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Sample records for intracellular bacterium ehrlichia

  1. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

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    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria.

  2. The genome of obligately intracellular Ehrlichia canis revealsthemes of complex membrane structure and immune evasion strategies

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    Mavromatis, K.; Kuyler Doyle, C.; Lykidis, A.; Ivanova, N.; Francino, P.; Chain, P.; Shin, M.; Malfatti, S.; Larimer, F.; Copeland,A.; Detter, J.C.; Land, M.; Richardson, P.M.; Yu, X.J.; Walker, D.H.; McBride, J.W.; Kyrpides, N.C.

    2005-09-01

    Ehrlichia canis, a small obligately intracellular, tick-transmitted, gram-negative, a-proteobacterium is the primary etiologic agent of globally distributed canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Complete genome sequencing revealed that the E. canis genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,315,030 bp predicted to encode 925 proteins, 40 stable RNA species, and 17 putative pseudogenes, and a substantial proportion of non-coding sequence (27 percent). Interesting genome features include a large set of proteins with transmembrane helices and/or signal sequences, and a unique serine-threonine bias associated with the potential for O-glycosylation that was prominent in proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions. Furthermore, two paralogous protein families associated with immune evasion were identified, one of which contains poly G:C tracts, suggesting that they may play a role in phase variation and facilitation of persistent infections. Proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions were identified including a small group of proteins (12) with tandem repeats and another with eukaryotic-like ankyrin domains (7).

  3. Hacker Within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

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    Taslima Taher Lina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME, an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival.

  4. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 Activates Canonical Notch Signaling To Downregulate TLR2/4 Expression and Promote Intracellular Survival

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    Taslima T. Lina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis preferentially targets mononuclear phagocytes and survives through a strategy of subverting innate immune defenses, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown E. chaffeensis type 1 secreted tandem repeat protein (TRP effectors are involved in diverse molecular pathogen-host interactions, such as the TRP120 interaction with the Notch receptor-cleaving metalloprotease ADAM17. In the present study, we demonstrate E. chaffeensis, via the TRP120 effector, activates the canonical Notch signaling pathway to promote intracellular survival. We found that nuclear translocation of the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain (NICD occurs in response to E. chaffeensis or recombinant TRP120, resulting in upregulation of Notch signaling pathway components and target genes notch1, adam17, hes, and hey. Significant differences in canonical Notch signaling gene expression levels (>40% were observed during early and late stages of infection, indicating activation of the Notch pathway. We linked Notch pathway activation specifically to the TRP120 effector, which directly interacts with the Notch metalloprotease ADAM17. Using pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against γ-secretase enzyme, Notch transcription factor complex, Notch1, and ADAM17, we demonstrated that Notch signaling is required for ehrlichial survival. We studied the downstream effects and found that E. chaffeensis TRP120-mediated activation of the Notch pathway causes inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways required for PU.1 and subsequent Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4 expression. This investigation reveals a novel mechanism whereby E. chaffeensis exploits the Notch pathway to evade the host innate immune response for intracellular survival.

  5. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 Activates Canonical Notch Signaling To Downregulate TLR2/4 Expression and Promote Intracellular Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Lina, Taslima T.; Dunphy, Paige S.; Luo, Tian; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ehrlichia chaffeensis preferentially targets mononuclear phagocytes and survives through a strategy of subverting innate immune defenses, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown E.?chaffeensis type 1 secreted tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors are involved in diverse molecular pathogen-host interactions, such as the TRP120 interaction with the Notch receptor-cleaving metalloprotease ADAM17. In the present study, we demonstrate E.?chaffeensis, via the TRP120 effector, activat...

  6. Engineering a predatory bacterium as a proficient killer agent for intracellular bio-products recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Virginia; Herencias, Cristina; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the potential of the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, an obligate predator of other Gram-negative bacteria, as an external cell-lytic agent for recovering valuable intracellular bio-products produced by prey cultures. The bio-product targets to be recovered......% of that accumulated by the prey bacteria, even at high biomass concentrations. This innovative downstream process highlights how B. bacteriovorus can be used as a novel, biological lytic agent for the inexpensive, industrial scale recovery of intracellular products from different Gram-negative prey cultures....

  7. Analysis of convergent gene transcripts in the obligate intracellular bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii.

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    Andrew Woodard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Termination of transcription is an important component of bacterial gene expression. However, little is known concerning this process in the obligate intracellular pathogen and model for reductive evolution, Rickettsia prowazekii. To assess transcriptional termination in this bacterium, transcripts of convergent gene pairs, some containing predicted intrinsic terminators, were analyzed. These analyses revealed that, rather than terminating at a specific site within the intervening region between the convergent genes, most of the transcripts demonstrated either a lack of termination within this region, which generated antisense RNA, or a putative non-site-specific termination that occurred throughout the intervening sequence. Transcripts terminating at predicted intrinsic terminators, as well as at a putative Rho-dependant terminator, were also examined and found to vary based on the rickettsial host environment. These results suggest that transcriptional termination, or lack thereof, plays a role in rickettsial gene regulation.

  8. Iron Starvation Conditions Upregulate Ehrlichia ruminantium Type IV Secretion System, tr1 Transcription Factor and map1 Genes Family through the Master Regulatory Protein ErxR

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    Amal Moumène

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia ruminantium is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes heartwater, a fatal disease in ruminants. Due to its intracellular nature, E. ruminantium requires a set of specific virulence factors, such as the type IV secretion system (T4SS, and outer membrane proteins (Map proteins in order to avoid and subvert the host's immune response. Several studies have been conducted to understand the regulation of the T4SS or outer membrane proteins, in Ehrlichia, but no integrated approach has been used to understand the regulation of Ehrlichia pathogenicity determinants in response to environmental cues. Iron is known to be a key nutrient for bacterial growth both in the environment and within hosts. In this study, we experimentally demonstrated the regulation of virB, map1, and tr1 genes by the newly identified master regulator ErxR (for Ehrlichia ruminantium expression regulator. We also analyzed the effect of iron depletion on the expression of erxR gene, tr1 transcription factor, T4SS and map1 genes clusters in E. ruminantium. We show that exposure of E. ruminantium to iron starvation induces erxR and subsequently tr1, virB, and map1 genes. Our results reveal tight co-regulation of T4SS and map1 genes via the ErxR regulatory protein at the transcriptional level, and, for the first time link map genes to the virulence function sensu stricto, thereby advancing our understanding of Ehrlichia's infection process. These results suggest that Ehrlichia is able to sense changes in iron concentrations in the environment and to regulate the expression of virulence factors accordingly.

  9. Natural history of zoonotic Ehrlichia species in the United States and discovery of a novel ehrlichial pathogen

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    Loftis, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Ehrlichia are obligate intracellular pathogens, transmitted by ixodid ticks, of both animals and humans. Ehrlichiae are emerging diseases in the USA, and the discovery of new species proceeds more rapidly than the development of models to study these agents. Laboratory animals were evaluated as

  10. 'Cand. Actinochlamydia clariae' gen. nov., sp. nov., a unique intracellular bacterium causing epitheliocystis in catfish (Clarias gariepinus in Uganda.

