≈ 0.03 μm 2 s −1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes. (paper)

  14. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, S.; Pozzi, D.; Candeloro De Sanctis, S.; Digman, M. A.; Gratton, E.; Caracciolo, G.

    2013-03-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP-DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol-DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ≈ 0.003 μm2 s-1). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ≈ 0.03 μm2 s-1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes.

  15. Dynamics of an HBV/HCV infection model with intracellular delay and cell proliferation

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    Zhang, Fengqin; Li, Jianquan; Zheng, Chongwu; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    A new mathematical model of hepatitis B/C virus (HBV/HCV) infection which incorporates the proliferation of healthy hepatocyte cells and the latent period of infected hepatocyte cells is proposed and studied. The dynamics is analyzed via Pontryagin's method and a newly proposed alternative geometric stability switch criterion. Sharp conditions ensuring stability of the infection persistent equilibrium are derived by applying Pontryagin's method. Using the intracellular delay as the bifurcation parameter and applying an alternative geometric stability switch criterion, we show that the HBV/HCV infection model undergoes stability switches. Furthermore, numerical simulations illustrate that the intracellular delay can induce complex dynamics such as persistence bubbles and chaos.

  16. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises.

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    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-04-28

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca(2+) is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca(2+) concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics's time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s; (ii) for the case of τ short, but they trend to a level line as τ → 0.1s, and for the case of τ > 0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store.

  17. Dynamics via measurability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Generators f for σ -algebras can be used to view the dynamics of an invertible measurable transformation T in terms of the range values of f ∘ T . Such generators are the norm rather than the exception. Related measurable and quantitative methods of estimating a function from the behavior of ergodic averages are also discussed.

  18. Resveratrol Interferes with Fura-2 Intracellular Calcium Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Richard F; Leech, Colin A; Roe, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol found in some fruits and especially in grapes, has been reported to provide diverse health benefits. Resveratrol's mechanism of action is the subject of many investigations, and some studies using the ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2 suggest that it modulates cellular calcium responses. In the current study, contradictory cellular calcium responses to resveratrol applied at concentrations exceeding 10 μM were observed during in vitro imaging studies depending on the calcium indicator used, with Fura-2 indicating an increase in intracellular calcium while Fluo-4 and the calcium biosensor YC3.60 indicated no response. When cells loaded with Fura-2 were treated with 100 μM resveratrol, excitation at 340 nm resulted in a large intensity increase at 510 nm, but the expected concurrent decline with 380 nm excitation was not observed. Pre-treatment of cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM did not prevent a rise in the 340/380 ratio when resveratrol was present, but it did prevent an increase in 340/380 when ATP was applied, suggesting that the resveratrol response was an artifact. Cautious data interpretation is recommended from imaging experiments using Fura-2 concurrently with resveratrol in calcium imaging experiments.

  19. Dynamic Rod Worth Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.; Chapman, D.M.; Hill, D.J.; Grobmyer, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) technique is a method of quickly validating the predicted bank worth of control rods and shutdown rods. The DRWM analytic method is based on three-dimensional, space-time kinetic simulations of the rapid rod movements. Its measurement data is processed with an advanced digital reactivity computer. DRWM has been used as the method of bank worth validation at numerous plant startups with excellent results. The process and methodology of DRWM are described, and the measurement results of using DRWM are presented

  20. Evaluating Nanoparticle Sensor Design for Intracellular pH Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2011-01-01

    quantification of pH is an unfortunate result when measuring pH too close to the limit of the sensitive range of the sensors. Triple-labeled nanosensors with a pH measurement range of 3.2-7.0, which was synthesized by adding two pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pKa to each sensor, seem to be a solution...

  1. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  2. The Living Cell as a Multi-agent Organisation: A Compositional Organisation Model of Intracellular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, C. M.; Snoep, J. L.; Treur, J.; Westerhoff, H. V.; Wijngaards, W. C. A.

    Within the areas of Computational Organisation Theory and Artificial Intelligence, techniques have been developed to simulate and analyse dynamics within organisations in society. Usually these modelling techniques are applied to factories and to the internal organisation of their process flows, thus obtaining models of complex organisations at various levels of aggregation. The dynamics in living cells are often interpreted in terms of well-organised processes, a bacterium being considered a (micro)factory. This suggests that organisation modelling techniques may also benefit their analysis. Using the example of Escherichia coli it is shown how indeed agent-based organisational modelling techniques can be used to simulate and analyse E.coli's intracellular dynamics. Exploiting the abstraction levels entailed by this perspective, a concise model is obtained that is readily simulated and analysed at the various levels of aggregation, yet shows the cell's essential dynamic patterns.

  3. Light-induced dynamic structural color by intracellular 3D photonic crystals in brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Masters, Nathan; O'Brien, Heath E; Lennon, Joseph; Atkinson, George; Cryan, Martin J; Oulton, Ruth; Whitney, Heather M

    2018-04-01

    Natural photonic crystals are responsible for strong reflectance at selective wavelengths in different natural systems. We demonstrate that intracellular opal-like photonic crystals formed from lipids within photosynthetic cells produce vivid structural color in the alga Cystoseira tamariscifolia . The reflectance of the opaline vesicles is dynamically responsive to environmental illumination. The structural color is present in low light-adapted samples, whereas higher light levels produce a slow disappearance of the structural color such that it eventually vanishes completely. Once returned to low-light conditions, the color re-emerges. Our results suggest that these complex intracellular natural photonic crystals are responsive to environmental conditions, changing their packing structure reversibly, and have the potential to manipulate light for roles beyond visual signaling.

  4. Tight Coupling of Metabolic Oscillations and Intracellular Water Dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoke, Henrik Seir; Tobiesen, Asger; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    conditions, ii) water dipolar relaxation oscillates with glycolysis and in phase with ATP concentration, iii) this phenomenon is scale-invariant from the subcellular to the ensemble of synchronized cells and, iv) the periodicity of both glycolytic oscillations and dipolar relaxation are equally affected by D......We detected very strong coupling between the oscillating concentration of ATP and the dynamics of intracellular water during glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate that: i) dipolar relaxation of intracellular water is heterogeneous within the cell and different from dilute......2O in a dose-dependent manner. These results offer a new insight into the coupling of an emergent intensive physicochemical property of the cell, i.e. cell-wide water dipolar relaxation, and a central metabolite (ATP) produced by a robustly oscillating metabolic process....

  5. Fluorescent real-time quantitative measurements of intracellular peroxynitrite generation and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen; Zhao, Qin; Liu, Jixiang; Liao, Jinfang; Peng, Ruogu; Xi, Yunting; Diwu, Zhenjun

    2017-03-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO - ), a strong oxidant species, is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O 2 .- ) radicals. It plays an important role as a biological regulator in numbers of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, we developed fluorescence-based real-time quantitative measurements to detect intracellular ONOO - . The probe DAX-J2 PON Green showed high selectivity toward ONOO - over other competing species, and has been successfully applied in microplate reader and flow cytometer to quantitatively measure endogenous ONOO - production. Moreover, the results demonstrated the inhibitory effects of curcumin on intracellular ONOO - generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of a novel method for measurement of intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Satoh, Ryosuke; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of metal and metalloid species in each of the cell compartments is termed as "metallome". It is important to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial or toxic effects exerted by a given metal or metalloid on human health. Therefore, we developed a method to measure intracellular metal ion concentration (particularly, intracellular calcium ion) in fission yeast. We evaluated the effects of nitric acid (HNO 3 ), zymolyase, and westase treatment on cytolysis in fission yeast. Moreover, we evaluated the changes in the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast in response to treatment with/without micafungin. The fission yeast undergoes lysis when treated with 60% HNO 3 , which is simpler and cheaper compared to the other treatments. Additionally, the intracellular calcium ion concentration in 60% HNO 3 -treated fission yeast was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. This study yields significant information pertaining to measurement of the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast, which is useful for elucidating the physiological or pathological functions of calcium ion in the biological systems. This study is the first step to obtain perspective view on the effect of the metallome in biological systems.

  7. Nanoscale live cell optical imaging of the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles in neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohee; Heo, Chaejeong; Suh, Minah; Lee, Young Hee

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and imaging technology have provided great opportunities to investigate cellular dynamics. Conventional imaging methods such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy are powerful techniques for cellular imaging, even at the nanoscale level. However, these techniques have limitations applications in live cell imaging because of the experimental preparation required, namely cell fixation, and the innately small field of view. In this study, we developed a nanoscale optical imaging (NOI) system that combines a conventional optical microscope with a high resolution dark-field condenser (Cytoviva, Inc.) and halogen illuminator. The NOI system's maximum resolution for live cell imaging is around 100 nm. We utilized NOI to investigate the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles of neural cells without immunocytological analysis. In particular, we studied direct, active random, and moderate random dynamic motions of intracellular microvesicles and visualized lysosomal vesicle changes after treatment of cells with a lysosomal inhibitor (NH4Cl). Our results indicate that the NOI system is a feasible, high-resolution optical imaging system for live small organelles that does not require complicated optics or immunocytological staining processes.

  8. Tissue architecture and function: dynamic reciprocity via extra- and intra-cellular matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-12-23

    Mammary gland development, functional differentiation, and homeostasis are orchestrated and sustained by a balance of biochemical and biophysical cues from the organ's microenvironment. The three-dimensional microenvironment of the mammary gland, predominantly 'encoded' by a collaboration between the extracellular matrix (ECM), hormones, and growth factors, sends signals from ECM receptors through the cytoskeletal intracellular matrix to nuclear and chromatin structures resulting in gene expression; the ECM in turn is regulated and remodeled by signals from the nucleus. In this chapter, we discuss how coordinated ECM deposition and remodeling is necessary for mammary gland development, how the ECM provides structural and biochemical cues necessary for tissue-specific function, and the role of the cytoskeleton in mediating the extra - to intracellular dialogue occurring between the nucleus and the microenvironment. When operating normally, the cytoskeletal-mediated dynamic and reciprocal integration of tissue architecture and function directs mammary gland development, tissue polarity, and ultimately, tissue-specific gene expression. Cancer occurs when these dynamic interactions go awry for an extended time.

  9. 3D Spatially Resolved Models of the Intracellular Dynamics of the Hepatitis C Genome Replication Cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Knodel, Markus

    2017-10-02

    Mathematical models of virus dynamics have not previously acknowledged spatial resolution at the intracellular level despite substantial arguments that favor the consideration of intracellular spatial dependence. The replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral RNA (vRNA) occurs within special replication complexes formed from membranes derived from endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). These regions, termed membranous webs, are generated primarily through specific interactions between nonstructural virus-encoded proteins (NSPs) and host cellular factors. The NSPs are responsible for the replication of the vRNA and their movement is restricted to the ER surface. Therefore, in this study we developed fully spatio-temporal resolved models of the vRNA replication cycle of HCV. Our simulations are performed upon realistic reconstructed cell structures-namely the ER surface and the membranous webs-based on data derived from immunostained cells replicating HCV vRNA. We visualized 3D simulations that reproduced dynamics resulting from interplay of the different components of our models (vRNA, NSPs, and a host factor), and we present an evaluation of the concentrations for the components within different regions of the cell. Thus far, our model is restricted to an internal portion of a hepatocyte and is qualitative more than quantitative. For a quantitative adaption to complete cells, various additional parameters will have to be determined through further in vitro cell biology experiments, which can be stimulated by the results deccribed in the present study.

  10. Pico Gauges for Minimally Invasive Intracellular Hydrostatic Pressure Measurements1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare H.; Knoblauch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells, however, remains difficult or impossible due to their small size and/or sensitivity to manipulation. Here, we report on a method that allows precise measurements in basically any cell type over all ranges of pressure. It is based on the compression of nanoliter and picoliter volumes of oil entrapped in the tip of microcapillaries, which we call pico gauges. The production of pico gauges can be accomplished with standard laboratory equipment, and measurements are comparably easy to conduct. Example pressure measurements are performed on cells that are difficult or impossible to measure with other methods. PMID:25232014

  11. Intracellular hepatitis C modeling predicts infection dynamics and viral protein mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunins, Thomas R; Marsh, Katherine A; Subramanya, Gitanjali; Uprichard, Susan L; Perelson, Alan S; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2018-03-21

    Hepatitis C virus infection is a global health problem, with nearly 2 million new infections occurring every year and up to 85% of these becoming chronic infections that pose serious long-term health risks. To effectively reduce the prevalence of HCV infection and associated diseases, it is important to understand the intracellular dynamics of the viral lifecycle. Here, we present a detailed mathematical model that represents the full hepatitis C lifecycle. It is the first full HCV model to be fit to acute intracellular infection data and the first to explore the functions of distinct viral proteins, probing multiple hypotheses of cis - and trans -acting mechanisms to provide insights for drug targeting. Model parameters were derived from the literature, experiments, and fitting to experimental intracellular viral RNA, extracellular viral titer, and HCV core and NS3 protein kinetic data from viral inoculation to steady-state. Our model predicts faster rates for protein translation and polyprotein cleavage than previous replicon models and demonstrates that the processes of translation and synthesis of viral RNA have the most influence on the levels of the species we tracked in experiments. Overall, our experimental data and the resulting mathematical infection model reveal information about the regulation of core protein during infection, produce specific insights into the roles of the viral core, NS5A, and NS5B proteins, and demonstrate the sensitivities of viral proteins and RNA to distinct reactions within the lifecycle. IMPORTANCE We have designed a model for the full lifecycle of hepatitis C virus. Past efforts have largely focused on modeling hepatitis C replicon systems, in which transfected subgenomic HCV RNA maintains autonomous replication in the absence of virion production or spread. We started with the general structure of these previous replicon models and expanded to create a model that incorporates the full virus lifecycle as well as additional

  12. Application of Raman microscopy for simultaneous and quantitative evaluation of multiple intracellular polymers dynamics functionally relevant to enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majed, Nehreen; Gu, April Z

    2010-11-15

    Polyphosphate (poly-P), polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen are the key functionally relevant intracellular polymers involved in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process. Further understanding of the mechanisms of EBPR has been hampered by the lack of cellular level quantification tools to accurately measure the dynamics of these polymers during the EBPR process. In this study, we developed a novel Raman microscopy method for simultaneous identification and quantification of poly-P, PHB, and glycogen abundance in each individual cell and their distribution among the populations in EBPR. Validation of the method was demonstrated via a batch phosphorus uptake and release test, in which the total intracellular polymers abundance determined via Raman approach correlated well with those measured via conventional bulk chemical analysis (correlation coefficient r = 0.8 for poly-P, r = 0.94 for PHB, and r = 0.7 for glycogen). Raman results, for the first time, clearly showed the distributions of microbial cells containing different abundance levels of the three intracellular polymers under the same environmental conditions (at a given time point), indicating population heterogeneity exists. The results revealed the intracellular distribution and dynamics of the functionally relevant polymers in different metabolic stages of the EBPR process and elucidated the association of cellular metabolic state with the fate of these polymers during various substrates availability conditions.

  13. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  14. DMPD: Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18573338 Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. Curr Opin Im...munol. 2008 Aug;20(4):383-8. Epub 2008 Jun 23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular DNA sensors ...in immunity. PubmedID 18573338 Title Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Authors Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. P

  15. Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Critically important inertia measurements are complex and expensive to obtain due to the extensive fixturing and custom instrumentation of conventional techniques....

  16. 35Cl- and 2H NMR measurement of intracellular water volume in renal proximal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.; Kumar, A.M.; Spitzer, A.; Gupta, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of cell water volume is essential for the calculation of concentrations of intracellular ions and metabolites in kidney tubules. The authors have developed a method which utilizes 35 Cl - NMR as a measure of extracellular volume and 2 H NMR in combination with a membrane-impermeant shift reagent Dy(DTPA) as a measure of the ratio of intra- and extracellular water volumes. Measurement of extracellular volume by 35 Cl - NMR is possible since intracellular 35 Cl - resonance is broadened beyond detection in most cells. The 2 H NMR measurements exploit the fact that only extracellular water is in direct contact with Dy(DTPA). However, rapid exchange of water across the cell membrane results in only a single 2 H 2 O resonance at a chemical shift which is a weighted average of the shifted extra- and unshifted intracellular water resonances. Denoting the extracellular volume as a fraction of the total volume by S/sub o/, and as a fraction of the total water volume by H/sub o/, the fractional cell water content, W = [(1/H/sub o/) -1]/[(1/S/sub o/)-1], can be calculated. Rat proximal tubule suspensions were prepared by the method developed in their laboratory. The water content was found to be 76.9 +/- 5% (anti +/- x SD, n = 4) at room temperature and 78.6% at 37 0 C. Increasing extracellular osmolality from 295 to 330 mosm/kg, by addition of mannitol, decreased the water content to 70.8%. The authors results are in good agreement with the previously reported values of 69-82%, obtained by other methods. Thus, NMR is an accurate, noninvasive method for measuring the water content of renal cells

  17. Measurements of Intracellular Ca2+ Content and Phosphatidylserine Exposure in Human Red Blood Cells: Methodological Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro C. Wesseling

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The increase of the intracellular Ca2+ content as well as the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS on the outer cell membrane surface after activation of red blood cells (RBCs by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA has been investigated by a variety of research groups. Carrying out experiments, which we described in several previous publications, we observed some discrepancies when comparing data obtained by different investigators within our research group and also between batches of LPA. In addition, we found differences comparing the results of double and single labelling experiments (for Ca2+ and PS. Furthermore, the results of PS exposure depended on the fluorescent dye used (annexin V-FITC versus annexin V alexa fluor® 647. Therefore, it seems necessary to investigate these methodological approaches in more detail to be able to quantify results and to compare data obtained by different research groups. Methods: The intracellular Ca2+ content and the PS exposure of RBCs separated from whole blood have been investigated after treatment with LPA (2.5 µM obtained from three different companies (Sigma-Aldrich, Cayman Chemical Company, and Santa Cruz Biotechnology Inc.. Fluo-4 and x-rhod-1 have been used to detect intracellular Ca2+ content, annexin V alexa fluor® 647 and annexin V-FITC have been used for PS exposure measurements. Both parameters (Ca2+ content, PS exposure were studied using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Results: The percentage of RBCs showing increased intracellular Ca2+ content as well as PS exposure changes significantly between different LPA manufacturers as well as on the condition of mixing of LPA with the RBC suspension. Furthermore, the percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure is reduced in double labelling compared to single labelling experiments and depends also on the fluorescent dye used. Finally, data on Ca2+ content are slightly affected whereas PS exposure data are not affected significantly

  18. Intracellular localization and dynamics of Hypericin loaded PLLA nanocarriers by image correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Deville, Sarah; D'Olieslaeger, Lien; Berden, Mandy; Ameloot, Marcel; Ethirajan, Anitha

    2015-11-28

    The study of cell-nanoparticle interactions is an important aspect for understanding drug delivery using nanocarriers. In this regard, advances in fluorescence based microscopy are useful for the investigation of temporal and spatial behavior of nanoparticles (NPs) within the intracellular environment. In this work, we focus on the delivery of the naturally-occurring hydrophobic photosensitizer Hypericin in human lung carcinoma A549 cells by using biodegradable poly L-lactic acid NPs. For the first time, Hypericin containing NPs are prepared by combining the miniemulsion technique with the solvent evaporation method. This approach yields an efficient loading of the NPs with Hypericin and allows for additional cargo molecules. To monitor the release of Hypercin from the NPs, an additional fluorescent lipophilic dye Coumarin-6 is incorporated in the NPs. Temporal and spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy is used to determine the fate of the NPs carrying the potential cargo. Both directed and non-directed motions are detected. By using image cross-correlation spectroscopy and specific fluorescent labeling of endosomes, lysosomes and mitochondria, the dynamics of the cargo loaded NPs in association with the organelles is studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaph Zylbertal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB, which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i, which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions.

  20. Analytic derivation of bacterial growth laws from a simple model of intracellular chemical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Parth Pratim; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Experiments have found that the growth rate and certain other macroscopic properties of bacterial cells in steady-state cultures depend upon the medium in a surprisingly simple manner; these dependencies are referred to as 'growth laws'. Here we construct a dynamical model of interacting intracellular populations to understand some of the growth laws. The model has only three population variables: an amino acid pool, a pool of enzymes that transport an external nutrient and produce the amino acids, and ribosomes that catalyze their own and the enzymes' production from the amino acids. We assume that the cell allocates its resources between the enzyme sector and the ribosomal sector to maximize its growth rate. We show that the empirical growth laws follow from this assumption and derive analytic expressions for the phenomenological parameters in terms of the more basic model parameters. Interestingly, the maximization of the growth rate of the cell as a whole implies that the cell allocates resources to the enzyme and ribosomal sectors in inverse proportion to their respective 'efficiencies'. The work introduces a mathematical scheme in which the cellular growth rate can be explicitly determined and shows that two large parameters, the number of amino acid residues per enzyme and per ribosome, are useful for making approximations.

  1. Intracellular dynamics of the Hsp90 co-chaperone p23 is dictated by Hsp90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, Didier

    2006-01-01

    p23 is a component of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone machine. It binds and stabilizes the ATP-bound dimeric form of Hsp90. Since Hsp90 binds protein substrates in the ATP conformation, p23 has been proposed to stabilize Hsp90-substrate complexes. In addition, p23 can also function as a molecular chaperone by itself and even possesses an unrelated enzymatic activity. Whether it fulfills the latter functions in cells while bound to Hsp90 remains unknown and is difficult to extrapolate from cell-free biochemical experiments. Using the 'fluorescence recovery after photobleaching' (FRAP) technology, I have examined the dynamics of human p23, expressed as a fusion protein with the green fluorescent protein (GFP), in living human HeLa cells. GFP-p23 is distributed throughout the cell, and its mobility is identical in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. When the Hsp90 interaction is disrupted either with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin or by introduction of point mutations into p23, the mobility of p23 is greatly accelerated. Under these conditions, its intracellular movement may be diffusion-controlled. In contrast, when wild-type p23 is able to bind Hsp90, a more complex FRAP behavior is observed, suggesting that it is quantitatively bound in Hsp90 complexes undergoing a multitude of other interactions

  2. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  3. Dynamic modulation of intracellular glucose imaged in single cells using a FRET-based glucose nanosensor

    OpenAIRE

    John, Scott A.; Ottolia, Michela; Weiss, James N.; Ribalet, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To study intracellular glucose homeostasis, the glucose nanosensor FLIPglu-600µM, which undergoes changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) upon interaction with glucose, was expressed in four mammalian cell lines: COS-7, CHO, HEK293, and C2C12. Upon addition of extracellular glucose, the intracellular FRET ratio decreased rapidly as intracellular glucose increased. The kinetics were fast (τ =5 to 15 s) in COS and C2C12 cells and slow (τ =20 to 40 s) in HEK and CHO cells. Upon ...

  4. Detection and Measurement of the Intracellular Calcium Variation in Follicular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Herrera-Navarro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method for measuring the variation of intracellular calcium in follicular cells. The proposal consists in two stages: (i the detection of the cell’s nuclei and (ii the analysis of the fluorescence variations. The first stage is performed via watershed modified transformation, where the process of labeling is controlled. The detection process uses the contours of the cells as descriptors, where they are enhanced with a morphological filter that homogenizes the luminance variation of the image. In the second stage, the fluorescence variations are modeled as an exponential decreasing function, where the fluorescence variations are highly correlated with the changes of intracellular free Ca2+. Additionally, it is introduced a new morphological called medium reconstruction process, which helps to enhance the data for the modeling process. This filter exploits the undermodeling and overmodeling properties of reconstruction operators, such that it preserves the structure of the original signal. Finally, an experimental process shows evidence of the capabilities of the proposal.

  5. Dynamics of inorganic nutrients in intertidal sediments: porewater, exchangeable and intracellular pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eGarcia-Robledo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: the porewater (PW nutrients and the exchangeable (EX ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC, highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC and EX and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance and organic matter (OM contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain. MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an

  6. Dynamic measurement of forward scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Rusch, W.

    1975-01-01

    A dynamic method for the measurement of forward scattering in a radio anechoic chamber is described. The quantity determined is the induced-field-ratio (IFR) of conducting cylinders. The determination of the IFR is highly sensitive to 1) multiple scattering between the cylinder and the obpring...

  7. Ultraviolet radiation and nanoparticle induced intracellular free radicals generation measured in human keratinocytes by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, F; Nazemi, B; Rautenberg, S; Ryll, M; Hadam, S; Gao, Q; Hackbarth, S; Haag, S F; Graf, C; Rühl, E; Blume-Peytavi, U; Lademann, J; Vogt, A; Meinke, M C

    2014-05-01

    Several nanoparticle-based formulations used in cosmetics and dermatology are exposed to sunlight once applied to the skin. Therefore, it is important to study possible synergistic effects of nanoparticles and ultraviolet radiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) was used to detect intracellular free radicals induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation and amorphous silica nanoparticle and to evaluate the influence of nanoparticle surface chemistry on particle cytotoxicity toward HaCaT cells. Uncoated titanium dioxide nanoparticles served as positive control. In addition, particle intracellular uptake, viability, and induction of interleukin-6 were measured. We found that photo-activated titanium dioxide particles induced a significant amount of intracellular free radicals. On the contrary, no intracellular free radicals were generated by the investigated silica nanoparticles in the dark as well as under UVB radiation. However, under UVB exposure, the non-functionalized silica nanoparticles altered the release of IL-6. At the same concentrations, the amino-functionalized silica nanoparticles had no influence on UVB-induced IL-6 release. EPR spectroscopy is a useful technique to measure nanoparticle-induced intracellular free radicals. Non-toxic concentrations of silica particles enhanced the toxicity of UVB radiation. This synergistic effect was not mediated by particle-generated free radicals and correlated with particle surface charge and intracellular distribution. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Propagation of dynamic measurement uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessling, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    The time-dependent measurement uncertainty has been evaluated in a number of recent publications, starting from a known uncertain dynamic model. This could be defined as the 'downward' propagation of uncertainty from the model to the targeted measurement. The propagation of uncertainty 'upward' from the calibration experiment to a dynamic model traditionally belongs to system identification. The use of different representations (time, frequency, etc) is ubiquitous in dynamic measurement analyses. An expression of uncertainty in dynamic measurements is formulated for the first time in this paper independent of representation, joining upward as well as downward propagation. For applications in metrology, the high quality of the characterization may be prohibitive for any reasonably large and robust model to pass the whiteness test. This test is therefore relaxed by not directly requiring small systematic model errors in comparison to the randomness of the characterization. Instead, the systematic error of the dynamic model is propagated to the uncertainty of the measurand, analogously but differently to how stochastic contributions are propagated. The pass criterion of the model is thereby transferred from the identification to acceptance of the total accumulated uncertainty of the measurand. This increases the relevance of the test of the model as it relates to its final use rather than the quality of the calibration. The propagation of uncertainty hence includes the propagation of systematic model errors. For illustration, the 'upward' propagation of uncertainty is applied to determine if an appliance box is damaged in an earthquake experiment. In this case, relaxation of the whiteness test was required to reach a conclusive result.

  9. Propagation of dynamic measurement uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, J P

    2011-01-01

    The time-dependent measurement uncertainty has been evaluated in a number of recent publications, starting from a known uncertain dynamic model. This could be defined as the 'downward' propagation of uncertainty from the model to the targeted measurement. The propagation of uncertainty 'upward' from the calibration experiment to a dynamic model traditionally belongs to system identification. The use of different representations (time, frequency, etc) is ubiquitous in dynamic measurement analyses. An expression of uncertainty in dynamic measurements is formulated for the first time in this paper independent of representation, joining upward as well as downward propagation. For applications in metrology, the high quality of the characterization may be prohibitive for any reasonably large and robust model to pass the whiteness test. This test is therefore relaxed by not directly requiring small systematic model errors in comparison to the randomness of the characterization. Instead, the systematic error of the dynamic model is propagated to the uncertainty of the measurand, analogously but differently to how stochastic contributions are propagated. The pass criterion of the model is thereby transferred from the identification to acceptance of the total accumulated uncertainty of the measurand. This increases the relevance of the test of the model as it relates to its final use rather than the quality of the calibration. The propagation of uncertainty hence includes the propagation of systematic model errors. For illustration, the 'upward' propagation of uncertainty is applied to determine if an appliance box is damaged in an earthquake experiment. In this case, relaxation of the whiteness test was required to reach a conclusive result

  10. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Intracellular Spies: Quantitative Real-Time Measurement of Intracellular Parameters In Vivo during Interaction of the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus with Human Monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mohebbi

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging (HSI is a technique based on the combination of classical spectroscopy and conventional digital image processing. It is also well suited for the biological assays and quantitative real-time analysis since it provides spectral and spatial data of samples. The method grants detailed information about a sample by recording the entire spectrum in each pixel of the whole image. We applied HSI to quantify the constituent pH variation in a single infected apoptotic monocyte as a model system. Previously, we showed that the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus conidia interfere with the acidification of phagolysosomes. Here, we extended this finding to monocytes and gained a more detailed analysis of this process. Our data indicate that melanised A. fumigatus conidia have the ability to interfere with apoptosis in human monocytes as they enable the apoptotic cell to recover from mitochondrial acidification and to continue with the cell cycle. We also showed that this ability of A. fumigatus is dependent on the presence of melanin, since a non-pigmented mutant did not stop the progression of apoptosis and consequently, the cell did not recover from the acidic pH. By conducting the current research based on the HSI, we could measure the intracellular pH in an apoptotic infected human monocyte and show the pattern of pH variation during 35 h of measurements. As a conclusion, we showed the importance of melanin for determining the fate of intracellular pH in a single apoptotic cell.

  11. In vivo measurement of cytosolic and mitochondrial pH using a pH-sensitive GFP derivative in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a relation between intracellular pH and growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orij, R.; Postmus, J.; ter Beek, A.; Brul, S.; Smits, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The specific pH values of cellular compartments affect virtually all biochemical processes, including enzyme activity, protein folding and redox state. Accurate, sensitive and compartment-specific measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) dynamics in living cells are therefore crucial to the

  12. Cell growth, intracellular calcium concentration and metabolic cooperation measured in cells exposed to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skauli, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    Colony-forming efficiency, DNA/protein and DNA/cell were measured in cells exposed to magnetic fields of 0.2 and 1 mT at a frequency of 50 Hz. Intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in cells exposed to 0.3 and 1 mT at 50 Hz. Metabolic cooperation was measured in cells exposed to 1 mT at 50 Hz. No significant effects of the fields were observed. 20 refs., 10 figs

  13. The Slow Dynamics of Intracellular Sodium Concentration Increase the Time Window of Neuronal Integration: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaph Zylbertal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i are rarely taken into account when neuronal activity is examined. As opposed to Ca2+, [Na+]i dynamics are strongly affected by longitudinal diffusion, and therefore they are governed by the morphological structure of the neurons, in addition to the localization of influx and efflux mechanisms. Here, we examined [Na+]i dynamics and their effects on neuronal computation in three multi-compartmental neuronal models, representing three distinct cell types: accessory olfactory bulb (AOB mitral cells, cortical layer V pyramidal cells, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. We added [Na+]i as a state variable to these models, and allowed it to modulate the Na+ Nernst potential, the Na+-K+ pump current, and the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger rate. Our results indicate that in most cases [Na+]i dynamics are significantly slower than [Ca2+]i dynamics, and thus may exert a prolonged influence on neuronal computation in a neuronal type specific manner. We show that [Na+]i dynamics affect neuronal activity via three main processes: reduction of EPSP amplitude in repeatedly active synapses due to reduction of the Na+ Nernst potential; activity-dependent hyperpolarization due to increased activity of the Na+-K+ pump; specific tagging of active synapses by extended Ca2+ elevation, intensified by concurrent back-propagating action potentials or complex spikes. Thus, we conclude that [Na+]i dynamics should be considered whenever synaptic plasticity, extensive synaptic input, or bursting activity are examined.

  14. Muscle glycogen depletion does not alter segmental extracellular and intracellular water distribution measured using bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiose, Keisuke; Yamada, Yosuke; Motonaga, Keiko; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2018-02-08

    Although each gram of glycogen is well known to bind 2.7-4.0 g of water, no studies have been conducted on the effect of muscle glycogen depletion on body water distribution. We investigated changes in extracellular and intracellular water (ECW and ICW) distribution in each body segment in muscle glycogen-depletion and glycogen-recovery condition using segmental bioimpedance spectroscopy technique (BIS). Twelve male subjects consumed 7.0 g.kg body mass -1 of indigestible (glycogen-depleted group) or digestible (glycogen-recovered group) carbohydrate for 24 hours after a glycogen-depletion cycling exercise. Muscle glycogen content using 13 C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, blood hydration status, body composition, and ECW and ICW content of the arm, trunk, and leg using BIS were measured. Muscle glycogen content at the thigh muscles decreased immediately after exercise (glycogen-depleted group, 71.6 {plus minus} 12.1 to 25.5 {plus minus} 10.1 mmol.kg -1 wet wt; glycogen-recovered group, 76.2 {plus minus} 16.4 to 28.1 {plus minus} 16.8 mmol.kg -1 wet wt) and recovered in the glycogen-recovered group (72.7 {plus minus} 21.2 mmol.kg -1 wet wt), but not in the glycogen-depleted group (33.2 {plus minus} 12.6 mmol.kg -1 wet wt) 24 hours post-exercise. Fat-free mass decreased in the glycogen-depleted group ( P glycogen-recovered group 24 hours post-exercise. However, no changes were observed in ECW and ICW content at the leg in both groups. Our results suggested that glycogen depletion per se does not alter body water distribution as estimated via BIS. This information is valuable in assessing body composition using BIS in athletes who show variable glycogen status during training and recovery.

  15. Centrality Measures of Dynamic Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Centrality Measures of Dynamic Social Networks by Allison Moore ARL-TN-0513 November 2012...Centrality Measures of Dynamic Social Networks Allison Moore Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...Centrality Measures of Dynamic Social Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Allison Moore

  16. Measurements based dynamic climate observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabene, Maher [The High Institute of Technological Studies (ISET), Sfax (Tunisia); Unite de Commande de Machines et Reseaux de Puissance CMERP-ENIS, Tunisia, Rte Mahdia Km 2, BP88A, ElBustan 3099 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    This paper introduces a dynamic prediction of solar radiation and ambient temperature. Medium term prediction is based on climatic parameters behaviours during the day before and on time distribution models. As for short term prediction, it is ensured by an ARMA predictor using Kalman filter. Herein, we describe our method and present prediction results. Validation is based on measures taken during the year 2005 in the north of Tunisia. The work effectiveness is illustrated by a short term and medium term prediction of the electric energy produced by a 1 KWp photovoltaic panel (PVP) installed at the Energy and Thermal Research Centre (CRTEn) in the north of Tunisia. Since our work delivers accurate climatic parameters prediction, the obtained results can be easily adapted to predict any other solar conversion system output. (author)

  17. B-Vitamin Competition: Intracellular and Dissolved B-Vitamins Provide Insight into Marine Microbial Community Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffridge, C.; Gomez-Consarnau, L.; Qu, P.; Tenenbaum, N.; Fu, F.; Hutchins, D. A.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The availability of B-vitamins has the ability to directly affect the dynamics of the marine microbial community. Here we show, for the first time, the connection between dissolved and intracellular B-vitamins in a marine environmental community. Two incubation experiments were conducted at a long-term study site (SPOT) in the San Pedro Basin off the coast of Los Angeles, CA. Experiments were conducted in oligotrophic, preupwelling conditions. Due to the 2015 El Niño event, the seasonal upwelling at SPOT did not occur, creating unusually nutrient depleted conditions. Vitamins B1, B7, and B12 were added in addition to macronutrients at concentrations similar to typical SPOT upwelling conditions. Intracellular and dissolved B-vitamin analyses were conducted to determine shifts in cellular B-vitamin requirements as a function of growth rate. We observed a significant bacterioplankton and phytoplankton growth responses with the addition of B-vitamins in a manner that appears to match the enzymatic requirements for these compounds (e.g. B1>B7>B12). Intracellular B-vitamin analysis of T0 samples support this observation, as all four forms of B12 were not detectable within cells, yet multiple forms of B1 and B7 were detected at or near levels previously reported. Treatments with B12 and macronutrients were observed to have the greatest growth rates. This finding, in addition to the apparent lack of intracellular B12 in the initial community, appears to indicate that the initial microbial community was limited by B12. The addition of each vitamin caused a distinct shift in the blooming microbial community. Our results demonstrate that B-vitamins strongly influence not only the growth rate, but also the species composition and species succession of the microbial community as a whole. Large-scale changes to upwelling regimes are predicted in the future ocean; our results indicate that B-vitamins will have a substantial role in controlling microbial community dynamics under

  18. Modelling the Dynamics of Intracellular Processes as an Organisation of Multiple Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Jonker, C.M.; Treur, J.; Armano, G.; Merelli, E.; Denzinger, J.; Martin, A.; Miles, S.; Tianfield, H.; Unland, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores how the dynamics of complex biological processes can be modeled as an organisation of multiple agents. This modelling perspective identifies organisational structure occurring in complex decentralised processes and handles complexity of the analysis of the dynamics by structuring

  19. Transport phenomena in intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2018-02-01

    The role of non-Gaussian noises on transport characteristic of Ca2+ in intracellular calcium oscillation system driven by non-Gaussian noises is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The statistical properties of velocity of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca2+ concentration are simulated. The results exhibit, as parameter p(which is used to control the degree of the departure from the non-Gaussian noise and Gaussian noise.)increases, calcium in cytosol shows positive, zero, and negative transport, but in calcium store always hold positive value. As non-Gaussian noises increase, calcium in cytosol appears negative and zero transport, and in calcium store appears positive transport. As correlation time of non-Gaussian noises varies, calcium in both cytosol and calcium store occur negative, zero, and positive transport.

  20. The genome of the obligate intracellular parasite Trachipleistophora hominis: new insights into microsporidian genome dynamics and reductive evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heinz

    Full Text Available The dynamics of reductive genome evolution for eukaryotes living inside other eukaryotic cells are poorly understood compared to well-studied model systems involving obligate intracellular bacteria. Here we present 8.5 Mb of sequence from the genome of the microsporidian Trachipleistophora hominis, isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient, which is an outgroup to the smaller compacted-genome species that primarily inform ideas of evolutionary mode for these enormously successful obligate intracellular parasites. Our data provide detailed information on the gene content, genome architecture and intergenic regions of a larger microsporidian genome, while comparative analyses allowed us to infer genomic features and metabolism of the common ancestor of the species investigated. Gene length reduction and massive loss of metabolic capacity in the common ancestor was accompanied by the evolution of novel microsporidian-specific protein families, whose conservation among microsporidians, against a background of reductive evolution, suggests they may have important functions in their parasitic lifestyle. The ancestor had already lost many metabolic pathways but retained glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway to provide cytosolic ATP and reduced coenzymes, and it had a minimal mitochondrion (mitosome making Fe-S clusters but not ATP. It possessed bacterial-like nucleotide transport proteins as a key innovation for stealing host-generated ATP, the machinery for RNAi, key elements of the early secretory pathway, canonical eukaryotic as well as microsporidian-specific regulatory elements, a diversity of repetitive and transposable elements, and relatively low average gene density. Microsporidian genome evolution thus appears to have proceeded in at least two major steps: an ancestral remodelling of the proteome upon transition to intracellular parasitism that involved reduction but also selective expansion, followed by a secondary compaction of genome

  1. Intracellular oxygen: Similar results from two methods of measurement using phosphorescent nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lloyd

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to resolve the spatio-temporal complexity of intracellular O2 distribution is the "Holy Grail" of cellular physiology. In an effort to obtain a minimally invasive approach to the mapping of intracellular O2 tensions, two methods of phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy were compared in the current study and gave similar results. These were two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy with pinhole shifting, and picosecond time-resolved epi-phosphorescence microscopy using a single 0.5 μm focused spot. Both methods utilized Ru coordination complex embedded nanoparticles (45 nm diameter as the phosphorescent probe, excited using pulsed outputs of a titanium–sapphire Tsunami lasers (710–1050 nm.

  2. The thermogenic actions of natriuretic peptide in brown adipocytes: The direct measurement of the intracellular temperature using a fluorescent thermoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Haruka; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshii, Akira; Kashiwagi, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoshiro; Ito, Keiichi; Yoshino, Takuya; Tanaka, Toshikazu D; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2017-10-11

    In addition to the various effects of natriuretic peptides (NPs) on cardiovascular systems, increasing attention is being paid to the possibility that NPs induce adipose tissue browning and activate thermogenic program. We herein established a direct intracellular temperature measurement system using a fluorescent thermoprobe and investigated the thermogenic effects of A-type NP (ANP) on brown adipocytes. The thermoprobe was successfully introduced into rat brown adipocytes, and the temperature dependent change in fluorescence intensity ratio was measured using a fluorescence microscope. After one-hour incubation with ANP, the degree of the change in fluorescence intensity ratio was significantly higher in ANP-treated (P thermogenic actions of ANP were more prominent when brown adipocytes were incubated at 35 °C than at 37 °C. Moreover, the increase in the intracellular temperature and the expression of UCP1 induced by ANP were cancelled by p38MAPK inhibition. Taken together, this study directly demonstrated the thermogenic actions of ANP in brown adipocytes through the use of a novel method of intracellular temperature measurement.

  3. Ultra-fast multispectral optical imaging of cortical oxygenation, blood flow, and intracellular calcium dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Matthew B.; Chen, Brenda R.; Burgess, Sean A.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Camera-based optical imaging of the exposed brain allows cortical hemodynamic responses to stimulation to be examined. Typical multispectral imaging systems utilize a camera and illumination at several wavelengths, allowing discrimination between changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration. However, most multispectral imaging systems utilize white light sources and mechanical filter wheels to multiplex illumination wavelengths, which are slow and difficult to synchronize at high frame rates. We present a new LED-based system capable of high-resolution multispectral imaging at frame rates exceeding 220 Hz. This improved performance enables simultaneous visualization of hemoglobin oxygenation dynamics within single vessels, changes in vessel diameters, blood flow dynamics from the motion of erythrocytes, and dynamically changing fluorescence. PMID:19724566

  4. Modeling cytoskeletal flow over adhesion sites: competition between stochastic bond dynamics and intracellular relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2010-01-01

    In migrating cells, retrograde flow of the actin cytoskeleton is related to traction at adhesion sites located at the base of the lamellipodium. The coupling between the moving cytoskeleton and the stationary adhesions is mediated by the continuous association and dissociation of molecular bonds. We introduce a simple model for the competition between the stochastic dynamics of elastic bonds at the moving interface and relaxation within the moving actin cytoskeleton represented by an internal viscous friction coefficient. Using exact stochastic simulations and an analytical mean field theory, we show that the stochastic bond dynamics lead to biphasic friction laws as observed experimentally. At low internal dissipation, stochastic bond dynamics lead to a regime of irregular stick-and-slip motion. High internal dissipation effectively suppresses cooperative effects among bonds and hence stabilizes the adhesion.

  5. Dynamic properties of energy affordability measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindl, Peter; Schuessler, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Measures of affordability and of fuel poverty are applied in practice to assess the affordability of energy services, for example, or of water or housing. The extensive body of literature on affordability measures has little overlap with the existing literature on poverty measurement. A comprehensive assessment of the response of affordability measures as a result of changes in the distribution of income or expenditure (the dynamic properties) is missing. This paper aims to fill this gap by providing a conceptual discussion on the ‘dynamics’ of both energy affordability measures and fuel poverty measures. Several types of measures are examined in a microsimulation framework. Our results indicate that some measures exhibit odd dynamic behavior. This includes measures used in practice, such as the low income/high cost measure and the double median of expenditure share indicator. Odd dynamic behavior causes the risk of drawing false policy recommendations from the measures. Thus, an appropriate response of affordability measures to changes in relevant variables is a prerequisite for defining meaningful measures that inform about affordability or deprivation in certain domains of consumption. - Highlights: • We investigate changes in fuel poverty measures as result from changes in income and expenditure. • More generally, we investigate dynamic behavior of affordability measures using microsimulation. • We propose axioms regarding dynamic behavior of affordability measures. • Some measures which are used in practice show unintuitive dynamic behavior. • Inappropriate dynamic behavior causes a risk of false policy implications.

  6. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 16982211 Title Ubiq

  7. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bouret

    Full Text Available We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  8. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Yann; Argentina, Médéric; Counillon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  9. Modeling and measuring intracellular fluxes of secreted recombinant protein in Pichia pastoris with a novel 34S labeling procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hann Stephan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The budding yeast Pichia pastoris is widely used for protein production. To determine the best suitable strategy for strain improvement, especially for high secretion, quantitative data of intracellular fluxes of recombinant protein are very important. Especially the balance between intracellular protein formation, degradation and secretion defines the major bottleneck of the production system. Because these parameters are different for unlimited growth (shake flask and carbon-limited growth (bioreactor conditions, they should be determined under "production like" conditions. Thus labeling procedures must be compatible with minimal production media and the usage of bioreactors. The inorganic and non-radioactive 34S labeled sodium sulfate meets both demands. Results We used a novel labeling method with the stable sulfur isotope 34S, administered as sodium sulfate, which is performed during chemostat culivations. The intra- and extracellular sulfur 32 to 34 ratios of purified recombinant protein, the antibody fragment Fab3H6, are measured by HPLC-ICP-MS. The kinetic model described here is necessary to calculate the kinetic parameters from sulfur ratios of consecutive samples as well as for sensitivity analysis. From the total amount of protein produced intracellularly (143.1 μg g-1 h-1 protein per yeast dry mass and time about 58% are degraded within the cell, 35% are secreted to the exterior and 7% are inherited to the daughter cells. Conclusions A novel 34S labeling procedure that enables in vivo quantification of intracellular fluxes of recombinant protein under "production like" conditions is described. Subsequent sensitivity analysis of the fluxes by using MATLAB, indicate the most promising approaches for strain improvement towards increased secretion.

  10. Dynamics of intracellular polymers in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes under different organic carbon concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lizhen; Ren, Li; Tang, Bo; Wu, Guangxue; Guan, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  11. Intracellular Water Exchange for Measuring the Dry Mass, Water Mass and Changes in Chemical Composition of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Vivian C.; Son, Sungmin; Li, Yingzhong; Knudsen, Scott M.; Olcum, Selim; Higgins, John M.; Chen, Jianzhu; Grover, William H.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell’s buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell’s water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell’s dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density – the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein), we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell. PMID:23844039

  12. Intracellular water exchange for measuring the dry mass, water mass and changes in chemical composition of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijó Delgado, Francisco; Cermak, Nathan; Hecht, Vivian C; Son, Sungmin; Li, Yingzhong; Knudsen, Scott M; Olcum, Selim; Higgins, John M; Chen, Jianzhu; Grover, William H; Manalis, Scott R

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell's buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell's water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell's dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density - the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein), we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell.

  13. Monitoring intracellular calcium ion dynamics in hair cell populations with Fluo-4 AM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateri J Spinelli

    Full Text Available We optimized Fluo-4 AM loading of chicken cochlea to report hair-bundle Ca(2+ signals in populations of hair cells. The bundle Ca(2+ signal reported the physiological state of the bundle and cell; extruding cells had very high bundle Fluo-4 fluorescence, cells with intact bundles and tip links had intermediate fluorescence, and damaged cells with broken tip links had low fluorescence. Moreover, Fluo-4 fluorescence in the bundle correlated with Ca(2+ entry through transduction channels; mechanically activating transduction channels increased the Fluo-4 signal, while breaking tip links with Ca(2+ chelators or blocking Ca(2+ entry through transduction channels each caused bundle and cell-body Fluo-4 fluorescence to decrease. These results show that when tip links break, bundle and soma Ca(2+ decrease, which could serve to stimulate the hair cell's tip-link regeneration process. Measurement of bundle Ca(2+ with Fluo-4 AM is therefore a simple method for assessing mechanotransduction in hair cells and permits an increased understanding of the interplay of tip links, transduction channels, and Ca(2+ signaling in the hair cell.

  14. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  15. Cognitive Styles, Dynamic Geometry and Measurement Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta-Pantazi, Demetra; Christou, Constantinos

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the outcomes of an empirical study undertaken to investigate the effect of students' cognitive styles on achievement in measurement tasks in a dynamic geometry learning environment, and to explore the ability of dynamic geometry learning in accommodating different cognitive styles and enhancing students' learning. A total of 49…

  16. Signal transforms in dynamic measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Layer, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to the analysis of measurement signals which requires specific mathematical operations like Convolution, Deconvolution, Laplace, Fourier, Hilbert, Wavelet or Z transform which are all presented in the present book. The different problems refer to the modulation of signals, filtration of disturbance as well as to the orthogonal signals and their use in digital form for the measurement of current, voltage, power and frequency are also widely discussed. All the topics covered in this book are presented in detail and illustrated by means of examples in MathCad and LabVIEW. This book provides a useful source for researchers, scientists and engineers who in their daily work are required to deal with problems of measurement and signal processing and can also be helpful to undergraduate students of electrical engineering.    

  17. Live-cell Microscopy and Fluorescence-based Measurement of Luminal pH in Intracellular Organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminal pH is an important functional feature of intracellular organelles. Acidification of the lumen of organelles such as endosomes, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus plays a critical role in fundamental cellular processes. As such, measurement of the luminal pH of these organelles has relevance to both basic research and translational research. At the same time, accurate measurement of intraorganellar pH in living cells can be challenging and may be a limiting hurdle for research in some areas. Here, we describe three powerful methods to measure rigorously the luminal pH of different intracellular organelles, focusing on endosomes, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. The described methods are based on live imaging of pH-sensitive fluorescent probes and include: (1 A protocol based on quantitative, ratiometric measurement of endocytosis of pH-sensitive and pH-insensitive fluorescent conjugates of transferrin; (2 A protocol for the use of proteins tagged with a ratiometric variant of the pH-sensitive intrinsically fluorescent protein pHluorin; and (3 A protocol using the fluorescent dye LysoSensor™. We describe necessary reagents, key procedures, and methods and equipment for data acquisition and analysis. Examples of implementation of the protocols are provided for cultured cells derived from a cancer cell line and for primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons. In addition, we present strengths and weaknesses of the different described intraorganellar pH measurement methods. These protocols are likely to be of benefit to many researchers, from basic scientists to those conducting translational research with a focus on diseases in patient-derived cells.

  18. Dynamic electrochemical measurement of chloride ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, Derk B.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the dynamic measurement of chloride ions using the transition time of a silver silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode. Silver silver chloride electrode is used extensively for potentiometric measurement of chloride ions concentration in electrolyte. In this measurement,

  19. Structural dynamics of soluble chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 examined by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoychev, Stoyan H; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L; Dirr, Heini W

    2009-09-08

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1, but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2, and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilizing domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix alpha1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand beta2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer.

  20. On the Dynamics of Bohmian Measures

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter A.