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    Andreas Steigen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Epitheliocystis, caused by bacteria infecting gill epithelial cells in fish, is common among a large range of fish species in both fresh- and seawater. The aquaculture industry considers epitheliocystis an important problem. It affects the welfare of the fish and the resulting gill disease may lead to mortalities. In a culture facility in Kampala, Uganda, juveniles of the African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus was observed swimming in the surface, sometimes belly up, showing signs of respiratory problems. Histological examination of gill tissues from this fish revealed large amounts of epitheliocysts, and also presence of a few Ichthyobodo sp. and Trichodina sp. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sequencing of the epitheliocystis bacterium 16S rRNA gene shows 86.3% similarity with Candidatus Piscichlamydia salmonis causing epitheliocystis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the morphology of the developmental stages of the bacterium is similar to that of members of the family Chlamydiaceae. The similarity of the bacterium rRNA gene sequences compared with other chlamydia-like bacteria ranged between 80.5% and 86.3%. Inclusions containing this new bacterium have tubules/channels (termed actinae that are radiating from the inclusion membrane and opening on the cell surface or in neighbouring cells. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation of tubules/channels (actinae from the inclusion membrane has never been described in any of the other members of Chlamydiales. It seems to be a completely new character and an apomorphy. We propose the name Candidatus Actinochlamydia clariae gen. nov., sp. nov. (Actinochlamydiaceae fam. nov., order Chlamydiales, phylum Chlamydiae for this new agent causing epitheliocystis in African sharptooth catfish.

  11. Complete genome of Phenylobacterium zucineum – a novel facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from human erythroleukemia cell line K562

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    Sun Jie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylobacterium zucineum is a recently identified facultative intracellular species isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562. Unlike the known intracellular pathogens, P. zucineum maintains a stable association with its host cell without affecting the growth and morphology of the latter. Results Here, we report the whole genome sequence of the type strain HLK1T. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3,996,255 bp and a circular plasmid (382,976 bp. It encodes 3,861 putative proteins, 42 tRNAs, and a 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that it is phylogenetically closest to Caulobacter crescentus, a model species for cell cycle research. Notably, P. zucineum has a gene that is strikingly similar, both structurally and functionally, to the cell cycle master regulator CtrA of C. crescentus, and most of the genes directly regulated by CtrA in the latter have orthologs in the former. Conclusion This work presents the first complete bacterial genome in the genus Phenylobacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the CtrA regulon is well conserved between C. crescentus and P. zucineum.

  12. Ehrlichia secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

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    Lin, Mingqun; Liu, Hongyan; Xiong, Qingming; Niu, Hua; Cheng, Zhihui; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-11-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes a potentially fatal emerging zoonosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis. E. chaffeensis has a limited capacity for biosynthesis and metabolism and thus depends mostly on host-synthesized nutrients for growth. Although the host cell cytoplasm is rich with these nutrients, as E. chaffeensis is confined within the early endosome-like membrane-bound compartment, only host nutrients that enter the compartment can be used by this bacterium. How this occurs is unknown. We found that ehrlichial replication depended on autophagy induction involving class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) activity, BECN1 (Beclin 1), and ATG5 (autophagy-related 5). Ehrlichia acquired host cell preincorporated amino acids in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner and ehrlichial growth was enhanced by treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy inducer. Moreover, ATG5 and RAB5A/B/C were routed to ehrlichial inclusions. RAB5A/B/C siRNA knockdown, or overexpression of a RAB5-specific GTPase-activating protein or dominant-negative RAB5A inhibited ehrlichial infection, indicating the critical role of GTP-bound RAB5 during infection. Both native and ectopically expressed ehrlichial type IV secretion effector protein, Etf-1, bound RAB5 and the autophagy-initiating class III PtdIns3K complex, PIK3C3/VPS34, and BECN1, and homed to ehrlichial inclusions. Ectopically expressed Etf-1 activated class III PtdIns3K as in E. chaffeensis infection and induced autophagosome formation, cleared an aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner, and enhanced ehrlichial proliferation. These data support the notion that E. chaffeensis secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy to repurpose the host cytoplasm and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III PtdIns3K, while avoiding autolysosomal killing.

  13. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

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    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  14. The genome of the intracellular bacterium of the coastal bivalve, Solemya velum: a blueprint for thriving in and out of symbiosis

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    Dmytrenko, Oleg; Russell, Shelbi L.; Loo, Wesley T.; Fontanez, Kristina M.; Liao, Li; Roeselers, Guus; Sharma, Raghav; Stewart, Frank J.; Newton, Irene LG; Woyke, Tanja; Wu, Dongying; Lang, Jenna; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Symbioses between chemoautotrophic bacteria and marine invertebrates are rare examples of living systems that are virtually independent of photosynthetic primary production. These associations have evolved multiple times in marine habitats, such as deep-sea hydrothermal vents and reducing sediments, characterized by steep gradients of oxygen and reduced chemicals. Due to difficulties associated with maintaining these symbioses in the laboratory and culturing the symbiotic bacteria, studies of chemosynthetic symbioses rely heavily on culture independent methods. The symbiosis between the coastal bivalve, Solemya velum, and its intracellular symbiont is a model for chemosynthetic symbioses given its accessibility in intertidal environments and the ability to maintain it under laboratory conditions. To better understand this symbiosis, the genome of the S. velum endosymbiont was sequenced. Results: Relative to the genomes of obligate symbiotic bacteria, which commonly undergo erosion and reduction, the S. velum symbiont genome was large (2.86 Mb), GC-rich (50.4percent), and contained a large number (78) of mobile genetic elements. Comparative genomics identified sets of genes specific to the chemosynthetic lifestyle and necessary to sustain the symbiosis. In addition, a number of inferred metabolic pathways and cellular processes, including heterotrophy, branched electron transport, and motility, suggested that besides the ability to function as an endosymbiont, the bacterium may have the capacity to live outside the host. Conclusions: The physiological dexterity indicated by the genome substantially improves our understanding of the genetic and metabolic capabilities of the S. velum symbiont and the breadth of niches the partners may inhabit during their lifecycle

  15. Seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii in dogs in North America

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    Beall Melissa J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the exposure of dogs to three different Ehrlichia spp. in the south and central regions of the United States where vector-borne disease prevalence has been previously difficult to ascertain, particularly beyond the metropolitan areas. Methods Dog blood samples (n = 8,662 were submitted from 14 veterinary colleges, 6 private veterinary practices and 4 diagnostic laboratories across this region. Samples were tested for E. canis, E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii specific antibodies using peptide microtiter ELISAs. Results Overall, E. canis, E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii seroprevalence was 0.8%, 2.8%, and 5.1%, respectively. The highest E. canis seroprevalence (2.3% was found in a region encompassing Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. E. chaffeensis seroreactivity was 6.6% in the central region (Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma and 4.6% in the southeast region (Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Seroreactivity to E. ewingii was also highest in the central region (14.6% followed by the southeast region (5.9%. The geospatial pattern derived from E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii seropositive samples was similar to previous reports based on E. chaffeensis seroreactivity in white-tailed deer and the distribution of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME cases reported by the CDC. Conclusions The results of this study provide the first large scale regional documentation of exposure to E. canis, E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii in pet dogs, highlighting regional differences in seroprevalence and providing the basis for heightened awareness of these emerging vector-borne pathogens by veterinarians and public health agencies.

  16. An Ehrlichia strain from a llama (Lama glama) and Llama-associated ticks (Ixodes pacificus).

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    Barlough, J E; Madigan, J E; Turoff, D R; Clover, J R; Shelly, S M; Dumler, J S

    1997-01-01

    An ehrlichia was identified in the blood of a diseased llama (lama glama). Sequencing of its 16S rRNA gene showed the ehrlichia to be closely related to members of the Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup. The agent was also found in a pool of ticks (Ixodes pacificus) collected at the llama site. PMID:9157118

  17. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens.

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    Samar Habib

    Full Text Available Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE, which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8-10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of heartwater (Ehrlichia ruminantium infection) in The Gambia

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    Faburay, B.

    2007-01-01

    Heartwater is caused by Ehrlichia ruminantium and transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyomma. It occurs in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Caribbean and affects domestic ruminants. There is general lack of information on the epidemiology of the disease in The Gambia. Results of a countrywide

  19. Anaplasma, Ehrlichia and Rickettsia species infections in cats

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    Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Radford, Alan D; Tasker, Séverine; Belák, Sándor; Addie, Diane D; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Horzinek, Marian C; Hosie, Margaret J; Lloret, Albert; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin

    2017-01-01

    OVERVIEW: Anaplasma species, Ehrlichia species and Rickettsia species are vector-borne pathogens infecting a wide variety of mammals, but causing disease in very few of them. Infection in cats: Anaplasma phagocytophilum is the most important feline pathogen among these rickettsial organisms, and

  20. Citrate synthase gene sequence: a new tool for phylogenetic analysis and identification of Ehrlichia.

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    Inokuma, H; Brouqui, P; Drancourt, M; Raoult, D

    2001-09-01

    The sequence of the citrate synthase gene (gltA) of 13 ehrlichial species (Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia muris, an Ehrlichia species recently detected from Ixodes ovatus, Cowdria ruminantium, Ehrlichia phagocytophila, Ehrlichia equi, the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis [HGE] agent, Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma centrale, Ehrlichia sennetsu, Ehrlichia risticii, and Neorickettsia helminthoeca) have been determined by degenerate PCR and the Genome Walker method. The ehrlichial gltA genes are 1,197 bp (E. sennetsu and E. risticii) to 1,254 bp (A. marginale and A. centrale) long, and GC contents of the gene vary from 30.5% (Ehrlichia sp. detected from I. ovatus) to 51.0% (A. centrale). The percent identities of the gltA nucleotide sequences among ehrlichial species were 49.7% (E. risticii versus A. centrale) to 99.8% (HGE agent versus E. equi). The percent identities of deduced amino acid sequences were 44.4% (E. sennetsu versus E. muris) to 99.5% (HGE agent versus E. equi), whereas the homology range of 16S rRNA genes was 83.5% (E. risticii versus the Ehrlichia sp. detected from I. ovatus) to 99.9% (HGE agent, E. equi, and E. phagocytophila). The architecture of the phylogenetic trees constructed by gltA nucleotide sequences or amino acid sequences was similar to that derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences but showed more-significant bootstrap values. Based upon the alignment analysis of the ehrlichial gltA sequences, two sets of primers were designed to amplify tick-borne Ehrlichia and Neorickettsia genogroup Ehrlichia (N. helminthoeca, E. sennetsu, and E. risticii), respectively. Tick-borne Ehrlichia species were specifically identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of AcsI and XhoI with the exception of E. muris and the very closely related ehrlichia derived from I. ovatus for which sequence analysis of the PCR product is needed. Similarly, Neorickettsia genogroup Ehrlichia species were specifically identified by

  1. Seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis infection in stray dogs from Serbia

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    Nataša Bogićević

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis is a zoonotic bacterial disease with worldwide distribution. With regards to the population of stray dogs, the disease is facilitated due to their lifestyle and the lack of anti-parasitic protection. The aim of this study was to provide serological data on the presence of a specific Ehrlichia canis IgG antibodies in stray dogs, originating from 7 municipalities in Serbia. During the period from April 2013 to June 2014, 217 canine sera were submitted to the laboratory of the Department of Infectious Diseases of Animals and Bees, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Belgrade. An immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT was performed to detect antibodies to Ehrlichia canis (cut off, 1:50. Seropositive dogs were found in 5 out of 7 counties with a seroprevalence varying from 3.57% to 20% and an overall seroprevalence of 11.06% (24/217. There was no statistically significant difference between the prevalence of infection and the host age or gender. Results showed that stray dogs contribute to maintaining and spreading of Ehrlichia canis in Serbia. Due to the close relationship between people and dogs, it is of great importance to constantly monitor and improve prevention of this disease.

  2. Efficient high-throughput molecular method to detect Ehrlichia ruminantium in ticks

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    Nídia Cangi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ehrlichia ruminantium is the causal agent of heartwater, a fatal tropical disease affecting ruminants with important economic impacts. This bacterium is transmitted by Amblyomma ticks and is present in sub-Saharan Africa, islands in the Indian Ocean and the Caribbean, where it represents a threat to the American mainland. Methods An automated DNA extraction method was adapted for Amblyomma ticks and a new qPCR targeting the pCS20 region was developed to improve E. ruminantium screening capacity and diagnosis. The first step in the preparation of tick samples, before extraction, was not automated but was considerably improved by using a Tissue Lyser. The new pCS20 Sol1 qPCR and a previously published pCS20 Cow qPCR were evaluated with the OIE standard pCS20 nested PCR. Results pCS20 Sol1 qPCR was found to be more specific than the nested PCR, with a 5-fold increase in sensitivity (3 copies/reaction vs 15 copies/reaction, was less prone to contamination and less time-consuming. As pCS20 Sol1 qPCR did not detect Rickettsia, Anasplasma and Babesia species or closely related species such as Panola Mountain Ehrlichia, E. chaffeensis and E. canis, its specificity was also better than Cow qPCR. In parallel, a tick 16S qPCR was developed for the quality control of DNA extraction that confirmed the good reproducibility of the automated extraction. The whole method, including the automated DNA extraction and pCS20 Sol1 qPCR, was shown to be sensitive, specific and highly reproducible with the same limit of detection as the combined manual DNA extraction and nested PCR, i.e. 6 copies/reaction. Finally, 96 samples can be tested in one day compared to the four days required for manual DNA extraction and nested PCR. Conclusions The adaptation of an automated DNA extraction using a DNA/RNA viral extraction kit for tick samples and the development of a new qPCR increased the accuracy of E. ruminantium epidemiological studies, as well as the

  3. Identificación morfológica de Ehrlichia sp. en las plaquetas de pacientes con infección por virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana, en Venezuela Morphologic identification of Ehrlichia sp. in the platelets of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus in Venezuela

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    Irene del Carmen de Tamí

    2004-11-01

    immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS after a variable period during which the individual can develop different types of opportunistic infections whose severity depends on his/her immune status. Human ehrlichiosis is a newly-recognized tick-borne infectious disease caused by Ehrlichia spp., which are obligate intracellular, Gram-negative bacteria showing tropism for blood cells (leukocytes and platelets. In Venezuela, the disease was first recognized in humans in 1994, when intra-cytoplasmic microcolonies (morula were found in human platelets. METHODS: We collected peripheral blood samples from 87 HIV-positive persons that were received at the Immunology Laboratory of the Oncology and Hematology Institute in Caracas, Venezuela, one of the country's referral centers for cases of HIV infection. Slides prepared from buffy coat that had been stained with Wright's solution and sealed with resin for preservation were examined retrospectively under the light microscope. RESULTS: Ehrlichia spp. were found in the platelets of 12 of the 87 (13.8% patients whose slides were examined. CONCLUSION: The presence of Ehrlichia sp. in the platelets of HIV-positive patients suggests that ehrlichiosis should be among the differential diagnoses of opportunistic infection in this group of patients.

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acid Knockdown and Intra-host Cell Complementation of Ehrlichia Type IV Secretion System Effector

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    Pratibha Sharma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Survival of Ehrlichia chaffeensis depends on obligatory intracellular infection. One of the barriers to E. chaffeensis research progress has been the inability, using conventional techniques, to generate knock-out mutants for genes essential for intracellular infection. This study examined the use of Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs technology to interrupt type IV secretion system (T4SS effector protein expression in E. chaffeensis followed by intracellular complementation of the effector to determine its requirement for infection. Successful E. chaffeensis infection depends on the E. chaffeensis-specific T4SS protein effector, ehrlichial translocated factor-1 (Etf-1, which induces Rab5-regulated autophagy to provide host cytosolic nutrients required for E. chaffeensis proliferation. Etf-1 is also imported by host cell mitochondria where it inhibits host cell apoptosis to prolong its infection. We designed a PNA specific to Etf-1 and showed that the PNA bound to the target region of single-stranded Etf-1 RNA using a competitive binding assay. Electroporation of E. chaffeensis with this PNA significantly reduced Etf-1 mRNA and protein, and the bacteria's ability to induce host cell autophagy and infect host cells. Etf-1 PNA-mediated inhibition of ehrlichial Etf-1 expression and E. chaffeensis infection could be intracellularly trans-complemented by ectopic expression of Etf-1-GFP in host cells. These data affirmed the critical role of bacterial T4SS effector in host cell autophagy and E. chaffeensis infection, and demonstrated the use of PNA to analyze the gene functions of obligate intracellular bacteria.