    2012-05-08

    The present work is devoted to the study of dynamical features of Bohmian measures, recently introduced by the authors. We rigorously prove that for sufficiently smooth wave functions the corresponding Bohmian measure furnishes a distributional solution of a nonlinear Vlasov-type equation. Moreover, we study the associated defect measures appearing in the classical limit. In one space dimension, this yields a new connection between mono-kinetic Wigner and Bohmian measures. In addition, we shall study the dynamics of Bohmian measures associated to so-called semi-classical wave packets. For these type of wave functions, we prove local in-measure convergence of a rescaled sequence of Bohmian trajectories towards the classical Hamiltonian flow on phase space. Finally, we construct an example of wave functions whose limiting Bohmian measure is not mono-kinetic but nevertheless equals the associated Wigner measure. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  1. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    system. The measurements were carried out during hyperventilation and with the subject breathing atmospheric air containing 5 vol. % and 7 vol. % carbon dioxide. Intracellular pH increased significantly during 15 min of hyper-ventilation and decreased significantly during 18 min respiration of air......The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...... containing 7 vol. % carbon dioxide. The intracellular buffer capacity was estimated. These results suggest that the ventilation response to carbon dioxide is correlated to changes in intracellular fluid pH....

  2. Intracellular microelectrode measurements in small cells evaluated with the patch clamp technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ince, C.; van Bavel, E.; van Duijn, B.; Donkersloot, K.; Coremans, A.; Ypey, D. L.; Verveen, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Microelectrode penetration of small cells leads to a sustained depolarization of the resting membrane potential due to a transmembrane shunt resistance (Rs) introduced by the microelectrode. This has led to underestimation of the resting membrane potential of various cell types. However, measurement

  3. Cross-linked self-assembled micelle based nanosensor for intracellular pH measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Windschiegl, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A micelle based nanosensor was synthesized and investigated as a ratiometric pH sensor for use in measurements in living cells by fluorescent microscopy. The nanosensor synthesis was based on self-assembly of an amphiphilic triblock copolymer, which was chemically cross-linked after micelle......-linked by an amidation reaction using 3,6,9-trioxaundecandioic acid cross-linker. The cross-linked micelle was functionalized with two pH sensitive fluorophores and one reference fluorophore, which resulted in a highly uniform ratiometric pH nanosensor with a diameter of 29 nm. The use of two sensor fluorophores...... provided a sensor with a very broad measurement range that seems to be influenced by the chemical design of the sensor. Cell experiments show that the sensor is capable of monitoring the pH distributions in HeLa cells....

  4. NMR dispersion measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring dynamic nuclear polarization from the NMR dispersive susceptibility is examined. Two prototype instruments are tested in a polarized proton target using organic target material. The more promising employs a tunnel diode oscillator, inside the target cavity, and should provide a precise polarization measurement working at a frequency far enough from the main resonance for the disturbance of the measured polarization to be negligible. Other existing methods for measuring target polarization are briefly reviewed. (author)

  5. Dynamics of intracellular ionic concentrations in single living cells using videomicrofluorometry: application to pHi variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallet, Pierre M.; Yassine, Mohamed; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of ions such as H+, Mg2+, Ca2+, is known to monitor the activity of many fundamental enzymes. Furthermore these ions are generally considered as intracellular messengers involved in the transduction of extracellular signals. Recent technological progress, occulting the physicochemical properties of the probe, led to the feeling that accurate data on microvolumes are instantly accessible. Unfortunately fluorescent probes are supposed to fill up conflicting requirements for ionic affinity, absence of fading and intracellular calibration. Such a situation generally precludes the use of the simplest methods of data acquisition and treatment. This paper is based on the use of microspectrofluorometry, resolution of single cell complex fluorescence spectrum, and videomicrofluorometry. The methods of data handling allow us to demonstrate that most of the problems met in intracellular calibration come from the fighting of cells against the modification of the extracellular pH. Using these techniques allows us to restrict the need of comparison between results in cuvettes and intracellular results to the physiological pH range. A consequence of such an approach is that the effect with time of known concentrations of amiloride and nigericin on pHi became accessible. Data is presented allowing us to get information on the behavior of the ionic channels and/or cation/H+ exchangers involved in the pHi regulation. Such a method leads the way to direct investigations and monitoring of the different processes of regulation of the intracellular ionic concentrations in different cell lines at the level of single cells. Using different specific modifiers (activators or blocking agents) and convenient specific fluorescent probes, the efficiency of such pathways is expected to be checked at will. Compared to the patch clamp techniques, the method can be extended to the study of pathways located on the inner cell membranes.

  6. Intracellular siRNA delivery dynamics of integrin-targeted, PEGylated chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Colombo, Stefano; Pourcelle, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles. The amount of intracellular siRNA delivered by αvβ3-targeted versus non-targeted nanoparticles was quantified in the human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line H1299 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using a stem-loop reverse...... that these nanoparticles might end up in late endosomes or lysosomes without releasing their cargo to the cell cytoplasm. Thus, the silencing efficiency of the chitosan-based nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the uptake and the intracellular trafficking in H1299 EGFP cells, which is critical information towards...

  7. Improving the Measurement of Earnings Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, Moira K.; Hryshko, Dmytro; Manovskii, Iourii

    The stochastic process for earnings is the key element of incomplete markets models in modern quantitative macroeconomics. We show that a simple modification of the canonical process used in the literature leads to a dramatic improvement in the measurement of earnings dynamics in administrative a...

  8. Dynamic Properties of Impulse Measuring Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.; Lausen, P.

    1971-01-01

    After some basic considerations the dynamic properties of the measuring system are subjected to a general examination based on a number of responses, characteristic of the system. It is demonstrated that an impulse circuit has an internal impedance different from zero, for which reason...

  9. Assessment of heterologous butyrate and butanol pathway activity by measurement of intracellular pathway intermediates in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Curt R; Tseng, Hsien-Chung; Tai, Mitchell; Prather, Kristala L J; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2010-09-01

    In clostridia, n-butanol production from carbohydrates at yields of up to 76% of the theoretical maximum and at titers of up to 13 g/L has been reported. However, in Escherichia coli, several groups have reported butyric acid or butanol production from recombinant expression of clostridial genes, at much lower titers and yields. To pinpoint deficient steps in the recombinant pathway, we developed an analytical procedure for the determination of intracellular pools of key pathway intermediates and applied the technique to the analysis of three sets of E. coli strains expressing various combinations of butyrate biosynthesis genes. Low expression levels of the hbd-encoded S-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase were insufficient to convert acetyl-CoA to 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, indicating that hbd was a rate-limiting step in the production of butyryl-CoA. Increasing hbd expression alleviated this bottleneck, but in resulting strains, our pool size measurements and thermodynamic analysis showed that the reaction step catalyzed by the bcd-encoded butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase was rate-limiting. E. coli strains expressing both hbd and ptb-buk produced crotonic acid as a byproduct, but this byproduct was not observed with expression of related genes from non-clostridial organisms. Our thermodynamic interpretation of pool size measurements is applicable to the analysis of other metabolic pathways.

  10. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  11. Modulating and Measuring Intracellular H2O2 Using Genetically Encoded Tools to Study Its Toxicity to Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K; Stein, Kassi T; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-12-16

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H 2 O 2 play paradoxical roles in mammalian physiology. It is hypothesized that low, baseline levels of H 2 O 2 are necessary for growth and differentiation, while increased intracellular H 2 O 2 concentrations are associated with pathological phenotypes and genetic instability, eventually reaching a toxic threshold that causes cell death. However, the quantities of intracellular H 2 O 2 that lead to these different responses remain an unanswered question in the field. To address this question, we used genetically encoded constructs that both generate and quantify H 2 O 2 in a dose-response study of H 2 O 2 -mediated toxicity. We found that, rather than a simple concentration-response relationship, a combination of intracellular concentration and the cumulative metric of H 2 O 2 concentration multiplied by time (i.e., the area under the curve) determined the occurrence and level of cell death. Establishing the quantitative relationship between H 2 O 2 and cell toxicity promotes a deeper understanding of the intracellular effects of H 2 O 2 specifically as an individual reactive oxygen species, and it contributes to an understanding of its role in various redox-related diseases.

  12. Dynamical measurements of the Spin Hall angle

    OpenAIRE

    Talalaevskyy, Oleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Broad study of magnetic properties of YIG films is performed. This thesis covers the whole path from YIG sample growth to characterization of magnetization dynamics. In the sub-chapter 5.1, full magnetic characterization of the thin sputtered YIG films is given. A batch of YIG samples with thicknesses of 19, 29, 38 and 49 nanometer is grown by magnetron sputtering for the spin waves experiment. The thickness and the surface roughness are controlled by XRR and AFM measurements. The obtained sa...

  13. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-08

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  14. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  15. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  16. Testing substellar models with dynamical mass measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu M.C.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have been using Keck laser guide star adaptive optics to monitor the orbits of ultracool binaries, providing dynamical masses at lower luminosities and temperatures than previously available and enabling strong tests of theoretical models. We have identified three specific problems with theory: (1 We find that model color–magnitude diagrams cannot be reliably used to infer masses as they do not accurately reproduce the colors of ultracool dwarfs of known mass. (2 Effective temperatures inferred from evolutionary model radii are typically inconsistent with temperatures derived from fitting atmospheric models to observed spectra by 100–300 K. (3 For the only known pair of field brown dwarfs with a precise mass (3% and age determination (≈25%, the measured luminosities are ~2–3× higher than predicted by model cooling rates (i.e., masses inferred from Lbol and age are 20–30% larger than measured. To make progress in understanding the observed discrepancies, more mass measurements spanning a wide range of luminosity, temperature, and age are needed, along with more accurate age determinations (e.g., via asteroseismology for primary stars with brown dwarf binary companions. Also, resolved optical and infrared spectroscopy are needed to measure lithium depletion and to characterize the atmospheres of binary components in order to better assess model deficiencies.

  17. A framework to reconcile frequency scaling measurements, from intracellular recordings, local-field potentials, up to EEG and MEG signals

    OpenAIRE

    Bedard, Claude; Gomes, Jean-Marie; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In this viewpoint article, we discuss the electric properties of the medium around neurons, which are important to correctly interpret extracellular potentials or electric field effects in neural tissue. We focus on how these electric properties shape the frequency scaling of brain signals at different scales, such as intracellular recordings, the local field potential (LFP), the electroencephalogram (EEG) or the magnetoencephalogram (MEG). These signals display frequency-scaling properties w...

  18. Intracellular kinetics of ATX-S10·Na(II) and its correlation with photochemical reaction dynamics during a pulsed photosensitization process: effect of pulse repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy with pulsed light excitation has interesting characteristics, its photosensitization mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that the intracellular kinetics of ATX-S10.Na(II), a lysosomal sensitizer, was closely related to photochemical reaction dynamics during photodynamic treatment of A549 cells with nanosecond pulsed light. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that at high frequencies of 10 and 30 Hz the sensitizer initially localized mainly in lysosomes but that it started to be redistributed to the cytosol in certain ranges of radiant exposures. These ranges were found to coincide with a regime of fluorescence degradation with limited oxygen consumption. On the other hand, at 5 Hz, there was no such a discontinuous behavior in the sensitizer redistribution characteristics throughout the period of irradiation; this was consistent with the fact that no reaction switching was observed. Two possible reasons for the appearance of the regime with limited oxygen consumption are discussed: participation of an oxygen-independent reaction and change in the microenvironment for the sensitizer caused by lysosomal photodamage. The pulse frequency-dependent intracellular kinetics of the sensitizer also explains our previous results showing higher cytotoxicity at 5 Hz than at 10 and 30 Hz.

  19. Intracellular dynamics and fate of polystyrene nanoparticles in A549 Lung epithelial cells monitored by image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy and single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Sarah; Penjweini, Rozhin; Smisdom, Nick; Notelaers, Kristof; Nelissen, Inge; Hooyberghs, Jef; Ameloot, Marcel

    2015-10-01

    Novel insights in nanoparticle (NP) uptake routes of cells, their intracellular trafficking and subcellular targeting can be obtained through the investigation of their temporal and spatial behavior. In this work, we present the application of image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy (IC(C)S) and single particle tracking (SPT) to monitor the intracellular dynamics of polystyrene (PS) NPs in the human lung carcinoma A549 cell line. The ensemble kinetic behavior of NPs inside the cell was characterized by temporal and spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS and STICS). Moreover, a more direct interpretation of the diffusion and flow detected in the NP motion was obtained by SPT by monitoring individual NPs. Both techniques demonstrate that the PS NP transport in A549 cells is mainly dependent on microtubule-assisted transport. By applying spatiotemporal image cross-correlation spectroscopy (STICCS), the correlated motions of NPs with the early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes are identified. PS NPs were equally distributed among the endolysosomal compartment during the time interval of the experiments. The cotransport of the NPs with the lysosomes is significantly larger compared to the other cell organelles. In the present study we show that the complementarity of ICS-based techniques and SPT enables a consistent elaborate model of the complex behavior of NPs inside biological systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Noninvasive hemoglobin measurement using dynamic spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaoqing; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Spectroscopy methods for noninvasive hemoglobin (Hgb) measurement are interfered by individual difference and particular weak signal. In order to address these problems, we have put forward a series of improvement methods based on dynamic spectrum (DS), including instrument design, spectrum extraction algorithm, and modeling approach. The instrument adopts light sources composed of eight laser diodes with the wavelength range from 600 nm to 1100 nm and records photoplethysmography signals at eight wavelengths synchronously. In order to simplify the optical design, we modulate the light sources with orthogonal square waves and design the corresponding demodulation algorithm, instead of adopting a beam-splitting system. A newly designed algorithm named difference accumulation has been proved to be effective in improving the accuracy of dynamic spectrum extraction. 220 subjects are involved in the clinical experiment. An extreme learning machine calibration model between the DS data and the Hgb levels is established. Correlation coefficient and root-mean-square error of prediction sets are 0.8645 and 8.48 g/l, respectively. The results indicate that the Hgb level can be derived by this approach noninvasively with acceptable precision and accuracy. It is expected to achieve a clinic application in the future.

  1. Conformational landscape of an amyloid intra-cellular domain and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm in protein dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Niemi, Antti J.

    2016-01-01

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is proposed as a framework, to investigate the conformational landscape of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A universal Cα-trace Landau free energy is deduced from general symmetry considerations, with the ensuing all-atom structure modeled using publicly available reconstruction programs Pulchra and Scwrl. As an example, the conformational stability of an amyloid precursor protein intra-cellular domain (AICD) is inspected; the reference conformation is the crystallographic structure with code 3DXC in Protein Data Bank (PDB) that describes a heterodimer of AICD and a nuclear multi-domain adaptor protein Fe65. Those conformations of AICD that correspond to local or near-local minima of the Landau free energy are identified. For this, the response of the original 3DXC conformation to variations in the ambient temperature is investigated, using the Glauber algorithm. The conclusion is that in isolation the AICD conformation in 3DXC must be unstable. A family of degenerate conformations that minimise the Landau free energy is identified, and it is proposed that the native state of an isolated AICD is a superposition of these conformations. The results are fully in line with the presumed intrinsically unstructured character of isolated AICD and should provide a basis for a systematic analysis of AICD structure in future NMR experiments.

  2. Conformational landscape of an amyloid intra-cellular domain and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm in protein dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng, E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se, E-mail: hjf@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se, E-mail: hjf@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fédération Denis Poisson, Université de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France)

    2016-07-28

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is proposed as a framework, to investigate the conformational landscape of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A universal Cα-trace Landau free energy is deduced from general symmetry considerations, with the ensuing all-atom structure modeled using publicly available reconstruction programs Pulchra and Scwrl. As an example, the conformational stability of an amyloid precursor protein intra-cellular domain (AICD) is inspected; the reference conformation is the crystallographic structure with code 3DXC in Protein Data Bank (PDB) that describes a heterodimer of AICD and a nuclear multi-domain adaptor protein Fe65. Those conformations of AICD that correspond to local or near-local minima of the Landau free energy are identified. For this, the response of the original 3DXC conformation to variations in the ambient temperature is investigated, using the Glauber algorithm. The conclusion is that in isolation the AICD conformation in 3DXC must be unstable. A family of degenerate conformations that minimise the Landau free energy is identified, and it is proposed that the native state of an isolated AICD is a superposition of these conformations. The results are fully in line with the presumed intrinsically unstructured character of isolated AICD and should provide a basis for a systematic analysis of AICD structure in future NMR experiments.

  3. Dynamic intracellular reorganization of cytoskeletons and the vacuole in defense responses and hypersensitive cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Kurusu, Takamitsu; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2011-05-01

    Plants have evolved various means for controlled and organized cell destruction, known as programmed cell death (PCD). In plant immune responses against microbial infection, hypersensitive cell death as a form of PCD is a crucial event to prevent the spread of biotrophic pathogens. Recent live cell imaging techniques have revealed dynamic features and significant roles of cytoskeletons and the vacuole during defense responses and the PCD. Actin microfilaments (MFs) focus on the infection sites and function as tracks for the polar transport of antimicrobial materials. To accomplish hypersensitive cell death, further dynamic changes in cytoskeletons are induced. MFs play a role in the structural and functional regulation of the vacuole, leading to execution of the PCD. We here overview spatiotemporal dynamic changes in the cytoskeletons and the vacuoles triggered by signals from pathogens, and propose a hypothetical model for MF-regulated vacuole-mediated PCD in plant immunity.

  4. The interaction between AMPKβ2 and the PP1-targeting subunit R6 is dynamically regulated by intracellular glycogen content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Dahlmans, Vivian; Rubio-Villena, Carla; Chanda, Dipanjan; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida; Coumans, Will A; Liu, Yilin; Voncken, J Willem; Luiken, Joost J F P; Glatz, Jan F C; Sanz, Pascual; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic stress-sensing kinase. We previously showed that glucose deprivation induces autophosphorylation of AMPKβ at Thr-148, which prevents the binding of AMPK to glycogen. Furthermore, in MIN6 cells, AMPKβ1 binds to R6 (PPP1R3D), a glycogen-targeting subunit of protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1), thereby regulating the glucose-induced inactivation of AMPK. In the present study, we further investigated the interaction of R6 with AMPKβ and the possible dependency on Thr-148 phosphorylation status. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analyses and co-immunoprecipitation (IP) of the overexpressed proteins in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T) cells revealed that both AMPKβ1 and AMPK-β2 wild-type (WT) isoforms bind to R6. The AMPKβ-R6 interaction was stronger with the muscle-specific AMPKβ2-WT and required association with the substrate-binding motif of R6. When HEK293T cells or C2C12 myotubes were cultured in high-glucose medium, AMPKβ2-WT and R6 weakly interacted. In contrast, glycogen depletion significantly enhanced this protein interaction. Mutation of AMPKβ2 Thr-148 prevented the interaction with R6 irrespective of the intracellular glycogen content. Treatment with the AMPK activator oligomycin enhanced the AMPKβ2-R6 interaction in conjunction with increased Thr-148 phosphorylation in cells grown in low-glucose medium. These data are in accordance with R6 binding directly to AMPKβ2 when both proteins detach from the diminishing glycogen particle, which is simultaneous with increased AMPKβ2 Thr-148 autophosphorylation. Such a model points to a possible control of AMPK by PP1-R6 upon glycogen depletion in muscle. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  5. Issues with performance measures for dynamic multi-objective optimisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Symposium on Computational Intelligence in Dynamic and Uncertain Environments (CIDUE), Mexico, 20-23 June 2013 Issues with Performance Measures for Dynamic Multi-objective Optimisation Mard´e Helbig CSIR: Meraka Institute Brummeria, South Africa...

  6. T cell migration dynamics within lymph nodes during steady state: an overview of extracellular and intracellular factors influencing the basal intranodal T cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worbs, Tim; Förster, Reinhold

    2009-01-01

    Naive T lymphocytes continuously recirculate through secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes until they are eventually activated by recognizing cognate peptide/MHC-complexes on the surface of antigen-protecting cells. The intranodal T cell migration behavior leading to these crucial--and potentially rare--encounters during the induction of an adaptive immune response could not be directly addressed until, in 2002, the use of two-photon microscopy also allowed the visualization of cellular dynamics deep within intact lymph nodes. Since then, numerous studies have confirmed that, by default, naive T cells are extremely motile, scanning the paracortical T cell zone for cognate antigen by means of an apparent random walk. This review attempts to summarize the current knowledge of factors influencing the basal migration behavior of naive T lymphocytes within lymph nodes during steady state. Extracellular cues, such as the motility-promoting influence of CCR7 ligands and the role of integrins during interstitial migration, as well as intracellular signaling pathways involved in T cell motility, will be discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on structural features of the lymph node environment orchestrating T cell migration, namely the framework of fibroblastic reticular cells serving as migration "highways." Finally, new approaches to simulate the cellular dynamics within lymph nodes in silico by means of mathematical modeling will be reviewed.

  7. Dynamic measurements of a simplified streak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushkin, A.V.; Postovalov, V.E.; Schelev, M.Y.; Jaeger, E.; Rempel, C.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the comparative testing of two types of electron-optical recording instruments, namely, TDS simplified streak device and anglo-soviet Imacon 500 picosecond streak camera fitted with PV-001 tube. The Imacon 500 streak camera was matched with a SIT vidicon readout system. Temporal resolution, dynamic range and input sensitivity were estimated for the same recording conditions. It is shown that for 6 ps laser probe pulses the TDS dynamic sensitivity at 530 nm input radiation is only four times less comparative to the commercial Imacon 500 system, while both systems have almost the same dynamic range

  8. Risk importance measures in the dynamic flowgraph methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrväinen, T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents new risk importance measures applicable to a dynamic reliability analysis approach with multi-state components. Dynamic reliability analysis methods are needed because traditional methods, such as fault tree analysis, can describe system's dynamical behaviour only in limited manner. Dynamic flowgraph methodology (DFM) is an approach used for analysing systems with time dependencies and feedback loops. The aim of DFM is to identify root causes of a top event, usually representing the system's failure. Components of DFM models are analysed at discrete time points and they can have multiple states. Traditional risk importance measures developed for static and binary logic are not applicable to DFM as such. Some importance measures have previously been developed for DFM but their ability to describe how components contribute to the top event is fairly limited. The paper formulates dynamic risk importance measures that measure the importances of states of components and take the time-aspect of DFM into account in a logical way that supports the interpretation of results. Dynamic risk importance measures are developed as generalisations of the Fussell-Vesely importance and the risk increase factor. -- Highlights: • New risk importance measures are developed for the dynamic flowgraph methodology. • Dynamic risk importance measures are formulated for states of components. • An approach to handle failure modes of a component in DFM is presented. • Dynamic risk importance measures take failure times into account. • Component's influence on the system's reliability can be analysed in detail

  9. Noninvasive measurement of dynamic correlation functions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uhrich, P

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available )spin systems and arbitrary equilibrium or nonequilibrium initial states. Different choices of the coupling operator give access to the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic correlation function. This protocol reduces disturbances due to the early...

  10. Does heterogeneity of intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] dynamics underlie speed tuning of direction-selective responses in starburst amacrine cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Amane; Poznanski, Roman R

    2016-01-14

    The starburst amacrine cell (SAC) plays a fundamental role in retinal motion perception. In the vertebrate retina, SAC dendrites have been shown to be directionally selective in terms of their Ca[Formula: see text] responses for stimuli that move centrifugally from the soma. The mechanism by which SACs show Ca[Formula: see text] bias for centrifugal motion is yet to be determined with precision. Recent morphological studies support a presynaptic delay in glutamate receptor activation induced Ca[Formula: see text] release from bipolar cells preferentially contacting SACs. However, bipolar cells are known to be electrotonically coupled so time delays between the bipolar cells that provide input to SACs seem unlikely. Using fluorescent microscopy and imunnostaining, we found that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is omnipresent in the soma extending to the distal processes of SACs. Consequently, a working hypothesis on heterogeneity of intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] dynamics from ER is proposed as a possible explanation for the cause of speed tuning of direction-selective Ca[Formula: see text] responses in dendrites of SACs.

  11. Identification of Potent Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 1 Inhibitors from Traditional Chinese Medicine through Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride intracellular channel 1 (CLIC1 is involved in the development of most aggressive human tumors, including gastric, colon, lung, liver, and glioblastoma cancers. It has become an attractive new therapeutic target for several types of cancer. In this work, we aim to identify natural products as potent CLIC1 inhibitors from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM database using structure-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics (MD simulation. First, structure-based docking was employed to screen the refined TCM database and the top 500 TCM compounds were obtained and reranked by X-Score. Then, 30 potent hits were achieved from the top 500 TCM compounds using cluster and ligand-protein interaction analysis. Finally, MD simulation was employed to validate the stability of interactions between each hit and CLIC1 protein from docking simulation, and Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA analysis was used to refine the virtual hits. Six TCM compounds with top MM-GBSA scores and ideal-binding models were confirmed as the final hits. Our study provides information about the interaction between TCM compounds and CLIC1 protein, which may be helpful for further experimental investigations. In addition, the top 6 natural products structural scaffolds could serve as building blocks in designing drug-like molecules for CLIC1 inhibition.

  12. Characterization of intracellular dynamics of inoculated PrP-res and newly generated PrPSc during early stage prion infection in Neuro2a cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Baron, Gerald S; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary To clarify the cellular mechanisms for the establishment of prion infection, we analyzed the intracellular dynamics of inoculated and newly generated abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc) in Neuro2a cells. Within 24 h after inoculation, the newly generated PrPSc was evident at the plasma membrane, in early endosomes, and in late endosomes, but this PrPSc was barely evident in lysosomes; in contrast, the majority of the inoculated PrPSc was evident in late endosomes and lysosomes. However, during the subsequent 48 h, the newly generated PrPSc increased remarkably in early endosomes and recycling endosomes. Overexpression of wild-type and mutant Rab proteins showed that membrane trafficking along not only the endocytic-recycling pathway but also the endo-lysosomal pathway is involved in de novo PrPSc generation. These results suggest that the trafficking of exogenously introduced PrPSc from the endo-lysosomal pathway to the endocytic-recycling pathway is important for the establishment of prion infection. PMID:24503096

  13. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    Through years, the dynamic resistance across the electrodes has been used for weld quality estimation and contact resistance measurement. However, the previous methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly based on measuring the voltage and current on the secondary side...... of the transformer in resistance welding machines, implying defects from induction noise and interference with the leads connected to the electrodes for measuring the voltage. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage on the primary side and the current on the secondary side......, as another application, the proposed method is used to measure the faying surface contact resistance....

  14. In vivo optical microprobe imaging for intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in response to dopaminergic signaling in deep brain evoked by cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongchi; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Ca2+ plays a vital role as second messenger in signal transduction and the intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) change is an important indicator of neuronal activity in the brain, including both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Due to the highly scattering and absorption of brain tissue, it is challenging to optically access the deep brain regions (e.g., striatum at >3mm under the brain surface) and image [Ca2+]i changes with cellular resolutions. Here, we present two micro-probe approaches (i.e., microlens, and micro-prism) integrated with a fluorescence microscope modified to permit imaging of neuronal [Ca2+]i signaling in the striatum using a calcium indicator Rhod2(AM). While a micro-prism probe provides a larger field of view to image neuronal network from cortex to striatum, a microlens probe enables us to track [Ca2+]i dynamic change in individual neurons within the brain. Both techniques are validated by imaging neuronal [Ca2+]i changes in transgenic mice with dopamine receptors (D1R, D2R) expressing EGFP. Our results show that micro-prism images can map the distribution of D1R- and D2R-expressing neurons in various brain regions and characterize their different mean [Ca2+]i changes induced by an intervention (e.g., cocaine administration, 8mg/kg., i.p). In addition, microlens images can characterize the different [Ca2+]i dynamics of D1 and D2 neurons in response to cocaine, including new mechanisms of these two types of neurons in striatum. These findings highlight the power of the optical micro-probe imaging for dissecting the complex cellular and molecular insights of cocaine in vivo.

  15. Integrating intracellular dynamics using CompuCell3D and Bionetsolver: applications to multiscale modelling of cancer cell growth and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Andasari

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a multiscale, individual-based simulation environment that integrates CompuCell3D for lattice-based modelling on the cellular level and Bionetsolver for intracellular modelling. CompuCell3D or CC3D provides an implementation of the lattice-based Cellular Potts Model or CPM (also known as the Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg or GGH model and a Monte Carlo method based on the metropolis algorithm for system evolution. The integration of CC3D for cellular systems with Bionetsolver for subcellular systems enables us to develop a multiscale mathematical model and to study the evolution of cell behaviour due to the dynamics inside of the cells, capturing aspects of cell behaviour and interaction that is not possible using continuum approaches. We then apply this multiscale modelling technique to a model of cancer growth and invasion, based on a previously published model of Ramis-Conde et al. (2008 where individual cell behaviour is driven by a molecular network describing the dynamics of E-cadherin and β-catenin. In this model, which we refer to as the centre-based model, an alternative individual-based modelling technique was used, namely, a lattice-free approach. In many respects, the GGH or CPM methodology and the approach of the centre-based model have the same overall goal, that is to mimic behaviours and interactions of biological cells. Although the mathematical foundations and computational implementations of the two approaches are very different, the results of the presented simulations are compatible with each other, suggesting that by using individual-based approaches we can formulate a natural way of describing complex multi-cell, multiscale models. The ability to easily reproduce results of one modelling approach using an alternative approach is also essential from a model cross-validation standpoint and also helps to identify any modelling artefacts specific to a given computational approach.

  16. Measurement fidelity in the presence of coherent dynamics or dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jian-Qiang; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the problem of a charge qubit probed by a quantum point contact when the measurement is concurrent with Hamiltonian-induced coherent dynamics or dissipation. This additional dynamics changes the state of the qubit before the measurement is completed. As a result, the measurement fidelity is reduced. We calculate the reduction in measurement fidelity in these cases. References: S. Ashhab, J. Q. You, and F. Nori, New J. Phys. 11, 083017 (2009); Phys. Scr. T137, 014005 (2009).

  17. MD1405: Demonstration of forced dynamic aperture measurements at injection

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, Felix Simon; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurements of dynamic aperture become more important for the LHC as it advances into increasingly nonlinear regimes of operations, as well as for the High Luminosity LHC where machine nonlinearities will have a significantly larger impact. Direct dynamic aperture measurements at top energy in the LHC are challenging, and conventional single kick methods are not viable. Dynamic aperture measurements under forced oscillation of AC dipoles have been proposed as s possible alternative observable. A first demonstration of forced DA measurements at injections energy is presented.

  18. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    of the bacterium. In situ analyses of Listeria monocytogenes single cells were performed during exposure to different concentrations of the disinfectant Incimaxx DES to study a possible population subdivision. Bacterial survival was quantified with plate counting and disinfection stress at the single-cell level...... by measuring intracellular pH (pHi) over time by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy. pHi values were initially 7 to 7.5 and decreased in both attached and planktonic L. monocytogenes cells during exposure to sublethal and lethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES. The response of the bacterial population...... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  19. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Lu, J.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The conventional methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly done by measuring the voltage and current at secondary side of transformer in resistance welding machines, in which the measuring set-up normally interferes with the movement of electrode, and the measuring precision...... is influenced by inductive noise caused by the high welding current. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage at primary side and current at secondary side. This increases the accuracy of measurement because of higher signal-noise ratio, and allows to apply to in...

  20. Dynamic measurements in non-uniform flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The response of gauges registering the flow velocity and pressure in highly non-uniform media (for example, a powder under shock compression or powdered low-density explosive) is simulated. The modeling employs an acoustic approach. Against the average level of the signal, the fluctuations generated by the heterogeneity of the medium are observed which may distort the results completely. For reliable measurements, gauges larger than the characteristic scale of the medium non-uniformity are required. Under this condition, electromagnetic flow measurements and the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) produce quite similar flow velocity profiles with small level of noise.

  1. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Lu, J.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The conventional methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly done by measuring the voltage and current at secondary side of transformer in resistance welding machines, in which the measuring set-up normally interferes with the movement of electrode, and the measuring precision is in...

  2. Research of dynamic goniometer method for direction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Yu. V.; Bokhman, E. D.; Ivanov, P. A.; Larichev, R. A.; Pavlov, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    The report presents the results of experimental research of the angle measurement system intended for measuring angles between normal to some mirrors setting directions in the space. Dynamic mode of system operation is defined by continuous rotation of platform with the autocollimating null-indicator. The angle measurements are provided by the holographic optical encoder.

  3. Measurement of the phase diffusion dynamics in the micromaser

    OpenAIRE

    Casagrande, F.; Ferraro, A.; Lulli, A.; Bonifacio, R.; Solano, E.; Walther, H.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a realistic scheme for measuring the micromaser linewidth by monitoring the phase diffusion dynamics of the cavity field. Our strategy consists in exciting an initial coherent state with the same photon number distribution as the micromaser steady-state field, singling out a purely diffusive process in the system dynamics. After the injection of a counter-field, measurements of the population statistics of a probe atom allow us to derive the micromaser linewidth. Our proposal aims ...

  4. Measurement of dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shigao; Silva, Glauber T; Kinnick, Randall R; Greenleaf, James F; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2005-05-01

    Dynamic radiation force from ultrasound has found increasing applications in elasticity imaging methods such as vibro-acoustography. Radiation force that has both static and dynamic components can be produced by interfering two ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies. This paper presents a method to measure both static and dynamic components of the radiation force on a sphere suspended by thin threads in water. Due to ultrasound radiation force, the sphere deflects to an equilibrant position and vibrates around it. The static radiation force is estimated from the deflection of the sphere. The dynamic radiation force is estimated from the calculated radiation impedance of the sphere and its vibration speed measured by a laser vibrometer. Experimental results on spheres of different size, vibrated at various frequencies, confirm the theoretical prediction that the dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere have approximately equal magnitudes [G. T. Silva, Phys. Rev. E 71, 056617 (2005)].

  5. Limitations and corrections in measuring dynamic characteristics of structural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, P.L.

    1978-10-01

    The work deals with limitations encountered in measuring the dynamic characteristics of structural systems. Structural loading and response are measured by transducers possessing multiple resonant frequencies in their transfer function. In transient environments, the resultant signals from these transducers are shown to be analytically unpredictable in amplitude level and frequency content. Data recorded during nuclear effects simulation testing on structures are analyzed. Results of analysis can be generalized to any structure which encounters dynamic loading. Methods to improve the recorded data are described which can be implemented on a frequency selective basis during the measurement process. These improvements minimize data distortion attributable to the transfer characteristics of the measuring transducers

  6. Unitarity, Feedback, Interactions - Dynamics Emergent from Repeated Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona Ugalde, Paulina; Altamirano, Natacha; Mann, Robert; Zych, Magdalena

    Modern measurement theory dispenses with the description of a measurement as a projection. Rather, the measurement is understood as an operation, whereby the system's final state is determined by an action of a completely positive trace non-increasing map and the outcomes are described by linear operators on the system, distributed according to a positive-operator valued measure (POVM). The POVM approach unifies the theory of measurements with a general description of dynamics, the theory of open quantum systems. Engineering a particular measurement and engineering a particular dynamics for the system are thus two complementary aspects of the same conceptual framework. This correspondence is directly applied in quantum simulations and quantum control theory . With this motivation, we study what types of dynamics can emerge from a model of repeated short interactions of a system with a set of ancillae. We show that contingent on the model parameters the resulting dynamics ranges from exact unitarity to arbitrary fast decoherence. For a series of measurements the effective dynamics includes feedback-control, which for a composite system yields effective interactions between the subsystems. We quantify the amount of decoherence accompanying such induced interactions. The simple framework used in the present study can find applications in devising novel quantum control protocols, or quantum simulations.

  7. Dynamic Anthropometry – Deffning Protocols for Automatic Body Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavenka Petrak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research on possibilities of protocol development for automatic computer-based determination of measurements on a 3D body model in defined dynamic positions. Initially, two dynamic body positions were defined for the research on dimensional changes of targeted body lengths and surface segments during body movement from basic static position into a selected dynamic body position. The assumption was that during body movement, specifi c length and surface dimensions would change significantly from the aspect of clothing construction and functionality of a garment model. 3D body scanning of a female test sample was performed in basic static and two defined dynamic positions. 3D body models were processed and measurement points were defined as a starting point for the determination of characteristic body measurements. The protocol for automatic computer measurement was defined for every dynamic body position by the systematic set of activities based on determined measurement points. The verification of developed protocols was performed by automatic determination of defined measurements on the test sample and by comparing the results with the conventional manual measurement.

  8. Structural Dynamics of Soluble Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein CLIC1 Examined by Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoychev, Stoyan H.; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L.; Dirr, Heini W.

    2009-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1 but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2 and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilising domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix α1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand β2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer. PMID:19650640

  9. The measurement of dynamic radii for passenger car tyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelache, G.; Moisescu, R.

    2017-10-01

    The tyre dynamic rolling radius is an extremely important parameter for vehicle dynamics, for operation of safety systems as ESP, ABS, TCS, etc., for road vehicle research and development, as well as for validation or as an input parameter of automotive simulations and models. The paper investigates the dynamic rolling radii of passenger car tyre and the influence of rolling speed and inflation pressure on their magnitude. The measurement of dynamic rolling radii has been performed on a chassis dynamometer test rig. The dynamic rolling radii have been measured indirectly, using longitudinal rolling speed and angular velocity of wheel. Due to the subtle effects that the parameters have on rolling radius magnitude, very accurate equipment has to be used. Two different methods have been chosen for measuring the wheel angular velocity: the stroboscopic lamp and the incremental rotary encoder. The paper shows that the stroboscopic lamp has an insufficient resolution, therefore it was no longer used for experimental investigation. The tyre dynamic rolling radii increase with rolling speed and with tyre inflation pressure, but the effect of pressure is more significant. The paper also makes considerations on the viability of simplified formulae from literature for calculating the tyre dynamic rolling radius.

  10. Measurement of dynamic efficiency: a directional distance function parametric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra, T.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Stefanou, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    This research proposes a parametric estimation of the structural dynamic efficiency measures proposed by Silva and Oude Lansink (2009). Overall, technical and allocative efficiency measurements are derived based on a directional distance function and the duality between this function and the optimal

  11. Nondestructive Measurement of Dynamic Modulus for Cellulose Nanofibril Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan Qing; Robert J. Ross; Zhiyong Cai; Yiqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films was performed using cantilever beam vibration (CBV) and acoustic methods to measure dynamic modulus. Static modulus was tested using tensile tension method. Correlation analysis shows the data measured by CBV has little linear relationship with static modulus, possessing a correlation coefficient (R

  12. Dynamic model of the electrorheological fluid based on measurement results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivenkov, K; Ulrich, S; Bruns, R

    2013-01-01

    To develop modern applications for vibration decoupling based on electrorheological fluids with suitable control strategies, an appropriate mathematical model of the ERF is necessary. The devices mostly used have annular-shape electrorheological valves. This requires the use of flow channels to measure the static and dynamic properties of the electrorheological fluids in similar flow conditions. Particularly for the identification of the dynamic behavior of the fluids, the influences of the non-electrorheological properties on the overall system must be taken into account. In this contribution three types of parameters with several nonlinear dependencies for the mapping of the static and dynamic properties of the ERF are considered: electro-rheological, hydraulic and electrical. The mathematical model introduced can precisely demonstrate the static and dynamic behavior of the electrorheological fluid and can be used for the future design of real systems for vibration decoupling or other systems with high dynamic requirements.

  13. Measuring the Dynamic Parameters of MCF7 Cell Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Carly; Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    2013-03-01

    Microtubules are the key component of the cytoskeleton. They are intrinsically dynamic displaying dynamic instability in which they randomly switch between a phase of growing and shrinking, both in vitro and in vivo. This dynamic is specified by the following parameters: growing rate, shrinking rate, frequency of catastrophe, and frequency of rescue. In this work, we will present our primary results in which we measured the dynamic parameters of a single microtubule polymerized from MCF7 tubulin in vitro. The results are significant since the MCF7 microtubules are non-neural mammalian consisting of different beta tubulin isotypes in their structures as compared to neural mammalian microtubules, such as bovine brain. The unique dynamic parameters of individual MCF7 microtubules in vitro, which are reported for the first time, indicate that non-neural microtubules can be fundamentally different from neural microtubules.

  14. Dynamic Aperture Measurements at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decking, W.; Robin, D.

    1999-01-01

    A large dynamic aperture for a storage ring is of importance for long lifetimes and a high injection efficiency. Measurements of the dynamic aperture of the third generation synchrotron light source Advanced Light Source (ALS) using beam excitation with kicker magnets are presented. The experiments were done for various accelerator conditions, allowing us to investigate the influence of different working points, chromaticities, insertion devices, etc.. The results are compared both with tracking calculations and a simple model for the dynamic aperture yielding good agreements. This gives us confidence in the predictability of the nonlinear accelerator model. This is especially important for future ALS upgrades as well as new storage ring designs

  15. Cumulative Measurement Errors for Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Located at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, the Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a real-time, six degree-of-freedom, short range motion base simulator originally designed to simulate the relative dynamics of two bodies in space mating together (i.e., docking or berthing). The SDTS has the capability to test full scale docking and berthing systems utilizing a two body dynamic docking simulation for docking operations and a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) simulation for berthing operations. The SDTS can also be used for nonmating applications such as sensors and instruments evaluations requiring proximity or short range motion operations. The motion base is a hydraulic powered Stewart platform, capable of supporting a 3,500 lb payload with a positional accuracy of 0.03 inches. The SDTS is currently being used for the NASA Docking System testing and has been also used by other government agencies. The SDTS is also under consideration for use by commercial companies. Examples of tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility integrates a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or de-mating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is used for input during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents unique challenges, one particular area of interest involves the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. The measurement systems for the test facility have two separate functions. The first is to take static measurements of facility and test hardware to determine both the static and moving frames used in the simulation and control system. The test hardware must be measured after each configuration change to determine both sets of reference frames. The second function is to take dynamic

  16. Measurements of dynamic shape factors of LMFBR aggregate aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.D.; Moss, O.R.; Briant, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    Dynamic shape factors for branched, chain-like aggregates of LMFBR mixed-oxide fuels have been measured with a LAPS spiral-duct centrifuge. The aerosol was generated by repeatedly pulsing a focused laser beam onto the surface of a typical LMFBR fuel pellet. The measured values of the dynamic shape factor, corrected for slip, vary between kappa = 3.60 at D/sub ae/ = 0.5 μm, and kappa = 2.23 at D/sub ae/ = 1.5 μm

  17. Dynamic Calibration and Verification Device of Measurement System for Dynamic Characteristic Coefficients of Sliding Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Runlin; Wei, Yangyang; Shi, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    The identification accuracy of dynamic characteristics coefficients is difficult to guarantee because of the errors of the measurement system itself. A novel dynamic calibration method of measurement system for dynamic characteristics coefficients is proposed in this paper to eliminate the errors of the measurement system itself. Compared with the calibration method of suspension quality, this novel calibration method is different because the verification device is a spring-mass system, which can simulate the dynamic characteristics of sliding bearing. The verification device is built, and the calibration experiment is implemented in a wide frequency range, in which the bearing stiffness is simulated by the disc springs. The experimental results show that the amplitude errors of this measurement system are small in the frequency range of 10 Hz–100 Hz, and the phase errors increase along with the increasing of frequency. It is preliminarily verified by the simulated experiment of dynamic characteristics coefficients identification in the frequency range of 10 Hz–30 Hz that the calibration data in this frequency range can support the dynamic characteristics test of sliding bearing in this frequency range well. The bearing experiments in greater frequency ranges need higher manufacturing and installation precision of calibration device. Besides, the processes of calibration experiments should be improved. PMID:27483283

  18. Computational fluid dynamics using in vivo ultrasound blood flow measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Marie Sand; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model environment for construction of patient-specific computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models for the abdominal aorta (AA). Realistic pulsatile velocity waveforms are employed by using in vivo ultrasound blood flow measurements. Ultrasound is suitable for acquisition...

  19. Dynamic Classifier Aggregation using Interaction-Sensitive Fuzzy Measures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefka, D.; Holeňa, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 270, 1 July (2015), s. 25-52 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-17187S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Fuzzy integral * Fuzzy measure * Dynamic classifier aggregation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 2.098, year: 2015

  20. Measuring Clearance Mechanics Based on Dynamic Leg Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Sam; Danino, Barry; Hayek, Shlomo; Carmeli, Eli

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify clearance mechanics during gait. Seventeen children diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy underwent a three-dimensional gait analysis evaluation. Dynamic leg lengths were measured from the hip joint center to the heel, to the ankle joint center and to the forefoot throughout the gait cycle. Significant…

  1. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Mancini, E.; Tay, J.; Shahand, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  2. In-flight measurement of upwind dynamic soaring in albatrosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2016-03-01

    In-flight measurement results on upwind flight of albatrosses using dynamic soaring are presented. It is shown how the birds manage to make progress against the wind on the basis of small-scale dynamic soaring maneuvers. For this purpose, trajectory features, motion quantities and mechanical energy relationships as well as force characteristics are analyzed. The movement on a large-scale basis consists of a tacking type flight technique which is composed of dynamic soaring cycle sequences with alternating orientation to the left and right. It is shown how this is performed by the birds so that they can achieve a net upwind flight without a transversal large-scale movement and how this compares with downwind or across wind flight. Results on upwind dynamic soaring are presented for low and high wind speed cases. It is quantified how much the tacking trajectory length is increased when compared with the beeline distance. The presented results which are based on in-flight measurements of free flying albatrosses were achieved with an in-house developed GPS-signal tracking method yielding the required high precision for the small-scale dynamic soaring flight maneuvers.

  3. Frontiers in Fluctuation Spectroscopy: Measuring protein dynamics and protein spatio-temporal connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digman, Michelle

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy has evolved from single point detection of molecular diffusion to a family of microscopy imaging correlation tools (i.e. ICS, RICS, STICS, and kICS) useful in deriving spatial-temporal dynamics of proteins in living cells The advantage of the imaging techniques is the simultaneous measurement of all points in an image with a frame rate that is increasingly becoming faster with better sensitivity cameras and new microscopy modalities such as the sheet illumination technique. A new frontier in this area is now emerging towards a high level of mapping diffusion rates and protein dynamics in the 2 and 3 dimensions. In this talk, I will discuss the evolution of fluctuation analysis from the single point source to mapping diffusion in whole cells and the technology behind this technique. In particular, new methods of analysis exploit correlation of molecular fluctuations originating from measurement of fluctuation correlations at distant points (pair correlation analysis) and methods that exploit spatial averaging of fluctuations in small regions (iMSD). For example the pair correlation fluctuation (pCF) analyses done between adjacent pixels in all possible radial directions provide a window into anisotropic molecular diffusion. Similar to the connectivity atlas of neuronal connections from the MRI diffusion tensor imaging these new tools will be used to map the connectome of protein diffusion in living cells. For biological reaction-diffusion systems, live single cell spatial-temporal analysis of protein dynamics provides a mean to observe stochastic biochemical signaling in the context of the intracellular environment which may lead to better understanding of cancer cell invasion, stem cell differentiation and other fundamental biological processes. National Institutes of Health Grant P41-RRO3155.

  4. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...

  5. A Dynamic Attitude Measurement System Based on LINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanzhou Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS. Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG. The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min.

  6. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  7. Dynamic Characterization of Cohesive Material Based on Wave Velocity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Sas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a description of the dynamic properties of cohesive material, namely silty clays, obtained by using one of the applied seismology methods, the bender elements technique. The authors’ aim was to present the dynamics of a porous medium, in particular an extremely important passage of seismic waves that travel through the bulk of a medium. Nowadays, the application of the bender element (BE technique to measure, e.g., small strain shear stiffness of soils in the laboratory is well recognized, since it allows for reliable and relatively economical shear wave velocity measurements during various laboratory experiments. However, the accurate estimation of arrival time during BE tests is in many cases unclear. Two different interpretation procedures (from the time domain of BE tests in order to measure travel times of waves were examined. Those values were then used to calculate shear and compression wave velocities and elastic moduli. Results showed that the dynamic parameters obtained by the start-to-start method were always slightly larger (up to about 20% than those obtained using the peak-to-peak one. It was found that the peak-to-peak method led to more scattered results in comparison to the start-to-start method. Moreover, the influence of the excitation frequency, the mean effective stress and the unloading process on the dynamic properties of the tested material was studied. In addition, the obtained results highlighted the importance of initial signal frequency and the necessity to choose an appropriate range of frequencies to measure the shear wave velocity in clayey soils.

  8. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amninder S Virk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction. Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  9. Simulation error propagation for a dynamic rod worth measurement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastanya, D.F.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    KRSKO nuclear station, subsequently adapted by Westinghouse, introduced the dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) technique for measuring pressurized water reactor rod worths. This technique has the potential for reduced test time and primary loop waste water versus alternatives. The measurement is performed starting from a slightly supercritical state with all rods out (ARO), driving a bank in at the maximum stepping rate, and recording the ex-core detectors responses and bank position as a function of time. The static bank worth is obtained by (1) using the ex-core detectors' responses to obtain the core average flux (2) using the core average flux in the inverse point-kinetics equations to obtain the dynamic bank worth (3) converting the dynamic bank worth to the static bank worth. In this data interpretation process, various calculated quantities obtained from a core simulator are utilized. This paper presents an analysis of the sensitivity to the impact of core simulator errors on the deduced static bank worth

  10. Dynamic Modeling of Pavements with Application to Deflection Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Stine Skov

    Pavement surface deflection measurements are the primary means of evaluating the bearing capacity of a pavement. The most common type of device used for measuring pavement surface deflections is the Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD). However, increasing attention has been given to the Rolling Wheel...... with different speeds is needed. In this thesis a new Finite Element formulation for transient dynamic loading of a layered half space is developed. Equations are derived in 2D and 3D and include efficient absorbing boundary conditions in the form of the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) which ensures capability...

  11. Space dependence of reactivity parameters on reactor dynamic perturbation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletti, R.; Ziegenbein, D.

    1985-01-01

    Practical application of reactor-dynamic perturbation measurements for on-power determination of differential reactivity weight of control rods and power coefficients of reactivity has shown a significant dependence of parameters on the position of outcore detectors. The space dependence of neutron flux signal in the core of a VVER-440-type reactor was measured by means of 60 self-powered neutron detectors. The greatest neutron flux alterations are located close to moved control rods and in height of the perturbation position. By means of computations, detector positions can be found in the core in which the one-point model is almost valid. (author)

  12. Quantitative analysis of impact measurements using dynamic load cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent J. Maranzano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is used to estimate material properties from a short duration transient impact force measured by dropping spheres onto rectangular coupons fixed to a dynamic load cell. The contact stress between the dynamic load cell surface and the projectile are modeled using Hertzian contact mechanics. Due to the short impact time relative to the load cell dynamics, an additional Kelvin–Voigt element is included in the model to account for the finite response time of the piezoelectric crystal. Calculations with and without the Kelvin–Voigt element are compared to experimental data collected from combinations of polymeric spheres and polymeric and metallic surfaces. The results illustrate that the inclusion of the Kelvin–Voigt element qualitatively captures the post impact resonance and non-linear behavior of the load cell signal and quantitatively improves the estimation of the Young's elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. Mathematically, the additional KV element couples one additional differential equation to the Hertzian spring-dashpot equation. The model can be numerically integrated in seconds using standard numerical techniques allowing for its use as a rapid technique for the estimation of material properties. Keywords: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, Dynamic load cell

  13. Automatic anatomical structures location based on dynamic shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Rapp, Walter; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Vander Sloten, Jos; Haex, Bart; Bogaert, Nico; Heitmann, Kjell

    2005-09-01

    New image processing methods and active photonics apparatus have made possible the development of relatively inexpensive optical systems for complex shape and object measurements. We present dynamic 360° scanning method for analysis of human lower body biomechanics, with an emphasis on the analysis of the knee joint. The anatomical structure (of high medical interest) that is possible to scan and analyze, is patella. Tracking of patella position and orientation under dynamic conditions may lead to detect pathological patella movements and help in knee joint disease diagnosis. The processed data is obtained from a dynamic laser triangulation surface measurement system, able to capture slow to normal movements with a scan frequency between 15 and 30 Hz. These frequency rates are enough to capture controlled movements used e.g. for medical examination purposes. The purpose of the work presented is to develop surface analysis methods that may be used as support of diagnosis of motoric abilities of lower limbs. The paper presents algorithms used to process acquired lower limbs surface data in order to find the position and orientation of patella. The algorithms implemented include input data preparation, curvature description methods, knee region discrimination and patella assumed position/orientation calculation. Additionally, a method of 4D (3D + time) medical data visualization is proposed. Also some exemplary results are presented.