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichia ewingii infection to Undetermined

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichia ewingii infection to Undetermined - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection to Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection to Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of...

  7. First isolation and molecular characterization of Ehrlichia canis in Costa Rica, Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, L E; Meneses, A I; Salazar, L; Jiménez, M; Romero, J J; Aguiar, D M; Labruna, M B; Dolz, G

    2011-08-01

    The present study investigated Ehrlichia species in blood samples from dogs suspected of clinical ehrlichiosis, using molecular and isolation techniques in cell culture. From a total of 310 canine blood samples analyzed by 16S rRNA nested PCR, 148 (47.7%) were positive for Ehrlichia canis. DNA from Ehrlichia chaffeensis or Ehrlichia ewingii was not detected in any sample using species-specific primers in separated reactions. Leukocytes from five PCR-positive dogs were inoculated into DH82 cells; successful isolation of E. canis was obtained in four samples. Partial sequence of the dsb gene of eight canine blood samples (including the five samples for in vitro isolation) was obtained by PCR and their analyses through BLAST showed 100% of identity with the corresponding sequence of E. canis in GenBank. This study represents the first molecular diagnosis, isolation, and molecular characterization of E. canis in dogs from Costa Rica. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PREVALENCE OF BABESIA SPP., EHRLICHIA SPP., AND TICK INFESTATIONS IN OKLAHOMA BLACK BEARS (URSUS AMERICANUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Delaina; Mitcham, Jessica R; Starkey, Lindsay A; Noden, Bruce H; Fairbanks, W Sue; Little, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    American black bears (Ursus americanus) are commonly infested with ticks throughout their range, but there are few surveys for tick-borne disease agents in bears. To characterize tick infestations and determine the prevalence of current infection with Babesia spp. and past or current infection with Ehrlichia spp. in newly re-established populations of black bears in east central and southeastern Oklahoma, US, we identified adult (n=1,048) and immature (n=107) ticks recovered from bears (n=62). We evaluated serum and whole blood samples from a subset (n=49) for antibodies reactive to, and characteristic DNA fragments of, Ehrlichia spp., as well as characteristic DNA fragments of Babesia spp. Amblyomma americanum, the most common tick identified, was found on a majority (56/62; 90%) of bears and accounted for 697/1,048 (66.5%) of all ticks recovered. Other ticks included Dermacentor variabilis (338/1,048; 32.3%) from 36 bears, Amblyomma maculatum (9/1,048; 0.9%) from three bears, and Ixodes scapularis (4/1,048; 0.4%) from three bears. Antibodies reactive to Ehrlichia spp. were detected in every bear tested (49/49; 100%); maximum inverse titers to Ehrlichia chaffeensis ranged from 64-4,096 (geometric mean titer 1,525). However, PCR failed to identify active infection with E. chaffeensis, Ehrlichia ewingii, or an Ehrlichia ruminantium-like agent. Infection with Babesia spp. was detected by PCR in 3/49 (6%) bears. Together these data confirm that tick infestations and infection with tick-borne disease agents are common in bears in the southern US. The significance of these infestations and infections to the health of bears, if any, and the identity of the Ehrlichia spp. responsible for the antibody reactivity seen, warrant further evaluation.

  9. Associated Factors to Seroprevalence of Ehrlichia spp. in Dogs of Quintana Roo, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Vega, Pedro Pablo; Bolio-Gonzalez, Manuel Emilio; Rodríguez-Vivas, Roger Iván; Gutierrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Pérez-Osorio, Carlos; Villegas-Perez, Sandra Luz; Sauri-Arceo, Carlos Humberto

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence to Ehrlichia spp. in dogs from Xcalak, Quintana Roo, Mexico, and the associated factors. Serum samples were obtained from 118 dogs and used in an indirect immunofluorescent assay test for the detection of antibodies against Ehrlichia spp. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about possible variables associated with seroprevalence. These variables were analyzed through Chi 2 test and logistic regression. Dog seroprevalence of antibodies against Ehrlichia spp. was 64% (75/118). Fifty-two percent (61/118) of dogs had tick infestation which was identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato . Anemia was observed in 36% of dogs. Leucopenia (2.5%), thrombocytopenia (70%), and hemorrhage (14%) were also observed. Thirty-one percent (23/75) of dogs with anemia, 4% (3/75) of dogs with leucopenia, 80% (60/75) of dogs with thrombocytopenia, 17% (13/75) of dogs with hemorrhages, and 59% (44/75) of dogs with ticks were positive for Ehrlichia spp. antibodies. The factors associated with seroprevalence were age (1-3 and >3 years old, OR = 7.77 and OR = 15.39, resp.), tick infestation (OR = 3.13), and thrombocytopenia (OR = 3.36). In conclusion, seroprevalence of Ehrlichia spp. was high in the community of Xcalak and its associated factors were age, tick infestation, and thrombocytopenia.

  10. Associated Factors to Seroprevalence of Ehrlichia spp. in Dogs of Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pablo Martínez-Vega

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence to Ehrlichia spp. in dogs from Xcalak, Quintana Roo, Mexico, and the associated factors. Serum samples were obtained from 118 dogs and used in an indirect immunofluorescent assay test for the detection of antibodies against Ehrlichia spp. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about possible variables associated with seroprevalence. These variables were analyzed through Chi2 test and logistic regression. Dog seroprevalence of antibodies against Ehrlichia spp. was 64% (75/118. Fifty-two percent (61/118 of dogs had tick infestation which was identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato. Anemia was observed in 36% of dogs. Leucopenia (2.5%, thrombocytopenia (70%, and hemorrhage (14% were also observed. Thirty-one percent (23/75 of dogs with anemia, 4% (3/75 of dogs with leucopenia, 80% (60/75 of dogs with thrombocytopenia, 17% (13/75 of dogs with hemorrhages, and 59% (44/75 of dogs with ticks were positive for Ehrlichia spp. antibodies. The factors associated with seroprevalence were age (1–3 and >3 years old, OR = 7.77 and OR = 15.39, resp., tick infestation (OR = 3.13, and thrombocytopenia (OR = 3.36. In conclusion, seroprevalence of Ehrlichia spp. was high in the community of Xcalak and its associated factors were age, tick infestation, and thrombocytopenia.

  11. Serodetection of Ehrlichia canis amongst dogs in central Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutendo Manyarara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia canis is a major pathogen in dogs throughout Africa, yet it has not been reported in Namibia. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of canine ehrlichiosis in central Namibia using the ImmunoComb assay (Biogal, Galed Laboratories. The study included 76 dogs that presented to the Rhino Park Veterinary Clinic in the north-western suburb of Khomasdal, Windhoek, Namibia, as well as 30 stray dogs from the Windhoek branch of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Of the 106 dogs tested, 53.8% were seropositive at titres > 1:80. Dogs that presented with symptoms of E. canis infection had a significantly higher seroprevalence (86.6% compared with apparently healthy dogs (41.6% (P = 0.00. Location of habitation was significant (P < 0.017, with a high percentage of dogs exposed to E. canis living in the northern or north-western part of Windhoek. As the first study to serologically establish E. canis as a major pathogen in dogs in central Namibia, it is notable that the highest proportion of seropositive dogs came from low-income areas. Further investigation is necessary to describe the ecology of this important tick-borne pathogen of companion animals in Namibia.

  12. A molecular epidemiological survey of Babesia, Hepatozoon, Ehrlichia and Anaplasma infections of dogs in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUBO, Shotaro; TATENO, Morihiro; ICHIKAWA, Yasuaki; ENDO, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne diseases are often encountered in canine clinical practice. In the present study, a molecular epidemiological survey of dogs in Japan was conducted to understand the prevalence and geographical distribution of Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. Pathogen-derived DNA in blood samples obtained from 722 dogs with a history of exposure to ticks and/or fleas was examined by PCR. The prevalence of Babesia gibsoni, Babesia odocoilei-like species, Hepatozoon canis and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. was 2.4% (16/722), 0.1% (1/722), 2.5% (18/722) and 1.5% (11/722), respectively. While B. gibsoni and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. were detected in the western part of Japan, H. canis was detected in Tohoku area in addition to western and central parts of Japan. PMID:25947226

  13. Characterization of a Neochlamydia-like Bacterium Associated with Epitheliocystis in Cultured Artic Char Salvelinus alpinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infections of branchial epithelium by intracellular gram-negative bacteria, termed epitheliocystis, have limited culture of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). To characterize a bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured char, gills were sampled for histopathologic examination, conventional...

  14. Soroprevalência de anticorpos anti-Ehrlichia canis em cães de Cuiabá, Mato Grosso Seroprevalence anti-Ehrlichia canis antibodies in dogs of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nivaldo da Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A erliquiose canina é uma doença transmitida por carrapatos Rhipicephalus sanguineus e ocasionada pela Ehrlichia canis, bactéria intracelular obrigatória. O presente estudo verificou a prevalência de anticorpos anti-E. canis em 254 cães de quatro regiões administrativas de Cuiabá, Estado de Mato Grosso, por imunofluorescência indireta, observando-se uma prevalência de 42,5% (108/254 sem diferença significativa entre as regiões. As variáveis idade, raça, sexo, hábitat, acesso à zona rural e presença de carrapatos foram analisadas. Os títulos de anticorpos variaram entre 1:40 a 1:2.560. Somente 32 (29,63% cães soropositivos estavam infestados por carrapatos, todos R. sanguineus. O resultado encontrado confirma que não há predisposição racial, sexual ou etária, enquanto a menor ocorrência de cães reagentes no intradomicílio provavelmente está relacionada à baixa infestação por carrapato, apesar de não ter sido observada diferença significativa entre os cães com ou sem a infestação com o carrapato vetor.Canine ehrlichiosis is a disease transmitted by ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus and caused by Ehrlichia canis, obligatory intracellular bacteria. The present study examined the prevalence of anti-E. canis in 254 dogs from four administrative regions of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, by indirect immunofluorescence assay. There was a prevalence of 42.5% (108/254 without significant difference between the studied regions. The variables age, breed, sex, habitat, access to rural and ticks were analyzed. The antibody titers ranged from 1:40 to 1:2,560. Only 32 (29.63% seropositive dogs were infested with ticks, all R. sanguineus. The results confirm that do not have breed, sex or age predisposition to ehrlichiosis due E. canis, while the lowest occurrence of reactive dogs indoors probably related to low tick infestation, although no significant difference between dogs with or without infestation with the tick vector.

  15. The recombinant 120-kilodalton protein of Ehrlichia chaffeensis, a potential diagnostic tool.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, X J; Crocquet-Valdes, P; Cullman, L C; Walker, D H

    1996-01-01

    DNA encoding two repeat units of 120-kDa protein of Ehrlichia chaffeensis was cloned into the expression vector pGEX and expressed in Escherichia coli. The sensitivity and specificity of a dot blot assay for detection of human antibodies with the recombinant protein were 86 and 100%, respectively, compared with an indirect immunofluorescence assay.

  16. Detection of Ehrlichia canis in domestic cats in the central-western region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ísis Assis Braga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichiosis is a worldwide distributed disease caused by different bacteria of the Ehrlichia genus that are transmitted by arthropod vectors. Its occurrence in dogs is considered endemic in several regions of Brazil. Regarding cats, however, few studies have been done and, consequently, there is not enough data available. In order to detect Ehrlichia spp. in cats from the central-western region of Brazil, blood and serum samples were collected from a regional population of 212 individuals originated from the cities of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande. These animals were tested by the Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR designed to amplify a 409 bp fragment of the dsb gene. The results obtained show that 88 (41.5% cats were seropositive by IFA and 20 (9.4% cats were positive by PCR. The partial DNA sequence obtained from PCR products yielded twenty samples that were found to match perfectly the Ehrlichia canis sequences deposited on GenBank. The natural transmission of Ehrlichia in cats has not been fully established. Furthermore, tick infestation was not observed in the evaluated cats and was not observed any association between age, gender and positivity of cats in both tests. The present study reports the first serological and molecular detection of E. canis in domestic cats located in the endemic area previously mentioned.

  17. The Microbiome of Ehrlichia-Infected and Uninfected Lone Star Ticks (Amblyomma americanum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Trout Fryxell

    Full Text Available The Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum, transmits several bacterial pathogens including species of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia. Amblyomma americanum also hosts a number of non-pathogenic bacterial endosymbionts. Recent studies of other arthropod and insect vectors have documented that commensal microflora can influence transmission of vector-borne pathogens; however, little is known about tick microbiomes and their possible influence on tick-borne diseases. Our objective was to compare bacterial communities associated with A. americanum, comparing Anaplasma/Ehrlichia -infected and uninfected ticks. Field-collected questing specimens (n = 50 were used in the analyses, of which 17 were identified as Anaplasma/Ehrlichia infected based on PCR amplification and sequencing of groEL genes. Bacterial communities from each specimen were characterized using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries. There was a broad range in diversity between samples, with inverse Simpson's Diversity indices ranging from 1.28-89.5. There were no statistical differences in the overall microbial community structure between PCR diagnosed Anaplasma/Ehrlichia-positive and negative ticks, but there were differences based on collection method (P < 0.05, collection site (P < 0.05, and sex (P < 0.1 suggesting that environmental factors may structure A. americanum microbiomes. Interestingly, there was not always agreement between Illumina sequencing and PCR diagnostics: Ehrlichia was identified in 16S rRNA gene libraries from three PCR-negative specimens; conversely, Ehrlichia was not found in libraries of six PCR-positive ticks. Illumina sequencing also helped identify co-infections, for example, one specimen had both Ehrlichia and Anaplasma. Other taxa of interest in these specimens included Coxiella, Borrelia, and Rickettsia. Identification of bacterial community differences between specimens of a single tick species from a single geographical site indicates that

  18. The glycoprotein TRP36 of Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV and related cattle pathogen Ehrlichia sp. UFMT-BV evolved from a highly variable clade of E. canis under adaptive diversifying selection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabezas-Cruz, A.; Valdés, James J.; de la Fuente, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, DEC 10 2014 (2014), s. 584 ISSN 1756-3305 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV * Ehrlichia sp. UFMT-BV * E. mineirensis * Host-shift * Diversifying episodic selection Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.430, year: 2014

  19. Detection and phylogenetic characterisation of novel Anaplasma and Ehrlichia species in Amblyomma triguttatum subsp. from four allopatric populations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofton, Alexander W; Waudby, Helen P; Petit, Sophie; Greay, Telleasha L; Ryan, Una M; Irwin, Peter J