  14. Airborne Measurement of Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics over Heterogeneous Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, T. J.; Hill, T. C.; Clement, R.; Moncrieff, J.; Disney, M.; Nichol, C. J.; Williams, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon sinks are currently believed to account for the removal and storage of approximately 25% of anthropogenic carbon emissions from the atmosphere. The processes involved are numerous and complex and many feedbacks are at play. The ability to study the dynamics of different ecosystems at scales meaningful to climatic forcing is essential for understanding the key processes involved and identifying crucial sensitivities and thresholds. Airborne platforms with the requisite instrumentation offer the opportunity to directly measure biological processes and atmospheric structures at scales that are not achievable by ground measurements alone. The current generation of small research aircraft such as the University of Edinburgh’s Diamond HK36TTC ECO Dimona present excellent platforms for measurement of both the atmosphere and terrestrial surface. In this study we present results from airborne CO2/H2O flux measuring campaigns in contrasting climatic systems to quantify spatial patterns in ecosystem photosynthesis. Several airborne campaigns were undertaken in Arctic Finland, as part of the Arctic Biosphere Atmosphere Coupling at Multiple Scales (ABACUS) project (2008), and mainland UK as part of the UK Population Biology Network (UKPopNet) 2009 project, to explore the variability in surface CO2 flux across spatial scales larger than captured using conventional ground based eddy covariance. We discuss the application of our aircraft platform as a tool to address the challenge of understanding carbon dynamics within landscapes of heterogeneous vegetation class, terrain and hydrology using complementary datasets acquired from airborne eddy covariance and remote sensing.

  15. Dynamic pressure measurement of cartridge operated vole captive bolt devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M; Philipp, K P; Franke, E; Frank, N; Bockholdt, B; Grossjohann, R; Ekkernkamp, A

    2009-01-10

    Vole captive bolt devices are powder actuated spring guns that are used as a pest control mean. After having triggered the explosion of the blank cartridge by touching a metal ring around the muzzle, the vole is killed by the massive propulsion of the gas jet. Improper use and recklessness while handling these devices may cause severe injuries with the hand of the operator at particular risk. Currently, there are no experimental investigations on the ballistic background of these devices. An experimental test set-up was designed for measurement of the firing pressure and the dynamic force of the gas jet of a vole captive bolt device. Therefore, a vole captive bolt device was prepared with a pressure take-off channel and a piezoelectric transducer for measurement of the firing pressure. For measurement of the dynamic impact force of the gas jet an annular quartz force sensor was installed on a test bench. Each three simultaneous measurements of the cartridges' firing pressure and the dynamic force of the blast wave were taken at various distances between muzzle and load washer. The maximum gas pressure in the explosion chamber was up to 1100 bar. The shot development over time showed a typical gas pressure curve. Flow velocity of the gas jet was up to 2000 m/s. The maximum impact force of the gas jet at the target showed a strong inverse ratio to the muzzle's distance and was up to 11,500 N for the contact shot distance. Energy density of the gas jet for the close contact shot was far beyond the energy density required for skin penetration. The unique design features (short tube between cartridge mouth and muzzle and narrow diameter of the muzzle) of these gadgets are responsible for the high firing pressure, velocity and force of the gas jet. These findings explain the trauma mechanics of the extensive tissue damage observed in accidental shots of these devices.

  16. Sensitivity evaluation of dynamic speckle activity measurements using clustering methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etchepareborda, Pablo; Federico, Alejandro; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate and compare the use of competitive neural networks, self-organizing maps, the expectation-maximization algorithm, K-means, and fuzzy C-means techniques as partitional clustering methods, when the sensitivity of the activity measurement of dynamic speckle images needs to be improved. The temporal history of the acquired intensity generated by each pixel is analyzed in a wavelet decomposition framework, and it is shown that the mean energy of its corresponding wavelet coefficients provides a suited feature space for clustering purposes. The sensitivity obtained by using the evaluated clustering techniques is also compared with the well-known methods of Konishi-Fujii, weighted generalized differences, and wavelet entropy. The performance of the partitional clustering approach is evaluated using simulated dynamic speckle patterns and also experimental data.

  17. Measuring TGF-β Ligand Dynamics in Culture Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zipei; Zi, Zhike; Liu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β plays an important role in a myriad of cell activities including differentiation, proliferation, and growth arrest. These effects are influenced by the concentration of TGF-β in the surrounding milieu, which is interpreted by mammalian cells and subsequently translated into meaningful signals that guide their proliferation, survival, or death. To predict cellular responses to TGF-ß signaling based on molecular mechanisms, it is important to consider how cells respond to different ligand doses and how variations in ligand exposure impact Smad signaling dynamics and subsequent gene expression. Here we describe methods to measure TGF-β concentration in the environment and approaches to perturb cellular TGF-β exposure to gain a quantitative understanding of signaling dynamics of this pathway.

  18. The dynamic of poverty measurement indexes, from HDI to MPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anila Nanaj

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the dynamic poverty measurement from Human Development Index (HDI to Multi Dimensional Poverty (MPI, as poverty indicators from Sen to Foster-Alkire indexes. The HDI takes into consideration three dimensions and four indexes, the MPI goes further. The dimensions and indicators exceed the limits of classical measurements of poverty, creates the possibilities of measuring and comparing multidimensional poverty. Multidimensional Poverty Index helps to analyze the spectrum of poverty, understanding of sustainable development emergency, as well as it is a great help for reading poverty phenomenon on a three dimensional aspect and under the sub-meaning of 10 different indicators. MPI calculation off ers further comparative analyses of MPI Albania and Eastern Balkan countries. Comprehensive indexes are generated and applied, but doesn’t mean their conclusions are translated (converted into comprehensive policies as well. The data and the indicators for poverty measurement in Albania are not frequently generated and calculated due to LSMS missing a> er 2012. So there is a big gap in poverty reports. Finally, we argue how the measures chosen to use in poverty measurement of course can lead or mislead towards the process of policy making due to the great practical relevance of measurement methodologies.

  19. Measurements of granular flow dynamics with high speed digital images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jingeol [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The flow of granular materials is common to many industrial processes. This dissertation suggests and validates image processing algorithms applied to high speed digital images to measure the dynamics (velocity, temperature and volume fraction) of dry granular solids flowing down an inclined chute under the action of gravity. Glass and acrylic particles have been used as granular solids in the experiment. One technique utilizes block matching for spatially averaged velocity measurements of the glass particles. This technique is compared with the velocity measurement using an optic probe which is a conventional granular flow velocity measurement device. The other technique for measuring the velocities of individual acrylic particles is developed with correspondence using a Hopfield network. This technique first locates the positions of particles with pattern recognition techniques, followed by a clustering technique, which produces point patterns. Also, several techniques are compared for particle recognition: synthetic discriminant function (SDF), minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter, modified minimum average correlation energy (MMACE) filter and variance normalized correlation. The author proposes an MMACE filter which improves generalization of the MACE filter by adjusting the amount of averaged spectrum of training images in the spectrum whitening stages of the MACE filter. Variance normalized correlation is applied to measure the velocity and temperature of flowing glass particles down the inclined chute. The measurements are taken for the steady and wavy flow and qualitatively compared with a theoretical model of granular flow.

  20. Study on the measurement method of a dynamic spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Li, G; Lin, L; Liu, Y L; Li, X X; Lu, Stephen C-Y

    2005-01-01

    Continuous non-invasive blood component sensing and regulation is necessary for patients with metabolism disorders. Utilizing near-infrared spectroscopy for non-invasively sensing blood component concentration has been a focus topic in biomedical optics applications. It has been shown to be versatile, speedy and sensitive to several kinds of samples. However, there is no report about any successful non-invasive blood component (except the artery blood oxygen saturation) concentration detection techniques that can meet the requirements of clinic application. One of the key difficulties is the influence of individual discrepancies. Dynamic spectrum is a new non-invasive measure method for sensing blood component concentration presented recently. It can theoretically eliminate the individual discrepancies of the tissues except the pulsatile component of the artery blood. This indicates a brand new way to measure the blood component concentration and the potential to provide absolute quantitation of hemodynamic variables. In this paper, the measurement methodology to acquire the DS from photoplethysmography (PPG) is studied. A dynamic spectrometer to acquire the DS is described

  1. Dynamic measurements of the elastic constants of glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    , and this requires knowledge of the dynamic elastic constants of the fiber skeleton. The mechanical properties of glass wool are highly anisotropic. Previously only one of the elastic constants has been measured dynamically, but here all the elastic constants are reported. The measurement method is well known......The sound wave in the air between the fibers of glass wool exerts an oscillatory viscous drag on the fibers and excites a mechanical wave in the fiber skeleton. Accurate calculations of sound attenuation in glass wool must take the mechanical wave in the fiber skeleton into account...... formula. The elastic constants were measured in the frequency range 20–160 Hz for glass wool of mass density 30 kg/m3. The elastic constant C11 depended on the frequency; at 20 Hz it was 1.5+0.01i MPa, and at 160 Hz it was 2.6+0.06i MPa. The constant C33=12+0.6i kPa did not depend on frequency. The shear...

  2. Dynamic Efficiency Measurements for Irradiated ATLAS Pixel Single Chip Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaff, Mike; Grosse-Knetter, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is the innermost subdetector of the ATLAS experiment. Due to this, the pixel detector has to be particularly radiation hard. In this diploma thesis effects on the sensor and the electronics which are caused by irradiation are examined. It is shown how the behaviour changes between an unirradiated sample and a irradiated sample, which was treated with the same radiation dose that is expected at the end of the lifetime of ATLAS. For this study a laser system, which is used for dynamic efficiency measurements was constructed. Furthermore, the behaviour of the noise during the detection of a particle was evaluated studied.

  3. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation measured with coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Coherent Hemodynamics Spectroscopy (CHS) is a novel technique for non-invasive measurements of local microcirculation quantities such as the capillary blood transit times and dynamic autoregulation. The basis of CHS is to measure, for instance with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), peripheral coherent hemodynamic changes that are induced by controlled perturbations in the systemic mean arterial pressure (MAP). In this study, the MAP perturbation was induced by the fast release of two pneumatic cuffs placed around the subject's thighs after they were kept inflated (at 200 mmHg) for two minutes. The resulting transient changes in cerebral oxy- (O) and deoxy- (D) hemoglobin concentrations measured with NIRS on the prefrontal cortex are then described by a novel hemodynamic model, from which quantifiable parameters such as the capillary blood transit time and a cutoff frequency for cerebral autoregulation are obtained. We present results on eleven healthy volunteers in a protocol involving measurements during normal breathing and during hyperventilation, which is known to cause a hypocapnia-induced increase in cerebral autoregulation. The measured capillary transit time was unaffected by hyperventilation (normal breathing: 1.1±0.1 s; hyperventilation: 1.1±0.1 s), whereas the cutoff frequency of autoregulation, which increases for higher autoregulation efficiency, was indeed found to be significantly greater during hyperventilation (normal breathing: 0.017±0.002 Hz; hyperventilation: 0.034±0.005 Hz). These results provide a validation of local cerebral autoregulation measurements with the new technique of CHS.

  4. Can foot anthropometric measurements predict dynamic plantar surface contact area?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Natalie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that increased plantar surface area, associated with pes planus, is a risk factor for the development of lower extremity overuse injuries. The intent of this study was to determine if a single or combination of foot anthropometric measures could be used to predict plantar surface area. Methods Six foot measurements were collected on 155 subjects (97 females, 58 males, mean age 24.5 ± 3.5 years. The measurements as well as one ratio were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measurements associated with total plantar contact area either including or excluding the toe region. The predicted values were used to calculate plantar surface area and were compared to the actual values obtained dynamically using a pressure sensor platform. Results A three variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measures/ratio and total plantar contact area (R2 = 0.77, p R2 = 0.76, p Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the clinician can use a combination of simple, reliable, and time efficient foot anthropometric measurements to explain over 75% of the plantar surface contact area, either including or excluding the toe region.

  5. Linking the transcriptional profiles and the physiological states of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during an extended intracellular infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle H Rohde

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis have evolved strategies for coping with the pressures encountered inside host cells. The ability to coordinate global gene expression in response to environmental and internal cues is one key to their success. Prolonged survival and replication within macrophages, a key virulence trait of M. tuberculosis, requires dynamic adaptation to diverse and changing conditions within its phagosomal niche. However, the physiological adaptations during the different phases of this infection process remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we have developed a multi-tiered approach to define the temporal patterns of gene expression in M. tuberculosis in a macrophage infection model that extends from infection, through intracellular adaptation, to the establishment of a productive infection. Using a clock plasmid to measure intracellular replication and death rates over a 14-day infection and electron microscopy to define bacterial integrity, we observed an initial period of rapid replication coupled with a high death rate. This was followed by period of slowed growth and enhanced intracellular survival, leading finally to an extended period of net growth. The transcriptional profiles of M. tuberculosis reflect these physiological transitions as the bacterium adapts to conditions within its host cell. Finally, analysis with a Transcriptional Regulatory Network model revealed linked genetic networks whereby M. tuberculosis coordinates global gene expression during intracellular survival. The integration of molecular and cellular biology together with transcriptional profiling and systems analysis offers unique insights into the host-driven responses of intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis.

  6. A dose and time response Markov model for the in-host dynamics of infection with intracellular bacteria following inhalation: with application to Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R M; Egan, J R; Hall, I M

    2014-06-06

    In a novel approach, the standard birth-death process is extended to incorporate a fundamental mechanism undergone by intracellular bacteria, phagocytosis. The model accounts for stochastic interaction between bacteria and cells of the immune system and heterogeneity in susceptibility to infection of individual hosts within a population. Model output is the dose-response relation and the dose-dependent distribution of time until response, where response is the onset of symptoms. The model is thereafter parametrized with respect to the highly virulent Schu S4 strain of Francisella tularensis, in the first such study to consider a biologically plausible mathematical model for early human infection with this bacterium. Results indicate a median infectious dose of about 23 organisms, which is higher than previously thought, and an average incubation period of between 3 and 7 days depending on dose. The distribution of incubation periods is right-skewed up to about 100 organisms and symmetric for larger doses. Moreover, there are some interesting parallels to the hypotheses of some of the classical dose-response models, such as independent action (single-hit model) and individual effective dose (probit model). The findings of this study support experimental evidence and postulations from other investigations that response is, in fact, influenced by both in-host and between-host variability.

  7. Measurements and analysis of end-to-end Internet dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxson, Vern [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Science Division

    1997-04-01

    Accurately characterizing end-to-end Internet dynamics - the performance that a user actually obtains from the lengthy series of network links that comprise a path through the Internet - is exceptionally difficult, due to the network`s immense heterogeneity. At the heart of this work is a `measurement framework` in which a number of sites around the Internet host a specialized measurement service. By coordinating `probes` between pairs of these sites one can measure end-to-end behavior along O(N2) paths for a framework consisting of N sites. Consequently, one obtains a superlinear scaling that allows measuring a rich cross-section of Internet behavior without requiring huge numbers of observation points. 37 sites participated in this study, allowing the author to measure more than 1,000 distinct Internet paths. The first part of this work looks at the behavior of end-to-end routing: the series of routers over which a connection`s packets travel. Based on 40,000 measurements made using this framework, the author analyzes: routing `pathologies` such as loops, outages, and flutter; the stability of routes over time; and the symmetry of routing along the two directions of an end-to-end path. The author finds that pathologies increased significantly over the course of 1995 and that Internet paths are heavily dominated by a single route. The second part of this work studies end-to-end Internet packet dynamics. The author analyzes 20,000 TCP transfers of 100 Kbyte each to investigate the performance of both the TCP endpoints and the Internet paths. The measurements used for this part of the study are much richer than those for the first part, but require a great degree of attention to issues of calibration, which are addressed by applying self-consistency checks to the measurements whenever possible. The author finds that packet filters are capable of a wide range of measurement errors, some of which, if undetected, can significantly taint subsequent analysis.

  8. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Balian, Roger; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2013-01-01

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum–classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie–Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix D -hat (t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin–pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state D -hat (t f ) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although D -hat (t f ) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of runs. Individual runs are

  9. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique et Systèmes Complexes, ISMANS, 44 Av. Bartholdi, 72000 Le Mans (France); Balian, Roger [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M., E-mail: T.M.Nieuwenhuizen@uva.nl [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum–classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie–Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix D{sup -hat} (t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin–pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of

  10. Measurement of Dynamic Friction Coefficient on the Irregular Free Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, S. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    A spent fuel storage cask must be estimated for a structural integrity when an earthquake occurs because it freely stands on ground surface without a restriction condition. Usually the integrity estimation for a seismic load is performed by a FEM analysis, the friction coefficient for a standing surface is an important parameter in seismic analysis when a sliding happens. When a storage cask is placed on an irregular ground surface, measuring a friction coefficient of an irregular surface is very difficult because the friction coefficient is affected by the surface condition. In this research, dynamic friction coefficients on the irregular surfaces between a concrete cylinder block and a flat concrete slab are measured with two methods by one direction actuator

  11. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  12. Holographic otoscope for nanodisplacement measurements of surfaces under dynamic excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Moreno, J M; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey T; Scarpino, C; Santoyo, F Mendoza

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel holographic otoscope system for measuring nanodisplacements of objects subjected to dynamic excitation. Such measurements are necessary to quantify the mechanical deformation of surfaces in mechanics, acoustics, electronics, biology, and many other fields. In particular, we are interested in measuring the sound-induced motion of biological samples, such as an eardrum. Our holographic otoscope system consists of laser illumination delivery (IS), optical head (OH), and image processing computer (IP) systems. The IS delivers the object beam (OB) and the reference beam (RB) to the OH. The backscattered light coming from the object illuminated by the OB interferes with the RB at the camera sensor plane to be digitally recorded as a hologram. The hologram is processed by the IP using the Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm, where the focal plane can be selected freely. Our holographic otoscope system is currently deployed in a clinic, and is packaged in a custom design. It is mounted in a mechatronic positioning system to increase its maneuverability degrees to be conveniently positioned in front of the object to be measured. We present representative results highlighting the versatility of our system to measure deformations of complex elastic surfaces in the wavelength scale including a copper foil membrane and postmortem tympanic membrane. SCANNING 33: 342-352, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurements in Diagnostics of Turbocharged Marine Internal Combustion Engines Part II Dynamic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczewski Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The second part of the article describes the technology of marine engine diagnostics making use of dynamic measurements of the exhaust gas temperature. Little-known achievements of Prof. S. Rutkowski of the Naval College in Gdynia (now: Polish Naval Academy in this area are presented. A novel approach is proposed which consists in the use of the measured exhaust gas temperature dynamics for qualitative and quantitative assessment of the enthalpy flux of successive pressure pulses of the exhaust gas supplying the marine engine turbocompressor. General design assumptions are presented for the measuring and diagnostic system which makes use of a sheathed thermocouple installed in the engine exhaust gas manifold. The corrected thermal inertia of the thermocouple enables to reproduce a real time-history of exhaust gas temperature changes.

  14. Protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of Na+/K+-ATPase opens intracellular C-terminal water pathway leading to third Na+-binding site in molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Hanne; Nissen, Poul; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2012-01-01

    -atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural consequences of phosphorylating the Na+/K+- ATPase (NKA) residue S936, which is the best characterized phosphorylation site in NKA, targeted in vivo by Protein Kinase A (PKA) (1-3). The MD simulations suggest that S936 phosphorylation opens...

  15. Distributed solar radiation fast dynamic measurement for PV cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Yang, Yi; Cui, Jian; Du, Xingjing; Zheng, Tao; Sardar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-10-01

    To study the operating characteristics about PV cells, attention must be given to the dynamic behavior of the solar radiation. The dynamic behaviors of annual, monthly, daily and hourly averages of solar radiation have been studied in detail. But faster dynamic behaviors of solar radiation need more researches. The solar radiation random fluctuations in minute-long or second-long range, which lead to alternating radiation and cool down/warm up PV cell frequently, decrease conversion efficiency. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation are mainly relevant to stochastic moving of clouds. Even in clear sky condition, the solar irradiations show a certain degree of fast variation. To evaluate operating characteristics of PV cells under fast dynamic irradiation, a solar radiation measuring array (SRMA) based on large active area photodiode, LoRa spread spectrum communication and nanoWatt MCU is proposed. This cross photodiodes structure tracks fast stochastic moving of clouds. To compensate response time of pyranometer and reduce system cost, the terminal nodes with low-cost fast-responded large active area photodiode are placed besides positions of tested PV cells. A central node, consists with pyranometer, large active area photodiode, wind detector and host computer, is placed in the center of the central topologies coordinate to scale temporal envelope of solar irradiation and get calibration information between pyranometer and large active area photodiodes. In our SRMA system, the terminal nodes are designed based on Microchip's nanoWatt XLP PIC16F1947. FDS-100 is adopted for large active area photodiode in terminal nodes and host computer. The output current and voltage of each PV cell are monitored by I/V measurement. AS62-T27/SX1278 LoRa communication modules are used for communicating between terminal nodes and host computer. Because the LoRa LPWAN (Low Power Wide Area Network) specification provides seamless interoperability among Smart Things without the

  16. Cerebral NMR spectroscopy to study intracellular space in vivo: methodological development for diffusion weighted spectroscopy at short time scale and for pH measurement using 31P detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchadour, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a unique modality to evaluate intracellular environment in vivo. Indeed observed molecules are specifically intracellular and generally have a biochemistry role and a specific cellular compartmentation. That could be a useful tool to understand cell functioning in their environment. My thesis work consisted in development of new sequence in both diffusion and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy.My first study was to develop a diffusion-weighted spectroscopy at ultra-short diffusion time to look at the anomalous diffusion in the rat brain. ADC evolution as a function of time shows that brain metabolites motion is mainly due to random diffusion and that active transport (if exist) are negligible. Data modeling evidences that diffusion at short diffusion time is sensitive to cytoplasm viscosity and short scale crowding. In collaboration with the pharmaceutical company, this technique was chosen to follow up transgenic mice (rTg4510), model of tau pathology. Preliminary results show significant differences of ADC at an early stage of neuro-degenerescence (3 and 6 months).Phosphorus spectroscopy allows observation of metabolites directly implicated in energetic processes. During this thesis, localization sequences were developed to measure intracellular pH in the primate striatum. These sequences are supposed to be used to evaluate the potential of pH as a bio-marker of neuro-degenerescence in a phenotypic model of the Huntington disease in the non-human primate. (author) [fr

  17. Dynamic fatigue measurement of human erythrocytes using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Yuhao; Liu, Jia; Du, E

    2017-07-15

    Erythrocytes must undergo severe deformation to pass through narrow capillaries and submicronic splenic slits for several hundred thousand times in their normal lifespan. Studies of erythrocyte biomechanics have been mainly focused on cell deformability and rheology measured from a single application of stress and mostly under a static or quasi-static state using classical biomechanical techniques, such as optical tweezers and micropipette aspiration. Dynamic behavior of erythrocytes in response to cyclic stresses that contributes to the membrane failure in blood circulation is not fully understood. This paper presents a new experimental method for dynamic fatigue analysis of erythrocytes, using amplitude modulated electrokinetic force field in a microfluidic platform. We demonstrate the capability of this new technique using a low cycle fatigue analysis of normal human erythrocytes and ATP-depleted erythrocytes. Cyclic tensile stresses are generated to induce repeated uniaxial stretching and extensional recovery of single erythrocytes. Results of morphological and biomechanical parameters of individually tracked erythrocytes show strong correlations with the number of the loading cycles. Under a same strength of electric field, after 180 stress cycles, for normal erythrocytes, maximum stretch ratio decreases from 3.80 to 2.86, characteristic time of cellular extensional recovery increases from 0.16s to 0.37s, membrane shear viscosity increases from 1.0(µN/m)s to 1.6(µN/m)s. Membrane deformation in a small number of erythrocytes becomes irreversible after large deformation for about 200 cyclic loads. ATP-depleted cells show similar trends in decreased deformation and increased characteristic time with the loading cycles. These results show proof of concept of the new microfluidics technique for dynamic fatigue analysis of human erythrocytes. Red blood cells (RBCs) experience a tremendous number of deformation in blood circulation before losing their mechanical

  18. Dynamical Behaviors of Rumor Spreading Model with Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia-Xia Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumor has no basis in fact and flies around. And in general, it is propagated for a certain motivation, either for business, economy, or pleasure. It is found that the web does expose us to more rumor and increase the speed of the rumors spread. Corresponding to these new ways of spreading, the government should carry out some measures, such as issuing message by media, punishing the principal spreader, and enhancing management of the internet. In order to assess these measures, dynamical models without and with control measures are established. Firstly, for two models, equilibria and the basic reproduction number of models are discussed. More importantly, numerical simulation is implemented to assess control measures of rumor spread between individuals-to-individuals and medium-to-individuals. Finally, it is found that the amount of message released by government has the greatest influence on the rumor spread. The reliability of government and the cognizance ability of the public are more important. Besides that, monitoring the internet to prevent the spread of rumor is more important than deleting messages in media which already existed. Moreover, when the minority of people are punished, the control effect is obvious.

  19. MEASURING THE MASS OF 4UO900-40 DYNAMICALLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, J. F.; Etzel, Paul B.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurements of neutron star masses are needed to constrain the equation of state of neutron star matter - of importance to both particle physics and the astrophysics of neutron stars - and to identify the evolutionary track of the progenitor stars that form neutron stars. The best measured values of the mass of 4UO900-40 (= Vela XR-l), 1.86 +/- 0.16 Msun (Barziv et al. 2001) and 1.93 +/- 0.20 Msun (Abubekerov et al. 2004), make it a leading candidate for the most massive neutron star known. The direct relationship between the maximum mass of neutron stars and the equation of state of ultra-dense matter makes 4UO900-40 an important neutron star mass to determine accurately. The confidence interval on previous mass estimates, obtained from observations that include parameters determined by non-dynamical methods, are not small enough to significantly restrict possible equations of state. We describe here a purely dynamical method for determining the mass of 4UO900-40, an X-ray pulsar, using the reprocessed UV pulses emitted by its BO.5Ib companion. One can derive the instantaneous radial velocity of each component by simultaneous X-ray and UV observations at the two quadratures of the system. The Doppler shift caused by the primary's rotational velocity and the illumination pattern of the X-rays on the primary, two of the three principal contributors to the uncertainty on the derived mass of the neutron star, almost exactly cancel by symmetry in this method. A heuristic measurement of the mass of 4UO900-40 using observations obtained previously with the High Speed Photometer on HST is given in Appendix A.

  20. Peptide Level Turnover Measurements Enable the Study of Proteoform Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Jana; Meng, Chen; Zolg, Daniel Paul; Samaras, Patroklos; Wilhelm, Mathias; Kuster, Bernhard

    2018-05-01

    The coordination of protein synthesis and degradation regulating protein abundance is a fundamental process in cellular homeostasis. Today, mass spectrometry-based technologies allow determination of endogenous protein turnover on a proteome-wide scale. However, standard dynamic SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling in Cell Culture) approaches can suffer from missing data across pulse time-points limiting the accuracy of such analysis. This issue is of particular relevance when studying protein stability at the level of proteoforms because often only single peptides distinguish between different protein products of the same gene. To address this shortcoming, we evaluated the merits of combining dynamic SILAC and tandem mass tag (TMT)-labeling of ten pulse time-points in a single experiment. Although the comparison to the standard dynamic SILAC method showed a high concordance of protein turnover rates, the pulsed SILAC-TMT approach yielded more comprehensive data (6000 proteins on average) without missing values. Replicate analysis further established that the same reproducibility of turnover rate determination can be obtained for peptides and proteins facilitating proteoform resolved investigation of protein stability. We provide several examples of differentially turned over splice variants and show that post-translational modifications can affect cellular protein half-lives. For example, N-terminally processed peptides exhibited both faster and slower turnover behavior compared with other peptides of the same protein. In addition, the suspected proteolytic processing of the fusion protein FAU was substantiated by measuring vastly different stabilities of the cleavage products. Furthermore, differential peptide turnover suggested a previously unknown mechanism of activity regulation by post-translational destabilization of cathepsin D as well as the DNA helicase BLM. Finally, our comprehensive data set facilitated a detailed evaluation of the impact of protein

  1. Made-to-measure modelling of observed galaxy dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovy, Jo; Kawata, Daisuke; Hunt, Jason A. S.

    2018-01-01

    Amongst dynamical modelling techniques, the made-to-measure (M2M) method for modelling steady-state systems is amongst the most flexible, allowing non-parametric distribution functions in complex gravitational potentials to be modelled efficiently using N-body particles. Here, we propose and test various improvements to the standard M2M method for modelling observed data, illustrated using the simple set-up of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. We demonstrate that nuisance parameters describing the modelled system's orientation with respect to the observer - e.g. an external galaxy's inclination or the Sun's position in the Milky Way - as well as the parameters of an external gravitational field can be optimized simultaneously with the particle weights. We develop a method for sampling from the high-dimensional uncertainty distribution of the particle weights. We combine this in a Gibbs sampler with samplers for the nuisance and potential parameters to explore the uncertainty distribution of the full set of parameters. We illustrate our M2M improvements by modelling the vertical density and kinematics of F-type stars in Gaia DR1. The novel M2M method proposed here allows full probabilistic modelling of steady-state dynamical systems, allowing uncertainties on the non-parametric distribution function and on nuisance parameters to be taken into account when constraining the dark and baryonic masses of stellar systems.

  2. Methodological aspects of EEG and Body dynamics measurements during motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro eReis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available EEG involves recording, analysis, and interpretation of voltages recorded on the human scalp originating from brain grey matter. EEG is one of the favorite methods to study and understand processes that underlie behavior. This is so, because EEG is relatively cheap, easy to wear, light weight and has high temporal resolution. In terms of behavior, this encompasses actions, such as movements, that are performed in response to the environment. However, there are methodological difficulties when recording EEG during movement such as movement artifacts. Thus, most studies about the human brain have examined activations during static conditions. This article attempts to compile and describe relevant methodological solutions that emerged in order to measure body and brain dynamics during motion. These descriptions cover suggestions of how to avoid and reduce motion artifacts, hardware, software and techniques for synchronously recording EEG, EMG, kinematics, kinetics and eye movements during motion. Additionally, we present various recording systems, EEG electrodes, caps and methods for determination of real/custom electrode positions. In the end we will conclude that it is possible to record and analyze synchronized brain and body dynamics related to movement or exercise tasks.

  3. Optical measurement methods to study dynamic behavior in MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembe, Christian; Kant, Rishi; Muller, Richard S.

    2001-10-01

    The maturing designs of moving microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) make it more-and-more important to have precise measurements and visual means to characterize dynamic microstructures. The Berkeley Sensor&Actuator Center (BSAC) has a forefront project aimed at developing these capabilities and at providing high-speed Internet (Supernet) access for remote use of its facilities. Already in operation are three optical-characterization tools: a stroboscopic-interferometer system, a computer-microvision system, and a laser-Doppler vibrometer. This paper describes precision and limitations of these systems and discusses their further development. In addition, we describe the results of experimental studies on the different MEMS devices, and give an overview about high-speed visualization of rapidly moving MEMS structures.

  4. Picosecond X-ray streak camera dynamic range measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, C., E-mail: celine.zuber@cea.fr; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Gontier, D.; Raimbourg, J.; Rubbelynck, C.; Trosseille, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Fronty, J.-P.; Goulmy, C. [Photonis SAS, Avenue Roger Roncier, BP 520, 19106 Brive Cedex (France)

    2016-09-15

    Streak cameras are widely used to record the spatio-temporal evolution of laser-induced plasma. A prototype of picosecond X-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to answer the Laser MegaJoule specific needs. The dynamic range of this instrument is measured with picosecond X-ray pulses generated by the interaction of a laser beam and a copper target. The required value of 100 is reached only in the configurations combining the slowest sweeping speed and optimization of the streak tube electron throughput by an appropriate choice of high voltages applied to its electrodes.

  5. Application of Anova to Pulse Detonation Engine Dynamic Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Subhash; Kumar, Rakesh; Sandhu, Manmohan; Jindal, TK

    2017-10-01

    Application of Anova to Pulse detonation engine dynamic performance measurement resulted in quantifying engine functionality during various operations. After evaluating the performance, techniques of improving it, were applied in multiple areas of relevant interest. This produced encouraging results and helped in upscaling efforts in a significant manner. The current paper deals in the details of anova implementation and systematic identification of key areas of improvements. The improvements were carried out after careful selection of plans in the engine, ground rig and instrumentation setup etc. It also yielded better reproducibility of performance and optimization of main subsystems of PDE. Further, this will also contribute to reduce the development cycle and trial complexity also, if researchers continue to extract concern areas to be addressed.

  6. Nephron blood flow dynamics measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Pavlov, Alexey N

    2011-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) has an important role in autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Because of the characteristics of signal transmission in the feedback loop, the TGF undergoes self-sustained oscillations in single-nephron blood flow, GFR, and tubular...... simultaneously. The interacting nephron fields are likely to be more extensive. We have turned to laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the blood flow dynamics of 50-100 nephrons simultaneously on the renal surface of anesthetized rats. We report the application of this method and describe analytic...... techniques for extracting the desired data and for examining them for evidence of nephron synchronization. Synchronized TGF oscillations were detected in pairs or triplets of nephrons. The amplitude and the frequency of the oscillations changed with time, as did the patterns of synchronization...

  7. Thermographic measurement of thermal bridges in buildings under dynamic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; De Carli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accurate knowledge of the thermal performance could reduce significantly the impact of buildings on global energy consumption. Infrared thermography is widely recognized as one of the key technologies for building surveys, thanks to its ability to acquire at a glance thermal images of the building envelope. However, a spot measurement could be misleading when the building is under dynamic thermal conditions. In this case data should be acquired for hours or days, depending on the thermal properties of the walls. Long term thermographic monitoring are possible but imply strong challenges from a practical standpoint. This work investigates the possibilities and limitations of spot thermographic surveys coupled with contact probes, that are able to acquire continuously the thermal signal for days, to investigate the thermal bridges of a building. The goal is the estimation of the reliability and accuracy of the measurement under realistic environmental conditions. Firstly, numerical simulations are performed to determine the reference value of an experimental case. Then a long term thermographic survey is performed and integrated with the contact probe measurement, assessing the feasibility of the method.

  8. A study of dynamic foot pressure measurement in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka D Madhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcer is a major source of morbidity and a leading cause of hospitalization. It is estimated that approximately 20% of hospital admissions among patients with diabetes mellitus are due to diabetic foot ulcer. It can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if appropriate care is not provided. Overall, the lower limb amputation in diabetic patients is 15 times higher than in non-diabetics. In the majority of cases, the cause for the foot ulcer is the altered architecture of the foot due to neuropathy resulting in abnormal pressure points on the soles. Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner and check its reliability and validity which can help to prevent foot ulceration. Design/Methodology/Approach: In the present study, a low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner is developed, and dynamic plantar pressures in a group of 110 Indian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers are measured. Practical Implications: If these pressure points can be detected, ulcers can be prevented by providing offloading footwear. Originality/Value: Differences are found in dynamic foot pressures in different study groups, namely, diabetic patients, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with foot ulcers, and nondiabetics. The differences are significant (P < 0.01, which showed the validity of the tool. Reliability and consistency of the tool was checked by test–retest method. Paper Type: Original Research work. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it is concluded that the scanner is successfully developed and it can measure foot pressures. It is a novel device to proactively monitor foot health in diabetics in an effort to prevent and reduce diabetic foot complications.

  9. Measurements of particle dynamics in slow, dense granular Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueth, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental measurements of particle dynamics on the lower surface of a three-dimensional (3D) Couette cell containing monodisperse spheres are reported. The average radial density and velocity profiles are similar to those previously measured within the bulk and on the lower surface of the 3D cell filled with mustard seeds. Observations of the evolution of particle velocities over time reveal distinct motion events, intervals where previously stationary particles move for a short duration before jamming again. The cross correlation between the velocities of two particles at a given distance r from the moving wall reveals a characteristic length scale over which the particles are correlated. The autocorrelation of a single particle’s velocity reveals a characteristic time scale τ, which decreases with increasing distance from the inner moving wall. This may be attributed to the increasing rarity at which the discrete motion events occur and the reduced duration of those events at large r. The relationship between the rms azimuthal velocity fluctuations, δvθ(r), and average shear rate, γ˙(r), was found to be δvθ∝γ˙α with α=0.52±0.04. These observations are compared with other recent experiments and with the modified hydrodynamic model recently introduced by Bocquet et al.

  10. Dynamic range measurement and calibration of SiPMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Lauscher, M.; Middendorf, L.; Niggemann, T.; Schumacher, J.; Stephan, M.; Bueno, A.; Navas, S.; Ruiz, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    Photosensors have played and will continue to play an important role in high-energy and Astroparticle cutting-edge experiments. As of today, the most common photon detection device in use is the photomultiplier tube (PMT). However, we are witnessing rapid progress in the field and new devices now show very competitive features when compared to PMTs. Among those state-of-the-art photo detectors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are a relatively new kind of semiconductor whose potential is presently studied by many laboratories. Their characteristics make them a very attractive candidate for future Astroparticle physics experiments recording fluorescence and Cherenkov light, both in the atmosphere and on the ground. Such applications may require the measurement of the light flux on the sensor for the purpose of energy reconstruction. This is a complex task due to the limited dynamic range of SiPMs and the presence of thermal and correlated noise. In this work we study the response of three SiPM types in terms of delivered charge when exposed to light pulses in a broad range of intensities: from single photon to saturation. The influence of the pulse time duration and the SiPM over-voltage on the response are also quantified. Based on the observed behaviour, a method is presented to reconstruct the real number of photons impinging on the SiPM surface directly from the measured SiPM charge. A special emphasis is placed on the description of the methodology and experimental design used to perform the measurements.

  11. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Clearance in Alzheimer Disease Measured with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint-Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-09-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Dynamic PET with 18 F-THK5117, a tracer for tau pathology, was used to estimate the ventricular CSF time-activity as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested 3 hypotheses: extracranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: Fifteen subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers, were examined with 18 F-THK5117. Ten subjects additionally underwent 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) PET scanning, and 8 were 11 C-PiB-positive. Ventricular time-activity curves of 18 F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated time-activity curves from extracranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF-positive extracranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinate CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET-measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  13. A comparison of different measures for dynamical event mean transverse momentum fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lianshou; Fu Jinghua

    2004-01-01

    Various measures for the dynamical event mean transverse momentum fluctuation are compared with the real dynamical fluctuation using a Monte Carlo model. The variance calculated from the G-moments can reproduce the dynamical variance well, while those obtained by subtraction procedures are approximate measures for not very low multiplicity. Φ pt , proposed by Gazdzicki M and Mrowczynski S, can also serve as an approximate measure after being divided by the square root of mean multiplicity

  14. Movement Characteristics Analysis and Dynamic Simulation of Collaborative Measuring Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    guoqing, MA; li, LIU; zhenglin, YU; guohua, CAO; yanbin, ZHENG

    2017-03-01

    Human-machine collaboration is becoming increasingly more necessary, and so collaborative robot applications are also in high demand. We selected a UR10 robot as our research subject for this study. First, we applied D-H coordinate transformation of the robot to establish a link system, and we then used inverse transformation to solve the robot’s inverse kinematics and find all the joints. Use Lagrange method to analysis UR robot dynamics; use ADAMS multibody dynamics simulation software to dynamic simulation; verifying the correctness of the derived kinetic models.

  15. Power measurements and analysis for dynamic circuit specialization

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Amit; Bonamy, Robin; Stroobandt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Circuit Specialization (DCS) is a technique for optimized FPGA implementation and is built on top of Partial Reconfiguration (PR). Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration (DPR) provides an opportunity to share the silicon area between different Partially Reconfigurable Modules (PRMs) and therefore results in smaller and faster designs that potentially also reduce the power consumption. In this paper, we show that energy consumption is an important factor that has to be considered while implem...

  16. Analysis on the dynamic error for optoelectronic scanning coordinate measurement network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shendong; Yang, Linghui; Lin, Jiarui; Guo, Siyang; Ren, Yongjie

    2018-01-01

    Large-scale dynamic three-dimension coordinate measurement technique is eagerly demanded in equipment manufacturing. Noted for advantages of high accuracy, scale expandability and multitask parallel measurement, optoelectronic scanning measurement network has got close attention. It is widely used in large components jointing, spacecraft rendezvous and docking simulation, digital shipbuilding and automated guided vehicle navigation. At present, most research about optoelectronic scanning measurement network is focused on static measurement capacity and research about dynamic accuracy is insufficient. Limited by the measurement principle, the dynamic error is non-negligible and restricts the application. The workshop measurement and positioning system is a representative which can realize dynamic measurement function in theory. In this paper we conduct deep research on dynamic error resources and divide them two parts: phase error and synchronization error. Dynamic error model is constructed. Based on the theory above, simulation about dynamic error is carried out. Dynamic error is quantized and the rule of volatility and periodicity has been found. Dynamic error characteristics are shown in detail. The research result lays foundation for further accuracy improvement.

  17. Neutron Reflectivity Measurement for Polymer Dynamics near Graphene Oxide Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jaseung

    We investigated the diffusion dynamics of polymer chains confined between graphene oxide layers using neutron reflectivity (NR). The bilayers of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA)/ deuterated PMMA (d-PMMA) films and polystyrene (PS)/d-PS films with various film thickness sandwiched between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared. From the NR results, we found that PMMA diffusion dynamics was reduced near the GO surface while the PS diffusion was not significantly changed. This is due to the different strength of GO-polymer interaction. In this talk, these diffusion results will be compared with dewetting dynamics of polymer thin films on the GO monolayers. This has given us the basis for development of graphene-based nanoelectronics with high efficiency, such as heterojunction devices for polymer photovoltaic (OPV) applications.

  18. Sub-10-nm intracellular bioelectronic probes from nanowire-nanotube heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian-Ming; Duan, Xiaojie; Jiang, Zhe; Dai, Xiaochuan; Xie, Ping; Cheng, Zengguang; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-01-28

    The miniaturization of bioelectronic intracellular probes with a wide dynamic frequency range can open up opportunities to study biological structures inaccessible by existing methods in a minimally invasive manner. Here, we report the design, fabrication, and demonstration of intracellular bioelectronic devices with probe sizes less than 10 nm. The devices are based on a nanowire-nanotube heterostructure in which a nanowire field-effect transistor detector is synthetically integrated with a nanotube cellular probe. Sub-10-nm nanotube probes were realized by a two-step selective etching approach that reduces the diameter of the nanotube free-end while maintaining a larger diameter at the nanowire detector necessary for mechanical strength and electrical sensitivity. Quasi-static water-gate measurements demonstrated selective device response to solution inside the nanotube, and pulsed measurements together with numerical simulations confirmed the capability to record fast electrophysiological signals. Systematic studies of the probe bandwidth in different ionic concentration solutions revealed the underlying mechanism governing the time response. In addition, the bandwidth effect of phospholipid coatings, which are important for intracellular recording, was investigated and modeled. The robustness of these sub-10-nm bioelectronics probes for intracellular interrogation was verified by optical imaging and recording the transmembrane resting potential of HL-1 cells. These ultrasmall bioelectronic probes enable direct detection of cellular electrical activity with highest spatial resolution achieved to date, and with further integration into larger chip arrays could provide a unique platform for ultra-high-resolution mapping of activity in neural networks and other systems.

  19. Performance of classification confidence measures in dynamic classifier systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefka, D.; Holeňa, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2013), s. 299-319 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-17187S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : classifier combining * dynamic classifier systems * classification confidence Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.412, year: 2013

  20. Wideband impedance measurements of DC motors under dynamic load conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diouf, F.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Duval, Fabrice; Bensetti, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    One of the principal conducted EMI(electromagnetic interferences) sources of low voltage DC (direct current) motors is the commutation occurring during rotation. In this paper the small-signal impedance of low voltage DC motors under different functioning modes, including the dynamic one is studied

  1. In vivo intracellular pH measurements in tobacco and Arabidopsis reveal an unexpected pH gradient in the endomembrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Bassil, Elias; Jublanc, Elodie; Alcon, Carine; Reguera, Maria; Sentenac, Hervé; Blumwald, Eduardo; Paris, Nadine

    2013-10-01

    The pH homeostasis of endomembranes is essential for cellular functions. In order to provide direct pH measurements in the endomembrane system lumen, we targeted genetically encoded ratiometric pH sensors to the cytosol, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the trans-Golgi, or the compartments labeled by the vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR), which includes the trans-Golgi network and prevacuoles. Using noninvasive live-cell imaging to measure pH, we show that a gradual acidification from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lytic vacuole exists, in both tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) epidermal (ΔpH -1.5) and Arabidopsis thaliana root cells (ΔpH -2.1). The average pH in VSR compartments was intermediate between that of the trans-Golgi and the vacuole. Combining pH measurements with in vivo colocalization experiments, we found that the trans-Golgi network had an acidic pH of 6.1, while the prevacuole and late prevacuole were both more alkaline, with pH of 6.6 and 7.1, respectively. We also showed that endosomal pH, and subsequently vacuolar trafficking of soluble proteins, requires both vacuolar-type H(+) ATPase-dependent acidification as well as proton efflux mediated at least by the activity of endosomal sodium/proton NHX-type antiporters.

  2. Real-time visualization of intracellular hydrodynamics in single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potma, Eric O.; Boeij, Wim P. de; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular water concentrations in single living cells were visualized by nonlinear coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In combination with isotopic exchange measurements, CARS microscopy allowed the real-time observation of transient intracellular hydrodynamics at a high

  3. Intracellular Drug Uptake-A Comparison of Single Cell Measurements Using ToF-SIMS Imaging and Quantification from Cell Populations with LC/MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carla F; Havelund, Rasmus; Passarelli, Melissa K; Marshall, Peter S; Francis, Ian; West, Andy; Alexander, Morgan R; Gilmore, Ian S; Dollery, Colin T

    2017-11-21

    ToF-SIMS is a label-free imaging method that has been shown to enable imaging of amiodarone in single rat macrophage (NR8383) cells. In this study, we show that the method extends to three other cell lines relevant to drug discovery: human embryonic kidney (HEK293), cervical cancer (HeLa), and liver cancer (HepG2). There is significant interest in the variation of drug uptake at the single cell level, and we use ToF-SIMS to show that there is great diversity between individual cells and when comparing each of the cell types. These single cell measurements are compared to quantitative measurements of cell-associated amiodarone for the population using LC/MS/MS and cell counting with flow cytometry. NR8383 and HepG2 cells uptake the greatest amount of amiodarone with an average of 2.38 and 2.60 pg per cell, respectively, and HeLa and Hek 293 have a significantly lower amount of amiodarone at 0.43 and 0.36 pg per cell, respectively. The amount of cell-associated drug for the ensemble population measurement (LC/MS/MS) is compared with the ToF-SIMS single cell data: a similar amount of drug was detected per cell for the NR8383, and HepG2 cells at a greater level than that for the HEK293 cells. However, the two techniques did not agree for the HeLa cells, and we postulate potential reasons for this.

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy Measurements of Protein Dynamics and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.

    2011-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has long been used to deduce the concentration and secondary structures of proteins in a variety of static and time resolved applications. Our focus is on developing new infrared methods to compare the structure, dynamics and function of nearly identical protein samples, in different environments, to apply to the problem of identifying bio-similar protein therapeutics. We have developed an order parameter describing protein conformation variations around the average molecular values. By comparing our order parameter and amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods, we explore the relationship between protein stability and the dynamics of the protein conformational distribution. Examples include lysozyme and albumin in solution, cytochrome c interacting with lipid membranes of varying net-negative surface charge density, fibrinogen on different polymer surfaces and bacteriorhodopsin during its photocycle.

  5. In situ measurements of oxygen dynamics in unsaturated archaeological deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Henning; Hollesen, Jørgen; Dunlop, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is a key parameter in the degradation of archaeological material, but little is known of its dynamics in situ. In this study, 10 optical oxygen sensors placed in a 2 m deep test pit in the cultural deposits at Bryggen in Bergen have monitored oxygen concentrations every half hour for more ...... of the soil exceeds 10–15% vol, while oxygen dissolved in infiltrating rainwater is of less importance for the supply of oxygen in the unsaturated zone....

  6. Optimizing Nanoelectrode Arrays for Scalable Intracellular Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2018-03-20

    Electrode technology for electrophysiology has a long history of innovation, with some decisive steps including the development of the voltage-clamp measurement technique by Hodgkin and Huxley in the 1940s and the invention of the patch clamp electrode by Neher and Sakmann in the 1970s. The high-precision intracellular recording enabled by the patch clamp electrode has since been a gold standard in studying the fundamental cellular processes underlying the electrical activities of neurons and other excitable cells. One logical next step would then be to parallelize these intracellular electrodes, since simultaneous intracellular recording from a large number of cells will benefit the study of complex neuronal networks and will increase the throughput of electrophysiological screening from basic neurobiology laboratories to the pharmaceutical industry. Patch clamp electrodes, however, are not built for parallelization; as for now, only ∼10 patch measurements in parallel are possible. It has long been envisioned that nanoscale electrodes may help meet this challenge. First, nanoscale electrodes were shown to enable intracellular access. Second, because their size scale is within the normal reach of the standard top-down fabrication, the nanoelectrodes can be scaled into a large array for parallelization. Third, such a nanoelectrode array can be monolithically integrated with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics to facilitate the large array operation and the recording of the signals from a massive number of cells. These are some of the central ideas that have motivated the research activity into nanoelectrode electrophysiology, and these past years have seen fruitful developments. This Account aims to synthesize these findings so as to provide a useful reference. Summing up from the recent studies, we will first elucidate the morphology and associated electrical properties of the interface between a nanoelectrode and a cellular membrane

  7. Simultaneous measurement of dynamic strain and temperature distribution using high birefringence PANDA fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengshi; Murayama, Hideaki

    2017-04-01

    New approach in simultaneous measurement of dynamic strain and temperature has been done by using a high birefringence PANDA fiber Bragg grating sensor. By this technique, we have succeeded in discriminating dynamic strain and temperature distribution at the sampling rate of 800 Hz and the spatial resolution of 1 mm. The dynamic distribution of strain and temperature were measured with the deviation of 5mm spatially. In addition, we have designed an experimental setup by which we can apply quantitative dynamic strain and temperature distribution to the fiber under testing without bounding it to a specimen.