    2017-08-01

    Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. are tick-borne pathogens that can cause severe disease in domestic animals, and several species are responsible for emerging zoonoses in the northern hemisphere. Until recently, the only members of these genera reported in Australia (A. marginale, A. centrale, and A. platys) were introduced from other continents, through the importation of domestic animals and their associated ticks. However, unique Anaplasma and Ehrlichia 16S rRNA gene sequences were recently detected for the first time in native Australian ticks, particularly in Amblyomma triguttatum subsp. ticks from southwest Western Australia (WA). We used molecular techniques to survey Am. triguttatum subsp. ticks from four allopatric populations in southern and western Australia for Anaplasma and Ehrlichia species, and described here the phylogeny of these novel organisms. An A. bovis variant (genotype Y11) was detected in ticks from two study sites; Yanchep National Park (12/280, 4.3%) and Barrow Island (1/69, 1.4%). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and groEL gene sequences concluded that A. bovis genotype Y11 is a unique genetic variant, distinct from other A. bovis isolates worldwide. Additionally, a novel Ehrlichia species was detected in Am. triguttatum subsp. from three of the four study sites; Yanchep National Park (18/280, 6.4%), Bungendore Park (8/46, 17.4%), and Innes National Park (9/214, 4.2%), but not from Barrow Island. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S, groEL, gltA, and map1 gene sequences revealed that this Ehrlichia sp. is most closely related to, but clearly distinct from, E. ruminantium and Ehrlichia sp. Panola Mountain. We propose to designate this new species 'Candidatus Ehrlichia occidentalis'. Anaplasma bovis genotype Y11 and 'Candidatus E. occidentalis' are the first Anaplasma and Ehrlichia species to be recorded in native Australian ticks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Manipulation of Host Cholesterol by Obligate Intracellular Bacteria

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    Dhritiman Samanta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a multifunctional lipid that plays important metabolic and structural roles in the eukaryotic cell. Despite having diverse lifestyles, the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens Chlamydia, Coxiella, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia all target cholesterol during host cell colonization as a potential source of membrane, as well as a means to manipulate host cell signaling and trafficking. To promote host cell entry, these pathogens utilize cholesterol-rich microdomains known as lipid rafts, which serve as organizational and functional platforms for host signaling pathways involved in phagocytosis. Once a pathogen gains entrance to the intracellular space, it can manipulate host cholesterol trafficking pathways to access nutrient-rich vesicles or acquire membrane components for the bacteria or bacteria-containing vacuole. To acquire cholesterol, these pathogens specifically target host cholesterol metabolism, uptake, efflux, and storage. In this review, we examine the strategies obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens employ to manipulate cholesterol during host cell colonization. Understanding how obligate intracellular pathogens target and use host cholesterol provides critical insight into the host-pathogen relationship.

  1. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydiales: clonal groupings within the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannekoek, Yvonne; Morelli, Giovanna; Kusecek, Barica; Morré, Servaas A.; Ossewaarde, Jacobus M.; Langerak, Ankie A.; van der Ende, Arie

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The obligate intracellular growing bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases like trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Several serovars and genotypes have been identified, but these could not be linked to clinical disease or outcome.

  2. Bacterium oxidizing carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, A

    1953-01-01

    Present-day knowledge of the microbiological oxidation of carbon monoxide is based on doubtful observations and imperfect experimental procedures. By making use of shake cultures in contact with gas mixtures containing high concentrations of CO and by employing liquid enrichment media with a low content of organic matter and solid media of the same composition with not more than 1.2% agar, it proved possible to isolate a co-oxidizing bacterium of the genus hydrogenomonas from sewage sludge. For the first time irrefutable proof has been given of the oxidation of carbon monoxide by a pure culture of a bacterium, both in growing cultures and in resting cell suspensions. 12 references.

  3. In vitro Culture of a Novel Genotype of Ehrlichia sp from Brazil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zweygarth, E.; Schol, H.; Lis, K.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Thiel, C.; Silaghi, C.; Ribeiro, M.F.B.; Passos, L.M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 60, NOV 2013 (2013), s. 86-92 ISSN 1865-1674 Grant - others:EU(XE) FP7-PEOPLE-ITN No.238511 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Ehrlichia * Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus * in vitro culture * tick cell * DH82 * endothelial cell * cattle * 16S rRNA * Brazil Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.116, year: 2013

  4. Experimental inoculation of beagle dogs with Ehrlichia species detected from Ixodes ovatus

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Malaika; Oikawa, T; Hiraoka, Hiroko; Kaneko, N; Itamoto, Kazuhito; Mizuno, Tohru; Okuda, Masaru; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2006-01-01

    Three beagle dogs were inoculated with mice spleen/liver homogenate infected with Ehrlichia species detected from Ixodes ovatus (EIO) and one dog was used as a control. All three infected dogs did not show clinical signs of disease except for mild pyrexia throughout the 41-day study period. Splenomegaly was observed from Day 7 post-inoculation (p.i.) in two of the dogs. Hematological and biochemical abnormalities included mild thrombocytopenia, hypoproteinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia and increased...

  5. Seroprevalencia de Leptospira sp., Rickettsia sp. Ehrlichia sp. en trabajadores rurales del departamento de Sucre, Colombia Seroprevalence of Leptospira sp., Rickettsia sp. and Ehrlichia sp. in rural workers of Sucre, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ríos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Determinar la seroprevalencia de Leptospira sp., Rickettsia sp. y Ehrlichia sp. en trabajadores de áreas rurales del departamento de Sucre. Material y métodos. Se realizó un estudio escriptivo, prospectivo, de corte transversal, que pretendió determinar la seroprevalencia e Leptospira sp., Rickettsia sp. y Ehrlichia sp. en 90 trabajadores de áreas rurales del departamento de Sucre. Se estableció la presencia de anticuerpos séricos anti-IgM específicos anti-Leptospira por la técnica de ELISA indirecta. Para la determinación de Rickettsia sp. y Ehrlichia sp. se uso la técnica de inmunofluorescencia indirecta. Resultados. La población evaluada estaba compuesta por 27 (30% ordeñadores, 21 (23% jornaleros, 18 (20% profesionales del campo y 24 (27% que realizaban otras actividades. Ventidós (24% muestras resultaron positivas en alguna de las pruebas. De éstas, 12 (13,3% fueron positivas para Leptospira sp., 7 (7,8% para Rickettsia sp. y 3 (3,3% ara Ehrlichia sp. Conclusión. Este fue el primer estudio que se llevó a cabo en el departamento de Sucre y permitió demostrar que existe una prevalencia importante de Leptospira p.,Rickettsia sp. y Ehrlichia sp.. Los factores de riesgo ocupacional fueron factores determinantes en la seropositividad.Objective. To determine the seroprevalence of Leptospira sp., Rickettsia sp. and Ehrlichia sp. in agricultural workers of Sucre. Methods. A descriptive prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in ninety rural workers of Sucre. Presence of serum antibodies anti-IgM specific anti-Leptospira by indirect ELISA was established. For the determination of Rickettsia and Ehrlichia indirect inmunoflorescence was used. Results.The population was composed by 27 (30% milkers, 21 (23% day workers, 18 farm professionals (20% and 24 (26% workers in others activities. A total of 22 (24% samples were positive to some test. Twelve (13.3% were positive to Leptospira sp., seven (7.8% to Rickettsia sp

  6. Engineering of obligate intracellular bacteria: progress, challenges and paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over twenty years have passed since the first report of genetic manipulation of an obligate intracellular bacterium. Through progress interspersed by bouts of stagnation, microbiologists and geneticists have developed approaches to genetically manipulate obligates. A brief overview of the current ge...

  7. Pathogenic mechanisms of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Masa, Roland; Venkei, Annamária; Mészáros, Sándor; Minarovits, Janos

    2017-06-01

    We wished to overview recent data on a subset of epigenetic changes elicited by intracellular bacteria in human cells. Reprogramming the gene expression pattern of various host cells may facilitate bacterial growth, survival, and spread. DNA-(cytosine C5)-methyltransferases of Mycoplasma hyorhinis targeting cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides and a Mycobacterium tuberculosis methyltransferase targeting non-CpG sites methylated the host cell DNA and altered the pattern of gene expression. Gene silencing by CpG methylation and histone deacetylation, mediated by cellular enzymes, also occurred in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. M. tuberculosis elicited cell type-specific epigenetic changes: it caused increased DNA methylation in macrophages, but induced demethylation, deposition of euchromatic histone marks and activation of immune-related genes in dendritic cells. A secreted transposase of Acinetobacter baumannii silenced a cellular gene, whereas Mycobacterium leprae altered the epigenotype, phenotype, and fate of infected Schwann cells. The 'keystone pathogen' oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis induced local DNA methylation and increased the level of histone acetylation in host cells. These epigenetic changes at the biofilm-gingiva interface may contribute to the development of periodontitis. Epigenetic regulators produced by intracellular bacteria alter the epigenotype and gene expression pattern of host cells and play an important role in pathogenesis.

  8. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Novel Ehrlichia and Hepatozoon agents infecting the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous) in southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Aliny P; Souza, Tayse D; Marcili, Arlei; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated infection by vector-borne agents in 58 crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous L.) that were road-killed in an Atlantic rainforest reserve in the state of Espírito Santo, southeastern Brazil. Spleen, lung, or blood samples collected from the foxes were tested in the laboratory by a battery of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting bacteria of the genera Rickettsia, Borrelia, Coxiella, Anaplasma, and Ehrlichia; and protozoa of the genera Babesia, Hepatozoon, and Leishmania. Of the targeted organisms, evidence of infection in the foxes was detected for Ehrlichia and Hepatozoon organisms only. Overall, six (10.3%) foxes were infected by an ehrlichial agent closely related to an ehrlichial agent recently detected in free-ranging Jaguars [(Panthera onca (L.)] in central-western Brazil, and to Ehrlichia ruminantium. For Hepatozoon, 28 (48.3%) foxes were infected by an agent closely related to Hepatozoon sp. Curupira 2 and H. americanum; and one (1.7%) fox was infected by an organism closely related to reptile-associated Hepatozoon agents. Finally, 11 (19.0%) foxes were found infested by Amblyomma cajennense (F.) nymphs, which were all PCR negative for the range of vector-borne agents cited above. Because the haplotypes found in free-ranging foxes are genetically closely related to pathogens of great veterinary importance, namely E. ruminantium and H. americanum, it is highly desirable to know if these novel organisms have any important role as agents of diseases in domestic animals and wildlife in Brazil.

  10. Possible death of a buffalo calf (Syncercus caffer due to suspected heartwater (Ehrlichia ruminantium : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfitzer

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Rickettsial organisms resembling Ehrlichia ruminantium (the causative organism of heartwater were demonstrated in brain smears and formalin-fixed brain sections derived from a buffalo calf that died on a private game reserve in northern KwaZulu-Natal. The possibility that the tick-free environment of a quarantine boma may have affected the calf 's immunity, is discussed. These findings suggest that monitoring heartwater in wild ruminants and making brain smears as a routine during post mortem evaluations of wild ruminants, should be encouraged.

  11. Ehrlichia canis morulae and DNA detection in whole blood and spleen aspiration samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Joice Lara Maia; Dagnone, Ana Sílvia; Munhoz, Thiago Demarchi; João, Carolina Franchi; Pereira, Wanderson Adriano Biscola; Machado, Rosângela Zacarias; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the detection of Ehrlichia canis morulae and DNA by nPCR in whole blood and spleen aspiration. The sample included 40 dogs showing thrombocytopenia associated to clinical signs suggestive of canine ehrlichiosis. Morulae detection showed that in 35 of the dogs studied, 17 had morulae in spleen tissue, and two in buffy coat smears. E. canis DNA was detected in 29/40 blood samples. We verified that morulae detection is more efficient in cytological preparations from spleen aspiration. On the other hand, nPCR on spleen and blood samples were equally efficient for disease diagnosis.

  12. Investigating the Adult Ixodid Tick Populations and Their Associated Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia Bacteria at a Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Hotspot in Western Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout Fryxell, Rebecca T; Hendricks, Brain M; Pompo, Kimberly; Mays, Sarah E; Paulsen, Dave J; Operario, Darwin J; Houston, Allan E

    2017-08-01

    Ehrlichiosis and rickettsiosis are two common bacterial tick-borne diseases in the southeastern United States. Ehrlichiosis is caused by ehrlichiae transmitted by Amblyomma americanum and rickettsiosis is caused by rickettsiae transmitted by Amblyomma maculatum and Dermacentor variabilis. These ticks are common and have overlapping distributions in the region. The objective of this study was to identify Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia species associated with questing ticks in a Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) hotspot, and identify habitats, time periods, and collection methods for collecting questing-infected ticks. Using vegetation drags and CO 2 -baited traps, ticks were collected six times (May-September 2012) from 100 sites (upland deciduous, bottomland deciduous, grassland, and coniferous habitats) in western Tennessee. Adult collections were screened for Anaplasma and Ehrlichia (simultaneous polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) and Rickettsia using genus-specific PCRs, and resulting positive amplicons were sequenced. Anaplasma and Ehrlichia were only identified within A. americanum (Ehrlichia ewingii, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Panola Mountain Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma odocoilei sp. nov.); more Ehrlichia-infected A. americanum were collected at the end of June regardless of habitat and collection method. Rickettsia was identified in three tick species; "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii" from A. americanum, R. parkeri and R. andeanae from A. maculatum, and R. montanensis ( = montana) from D. variabilis. Overall, significantly more Rickettsia-infected ticks were identified as A. americanum and A. maculatum compared to D. variabilis; more infected-ticks were collected from sites May-July and with dragging. In this study, we report in the Tennessee RMSF hotspot the following: (1) Anaplasma and Ehrlichia are only found in A. americanum, (2) each tick species has its own Rickettsia species, (3) a majority of questing-infected ticks are collected May-July, (4) A

  13. Case report of canine co-infection with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanovska Jovana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine leishmaniasis (CanL due to Leishmania infantum and canine monocytic ehrilichiosis (CME due to Ehrlichia canis are common diseases with zoonotic potential in the Mediterranean area. Their prevalence in R. Macedonia as a neighboring Mediterranean county is expected. In both diseases similar clinical symptoms can be manifested in dogs such as: lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, epistaxis, fever, pale mucous membranes, enlarged lymph nodes, splenomegaly, ocular signs. This case report present an atypical case of 11 year old female Samoyed with starting single clinical symptom epistaxys. Initial diagnostic procedures revealed the presence only of CanL, which was diagnosed using indirect immunofluorescence method and ELISA. First laboratory findings showed normal hematological and renal profiles. Dog was put on a treatment with Allopurinol (20mg/kg, p/o for at least 9 months. Termination of the therapy after 6 months brought a numerous clinical symptoms involving weakness, dehydration, pale mucous membranes lost pupilar reflex, uremic breath and biochemical parameters revealed a renal failure. Using a commercial ELISA kit Ehrlichia canis as a co infection was diagnosed. Most probably the second infectious agent was induced in the past 6 months, causing more severe pathological effects than CanL infection alone.