  8. Further development of the Dynamic Control Assemblies Worth Measurement Method for Advanced Reactivity Computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petenyi, V.; Strmensky, C.; Jagrik, J.; Minarcin, M.; Sarvaic, I.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic control assemblies worth measurement technique is a quick method for validation of predicted control assemblies worth. The dynamic control assemblies worth measurement utilize space-time corrections for the measured out of core ionization chamber readings calculated by DYN 3D computer code. The space-time correction arising from the prompt neutron density redistribution in the measured ionization chamber reading can be directly applied in the advanced reactivity computer. The second correction concerning the difference of spatial distribution of delayed neutrons can be calculated by simulation the measurement procedure by dynamic version of the DYN 3D code. In the paper some results of dynamic control assemblies worth measurement applied for NPP Mochovce are presented (Authors)

  9. Visual search tasks: measurement of dynamic visual lobe and relationship with display movement velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin-Dong; Yu, Rui-Feng; Lin, Xue-Lian; Xie, Ya-Qing; Ma, Liang

    2018-02-01

    Visual lobe is a useful tool for predicting visual search performance. Up till now, no study has focused on dynamic visual lobe. This study developed a dynamic visual lobe measurement system (DVLMS) that could effectively map dynamic visual lobe and calculate visual lobe shape indices. The effects of display movement velocity on lobe shape indices were examined under four velocity conditions: 0, 4, 8 and 16 deg/s. In general, with the increase of display movement velocity, visual lobe area and perimeter became smaller, whereas lobe shape roundness, boundary smoothness, symmetry and regularity deteriorated. The elongation index was not affected by velocity. Regression analyses indicated that display movement velocity was important in determining dynamic visual lobe shape indices. Dynamic visual lobe provides another option for better understanding dynamic vision, in addition to dynamic visual acuity. Findings of this study can provide guidelines for analysing and designing dynamic visual tasks. Practitioner Summary: Dynamic visual lobe is important in reflecting the visual ability of searching for a moving target. We developed a dynamic visual lobe measurement system (DVLMS) and examined display movement velocity's effects on lobe shape. Findings revealed that velocity was a key factor affecting dynamic visual lobe shape indices.

  10. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPD-induced immune biomarkers measurable in vitro following BCG vaccination of UK adolescents by multiplex bead array and intracellular cytokine staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worth Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vaccine efficacy reported following Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG administration to UK adolescents is 77% and defining the cellular immune response in this group can inform us as to the nature of effective immunity against tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to identify which cytokines and lymphocyte populations characterise the peripheral blood cellular immune response following BCG vaccination. Results Diluted blood from before and after vaccination was stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative for 6 days, after which soluble biomarkers in supernatants were assayed by multiplex bead array. Ten out of twenty biomarkers measured were significantly increased (p Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative stimulation of PBMC samples from the 12 month group revealed that IFNγ expression was detectable in CD4 and CD8 T-cells and natural killer cells. Polyfunctional flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that cells expressing IFNγ alone formed the majority in each subpopulation of cells. Only in CD4 T-cells and NK cells were there a notable proportion of responding cells of a different phenotype and these were single positive, TNFα producers. No significant expression of the cytokines IL-2, IL-17 or IL-10 was seen in any population of cells. Conclusions The broad array of biomarker responses detected by multiplex bead array suggests that BCG vaccination is capable, in this setting, of inducing a complex immune phenotype. Although polyfunctional T-cells have been proposed to play a role in protective immunity, they were not present in vaccinated adolescents who, based on earlier epidemiological studies, should have developed protection against pulmonary tuberculosis. This may be due to the later sampling time point available for testing or on the kinetics of the assays used.

  12. Dynamics of 'quantumness' measures in the decohering harmonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the behaviour under decoherence of four different measures of the distance between quantum states and classical states for the harmonic oscillator coupled to a linear Markovian bath. Three of these are relative measures, using different definitions of the distance between the given quantum states and the set of ...

  13. The intracellular pharmacokinetics of terminally capped peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Witsenburg, J.J.; Glauner, H.B.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.M.; Ferro, E.S.; Verdurmen, W.P.R.; Brock, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    With significant progress in delivery technologies, peptides and peptidomimetics are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutics also for intracellular applications. However, analyses of the intracellular behavior of peptides are a challenge; therefore, knowledge on the intracellular

  14. Analysis of strawberry ripening by dynamic speckle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulone, C.; Budini, N.; Vincitorio, F. M.; Freyre, C.; López Díaz, A. J.; Ramil Rego, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work seeks to determine the age of a fruit from observation of its dynamic speckle pattern. A mobile speckle pattern originates on the fruit's surface due to the interference of the wavefronts reflected from moving scatterers. For this work we analyzed two series of photographs of a strawberry speckle pattern, at different stages of ripening, acquired with a CMOS camera. The first day, we took ten photographs at an interval of one second. The same procedure was repeated the next day. From each series of images we extracted several statistical descriptors of pixel-to-pixel gray level variation during the observation time. By comparing these values from the first to the second day we noticed a diminution of the speckle activity. This decay demonstrated that after only one day the ripening process of the strawberry can be detected by dynamic speckle pattern analysis. For this study we employed a simple new algorithm to process the data obtained from the photographs. This algorithm allows defining a global mobility index that indicates the evolution of the fruit's ripening.

  15. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  16. Dichlorodihydrofluorescein and dihydrorhodamine 123 are sensitive indicators of peroxynitrite in vitro: implications for intracellular measurement of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, J P

    1997-04-01

    2,7-Dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCDHF), commonly known as dichlorofluorescin, and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) are often used to detect the production of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in cells via oxidation to their respective fluorescent products. To determine which biological oxidants might be involved, DCDHF and DHR were exposed to a number of oxidants in vitro to determine which are capable of oxidizing these compounds. Formation of dichlorofluorescein (DCF) and rhodamine is typically monitored by measuring their intrinsic fluorescence, however, absorbance can also be utilized (epsilon500 nm = 59,500 and 78,800 M(-1) cm(-1) for DCF and rhodamine, respectively). Peroxynitrite (ONOO-) readily oxidized both compounds with an efficiency equal to 38% of added ONOO- for DCDHF and 44% for DHR. Addition of nitric oxide (NO) to a superoxide-generating system resulted in DCDHF and DHR oxidation which was inhibitable by superoxide dismutase (SOD). SIN-1-mediated oxidation of DCDHF and DHR was also SOD-inhibitable, suggesting that peroxynitrite is the primary oxidant formed from SIN-1 decomposition. Aerobic addition of NO resulted in DCDHF oxidation in a manner consistent with nitrogen dioxide (.NO2) formation. NO did not oxidize DHR and actually inhibited UV-light-induced DHR oxidation. Simultaneous addition of NO and ONOO- resulted in an apparent inhibition of indicator oxidation; however, subsequent addition of ONOO- alone 20 s later produced a higher than average amount of oxidized indicator. Addition of indicator after NO + ONOO- followed by subsequent ONOO- addition gave similar results, suggesting the formation of a relatively stable, oxidant-activated NO/ONOO- adduct. At pH 7.4, hypochlorous acid was 66% efficient at oxidizing DHR but only 9% with DCDHF. Neither H2O2 (1 mM) nor superoxide flux alone produced significant indicator oxidation. Oxidation of DCDHF by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) plus H2O2 was considerably less efficient than oxidation of DHR. At 20

  17. Low-Temperature Decoupling of Water and Protein Dynamics Measured by Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio

    2017-10-05

    Water plays a major role in biosystems, greatly contributing to determine their structure, stability, and function. It is well known, for instance, that proteins require a minimum amount of water to be fully functional. Despite many years of intensive research, however, the detailed nature of protein-hydration water interactions is still partly unknown. The widely accepted "protein dynamical transition" scenario is based on perfect coupling between the dynamics of proteins and that of their hydration water, which has never been probed in depth experimentally. I present here high-resolution elastic neutron scattering measurements of the atomistic dynamics of lysozyme in water. The results show for the first time that the dynamics of proteins and of their hydration water are actually decoupled at low temperatures. This important result challenges the "protein dynamical transition" scenario and requires a new model to link protein dynamics to the dynamics of its hydration water.

  18. Ultrasonic fluid quantity measurement in dynamic vehicular applications a support vector machine approach

    CERN Document Server

    Terzic, Jenny; Nagarajah, Romesh; Alamgir, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Accurate fluid level measurement in dynamic environments can be assessed using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach. SVM is a supervised learning model that analyzes and recognizes patterns. It is a signal classification technique which has far greater accuracy than conventional signal averaging methods. Ultrasonic Fluid Quantity Measurement in Dynamic Vehicular Applications: A Support Vector Machine Approach describes the research and development of a fluid level measurement system for dynamic environments. The measurement system is based on a single ultrasonic sensor. A Support Vector Machines (SVM) based signal characterization and processing system has been developed to compensate for the effects of slosh and temperature variation in fluid level measurement systems used in dynamic environments including automotive applications. It has been demonstrated that a simple ν-SVM model with Radial Basis Function (RBF) Kernel with the inclusion of a Moving Median filter could be used to achieve the high levels...

  19. Dynamical measurements of the interior structure of exoplanets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Juliette C.; Batygin, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Giant gaseous planets often reside on orbits in sufficient proximity to their host stars for the planetary quadrupole gravitational field to become non-negligible. In presence of an additional planetary companion, a precise characterization of the system's orbital state can yield meaningful constraints on the transiting planet's interior structure. However, such methods can require a very specific type of system. This paper explores the dynamic range of applicability of these methods and shows that interior structure calculations are possible for a wide array of orbital architectures. The HAT-P-13 system is used as a case study, and the implications of perturbations arising from a third distant companion on the feasibility of an interior calculation are discussed. We find that the method discussed here is likely to be useful in studying other planetary systems, allowing the possibility of an expanded survey of the interiors of exoplanets.

  20. A novel method of evaluating dynamic measurement uncertainty utilizing digital filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, J P

    2009-01-01

    For every measurement, a measurement uncertainty should be associated with the estimate of the measurand. In particular, this applies to all the common non-stationary transient dynamic measurements made with linear time-invariant measurement systems, despite the present standard treatment providing little guidance for this case. To complete recent studies on the estimation and correction of the systematic dynamic error, the remaining evaluation of measurement uncertainty is addressed here. A method based on digital filtering will be utilized to find the generically time-dependent dynamic contribution to the uncertainty. It will be shown that the widely accepted approach to calculate the stationary uncertainty can be extended to transient measurements, provided some complementary techniques are used and the sensitivity is generalized to be a time-dependent signal instead of a constant. For illustration, the method is applied to the same measurement system analysed in the related published studies

  1. Measuring Group Work Dynamics and Its Relation with L2 Learners' Task Motivation and Language Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupore, Glen

    2016-01-01

    While learners of a second language (L2) are increasingly interacting in small groups as part of a communicative methodological paradigm, very few studies have investigated the social dynamics that occur in such groups. The aim of this study is to introduce a group work dynamic measuring instrument and to investigate the relationship between group…

  2. Q-angle static or dynamic measurements, which is the best choice for patellofemoral pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danilo de Oliveira; Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; Gonçalves, Ana Valéria; Ferrari, Deisi; Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; de Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis

    2015-12-01

    The elevated Q-angle seems to be one of the most suggested factors contributing to patellofemoral pain. Females with patellofemoral pain are often evaluated through static clinical tests in clinical practice. However, the adaptations seem to appear more frequently in dynamic conditions. Performing static vs. dynamic evaluations of widely used measures would add to the knowledge in this area. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminatory capability of three Q-angle measurements: a static clinical test, peak dynamic knee valgus during stair ascent and a static measurement using a three-dimensional system. Twenty-nine females with patellofemoral pain and twenty-five pain-free females underwent clinical Q-angle measurement and static and dynamic knee valgus measurements during stair ascent, using a three-dimensional system. All measurements were obtained and comparisons between groups, reliability and discriminatory capability were calculated. Peak dynamic knee valgus was found to be greater in the patellofemoral pain group. On the other hand, no significant effects were found for static knee valgus or clinical Q-angle measurements between groups. The dynamic variable demonstrated the best discriminatory capability. Low values of reliability were found for clinical Q-angle, in contrast to the high values found for the three-dimensional system measurements. Based on our findings, avoiding or correcting dynamic knee valgus during stair ascent may be an important component of rehabilitation programs in females with patellofemoral pain who demonstrate excessive dynamic knee valgus. Q-angle static measurements were not different between groups and presented poor values of discriminatory capability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamics of 'quantumness' measures in the decohering harmonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-26

    Jul 26, 2016 ... relative measures compare to each other in static sys- tems? (2) While studies so far have looked at the 'cat states', which are relatively complex, how does non- classicality behave in a decohering system for simpler states such as Fock states (which correspond to the well-studied experimental situation)?.

  4. The Focus Factor: A Dynamic Measure of Journal Specialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We present a new bibliometric indicator to measure journal specialisation over time, named the focus factor. This new indicator is based on bibliographic coupling and counts the percentage of re-citations given in subsequent years. Method: The applicability of the new indicator is demonstrated on a selection of general science…

  5. X-Ray Measured Dynamics of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr-1 (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = tm ) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr-1 (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of [approx]0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr-1 and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of [less, similar]0.2 cm-3.

  6. An intelligent instrument for measuring the dynamic parameters of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Guoping

    2002-01-01

    An intelligent instrument was developed for measuring direction and velocity of the groundwater, permeability coefficient, hydraulic transmitting coefficient, static level, hydraulic gradient and flow direction of each layer. The instrument can be widely applied for detecting seepage of abutment and river bank, exploitation of groundwater, conservation of water and soil, water surging in mine, survey of groundwater resource and environment protection etc

  7. Quantification of the Force of Nanoparticle-Cell Membrane Interactions and Its Influence on Intracellular Trafficking of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasir, Jaspreet K.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with the cell membrane and their trafficking through cells is imperative to fully explore the use of NPs for efficient intracellular delivery of therapeutics. Here, we report a novel method of measuring the force of NP-cell membrane interactions using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Poly(dl-lactide co-glycolide, PLGA) NPs functionalized with poly-l-lysine were used as a model system, to demonstrate that this force determines the adhesive interaction of NPs with the cell membrane and in turn the extent of cellular uptake of NPs, and hence that of the encapsulated therapeutic. Cellular uptake of NPs was monitored using AFM imaging, and the dynamics of their intracellular distribution was quantified using confocal microscopy. Results demonstrated that the functionalized NPs have a five-fold greater force of adhesion with the cell membrane and the time-lapse AFM images show their rapid internalization than unmodified NPs. The intracellular trafficking study showed that the functionalized NPs escape more rapidly and efficiently from late endosomes than unmodified NPs and result in 10-fold higher intracellular delivery of the encapsulated model protein. The findings described herein enhance our basic understanding of the NP-cell membrane interaction on the basis of physical phenomena that could have wider applications in developing efficient nanocarrier systems for intracellular delivery of therapeutics. PMID:18692238

  8. INTRACELLULAR Ca2+ HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahdevi Nandar Kurniawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ signaling functions to regulate many cellular processes. Dynamics of Ca2+ signaling or homeostasis is regulated by the interaction between ON and OFF reactions that control Ca2+ flux in both the plasma membrane and internal organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria. External stimuli activate the ON reactions, which include Ca2+ into the cytoplasm either through channels in the plasma membrane or from internal storage like in ER. Most of the cells utilize both channels/sources, butthere area few cells using an external or internal source to control certain processes. Most of the Ca2+ entering the cytoplasm adsorbed to the buffer, while a smaller part activate effect or to stimulate cellular processes. Reaction OFF is pumping of cytoplasmic Ca2+ using a combination mechanism of mitochondrial and others. Changes in Ca2+ signal has been detected in various tissues isolated from animals induced into diabetes as well as patients with diabetes. Ca2+ signal interference is also found in sensory neurons of experimental animals with diabetes. Ca2+ signaling is one of the main signaling systems in the cell.

  9. Dynamic Length Metrology (DLM) for measurements with sub-micrometre uncertainty in a production environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Conventional length metrology for traceable accurate measurements requires costly temperature controlled facilities, long waiting time for part acclimatisation, and separate part material characterisation. This work describes a method called Dynamic Length Metrology (DLM) developed to achieve sub...

  10. Fast internal dynamics in polyelectrolyte gels measured by dynamic light scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rasmark, P. J.; Koňák, Čestmír; Štěpánek, Petr; Elvingson, C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, 4-5 (2005), s. 335-342 ISSN 0170-0839 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050306; GA ČR GESON/03/E001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyelectrolyte gel * dynamic light scattering * poly(acrylic acid) Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.904, year: 2005

  11. Biosensor based on measurements of the clustering dynamics of magnetic particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a biosensor for optical detection of Brownian relaxation dynamics of magnetic particles measured by light transmission. The magnetic particles can be functionalized with biological ligands for the detection of target analytes in a sample.......Disclosed herein is a biosensor for optical detection of Brownian relaxation dynamics of magnetic particles measured by light transmission. The magnetic particles can be functionalized with biological ligands for the detection of target analytes in a sample....

  12. Hyperbolicity, sinks and measure in one dimensional dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañé, Ricardo

    1985-12-01

    Let f be a C 2 map of the circle or the interval and let Σ( f) denote the complement of the basins of attraction of the attracting periodic orbits. We prove that Σ( f) is a hyperbolic expanding set if (and obviously only if) every periodic point is hyperbolic and Σ( f) doesn't contain the critical point. This is the real one dimensional version of Fatou's hyperbolicity criteria for holomorphic endomorphisms of the Riemann sphere. We also explore other applications of the techniques used for the result above, proving, for instance, that for every C 2 immersion f of the circle (i.e. a map of the circle onto itself without critical points), either its Julia set has measure zero or it is the whole circle and then f is ergodic, i.e. positively invariant Borel sets have zero or full measure.

  13. Tailoring Multiqubit Measurement Operators Through Dynamic Cavity States (Part 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumoff, J.; Chou, K.; Nigg, S.; Reed, M.; Vlastakis, B.; Heeres, R.; Frunzio, L.; Girvin, S.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    Recent improvements in resonator coherence times in the field of superconducting qubits have allowed access to a rich new toolbox which takes advantage of their large and long-lived Hilbert space. In this talk, I introduce several techniques utilizing the cavity state and protocols built from these techniques. We condition the evolution of a cavity state via dispersive interactions with multiple qubits, and manipulate the system to implement quantum erasure, selectively reducing the space of the resulting entanglement. This can be tailored to create a spectrum of measurement operators including measurements on a selectable subset of the system. This ability is a prerequisite for most approaches to quantum error correction. The following talk will cover the experimental implementation. Work supported by IARPA and ARO.

  14. Wind Turbine Performance Measurements by Means of Dynamic Data Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Pedersen, Troels; Wagner, Rozenn; Demurtas, Giorgio

    curves could be made faster with 1Hz dataset. In the FastWind project the Langevin power curve method was used on real power curve measurement datasets with the purpose to evaluate the method for practical use. A practical guide to application of the method to real power curve measurement data was made....... The study showed that the method has a range of parameter settings that the user must consider. Additionally to the wind speed binning power binning is needed but power binning size is not specified. Determination of drift in each bin is described with a general formula but in practice several additional...... tools have been developed by authors to try to make the drift field and fixed point determination more robust. A sensitivity analysis with nacelle lidar data showed drift determination was not very dependent on the time steps applied, leading to use of time steps of 2-3 points for each dataset. Power...

  15. Measurement of neutron importance by a dynamic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, V.M.; Matusevich, E.S.; Regushevskij, V.I.; Sazonov, S.P.; Usikov, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is proposed for measuring neutron importance spatial distribution in a critical reactor by determining the parameters of its run-up with a constant neutron source. 252 Cf quasiisotropic point source was used. The measurements were performed at a critical assembly with a highly enriched uranium core and beryllium reflector. Importance distributions in critical and subsritical assemblies were compared for various degrees of subcriticality. Absolute normalization for the importance was obtained, and some new integral reactor characteristics were determined experimentally on its basis. An experimental data acquisition and processing system was developed on the basis of the ELECTRONIKA-100 computer. An algorithm was also developed for statistical treatment of the data. The importance distributions in critical and subcritical assemblies proved to coincide up to a rather deep subcriticality

  16. Dynamic strain measurements in a sliding microstructured contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennewitz, Roland; David, Jonathan; Lannoy, Charles-Francois de; Drevniok, Benedict; Hubbard-Davis, Paris; Miura, Takashi; Trichtchenko, Olga

    2008-01-01

    A novel experiment is described which measures the tangential strain development across the contact between a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) block and a glass surface during the initial stages of sliding. The surface of the PDMS block has been microfabricated to take the form of a regular array of pyramidal tips at 20 μm separation. Tangential strain is measured by means of light scattering from the interface between the block and surface. Three phases are observed in all experiments: initial shear deformation of the whole PDMS block, a pre-sliding tangential compression of the tip array with stepwise increase of the compressive strain, and sliding in stick-slip movements as revealed by periodic variation of the strain. The stick-slip sliding between the regular tip array and the randomly rough counter surface always takes on the periodicity of the tip array. The fast slip can cause either a sudden increase or a sudden decrease in compressive strain

  17. Mathematical Modelling of Bacterial Meningitis Transmission Dynamics with Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kiddy K. Asamoah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination and treatment are the most effective ways of controlling the transmission of most infectious diseases. While vaccination helps susceptible individuals to build either a long-term immunity or short-term immunity, treatment reduces the number of disease-induced deaths and the number of infectious individuals in a community/nation. In this paper, a nonlinear deterministic model with time-dependent controls has been proposed to describe the dynamics of bacterial meningitis in a population. The model is shown to exhibit a unique globally asymptotically stable disease-free equilibrium E0, when the effective reproduction number RVT≤1, and a globally asymptotically stable endemic equilibrium E1, when RVT>1; and it exhibits a transcritical bifurcation at RVT=1. Carriers have been shown (by Tornado plot to have a higher chance of spreading the infection than those with clinical symptoms who will sometimes be bound to bed during the acute phase of the infection. In order to find the best strategy for minimizing the number of carriers and ill individuals and the cost of control implementation, an optimal control problem is set up by defining a Lagrangian function L to be minimized subject to the proposed model. Numerical simulation of the optimal problem demonstrates that the best strategy to control bacterial meningitis is to combine vaccination with other interventions (such as treatment and public health education. Additionally, this research suggests that stakeholders should press hard for the production of existing/new vaccines and antibiotics and their disbursement to areas that are most affected by bacterial meningitis, especially Sub-Saharan Africa; furthermore, individuals who live in communities where the environment is relatively warm (hot/moisture are advised to go for vaccination against bacterial meningitis.

  18. An innovative navigation scheme for Mars entry using dynamic pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianfeng; Gao, Ai; Zong, Hua; Cui, Pingyuan

    2017-11-01

    Complete observability of dynamic system is a major concern of navigation in Mars precision landing exploration missions. It is demonstrated that, however, the current measurements used for navigation during Mars entry cannot guarantee the complete observability of the dynamic system. This paper proposes an integrated navigation scheme for Mars entry phase using the dynamic pressure and accelerations from inertial measurement unit (IMU). The dynamic pressure derived from the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS), and the triaxle accelerations from IMU are integrated in a filter as navigation measurements to increase the dynamic system observability and perform state estimation on-board. Afterward, the perturbation of the dynamic caused by parameter uncertainties is built. In order to address the impact of perturbation on state estimation, an adaptive estimator based on modified mixture-of-expert framework is given. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed integrated navigation scheme can ensure the complete observability of the dynamic system, and the state estimation are converged with entry time after the dynamic pressure has built up.

  19. A Sensor Dynamic Measurement Error Prediction Model Based on NAPSO-SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Minlan; Jiang, Lan; Jiang, Dingde; Li, Fei; Song, Houbing

    2018-01-15

    Dynamic measurement error correction is an effective way to improve sensor precision. Dynamic measurement error prediction is an important part of error correction, and support vector machine (SVM) is often used for predicting the dynamic measurement errors of sensors. Traditionally, the SVM parameters were always set manually, which cannot ensure the model's performance. In this paper, a SVM method based on an improved particle swarm optimization (NAPSO) is proposed to predict the dynamic measurement errors of sensors. Natural selection and simulated annealing are added in the PSO to raise the ability to avoid local optima. To verify the performance of NAPSO-SVM, three types of algorithms are selected to optimize the SVM's parameters: the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO), the improved PSO optimization algorithm (NAPSO), and the glowworm swarm optimization (GSO). The dynamic measurement error data of two sensors are applied as the test data. The root mean squared error and mean absolute percentage error are employed to evaluate the prediction models' performances. The experimental results show that among the three tested algorithms the NAPSO-SVM method has a better prediction precision and a less prediction errors, and it is an effective method for predicting the dynamic measurement errors of sensors.

  20. Use of measurement theory for operationalization and quantification of psychological constructs in systems dynamics modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitkov-Norris, Elena; Yeghiazarian, Ara

    2016-11-01

    The analytical tools available to social scientists have traditionally been adapted from tools originally designed for analysis of natural science phenomena. This article discusses the applicability of systems dynamics - a qualitative based modelling approach, as a possible analysis and simulation tool that bridges the gap between social and natural sciences. After a brief overview of the systems dynamics modelling methodology, the advantages as well as limiting factors of systems dynamics to the potential applications in the field of social sciences and human interactions are discussed. The issues arise with regards to operationalization and quantification of latent constructs at the simulation building stage of the systems dynamics methodology and measurement theory is proposed as a ready and waiting solution to the problem of dynamic model calibration, with a view of improving simulation model reliability and validity and encouraging the development of standardised, modular system dynamics models that can be used in social science research.

  1. A dynamic optical measurement system for cryogenic fluids using laser interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J H; Bao, S R; Zhang, R P; Qiu, L M

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic visualization is of great significance in the research of flow conditions and mass transfer process of cryogenic fluids. In this paper, two common ways to measure the concentration of cryogenic fluids are introduced and compared. To improve the real-time monitoring of cryogenic fluid, a non-contact dynamic optical measurement system using laser interferometry is designed, which is sensitive to subtle changes of fluid concentration. A precise and dynamic interference pattern can be obtained using this system. Two-dimensional concentration distribution of the fluid can be calculated from the interference pattern. Detailed calculation process is presented in the paper. (paper)

  2. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation: 2016 project annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, Sergei O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 3, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) the demonstration of the measurement of thermally activated defect-interaction processes by pulsed ion beam techniques and (ii) the demonstration of alternative characterization techniques to study defect dynamics. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  3. INFORMATION MINING OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF LAKES BASED ON MULTIPLE DYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Feng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are important water resources and integral parts of the natural ecosystem, and it is of great significance to study the evolution of lakes. The area of each lake increased and decreased at the same time in natural condition, only but the net change of lakes’ area is the result of the bidirectional evolution of lakes. In this paper, considering the effects of net fragmentation, net attenuation, swap change and spatial invariant part in lake evolution, a comprehensive evaluation indexes of lake dynamic evolution were defined,. Such degree contains three levels of measurement: 1 the swap dynamic degree (SDD reflects the space activity of lakes in the study period. 2 the attenuation dynamic degree (ADD reflects the net attenuation of lakes into non-lake areas. 3 the fragmentation dynamic degree (FDD reflects the trend of lakes to be divided and broken into smaller lakes. Three levels of dynamic measurement constitute the three-dimensional "Swap - attenuation – fragmentation" dynamic evolution measurement system of lakes. To show its effectiveness, the dynamic measurement was applied to lakes in Jianghan Plain, the middle Yangtze region of China for a more detailed analysis of lakes from 1984 to 2014. In combination with spatial-temporal location characteristics of lakes, the hidden information in lake evolution in the past 30 years can be revealed.

  4. Low latitude southern hemisphere mesospheric dynamics from meteor radars measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Paulo; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Clemesha, Barclay; Buriti, Ricardo; Paulino, Ana Roberta; Guharay, Amitava; Andrioli, Vania Fatima

    Three meteor radars of the SkiYmet type have been installed in Brazil covering low, tropical and sub-tropical latitudes. The first at Cachoeira Paulista(22.7° S, 45.0° W) started in march 1999, the second at Cariri(7.4° S, 36.5° W) in May, 2005, and the last one at Santa Maria( 29.7° S, 53.8° W) in December, 2005. Data obtained in coincident periods of measurements permitted the determination of the Mean Winds, Planetary Waves, Tides and Gravity Wave Variances for these different latitudes and the comparison of them. Amplitude and phase structures are similar for Cachoeira Paulista and Santa Maria, but differ from the near-equatorial site Cariri. Also the Lunar Semidiurnal Tides have been studied at the three sites for the period January 2005 to December 2008. Amplitudes between 1 and 8 m/s were determined with the meridional winds being larger than the zonal in the three sites. It is found that northern hemisphere SSW’s affect the QTDW , and the Solar and Lunar tides at southern low latitudes but the 2002 southern hemisphere major SSW had a small effect in tropical MLT. Wind measurements have also been used to study Kelvin waves, terdiurnal Tide and QTDW variability. In this presentation we summarize the main results obtained.

  5. Characterization of the overall and internal dynamics of short oligonucleotides by depolarized dynamic light scattering and NMR relaxation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eimer, W.; Williamson, J.R.; Boxer, S.G.; Pecora, R.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of three synthetic oligonucleotides d(CG) 4 , d(CG) 6 , and d(CGCGTTGTTCGCG) of different length and shape were studied in solution by depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) and time-resolved nuclear Overhauser effect cross-relaxation measurements. For cylindrically symmetric molecules the DDLS spectrum is dominated by the rotation of the main symmetry axis of the cylinder. The experimental correlation times describe the rotation of the oligonucleotides under hydrodynamic stick boundary conditions. It is shown that the hydrodynamic theory of Tirado and Garcia de la Torre gives good predictions of the rotational diffusion coefficients of cylindrically symmetric molecules of the small axial ratios studied here. These relations are used to calculate the solution dimensions of the DNA fragments from measured correlation times. The DDLS relaxations measurements provide a power method for distinguishing between different conformations of the oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the rotational correlation times are a very sensitive probe of the length of different fragments. The NMR results reflect the anisotropic motion of the molecules as well as the amount of local internal motion present. The experimental correlation time from NMR is determined by the rotation of both the short and long axes of the oligonucleotide. The authors results are compared with those from NMR relaxation measurements on other short oligonucleotides with lengths of up to 20 base pairs. Various dynamic models for the reorientation of the internuclear vector are applied to their interpretation

  6. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Measuring and modeling behavioral decision dynamics in collective evacuation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean M Carlson

    Full Text Available Identifying and quantifying factors influencing human decision making remains an outstanding challenge, impacting the performance and predictability of social and technological systems. In many cases, system failures are traced to human factors including congestion, overload, miscommunication, and delays. Here we report results of a behavioral network science experiment, targeting decision making in a natural disaster. In a controlled laboratory setting, our results quantify several key factors influencing individual evacuation decision making in a controlled laboratory setting. The experiment includes tensions between broadcast and peer-to-peer information, and contrasts the effects of temporal urgency associated with the imminence of the disaster and the effects of limited shelter capacity for evacuees. Based on empirical measurements of the cumulative rate of evacuations as a function of the instantaneous disaster likelihood, we develop a quantitative model for decision making that captures remarkably well the main features of observed collective behavior across many different scenarios. Moreover, this model captures the sensitivity of individual- and population-level decision behaviors to external pressures, and systematic deviations from the model provide meaningful estimates of variability in the collective response. Identification of robust methods for quantifying human decisions in the face of risk has implications for policy in disasters and other threat scenarios, specifically the development and testing of robust strategies for training and control of evacuations that account for human behavior and network topologies.

  8. Reliability and Correlation of Static and Dynamic Foot Arch Measurement in a Healthy Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Timo; Zech, Astrid; Wegscheider, Karl; Lezius, Susanne; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Sehner, Susanne; Hollander, Karsten

    2017-09-01

    Measurement of the medial longitudinal foot arch in children is a controversial topic, as there are many different methods without a definite standard procedure. The purpose of this study was to 1) investigate intraday and interrater reliability regarding dynamic arch index and static arch height, 2) explore the correlation between both arch indices, and 3) examine the variation of the medial longitudinal arch at two different times of the day. Eighty-six children (mean ± SD age, 8.9 ± 1.9 years) participated in the study. Dynamic footprint data were captured with a pedobarographic platform. For static arch measurements, a specially constructed caliper was used to assess heel-to-toe length and dorsum height. A mixed model was established to determine reliability and variation. Reliability was found to be excellent for the static arch height index in sitting (intraday, 0.90; interrater, 0.80) and standing positions (0.88 and 0.85) and for the dynamic arch index (both 1.00). There was poor correlation between static and dynamic assessment of the medial longitudinal arch (standing dynamic arch index, r = -0.138; sitting dynamic arch index, r = -0.070). Static measurements were found to be significantly influenced by the time of day (P static arch height index is influenced by gender (P = .004), whereas dynamic arch index is influenced by side (P = .011) and body mass index (P static foot measurements are reliable for medial longitudinal foot arch assessment in children. The variation of static arch measurements during the day has to be kept in mind. For clinical purposes, static and dynamic arch data should be interpreted separately.

  9. Quantitative Measures of Chaotic Charged Particle Dynamics in the Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, D. L.; Martin, R. F., Jr.; Burris, C.

    2017-12-01

    It has long been noted that the motion of charged particles in magnetotail-like magnetic fields is chaotic, however, efforts to quantify the degree of chaos have had conflicting conclusions. In this paper we re-examine the question by focusing on quantitative measures of chaos. We first examine the percentage of orbits that enter the chaotic region of phase space and the average trapping time of those particles. We then examine the average exponential divergence rate (AEDR) of the chaotic particles between their first and last crossing of the mid-plane. We show that at resonant energies where the underlying phase space has a high degree of symmetry, only a small number of particle enter the chaotic region, but they are trapped for long periods of time and the time asymptotic value of the AEDR is very close to the average value of the AEDR. At the off-resonant energies where the phase space is highly asymmetric, the majority of the particle enter the chaotic region for fairly short periods of time and the time asymptotic value of the AEDR is much smaller than the average value. The root cause is that in the resonant case, the longest-lived orbits tend interact with the current many times and sample the entire chaotic region, whereas in the non-resonant case the longest-lived orbits only interact with the current sheet a small number of times but have very long mirrorings where the motion is nearly regular. Additionally we use an ad-hoc model where we model the current sheet as a Lorentz scattering system with each interaction with the current sheet being considered as a "collision". We find that the average kick per collision is greatest at off-resonant energies. Finally, we propose a chaos parameter as the product of the AEDR times the average chaotic particle trapping time times the percentage of orbits that are chaotic. We find that this takes on peak values at the resonant energies.

  10. Dynamic Modeling Accuracy Dependence on Errors in Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear simulation of the NASA Generic Transport Model was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of dynamic models identified from flight data. Measurements from a typical system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated and then used to estimate stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo analysis. Based on the results, recommendations were provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using other flight conditions, parameter estimation methods, and a full-scale F-16 nonlinear aircraft simulation were compared with these recommendations.

  11. New sensitive micro-measurements of dynamic surface tension and diffusion coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinoshita, Koji; Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Needham, David

    2017-01-01

    Currently available dynamic surface tension (DST) measurement methods, such as Wilhelmy plate, droplet- or bubble-based methods, still have various experimental limitations such as the large size of the interface, convection in the solution, or a certain “dead time” at initial measurement. These ...

  12. Dynamics of fast ions during sawtooth oscillations in the TEXTOR tokamak measured by collective Thomson scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Salewski, Mirko; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Experimental investigations of sawteeth interaction with fast ions measured by collective Thomson scattering on TEXTOR are presented. Time-resolved measurements of localized 1D fast-ion distribution functions allow us to study fast-ion dynamics during several sawtooth cycles. Sawtooth oscillation...

  13. Measurement of dynamic wedge angles and beam profiles by means of MRI ferrous sulphate gel dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Magnus; Furre, Torbjørn; Rødal, Jan; Skretting, Arne; Olsen, Dag R.

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the possible value of measuring the dose distribution in dynamic wedge photon beams using ferrous sulphate gel phantoms analysed by MRI. The wedge angles and dose profiles were measured for a field size of and for dynamic wedge angles of , , and using a 15 MV photon beam generated from a Clinac 2100 CD (Varian). The dose profiles obtained from MRI ferrous sulphate gel were in good agreement with the dose measurements performed with a diode detector array. Also, the wedge angles determined from the MRI ferrous sulphate gel agreed well with the values obtained by using film dosimetry and with calculations by use of TMS (treatment planning system) (Helax, Uppsala, Sweden). The study demonstrated that MRI ferrous sulphate gel dosimetry is an adequate tool for measurements of some beam characteristics of dynamic radiation fields.

  14. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P.; Orange, François; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe 2 O 4 and polystyrene/CoFe 2 O 4 mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory–Huggins interaction parameters. - Highlights: • Oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were dispersed in polymer melts. • MNPs dispersed well in polybutadiene but not in polystyrene. • Dynamic magnetic susceptibility (DMS) measurements assessed presence of aggregates. • DMS predictions were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. • The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter correlated with MNP dispersion

  15. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 9000 Mayaguez, PR 00681 PR (United States); Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1006 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32603 (United States); Orange, François [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Guinel, Maxime J.-F. [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and polystyrene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory–Huggins interaction parameters. - Highlights: • Oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were dispersed in polymer melts. • MNPs dispersed well in polybutadiene but not in polystyrene. • Dynamic magnetic susceptibility (DMS) measurements assessed presence of aggregates. • DMS predictions were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. • The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter correlated with MNP dispersion.

  16. Comparison of experimental measurements of power MOSFET SEBs in dynamic and static modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvel, P.; Peyrotte, C.; Baiget, A.; Stassinopoulos, E.G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a study to determine the Single Event Burnout (SEB) sensitivity for burnout of IRF-150 Power MOSFETs in both static and dynamic modes in terms of LET threshold and cross section is described. The dynamic tests were conducted with a power converter which was designed for actual space application. The results were compared with static measurements which were made during the exposure to the heavy ions. The data showed that the dynamic mode was less sensitive than the static by two orders of magnitude in cross section. It was also observed that ions with a range less than 30 microns did not produce destructive burnout in the dynamic mode even when their LET exceeded the threshold value. The extent of physical MOSFET damage in the destructive, dynamic tests appeared to correlate with the ion LET and source-drain voltage

  17. On the Torque as a Measure of Mechanical Interaction in the Principles of Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2013-01-01

    In most discussions, the Principles of Dynamics are expressed using the force as a measure of mechanical interaction between the bodies. The intention of the paper is to extend the usual discussion on basic theorems, laws and principles in Dynamics of rigid bodies including the torque as another independent measure of mechanical interaction between the bodies. In D'Alambert's principle of Dynamics, beside the forces, the active and reaction torques are also included. The torque is introduced in the Euler-Newton equations for general motion of the rigid body. The General Equation of Dynamics is reformulated by including the virtual work of the torques on the virtual rotation. An additional view to Newton's Laws is also given.

  18. Examining the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic postural stability measures in differentiating among ankle instability status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kathy; Glutting, Joseph; Wikstrom, Erik; Gustavsen, Geoff; Royer, Todd; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-02-01

    Dynamic postural stability is defined as the ability to transition from a dynamic movement to a stable condition over one's base of support. Measures of dynamic stability have been used extensively to classify ankle instability status and assist clinicians with ankle injury interventions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if current methods of quantifying dynamic stability are accurate in differentiating among healthy, coper, and unstable ankles. One hundred ninety four Division-I collegiate athletes (football, volleyball, field hockey, men's/women's soccer, men's/women's lacrosse, men's/women's basketball) volunteered for this study. Participants were categorized into healthy, coper, and stable groups by a self-reported questionnaire and previous history of ankle injuries. Dynamic postural stability was assessed using the Multi-Directional Dynamic Stability Protocol by jumping and landing single-legged onto a force platform from four different directions. Receiver operator curves were used to analyze the accuracy of current techniques of calculating dynamic stability among groups. None of the existing methods were found to be accurate in differentiating ankle instability status in any of the jump landings. Researchers have commonly used these existing methods to quantify dynamic postural stability. None of the current calculation techniques worked with our jump landing protocol. Researchers need to pay attention to the protocol and calculation technique pairings in that using inaccurate measures of dynamic postural stability makes any findings of that research ineffective. Therefore, this challenges researchers to develop a more accurate calculation to quantify dynamic postural stability, or develop a jump landing protocol that exposes sensorimotor deficits in the more able-bodied population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic strain measurement of hydraulic system pipeline using fibre Bragg grating sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue failure is a serious problem in hydraulic piping systems installed in the machinery and equipment working in harsh operational conditions. To alleviate this problem, health monitoring of pipes can be conducted by measuring and analysing vibration-induced strain. Fibre Bragg grating is considered as a promising sensing approach for dynamic load monitoring. In this article, dynamic strain measurements based on fibre Bragg grating sensors for small-bore metal pipes have been investigated. The quasi-distributed strain sensing of fibre Bragg grating sensors is introduced. Two comparison experiments were carried out under vibration and impact loads among the methods of electrical strain gauge, piezoelectric accelerometer and fibre Bragg grating sensor. Experimental results indicate that fibre Bragg grating sensor possesses an outstanding ability to resist electromagnetic interference compared with strain gauge. The natural frequency measurement results, captured by fibre Bragg grating sensor, agree well with the modal analysis results obtained from finite element analysis. In addition, the attached fibre Bragg grating sensor brings a smaller impact on the dynamic characteristics of the measured pipe than the accelerometer due to its small size and lightweight. Fibre Bragg grating sensors have great potential for the quasi-distributed measurement of dynamic strain for the dynamic characteristic research and health monitoring of hydraulic system pipeline.

  20. The Relationship of Static Tibial Tubercle-Trochlear Groove Measurement and Dynamic Patellar Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Victor R; Sheehan, Frances T; Shen, Aricia; Yao, Lawrence; Jackson, Jennifer N; Boden, Barry P

    2017-07-01

    The tibial tubercle to trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance is used for screening patients with a variety of patellofemoral joint disorders to determine who may benefit from patellar medialization using a tibial tubercle osteotomy. Clinically, the TT-TG distance is predominately based on static imaging with the knee in full extension; however, the predictive ability of this measure for dynamic patellar tracking patterns is unknown. To determine whether the static TT-TG distance can predict dynamic lateral displacement of the patella. Cohort study (Diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. The static TT-TG distance was measured at full extension for 70 skeletally mature subjects with (n = 32) and without (n = 38) patellofemoral pain. The dynamic patellar tracking patterns were assessed from approximately 45° to 0° of knee flexion by use of dynamic cine-phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, the value of dynamic lateral tracking corresponding to the exact knee angle measured in the static images for that subject was identified. Linear regression analysis determined the predictive ability of static TT-TG distance for dynamic patellar lateral displacement for each cohort. The static TT-TG distance measured with the knee in full extension cannot accurately predict dynamic lateral displacement of the patella. There was weak predictive ability among subjects with patellofemoral pain ( r 2 = 0.18, P = .02) and no predictive capability among controls. Among subjects with patellofemoral pain and static TT-TG distances 15 mm or more, 8 of 13 subjects (62%) demonstrated neutral or medial patellar tracking patterns. The static TT-TG distance cannot accurately predict dynamic lateral displacement of the patella. A large percentage of patients with patellofemoral pain and pathologically large TT-TG distances may have neutral to medial maltracking patterns.

  1. Novel Readout Method for Molecular Diagnostic Assays Based on Optical Measurements of Magnetic Nanobead Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins; Bejhed, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    transmission spectra of MNB suspensions measured upon application of a weak uniaxial AC magnetic field correlate well with the rotation dynamics of the individual MNBs. Adding a target analyte to the solution leads to the formation of permanent MNB clusters, namely, to the suppression of the dynamic MNB......We demonstrate detection of DNA coils formed from a Vibrio cholerae DNA target at picomolar concentrations using a novel optomagnetic approach exploiting the dynamic behavior and optical anisotropy of magnetic nanobead (MNB) assemblies. We establish that the complex second harmonic optical...

  2. [Measurement of multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation based on dynamic spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Wen-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The present paper puts forward multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation measurement based on dynamic spectroscopy to do the non-invasive determination of oxygen saturation. Compared to conventional ways, the new method makes full use of more wavelengths light and improves the measurement accuracy. During the experiment, the in-vivo measurements were carried out on 60 patients and their spectroscopic data were collected by the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer. Singletrial estimation method was used to extract the dynamic spectroscopy at the wavelengths of 606. 44 approximately 987. 55 nm. Oxygen saturation obtained from arterial blood gas analysis is regarded as the true value. Synergy interval partial least square (siPLS) was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' oxygen saturation values against dynamic spectroscopy data. The relative error of prediction is +/-0. 017 6, but the relative error of the subjects in the same set measured by the patient monitor which was two-wavelength measure system is +/-0. 116 4. Measurement results show that the use of the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer to collect multi-wavelength spectroscopic data and dynamic spectroscopy method to process data can do better in improving the accuracy of the oxygen saturation measurement.

  3. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  4. Evaluating measurement of dynamic constructs: defining a measurement model of derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Ryne

    2015-03-01

    While measurement evaluation has been embraced as an important step in psychological research, evaluating measurement structures with longitudinal data is fraught with limitations. This article defines and tests a measurement model of derivatives (MMOD), which is designed to assess the measurement structure of latent constructs both for analyses of between-person differences and for the analysis of change. Simulation results indicate that MMOD outperforms existing models for multivariate analysis and provides equivalent fit to data generation models. Additional simulations show MMOD capable of detecting differences in between-person and within-person factor structures. Model features, applications, and future directions are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Holographic otoscope for nano-displacement measurements of surfaces under dynamic excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Flores-Moreno, J. M.; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey T.; Scarpino, C.; Santoyo, F. Mendoza

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel holographic otoscope system for measuring nano-displacements of objects subjected to dynamic excitation. Such measurements are necessary to quantify the mechanical deformation of surfaces in mechanics, acoustics, electronics, biology and many other fields. In particular, we are interested in measuring the sound-induced motion of biological samples, such as an eardrum. Our holographic otoscope system consists of laser illumination delivery (IS), optical head (OH), and image...

  6. Mercury dynamics in a San Francisco estuary tidal wetland: assessing dynamics using in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Downing, Bryan D.; Boss, Emmanuel; Pellerin, Brian A.; Ganju, Neil K.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Byington, Amy A.; Heim, Wesley A.; Stephenson, Mark; Fujii, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We used high-resolution in situ measurements of turbidity and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) to quantitatively estimate the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, a tidal wetland. Turbidity and FDOM—representative of particle-associated and filter-passing Hg, respectively—together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentration in unfiltered water samples (UTHg) collected during a single tidal cycle in spring, fall, and winter, 2005–2006. Continuous in situ turbidity and FDOM data spanning at least a full spring-neap period were used to generate UTHg concentration time series using this relationship, and then combined with water discharge measurements to calculate Hg fluxes in each season. Wetlands are generally considered to be sinks for sediment and associated mercury. However, during the three periods of monitoring, Browns Island wetland did not appreciably accumulate Hg. Instead, gradual tidally driven export of UTHg from the wetland offset the large episodic on-island fluxes associated with high wind events. Exports were highest during large spring tides, when ebbing waters relatively enriched in FDOM, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and filter-passing mercury drained from the marsh into the open waters of the estuary. On-island flux of UTHg, which was largely particle-associated, was highest during strong winds coincident with flood tides. Our results demonstrate that processes driving UTHg fluxes in tidal wetlands encompass both the dissolved and particulate phases and multiple timescales, necessitating longer term monitoring to adequately quantify fluxes.

  7. Classification of cardiac rhythm using heart rate dynamical measures: validation in MIT-BIH databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Marta; Carozzi, Luca; Moss, Travis J; de Pasquale, Marco; Cerutti, Sergio; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Ferrario, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Identification of atrial fibrillation (AF) is a clinical imperative. Heartbeat interval time series are increasingly available from personal monitors, allowing new opportunity for AF diagnosis. Previously, we devised numerical algorithms for identification of normal sinus rhythm (NSR), AF, and SR with frequent ectopy using dynamical measures of heart rate. Here, we wished to validate them in the canonical MIT-BIH ECG databases. We tested algorithms on the NSR, AF and arrhythmia databases. When the databases were combined, the positive predictive value of the new algorithms exceeded 95% for NSR and AF, and was 40% for SR with ectopy. Further, dynamical measures did not distinguish atrial from ventricular ectopy. Inspection of individual 24hour records showed good correlation of observed and predicted rhythms. Heart rate dynamical measures are effective ingredients in numerical algorithms to classify cardiac rhythm from the heartbeat intervals time series alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dependence of Dynamic Modeling Accuracy on Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) nonlinear simulation was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of identified parameters in mathematical models describing the flight dynamics and determined from flight data. Measurements from a typical flight condition and system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated by introducing noise, resolution errors, and bias errors. The data were then used to estimate nondimensional stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using additional flight conditions and parameter estimation methods, as well as a nonlinear flight simulation of the General Dynamics F-16 aircraft, were compared with these recommendations

  9. Dynamic footprint measurement collection technique and intrarater reliability: ink mat, paper pedography, and electronic pedography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fascione, Jeanna M; Crews, Ryan T; Wrobel, James S

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the variability of footprint measurement collection techniques and the reliability of footprint measurements would assist with appropriate clinical foot posture appraisal. We sought to identify relationships between these measures in a healthy population. On 30 healthy participants, midgait dynamic footprint measurements were collected using an ink mat, paper pedography, and electronic pedography. The footprints were then digitized, and the following footprint indices were calculated with photo digital planimetry software: footprint index, arch index, truncated arch index, Chippaux-Smirak Index, and Staheli Index. Differences between techniques were identified with repeated-measures analysis of variance with post hoc test of Scheffe. In addition, to assess practical similarities between the different methods, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated. To assess intrarater reliability, footprint indices were calculated twice on 10 randomly selected ink mat footprint measurements, and the ICC was calculated. Dynamic footprint measurements collected with an ink mat significantly differed from those collected with paper pedography (ICC, 0.85-0.96) and electronic pedography (ICC, 0.29-0.79), regardless of the practical similarities noted with ICC values (P = .00). Intrarater reliability for dynamic ink mat footprint measurements was high for the footprint index, arch index, truncated arch index, Chippaux-Smirak Index, and Staheli Index (ICC, 0.74-0.99). Footprint measurements collected with various techniques demonstrate differences. Interchangeable use of exact values without adjustment is not advised. Intrarater reliability of a single method (ink mat) was found to be high.

  10. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.dupuis@upmc.fr

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH. - Highlights: • Dynamic hysteresis measurements are a promising tool to study magnetic hyperthermia. • Dynamic hysteresis cycles can be reproduced using a simple model. • The effect of viscosity on hyperthermia of maghemite is weaker than expected.

  11. Correction for dynamic bias error in transmission measurements of void fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Svärd, S. Jacobsson; Sjöstrand, H.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic bias errors occur in transmission measurements, such as X-ray, gamma, or neutron radiography or tomography. This is observed when the properties of the object are not stationary in time and its average properties are assessed. The nonlinear measurement response to changes in transmission within the time scale of the measurement implies a bias, which can be difficult to correct for. A typical example is the tomographic or radiographic mapping of void content in dynamic two-phase flow systems. In this work, the dynamic bias error is described and a method to make a first-order correction is derived. A prerequisite for this method is variance estimates of the system dynamics, which can be obtained using high-speed, time-resolved data acquisition. However, in the absence of such acquisition, a priori knowledge might be used to substitute the time resolved data. Using synthetic data, a void fraction measurement case study has been simulated to demonstrate the performance of the suggested method. The transmission length of the radiation in the object under study and the type of fluctuation of the void fraction have been varied. Significant decreases in the dynamic bias error were achieved to the expense of marginal decreases in precision.

  12. Utilization of an electronic portal imaging device for measurement of dynamic wedge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, Eric S.; Miner, Marc S.; Butker, Elizabeth K.; Sutton, Danny S.; Davis, Lawrence W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Due to the motion of the collimator during dynamic wedge treatments, the conventional method of collecting comprehensive wedge data with a water tank and a scanning ionization chamber is obsolete. It is the objective of this work to demonstrate the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and software to accomplish this task. Materials and Methods: A Varian Clinac[reg] 2300 C/D, equipped with a PortalVision TM EPID and Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software, was used to produce the radiation field. The Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software allows for a band of 10 of 256 high voltage electrodes to be continuously read and averaged by the 256 electrometer electrodes. The file that is produced contains data relating to the integrated ionization at each of the 256 points, essentially the cross plane beam profile. Software was developed using Microsoft C ++ to reformat the data for import into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing for easy mathematical manipulation and graphical display. Beam profiles were measured by the EPID with a 100 cm TSD for various field sizes. Each field size was measured open, steel wedged, and dynamically wedged. Scanning ionization chamber measurements performed in a water tank were compared to the open and steel wedged fields. Ionization chamber measurements taken in a water tank were compared with the dynamically wedged measurements. For the EPID measurements the depth was varied using Gammex RMI Solid Water TM placed directly above the EPID sensitive volume. Bolus material was placed between the Solid Water TM and the EPID to avoid an air gap. Results: Comparison of EPID measurements with those from an ion chamber in a water tank showed a discrepancy of ∼5%. Scans were successfully obtained for open, steel wedged and dynamically wedged beams. Software has been developed to allow for easy graphical display of beam profiles. Conclusions: Measurement of dynamic wedge data proves to be easily

  13. Intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, S; Chevalier, J; Cremieux, A

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in mycobacteria, two methods were used with Mycobacterium smegmatis. A radiometric method (K. V. Cundy, C. E. Fasching, K. E. Willard, and L. R. Peterson, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:491-497, 1991) was used without great modification, but the fluorometric method (P. G. S. Mortimer and L. J. V. Piddock, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:639-653, 1991) was changed considerably. Indeed, adsorption of the quinolone to the bacterial surface was characterized by measuring the level of accumulation of 0 degree C. Taking into account the adsorption, the pH of the washing buffer was increased from 7.0 to 9.0 to improve the desorption of norfloxacin from the cell surface. Both the fluorometric method, with the technical improvement, and the radiometric method could be used to estimate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin, which resulted from the difference between the whole uptake measured at 37 degrees C and the adsorption measured at 0 degrees C. A total of 35 ng of norfloxacin per mg of cells (dry weight) penetrated into the M. smegmatis cell, and the steady state was achieved in 5 min. Use of inhibitors of the proton motive force revealed that transport of norfloxacin was energy independent. Thus, the same mechanisms of quinolone accumulation that occur in eubacteria seem to occur in mycobacteria, at least in M. smegmatis. PMID:8585727

  14. Fast-ion dynamics in the TEXTOR tokamak measured by collective Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev, H; Nielsen, S K; Porte, L; Hoekzema, J A; Korsholm, S B; Meo, F; Michelsen, P K; Michelsen, S; Oosterbeek, J W; Tsakadze, E L; Westerhof, E; Woskov, P

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of fast ion populations in the TEXTOR tokamak are measured by collective Thomson scattering of millimetre wave radiation generated by a gyrotron operated at 110 GHz and 100-150 kW. Temporal evolution of the energetic ion velocity distribution at switch on of neutral beam injection (NBI) and the slowdown after switch off of NBI are measured. The turn on phase of the NBI has, furthermore, been measured in plasmas with a range of electron densities and temperatures. All of these measurements are shown to be in good agreement with simple Fokker-Planck modelling. Bulk ion rotation velocity is also measured

  15. High throughput gene expression measurement with real time PCR in a microfluidic dynamic array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L Spurgeon

    Full Text Available We describe a high throughput gene expression platform based on microfluidic dynamic arrays. This system allows 2,304 simultaneous real time PCR gene expression measurements in a single chip, while requiring less pipetting than is required to set up a 96 well plate. We show that one can measure the expression of 45 different genes in 18 tissues with replicates in a single chip. The data have excellent concordance with conventional real time PCR and the microfluidic dynamic arrays show better reproducibility than commercial DNA microarrays.

  16. Optimization of Measurements on Dynamically Sensitive Structures Using a Reliability Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    Design of a measuring program devoted to parameter identification of structural dynamic systems described by random fields is considered. The design problem is formulated as an optimization problem to minimize the total expected costs due to failure and costs of a measuring program. Design variab...... variables are the numbers of measuring points, the locations of these points and the required number of sample records. An example with a simply supported plane, vibrating beam is considered and tentative results are presented.......Design of a measuring program devoted to parameter identification of structural dynamic systems described by random fields is considered. The design problem is formulated as an optimization problem to minimize the total expected costs due to failure and costs of a measuring program. Design...

  17. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  18. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  19. Analysis and Optimization of Dynamic Measurement Precision of Fiber Optic Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the dynamic performance of high precision interferometer fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG, the influencing factors of the fast response characteristics are analyzed based on a proposed assistant design setup, and a high dynamic detection method is proposed to suppress the adverse effects of the key influencing factors. The assistant design platform is built by using the virtual instrument technology for IFOG, which can monitor the closed-loop state variables in real time for analyzing the influence of both the optical components and detection circuit on the dynamic performance of IFOG. The analysis results indicate that nonlinearity of optical Sagnac effect, optical parameter uncertainty, dynamic characteristics of internal modules and time delay of signal detection circuit are the major causes of dynamic performance deterioration, which can induce potential system instability in practical control systems. By taking all these factors into consideration, we design a robust control algorithm to realize the high dynamic closed-loop detection of IFOG. Finally, experiments show that the improved 0.01 deg/h high precision IFOG with the proposed control algorithm can achieve fast tracking and good dynamic measurement precision.

  20. Static and dynamic stress analyses of the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Oram, C.; Sick, M.

    2014-03-01

    More efforts are put on hydro-power to balance voltage and frequency within seconds for primary control in modern smart grids. This requires hydraulic turbines to run at off-design conditions. especially at low load or speed-no load. Besides. the tendency of increasing power output and decreasing weight of the turbine runners has also led to the high level vibration problem of the runners. especially high head Francis runners. Therefore. it is important to carry out the static and dynamic stress analyses of prototype high head Francis runners. This paper investigates the static and dynamic stresses on the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurements and numerical simulations. The site measurements are performed with pressure transducers and strain gauges. Based on the measured results. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the flow channel from stay vane to draft tube cone are performed. Static pressure distributions and dynamic pressure pulsations caused by rotor-stator interaction (RSI) are obtained under various operating conditions. With the CFD results. static and dynamic stresses on the runner at different operating points are calculated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The agreement between simulation and measurement is analysed with linear regression method. which indicates that the numerical result agrees well with that of measurement. Furthermore. the maximum static and dynamic stresses on the runner blade are obtained at various operating points. The relations of the maximum stresses and the power output are discussed in detail. The influences of the boundary conditions on the structural behaviour of the runner are also discussed.

  1. Modeling and Experimental Tests of a Mechatronic Device to Measure Road Profiles Considering Impact Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza, A.; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    to highlight that the aim of this device is to independently measure two road profiles, without the influence of the vehicle dynamics where the mechanism is attached. Before the mechatronic mechanism is attached to a real vehicle, its dynamic behavior must be known. A theoretical analysis of the mechanism......Vehicles travel at different speeds and, as a consequence, experience a broad spectrum of vibrations. One of the most important source of vehicle vibration is the road profile. Hence the knowledge of the characteristics of a road profile enables engineers to predict the dynamic behavior...... dynamics is led with help of a set of non-linear equations of motion obtained using Newton-Euler-Jourdain´s Method. Such a set of equation is numerically solved and the theoretical results are compared with experimental carried out with a laboratory prototype. Comparisons show that the theoretical model...

  2. Measurement of the dynamics in ski jumping using a wearable inertial sensor-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardonnens, Julien; Favre, Julien; Cuendet, Florian; Gremion, Gérald; Aminian, Kamiar

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics is a central aspect of ski jumping, particularly during take-off and stable flight. Currently, measurement systems able to measure ski jumping dynamics (e.g. 3D cameras, force plates) are complex and only available in few research centres worldwide. This study proposes a method to determine dynamics using a wearable inertial sensor-based system which can be used routinely on any ski jumping hill. The system automatically calculates characteristic dynamic parameters during take-off (position and velocity of the centre of mass perpendicular to the table, force acting on the centre of mass perpendicular to the table and somersault angular velocity) and stable flight (total aerodynamic force). Furthermore, the acceleration of the ski perpendicular to the table was quantified to characterise the skis lift at take-off. The system was tested with two groups of 11 athletes with different jump distances. The force acting on the centre of mass, acceleration of the ski perpendicular to the table, somersault angular velocity and total aerodynamic force were different between groups and correlated with the jump distances. Furthermore, all dynamic parameters were within the range of prior studies based on stationary measurement systems, except for the centre of mass mean force which was slightly lower.

  3. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  4. Intracellular Renin Disrupts Chemical Communication between Heart Cells. Pathophysiological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, Walmor C

    2014-01-01

    HighlightsIntracellular renin disrupts chemical communication in the heartAngiotensinogen enhances the effect of reninIntracellular enalaprilat reduces significantly the effect of reninIntracellular renin increases the inward calcium currentHarmful versus beneficial effect during myocardial infarction The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; (1) under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell to cell through gap junctions; (2) the intracellular dialysis of renin (100 nM) disrupts chemical communication - an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100 nM); (3) enalaprilat (10(-9) M) administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; (4) aliskiren (10(-8) M) inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication; (5) the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II) was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; (6) the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed; (7) the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  5. Estimation of Dynamic Errors in Laser Optoelectronic Dimension Gauges for Geometric Measurement of Details

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasanov Zimfir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the capabilities and particularities of the approach to the improvement of metrological characteristics of fiber-optic pressure sensors (FOPS based on estimation estimation of dynamic errors in laser optoelectronic dimension gauges for geometric measurement of details. It is shown that the proposed criteria render new methods for conjugation of optoelectronic converters in the dimension gauge for geometric measurements in order to reduce the speed and volume requirements for the Random Access Memory (RAM of the video controller which process the signal. It is found that the lower relative error, the higher the interrogetion speed of the CCD array. It is shown that thus, the maximum achievable dynamic accuracy characteristics of the optoelectronic gauge are determined by the following conditions: the parameter stability of the electronic circuits in the CCD array and the microprocessor calculator; linearity of characteristics; error dynamics and noise in all electronic circuits of the CCD array and microprocessor calculator.

  6. Static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures measured during the FESTER experiment: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, W. H.; February, F.; Seiffer, D. P.; Eisele, C.

    2016-10-01

    The First European South African Experiment (FESTER) was conducted over about a 10 month period at the Institute of Maritime Technology (IMT) in False Bay, South Africa. One of the principal goals was recording of static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures under different environmental conditions for both validations of existing thermal equilibrium signature prediction codes, but also to aid development of dynamic thermal signature models. A small scientific work boat (called Sea Lab) was used as the principal target and sensor platform. Painted metal plates of different thicknesses were also used as infrared targets on-board Sea Lab to study static/dynamic thermal signatures and were also fitted with pyrgeometers, pyrometers and iButton temperature sensors/loggers. First results focused on the variable of thermal signatures as function of environmental conditions and the accuracy of calculated source temperatures (from measured radiometric temperatures) compared to the physical temperature measurements of the plates.

  7. Power system dynamics and stability with synchrophasor measurement and power system toolbox

    CERN Document Server

    Sauer, Peter W; Chow, Joe H

    2017-01-01

    This new edition addresses the needs of dynamic modeling and simulation relevant to power system planning, design, and operation, including a systematic derivation of synchronous machine dynamic models together with speed and voltage control subsystems. Reduced-order modeling based on integral manifolds is used as a firm basis for understanding the derivations and limitations of lower-order dynamic models. Following these developments, a multi-machine model interconnected through the transmission network is formulated and simulated using numerical simulation methods. Energy function methods are discussed for direct evaluation of stability. Small-signal analysis is used for determining the electromechanical modes and mode-shapes, and for power system stabilizer design. Time-synchronized high-sampling-rate phasor measurement units (PMUs) to monitor power system disturbances ave been implemented throughout North America and many other countries. In this second edition, new chapters on synchrophasor measurement ...

  8. Void fraction measurement in two-phase flow processes via symbolic dynamic filtering of ultrasonic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep; Keller, Eric; Talley, Justin; Srivastav, Abhishek; Ray, Asok; Kim, Seungjin

    2009-01-01

    This communication introduces a non-intrusive method for void fraction measurement and identification of two-phase flow regimes, based on ultrasonic sensing. The underlying algorithm is built upon the recently reported theory of a statistical pattern recognition method called symbolic dynamic filtering (SDF). The results of experimental validation, generated on a laboratory test apparatus, show a one-to-one correspondence between the flow measure derived from SDF and the void fraction measured by a conductivity probe. A sharp change in the slope of flow measure is found to be in agreement with a transition from fully bubbly flow to cap-bubbly flow. (rapid communication)

  9. Another Approach to Measuring Human Development: The Composite Dynamic Human Development Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao-Ubillos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks mainly to contribute to the debate on how the relative degree of development of a country should be measured by proposing an indicator to build on the valuable starting point provided by the Human Development Index (HDI). The indicator proposed is called the "Composite, Dynamic Human Development Index". It incorporates in a simple…

  10. Benchmarking polarizable molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous sodium hydroxide by diffraction measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, Robert; Megyes, T.; Bakó, I.; Pusztai, L.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 16 (2009), s. 4022-4027 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : hydroxide * molecular dynamics * diffraction measurements Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2009

  11. A general procedure for estimating dynamic displacements using strain measurements and operational modal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Anders; Aenlle, Manuel L.; Brincker, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Measurement systems are being installed in more and more civil structures with the purpose of monitoring the general dynamic behavior of the structure. The instrumentation is typically done with accelerometers, where experimental frequencies and mode shapes can be identified using modal analysis...

  12. Development of a Modular Test Stand for the Measuring of Dynamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to evaluate the human's dynamic physical strain during work, for example during assembly work, an evaluation library of all executions carried out by humans is needed. Therefore, necessary measurements of muscular strains via electromyography have to be carried out which require standardized and repeatable ...

  13. Comparison of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms for optimization of externalities by using dynamic traffic management measures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, Luc Johannes Josephus; van Berkum, Eric C.; Bliemer, M.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The externalities of traffic are increasingly important for policy decisions related to design of a road network. Optimization of externalities with dynamic traffic management measures influencing the supply of infrastructure is a multiobjective network design problem, which in turn is a bi-level

  14. Biosensor based on the measurements of clustering dynamics of magnetic particles using a double pass setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a biosensor for optical detection of Brownian relaxation dynamics of magnetic particles measured by light transmission. The magnetic particles can be functionalized with biological ligands for the detection of target analytes in a sample. The setup may be implemented in a disc...

  15. A new measurement method for the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lijing; Hou, Yanyan; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Hongjie; Xi, Tao; Qi, Xiangyang; Li, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    To measure the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process, some original work was carried out and a new measurement method was developed. Compared with the traditional method, using the instantaneous electrode voltage and welding current at peak current point in each half cycle, the resistance curve from the newly proposed method can provide more details of the dynamic resistance changes over time. To test the specific performance of the proposed method, a series of welding experiments were carried out and the tensile shear strengths of the weld samples were measured. Then, the measurement error of the proposed method was evaluated. Several features were extracted from the dynamic resistance curves. The correlations between the extracted features and weld strength were analyzed and the results show that these features are closely related to the weld strength and they can be used for welding quality monitoring. Moreover, the dynamic resistance curve from the newly proposed method can also be used to monitor some abnormal welding conditions. (paper)

  16. A Chandra Survey of Supermassive Black Holes with Dynamical Mass Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gültekin, K.; Cackett, E.M.; Miller, J.M.; Di Matteo, T.; Markoff, S.; Richstone, D.O.

    2012-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of 12 galaxies that contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with dynamical mass measurements. Each galaxy was observed for 30 ks and resulted in a total of 68 point-source detections in the target galaxies including SMBH sources, ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs),

  17. Small specimen measurements of dynamic fracture toughness of heavy section steels for nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Iwadate, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1987-01-01

    This study presents the dynamic fracture toughness properties (KId) of 12 heats of RPV steels measured using small specimens and analysed based on the current research. The correlation between the KId test and other engineering small specimen tests such as Charpy test and drop weight test are also discussed and a method to predict the KId value is presented. (orig./HP)

  18. Working Memory and Dynamic Measures of Analogical Reasoning as Predictors of Children's Math and Reading Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, C.; Bergwerff, C.E.; Heiser, W.J.; Resing, W. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and inductive reasoning ability each appear related to children's achievement in math and reading. Dynamic measures of reasoning, based on an assessment procedure including feedback, may provide additional predictive value. The aim of this study was to investigate whether working

  19. Working Memory and Dynamic Measures of Analogical Reasoning as Predictors of Children's Math and Reading Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, C.E.; Bergwerff, C.E.; Heiser, W.J.; Resing, W.C.M.

    Working memory and inductive reasoning ability each appear related to children's achievement in math and reading. Dynamic measures of reasoning, based on an assessment procedure including feedback, may provide additional predictive value. The aim of this study was to investigate whether working

  20. Dynamic response of the Initial Systolic Time Interval to a breathing stimulus measured with impedance cardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Jan H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Janssen, T. W J

    2010-01-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) is a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The present study reports about the dynamic response of ISTI to a Valsalva manoeuvre. This response was investigated in 22 young healthy volunteers, having different

  1. Dynamic properties of silica aerogels as deduced from specific-heat and thermal-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernasconi, A.; Sleator, T.; Posselt, D.

    1992-01-01

    The specific heat C(p) and the thermal conductivity lambda of a series of base-catalyzed silica aerogels have been measured at temperatures between 0.05 and 20 K. The results confirm that the different length-scale regions observed in the aerogel structure are reflected in the dynamic behavior...

  2. Measuring Dynamic Signals with Direct Sensor-to-Microcontroller Interfaces Applied to a Magnetoresistive Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Sifuentes, Ernesto; Gonzalez-Landaeta, Rafael; Cota-Ruiz, Juan; Reverter, Ferran

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of direct interface circuits (DIC), where the sensor is directly connected to a microcontroller, when a resistive sensor subjected to dynamic changes is measured. The theoretical analysis provides guidelines for the selection of the components taking into account both the desired resolution and the bandwidth of the input signal. Such an analysis reveals that there is a trade-off between the sampling frequency and the resolution of the measurement, and this...

  3. Dynamic oxygenation measurements using a phosphorescent coating within a mammary window chamber mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorescent lifetime imaging was employed to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of oxygen partial pressure in tissue under the coverslip of a mammary window chamber breast cancer mouse model. A thin platinum-porphyrin coating, whose phosphorescent lifetime varies monotonically with oxygen partial pressure, was applied to the coverslip surface. Dynamic temporal responses to induced modulations in oxygenation levels were measured using this approach. PMID:25780753

  4. Comparison of particle size measurements of some aqueous suspensions by laser polarimetry and dynamic light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirikov, S N

    2016-01-01

    The results of the size distributions measurements of the particles of aqueous suspensions of ZnO, CuO, TiO 2 , and BaTiO 3 by methods of laser polarimetry and dynamic light scattering are considered. These measurements are compared with the results obtained by electron microscopy. It is shown that a laser polarimetry method gives more accurate results for size parameter values more than 1-2. (paper)

  5. Measurement of the Dynamic Displacements of Railway Bridges Using Video Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a non-contact dynamic displacement measurement system for railway bridges based on video technology. The system, consisting of a high speed video camera, an optical lens, lighting lamps and a precision target, can perform measurements with high precision for distances from the camera to the target up to 25 m, with acquisition frame rates ranging from 64 fps to 500 fps, and be articulated with other measurement systems, which promotes its integration in structural health monitoring systems. The system’s performance was evaluated based on two tests, one in the laboratory and other on the field. The laboratory test evaluated the performance of the system in measuring the displacement of a steel beam, subjected to a point load applied dynamically, for distances from the camera to the target between 3 m and 15 m. The field test allowed evaluating the system’s performance in the dynamic measurement of the displacement of a point on the deck of a railway bridge, induced by passing trains at speeds between 160 km/h and 180 km/h, for distances from the camera to the target up to 25 m. The results of both tests show a very good agreement between the displacement measurement obtained with the video system and with a LVDT.

  6. Research on an optoelectronic measurement system of dynamic envelope measurement for China Railway high-speed train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziyue; Gan, Xiaochuan; Zou, Zhi; Ma, Liqun

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic envelope measurement plays very important role in the external dimension design for high-speed train. Recently there is no digital measurement system to solve this problem. This paper develops an optoelectronic measurement system by using monocular digital camera, and presents the research of measurement theory, visual target design, calibration algorithm design, software programming and so on. This system consists of several CMOS digital cameras, several luminous targets for measuring, a scale bar, data processing software and a terminal computer. The system has such advantages as large measurement scale, high degree of automation, strong anti-interference ability, noise rejection and real-time measurement. In this paper, we resolve the key technology such as the transformation, storage and calculation of multiple cameras' high resolution digital image. The experimental data show that the repeatability of the system is within 0.02mm and the distance error of the system is within 0.12mm in the whole workspace. This experiment has verified the rationality of the system scheme, the correctness, the precision and effectiveness of the relevant methods.

  7. Describing and compensating gas transport dynamics for accurate instantaneous emission measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Soltic, Patrik; Ajtay, Delia

    Instantaneous emission measurements on chassis dynamometers and engine test benches are becoming increasingly usual for car-makers and for environmental emission factor measurement and calculation, since much more information about the formation conditions can be extracted than from the regulated bag measurements (integral values). The common exhaust gas analysers for the "regulated pollutants" (carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide) allow measurement at a rate of one to ten samples per second. This gives the impression of having after-the-catalyst emission information with that chronological precision. It has been shown in recent years, however, that beside the reaction time of the analysers, the dynamics of gas transport in both the exhaust system of the car and the measurement system last significantly longer than 1 s. This paper focuses on the compensation of all these dynamics convoluting the emission signals. Most analysers show linear and time-invariant reaction dynamics. Transport dynamics can basically be split into two phenomena: a pure time delay accounting for the transport of the gas downstream and a dynamic signal deformation since the gas is mixed by turbulence along the way. This causes emission peaks to occur which are smaller in height and longer in time at the sensors than they are after the catalyst. These dynamics can be modelled using differential equations. Both mixing dynamics and time delay are constant for modelling a raw gas analyser system, since the flow in that system is constant. In the exhaust system of the car, however, the parameters depend on the exhaust volume flow. For gasoline cars, the variation in overall transport time may be more than 6 s. It is shown in this paper how all these processes can be described by invertible mathematical models with the focus on the more complex case of the car's exhaust system. Inversion means that the sharp emission signal at the catalyst out location can be

  8. Intracellular ion channels and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eLeanza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K+ channels (Ca2+-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K+ channel-3 (TASK-3, Ca2+ uniporter MCU, Mg2+-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 receptor, the ER-located Ca2+ depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1, a component of the store-operated Ca2+ channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment.

  9. An evaluation of dynamic mutuality measurements and methods in cyclic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohua; Huang, Guitian; Duan, Na

    2010-12-01

    Several measurements and techniques have been developed to detect dynamic mutuality and synchronicity of time series in econometrics. This study aims to compare the performances of five methods, i.e., linear regression, dynamic correlation, Markov switching models, concordance index and recurrence quantification analysis, through numerical simulations. We evaluate the abilities of these methods to capture structure changing and cyclicity in time series and the findings of this paper would offer guidance to both academic and empirical researchers. Illustration examples are also provided to demonstrate the subtle differences of these techniques.

  10. Development of dynamic 3-D surface profilometry using stroboscopic interferometric measurement and vertical scanning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, K-C; Chen, L-C; Lin, C-D; Chang, Calvin C; Kuo, C-F; Chou, J-T

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this technical advance is to provide a single optical interferometric framework and methodology to be capable of delivering both nano-scale static and dynamic surface profilometry. Microscopic interferometry is a powerful technique for static and dynamic characterization of micro (opto) electromechanical systems (M (O) EMS). In view of this need, a microscopic prototype based on white-light stroboscopic interferometry and the white light vertical scanning principle, was developed to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry and characterization of MEMS devices. The system primarily consists of an optical microscope, on which a Mirau interferometric objective embedded with a piezoelectric vertical translator, a high-power LED light module with dual operation modes and light synchronizing electronics unit are integrated. A micro cantilever beam used in AFM was measured to verify the system capability in accurate characterization of dynamic behaviours of the device. The full-field second-mode vibration at a vibratory frequency of 68.60 kHz can be fully characterized and 3-5 nm of vertical measurement resolution as well as tens of micrometers of vertical measurement range can be easily achieved

  11. Dynamic measurement of coal thermal properties and elemental composition of volatile matter during coal pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Stanger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new technique that allows dynamic measurement of thermal properties, expansion and the elemental chemistry of the volatile matter being evolved as coal is pyrolysed is described. The thermal and other properties are measured dynamically as a function of temperature of the coal without the need for equilibration at temperature. In particular, the technique allows for continuous elemental characterisation of tars as they are evolved during pyrolysis and afterwards as a function of boiling point. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the properties of maceral concentrates from a coal. The variation in heats of reaction, thermal conductivity and expansion as a function of maceral composition is described. Combined with the elemental analysis, the results aid in the interpretation of the chemical processes contributing to the physical and thermal behaviour of the coal during pyrolysis. Potential applications in cokemaking studies are discussed.

  12. Optimization of Measurements on Dynamically Sensitive Structures Using a Reliability Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    1990-01-01

    Design of measuring program devoted to parameter identification of structural dynamic systems described by random fields is considered. The design problem is formulated as an optimization problem to minimize the total expected costs due to failure and costs of masuring program. Design variables a...... are the numbers of measuring points, the locations of these points and the required number of sample records. An example with a simply supported plane, vibrating beam is considered and tentative results are presented.......Design of measuring program devoted to parameter identification of structural dynamic systems described by random fields is considered. The design problem is formulated as an optimization problem to minimize the total expected costs due to failure and costs of masuring program. Design variables...

  13. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K.; Sikes, Hadley D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies. PMID:25460730

  14. Seamless variation of isometric and anisometric dynamical integrity measures in basins's erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, P.; Lenci, S.; Rega, G.

    2018-03-01

    Anisometric integrity measures defined as improvement and generalization of two existing measures (LIM, local integrity measure, and IF, integrity factor) of the extent and compactness of basins of attraction are introduced. Non-equidistant measures make it possible to account for inhomogeneous sensitivities of the state space variables to perturbations, thus permitting a more confident and targeted identification of the safe regions. All four measures are used for a global dynamics analysis of the twin-well Duffing oscillator, which is performed by considering a nearly continuous variation of a governing control parameter, thanks to the use of parallel computation allowing reasonable CPU time. This improves literature results based on finite (and commonly large) variations of the parameter, due to computational constraints. The seamless evolution of key integrity measures highlights the fine aspects of the erosion of the safe domain with respect to the increasing forcing amplitude.

  15. Dynamic response of infrastructure to environmentally induced loads analysis, measurements, testing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Manolis, George

    2017-01-01

    This book provides state of the art coverage of important current issues in the analysis, measurement, and monitoring of the dynamic response of infrastructure to environmental loads, including those induced by earthquake motion and differential soil settlement. The coverage is in five parts that address numerical methods in structural dynamics, soil–structure interaction analysis, instrumentation and structural health monitoring, hybrid experimental mechanics, and structural health monitoring for bridges. Examples that give an impression of the scope of the topics discussed include the seismic analysis of bridges, soft computing in earthquake engineering, use of hybrid methods for soil–structure interaction analysis, effects of local site conditions on the inelastic dynamic analysis of bridges, embedded models in wireless sensor networks for structural health monitoring, recent developments in seismic simulation methods, and seismic performance assessment and retrofit of structures. Throughout, the empha...

  16. A Thorax Simulator for Complex Dynamic Bioimpedance Measurements With Textile Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Mark; Muhlsteff, Jens; Teichmann, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements on the human thorax are suitable for assessment of body composition or hemodynamic parameters, such as stroke volume; they are non-invasive, easy in application and inexpensive. When targeting personal healthcare scenarios, the technology can be integrated into textiles to increase ease, comfort and coverage of measurements. Bioimpedance is generally measured using two electrodes injecting low alternating currents (0.5-10 mA) and two additional electrodes to measure the corresponding voltage drop. The impedance is measured either spectroscopically (bioimpedance spectroscopy, BIS) between 5 kHz and 1 MHz or continuously at a fixed frequency around 100 kHz (impedance cardiography, ICG). A thorax simulator is being developed for testing and calibration of bioimpedance devices and other new developments. For the first time, it is possible to mimic the complete time-variant properties of the thorax during an impedance measurement. This includes the dynamic real part and dynamic imaginary part of the impedance with a peak-to-peak value of 0.2 Ω and an adjustable base impedance (24.6 Ω ≥ Z0 ≥ 51.6 Ω). Another novelty is adjustable complex electrode-skin contact impedances for up to 8 electrodes to evaluate bioimpedance devices in combination with textile electrodes. In addition, an electrocardiographic signal is provided for cardiographic measurements which is used in ICG devices. This provides the possibility to generate physiologic impedance changes, and in combination with an ECG, all parameters of interest such as stroke volume (SV), pre-ejection period (PEP) or extracellular resistance (Re) can be simulated. The speed of all dynamic signals can be altered. The simulator was successfully tested with commercially available BIS and ICG devices and the preset signals are measured with high correlation (r = 0.996).

  17. Potent Antibacterial Nanoparticles against Biofilm and Intracellular Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Haibo; Tang, Jiangjiang; Liu, Qianjin; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-01-01

    The chronic infections related to biofilm and intracellular bacteria are always hard to be cured because of their inherent resistance to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Herein we develop a facile approach to overcome the above conundrum through phosphatidylcholine-decorated Au nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GPA NPs). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet?visible (UV?vis) absorption spectra...

  18. The use of electrical anisotropy measurements to monitor soil crack dynamics - laboratory evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraei, Amirhossein; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Swelling and shrinking of soil cracks is a key factor determining water fluxes in many irrigated soils. Most previous studies have used time-intensive and destructive methods for crack characterization, such as depth and volume determination from simplified geometrical measurements or liquid latex filling. Because of their destructive and time-consuming nature, these methods have only provided instantaneous estimates of the geometry and/or volume of cracks. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of anisotropy in electrical resistivity measured with a square electrode array to determine crack depth dynamics. In a first step, the performance of the method was analyzed using a laboratory experiment where an artificial soil crack was emulated using a plastic plate in a water bath. Since cracking depth was precisely known, this experiment allowed to develop a method to estimate soil crack depth from measurements of the electrical anisotropy. In a second step, electrical anisotropy was measured during soil crack development within a soil monolith consisting of a mix of sand and bentonite. The cracking depth estimated from electrical measurement compared well with reference ruler measurements. These laboratory measurements inspired confidence in the use of electrical anisotropy for soil crack investigations, and consequently the developed methods will be applied to investigate soil crack dynamics in the field in a next step.

  19. Optimization of dynamic envelope measurement system for high speed train based on monocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Liu, Changjie; Fu, Luhua; Wang, Zhong

    2018-01-01

    The definition of dynamic envelope curve is the maximum limit outline caused by various adverse effects during the running process of the train. It is an important base of making railway boundaries. At present, the measurement work of dynamic envelope curve of high-speed vehicle is mainly achieved by the way of binocular vision. There are some problems of the present measuring system like poor portability, complicated process and high cost. A new measurement system based on the monocular vision measurement theory and the analysis on the test environment is designed and the measurement system parameters, the calibration of camera with wide field of view, the calibration of the laser plane are designed and optimized in this paper. The accuracy has been verified to be up to 2mm by repeated tests and experimental data analysis. The feasibility and the adaptability of the measurement system is validated. There are some advantages of the system like lower cost, a simpler measurement and data processing process, more reliable data. And the system needs no matching algorithm.

  20. Investigating DOC export dynamics using high-frequency instream concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwoud, Marieke; Keller, Toralf; Musolff, Andreas; Frei, Sven; Park, Ji-Hyung; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    Being able to monitor DOC concentrations using in-situ high frequency measurements makes it possible to better understand concentration-discharge behavior under different hydrological conditions. We developed a UV-Vis probe setup for modified/adapted use under field conditions. The quasi mobile probe setup allows a more flexible probe deployment. New or existing monitoring sites can easily be equipped for quasi-continuous monitoring or measurements can be performed at changing locations, without the need for additional infrastructure. We were able to gather high frequency data on DOC dynamics for one year in two streams in the Harz mountains in Germany. It proved that obtaining accurate DOC concentrations from the UV-Vis probes required frequent maintenance and probe calibration. The advantage of the setup over standard monitoring protocols becomes evident when comparing net exports over a year. In addition to mass improved balance calculations the high-frequency measurements can reveal intricate hysteretic relationships between discharge and concentrations that can provide valuable insights into the hydrologic dynamics and mechanisms that govern the delivery of DOC to the receiving waters. Measurements with similar probes from two additional catchments in Southern Germany and South Korea will be used to illustrate different discharge-concentration relationships and what can be learned from them about the hydrologic mechanisms that control the dynamics of DOC export.

  1. Technical Note: Measurement of common carotid artery lumen dynamics using black-blood MR cine imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Erpeng; Dong, Li; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Lyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Xihai; Wang, Jinnan; Yuan, Chun; Guo, Hua

    2017-03-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the common carotid artery (CCA) lumen dynamics using a black-blood cine (BB-cine) imaging method. Motion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (MSDE) prepared spoiled gradient sequence was used for the BB-cine imaging. CCAs of eleven healthy volunteers were studied using this method. Lumen dynamics, including lumen area evolution waveforms and distension values, were measured and evaluated by comparing this method with bright-blood cine (BrB-cine) imaging. Compared with the BrB-cine images, flow artifacts were effectively suppressed in the BB-cine images. BrB-cine images generally show larger lumen areas than BB-cine images. The lumen area waveforms and distension measurements from BB-cine imaging showed smaller variances among different subjects than BrB-cine imaging. The proposed BB-cine imaging technique can suppress the flow artifacts effectively and reduce the partial volume effects from the vessel wall. This might allow more accurate lumen dynamics measurements than traditional BrB-cine imaging, which may further be valuable for investigating biomechanical and functional properties of the cardiovascular system. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Measure Advancing, Receding and Dynamic Contact Angles of granular materials in a close column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Gerardo; Li, Minglu; Moghtadernejad, Sara; Drazer, German

    2017-11-01

    Wetting properties of granular materials are usually obtained by the Washburn column technique. One problem is that the effective contact angle measured is dynamic and variable. The open column technique also allows to measure static advancing contact angle when the interface stops because the driving capillary pressure is balanced by the hydrostatic pressure. However, when particle diameters are in the range of tens of microns the static condition cannot be achieved at practical heights. Also, the open column device cannot be used to measure receding contact angles or contact angles of non-wetting liquids. Dynamics of a close column filled with granular material of different particle sizes where the liquid mass, the enclosed air pressure and the front position are monitored as a function of time is studied. Contact angle is calculated in dynamic and advancing static conditions. Then, a Syringe pump is used to increase the pressure inside the column so that the receding contact angle can also be studied. Supplementary experiments with a reference liquid that completely wets the powder are performed. Using a second liquid decouples the properties of the bed from the result and allows to measure the contact angles without making assumptions on the pore size or geometry.

  3. Reconstruction of dynamic structures of experimental setups based on measurable experimental data only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tian-Yu; Chen, Yang; Yang, Hu-Jiang; Xiao, Jing-Hua; Hu, Gang

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, massive amounts of data have been accumulated in various and wide fields, it has become today one of the central issues in interdisciplinary fields to analyze existing data and extract as much useful information as possible from data. It is often that the output data of systems are measurable while dynamic structures producing these data are hidden, and thus studies to reveal system structures by analyzing available data, i.e., reconstructions of systems become one of the most important tasks of information extractions. In the past, most of the works in this respect were based on theoretical analyses and numerical verifications. Direct analyses of experimental data are very rare. In physical science, most of the analyses of experimental setups were based on the first principles of physics laws, i.e., so-called top-down analyses. In this paper, we conducted an experiment of “Boer resonant instrument for forced vibration” (BRIFV) and inferred the dynamic structure of the experimental set purely from the analysis of the measurable experimental data, i.e., by applying the bottom-up strategy. Dynamics of the experimental set is strongly nonlinear and chaotic, and itʼs subjects to inevitable noises. We proposed to use high-order correlation computations to treat nonlinear dynamics; use two-time correlations to treat noise effects. By applying these approaches, we have successfully reconstructed the structure of the experimental setup, and the dynamic system reconstructed with the measured data reproduces good experimental results in a wide range of parameters.

  4. Ocular pulse amplitude measurement using pascal dynamic contour tonometer in glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsimpris, J M; Theoulakis, P E; Papadopoulos, G E; Katsimpris, A; Lepidas, J; Petropoulos, I K

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to measure and compare the ocular pulse amplitude using Pascal dynamic contour tonometry in normal persons and in glaucoma patients. 20 patients (40 eyes) with primary open angle glaucoma (Group A), 8 patients (16 eyes) with normal tension glaucoma (Group B), and 12 patients (24 eyes) with ocular hypertension (Group C) were included in the study. Control group (Group D) comprised 25 normal volunteers (50 eyes). Intraocular pressure was measured using both Goldmann applanation tonometry in the slit-lamp and Pascal dynamic contour tonometry. Ocular pulse amplitude was evaluated with Pascal dynamic contour tonometry. Statistical evaluation of the differences in ocular pulse amplitude and intraocular pressure among the different groups was performed using Student's t-test. Mean ocular pulse amplitude values expressed in mmHg were 3.66 ± 1.00, 2.46 ± 0.60, 4.04 ± 1.47, and 2.52 ± 0.52, for Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively. The ocular pulse amplitude was significantly higher in Group A (primary open angle glaucoma) and Group C (ocular hypertension) when compared with Group D (control group) and Group B (normal tension glaucoma). No statistically significant difference was detected between Group D (control group) and Group B (normal tension glaucoma). Although we can measure the intraocular pressure with Goldmann applanation tonometry, no information can be derived regarding the ocular pulse amplitude. The use of Pascal dynamic contour tonometry in intraocular pressure estimation provides useful clinical information also about the magnitude of the ocular pulse amplitude in different types of glaucoma. Pascal dynamic contour tonometry discloses an elevation of ocular pulse amplitude in primary open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension patients. On the contrary, the ocular pulse amplitude is within normal limits in normal tension glaucoma patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Credit Rating via Dynamic Slack-Based Measure And It´s Optimal Investment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Delavarkhalafi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we check the credit rating of firms applied for a loan. In this regard we introduce a model, named Dynamic Slack-Based Measure (DSBM for measuring credit rating of applicant companies. Selection of financial ratios that represent the financial state of a company -in the best possible way- is one of the most challenging parts of any credit rating analysis. At first, ranking needs to identify the appropriate variables. Therefore we introduce five financial variables to provide a ranking. As noted above, we assess the performance of these firms. Then we introduce the dynamic model of SBM and theorems, also we discuss the overall structure of DSBM. Then we will present the implementation and the simulation model. After that, we propose a stochastic controlled dynamic system model to express the optimal strategy. Banks expect companies selected with DSBM model, act in accordance with this strategy. This stochastic dynamic system is originated from the balance sheets of firms applying for a loan. Finally we evaluate the performance of the system and strategy problem.

  6. A dynamic artificial clam (Corbicula fluminea) allows parsimony on-line measurement of waterborne metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jou, L.-J. [Ecotoxicological Modeling Center, Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617 (China); Department of Biomechatronic Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan, Taiwan 260 (China); Liao, C.-M. [Ecotoxicological Modeling Center, Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617 (China)]. E-mail: cmliao@ntu.edu.tw

    2006-11-15

    We introduce a novel on-line biomonitoring system based on a valvometric conversion technique for clam Corbicula fluminea, allowing for rapid, continuous, and ecological relevant water quality control. Our model builds upon the basic principles of biological early warning system model in two ways. We first adopted a risk-based methodology to build a dynamic artificial clam for simulating how the bivalve closure rhythm in response to waterborne copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd). Secondly, we integrated a probabilistic model associated with the time-varying dose-response relationships of valve closing behavior into the mechanisms of a dynamic artificial clam, allowing estimation of the time-varying waterborne Cu/Cd concentrations for on-line providing the outcomes of the toxicity detection technique. Measurements with Cu/Cd were performed and the calculated EC50 values were compared with published data for the valve movement test with C. fluminea. This proposed dynamic artificial clam provides a better quantitative understanding of on-line biomonitoring measurements of waterborne metals and may foster applications in clam farm management strategy and ecotoxicological risk assessment. - A dynamic artificial clam allows on-line biomonitoring waterborne metal toxicity.

  7. Fundamental and biotechnological applications of neutron scattering measurements for macromolecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehei, Moeava; Daniel, Roy; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    To explore macromolecular dynamics on the picosecond timescale, we used neutron spectroscopy. First, molecular dynamics were analyzed for the hyperthermophile malate dehydrogenase from Methanococcus jannaschii and a mesophilic homologue, the lactate dehydrogenase from Oryctolagus cunniculus muscle. Hyperthermophiles have elaborate molecular mechanisms of adaptation to extremely high temperature. Using a novel elastic neutron scattering approach that provides independent measurements of the global flexibility and of the structural resilience (rigidity), we have demonstrated that macromolecular dynamics represents one of these molecular mechanisms of thermoadaptation. The flexibilities were found to be similar for both enzymes at their optimal activity temperature and the resilience is higher for the hyperthermophilic protein. Secondly, macromolecular motions were examined in a native and immobilized dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli. The immobilized mesophilic enzyme has increased stability and decreased activity, so that its properties are changed to resemble those of the thermophilic enzyme. Are these changes reflected in dynamical behavior? For this study, we performed quasielastic neutron scattering measurements to probe the protein motions. The residence time is 7.95 ps for the native DHFR and 20.36 ps for the immobilized DHFR. The average height of the potential barrier to local motions is therefore increased in the immobilized DHFR, with a difference in activation energy equal to 0.54 kcal/mol, which is, using the theoretical rate equation, of the same order than expected from calculation.

  8. Modeling and Experimental Tests of a Mechatronic Device to Measure Road Profiles Considering Impact Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza, A.; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    of a vehicle and to test its components in laboratory. In this framework a mechanism to measure road profiles is designed and presented. Such a mechanism is composed of two rolling wheels and two long beams attached to the vehicles by means of four Kardan joints. The wheels are kept in contact to the ground...... to highlight that the aim of this device is to independently measure two road profiles, without the influence of the vehicle dynamics where the mechanism is attached. Before the mechatronic mechanism is attached to a real vehicle, its dynamic behavior must be known. A theoretical analysis of the mechanism...... predicts well the mechanism movements. However it was also experimentally observed that the contact between the wheels and the road profile is not permanent. To analyze the non-contact between the wheels and the road, the Newton-Euler´s Method is used to calculate forces and moments of reactions between...

  9. Frequency-scanning interferometry using a time-varying Kalman filter for dynamic tracking measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xingyu; Liu, Zhigang; Tao, Long; Deng, Zhongwen

    2017-10-16

    Frequency scanning interferometry (FSI) with a single external cavity diode laser (ECDL) and time-invariant Kalman filtering is an effective technique for measuring the distance of a dynamic target. However, due to the hysteresis of the piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) actuator in the ECDL, the optical frequency sweeps of the ECDL exhibit different behaviors, depending on whether the frequency is increasing or decreasing. Consequently, the model parameters of Kalman filter appear time varying in each iteration, which produces state estimation errors with time-invariant filtering. To address this, in this paper, a time-varying Kalman filter is proposed to model the instantaneous movement of a target relative to the different optical frequency tuning durations of the ECDL. The combination of the FSI method with the time-varying Kalman filter was theoretically analyzed, and the simulation and experimental results show the proposed method greatly improves the performance of dynamic FSI measurements.

  10. A novel test method for measuring the thermal properties of clothing ensembles under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, X; Fan, J

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic thermal properties of clothing ensembles are important to thermal transient comfort, but have so far not been properly quantified. In this paper, a novel test procedure and new index based on measurements on the sweating fabric manikin-Walter are proposed to quantify and measure the dynamic thermal properties of clothing ensembles. Experiments showed that the new index is correlated to the changing rate of the body temperature of the wearer, which is an important indicator of thermal transient comfort. Clothing ensembles having higher values of the index means the wearer will have a faster changing rate of body temperature and shorter duration before approaching a dangerous thermo-physiological state, when he changes from 'resting' to 'exercising' mode. Clothing should therefore be designed to reduce the value of the index

  11. A Neural Network Approach to Fluid Quantity Measurement in Dynamic Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Terzic, Edin; Nagarajah, Romesh; Alamgir, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Sloshing causes liquid to fluctuate, making accurate level readings difficult to obtain in dynamic environments. The measurement system described uses a single-tube capacitive sensor to obtain an instantaneous level reading of the fluid surface, thereby accurately determining the fluid quantity in the presence of slosh. A neural network based classification technique has been applied to predict the actual quantity of the fluid contained in a tank under sloshing conditions.   In A neural network approach to fluid quantity measurement in dynamic environments, effects of temperature variations and contamination on the capacitive sensor are discussed, and the authors propose that these effects can also be eliminated with the proposed neural network based classification system. To examine the performance of the classification system, many field trials were carried out on a running vehicle at various tank volume levels that range from 5 L to 50 L. The effectiveness of signal enhancement on the neural network base...

  12. Dynamic cure measurement of dental polymer composites using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Palin, Will M.; Shortall, Adrian C.

    2008-02-01

    Dental amalgam is being increasingly replaced by Light-activated resin-based dental composites. However, these materials are limited by inefficient setting reactions as a function of depth, constraining the maximum extent of cure and reducing biocompatibility. In this paper we demonstrate a novel metrological tool for dynamic monitoring of refractive index and thickness change through curing resins using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We present real-time measurements from pre- to post-cure of a series of un-filled bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resins with different inhibitor concentrations. Our results demonstrate that refractive index measurements are sensitive to the extent of cure of such resins and that the inhibitor concentration strongly affects the cure dynamics and final extent of cure.

  13. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A. Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M.; Temanni, M. Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  14. Measurement of dynamic interaction between a vibrating fuel element and its support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, N.J.; Tromp, J.H.; Smith, B.A.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada). Chalk River Labs.

    1996-12-01

    Flow-induced vibration of CANDU{reg_sign} fuel can result in fretting damage of the fuel and its support. A WOrk-Rate Measuring Station (WORMS) was developed to measure the relative motion and contact forces between a vibrating fuel element and its support. The fixture consists of a small piece of support structure mounted on a micrometer stage. This arrangement permits position of the support relative to the fuel element to be controlled to within {+-} {micro}m. A piezoelectric triaxial load washer is positioned between the support and micrometer stage to measure contact forces, and a pair of miniature eddy-current displacement probes are mounted on the stage to measure fuel element-to-support relative motion. WORMS has been utilized to measure dynamic contact forces, relative displacements and work-rates between a vibrating fuel element and its support. For these tests, the fuel element was excited with broadband random force excitation to simulate flow-induced vibration due to axial flow. The relationship between fuel element-to-support gap or preload (i.e., interference or negative gap) and dynamic interaction (i.e., relative motion, contact forces and work-rates) was derived. These measurements confirmed numerical simulations of in-reactor interaction predicted earlier using the VIBIC code.

  15. A High Dynamic-Range Beam Position Measurement System for ELSA-2

    CERN Document Server

    Balleyguier, P; Guimbal, P; Borrion, H

    2003-01-01

    New beamlines are presently under construction for ELSA, a 20 MeV electron linac located at Bruyères-le-Châtel. These lines need a beam position measurement system filling the following requirements: small footprint, wide dynamic range, single-bunch/multi-bunch capability, simple design. We designed a compact 4-stripline sensor and an electronic treatment chain based on logarithmic amplifiers. This paper presents the design, cold and hot test results.

  16. Monitoring hillslope moisture dynamics with surface ERT for enhancing spatial significance of hydrometric point measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, R.; Heller, K.; Günther, T.; Kleber, A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides floodplains, hillslopes are basic units that mainly control water movement and flow pathways within catchments of subdued mountain ranges. The structure of their shallow subsurface affects water balance, e.g. infiltration, retention, and runoff. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in the knowledge of the hydrological dynamics on hillslopes, notably due to the lack of generalization and transferability. This study presents a robust multi-method framework of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in addition to hydrometric point measurements, transferring hydrometric data into higher spatial scales to obtain additional patterns of distribution and dynamics of soil moisture on a hillslope. A geoelectrical monitoring in a small catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains was carried out at weekly intervals from May to December 2008 to image seasonal moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale. To link water content and electrical resistivity, the parameters of Archie's law were determined using different core samples. To optimize inversion parameters and methods, the derived spatial and temporal water content distribution was compared to tensiometer data. The results from ERT measurements show a strong correlation with the hydrometric data. The response is congruent to the soil tension data. Water content calculated from the ERT profile shows similar variations as that of water content from soil moisture sensors. Consequently, soil moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale may be determined not only by expensive invasive punctual hydrometric measurements, but also by minimally invasive time-lapse ERT, provided that pedo-/petrophysical relationships are known. Since ERT integrates larger spatial scales, a combination with hydrometric point measurements improves the understanding of the ongoing hydrological processes and better suits identification of heterogeneities.

  17. Working Memory and Dynamic Measures of Analogical Reasoning as Predictors of Children's Math and Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Claire E.; Bergwerff, Catharina E.; Heiser, Willem J.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and inductive reasoning ability each appear related to children's achievement in math and reading. Dynamic measures of reasoning, based on an assessment procedure including feedback, may provide additional predictive value. The aim of this study was to investigate whether working memory and dynamic measures of analogical…

  18. Redox-controlled backbone dynamics of human cytochrome c revealed by 15N NMR relaxation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Koichi; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Uchida, Takeshi; Kawano, Keiichi; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The dynamic parameters for the backbone dynamics in Cyt c were determined. → The backbone mobility of Cyt c is highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme. → The backbone mobility of Cyt c is more restricted upon the oxidation of the heme. → The redox-dependent dynamics are shown in the backbone of Cyt c. → The backbone dynamics of Cyt c would regulate the electron transfer from Cyt c. -- Abstract: Redox-controlled backbone dynamics in cytochrome c (Cyt c) were revealed by 2D 15 N NMR relaxation experiments. 15 N T 1 and T 2 values and 1 H- 15 N NOEs of uniformly 15 N-labeled reduced and oxidized Cyt c were measured, and the generalized order parameters (S 2 ), the effective correlation time for internal motion (τ e ), the 15 N exchange broadening contributions (R ex ) for each residue, and the overall correlation time (τ m ) were estimated by model-free dynamics formalism. These dynamic parameters clearly showed that the backbone dynamics of Cyt c are highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme that functions as the stable hydrophobic core. Upon oxidation of the heme iron in Cyt c, the average S 2 value was increased from 0.88 ± 0.01 to 0.92 ± 0.01, demonstrating that the mobility of the backbone is further restricted in the oxidized form. Such increases in the S 2 values were more prominent in the loop regions, including amino acid residues near the thioether bonds to the heme moiety and positively charged region around Lys87. Both of the regions are supposed to form the interaction site for cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and the electron pathway from Cyt c to CcO. The redox-dependent mobility of the backbone in the interaction site for the electron transfer to CcO suggests an electron transfer mechanism regulated by the backbone dynamics in the Cyt c-CcO system.

  19. Intracellular renin disrupts chemical communication between heart cells. Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmor eDe Mello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; 1 under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell-to-cell through gap junctions; 2 the intracellular dialysis of renin (100nM disrupts chemical communication-an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100nM; 3 enalaprilat (10-9M administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; 4 aliskiren (10-8M inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication;5 the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; 6 the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed;7 the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis, causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  20. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH.

  1. A Kicker Pulse Generator for Measurement of the Tune and Dynamic Aperture in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, E; Vossenberg, E

    2007-01-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN will be equipped with fast pulsed two-function magnets, which will be part of the measurement system for the tune and the dynamic aperture. For the tune measurement, the magnets will excite coherent oscillations of part of the beam. This is achieved by means of a generator producing a 5.1 mus base half-sine pulse of 1.2 kA amplitude, superimposed with a 3rd harmonic to produce a -2 mus flat top. A kick repetition rate of 2 Hz is possible. The maximum generator voltage is 3.3 kV, with a dynamic range of about 20. A 5.2 kV press-pack capsule IGBT is used as switching element. A fast 30 A gate driver is used for triggering. The generator pulse current interruption is obtained with an extra-fast small recovery series diode. Several advantages of the press-pack IGBT construction with respect to conventional IGBT modules will be discussed. To measure the dynamic aperture of the LHC at different beam energies, the same magnets will also be driven by a more powerful generator w...

  2. Measurement Research of Motorized Spindle Dynamic Stiffness under High Speed Rotating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed motorized spindle has become a key functional unit of high speed machine tools and effectively promotes the development of machine tool technology. The development of higher speed and more power puts forward the stricter requirement for the performance of motorized spindle, especially the dynamic performance which affects the machining accuracy, reliability, and production efficiency. To overcome the problems of ineffective loading and dynamic performance measurement of motorized spindle, a noncontact electromagnetic loading device is developed. The cutting load can be simulated by using electromagnetic force. A new method of measuring force by force sensors is presented, and the steady and transient loading force could be measured exactly. After the high speed machine spindle is tested, the frequency response curves of the spindle relative to machine table are collected at 0~12000 rpm; then the relationships between stiffness and speeds as well as between damping ratio and speeds are obtained. The result shows that not only the static and dynamic stiffness but also the damping ratio declined with the increase of speed.

  3. Developing a new measure of small bowel peristalsis with dynamic MR: a proof of concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farghal, Aser; Kasmai, Bahman; Malcolm, Paul N.; Toms, Andoni P.; Graves, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Small bowel peristalsis is a complex of many individual motion elements. Although each element of peristalsis can be measured there is no current global measure of peristalsis. Purpose. To examine the feasibility of automated computerized assessment of global small bowel motility using simple computational methods. Material and Methods. Coronal dynamic MR images were obtained from five healthy volunteers who had fasted for 9 h and drunk 1.5 L of water. Images were taken using single breath-hold and ECG triggering. Acquisitions were repeated at 10 and 20 min after an intramuscular injection of hyoscine butylbromide. Parametric maps were generated representing the mean change in signal amplitude (MSA) per voxel for each dynamic acquisition. Two observers independently assessed thresholding for optimal segmentation of small bowel from other sources of signal. Total voxel activity (TVA) for each study was calculated as a sum of MSA per slice and whole examination and TVA profiles were generated. Results. Independent observations suggest that the automated segmentation method described usefully segments small bowel activity from other signal. Small bowel movement represented as TVA varied three-fold in the five volunteers and was inhibited by anti-muscarinic injection. Conclusion. It is possible to develop a new measure, based on automated segmentation of mean signal amplitude changes, of small bowel peristalsis using dynamic MR

  4. Developing a new measure of small bowel peristalsis with dynamic MR: a proof of concept study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farghal, Aser; Kasmai, Bahman; Malcolm, Paul N.; Toms, Andoni P. [Dept. of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich Univ. Hospital NHS Trust, Norwich (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andoni.toms@nnuh.nhs.uk; Graves, Martin J. [Univ. Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Background. Small bowel peristalsis is a complex of many individual motion elements. Although each element of peristalsis can be measured there is no current global measure of peristalsis. Purpose. To examine the feasibility of automated computerized assessment of global small bowel motility using simple computational methods. Material and Methods. Coronal dynamic MR images were obtained from five healthy volunteers who had fasted for 9 h and drunk 1.5 L of water. Images were taken using single breath-hold and ECG triggering. Acquisitions were repeated at 10 and 20 min after an intramuscular injection of hyoscine butylbromide. Parametric maps were generated representing the mean change in signal amplitude (MSA) per voxel for each dynamic acquisition. Two observers independently assessed thresholding for optimal segmentation of small bowel from other sources of signal. Total voxel activity (TVA) for each study was calculated as a sum of MSA per slice and whole examination and TVA profiles were generated. Results. Independent observations suggest that the automated segmentation method described usefully segments small bowel activity from other signal. Small bowel movement represented as TVA varied three-fold in the five volunteers and was inhibited by anti-muscarinic injection. Conclusion. It is possible to develop a new measure, based on automated segmentation of mean signal amplitude changes, of small bowel peristalsis using dynamic MR.

  5. Diurnal Variation of Optical Coherence Tomography Measurements of Static and Dynamic Anterior Segment Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Benjamin Y; Penteado, Rafaella C; Weinreb, Robert N

    2018-01-01

    To examine the diurnal variation of static and dynamic anterior segment parameters in young, healthy eyes by comparing anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) measurements obtained in the morning and evening and also in the light and dark. Twenty-two subjects ranging from 19 to 47 years of age with no past ocular history were selected. Imaging was performed with the Tomey CASIA2 AS-OCT device in 2 fixed lighting environments, light and dark, between the hours of 08:30 to 10:00 and 17:30 to 19:00. Four AS-OCT images were analyzed per eye. Pupil diameter (PD), iris area (IA), iris curvature (IC), anterior chamber depth (ACD), lens vault (LV), anterior chamber width (ACW), anterior chamber area (ACA), angle opening distance (AOD), angle recess area (ARA), trabecular iris space area (TISA), and trabecular iris angle (TIA) were measured. Pupil diameter was similar between the AM and PM groups in the light (P=0.89) and dark (P=0.51). There was no significant difference between AM and PM measurement values for any of the static or dynamic parameters in the light (P>0.39) and dark (P>0.31). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) demonstrated excellent agreement between AM and PM measurement values in the light (ICC>0.81) and dark (ICC>0.93). In addition, there was no significant difference between AM and PM angle opening distance at 500 µm measurement values in the light (P>0.34) and dark (P>0.40) when each of 8 angle sectors was analyzed individually. No significant diurnal variation of static or dynamic anterior segment parameter measurements was detected in the light and dark. Diurnal variation of these parameters does not regularly occur in young, healthy eyes.

  6. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3 buff...

  7. Brain network dynamics characterization in epileptic seizures. Joint directed graph and pairwise synchronization measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A. C.; Machado, B. S.; Florence, G.; Hamad, A. P.; Sakamoto, A. C.; Fujita, A.; Baccalá, L. A.; Amaro, E.; Sameshima, K.

    2014-12-01

    Here we propose and evaluate a new approach to analyse multichannel mesial temporal lobe epilepsy EEG data from eight patients through complex network and synchronization theories. The method employs a Granger causality test to infer the directed connectivity graphs and a wavelet transform based phase synchronization measure whose characteristics allow studying dynamical transitions during epileptic seizures. We present a new combined graph measure that quantifies the level of network hub formation, called network hub out-degree, which closely reflects the level of synchronization observed during the ictus.

  8. Direct Measurement of the Electron Energy Relaxation Dynamics in Metallic Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsolle, Edouard; Rousseau, Alexandre; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the dynamical response of thermal noise to an ac excitation in conductors at low temperature. From the frequency dependence of this response function—the (noise) thermal impedance—in the range 1 kHz-1 GHz we obtain direct determinations of the inelastic relaxation times relevant in metallic wires at low temperature: the electron-phonon scattering time and the diffusion time of electrons along the wires. Combining these results with that of resistivity provides a measurement of heat capacity of samples made of thin film. The simplicity and reliability of this technique makes it very promising for future applications in other systems.

  9. Magnetic field measurements of Fermilab/General Dynamics built full scale SSC collider dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchamps, S.; Bleadon, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.; Strait, J.; Wake, M.; Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Ogitsu, T.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of magnetic field measurements made on a series of 50 mm aperture 15 m long SSC collider dipole magnets designed and manufactured at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) for use in the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) Accelerator System String Test. The magnets were assembled by Fermilab and General Dynamics personnel, and were tested at the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) at Fermilab. Measurements of the dipole field angle, dipole field strength, and field shape parameters at various stages in magnet construction and testing are described

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M; Coolens, C

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M; Coolens, C

    2013-09-07

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  13. Measuring Dynamic Signals with Direct Sensor-to-Microcontroller Interfaces Applied to a Magnetoresistive Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes, Ernesto; Gonzalez-Landaeta, Rafael; Cota-Ruiz, Juan; Reverter, Ferran

    2017-05-18

    This paper evaluates the performance of direct interface circuits (DIC), where the sensor is directly connected to a microcontroller, when a resistive sensor subjected to dynamic changes is measured. The theoretical analysis provides guidelines for the selection of the components taking into account both the desired resolution and the bandwidth of the input signal. Such an analysis reveals that there is a trade-off between the sampling frequency and the resolution of the measurement, and this depends on the selected value of the capacitor that forms the RC circuit together with the sensor resistance. This performance is then experimentally proved with a DIC measuring a magnetoresistive sensor exposed to a magnetic field of different frequencies, amplitudes, and waveforms. A sinusoidal magnetic field up to 1 kHz can be monitored with a resolution of eight bits and a sampling frequency of around 10 kSa/s. If a higher resolution is desired, the sampling frequency has to be lower, thus limiting the bandwidth of the dynamic signal under measurement. The DIC is also applied to measure an electrocardiogram-type signal and its QRS complex is well identified, which enables the estimation, for instance, of the heart rate.

  14. Measuring Dynamic Signals with Direct Sensor-to-Microcontroller Interfaces Applied to a Magnetoresistive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Sifuentes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the performance of direct interface circuits (DIC, where the sensor is directly connected to a microcontroller, when a resistive sensor subjected to dynamic changes is measured. The theoretical analysis provides guidelines for the selection of the components taking into account both the desired resolution and the bandwidth of the input signal. Such an analysis reveals that there is a trade-off between the sampling frequency and the resolution of the measurement, and this depends on the selected value of the capacitor that forms the RC circuit together with the sensor resistance. This performance is then experimentally proved with a DIC measuring a magnetoresistive sensor exposed to a magnetic field of different frequencies, amplitudes, and waveforms. A sinusoidal magnetic field up to 1 kHz can be monitored with a resolution of eight bits and a sampling frequency of around 10 kSa/s. If a higher resolution is desired, the sampling frequency has to be lower, thus limiting the bandwidth of the dynamic signal under measurement. The DIC is also applied to measure an electrocardiogram-type signal and its QRS complex is well identified, which enables the estimation, for instance, of the heart rate.

  15. Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

    2012-08-21

    Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods.

  16. Nanoscale characterization of dynamic cellular viscoelasticity by atomic force microscopy with varying measurement parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xu, Xinning; Xing, Xiaojing; Dang, Dan; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2018-03-27

    Cell mechanics plays an important role in regulating the physiological activities of cells. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a novel powerful instrument for quantifying the mechanics of single cells at the nanoscale. The applications of AFM in single-cell mechanical assays in the past decade have significantly contributed to the field of cell and molecular biology. However, current AFM-based cellular mechanical studies are commonly carried out with fixed measurement parameters, which provides limited information about the dynamic cellular mechanical behaviors in response to the variable external stimuli. In this work, we utilized AFM to investigate cellular viscoelasticity (portrayed as relaxation time) with varying measurement parameters, including ramp rate and surface dwell time, on both cell lines and primary cells. The experimental results show that the obtained cellular relaxation times are remarkably dependent on the parameter surface dwell time and ramp rate during measurements. Besides, the dependencies to the measurement parameters are variable for different types of cells, which can be potentially used to indicate cell states. The research improves our understanding of single-cell dynamic rheology and provides a novel idea for discriminating different types of cells by AFM-based cellular viscoelastic assays with varying measurement parameters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Adaptive Scheme for Robot Localization and Mapping with Dynamically Configurable Inter-Beacon Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Torres-González

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons are used as landmarks for range-only (RO simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM. This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16% and similar beacon energy consumption.

  18. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  19. A new method to measure mechanics and dynamic assembly of branched actin networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauër, Pierre; Tavacoli, Joe; Pujol, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    networks and controlled enough to access to their non linear mechanical responses. Deformations are measured with nanometer-resolution, well below the optical resolution. Self-assembly of the magnetic particles into chains simplifies experiments and allows for parallel measurements. The combination......We measured mechanical properties and dynamic assembly of actin networks with a new method based on magnetic microscopic cylinders. Dense actin networks are grown from the cylinders’ surfaces using the biochemical Arp2/3-machinery at play in the lamellipodium extension and other force...... of accuracy and good throughput of measurements results in a method with high potential for cell and cytoskeleton mechanics. Using this method, we observed in particular a strong non linear mechanical behavior of dense branched actin networks at low forces that has not been reported previously....

  20. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  1. Development of a fast method for quantitative measurement of hyperpolarized 129Xe dynamics in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hirohiko; Kimura, Atsuomi; Akiyama, Kazue; Ota, Chikako; Okimoto, Kazuki; Fujiwara, Hideaki

    2012-02-01

    A fast method has been established for the precise measurement and quantification of the dynamics of hyperpolarized (HP) xenon-129 ((129)Xe) in the mouse brain. The key technique is based on repeatedly applying radio frequency (RF) pulses and measuring the decrease of HP (129)Xe magnetization after the brain Xe concentration has reached a steady state due to continuous HP (129)Xe ventilation. The signal decrease of the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal was well described by a simple theoretical model. The technique made it possible to rapidly evaluate the rate constant α, which is composed of cerebral blood flow (CBF), the partition coefficient of Xe between the tissue and blood (λ(i)), and the longitudinal relaxation time (T(1i)) of HP (129)Xe in the brain tissue, without any effect of depolarization by RF pulses and the dynamics in the lung. The technique enabled the precise determination of α as 0.103 ± 0.018  s(-1) (± SD, n = 5) on healthy mice. To investigate the potential of this method for detecting physiological changes in the brain of a kainic acid (KA) -induced mouse model of epilepsy, an attempt was made to follow the time course of α after KA injection. It was found that the α value changes characteristically with time, reflecting the change in the physiological state of the brain induced by KA injection. By measuring CBF using (1)H MRI and (129)Xe dynamics simultaneously and comparing these results, it was suggested that the reduction of T(1i), in addition to the increase of CBF due to KA-induced epilepsy, are possible causes of the change in (129)Xe dynamics. Thus, the present method would be useful to detect a pathophysiological state in the brain and provide a novel tool for future brain study. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. MR imaging of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janick, P.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Asakura, T.

    1989-01-01

    MR imaging was performed on varying concentrations of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin as well as varying proportions of deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in vitro at 1.5T with use of standard spin-echo and gradient-refocused spin sequences. This study indicates that susceptibility-induced T2 shortening occurs over a broad range of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin concentrations (maximal at hematocrits between 20% and 45%), reflecting diffusional effects at the cellular level. T2* gradient-echo imaging enhances the observed hypointensity in images of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin. The characteristic MR appearance of acute hemotomas can be modeled by the behavior of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin

  3. Study on dynamic deformation synchronized measurement technology of double-layer liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huiying; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Zhanwei

    2017-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces plays an important role in many fields, such as fluid mechanics, biomechanics, petrochemical industry and aerospace engineering. It is difficult to measure dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces synchronously for traditional methods. In this paper, a novel and effective method for full-field static and dynamic deformation measurement of double-layer liquid surfaces has been developed, that is wavefront distortion of double-wavelength transmission light with geometric phase analysis (GPA) method. Double wavelength lattice patterns used here are produced by two techniques, one is by double wavelength laser, and the other is by liquid crystal display (LCD). The techniques combine the characteristics such as high transparency, low reflectivity and fluidity of liquid. Two color lattice patterns produced by laser and LCD were adjusted at a certain angle through the tested double-layer liquid surfaces simultaneously. On the basis of the refractive indexes difference of two transmitted lights, the double-layer liquid surfaces were decoupled with GPA method. Combined with the derived relationship between phase variation of transmission-lattice patterns and out-of plane heights of two surfaces, as well as considering the height curves of the liquid level, the double-layer liquid surfaces can be reconstructed successfully. Compared with the traditional measurement method, the developed method not only has the common advantages of the optical measurement methods, such as high-precision, full-field and non-contact, but also simple, low cost and easy to set up.

  4. Dynamic strain measurements of marine propellers under non-uniform inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jin; Croaker, Paul; Zhang, Zhiyi; Hua, Hongxing

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the dynamic strain characteristics of marine propellers under non-uniform inflow. Two 7-bladed highly skewed model propellers of identical geometries, but different elastic characteristics were tested at various rotational speeds and free stream velocities in the water tunnel. Two kinds of wire mesh wake screens located 400mm upstream of the propeller plane were used to generate four-cycle and six-cycle inflows. A laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) system located 100mm downstream of the wake screen plane was used to measure the axial velocity distributions produced by the wake screens. Strain gauges were bonded onto the propeller blades in different positions. A customized underwater data acquisition system which can record data off-line was used to record the dynamic strain. The results show that the frequency properties of the blade dynamic strain are determined by the harmonics of the inflow and that the stiffness of the propeller has an essential effect on the dynamic strain amplitudes.

  5. Measurement and analysis of tyre and tread block dynamics due to contact phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusarosco, M.; Cigada, A.; Manzoni, S.

    2011-06-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic behaviour of tyres and it is aimed at describing their dynamic features in the frequency band above 1 kHz, a range difficult to manage due to measurement noise and to the unreliability of numerical models, where the main influence is that of tread and blocks. Measurements have been made possible by fixing three three-axial micro-electro-mechanical system accelerometers on the liner and exciting the tyre under test by means of a dedicated test bench, suitably designed and constructed. Different kinds of tests have been considered in this research and described in the present paper. All of them show that a strong link exists between contact phenomena and tyre response in the frequency band over 1 kHz. This field is dominated by the tread and block dynamic responses. Furthermore, it is shown that vibrations of a sliding tyre give contributions in that frequency range for the above-mentioned reasons. It is thought that the study of the tyre behaviour over 1 kHz, though affected by significant uncertainties, can provide a proper knowledge to improve breaking effectiveness.

  6. An implantable sensor device measuring suture tension dynamics: results of developmental and experimental work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachtrupp, A; Wetter, O; Höer, J

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge about suture tension dynamics after laparotomy closure is limited due to the lack of adequate measurement tools. As a consequence, a miniaturized implantable sensor and data logger were developed and applied experimentally in a porcine model to measure suture tension dynamics after laparotomy closure. We developed an implantable device (6 × 3 × 1 mm) fitted with silicon strain gauges and an implantable data logger allowing long-term registration. In nine domestic pigs, sensors and loggers were implanted along the suture closing a median laparotomy registering suture tension over a period of 23 h. Fascial closure was achieved by a mean suture tension of 1.07 N. After 30 minutes, suture tension was reduced to 0.81N (-24.3 %, p = 0.0003). After 12 h, tension showed a further decrease to 0.69 N (-35.5 %, n.s.), after 23 h mean suture tension reached 0.56 N, (-47.7 %, p = 0.014). The aim to develop an implantable miniaturized sensor device registering long-term suture tension dynamics was achieved. The use in the animal experiment was feasible and safe. We observed a loss of almost 50 % of suture tension 23 h after fascial closure. This could mean that up to 50 % of initial suture tension may be an unnecessary surplus not contributing to tissue stability but to the risk of suture failure.

  7. Modeling the heterogeneity of human dynamics based on the measurements of influential users in Sina Microblog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxu; Guan, Xiaohong; Qin, Tao; Yang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    Online social network has become an indispensable communication tool in the information age. The development of microblog also provides us a great opportunity to study human dynamics that play a crucial role in the design of efficient communication systems. In this paper we study the characteristics of the tweeting behavior based on the data collected from Sina Microblog. The user activity level is measured to characterize how often a user posts a tweet. We find that the user activity level follows a bimodal distribution. That is, the microblog users tend to be either active or inactive. The inter-tweeting time distribution is then measured at both the aggregate and individual levels. We find that the inter-tweeting time follows a piecewise power law distribution of two tails. Furthermore, the exponents of the two tails have different correlations with the user activity level. These findings demonstrate that the dynamics of the tweeting behavior are heterogeneous in different time scales. We then develop a dynamic model co-driven by the memory and the interest mechanism to characterize the heterogeneity. The numerical simulations validate the model and verify that the short time interval tweeting behavior is driven by the memory mechanism while the long time interval behavior by the interest mechanism.

  8. Evaluating energy efficiency for airlines: An application of Virtual Frontier Dynamic Slacks Based Measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Qiang; Li, Ye; Yu, Chen-lu; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The fast growing Revenue Passenger Kilometers and the relatively lagged energy supply of aviation industry impels the airlines to improve energy efficiency. In this paper, we focus on evaluating and analyzing influencing factors for airline energy efficiency. Number of employees and aviation kerosene are chosen as the inputs. Revenue Ton Kilometers, Revenue Passenger Kilometers and total business income are the outputs. Capital stock is selected as the dynamic factor. A new model, Virtual Frontier Dynamic Slacks Based Measure, is proposed to calculate the energy efficiencies of 21 airlines from 2008 to 2012. We verify two important properties to manifest the advantages of the new model. Then a regression is run to analyze the influencing factors of airline energy efficiency. The main findings are: 1. The overall energy efficiency of Malaysia Airlines is the highest during 2008–2012.2. Per capita Gross Domestic Product, the average service age of fleet size and average haul distance have significant impacts on the efficiency score. 3. The difference between full-service carriers and low-cost carriers has no significant effects on airline energy efficiency. - Highlights: • A Virtual Frontier Dynamic Slacks Based Measure is developed. • 21 airlines' energy efficiencies are evaluated. • Malaysia Airlines has the highest overall energy efficiency. • Three explanatory variables have significant impacts.

  9. Full-field measurement of dynamic stress by mechanoluminescence sensing film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenshu; Xu, Chao-Nan; Imai, Yusuke; Bu, Nan

    2009-07-01

    Full-field measurement of dynamic stress has been realized by coating the surface of the test object metal with a upgrade mechanoluminescence sensing film of SrAl2O4:Eu (SAOE). Mechanoluminescent materials are attractive smart materials that can emit light induced by mechanical deformation. The ML sensing film of SAOE has been developed to make possible to visualize dynamic stress. Consequently this visualization technique has been become a promising experimental technique to investigate full-field stress analysis. In this paper we report the applications of the SAO ML sensing film for full-field stress analysis in aluminum alloy 5052 samples. Using the SAOE ML sensing film, the stress concentration produced by a circular hole was observed with the naked eyes in real time and the two-dimensional stress distribution was quantitatively measured; the complex and dynamic Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect, known as instability during plastic deformation, has been visualized, and the propagating characteristics of PLC bands were precisely investigated.

  10. Dynamic computerised hand dynamometry: measuring outcomes following upper limb botulinum toxin-A injections in adults with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Hannah L; Baguley, Ian J; Nott, Melissa T; Chapparo, Chrisine

    2014-04-01

    Evaluate upper limb performance in adults receiving botulinum toxin-A injections for upper limb spasticity using Dynamic Computerised Hand Dynamometry and current clinical measures. Pre-test/post-test clinical intervention study. Twenty-eight participants with spasticity following acquired brain injury. Botulinum toxin-A effects were measured 4 weeks post-injection using Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry. Current clinical upper limb performance measures spanning the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health domains were also conducted at the Body Function and Structure (Modified Ashworth Scale; Tardieu Scale) and Activity (Action Research Arm Test; Goal Attainment Scaling; patient disability and carer burden scales) domains. Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry hand performance measures were correlated with performance on current clinical measures. Significant post botulinum toxin-A changes were identified on current clinical measures and the Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry. Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry results correlated with current clinical measures demonstrating functional upper limb change across the Body Function and Structure and Activity domains. Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry sensitively assesses the effects of botulinum toxin-A on upper limb spasticity during a simple, functionally based, grasp and release task. Unlike current measures, the Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry provides information across the Body Function and Structure and Activity domains of the International Classification of Function.

  11. The study of sheath flow dark zone phenomenon in dynamic individual cells scattering measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Xiaopin; Zhang, Weiguang

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic cells scattering is one of the most efficient approaches exploring in measurements of cells size, morphology and growth states. This technique can be widely applied in real-time detection for pharmaceutical industry, food industry, liquor industry and other biological fields. A novel method named dynamic individual cells scattering measurement is designed in this paper, which can make cells pass through quartz glass measurement zone one by one with sheath flow driving force. During the experiments, an obvious phenomenon has been found which is called sheath flow dark zone phenomenon (SFDZ). Under the influence of SFDZ, sheath flow forming detection becomes very difficult. In this paper, the causes giving rise to SFDZ have been analyzed. And an improved method is put forward, in which the orifice inside the measurement zone is set as an optical system. Then the illuminating system is redesigned. In this way, almost all the illuminating light can enter orifice so that the total reflection energy decreases substantially. A comparison experiments have been done, which proves the efficiency of this redesigned optical system and its sound effects on SFDZ avoiding.

  12. Deviation rectification for dynamic measurement of rail wear based on coordinate sets projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Ma, Ziji; Li, Yanfu; Liu, Hongli; Zeng, Jiuzhen; Jin, Tan

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic measurement of rail wear using a laser imaging system suffers from random vibrations in the laser-based imaging sensor which cause distorted rail profiles. In this paper, a simple and effective method for rectifying profile deviation is presented to address this issue. There are two main steps: profile recognition and distortion calibration. According to the constant camera and projector parameters, efficient recognition of measured profiles is achieved by analyzing the geometric difference between normal profiles and distorted ones. For a distorted profile, by constructing coordinate sets projecting from it to the standard one on triple projecting primitives, including the rail head inner line, rail waist curve and rail jaw, iterative extrinsic camera parameter self-compensation is implemented. The distortion is calibrated by projecting the distorted profile onto the x – y plane of a measuring coordinate frame, which is parallel to the rail cross section, to eliminate the influence of random vibrations in the laser-based imaging sensor. As well as evaluating the implementation with comprehensive experiments, we also compare our method with other published works. The results exhibit the effectiveness and superiority of our method for the dynamic measurement of rail wear. (paper)

  13. Dynamic calibration of piezoelectric transducers for ballistic high-pressure measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkarous Lamine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a dynamic calibration standard for high-amplitude pressure piezoelectric transducers implies the implementation of a system which can provide reference pressure values with known characteristics and uncertainty. The reference pressure must be issued by a sensor, as a part of a measuring chain, with a guaranteed traceability to an international standard. However, this operation has not been completely addressed yet until today and is still calling further investigations. In this paper, we introduce an experimental study carried out in order to contribute to current efforts for the establishment of a reference dynamic calibration method. A suitable practical calibration method based on the calculation of the reference pressure by measurement of the displacement of the piston in contact with an oil-filled cylindrical chamber is presented. This measurement was achieved thanks to a high speed camera and an accelerometer. Both measurements are then compared. In the first way, pressure was generated by impacting the piston with a free falling weight and, in the second way, with strikers of known weights and accelerated to the impact velocities with an air gun. The aim of the experimental setup is to work out a system which may generate known hydraulic pressure pulses with high-accuracy and known uncertainty. Moreover, physical models were also introduced to consolidate the experimental study. The change of striker’s velocities and masses allows tuning the reference pressure pulses with different shapes and, therefore, permits to sweep a wide range of magnitudes and frequencies.

  14. A full Stokes vector ellipsometry measurement system for in situ diagnostics in dynamic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, L; Eliezer, S; Appelbaum, G; Nissim, N; Perelmutter, L; Mond, M

    2012-05-01

    A fast ellipsometry system with a resolution of only a few nanoseconds that can simultaneously measure all four Stokes parameters was developed for use in dynamic experiments. Due to its fine temporal resolution, the system is useful for a wide variety of dynamic setups, two of which are presented, fast foil heating and shock compression. As a test case the optical properties of nickel were measured in a fast foil heating setup. The complex index of refraction and emissivity at 532 nm and in the range of 1000-1900 K are presented. It was found that the emissivity monotonously increases below and above the melting point while an abrupt increase of about 2% was observed at the phase transition. These results are in accordance with the literature. Shock compression experiments included sample-free surface measurements. Samples of 1020 steel were shocked up to 25 GPa on the Hugoniot curve. The measured optical properties under these conditions showed a significant change; the value of the emissivity was doubled.

  15. Dynamic Data Filtering of Long-Range Doppler LiDAR Wind Speed Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke Beck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Doppler LiDARs have become flexible and versatile remote sensing devices for wind energy applications. The possibility to measure radial wind speed components contemporaneously at multiple distances is an advantage with respect to meteorological masts. However, these measurements must be filtered due to the measurement geometry, hard targets and atmospheric conditions. To ensure a maximum data availability while producing low measurement errors, we introduce a dynamic data filter approach that conditionally decouples the dependency of data availability with increasing range. The new filter approach is based on the assumption of self-similarity, that has not been used so far for LiDAR data filtering. We tested the accuracy of the dynamic data filter approach together with other commonly used filter approaches, from research and industry applications. This has been done with data from a long-range pulsed LiDAR installed at the offshore wind farm ‘alpha ventus’. There, an ultrasonic anemometer located approximately 2.8 km from the LiDAR was used as reference. The analysis of around 1.5 weeks of data shows, that the error of mean radial velocity can be minimised for wake and free stream conditions.

  16. Application of genetically encoded redox biosensors to measure dynamic changes in the glutathione, bacillithiol and mycothiol redox potentials in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Quach Ngoc; Linzner, Nico; Loi, Vu Van; Antelmann, Haike

    2018-02-15

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize glutathione (GSH) as their major LMW thiol. However, most Gram-positive bacteria do not encode enzymes for GSH biosynthesis and produce instead alternative LMW thiols, such as bacillithiol (BSH) and mycothiol (MSH). BSH is utilized by Firmicutes and MSH is the major LMW thiol of Actinomycetes. LMW thiols are required to maintain the reduced state of the cytoplasm, but are also involved in virulence mechanisms in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Infection conditions often cause perturbations of the intrabacterial redox balance in pathogens, which is further affected under antibiotics treatments. During the last years, novel glutaredoxin-fused roGFP2 biosensors have been engineered in many eukaryotic organisms, including parasites, yeast, plants and human cells for dynamic live-imaging of the GSH redox potential in different compartments. Likewise bacterial roGFP2-based biosensors are now available to measure the dynamic changes in the GSH, BSH and MSH redox potentials in model and pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In this review, we present an overview of novel functions of the bacterial LMW thiols GSH, MSH and BSH in pathogenic bacteria in virulence regulation. Moreover, recent results about the application of genetically encoded redox biosensors are summarized to study the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions, persistence and antibiotics resistance. In particularly, we highlight recent biosensor results on the redox changes in the intracellular food-borne pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium as well as in the Gram-positive pathogens S. aureus and M. tuberculosis during infection conditions and under antibiotics treatments. These studies established a link between ROS and antibiotics resistance with the intracellular LMW thiol-redox potential. Future applications should be directed

  17. Technical improvements for the dynamic measurement of general scour and landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung Yang, Han; Su, Chih Chiang

    2017-04-01

    Disasters occurring near riverbeds, such as landslides, earth slides, debris flow, and general scour, are easily caused by flooding from typhoons. The occurrence of each type of disaster involves a process, so if a disaster event can be monitored in real time, hazards can be predicted, thereby enabling early warnings that could reduce the degree of loss engendered by the disaster. The study of technical improvements for the dynamic measurement of general scour and landslides could help to release these early warnings. In this study, improved wireless tracers were set up on site to ensure the feasibility of the improved measurement technology. A wireless tracer signal transmission system was simultaneously set up to avoid danger to surveyors caused by them having to be on site to take measurements. In order to understand the real-time dynamic riverbed scouring situation, after the flow path of the river was confirmed, the sites for riverbed scouring observation were established at the P30 pier of the Dajia River Bridge of National Highway No. 3, and approximately 100 m both upstream and downstream (for a total of three sites). A rainy event that caused riverbed erosion occurred in May 2015, and subsequently, Typhoons Soudelor, Goni, and Dujuan caused further erosion in the observed area. The results of the observations of several flood events revealed that wireless tracers can reflect the change in riverbed scour depth caused by typhoons and flooding in real time. The wireless tracer technique can be applied to real-time dynamic scouring observation of rivers, and these improvements in measurement technology could be helpful in preventing landslides in the future.

  18. Intracellular Shuttle: The Lactate Aerobic Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Santos de Oliveira Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactate is a highly dynamic metabolite that can be used as a fuel by several cells of the human body, particularly during physical exercise. Traditionally, it has been believed that the first step of lactate oxidation occurs in cytosol; however, this idea was recently challenged. A new hypothesis has been presented based on the fact that lactate-to-pyruvate conversion cannot occur in cytosol, because the LDH enzyme characteristics and cytosolic environment do not allow the reaction in this way. Instead, the Intracellular Lactate Shuttle hypothesis states that lactate first enters in mitochondria and only then is metabolized. In several tissues of the human body this idea is well accepted but is quite resistant in skeletal muscle. In this paper, we will present not only the studies which are protagonists in this discussion, but the potential mechanism by which this oxidation occurs and also a link between lactate and mitochondrial proliferation. This new perspective brings some implications and comes to change our understanding of the interaction between the energy systems, because the product of one serves as a substrate for the other.

  19. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  20. Dynamic deformation image de-blurring and image processing for digital imaging correlation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Li, Y.; Suo, T.; Liu, H.; Zhang, C.

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a method for de-blurring of images captured in the dynamic deformation of materials. De-blurring is achieved based on the dynamic-based approach, which is used to estimate the Point Spread Function (PSF) during the camera exposure window. The deconvolution process involving iterative matrix calculations of pixels, is then performed on the GPU to decrease the time cost. Compared to the Gauss method and the Lucy-Richardson method, it has the best result of the image restoration. The proposed method has been evaluated by using the Hopkinson bar loading system. In comparison to the blurry image, the proposed method has successfully restored the image. It is also demonstrated from image processing applications that the de-blurring method can improve the accuracy and the stability of the digital imaging correlation measurement.

  1. A simple Fourier analysis technique for measuring the dynamic response of manual control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. W.; Jex, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    From a practical standpoint most dynamic response analysis techniques are complicated, expensive, and time consuming to mechanize and operate. Adaptive parameter tracking techniques partially overcome these faults, but they have prescribed forms which is an undesirable restriction for basic research. To overcome these drawbacks, an on-line Fourier analysis technique has been developed which deals only with the input and error signals in a manual feedback control system. Several sine waves are used for the input, and the on-line data measurement includes the error variance and a simple means for obtaining the sine and cosine transforms of the error signal at each of the input frequencies. From this relatively small amount of data, we show simple ways to compute the open- and closed-loop dynamic response at input frequencies and the relative amount of linearly correlated power in the error signal.

  2. Dynamic Load Measurement of Ballistic Gelatin Impact Using an Instrumented Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidt, J. D.; Periira, J. M.; Hammer, J. T.; Gilat, A.; Ruggeri, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Bird strikes are a common problem for the aerospace industry and can cause serious damage to an aircraft. Ballistic gelatin is frequently used as a surrogate for actual bird carcasses in bird strike tests. Numerical simulations of these tests are used to supplement experimental data, therefore it is necessary to use numerical modeling techniques that can accurately capture the dynamic response of ballistic gelatin. An experimental technique is introduced to validate these modeling techniques. A ballistic gelatin projectile is fired into a strike plate attached to a 36 in. long sensor tube. Dynamic load is measured at two locations relative to the strike plate using strain gages configured in a full Wheatstone bridge. Data from these experiments are used to validate a gelatin constitutive model. Simulations of the apparatus are analyzed to investigate its performance.

  3. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  4. Phase-resolved fluid dynamic forces of a flapping foil energy harvester based on PIV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, James

    2017-11-01

    Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements are performed in a wind tunnel to evaluate the spatial and temporal fluid dynamic forces acting on a flapping foil operating in the energy harvesting regime. Experiments are conducted at reduced frequencies (k = fc/U) of 0.05 - 0.2, pitching angle of, and heaving amplitude of A / c = 0.6. The phase-averaged pressure field is obtained by integrating the pressure Poisson equation. Fluid dynamic forces are then obtained through the integral momentum equation. Results are compared with a simple force model based on the concept of flow impulse. These results help to show the detailed force distributions, their transient nature and aide in understanding the impact of the fluid flow structures that contribute to the power production.

  5. Three-dimensional display and measurement of cardiac dynamic indexes from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, M.; Matsuo, M.; Yamasaki, K.; Banno, T.; Toriwaki, J.; Yokoi, S.; Oshita, H.

    1986-01-01

    The cardiac dynamic index, to which such variables as cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion contribute, is routinely determined using various modalities such as angiography, radionuclide imaging, US, and x-ray CT. Each of these modalities, however, has some disadvantages in regard to evaluating the cardiac dynamic index. The authors have obtained precise multidirectional projection images of the heart by means of computer graphics and reformatted data of cardiac MR images obtained with cardiac gating. The contiguous coronal MR images of the heart are made at an interimage distance of 5 mm. In each section, five or six cardiac images can be obtained, depending on the systolic or diastolic phase. These images are stored in a computer, and a three-dimensional display of the heart with biocular observation and with multiplex holograms is made possible with computer graphics. Three-dimensional measurement of the cardiac index is now being attempted, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion

  6. Dynamic Team Theory of Stochastic Differential Decision Systems with Decentralized Noisy Information Structures via Girsanov's Measure Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Charalambous, Charalambos D.; Ahmed, Nasir U.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present two methods which generalize static team theory to dynamic team theory, in the context of continuous-time stochastic nonlinear differential decentralized decision systems, with relaxed strategies, which are measurable to different noisy information structures. For both methods we apply Girsanov's measure transformation to obtain an equivalent dynamic team problem under a reference probability measure, so that the observations and information structures available for ...

  7. Dynamic fiber Bragg grating strain sensor interrogation with real-time measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinwoo; Kwon, Yong Seok; Ko, Myeong Ock; Jeon, Min Yong

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate a 1550 nm band resonance Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber laser with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array. Using the FDML fiber laser, we successfully demonstrate real-time monitoring of dynamic FBG strain sensor interrogation for structural health monitoring. The resonance FDML fiber laser consists of six multiplexed FBGs, which are arranged in series with delay fiber lengths. It is operated by driving the fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF) with a sinusoidal waveform at a frequency corresponding to the round-trip time of the laser cavity. Each FBG forms a laser cavity independently in the FDML fiber laser because the light travels different length for each FBG. The very closely positioned two FBGs in a pair are operated simultaneously with a frequency in the FDML fiber laser. The spatial positions of the sensing pair can be distinguished from the variation of the applied frequency to the FFP-TF. One of the FBGs in the pair is used as a reference signal and the other one is fixed on the piezoelectric transducer stack to apply the dynamic strain. We successfully achieve real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the frequencies applied to the FBG without any signal processing delay. The real-time monitoring system is displayed simultaneously on the monitor for the variation of the two peaks, the modulation interval of the two peaks, and their fast Fourier transform spectrum. The frequency resolution of the dynamic variation could reach up to 0.5 Hz for 2 s integration time. It depends on the integration time to measure the dynamic variation. We believe that the real-time monitoring system will have a potential application for structural health monitoring.

  8. Multiple bunch longitudinal dynamics measurements at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holtzapple

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring (CESR has a longitudinal dipole-coupled-bunch instability that limits the total amount of current that can be stored in the ring without feedback. As a result, it is one of the major limitations for higher stored current and luminosity. This paper reports the measurements of multiple bunch longitudinal dynamics done on CESR with a streak camera. The camera was used to measure the dependence of the bunch distribution on current and accelerating rf voltage, for multiple bunches stored in CESR, as well as the effects of the longitudinal instability on the bunch distribution. Measurements of the beam's longitudinal bunch distribution with multiple bunches present in the ring help give an understanding of the instability, how it affects the bunch distribution, and possibly give insight into a cure of the instability.

  9. Dynamic VaR Measurement of Gold Market with SV-T-MN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available VaR (Value at Risk in the gold market was measured and predicted by combining stochastic volatility (SV model with extreme value theory. Firstly, for the fat tail and volatility persistence characteristics in gold market return series, the gold price return volatility was modeled by SV-T-MN (SV-T with Mixture-of-Normal distribution model based on state space. Secondly, future sample volatility prediction was realized by using approximate filtering algorithm. Finally, extreme value theory based on generalized Pareto distribution was applied to measure dynamic risk value (VaR of gold market return. Through the proposed model on the price of gold, empirical analysis was investigated; the results show that presented combined model can measure and predict Value at Risk of the gold market reasonably and effectively and enable investors to further understand the extreme risk of gold market and take coping strategies actively.

  10. Vertical dynamic deflection measurement in concrete beams with the Microsoft Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaojuan; Lichti, Derek; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Chow, Jacky; Ang, Kathleen

    2014-02-19

    The Microsoft Kinect is arguably the most popular RGB-D camera currently on the market, partially due to its low cost. It offers many advantages for the measurement of dynamic phenomena since it can directly measure three-dimensional coordinates of objects at video frame rate using a single sensor. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the development of a Microsoft Kinect-based system for measuring the deflection of reinforced concrete beams subjected to cyclic loads. New segmentation methods for object extraction from the Kinect's depth imagery and vertical displacement reconstruction algorithms have been developed and implemented to reconstruct the time-dependent displacement of concrete beams tested in laboratory conditions. The results demonstrate that the amplitude and frequency of the vertical displacements can be reconstructed with submillimetre and milliHz-level precision and accuracy, respectively.

  11. Technique for velocity vector field dynamics measurement on the basis of smoke visualization of flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Dushin, N. S.; Saushin, I. I.

    2017-09-01

    The main difference between Smoke Image Velocimetry (SIV) technique and traditional PIV is that the smoke with continuous intensity in the image is seeded into the flow instead of separate particles. Owing to better smoke reflectivity, relatively primitive equipment is enough to measure the dynamics of velocity vector fields with the frequency of 25 kHz and higher. The image processing algorithm is adapted to high tracer concentration and relatively large displacement of smoke patches between two consecutive frames. The results of SIV testing are presented, including the estimations of the most measurement noise sensitive characteristics of turbulence calculated from spatial derivatives of fluctuations of small-scale turbulence. The measurement results have been shown to agree well with the data obtained by other methods. Application of SIV technique opens new possibilities in the research of flow pattern and turbulence in unsteady and fast processes.

  12. Measurement of droplet dynamics across grid spacer in mist cooling of subchannel of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Sheen, H.J.; Cho, S.K.; Issapour, I.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment was conducted of the dynamics and heat transfer of a droplet-vapor mist flow across a test grid spacer in a flow channel of 2 x 2 electrically heated simulation fuel rods. Embedded thermocouples were used to measure the rod cladding temperature and an unshielded Chromel-Alumel thermocouple was transversed in the center of the subchannel to measure the temperature of the water and steam coolant phases at various axial locations. Thermocouples were also embedded in the test grid spacer. Optical measurements of the size and velocity distributions of droplets and the velocity distribution of the superheated steam were made by special laser-Doppler anemometry techniques through quartz glass windows immediately upstream and downstream of the test grid spacer. Experiments over a range of steam and injected water flow rates and rod heat flux have been performed and some representative results and discussions are presented

  13. Measuring the Dynamic Characteristics of a Low Specific Speed Pump—Turbine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Cathrin Walseth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from an experiment performed to obtain the dynamic characteristics of a reversible pump-turbine model. The characteristics were measured in an open loop system where the turbine initially was run on low rotational speed before the generator was disconnected allowing the turbine to go towards runaway. The measurements show that the turbine experience damped oscillations in pressure, speed and flow rate around runaway corresponding with presented stability criterion in published literature. Results from the experiment is reproduced by means of transient simulations. A one dimensional analytical turbine model for representation of the pump-turbine is used in the calculations. The simulations show that it is possible to reproduce the physics in the measurement by using a simple analytical model for the pump-turbine as long as the inertia of the water masses in the turbine are modeled correctly.

  14. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  15. Intracellular Polyamines Enhance Astrocytic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Jan; Inyushin, Mikhail; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V.; Rivera, Yomarie; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y.; Nichols, Colin G.; Eaton, Misty J.; Skatchkov, Serguei N.

    2013-01-01

    Spermine (SPM) and spermidine (SPD), endogenous polyamines (PA) with the ability to modulate various ion channels and receptors in the brain, exert neuroprotective, antidepressant, antioxidant and other effects in vivo such as increasing longevity. These PA are preferably accumulated in astrocytes, and we hypothesized that SPM increases glial intercellular communication by interacting with glial gap junctions. Results obtained in situ, using Lucifer yellow propagation in the astrocytic syncitium of 21–25 day old rat CA1 hippocampal slices, showed reduced coupling when astrocytes were dialyzed with standard intracellular solutions (ICS) without SPM. However, there was a robust increase in the spreading of Lucifer yellow via gap junctions to neighboring astrocytes when the cells were patched with ICS containing 1 mM SPM; a physiological concentration in glia. Lucifer yellow propagation was inhibited by gap junction blockers. Our findings show that the glial syncitium propagates SPM via gap junctions and further suggest a new role of polyamines in the regulation of the astroglial network in both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23076119

  16. PIV-measured versus CFD-predicted flow dynamics in anatomically realistic cerebral aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Matthew D; Nikolov, Hristo N; Milner, Jaques S; Lownie, Stephen P; Demont, Edwin M; Kalata, Wojciech; Loth, Francis; Holdsworth, David W; Steinman, David A

    2008-04-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of nominally patient-specific cerebral aneurysms is increasingly being used as a research tool to further understand the development, prognosis, and treatment of brain aneurysms. We have previously developed virtual angiography to indirectly validate CFD-predicted gross flow dynamics against the routinely acquired digital subtraction angiograms. Toward a more direct validation, here we compare detailed, CFD-predicted velocity fields against those measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Two anatomically realistic flow-through phantoms, one a giant internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm and the other a basilar artery (BA) tip aneurysm, were constructed of a clear silicone elastomer. The phantoms were placed within a computer-controlled flow loop, programed with representative flow rate waveforms. PIV images were collected on several anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) planes. CFD simulations were then carried out using a well-validated, in-house solver, based on micro-CT reconstructions of the geometries of the flow-through phantoms and inlet/outlet boundary conditions derived from flow rates measured during the PIV experiments. PIV and CFD results from the central AP plane of the ICA aneurysm showed a large stable vortex throughout the cardiac cycle. Complex vortex dynamics, captured by PIV and CFD, persisted throughout the cardiac cycle on the central LAT plane. Velocity vector fields showed good overall agreement. For the BA, aneurysm agreement was more compelling, with both PIV and CFD similarly resolving the dynamics of counter-rotating vortices on both AP and LAT planes. Despite the imposition of periodic flow boundary conditions for the CFD simulations, cycle-to-cycle fluctuations were evident in the BA aneurysm simulations, which agreed well, in terms of both amplitudes and spatial distributions, with cycle-to-cycle fluctuations measured by PIV in the same geometry. The overall good agreement

  17. Flow dynamics at a river confluence on Mississippi River: field measurement and large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung; Khosronejad, Ali; Bartelt, Nicole; Woldeamlak, Solomon; Peterson, Bonnie; Dewall, Petronella; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota Team; Minnesota Department of Transportation Team

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a river confluence on Mississippi River branch in the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. Field measurements by Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler using on-board GPS tracking were carried out for five campaigns in the summer of 2014 and 2015 to collect both river bed elevation data and flow fields. Large Eddy Simulation is carried out to simulate the flow field with the total of 100 million grid points for the domain length of 3.2 km. The simulation results agree well with field measurements at measured cross-sections. The results show the existence of wake mode on the mixing interface of two branches near the upstream junction corner. The mutual interaction between the shear layers emanating from the river banks leading to the formation of large scale energetic structures that leads to ``switching'' side of the flow coherent structures. Our result here is a feasibility study for the use of eddy-resolving simulations in predicting complex flow dynamics in medium-size natural rivers. This work is funded by Minnesota Dept. Transportation and Minnesota Institute of Supercomputing.

  18. Cellular dynamics of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells measured using MEMS force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Hirayama Shoji, Kayoko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2018-04-01

    Adhesive cells perceive the mechanical properties of the substrates to which they adhere, adjusting their cellular mechanical forces according to their biological characteristics. This mechanical interaction subsequently affects the growth, locomotion, and differentiation of the cell. However, little is known about the detailed mechanism that underlies this interaction between adherent cells and substrates because dynamically measuring mechanical phenomena is difficult. Here, we utilize microelectromechamical systems force sensors that can measure cellular traction forces with high temporal resolution (~2.5 µs) over long periods (~3 h). We found that the cellular dynamics reflected physical phenomena with time scales from milliseconds to hours, which contradicts the idea that cellular motion is slow. A single focal adhesion (FA) generates an average force of 7 nN, which disappears in ms via the action of trypsin-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The force-changing rate obtained from our measurements suggests that the time required for an FA to decompose was nearly proportional to the force acting on the FA.

  19. Measurement-based performance profiles and dynamics of UDT over dedicated connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian [University of Chicago; Kettimuthu, R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wu, Qishi [University of Memphis; Yun, Daqing [Harrisburg University; Rao, Nageswara S. [ORNL; Liu, Qiang [ORNL

    2016-11-01

    Wide-area data transfers in high-performance computing and big data scenarios are increasingly being carried over dedicated network connections that provide high capacities at low loss rates. UDP-based transport protocols are expected to be particularly well-suited for such transfers but their performance is relatively unexplored over a wide range of connection lengths, compared to TCP over shared connections. We present extensive throughput measurements of UDP-based Data Transfer (UDT) over a suite of physical and emulated 10 Gbps connections. In sharp contrast to current UDT analytical models, these measurements indicate much more complex throughput dynamics that are sensitive to the connection modality, protocol parameters, and round-trip times. Lyapunov exponents estimated from the Poincare maps of UDT traces clearly indicate regions of instability and complex dynamics. We propose a simple model based on the ramp-up and sustainment regimes of a generic transport protocol, which qualitatively illustrates the dominant monotonicity and concavity properties of throughput profiles and relates them to Lyapunov exponents. These measurements and analytical results together enable us to comprehensively evaluate UDT performance and select parameters to achieve high throughput, and they also provide guidelines for designing effective transport protocols for dedicated connections.

  20. Optimal Control Method of Robot End Position and Orientation Based on Dynamic Tracking Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dalong; Xu, Lijuan

    2018-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of robot pose positioning and control, this paper proposed a dynamic tracking measurement robot pose optimization control method based on the actual measurement of D-H parameters of the robot, the parameters is taken with feedback compensation of the robot, according to the geometrical parameters obtained by robot pose tracking measurement, improved multi sensor information fusion the extended Kalan filter method, with continuous self-optimal regression, using the geometric relationship between joint axes for kinematic parameters in the model, link model parameters obtained can timely feedback to the robot, the implementation of parameter correction and compensation, finally we can get the optimal attitude angle, realize the robot pose optimization control experiments were performed. 6R dynamic tracking control of robot joint robot with independent research and development is taken as experimental subject, the simulation results show that the control method improves robot positioning accuracy, and it has the advantages of versatility, simplicity, ease of operation and so on.

  1. Power system observability and dynamic state estimation for stability monitoring using synchrophasor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kai; Qi, Junjian; Kang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Growing penetration of intermittent resources such as renewable generations increases the risk of instability in a power grid. This paper introduces the concept of observability and its computational algorithms for a power grid monitored by the wide-area measurement system (WAMS) based on synchrophasors, e.g. phasor measurement units (PMUs). The goal is to estimate real-time states of generators, especially for potentially unstable trajectories, the information that is critical for the detection of rotor angle instability of the grid. The paper studies the number and siting of synchrophasors in a power grid so that the state of the system can be accurately estimated in the presence of instability. An unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is adopted as a tool to estimate the dynamic states that are not directly measured by synchrophasors. The theory and its computational algorithms are illustrated in detail by using a 9-bus 3-generator power system model and then tested on a 140-bus 48-generator Northeast Power Coordinating Council power grid model. Case studies on those two systems demonstrate the performance of the proposed approach using a limited number of synchrophasors for dynamic state estimation for stability assessment and its robustness against moderate inaccuracies in model parameters.

  2. Field Measurement-Based System Identification and Dynamic Response Prediction of a Unique MIT Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Young-Jin; Trocha, Peter; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2016-07-01

    Tall buildings are ubiquitous in major cities and house the homes and workplaces of many individuals. However, relatively few studies have been carried out to study the dynamic characteristics of tall buildings based on field measurements. In this paper, the dynamic behavior of the Green Building, a unique 21-story tall structure located on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), was characterized and modeled as a simplified lumped-mass beam model (SLMM), using data from a network of accelerometers. The accelerometer network was used to record structural responses due to ambient vibrations, blast loading, and the October 16th 2012 earthquake near Hollis Center (ME, USA). Spectral and signal coherence analysis of the collected data was used to identify natural frequencies, modes, foundation rocking behavior, and structural asymmetries. A relation between foundation rocking and structural natural frequencies was also found. Natural frequencies and structural acceleration from the field measurements were compared with those predicted by the SLMM which was updated by inverse solving based on advanced multiobjective optimization methods using the measured structural responses and found to have good agreement.

  3. Field Measurement-Based System Identification and Dynamic Response Prediction of a Unique MIT Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Cha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tall buildings are ubiquitous in major cities and house the homes and workplaces of many individuals. However, relatively few studies have been carried out to study the dynamic characteristics of tall buildings based on field measurements. In this paper, the dynamic behavior of the Green Building, a unique 21-story tall structure located on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA, was characterized and modeled as a simplified lumped-mass beam model (SLMM, using data from a network of accelerometers. The accelerometer network was used to record structural responses due to ambient vibrations, blast loading, and the October 16th 2012 earthquake near Hollis Center (ME, USA. Spectral and signal coherence analysis of the collected data was used to identify natural frequencies, modes, foundation rocking behavior, and structural asymmetries. A relation between foundation rocking and structural natural frequencies was also found. Natural frequencies and structural acceleration from the field measurements were compared with those predicted by the SLMM which was updated by inverse solving based on advanced multiobjective optimization methods using the measured structural responses and found to have good agreement.

  4. Angular Motion Estimation Using Dynamic Models in a Gyro-Free Inertial Measurement Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmar Loffeld

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we summarize the results of using dynamic models borrowed from tracking theory in describing the time evolution of the state vector to have an estimate of the angular motion in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit (GF-IMU. The GF-IMU is a special type inertial measurement unit (IMU that uses only a set of accelerometers in inferring the angular motion. Using distributed accelerometers, we get an angular information vector (AIV composed of angular acceleration and quadratic angular velocity terms. We use a Kalman filter approach to estimate the angular velocity vector since it is not expressed explicitly within the AIV. The bias parameters inherent in the accelerometers measurements’ produce a biased AIV and hence the AIV bias parameters are estimated within an augmented state vector. Using dynamic models, the appended bias parameters of the AIV become observable and hence we can have unbiased angular motion estimate. Moreover, a good model is required to extract the maximum amount of information from the observation. Observability analysis is done to determine the conditions for having an observable state space model. For higher grades of accelerometers and under relatively higher sampling frequency, the error of accelerometer measurements is dominated by the noise error. Consequently, simulations are conducted on two models, one has bias parameters appended in the state space model and the other is a reduced model without bias parameters.

  5. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2011-01-01

    the instantaneous transversal wake position which is quantitatively compared with the prediction of the Dynamic Wake Meandering model. The results, shown for two 10-min time series, suggest that the conjecture of the wake behaving as a passive tracer is a fair approximation; this corroborates and expands...... the results of one-dimensional measurements already presented in the first part of this paper. Consequently, it is now possible to separate the deterministic and turbulent parts of the wake wind field, thus enabling capturing the wake in the meandering frame of reference. The results correspond, qualitatively...

  6. Generalized Galilean transformations and the measurement problem in the entropic dynamics approach to quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David T.

    Quantum mechanics is an extremely successful and accurate physical theory, yet since its inception, it has been afflicted with numerous conceptual difficulties. The primary subject of this thesis is the theory of entropic quantum dynamics (EQD), which seeks to avoid these conceptual problems by interpreting quantum theory from an informational perspective. We begin by reviewing Cox's work in describing probability theory as a means of rationally and consistently quantifying uncertainties. We then discuss how probabilities can be updated according to either Bayes' theorem or the extended method of maximum entropy (ME). After that discussion, we review the work of Caticha and Giffin that shows that Bayes' theorem is a special case of ME. This important result demonstrates that the ME method is the general method for updating probabilities. We then review some motivating difficulties in quantum mechanics before discussing Caticha's work in deriving quantum theory from the approach of entropic dynamics, which concludes our review. After entropic dynamics is introduced, we develop the concepts of symmetries and transformations from an informational perspective. The primary result is the formulation of a symmetry condition that any transformation must satisfy in order to qualify as a symmetry in EQD. We then proceed to apply this condition to the extended Galilean transformation. This transformation is of interest as it exhibits features of both special and general relativity. The transformation yields a gravitational potential that arises from an equivalence of information. We conclude the thesis with a discussion of the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. We discuss the difficulties that arise in the standard quantum mechanical approach to measurement before developing our theory of entropic measurement. In entropic dynamics, position is the only observable. We show how a theory built on this one observable can account for the multitude of measurements present in

  7. The measurement and modeling of alpha-particle-induced charge collection in dynamic memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldiges, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of α-particle-induced charge collection in high-density dynamic random access memories. A novel technique for the measurement of charge collection in high-density memory cells and bit lines due to α-particle strikes was developed. The technique involves D.C. tests on simple test structures with an α-particle source on the device package as a lid. The advantages of this new measurement technique are: the method allows for in-situ measurements of charge collection on both MOS capacitors and bit lines found in present-day memories; the on-chip measurement technique minimizes errors due to external probes loading the device under test; the measurements can be controlled by a personal computer, with the data being able to be reduced on the same machine. Results obtained using this new measurement technique show that the charge collection is found to depend upon test-structure size and the configuration of its neighbors. Results of two-dimensional simulations of charge flow along the surface of an MOS capacitor from current injection due to an α-particle strike indicate that a spatial potential variation of 0.5V may occur between the point of current injection and capacitor edge for a 1M dRAM capacitor

  8. The Correlation between Dynamic Balance Measures and Stance Sub-phase COP Displacement Time in Older Adults during Obstacle Crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seol; Ko, Yu-Min; Park, Ji-Won

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the relationship between the center of pressure (COP) displacement time during the stance subphases and dynamic balance ability when elderly cross obstacles 0, 10, and 40 cm in height. [Subjects] Fifteen older adults were enrolled in this study (≥65 years of age). [Methods] An F-Scan System was used to measure the COP displacement time when subjects crossed obstacles 0, 10, and 40 cm in height, and the Dynamic Gait Index, Berg Balance Scale, and Four Square Step Test were used to measure dynamic balance ability. [Results] The Dynamic Gait Index, Berg Balance Scale, and Four Square Step Test were correlated with each other. Dynamic balance tests were correlated with the COP displacement time during the stance phase. At obstacle heights of 10 and 40 cm during loading response and at all heights during pre-swing, there were correlations with dynamic balance ability. However, dynamic balance ability did not affect the COP displacement time during mid-stance and terminal stance. [Conclusion] People with a lower dynamic balance ability show a larger COP displacement time during loading response and pre-swing. Therefore, dynamic balance ability can be predicted by measuring the COP displacement time.

  9. Biomechanical Properties of the Cornea Measured With the Dynamic Scheimpflug Analyzer in Young Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hun; Kang, David Sung Yong; Ha, Byoung Jin; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Eung Kweon; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Kim, Ha Yan; Kim, Tae-Im

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the biomechanical properties of the cornea using the dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer in young healthy adults. This prospective cross-sectional population study included 944 eyes of 472 participants aged 20 to 40 years. Participants underwent ophthalmic investigations, including evaluation of biomechanical properties of the cornea using the dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer, manifest refraction, and measurements of keratometric values by autokeratometry, intraocular pressure (IOP) by noncontact tonometer, central corneal thickness (CCT) by ultrasound, and white-to-white distance by Scheimpflug tomography. Statistical analyses included determination of the reference interval with a bootstrapping method, linear quantile mixed-effects model, and Spearman correlation analysis between the corneal biomechanical parameters and other variables (age, manifest refraction spherical equivalent, CCT, IOP, white-to-white, and keratometric values). The 90% CIs of all corneal biomechanical parameters demonstrated that the ranges of the 90% CIs for the reference data were almost identical with and without bootstrapping. Quantile regression to determine the fifth, 50th, and 95th percentiles of each corneal biomechanical parameter supported the findings from the nonparametric method with the 90% CIs. Correlation analysis showed significant correlations between the parameters and variables, but there was a relatively high Spearman correlation coefficient in the case of the correlations with the CCT and IOP. Using data from a large population of young healthy adults, we developed a database of normal values for multiple corneal biomechanical parameters obtained from the dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer. We conclude that the biomechanical properties of the cornea are influenced by the CCT and IOP.

  10. Intracellular calcium homeostasis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) is a universal carrier of biological information: it controls cell life from its origin at fertilization to its end in the process of programmed cell death. Ca(2+) is a conventional diffusible second messenger released inside cells by the interaction of first messengers with plasma membrane receptors. However, it can also penetrate directly into cells to deliver information without the intermediation of first or second messengers. Even more distinctively, Ca(2+) can act as a first messenger, by interacting with a plasma membrane receptor to set in motion intracellular signaling pathways that involve Ca(2+) itself. Perhaps the most distinctive property of the Ca(2+) signal is its ambivalence: while essential to the correct functioning of cells, Ca(2+) becomes an agent that mediates cell distress, or even (toxic) cell death, if its concentration and movements inside cells are not carefully tuned. Ca(2+) is controlled by reversible complexation to specific proteins, which could be pure Ca(2+) buffers, or which, in addition to buffering Ca(2+), also decode its signal to pass it on to targets. The most important actors in the buffering of cell Ca(2+) are proteins that transport it across the plasma membrane and the membrane of the organelles: some have high Ca(2+) affinity and low transport capacity (e.g., Ca(2+) pumps), others have opposite properties (e.g., the Ca(2+) uptake system of mitochondria). Between the initial event of fertilization, and the terminal event of programmed cell death, the Ca(2+) signal regulates the most important activities of the cell, from the expression of genes, to heart and muscle contraction and other motility processes, to diverse metabolic pathways involved in the generation of cell fuels.

  11. Foam rolling for delayed-onset muscle soreness and recovery of dynamic performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E P; Bradbury-Squires, David J; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G; Button, Duane C

    2015-01-01

    After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Controlled laboratory study. University laboratory. A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures.

  12. Quantification of resilience to water scarcity, a dynamic measure in time and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonovic, S. P.; Arunkumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    There are practical links between water resources management, climate change adaptation and sustainable development leading to reduction of water scarcity risk and re-enforcing resilience as a new development paradigm. Water scarcity, due to the global change (population growth, land use change and climate change), is of serious concern since it can cause loss of human lives and serious damage to the economy of a region. Unfortunately, in many regions of the world, water scarcity is, and will be unavoidable in the near future. As the scarcity is increasing, at the same time it erodes resilience, therefore global change has a magnifying effect on water scarcity risk. In the past, standard water resources management planning considered arrangements for prevention, mitigation, preparedness and recovery, as well as response. However, over the last ten years substantial progress has been made in establishing the role of resilience in sustainable development. Dynamic resilience is considered as a novel measure that provides for better understanding of temporal and spatial dynamics of water scarcity. In this context, a water scarcity is seen as a disturbance in a complex physical-socio-economic system. Resilience is commonly used as a measure to assess the ability of a system to respond and recover from a failure. However, the time independent static resilience without consideration of variability in space does not provide sufficient insight into system's ability to respond and recover from the failure state and was mostly used as a damage avoidance measure. This paper provides an original systems framework for quantification of resilience. The framework is based on the definition of resilience as the ability of physical and socio-economic systems to absorb disturbance while still being able to continue functioning. The disturbance depends on spatial and temporal perspectives and direct interaction between impacts of disturbance (social, health, economic, and other) and

  13. Quantification of resilience to water scarcity, a dynamic measure in time and space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Simonovic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are practical links between water resources management, climate change adaptation and sustainable development leading to reduction of water scarcity risk and re-enforcing resilience as a new development paradigm. Water scarcity, due to the global change (population growth, land use change and climate change, is of serious concern since it can cause loss of human lives and serious damage to the economy of a region. Unfortunately, in many regions of the world, water scarcity is, and will be unavoidable in the near future. As the scarcity is increasing, at the same time it erodes resilience, therefore global change has a magnifying effect on water scarcity risk. In the past, standard water resources management planning considered arrangements for prevention, mitigation, preparedness and recovery, as well as response. However, over the last ten years substantial progress has been made in establishing the role of resilience in sustainable development. Dynamic resilience is considered as a novel measure that provides for better understanding of temporal and spatial dynamics of water scarcity. In this context, a water scarcity is seen as a disturbance in a complex physical-socio-economic system. Resilience is commonly used as a measure to assess the ability of a system to respond and recover from a failure. However, the time independent static resilience without consideration of variability in space does not provide sufficient insight into system's ability to respond and recover from the failure state and was mostly used as a damage avoidance measure. This paper provides an original systems framework for quantification of resilience. The framework is based on the definition of resilience as the ability of physical and socio-economic systems to absorb disturbance while still being able to continue functioning. The disturbance depends on spatial and temporal perspectives and direct interaction between impacts of disturbance (social, health

  14. Impact of control measures and dynamics of sand flies in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold-Castro, Kárin R; Fenelon, Vanderson C; Rossi, Robson M; Brito, João E C; Freitas, Janaina S; Teodoro, Ueslei

    2013-06-01

    We report the results of control measures introduced to reduce the density of sand flies in domiciles and subsequent monitoring of the effects of these measures on the sand fly populations. The most common species of sand flies were Nyssomyia neivai and Nyssomyia whitmani, which are naturally infected by Leishmania. A total of 268,382 (93.4%) sand flies were collected in ecotypes constructed with the aim of attracting sand flies, and 19,091 (6.6%) sand flies were collected in the ecotypes consisting of residences and other buildings. Human actions determine the growth or reduction of the sand fly population in human-occupied space. Understanding the dynamics of sand flies in this environment can substantially contribute to the prevention of cutaneous leishmaniasis. © 2013 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  15. Dynamic response of thermal neutron measurements in electrochemically produced cold fusion subject to pulsed current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, Jose; Converti, Jose; Mayer, Roberto; Guido, German; Florido, Pablo; Patino, Nestor; Sobehart, Leonardo; Gomez, Silvia; Larreteguy, Axel

    1988-01-01

    The present work shows the results of measurements performed on electrolytic cells using a high efficiency (22%) neutron detection system in combination with a procedure involving a non-stationary current through the cell's circuit. Cold fusion was produced in electrolytic cells containing LiH dissolved in heavy water with a palladium cathode. The dynamic response to low frequency current pulses was measured. Characteristic patterns showing one or two bumps were obtained in a repeatable fashion. These patterns are strongly dependent on the previous charging history of the cathode. The technique employed seems to be very convenient as a research tool for a systematic study of the different variables governing the phenomenon. (Author)

  16. Numerical simulation and analysis of fuzzy PID and PSD control methodologies as dynamic energy efficiency measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardehali, M.M.; Saboori, M.; Teshnelab, M.

    2004-01-01

    Energy efficiency enhancement is achieved by utilizing control algorithms that reduce overshoots and undershoots as well as unnecessary fluctuations in the amount of energy input to energy consuming systems during transient operation periods. It is hypothesized that application of control methodologies with characteristics that change with time and according to the system dynamics, identified as dynamic energy efficiency measures (DEEM), achieves the desired enhancement. The objective of this study is to simulate and analyze the effects of fuzzy logic based tuning of proportional integral derivative (F-PID) and proportional sum derivative (F-PSD) controllers for a heating and cooling energy system while accounting for the dynamics of the major system components. The procedure to achieve the objective includes utilization of fuzzy logic rules to determine the PID and PSD controllers gain coefficients so that the control laws for regulating the heat exchangers heating or cooling energy inputs are determined in each time step of the operation period. The performances of the F-PID and F-PSD controllers are measured by means of two cost functions that are based on quadratic forms of the energy input and deviation from a set point temperature. It is found that application of the F-PID control algorithm, as a DEEM, results in lower costs for energy input and deviation from a set point temperature by 24% and 17% as compared to a PID and 13% and 8% as compared to a PSD, respectively. It is also shown that the F-PSD performance is better than that of the F-PID controller

  17. Flexible Piezoelectric Tactile Sensor Array for Dynamic Three-Axis Force Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Liu, Weiting; Gu, Chunxin; Cheng, Xiaoying; Fu, Xin

    2016-06-03

    A new flexible piezoelectric tactile sensor array based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film is proposed for measuring three-axis dynamic contact force distribution. The array consists of six tactile units arranged as a 3 × 2 matrix with spacing 8 mm between neighbor units. In each unit, a PVDF film is sandwiched between four square-shaped upper electrodes and one square-shaped lower electrode, forming four piezoelectric capacitors. A truncated pyramid bump is located above the four piezoelectric capacitors to improve force transmission. A three-axis contact force transmitted from the top of the bump will lead to the four piezoelectric capacitors underneath undergoing different charge changes, from which the normal and shear components of the force can be calculated. A series of dynamic tests have been carried out by exerting sinusoidal forces with amplitudes ranging from 0 to 0.5 N in the x-axis, 0 to 0.5 N in the y-axis, and 0 to 1.5 N in the z-axis, separately. The tactile units show good sensitivities with 14.93, 14.92, and 6.62 pC/N in the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. They can work with good linearity, relatively low coupling effect, high repeatability, and acceptable frequency response in the range of 5-400 Hz to both normal and shear load. In addition, dynamic three-axis force measurement has been conducted for all of the tactile units. The average errors between the applied and calculated forces are 10.68% ± 6.84%. Furthermore, the sensor array can be easily integrated onto a curved surface, such as robotic and prosthetic hands, due to its excellent flexibility.

  18. Flexible Piezoelectric Tactile Sensor Array for Dynamic Three-Axis Force Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new flexible piezoelectric tactile sensor array based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF film is proposed for measuring three-axis dynamic contact force distribution. The array consists of six tactile units arranged as a 3 × 2 matrix with spacing 8 mm between neighbor units. In each unit, a PVDF film is sandwiched between four square-shaped upper electrodes and one square-shaped lower electrode, forming four piezoelectric capacitors. A truncated pyramid bump is located above the four piezoelectric capacitors to improve force transmission. A three-axis contact force transmitted from the top of the bump will lead to the four piezoelectric capacitors underneath undergoing different charge changes, from which the normal and shear components of the force can be calculated. A series of dynamic tests have been carried out by exerting sinusoidal forces with amplitudes ranging from 0 to 0.5 N in the x-axis, 0 to 0.5 N in the y-axis, and 0 to 1.5 N in the z-axis, separately. The tactile units show good sensitivities with 14.93, 14.92, and 6.62 pC/N in the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. They can work with good linearity, relatively low coupling effect, high repeatability, and acceptable frequency response in the range of 5–400 Hz to both normal and shear load. In addition, dynamic three-axis force measurement has been conducted for all of the tactile units. The average errors between the applied and calculated forces are 10.68% ± 6.84%. Furthermore, the sensor array can be easily integrated onto a curved surface, such as robotic and prosthetic hands, due to its excellent flexibility.

  19. The pion polarisability and more measurements on chiral dynamics at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Within the physics program of the COMPASS experiment at CERN pion-photon reactions are measured via the Primakoff effect, referring to processes in which high-energetic pions react with the quasi-real photon field that surrounds the target nuclei. The production of a single hard photon in such a pion scattering at lowest momentum transfer to the nucleus is related to pion Compton scattering. From the measured cross-section shape, the pion polarisability has been determined, a result that has been published meanwhile as a Physical Review Letter [ 1 ]. The COMPASS measurement is in tension with the earlier dedicated measurements, and rather in agreement with the theoretical expectation from chiral perturbation theory. The analysis of a more recent high-statistics data taking is underway. Reactions with neutral and more charged pions in the final state are measured and analyzed as well. At low energy in the pion-photon centre-of-momentum system, these reactions are governed by chiral dynamics and contain informa...

  20. Adaptive digital fringe projection technique for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; He, Yunbo; Liu, Junxiu; Wang, Xingjin

    2016-04-04

    It is a challenge for any optical method to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured fringe pattern images, leading to phase and measurement errors. This paper presents a new adaptive digital fringe projection technique which avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of objects that has a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Compared to previous high dynamic range 3-D scan methods using many exposures and fringe pattern projections, which consumes a lot of time, the proposed technique uses only two preliminary steps of fringe pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns, by adaptively adjusting the pixel-wise intensity of the projected fringe patterns based on the saturated pixels in the captured images of the surface being measured. For the bright regions due to high surface reflectivity and high illumination by the ambient light and surfaces interreflections, the projected intensity is reduced just to be low enough to avoid image saturation. Simultaneously, the maximum intensity of 255 is used for those dark regions with low surface reflectivity to maintain high SNR. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve higher 3-D measurement accuracy across a surface with a large range of reflectivity variation.

  1. Holographic otoscope for nano-displacement measurements of surfaces under dynamic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Moreno, J. M.; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey T.; Scarpino, C.; Santoyo, F. Mendoza

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe a novel holographic otoscope system for measuring nano-displacements of objects subjected to dynamic excitation. Such measurements are necessary to quantify the mechanical deformation of surfaces in mechanics, acoustics, electronics, biology and many other fields. In particular, we are interested in measuring the sound-induced motion of biological samples, such as an eardrum. Our holographic otoscope system consists of laser illumination delivery (IS), optical head (OH), and image processing computer (IP) systems. The IS delivers the object beam (OB) and the reference beam (RB) to the OH. The backscattered light coming from the object illuminated by the OB interferes with the RB at the camera sensor plane to be digitally recorded as a hologram. The hologram is processed by the IP using Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm, where the focal plane can be selected freely. Our holographic otoscope system is currently deployed in a clinic, and is packaged in a custom design. It is mounted in a mechatronic positioning system to increase its maneuverability degrees to be conveniently positioned in front of the object to be measured. We present representative results highlighting the versatility of our system to measure deformations of complex elastic surfaces in the wavelength scale including a copper foil membrane and postmortem tympanic membrane (TM). PMID:21898459

  2. The development of a new method of idiographic measurement for dynamic assessment intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurley Emma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method of idiographic measurement for dynamic assessment (DA intervention. There are two main methods of measurement for DA intervention; split -half tests and integrated scoring systems. Split-half tests of ability have proved useful from a research perspective. Integrated scoring systems coupled with case studies are useful from a practitioner perspective. The purpose of this research is to bridge the gap between research and practice by developing a methodology that is compatible with both. To this end the paper proposes a measureable idiographic method of measurement, which utilises multi-dimensional scaling (MDS and general procrustean analysis (GPA to analyse the result of card-sort data gathered from a learner across the entire intervention. This approach provides a method of assessment, which is both compatible with individual intervention and suited to building a body of evidence-based research for DA. An example of the method in practice is given for illustrative purposes. The initial results suggest that this approach provides a methodology that satisfies the requirements of both practitioners when formulating targeted intervention and researchers who require methods of measurement of change in ability of the individual over time.

  3. Dynamic measurement of the corneal tear film with a Twyman-Green interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Jason D; Greivenkamp, John E; Primeau, Brian C

    2015-05-01

    An interferometer for measuring dynamic properties of the in vivo tear film on the human cornea has been developed. The system is a near-infrared instantaneous phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. The laser source is a 785 nm solid-state laser, and the system has been carefully designed and calibrated to ensure that the system operates at eye-safe levels. Measurements are made over a 6 mm diameter on the cornea.Successive frames of interferometric height measurements are combined to produce movies showing both the quantitative and qualitative changes in the topography of the tear film surface and structure. To date, measurement periods of up to 120 s at 28.6 frames per second have been obtained. Several human subjects have been examined using this system, demonstrating a surface height resolution of 25 nm and spatial resolution of 6 μm. Examples of features that have been observed in these preliminary studies of the tear film include postblink disruption, evolution, and stabilization of the tear film; tear film artifacts generated by blinking; tear film evaporation and breakup; and the propagation of foreign objects in the tear film. This paper discusses the interferometer design and presents results from in vivo measurements.

  4. Development and validation of the downhole freestanding shear device (DFSD) for measuring the dynamic properties of clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The Downhole Freestanding Shear Device (DFSD) is an innovative tool developed for in situ measurement of dynamic : properties (modulus and damping) of clay soils over a broad range of strains. The device essentially performs : laboratory-quality tors...

  5. MEASURED AND CALCULATED DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF THE BRIDGE DECK MODEL REINFORCED WITH FRP BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz PIĄTKOWSKI

    Full Text Available Composite materials mainly used in the aeronautics industry are gaining more and more application in various areas such as the construction of bridges. The article presents a set of dynamic researches carried out on a plate made of lightweight concrete reinforced with composite bars. The tested plate with dimensions 514 x 190 x 18 cm was a model of the real bridge deck. A multi-channel signal recorder with specialized software was used for performing the measurements and to estimate modal parameters of the plate. Dynamic response of the plate on a modal hammer impact was measured with numerous of piezoelectric acceleration sensors. The vibration tests were carried out simultaneously with statics tests only for non-cracked concrete of the plate. A range of FEM models was created, started with analytical 1-D beam model. Next, more complex 2-D plate and 3-D volume models were developed. The aim was to show how the results change in terms of complexity of the model. Only in the 3-D model the composite rebar was modelled. Additionally, in case of 2-D and 3-D models there were considered various lengths of the selected support. The basic frequencies and mode shapes obtained for physical model were compared with those for numerical models. There were significant differences. The conducted analysis indicated more complicated than theoretical boundary conditions of the tested plate.

  6. Analyzing repeated measures data on individuals nested within groups: accounting for dynamic group effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Daniel J; Gottfredson, Nisha C; Dean, Danielle; Zucker, Robert A

    2013-03-01

    Researchers commonly collect repeated measures on individuals nested within groups such as students within schools, patients within treatment groups, or siblings within families. Often, it is most appropriate to conceptualize such groups as dynamic entities, potentially undergoing stochastic structural and/or functional changes over time. For instance, as a student progresses through school, more senior students matriculate while more junior students enroll, administrators and teachers may turn over, and curricular changes may be introduced. What it means to be a student within that school may thus differ from 1 year to the next. This article demonstrates how to use multilevel linear models to recover time-varying group effects when analyzing repeated measures data on individuals nested within groups that evolve over time. Two examples are provided. The 1st example examines school effects on the science achievement trajectories of students, allowing for changes in school effects over time. The 2nd example concerns dynamic family effects on individual trajectories of externalizing behavior and depression. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Reconstruction of tissue dynamics in the compressed breast using multiplexed measurements and temporal basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverman, Gregory; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, S. A.; Selb, J. J.; Boas, David A.

    2007-02-01

    In the course of our experiments imaging the compressed breast in conjunction with digital tomosynthesis, we have noted that significant changes in tissue optical properties, on the order of 5%, occur during our imaging protocol. These changes seem to consistent with changes both in total Hemoglobin concentration as well as in oxygen saturation, as was the case for our standalone breast compression study, which made use of reflectance measurements. Simulation experiments show the importance of taking into account the temporal dynamics in the image reconstruction, and demonstrate the possibility of imaging the spatio-temporal dynamics of oxygen saturation and total Hemoglobin in the breast. In the image reconstruction, we make use of spatio-temporal basis functions, specifically a voxel basis for spatial imaging, and a cubic spline basis in time, and we reconstruct the spatio-temporal images using the entire data set simultaneously, making use of both absolute and relative measurements in the cost function. We have modified the sequence of sources used in our imaging acquisition protocol to improve our temporal resolution, and preliminary results are shown for normal subjects.

  8. Applying graph partitioning methods in measurement-based dynamic load balancing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatele, Abhinav [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fourestier, Sebastien [Univ. of Bordeaux (France). Bordeaux Lab. for Research in Computer Science; Menon, Harshitha [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Kale, Laxmikant V. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Pellegrini, Francois [Univ. of Bordeaux (France). Bordeaux Lab. for Research in Computer Science

    2011-09-26

    Load imbalance leads to an increasing waste of resources as an application is scaled to more and more processors. Achieving the best parallel efficiency for a program requires optimal load balancing which is a NP-hard problem. However, finding near-optimal solutions to this problem for complex computational science and engineering applications is becoming increasingly important. Charm++, a migratable objects based programming model, provides a measurement-based dynamic load balancing framework. This framework instruments and then migrates over-decomposed objects to balance computational load and communication at runtime. This paper explores the use of graph partitioning algorithms, traditionally used for partitioning physical domains/meshes, for measurement-based dynamic load balancing of parallel applications. In particular, we present repartitioning methods developed in a graph partitioning toolbox called SCOTCH that consider the previous mapping to minimize migration costs. We also discuss a new imbalance reduction algorithm for graphs with irregular load distributions. We compare several load balancing algorithms using microbenchmarks on Intrepid and Ranger and evaluate the effect of communication, number of cores and number of objects on the benefit achieved from load balancing. New algorithms developed in SCOTCH lead to better performance compared to the METIS partitioners for several cases, both in terms of the application execution time and fewer number of objects migrated.

  9. Causality analysis in business performance measurement system using system dynamics methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Zainuridah; Yusoff, Wan Fadzilah Wan; Maarof, Faridah

    2014-07-01

    One of the main components of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) that differentiates it from any other performance measurement system (PMS) is the Strategy Map with its unidirectional causality feature. Despite its apparent popularity, criticisms on the causality have been rigorously discussed by earlier researchers. In seeking empirical evidence of causality, propositions based on the service profit chain theory were developed and tested using the econometrics analysis, Granger causality test on the 45 data points. However, the insufficiency of well-established causality models was found as only 40% of the causal linkages were supported by the data. Expert knowledge was suggested to be used in the situations of insufficiency of historical data. The Delphi method was selected and conducted in obtaining the consensus of the causality existence among the 15 selected expert persons by utilizing 3 rounds of questionnaires. Study revealed that only 20% of the propositions were not supported. The existences of bidirectional causality which demonstrate significant dynamic environmental complexity through interaction among measures were obtained from both methods. With that, a computer modeling and simulation using System Dynamics (SD) methodology was develop as an experimental platform to identify how policies impacting the business performance in such environments. The reproduction, sensitivity and extreme condition tests were conducted onto developed SD model to ensure their capability in mimic the reality, robustness and validity for causality analysis platform. This study applied a theoretical service management model within the BSC domain to a practical situation using SD methodology where very limited work has been done.

  10. Disentangling distribution effects and nature of the dynamics in relaxation measurements: the RMR method

    CERN Document Server

    Sappey, R; Ocio, M; Hammann, J

    2000-01-01

    We discuss here the nature of the low-temperature magnetic relaxation in samples of magnetic nanoparticles. In addition to usual magnetic viscosity measurement, we have used the residual memory ratio (RMR) method. This procedure enables us to overcome the uncertainties usually associated with the energy barrier distribution, thus giving a more detailed insight on the nature of the observed dynamics. A custom-made apparatus coupling dilution refrigeration and SQUID magnetometry allowed measurements of very diluted samples at temperatures ranging between 60 mK and 7 K. Two types of particles have been studied: gamma-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 of moderate anisotropy, and CoFe sub 2 O sub 4 of higher anisotropy where quantum effects are more likely to occur. In both cases, the data cannot simply be interpreted in terms of mere thermally activated dynamics of independent particles. The deviation from thermal activation seems to go opposite of what is expected from the possible effect of particle interactions. We therefore b...

  11. Counting calories in cormorants: dynamic body acceleration predicts daily energy expenditure measured in pelagic cormorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothart, Mason R; Elliott, Kyle H; Wood, Thomas; Hatch, Scott A; Speakman, John R

    2016-07-15

    The integral of the dynamic component of acceleration over time has been proposed as a measure of energy expenditure in wild animals. We tested that idea by attaching accelerometers to the tails of free-ranging pelagic cormorants (Phalacrocorax pelagicus) and simultaneously estimating energy expenditure using doubly labelled water. Two different formulations of dynamic body acceleration, [vectorial and overall DBA (VeDBA and ODBA)], correlated with mass-specific energy expenditure (both R(2)=0.91). VeDBA models combining and separately parameterizing flying, diving, activity on land and surface swimming were consistently considered more parsimonious than time budget models and showed less variability in model fit. Additionally, we observed evidence for the presence of hypometabolic processes (i.e. reduced heart rate and body temperature; shunting of blood away from non-essential organs) that suppressed metabolism in cormorants while diving, which was the most metabolically important activity. We concluded that a combination of VeDBA and physiological processes accurately measured energy expenditure for cormorants. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. A compact fast ionization gauge for in situ measurement of high-density neutral flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.

    2014-04-01

    A compact ionization gauge has been developed to carry out in situ measurements of high density (1020-1022 m-3) neutral gas flow dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution. Key design aspects are discussed including gauge sensitivity and time response scaling with decreased probe dimensions, high-pressure operation, improved driver circuit bandwidth, and techniques for constructing a miniaturized probe head. Gas adsorption was discovered to significantly alter emission current and gauge sensitivity over timescales of several seconds. This effect must be taken into consideration when making time-resolved, high-density measurements. Over short timescales gauge response was predicted by scaling the sensitivity of a nominal Bayard-Alpert gauge to account for variations in probe dimensions and species-dependent ionization cross-section. Time-resolved neutral density profiles have been acquired in the Magnetized Shock Experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory, providing data on the initial conditions of the ionization, plasmoid formation, and translation processes. It is shown that the desired density profiles can be achieved using a dynamic gas fill and that density can be scaled independently of the spatial profile.

  13. Dynamic Oil Consumption Measurement of Internal Combustion Engines using Laser Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellmeier, Stefan; Alonso, Eduardo; Boesl, Ulrich

    2014-01-07

    A new approach has been developed to measure dynamic consumption of lubricant oil in an internal combustion engine. It is based on the already known technique where sulfur is used as a natural tracer of the engine oil. Since ejection of motor oil in gaseous form into the exhaust is by far the main source of engine oil consumption, detection of sulfur in the exhaust emission is a valuable way to measure engine oil consumption in a dynamic way. In earlier approaches, this is done by converting all sulfur containing chemical components into SO2 by thermal pyrolysis in a high temperature furnace at atmospheric pressure. The so-formed SO2 then is detected by broadband-UV-induced fluorescence or mass spectrometric methods. The challenge is to reach the necessary detection limit of 50 ppb. The new approach presented here includes sulfur conversion in a low-pressure discharge cell and laser-induced fluorescence with wavelength and fluorescence lifetime selection. A limit of detection down to 10 ppb at a temporal resolution in the time scale of few seconds is reached. Extensive, promising studies have been performed at a real engine test bench. Future developments of a compact, mobile device based on these improvements are discussed.

  14. Measurement of lung tissue dynamics in artificially ventilated rats with optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Christian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of lung tissue and the airways become a major task for medical care and health care systems in modern industrial countries in the future. Suitable treatment methods and strategies for lung support and artificial ventilation are of dare need. Besides the obvious importance as life-saving intervention, the effects of usually used over-pressure ventilation onto the sensitive alveolar tissue are insufficiently understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to characterize lung tissue during artificial ventilation at the alveolar level. Those measurements can be used to link micromechanics of alveolar structures to mechanical properties of the whole lung like compliance and resistance measured at the ventilator device. This can be done only in animal experiments due to the fact that imaging techniques used in human diagnostics like CT or MRT fail to resolve alveolar tissue structures. The disadvantage of high-resolution techniques like optical coherence tomography (OCT or intravital microscopy (IVM is the need of a surgical access to the lung due to the limitation in penetration depth of these techniques. Furthermore, imaging dynamic processes with high-resolution imaging techniques during uninterrupted artificial ventilation is a challenging task. In this study, we present a measurement setup for combined imaging of conventional pressure-controlled ventilated rats and the visualization of volume changes of alveolar structures during one cycle of breath. A custom-made OCT system in combination with a triggered scanning algorithm was used to acquire time-resolved 3D OCT image data. Furthermore, this system was combined with a self-adapting autofocus function for intravital microscopy to track the lung surface keeping the tissue in focal plane. The combination of new dynamic measurement modes for OCT and IVM allows new insights into alveolar tissue and will promote the understanding of mechanical behavior during artificial ventilation.

  15. Dynamic Electrochemistry Corrects for Hematocrit Interference on Blood Glucose Determinations with Patient Self-Measurement Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musholt, Petra B; Schipper, Christina; Thomé, Nicole; Ramljak, Sanja; Schmidt, Marc; Forst, Thomas; Pfützner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that dynamic electrochemistry can be used to correct blood glucose measurement results for potentially interfering conditions, such as humidity, hematocrit (HCT) variations, and ascorbic acid. The purpose of this laboratory investigation was to assess the potential influence of hematocrit variations on a variety of blood glucose meters applying different measurement technologies. Methods Venous heparinized whole blood was drawn, immediately aliquoted, and manipulated to contain three different blood glucose concentrations (80, 155, and 310 mg/dl) and five different hematocrit levels (25%, 37%, 45%, 52%, and 60%). After careful oxygenation to normal blood oxygen pressure, each of the resulting 15 different samples was measured 8 times with the following devices: BGStar, Contour, Accu-Chek Aviva, Accu-Chek Aviva Nano, Breeze 2, Precision Xceed, OneTouch Ultra 2, OneTouch Verio, FreeStyle Freedom Lite, Glucocard G+, GlucoMen LX, GlucoMen GM, and StatStrip [point-of-care (POC) device]. Cobas (Roche Diagnostics, glucose hexokinase method) served as laboratory plasma reference method. Stability to hematocrit influence was assumed when less than 10% bias occurred between the highest and lowest hematocrit levels when analyzing mean deviations for all three glucose concentrations. Results Besides the POC StatStrip device, which is known to measure and correct for hematocrit (resulting in hematocrit variations occur in daily routine (e.g., because of smoking, exercise, hypermenorrhea, pregnancy, stay in mountains, and hemodialysis), our results may encourage use of meters with stable performance under these conditions. Dynamic electrochemistry as used in the BGStar device (sanofi-aventis) appears to be an effective technology to correct for potential hematocrit influence on the meter results. PMID:22027312

  16. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential evolut...

  17. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  18. Novel Modeling of Task vs. Rest Brain State Predictability Using a Dynamic Time Warping Spectrum: Comparisons and Contrasts with Other Standard Measures of Brain Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Martin; Lorenz, Romy; Scott, Gregory; Sharp, David J; Fagerholm, Erik D; Leech, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic time warping, or DTW, is a powerful and domain-general sequence alignment method for computing a similarity measure. Such dynamic programming-based techniques like DTW are now the backbone and driver of most bioinformatics methods and discoveries. In neuroscience it has had far less use, though this has begun to change. We wanted to explore new ways of applying DTW, not simply as a measure with which to cluster or compare similarity between features but in a conceptually different way. We have used DTW to provide a more interpretable spectral description of the data, compared to standard approaches such as the Fourier and related transforms. The DTW approach and standard discrete Fourier transform (DFT) are assessed against benchmark measures of neural dynamics. These include EEG microstates, EEG avalanches, and the sum squared error (SSE) from a multilayer perceptron (MLP) prediction of the EEG time series, and simultaneously acquired FMRI BOLD signal. We explored the relationships between these variables of interest in an EEG-FMRI dataset acquired during a standard cognitive task, which allowed us to explore how DTW differentially performs in different task settings. We found that despite strong correlations between DTW and DFT-spectra, DTW was a better predictor for almost every measure of brain dynamics. Using these DTW measures, we show that predictability is almost always higher in task than in rest states, which is consistent to other theoretical and empirical findings, providing additional evidence for the utility of the DTW approach.

  19. Novel modeling of task versus rest brain state predictability using a dynamic time warping spectrum: comparisons and contrasts with other standard measures of brain dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eDinov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic time warping, or DTW, is a powerful and domain-general sequence alignment method for computing a similarity measure. Such dynamic programming-based techniques like DTW are now the backbone and driver of most bioinformatics methods and discoveries. In neuroscience it has had far less use, though this has begun to change. We wanted to explore new ways of applying DTW, not simply as a measure with which to cluster or compare similarity between features but in a conceptually different way. We have used DTW to provide a more interpretable spectral description of the data, compared to standard approaches such as the Fourier and related transforms. The DTW approach and standard discrete Fourier transform (DFT are assessed against benchmark measures of neural dynamics. These include EEG microstates, EEG avalanches and the sum squared error (SSE from a multilayer perceptron (MLP prediction of the EEG timeseries, and simultaneously acquired FMRI BOLD signal. We explored the relationships between these variables of interest in an EEG-FMRI dataset acquired during a standard cognitive task, which allowed us to explore how DTW differentially performs in different task settings. We found that despite strong correlations between DTW and DFT-spectra, DTW was a better predictor for almost every measure of brain dynamics. Using these DTW measures, we show that predictability is almost always higher in task than in rest states, which is consistent to other theoretical and empirical findings, providing additional evidence for the utility of the DTW approach.

  20. A general procedure for estimating dynamic displacements using strain measurements and operational modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte, Anders; Aenlle, Manuel L.; Brincker, Rune

    2016-02-01

    Measurement systems are being installed in more and more civil structures with the purpose of monitoring the general dynamic behavior of the structure. The instrumentation is typically done with accelerometers, where experimental frequencies and mode shapes can be identified using modal analysis and used in health monitoring algorithms. But the use of accelerometers is not suitable for all structures. Structures like wind turbine blades and wings on airplanes can be exposed to lightning, which can cause the measurement systems to fail. Structures like these are often equipped with fiber sensors measuring the in-plane deformation. This paper proposes a method in which the displacement mode shapes and responses can be predicted using only strain measurements. The method relies on the newly discovered principle of local correspondence, which states that each experimental mode can be expressed as a unique subset of finite element modes. In this paper the technique is further developed to predict the mode shapes in different states of the structure. Once an estimate of the modes is found, responses can be predicted using the superposition of the modal coordinates weighted by the mode shapes. The method is validated with experimental tests on a scaled model of a two-span bridge installed with strain gauges. Random load was applied to simulate a civil structure under operating condition, and strain mode shapes were identified using operational modal analysis.

  1. Viscosity measurements of water at high temperatures and pressures using dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shigeru; Ghosh, Swapan K; Alargova, Rossitza G; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2006-09-21

    The application of dynamic light scattering to measure viscosity of water at high temperatures and pressures is demonstrated. Viscosity was obtained from the translational diffusion coefficient of probe particles dispersed in the medium by the Einstein-Stokes relationship. Measurements were carried out with polystyrene latex, colloidal silica, and colloidal gold. Under a constant pressure of 25 MPa, good agreement was found between the measured and calculated viscosities up to 275 degrees C with the polystyrene latex, 200 degrees C with the colloidal silica, and 297 degrees C with the colloidal gold. It was found that failure of the measurements at high temperatures is ascribed to change in either the dispersion stability or chemical stability of the probe particles. The present results indicate that the technique could also be used for other supercritical fluids having high critical temperature and pressure, such as methanol (T(c) = 239.4 degrees C, P(c) = 8.1 MPa) and ethanol (T(c) = 243.1 degrees C, P(c) = 6.4 MPa).

  2. The measurement of intracranial pressure and brain displacement due to short-duration dynamic overpressure loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaskiw, A. S.; Ott, K. A.; Armiger, R. S.; Wickwire, A. C.; Alphonse, V. D.; Voo, L. M.; Carneal, C. M.; Merkle, A. C.

    2018-01-01

    The experimental measurement of biomechanical responses that correlate with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has proven challenging. These data are critical for both the development and validation of computational and physical head models, which are used to quantify the biomechanical response to blast as well as to assess fidelity of injury mitigation strategies, such as personal protective equipment. Therefore, foundational postmortem human surrogate (PMHS) experimental data capturing the biomechanical response are necessary for human model development. Prior studies have measured short-duration pressure transmission to the brain (Kinetic phase), but have failed to reproduce and measure the longer-duration inertial loading that can occur (Kinematic phase). Four fully instrumented PMHS were subjected to short-duration dynamic overpressure in front-facing and rear-facing orientations, where intracranial pressure (ICP), global head kinematics, and brain motion (as measured by high-speed X-ray) with respect to the skull were recorded. Peak ICP results generally increased with increased dose, and a mirrored pressure response was seen when comparing the polarity of frontal bone versus occipital bone ICP sensors. The head kinematics were delayed when compared to the pressure response and showed higher peak angles for front-facing tests as compared to rear-facing. Brain displacements were approximately 2-6 mm, and magnitudes did not change appreciably between front- and rear-facing tests. These data will be used to inform and validate models used to assess bTBI.

  3. Comparing Dynamic Treatment Regimes Using Repeated-Measures Outcomes: Modeling Considerations in SMART Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Kasari, Connie; Lynch, Kevin G.; Oslin, David W.; Pelham, William E.; Fabiano, Gregory; Almirall, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic treatment regime (DTR) is a sequence of decision rules, each of which recommends a treatment based on a patient’s past and current health status. Sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials (SMARTs) are multi-stage trial designs that yield data specifically for building effective DTRs. Modeling the marginal mean trajectories of a repeated-measures outcome arising from a SMART presents challenges, because traditional longitudinal models used for randomized clinical trials do not take into account the unique design features of SMART. We discuss modeling considerations for various forms of SMART designs, emphasizing the importance of considering the timing of repeated measures in relation to the treatment stages in a SMART. For illustration, we use data from three SMART case studies with increasing level of complexity, in autism, child attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and adult alcoholism. In all three SMARTs we illustrate how to accommodate the design features along with the timing of the repeated measures when comparing DTRs based on mean trajectories of the repeated-measures outcome. PMID:26638988

  4. High Dynamic Magnetic Beam Current Measurements by Means of Optimised Magneto-Resistance (MR) Sensor Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hape, M; Ricken, W

    2005-01-01

    The GSI-FAIR project (facility for antiprotons and ion research) will comprehend DC currents up to around 5 A in the SIS 100 synchrotron and after bunch compression down to 50 ns pulse length the peak currents will reach up to 100 A. To meet these higher demands of beam current measurements new sensor techniques are foreseen. The measurement device itself will be designed in form of a clip-on ampere-meter. The air gap of the flux concentrator is assumed to be around 5 mm and thus, the estimated maximum field therein is around 30 mT for a beam current of 100 A peak. The resolution of this device is aimed to be 1 mA in beam current, corresponding to a system dynamic of around 105. This high demands of beam current measurement require more sophisticated sensor types than just using a Hall probe. The characteristics of AMR (anisotropic magneto-resistance), GMR (giant magneto-resistance) and GMI (giant magneto-impedance) sensors like hysteresis, linearity and sensitivity have been measured within the magnetic fiel...

  5. Application of the dynamic control rod reactivity measurement method to Korea standard nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. K.; Shin, H. C.; Bae, S. M.; Lee, Y. G.

    2004-01-01

    To measure and validate the worth of control bank or shutdown bank, the dynamic control rod reactivity measurement (DCRM) technique has been developed and applied to six cases of Low Power Physics Tests of PWRs including Korea Standard Nuclear Power plant (KSNP) based on the CE System 80 NSSS. Through the DORT results for each two ex-ore detector response and the three dimensional core transient simulations for rod movements, the key parameters of DCRM method are determined to implement into the Direct Digital Reactivity Computer System (DDRCS). A total of 9 bank worths of two KSNP plants were measured to compare with the worths of the conventional rod worth measurement method. The results show that the average error of DCRM method is nearly the same as the conventional Rod Swap and Boron Dilution Method but lower standard deviation. It takes about twenty minutes from the beginning of rod movement to final estimation of the integral static worth of a control bank. (authors)

  6. Potent Antibacterial Nanoparticles against Biofilm and Intracellular Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haibo; Tang, Jiangjiang; Liu, Qianjin; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-01-01

    The chronic infections related to biofilm and intracellular bacteria are always hard to be cured because of their inherent resistance to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Herein we develop a facile approach to overcome the above conundrum through phosphatidylcholine-decorated Au nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GPA NPs). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra which demonstrated that GPA NPs with a diameter of approximately 180 nm were uniform. The loading manner and release behaviors were also investigated. The generated GPA NPs maintained their antibiotic activities against planktonic bacteria, but more effective to damage established biofilms and inhibited biofilm formation of pathogens including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, GPA NPs were observed to be nontoxic to RAW 264.7 cells and readily engulfed by the macrophages, which facilitated the killing of intracellular bacteria in infected macrophages. These results suggested GPA NPs might be a promising antibacterial agent for effective treatment of chronic infections due to microbial biofilm and intracellular bacteria.

  7. Relationship between ventral hernia defect area and intra-abdominal pressure: dynamic in vivo measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qandeel, Haitham; O'Dwyer, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    It is an acceptable concept that the ventral hernia defect area will increase with a rise in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). The literature lacks the evidence about how much this increase is in vivo. The aim of this study was to objectively measure the change in the ventral hernia defect area with increasing intra-abdominal pressure. In a prospective study of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, the area of hernia defect was measured from inside the abdomen using a sterile paper ruler. The horizontal (width) and vertical (length) measurements of the defect were taken at two pressure points: (IAP = 8 mmHg) and (IAP = 15 mmHg). The hernia defect area was calculated as an oval shape using a standard formula. Eighteen consecutive patients with a ventral hernia were included in this study (8 males: 10 females). Median age was 60 years (30-81), body mass index (BMI) was 29.9 (22.6-37.6). Changing the IAP significantly, (P hernia defect. The median calculated defect area, as an oval shape, was 5.6 cm(2) (Q1-Q3 = 3.5-15.5) and 6.9 cm(2) (Q1-Q3 = 4.5-18.7) at 8 and 15 mmHg IAP, respectively. The calculated area of mesh required to cover the defect with a 5 cm overlap increased by a median of 5% (Q1-Q3 = 3-6%). The change in defect area did not differ significantly between obese and non-obese patients (P = 0.5). Dynamic, rather than static, measurements of ventral hernia area during laparoscopy provide a simple way of in vivo objective measurement that helps the surgeon choose the appropriate area of mesh. When choosing mesh area, we support the trend toward a larger overlap of at least 5 cm if less precise methods of measuring defect area are been used.

  8. Investigating Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Simon R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    for signal transduction. One of the major mechanisms for GPCR regulation involves their endocytic trafficking, which serves to internalize the receptors from the plasma membrane and thereby attenuate G protein-dependent signaling. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that GPCRs can signal...... independently of G proteins, as well as from intracellular compartments including endosomes. It is in this context that receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking have attracted renewed interest within the GPCR field. In this chapter, we will review the current understanding and methodologies...... that have been used to investigate internalization and intracellular signaling of GPCRs, with a particular focus on emerging real-time techniques. These recent developments have improved our understanding of the complexities of GPCR internalization and intracellular signaling and suggest that the broader...

  9. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  10. Dynamic pressure probe response tests for robust measurements in periodic flows close to probe resonating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhun Şahin, Fatma; Schiffmann, Jürg

    2018-02-01

    A single-hole probe was designed to measure steady and periodic flows with high fluctuation amplitudes and with minimal flow intrusion. Because of its high aspect ratio, estimations showed that the probe resonates at a frequency two orders of magnitude lower than the fast response sensor cut-off frequencies. The high fluctuation amplitudes cause a non-linear behavior of the probe and available models are neither adequate for a quantitative estimation of the resonating frequencies nor for predicting the system damping. Instead, a non-linear data correction procedure based on individual transfer functions defined for each harmonic contribution is introduced for pneumatic probes that allows to extend their operating range beyond the resonating frequencies and linear dynamics. This data correction procedure was assessed on a miniature single-hole probe of 0.35 mm inner diameter which was designed to measure flow speed and direction. For the reliable use of such a probe in periodic flows, its frequency response was reproduced with a siren disk, which allows exciting the probe up to 10 kHz with peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging between 20%-170% of the absolute mean pressure. The effect of the probe interior design on the phase lag and amplitude distortion in periodic flow measurements was investigated on probes with similar inner diameters and different lengths or similar aspect ratios (L/D) and different total interior volumes. The results suggest that while the tube length consistently sets the resonance frequency, the internal total volume affects the non-linear dynamic response in terms of varying gain functions. A detailed analysis of the introduced calibration methodology shows that the goodness of the reconstructed data compared to the reference data is above 75% for fundamental frequencies up to twice the probe resonance frequency. The results clearly suggest that the introduced procedure is adequate to capture non-linear pneumatic probe dynamics and to

  11. Capturing Dynamics of Biased Attention: Are New Attention Variability Measures the Way Forward?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Wil Kruijt

    Full Text Available New indices, calculated on data from the widely used Dot Probe Task, were recently proposed to capture variability in biased attention allocation. We observed that it remains unclear which data pattern is meant to be indicative of dynamic bias and thus to be captured by these indices. Moreover, we hypothesized that the new indices are sensitive to SD differences at the response time (RT level in the absence of bias.Randomly generated datasets were analyzed to assess properties of the Attention Bias Variability (ABV and Trial Level Bias Score (TL-BS indices. Sensitivity to creating differences in 1 RT standard deviation, 2 mean RT, and 3 bias magnitude were assessed. In addition, two possible definitions of dynamic attention bias were explored by creating differences in 4 frequency of bias switching, and 5 bias magnitude in the presence of constant switching.ABV and TL-BS indices were found highly sensitive to increasing SD at the response time level, insensitive to increasing bias, linearly sensitive to increasing bias magnitude in the presence of bias switches, and non-linearly sensitive to increasing the frequency of bias switches. The ABV index was also found responsive to increasing mean response times in the absence of bias.Recently proposed DPT derived variability indices cannot uncouple measurement error from bias variability. Significant group differences may be observed even if there is no bias present in any individual dataset. This renders the new indices in their current form unfit for empirical purposes. Our discussion focuses on fostering debate and ideas for new research to validate the potentially very important notion of biased attention being dynamic.

  12. Space robots with flexible appendages: Dynamic modeling, coupling measurement, and vibration suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Deshan; Wang, Xueqian; Xu, Wenfu; Liang, Bin

    2017-05-01

    For a space robot with flexible appendages, vibrations of flexible structure can be easily excited during both orbit and/or attitude maneuvers of the base and the operation of the manipulators. Hence, the pose (position and attitude) of the manipulator's end-effector will greatly deviate from the desired values, and furthermore, the motion of the manipulator will trigger and exacerbate vibrations of flexible appendages. Given lack of the atmospheric damping in orbit, the vibrations will last for quite a while and cause the on-orbital tasks to fail. We derived the rigid-flexible coupling dynamics of a space robot system with flexible appendages and established a coupling model between the flexible base and the space manipulator. A specific index was defined to measure the coupling degree between the flexible motion of the appendages and the rigid motion of the end-effector. Then, we analyzed the dynamic coupling for different conditions, such as modal displacements, joint angles (manipulator configuration), and mass properties. Moreover, the coupling map was adopted and drawn to represent the coupling motion. Based on this map, a trajectory planning method was addressed to suppress structure vibration. Finally, simulation studies of typical cases were performed, which verified the proposed models and method. This work provides a theoretic basis for the system design, performance evaluation, trajectory planning, and control of such space robots.

  13. A computational growth model for measuring dynamic cortical development in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jingxin; Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-10-01

    Human cerebral cortex develops extremely fast in the first year of life. Quantitative measurement of cortical development during this early stage plays an important role in revealing the relationship between cortical structural and high-level functional development. This paper presents a computational growth model to simulate the dynamic development of the cerebral cortex from birth to 1 year old by modeling the cerebral cortex as a deformable elastoplasticity surface driven via a growth model. To achieve a high accuracy, a guidance model is also incorporated to estimate the growth parameters and cortical shapes at later developmental stages. The proposed growth model has been applied to 10 healthy subjects with longitudinal brain MR images acquired at every 3 months from birth to 1 year old. The experimental results show that our proposed method can capture the dynamic developmental process of the cortex, with the average surface distance error smaller than 0.6 mm compared with the ground truth surfaces, and the results also show that 1) the curvedness and sharpness decrease from 2 weeks to 12 months and 2) the frontal lobe shows rapidly increasing cortical folding during this period, with relatively slower increase of the cortical folding in the occipital and parietal lobes.

  14. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn; Wei, Lihui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision

  15. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn, E-mail: gwells@ottawaheart.ca [Division of Cardiology, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y4W7 (Canada); Wei, Lihui [Nordion, Inc., Ottawa, Ontario K2K 1X8 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision.

  16. Entropy-based Measures of EEG Arousals as Biomarkers for Sleep Dynamics: Applications to Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamasebi, Reza; Redline, Susan; Patel, Sanjay R; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: We propose a generation of PSG-derived measures that using entropy can quantify temporal patterns of sleep, and investigate the role of these measures as predictors of hypertension. We also investigate the influence of age on these entropy-based measures as compared to traditional indices. Design and Setting: Cross-sectional analyses of the association between hypertension status with traditional PSG and novel measures using adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression models. The novel measures were developed to quantify variability of the arousal event process. Patients or Participants: Analyses were based on a subsample of subjects from the Cleveland Family Study with clearly disparate hypertension status. Measurements and Results: Among traditional PSG indices, the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) has the highest Odds Ratio (unadjusted and adjusted for age, gender, race, BMI: OR = 2.36 (95% CI: 1.48, 3.75, P = 0.0003) and 1.18, (95% CI: 0.76, 1.84, P = 0.46), respectively). The best predictor among the entropy-based measures is derived from analysis of the temporal patterns of arousal duration with unadjusted and adjusted ORs of 1.36 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.71, P = 0.0085) and 2.08 (95% CI: 1.19, 3.64, P = 0.01), respectively. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that when adjusted for common confounders such as age, gender, race, and BMI, the entropy-based features that quantify the variability of the arousal event process are more strongly associated with hypertension as compared to traditional PSG indices; they are not as strongly influenced by age as are the traditional indices. The result implies that the regularity of arousals may be an important feature associated with hypertension. These measures may provide a powerful tool for discriminating individuals at risk for comorbidities, such as hypertension, associated with sleep disturbances. Citation: Jamasebi R; Redline S; Patel SR; Loparo KA. Entropy-based measures of EEG arousals as biomarkers for sleep

  17. Molecular dynamical and structural studies for the bakelite by neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voi, D.L.

    1992-05-01

    Neutron reaction cross sections were determined by transmission and scattering measurements, to study the dynamics and molecular structure of calcined bakelites. Total cross sections were determined, with a deviation smaller than 5%, from the literature values, by neutron transmission method and a specially devised approximation. These cross sections were then correlated with data obtained with infra-red spectroscopy, elemental analysis and other techniques to get the probable molecular formulae of bakelite. Double differential scattering cross sections, scattering law values and frequency distributions were determined with 15% error using the neutron inelastic scattering method. The frequency distributions as well as the overall results from all experimental techniques used in this work allowed to suggest a structural model like polycyclic hydrocarbons, for calcined bakelite at 800 0 C. (author)

  18. Measurement of Liquid-Metal Two-Phase Flow with a Dynamic Neutron Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, J. E.; Lim, I. C.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, C. M.; Nam, H. Y.; Saito, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic neutron radiography(DNR) has complementary characteristics to X-ray radiography and is suitable to visualization and measurement of a multi-phase flow research in a metallic duct and liquid metal flow. The flow-field information of liquid metal system is very important for the safety analysis of fast breeder reactor and the design of the spallation target of accelerator driven system. A DNR technique was applied to visualize the flow field in the gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with the HANARO-beam facility. The lead bismuth eutectic and the nitrogen gas were used to construct the two-phase flow field in the natural circulation U-channel. The two-phase flow images in the riser were taken at various combinations of the liquid flow and gas flow with high frame-rate neutron radiography at 1000 fps

  19. Modeled and Measured Dynamics of a Composite Beam with Periodically Varying Foam Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Cano, Roberto J.; Schiller, Noah H.; Roberts Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of a sandwich beam with carbon fiber composite facesheets and foam core with periodic variations in material properties are studied. The purpose of the study is to compare finite element predictions with experimental measurements on fabricated beam specimens. For the study, three beams were fabricated: one with a compliant foam core, a second with a stiffer core, and a third with the two cores alternating down the length of the beam to create a periodic variation in properties. This periodic variation produces a bandgap in the frequency domain where vibrational energy does not readily propagate down the length of the beam. Mode shapes and natural frequencies are compared, as well as frequency responses from point force input to velocity response at the opposite end of the beam.

  20. Dynamic Measurement for the Diameter of A Train Wheel Based on Structured-Light Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheels are very important for the safety of a train. The diameter of the wheel is a significant parameter that needs regular inspection. Traditional methods only use the contact points of the wheel tread to fit the rolling round. However, the wheel tread is easily influenced by peeling or scraping. Meanwhile, the circle fitting algorithm is sensitive to noise when only three points are used. This paper proposes a dynamic measurement method based on structured-light vision. The axle of the wheelset and the tread are both employed. The center of the rolling round is determined by the axle rather than the tread only. Then, the diameter is calculated using the center and the contact points together. Simulations are performed to help design the layout of the sensors, and the influences of different noise sources are also analyzed. Static and field experiments are both performed, and the results show it to be quite stable and accurate.

  1. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    elemental mercury shows that when HCl is present with either SO2 or NOx the mercury measurement after the converter is unstable and lower than the elemental mercury inlet level. The conclusion is that red brass chips cannot fully reduce oxidized mercury to elemental mercury when simulated cement kiln gas...... is applied. A sodium sulfite-based converter material was prepared by dry impregnation of sodium sulfite and calcium sulfate powders on zeolite pellets using water glass as binder. The sulfite converter works well at 500°C with less than 10ppmv HCl in the simulated cement kiln flue gas. The 95% response time...... of the sulfite converter is short and typically within 2min. Dynamic mercury adsorption and oxidation tests on commercial activated carbons Darco Hg and HOK standard were performed at 150°C using simulated cement kiln gas and a fixed bed reactor system. It is shown that the converter and analyzer system...

  2. An Overview of Dynamic Contact Resistance Measurement of HV Circuit Breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhole, A. A.; Gandhare, W. Z.

    2016-06-01

    With the deregulation of the electrical power industry, utilities and service companies are operating in a changing business environment. High voltage circuit breakers are extremely important for the function of modern electric power supply systems. The need to predict the proper function of circuit breaker grew over the years as the transmission networks expanded. The maintenance of circuit breakers deserves special consideration because of their importance for routine switching and for protection of other equipments. Electric transmission system breakups and equipment destruction can occur if a circuit breaker fails to operate because of a lack of preventive maintenance. Dynamic Contact Resistance Measurement (DCRM) is known as an effective technique for assessing the condition of power circuit breakers contacts and operating mechanism. This paper gives a general review about DCRM. It discusses the practical case studies on use of DCRM for condition assessment of high voltage circuit breakers.

  3. Hydrophobic attraction as revealed by AFM force measurements and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Keqing; Nguyen, Anh V; Miller, Jan D

    2005-07-14

    Spherical calcium dioleate particles ( approximately 10 mum in diameter) were used as AFM (atomic force microscope) probes to measure interaction forces of the collector colloid with calcite and fluorite surfaces. The attractive AFM force between the calcium dioleate sphere and the fluorite surface is strong and has a longer range than the DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) prediction. The AFM force between the calcium dioleate sphere and the mineral surfaces does not agree with the DLVO prediction. Consideration of non-DLVO forces, including the attractive hydrophobic force and the repulsive hydration force, was necessary to explain the experimental results. The non-DLVO interactions considered were justified by the different interfacial water structures at calcite- and fluorite-water interfaces as revealed by the numerical computation experiments with molecular dynamics simulation.

  4. Hydrogen partitioning in pure cast aluminum as determined by dynamic evolution rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peterson, D. T.; Schmidt, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen in pure aluminum can be found in two different states. One is related to a presence in gas-filled pores, while the other state involves the formation of a solid solution between hydrogen and aluminum. The considered investigation is concerned with the distribution of the hydrogen between various states. A dynamic technique is employed to measure the evolution of hydrogen from commercially available samples of polycrystalline pure aluminum under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The obtained data are compared with the results of a statistical analysis concerning the porosity in the cast aluminum. It was found that more than 99 pct of the hydrogen in the aluminum is located in large pores. Less than 1 pct of the hydrogen is partitioned between the solid solution and the small pores.

  5. Non-linear beam dynamics tests in the LHC: measurement of intensity decay for probing dynamic aperture at injection

    CERN Document Server

    Cettour Cave, S; Giovannozzi, M; Ludwig, M; MacPherson, A; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    For a second year in a row dynamic aperture experiments have been performed at the LHC. These studies have been carried out by two teams following alternative techniques: On Beam 1 a novel approach has been tested which heats the beam until the emittance becomes large, and derives the dynamic aperture from beam losses assuming an inverse logarithm model for the time-dependence of the intensity. On Beam 2, the traditional approach of sampling the dynamic aperture with large amplitude kicks has been pursued [1]. In 2011, considerable progress was made and impressive results have been reported. In 2012 a further Machine Development (MD) session was scheduled during which both teams have benefited from an improved availability of the beams and more optimal performance of the instrumentation. Observations and analysis are presented as two MD reports of the LHC dynamic aperture experiment MD. This note describes the observations made on Beam 1, when the strength of the spool pieces have been varied. The key quantit...

  6. Portable dynamic light scattering instrument and method for the measurement of blood platelet suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer-Spurej, Elisabeth; Brown, Keddie; Labrie, Audrey; Marziali, Andre; Glatter, Otto

    2006-01-01

    No routine test exists to determine the quality of blood platelet transfusions although every year millions of patients require platelet transfusions to survive cancer chemotherapy, surgery or trauma. A new, portable dynamic light scattering instrument is described that is suitable for the measurement of turbid solutions of large particles under temperature-controlled conditions. The challenges of small sample size, short light path through the sample and accurate temperature control have been solved with a specially designed temperature-controlled sample holder for small diameter, disposable capillaries. Efficient heating and cooling is achieved with Peltier elements in direct contact with the sample capillary. Focusing optical fibres are used for light delivery and collection of scattered light. The practical use of this new technique was shown by the reproducible measurement of latex microspheres and the temperature-induced morphological changes of human blood platelets. The measured parameters for platelet transfusions are platelet size, number of platelet-derived microparticles and the response of platelets to temperature changes. This three-dimensional analysis provides a high degree of confidence for the determination of platelet quality. The experimental data are compared to a matrix and facilitate automated, unbiased quality testing

  7. Identification of Capacitive MEMS Accelerometer Structure Parameters for Human Body Dynamics Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincas Benevicius

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their small size, low weight, low cost and low energy consumption, MEMS accelerometers have achieved great commercial success in recent decades. The aim of this research work is to identify a MEMS accelerometer structure for human body dynamics measurements. Photogrammetry was used in order to measure possible maximum accelerations of human body parts and the bandwidth of the digital acceleration signal. As the primary structure the capacitive accelerometer configuration is chosen in such a way that sensing part measures on all three axes as it is 3D accelerometer and sensitivity on each axis is equal. Hill climbing optimization was used to find the structure parameters. Proof-mass displacements were simulated for all the acceleration range that was given by the optimization problem constraints. The final model was constructed in Comsol Multiphysics. Eigenfrequencies were calculated and model’s response was found, when vibration stand displacement data was fed into the model as the base excitation law. Model output comparison with experimental data was conducted for all excitation frequencies used during the experiments.

  8. Realization of High Dynamic Range Imaging in the GLORIA Network and Its Effect on Astronomical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Vítek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science project GLORIA (GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array is a first free- and open-access network of robotic telescopes in the world. It provides a web-based environment where users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes and/or by analyzing data that other users have acquired with GLORIA or from other free-access databases. Network of 17 telescopes allows users to control selected telescopes in real time or schedule any more demanding observation. This paper deals with new opportunity that GLORIA project provides to teachers and students of various levels of education. At the moment, there are prepared educational materials related to events like Sun eclipse (measuring local atmosphere changes, Aurora Borealis (calculation of Northern Lights height, or transit of Venus (measurement of the Earth-Sun distance. Student should be able to learn principles of CCD imaging, spectral analysis, basic calibration like dark frames subtraction, or advanced methods of noise suppression. Every user of the network can design his own experiment. We propose advanced experiment aimed at obtaining astronomical image data with high dynamic range. We also introduce methods of objective image quality evaluation in order to discover how HDR methods are affecting astronomical measurements.

  9. Prediction of the dynamic response of complex transmission line systems for unsteady pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, C; Persico, G; Rowe, A L

    2008-01-01

    Among the measurement and control systems of gas turbine engines, a recent new issue is the possibility of performing unsteady pressure measurements to detect flow anomalies in an engine or to evaluate loads on aerodynamic surfaces. A possible answer to this demand could be extending the use of well known and widely used transmission line systems, which have been applied so far to steady monitoring, to unsteady measurements thanks to proper dynamic modeling and compensation. Despite the huge number of models existing in the literature, a novel method has been developed, which is at the same time easy-to-handle, flexible and capable of reproducing the actual physics of the problem. Furthermore, the new model is able to deal with arbitrary complex networks of lines and cavities, and thus its applicability is not limited to series-connected systems. The main objectives of this paper are to show the derivation of the model, its validation against experimental tests and example of its applicability

  10. Dynamically and Statically Measured Small Strain Stiffness of Dense Toyoura Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Sajjad; Sato, Takeshi; Koseki, Junichi

    Small strain stiffness of dense Toyoura sand was investigated by performing triaxial compression tests using large scale apparatus. The specimens were rectangular prismatic with dimensions of 50 cm high and 23.5 cm times 23.5 cm in cross-section. To measure the vertical stress σ1, a load cell is located just above the top cap inside the triaxial cell in order to eliminate the effects of piston friction. The vertical strain ɛ1 was measured not only externally but also locally with three pairs of vertical local deformation transducers (LDTs). Three tests were conducted using air-dried Toyoura sand (Dmax = 0.35 mm, D50 = 0.23 mm, Uc = 1.80, emax = 0.966, emin = 0.600 and Gs = 2.635) as the test material. The specimens were prepared by employing air pluviation method and keeping dry densities within the range of 1.62 - 1.63 g/cm3. Dynamic and static Young's moduli were evaluated by wave velocity measurement and by conducting small unloading/reloading cycles, respectively.

  11. Projectile Impact Point Prediction Based on Self-Propelled Artillery Dynamics and Doppler Radar Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Any trajectory calculation method has three primary sources of errors, which are model error, parameter error, and initial state error. In this paper, based on initial projectile flight trajectory data measured using Doppler radar system; a new iterative method is developed to estimate the projectile attitude and the corresponding impact point to improve the second shot hit probability. In order to estimate the projectile initial state, the launch dynamics model of practical 155 mm self-propelled artillery is defined, and hence, the vibration characteristics of the self-propelled artillery is obtained using the transfer matrix method of linear multibody system MSTMM. A discrete time transfer matrix DTTM-4DOF is developed using the modified point mass equations of motion to compute the projectile trajectory and set a direct algebraic relation between any two successive radar data. During iterations, adjustments to the repose angle are made until an agreement with acceptable tolerance occurs between the Doppler radar measurements and the estimated values. Simulated Doppler radar measurements are generated using the nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom trajectory model using the resulted initial disturbance. Results demonstrate that the data estimated using the proposed algorithm agrees well with the simulated Doppler radar data obtained numerically using the nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom model.

  12. Assessment of a dynamic reference material for calibration of full-field measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Feligiotti, Mara; Davighi, Andrea; Whelan, Maurice; Wang, Weizhuo V.; Patterson, Eann A.

    2012-10-01

    For holography and speckle interferometry the calibration of the sensitivity is a must, because illumination and observation directions vary across the field of view. A numerical estimate or a static calibration using rigid body motions is standard, and reference materials exist for static strain calibration. Recently, reference materials for the dynamic calibration of optical instruments of displacement and strain measurement were designed and prototypes were manufactured in the European FP7 project ADVISE. We review the properties of the reference material and the concept of traceability for the field of displacement values by using a calibrated single point transducer. The mode shape is assessed using out-of-plane DSPI, Finite Element Analysis as well as analytic solutions of the plate vibration. We present measurements using stroboscopic DSPI on the reference material under acoustic excitation and compare the measured mode shapes to the ones predicted by FE analysis. We apply different comparison methodologies based on point-by-point deviations and on decomposition of the mode shapes into a set of orthogonal basis functions. The latter method is well suited to assess stability and reproducibility of a mode shape. Finally, the deviations are used to estimate the reference material uncertainty which is an essential parameter for determining the calibration uncertainty. Uncertainty contributions of the DSPI set-up are taken into account. To conclude, the application area and limitations of the reference material are discussed.

  13. Dynamic measurement of pennation angle of gastrocnemius muscles during contractions based on ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yongjin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle fascicle pennation angle (PA is an important parameter related to musculoskeletal functions, and ultrasound imaging has been widely used for measuring PA, but manually and frame by frame in most cases. We have earlier reported an automatic method to estimate aponeurosis orientation based on Gabor transform and Revoting Hough Transform (RVHT. Methods In this paper, we proposed a method to estimate the overall orientation of muscle fascicles in a region of interest, in order to complete computing the orientation of the other side of the pennation angle, but the side found by RVHT. The measurements for orientations of both fascicles and aponeurosis were conducted in each frame of ultrasound images, and then the dynamic change of pennation angle during muscle contraction was obtained automatically. The method for fascicle orientation estimation was evaluated using synthetic images with different noise levels and later on 500 ultrasound images of human gastrocnemius muscles during isometric plantarflexion. Results The muscle fascicle orientations were also estimated manually by two operators. From the results it’s found that the proposed automatic method demonstrated a comparable performance to the manual method. Conclusions With the proposed methods, ultrasound measurement for muscle pennation angles can be more widely used for functional assessment of muscles.

  14. A new method to measure and model dynamic oxygen microdistributions in moving biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Chen, You-Peng; Dong, Yang; Wang, Xi-Xi; Guo, Jin-Song; Shen, Yu; Yan, Peng; Ma, Teng-Fei; Sun, Xiu-Qian; Fang, Fang; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Biofilms in natural environments offer a superior solution to mitigate water pollution. Artificially intensified biofilm reactors represented by rotating biological contactors (RBCs) are widely applied and studied. Understanding the oxygen transfer process in biofilms is an important aspect of these studies, and describing this process in moving biofilms (such as biofilms in RBCs) is a particular challenge. Oxygen transfer in RBCs behaves differently than in other biological reactors due to the special oxygen supply mode that results from alternate exposure of the biofilm to wastewater and air. The study of oxygen transfer in biofilms is indispensable for understanding biodegradation in RBCs. However, the mechanisms are still not well known due to a lack of effective tools to dynamically analyze oxygen diffusion, reaction, and microdistribution in biofilms. A new experimental device, the Oxygen Transfer Modeling Device (OTMD), was designed and manufactured for this purpose, and a mathematical model was developed to model oxygen transfer in biofilm produced by an RBC. This device allowed the simulation of the local environment around the biofilm during normal RBC operation, and oxygen concentrations varying with time and depth in biofilm were measured using an oxygen microelectrode. The experimental data conformed well to the model description, indicating that the OTMD and the model were stable and reliable. Moreover, the OTMD offered a flexible approach to study the impact of a single-factor on oxygen transfer in moving biofilms. In situ environment of biofilm in an RBC was simulated, and dynamic oxygen microdistributions in the biofilm were measured and well fitted to the built model description. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shaper-Based Filters for the compensation of the load cell response in dynamic mass measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richiedei, Dario; Trevisani, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel model-based signal filtering technique for dynamic mass measurement through load cells. Load cells are sensors with an underdamped oscillatory response which usually imposes a long settling time. Real-time filtering is therefore necessary to compensate for such a dynamics and to quickly retrieve the mass of the measurand (which is the steady state value of the load cell response) before the measured signal actually settles. This problem has a big impact on the throughput of industrial weighing machines. In this paper a novel solution to this problem is developed: a model-based filtering technique is proposed to ensure accurate, robust and rapid estimation of the mass of the measurand. The digital filters proposed are referred to as Shaper-Based Filters (SBFs) and are based on the convolution of the load cell output signal with a sequence of few impulses (typically, between 2 and 5). The amplitudes and the instants of application of such impulses are computed through the analytical development of the load cell step response, by imposing the admissible residual oscillation in the steady-state filtered signal and by requiring the desired sensitivity of the filter. The inclusion of robustness specifications tackles effectively the unavoidable uncertainty and variability in the load cell frequency and damping. The effectiveness of the proposed filters is proved experimentally through an industrial set up: the load-cell-instrumented weigh bucket of a multihead weighing machine for packaging. A performance comparison with other benchmark filters is provided and discussed too.

  16. The need for speed: escape velocity and dynamical mass measurements of the Andromeda galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Prajwal R.; Sharma, Sanjib; Lewis, Geraint F.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Driver, Simon P.

    2018-04-01

    Our nearest large cosmological neighbour, the Andromeda galaxy (M31), is a dynamical system, and an accurate measurement of its total mass is central to our understanding of its assembly history, the life-cycles of its satellite galaxies, and its role in shaping the Local Group environment. Here, we apply a novel approach to determine the dynamical mass of M31 using high-velocity Planetary Nebulae, establishing a hierarchical Bayesian model united with a scheme to capture potential outliers and marginalize over tracers unknown distances. With this, we derive the escape velocity run of M31 as a function of galactocentric distance, with both parametric and non-parametric approaches. We determine the escape velocity of M31 to be 470 ± 40 km s-1 at a galactocentric distance of 15 kpc, and also, derive the total potential of M31, estimating the virial mass and radius of the galaxy to be 0.8 ± 0.1 × 1012 M⊙ and 240 ± 10 kpc, respectively. Our M31 mass is on the low side of the measured range, this supports the lower expected mass of the M31-Milky Way system from the timing and momentum arguments, satisfying the H I constraint on circular velocity between 10 ≲ R/ kpc < 35, and agreeing with the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation. To place these results in a broader context, we compare them to the key predictions of the ΛCDM cosmological paradigm, including the stellar-mass-halo-mass and the dark matter halo concentration-virial mass correlation, and finding it to be an outlier to this relation.

  17. Overview of Ice-Sheet Mass Balance and Dynamics from ICESat Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the ICESat mission was to determine the present-day mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, identify changes that may be occurring in the surface-mass flux and ice dynamics, and estimate their contributions to global sea-level rise. Although ICESat's three lasers were planned to make continuous measurements for 3 to 5 years, the mission was re-planned to operate in 33-day campaigns 2 to 3 times each year following failure of the first laser after 36 days. Seventeen campaigns were conducted with the last one in the Fall of 2009. Mass balance maps derived from measured ice-sheet elevation changes show that the mass loss from Greenland has increased significantly to about 170 Gt/yr for 2003 to 2007 from a state of near balance in the 1990's. Increased losses (189 Gt/yr) from melting and dynamic thinning are over seven times larger'than increased gains (25 gt/yr) from precipitation. Parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet and the Antarctic Peninsula are losing mass at an increasing rate, but other parts of West Antarctica and the East Antarctic ice sheet are gaining mass at an increasing rate. Increased losses of 35 Gt/yr in Pine Island, Thwaites-Smith, and Marie-Bryd.Coast are more than balanced by gains in base of Peninsula and ice stream C, D, & E systems. From the 1992-2002 to 2003-2007 period, the overall mass balance for Antarctica changed from a loss of about 60 Gt/yr to near balance or slightly positive.

  18. Surface current dynamics under sea breeze conditions observed by simultaneous HF radar, ADCP and drifter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Fraunié, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Ocean surface boundary layer dynamics off the southern coast of France in the NW Mediterranean is investigated by using velocity observations by high-frequency (HF) radars, surface drifting buoys and a downward-looking drifting acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The analysis confirms that velocities measured by HF radars correspond to those observed by an ADCP at the effective depth z f = k -1, where k is wavenumber of the radio wave emitted by the radar. The radials provided by the radars were in a very good agreement with in situ measurements, with the relative errors of 1 and 9 % and root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.02 and 0.04 m/s for monostatic and bistatic radar, respectively. The total radar-based velocities appeared to be slightly underestimated in magnitude and somewhat biased in direction. At the end of the survey period, the difference in the surface current direction, based on HF radar and ADCP data, attained 10°. It was demonstrated that the surface boundary layer dynamics cannot be reconstructed successfully without taking into the account velocity variation with depth. A significant misalignment of ˜30° caused by the sea breeze was documented between the HF radar (HFR-derived) surface current and the background current. It was also found that the ocean response to a moderate wind forcing was confined to the 4-m-thick upper layer. The respective Ekman current attained the maximum value of 0.15 m/s, and the current rotation was found to be lagging the wind by approximately 40 min, with the current vector direction being 15-20° to the left of the wind. The range of velocity variability due to wind forcing was found comparable with the magnitude of the background current variability.

  19. Aeolian dust emissions in Southern Africa: field measurements of dynamics and drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard; King, James; Eckardt, Frank; Bryant, Robert; Nield, Joanna; Dansie, Andrew; Baddock, Matthew; Haustein, Karsten; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; von Holdt, Johannah; Hipondoka, Martin; Seely, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Airborne dust derived from the world's deserts is a critical component of Earth System behaviour, affecting atmospheric, oceanic, biological, and terrestrial processes as well as human health and activities. However, very few data have been collected on the factors that control dust emission from major source areas, or on the characteristics of the dust that is emitted. Such a paucity of data limits the ability of climate models to properly account for the radiative and dynamical impacts triggered by atmospheric dust. This paper presents field data from the DO4 Models (Dust Observations for Models) project that aims to understand the drivers of variability in dust emission processes from major source areas in southern Africa. Data are presented from three field campaigns undertaken between 2011 and 2015. We analysed remote sensing data to identify the key geomorphological units in southern Africa which are responsible for emission of atmospheric dust. These are the Makgadikgadi pans complex in northern Botswana, the ephemeral river valleys of western Namibia, and Etosha Pan in northern Namibia. Etosha Pan is widely recognised as perhaps the most significant source of atmospheric dust in the southern hemisphere. We deployed an array of field equipment within each source region to measure the variability in and dynamics of aeolian erosivity, as well as dust concentration and flux characteristics. This equipment included up to 11 meteorological stations measuring wind shear stress and other standard climatic parameters, Cimel sun photometers, a LiDAR, sediment transport detectors, high-frequency dust concentration monitors, and dust flux samplers. Further data were gathered at each site on the dynamics of surface characteristics and erodibility parameters that impact upon erosion thresholds. These data were augmented by use of a Pi-Swerl portable wind tunnel. Our data represent the first collected at source for these key dust emission areas and highlight the

  20. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  1. Re-Assessing Poverty Dynamics and State Protections in Britain and the US: The Role of Measurement Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worts, Diana; Sacker, Amanda; McDonough, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses a key methodological challenge in the modeling of individual poverty dynamics--the influence of measurement error. Taking the US and Britain as case studies and building on recent research that uses latent Markov models to reduce bias, we examine how measurement error can affect a range of important poverty estimates. Our data…

  2. Comparison of three different concepts of high dynamic range and dependability optimised current measurement digitisers for beam loss systems

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, W; Effinger, E; Venturini, G G; Zamantzas, C

    2012-01-01

    Three Different Concepts of High Dynamic Range and Dependability Optimised Current Measurement Digitisers for Beam Loss Systems will be compared on this paper. The first concept is based on Current to Frequency Conversion, enhanced with an ADC for extending the dynamic range and decreasing the response time. A summary of 3 years’ worth of operational experience with such a system for LHC beam loss monitoring will be given. The second principle is based on an Adaptive Current to Frequency Converter implemented in an ASIC. The basic parameters of the circuit are discussed and compared with measurements. Several measures are taken to harden both circuits against single event effects and to make them tolerant for operation in radioactive environments. The third circuit is based on a Fully Differential Integrator for enhanced dynamic range, where laboratory and test installation measurements will be presented. All circuits are designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and have reliability and fail safe...

  3. Smartphone-based accelerometry is a valid tool for measuring dynamic changes in knee extension range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støve, Morten Pallisgaard; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto

    2018-01-01

    the validity of smartphone-based accelerometry measuring the dynamic range of motion of the knee joint during a passively executed extension movement.Materials and methodsDynamic knee extension range of motion was examined three consecutive times in twenty-one healthy male subjects utilising an isokinetic...... dynamometer to generate passively the extension motion. Measurements of joint angles in dynamic knee extension were performed using two methods: (i) isokinetic dynamometer (gold-standard method, Biodex System 4 Pro) and (ii) smartphone (iPhone 6, attached to the tibia) accelerometry data.......ResultsTests of validity showed excellent correlation (rs = 0.899) between methods, with a low standard error of measurement of 0.62 deg. and limits of agreement ranging from − 9.1 to 8.8 deg. Interclass correlation coefficients showed excellent between-measures reliability (ICC > 0.862) for both methods.ConclusionsSmartphone...

  4. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Lassila, Antti; Reischl, Bernhard; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation. (paper)

  5. Reliability of a Novel High Intensity One Leg Dynamic Exercise Protocol to Measure Muscle Endurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Pageaux

    Full Text Available We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60, 100 (MVC100 and 140 (MVC140 deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s, 20 s (P20 and 40 s (P40 post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001. MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05 and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05. High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.

  6. A DMA-train for precision measurement of sub-10 nm aerosol dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Dominik; Steiner, Gerhard; Winkler, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol dynamics in the sub-10 nm size range are crucially important for quantifying the impact of new particle formation onto the global budget of cloud condensation nuclei. Here we present the development and characterization of a differential mobility analyzer train (DMA-train), operating six DMAs in parallel for high-time-resolution particle-size-distribution measurements below 10 nm. The DMAs are operated at six different but fixed voltages and hence sizes, together with six state-of-the-art condensation particle counters (CPCs). Two Airmodus A10 particle size magnifiers (PSM) are used for channels below 2.5 nm while sizes above 2.5 nm are detected by TSI 3776 butanol-based or TSI 3788 water-based CPCs. We report the transfer functions and characteristics of six identical Grimm S-DMAs as well as the calibration of a butanol-based TSI model 3776 CPC, a water-based TSI model 3788 CPC and an Airmodus A10 PSM. We find cutoff diameters similar to those reported in the literature. The performance of the DMA-train is tested with a rapidly changing aerosol of a tungsten oxide particle generator during warmup. Additionally we report a measurement of new particle formation taken during a nucleation event in the CLOUD chamber experiment at CERN. We find that the DMA-train is able to bridge the gap between currently well-established measurement techniques in the cluster-particle transition regime, providing high time resolution and accurate size information of neutral and charged particles even at atmospheric particle concentrations.

  7. A HYBRID BALANCED SCORECARD AND SYSTEM DYNAMICS FOR MEASURING PUBLIC SECTOR PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRI GUNARSIH

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Performance measurement on an organization whether it is a profit or nonprofit, has to be conducted in order to evaluate plan attainment. This measurement is considered incomplete as the performance of a company is not only based on financial perspective, but also other perspectives. Balanced Score Card (BSC is a performance measurement method using four perspectives: financial, customers, internal business processes and learning and growth. BSC measurement can be applied on profit and non-profit organizations. BSC focuses on causality (cause and effect which is based only on linear correlation. This situation is the weakness on BSC because it cannot continue to the specific forward step that can predict the future activities. In this study, BSC is combined with System Dynamics (SD that can identify the interaction among four perspectives and also related variable through a causal loop design model. Hybrid modelling design between BSC and SD gives an effective and interesting contemporary study. Then, the model performed with 2012 data input and performance forecasting until 2017. The result obtained for the financial perspectives related to fund absorption from 2013 until 2017 consecutively 100%, 100%, 85%, 72% and 100% with the most influential variable of tax and non-tax by 44.3% and the smallest variable effect is levies variable with 0,08%.Perspectives toward customers related to the efficiency and effective value by 50%, 43%, 43%, 48%, 49 % to customer dissatisfaction variable 48.09%, and 12.03% of customer's satisfaction. Internal business process perspective relates to the value of the total effective capacity by 80%, 71%, 69%, 71%, and 70%. With the most influential variable is the productivity and innovation for 50.77% and 1.94% variable staff morale. The last perspectives is learning and growth effective value for 50%, 44%, 56%, 47%, 46% with the most influential variable is the skill level of workers 27.98% and the smallest effect is

  8. Application of "FLUOR-P" device for analysis of the space flight effects on the intracellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, Olga; Rudimov, Evgeny; Buravkova, Ludmila; Galchuk, Sergey

    The mechanisms of cellular gravisensitivity still remain unclear despite the intensive research in the hypogravity effects on cellular function. In most cell culture experiments on unmanned vehicles "Bion" and "Photon", as well as on the ISS only allow post-flight analysis of biological material, including fixed cells is provided. The dynamic evaluation cellular parameters over a prolonged period of time is not possible. Thus, a promising direction is the development of equipment for onboard autonomous experiments. For this purpose, the SSC RF IBMP RAS has developed "FLUOR-P" device for measurement and recording of the dynamic differential fluorescent signal from nano- and microsized objects of organic and inorganic nature (human and animal cells, unicellular algae, bacteria, cellular organelles suspension) in hermetically sealed cuvettes. Besides, the device allows to record the main physical factors affecting the analyzed object (temperature and gravity loads: position in space, any vector acceleration, shock) in sync with the main measurements. The device is designed to perform long-term programmable autonomous experiments in space flight on biological satellites. The device software of allows to carry out complex experiments using cell. Permanent registration of data on built-in flash will give the opportunity to analyze the dynamics of the estimated parameters. FLUOR-P is designed as a monobloc (5.5 kg weight), 8 functional blocks are located in the inner space of the device. Each registration unit of the FLUOR-P has two channels of fluorescence intensity and excitation light source with the wavelength range from 300 nm to 700 nm. During biosatellite "Photon" flight is supposed to conduct a full analysis of the most important intracellular parameters (mitochondria activity and intracellular pH) dynamics under space flight factors and to assess the possible contribution of temperature on the effects of microgravity. Work is supported by Roskosmos and the

  9. Evaluation of resilient abutment components on measured strain using dynamic loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D; Stanford, C M; Aquilino, S A

    1998-07-01

    Factors that affect transmission of strain from prostheses to bone may affect the long-term success of loaded implants. Current in vitro models are theoretically predictive (finite element modeling) or facsimile (photoelastic) in nature. A more clinically relevant in vitro model for strain evaluation should be investigated. This study attempted: (1) to validate a human cadaver bone model for vitro measurement of cortical bone strain, and (2) to evaluate the effect on cortical strain measurements of a resilient plastic component incorporated within a titanium implant in response to variable dynamic loading. Two IMZ (Interpore International) abutment alternatives were used: the titanium Abutment Complete and the polyoxymethylene Intra-mobile Element. The model system consisted of two implants placed in unfixed human cadaver ulna bone to simulate an implant bound edentulous region. Four biaxial rosette strain gauges simultaneously recorded cortical bone strain immediately mesial and distal to each implant. During experimentation a simulated prosthetic framework supported by either titanium or polyoxymethylene abutments was dynamically loaded 6 min from the terminal abutment along a cantilever extension. Cyclic nominal peak loads were applied with a materials testing machine at 20-N intervals from 20 to 200 N at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute. The protocol allowed frequency of load application to vary. A Newtonian linear correlation (r2 > or = 0.98) between load application and strain output was determined for each gauge position except for the terminal gauge located opposite the cantilever. Cortical strains recorded were within reported physiologic ranges involved in bone modeling and remodeling. Further, the polyoxymethylene abutment components did not result in reduction of peak microstrain at any gauge position. The Intra-mobile Element abutments, however, did increase the time required to complete 10 loading cycles when compared with the titanium Abutment

  10. The effects of dynamic hyperinflation on CT emphysema measurements in patients with COPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco, E-mail: grtalves@gmail.com [Post-graduation Program in Medicine (Radiology), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Post-graduation Program in Medicine (Radiology), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Radiology Department, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital (United Kingdom); Teixeira, Paulo José Zimmerman [Pulmonology Department, Federal University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre (Brazil); Berton, Danilo Cortozi [Pulmonology Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Rubin, Adalberto Sperb [Pulmonology Department, Federal University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Post-graduation Program in Medicine (Radiology), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Objectives: Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) significantly affects dyspnea and intolerance to exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) of the chest is the modality of choice for quantification of the extent of anatomical lung damage in patients with COPD. The purpose of this article is to assess the effects of DH on QCT measurements. Methods: The study sample comprised patients with Global initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages III and IV COPD referred for chest CT. We examined differences in total lung volume (TLV), emphysema volume (EV), and emphysema index (EI) determined by QCT before and after DH induction by metronome-paced tachypnea (MPT). Initial (resting) and post-MPT CT examinations were performed with the same parameters. Results: Images from 66 CT scans (33 patients) were evaluated. EV and EI, but not TLV, increased significantly (p < 0.0001) after DH induction. Conclusion: QCT showed significant increases in EV and EI after MPT-induced DH in patients with GOLD stages III and IV COPD. For longitudinal assessment of patients with COPD using QCT, we recommend the application of a pre-examination rest period, as DH could mimic disease progression. QCT studies of the effects of DH-preventive therapy before exercise could expand our knowledge of effective measures to delay DH-related progression of COPD.

  11. Spin dynamics and exchange interactions in CuO measured by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, H.; Gaw, S. M.; Princep, A. J.; Hamilton, E.; Tóth, S.; Ewings, R. A.; Enderle, M.; Wheeler, E. M. Hétroy; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic properties of CuO encompass several contemporary themes in condensed-matter physics, including quantum magnetism, magnetic frustration, magnetically-induced ferroelectricity, and orbital currents. Here we report polarized and unpolarized neutron inelastic scattering measurements which provide a comprehensive map of the cooperative spin dynamics in the low-temperature antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase of CuO throughout much of the Brillouin zone. At high energies (E ≳100 meV ), the spectrum displays continuum features consistent with the des Cloizeax-Pearson dispersion for an ideal S =1/2 Heisenberg AFM chain. At lower energies, the spectrum becomes more three dimensional, and we find that a linear spin-wave model for a Heisenberg AFM provides a very good description of the data, allowing for an accurate determination of the relevant exchange constants in an effective spin Hamiltonian for CuO. In the high-temperature helicoidal phase, there are features in the measured low-energy spectrum that we could not reproduce with a spin-only model. We discuss how these might be associated with the magnetically-induced multiferroic behavior observed in this phase.

  12. Flexible core masking technique for beam halo measurements with high dynamic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egberts, J; Welsch, C P

    2010-01-01

    A thorough understanding of halo formation and its possible control is highly desirable for essentially all particle accelerators. Particles outside the beam core are not only lost for further experiments, they are also likely to hit the beam pipe, and activate this, as well as accelerator and experimental components in close proximity, which makes work on the accelerator costly and time consuming. Well established techniques for transverse beam profile measurements of electron or high energy hadron beams are the observation of synchrotron radiation, optical transition radiation or the like. A particular challenge, however, is the detection of particles in the tail regions of the beam distribution in close proximity of the very intense beam core. Results from laboratory measurements on two different devices are presented that might form the technical base of a future beam halo monitor: the novel SpectraCam XDR camera system which has an intrinsically high dynamic range due to its unique pixel design, and a flexible masking technique based on a DMD micro mirror array which allows for a fast mask generation to blank out the central core.

  13. Measurement techniques for low emittance tuning and beam dynamics at CESR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, M. G.; Dobbins, J. A.; Forster, M. J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Meller, R. E.; Peterson, D. P.; Ramirez, G. A.; Rendina, M. C.; Rider, N. T.; Sagan, D. C.; Shanks, J.; Sikora, J. P.; Stedinger, M. G.; Strohman, C. R.; Williams, H. A.; Palmer, M. A.; Holtzapple, R. L.; Flanagan, J.

    2018-03-01

    After operating as a High Energy Physics electron-positron collider, the Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring (CESR) has been converted to become a dedicated synchrotron light source for the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). Over the course of several years CESR was adapted for accelerator physics research as a test accelerator, capable of studying topics relevant to future damping rings, colliders and light sources. Initially some specific topics were targeted for accelerator physic research with the storage ring in this mode, labeled CesrTA. These topics included 1) tuning techniques to produce low emittance beams, 2) the study of electron cloud (EC) development in a storage ring and 3) intra-beam scattering effects. The complete conversion of CESR to CesrTA occurred over a several year period, described elsewhere [1–3]. A number of specific instruments were developed for CesrTA. Much of the pre-existing instrumentation was modified to accommodate the scope of these studies and these are described in a companion paper [4]. To complete this research, a number of procedures were developed or modified, often requiring coordinated measurements among different instruments [5]. This paper provides an overview of types of measurements employed for the study of beam dynamics during the operation of CesrTA.

  14. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Behm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  15. Capabilities of optical SIV technique in measurements of flow velocity vector field dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Dushin, N. S.; Saushin, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The main difference between Smoke Image Velocimetry (SIV) technique and the conventional PIV is that higher concentration of tracer particles typical of smoke visualization techniques is used in SIV. Not separate particles but smoke structures with continuous pixel intensity are visible in the recorded images. Owing to better smoke reflectivity, higher spatial and temporal resolution is obtained in the case when relatively simple equipment (camera and laser) is used. It is simple enough to perform SIV measurements of velocity vector field dynamics at the frequency exceeding 15000 Hz, which offers new opportunities in unsteady flow examination. The paper describes fundamentals of SIV technique and gives some new results obtained using this method for the measurements that require high spatial and temporal resolution. The latter include frequency spectra of turbulent velocity fluctuations, turbulence dissipation profiles in the boundary layer and higher-order moments of velocity fluctuations. It has been shown that SIV technique considerably extends the potential of experimental studies of turbulence and flow structure in high-speed processes.

  16. Measuring the dynamic polarizability of tungsten atom via electrical wire explosion in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huantong; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2018-02-01

    Electrical explosion of wire provides a practical approach to the experimental measurement of dynamic polarizability of metal atoms with high melting and boiling temperatures. With the help of insulation coating, a section of tungsten wire was transformed to the plasma state while the near electrode region was partially vaporized, which enabled us to locate the "neutral-region" (consisting of gaseous atoms) in the Mach-Zehnder interferogram. In this paper, the polarizability of the tungsten atom at 532 nm was reconstructed based on a technique previously used for the same purpose, and the basic preconditions of the measurement were verified in detail, including the existence of the neutral region, conservation of linear density of tungsten during wire expansion, and neglect of the vaporized insulation coating. The typical imaging time varied from 80 ns to as late as 200 ns and the reconstructed polarizability of the tungsten atom was 16 ± 1 Å3, which showed good statistical consistency and was also in good agreement with the previous results.

  17. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  18. Characterising thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors through dynamic electrothermal measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Jensen, Ole Kiel

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a method to characterise thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through dynamic electrothermal measurements. A measured relation between RF gain and the channel temperature (Tc) is formed and used for indirect measurements...... method ensures that trapping effects have insignificant impact on the measurements of Tc responses, which makes this method suitable for GaN HEMT characterisation. The applicability of this method is demonstrated by characterising thermal resistances and capacitances of a CREE CGH40006P GaN HEMT....... of dynamic Tc responses. Thermal resistances and capacitances are characterised on the basis of measured Tc responses and power dissipation (Pd) in HEMTs. The proposed method makes it possible to measure fast Tc responses and avoids the use of imaging and spectroscopy techniques. Additionally, the proposed...

  19. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  20. A new measure of the CoP trajectory in postural sway: dynamics of heading change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; Haran, F J; Glass, Stephen M; Warren, William H

    2014-11-01

    The maintenance of upright stance requires the simultaneous control of posture in both the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) dimensions. Postural sway is typically measured by quantifying the movement of the center of pressure (CoP) in the AP and ML dimensions independently. Metrics such as path length and 95% ellipse area have been developed to take into account movement in both the AP and ML directions, but these metrics only quantify the magnitude of the CoP movement. The movement of the CoP is technically a vector quantity with both magnitude and direction characteristics. The direction of displacement, or heading, of the CoP may provide further insight into the control of posture. Accordingly, we present a novel variable that describes the rate of change in direction of CoP displacement in two dimensions, the heading change (Δϕ), which is derived from the CoP heading (ϕ). We then compared the standard deviation (SD) and the dynamic structure characterized by sample entropy (SampEn) of the heading change time series to previously examined metrics presented in the literature (SD and SampEn of the AP and ML time series, path length, SD and SampEn of the CoP resultant magnitude time series) during a 60s single-leg stance performed by healthy participants and patients with a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) prior to surgical intervention. Patients with an ACL rupture exhibited a different dynamic structure in Δϕ compared to healthy controls, t(14)=2.44, p=0.029, whereas none of the other metrics differed between groups (all p>0.05). The novelty and utility of Δϕ is that it characterizes directional changes of the CoP, whereas previously documented postural control analyses describe only changes in magnitude. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. All rights reserved.