  14. Molecular detection of Anaplasma bovis, Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon felis in cats from Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Luz, Maria Francisca; Granada, Sara; Vilhena, Hugo; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Lopes, Ana Patrícia; Cardoso, Luís; Baneth, Gad

    2018-03-20

    Molecular identification of tick-borne pathogen infection in cats from Africa is scarce. The presence of bacterial (Anaplasma and Ehrlichia) and protozoal (Babesia and Hepatozoon) agents was investigated in blood samples from 102 domestic cats from Luanda, Angola, by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Three cats (2.9%) were found infected with Ehrlichia canis, three (2.9%) with Hepatozoon felis and one (1.0%) with Anaplasma bovis. The prevalence of infections with one single agent was 4.9%, and that of infection with two agents (i.e. E. canis and H. felis) was 1.0%. In total, six cats (5.9%) were found infected with at least one of the detected tick-borne agents. This is the first report of A. bovis, E. canis and H. felis in cats from Angola. To the best of our knowledge, A. bovis is also being reported for the first time in domestic cats outside of Japan. Cats are at a low to moderate risk of being infected with tick-borne agents in Luanda.

  15. Ticks circulate Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Babesia and Theileria parasites in North of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekloo, Ahmad Jafar; Bakhshi, Hasan; Soufizadeh, Ayoub; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Bekloo, Romina Jafar; Ramzgouyan, Maryam Roya; Chegeni, Asadollah Hosseini; Faghihi, Faezeh; Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh

    2017-12-15

    Ticks serve as important vectors of some pathogens of medical importance all over the world and identification of their rate of infection plays an important role for further control of diseases. In the current study, we investigated on ticks collected from north of Iran where raising and caring livestock are the main task of the people in order to find evidences of infection of Babesia, Theileria, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia microbial agents. Totally, 609 hard tick species from two genera Hyalomma and Rhipicephalus including; Hy. scupense, Hy. dromedarii, Hy. rufipes, Hy. marginatum, Hy. asiaticum, Hy. anatolicum, R. bursa, R. sanguineus and R. turanicus were identified. Molecular analysis revealed the presence of Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Babesia and Theileria microorganism agents in all collected tick species except Hy. asiaticum and R. turanicus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on identification of B. occultans in Hyalomma anatolicum and B. ovis in Hyalomma sp in Iran. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis.

  17. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. High infection of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. among tick species collected from different geographical locations of Iran

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    Leila Tajedin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To ascertain the prevalence of the Anaplasma/Ehrlichia infections in tick population within four provinces of Iran. Methods: A total of 384 tick specimens were collected from domestic animals inhabiting in four provinces (East Azerbaijan, Gilan, South Khorasan and Yazd. Specimens were identified based on morphological analysis. The detection of Anaplasma spp./Ehrlichia spp. within tick samples was carried out by nested PCR amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene accompanied by DNA sequencing and analysis for verification. Results: A total of 10 tick species were identified as follows: Ornithodoros lahorensis (O. lahorensis (44.8%, Hyalomma dromedarii (15.6%, Dermacentor marginatus (13.5%, Hyalomma anatolicum (11.2%, Hyalomma asiaticum (5.7%, Hyalomma marginatum (4.9%, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (2.3%, Hyalomma detritum (1.0%, Dermacentor niveus (0.5% and Argas persicus (0.3%. The percentage distribution of Anaplasma/Ehrlichia was 55.5% (213 across 384 studied ticks. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Anaplasma ovis infection in O. lahorensis in Iran. We also conjecture the prevalence of Ehrlichia spp. in Yazd Province based on sequencing results; also, it is suggested that O. lahorensis is a potential vector in the studied area. This survey highlights the importance of Argasidae family to verify and correlate their threat in causing anaplasmosis and other diseases in animals.

  19. In vitro culture and structural differences in the major immunoreactive protein gp36 of geographically distant Ehrlichia canis isolates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zweygarth, E.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Josemans, A.I.; Oosthuizen, M.C.; Matjila, P.T.; Lis, K.; Broniszewska, M.; Schöl, H.; Ferrolho, J.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Passos, L.M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2014), s. 423-431 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Ehrlichia canis * In vitro culture * IDE8 tick cells * DH82 * 16S rRNA * gp36 Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2014

  20. Leishmania, Babesia and Ehrlichia in urban pet dogs: co-infection or cross-reaction in serological methods?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe da Silva Krawczak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study was designed to assess the occurrence of co-infection or cross-reaction in the serological techniques used for detecting the anti-Leishmania spp., -Babesia canis vogeli and -Ehrlichia canis antibodies in urban dogs from an area endemic to these parasites. METHODS: The serum samples from dogs were tested for the Babesia canis vogeli strain Belo Horizonte antigen and Ehrlichia canis strain São Paulo by immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT and by anti-Leishmania immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody detection to assess Leishmania infection. We used the following four commercial kits for canine visceral leishmaniasis: ELISA, IFAT, Dual Path Platform (DPP (Bio Manguinhos(r/FIOCRUZ/MS and a rK39 RDT (Kalazar Detect Canine Rapid Test; Inbios. RESULTS : Of 96 serum samples submitted to serological assays, 4 (4.2% were positive for Leishmania as determined by ELISA; 12 (12.5%, by IFAT; 14 (14.6% by rK39 RDT; and 20 (20.8%, by DPP. Antibodies against Ehrlichia and Babesia were detected in 23/96 (23.9% and 30/96 (31.2% samples, respectively. No significant association was identified between the results of tests for detecting Babesia or Ehrlichia and those for detecting Leishmania (p-value>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we demonstrated co-infection with Ehrlichia or Babesia and Leishmania in dogs from Minas Gerais (Brazil; we also found that the serological tests that were used did not cross-react.

  1. Comparison of Ehrlichia muris Strains Isolated from Wild Mice and Ticks and Serologic Survey of Humans and Animals with E. muris as Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Makoto; Ito, Tadahiko; Suto, Chiharu; Shibata, Shinichiro; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Hata, Kazuhisa; Hirai, Katsuya

    1999-01-01

    In metropolitan Tokyo, the Ehrlichia muris seropositivity rate of 24 wild mice was 63% in Hinohara Village, but in the surrounding areas, it was 0 to 5%. This finding suggests that the reservoir of E. muris is focal. Among the 15 seropositive mice, ehrlichiae were isolated from 9 Apodemus speciosus mice and 1 A. argenteus mouse, respectively. Five ehrlichial isolates were obtained from 10 ticks (Haemaphysalis flava) collected in Asuke Town, Aichi Prefecture, where the E. muris type strain had...

  2. Factores asociados a la infección por Ehrlichia canis en perros infestados con garrapatas en la ciudad de Huánuco, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Huerto-Medina

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue determinar la frecuencia y factores asociados a la infección por Ehrlichia canis en perros. Se recolectaron muestras de sangre de 150 perros infestados con garrapatas en 10 consultorios veterinarios de la ciudad de Huánuco en Perú, los perros fueron seleccionados al azar sin distinción de raza, edad ni sexo. Se detectó anticuerpos contra Ehrlichia canis mediante inmunoensayo cromatográfico. El 51,3% de perros estuvieron infectados por Ehrlichia canis. En el análisis multivariado se encontraron asociados a la presencia Ehrlichia canis, el mal estado de salud del perro (p=0,049, un promedio mayor de infestación por garrapatas (p=0,018, perros de edad adulta (p=0,038. La frecuencia de Ehrlichia canis en perros de esta ciudad es alta. Se recomienda el control de la garrapata marrón del perro (Rhipicephalus sanguineus vector de la Ehrlichia canis

  3. Babesia canis vogeli, Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma platys infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Izzi, Salah; Martin, Donald S; Chan, Roxanne Y Y; Leutenegger, Christian M

    2013-12-01

    A 12-month-old male neutered mixed breed dog was presented with a history of diarrhea, lethargy, emaciation, polydypsia, and sniffling. Physical examination findings included pale mucous membranes, increased heart and respiratory rates, and normal rectal temperature (38°C). Hematologic abnormalities included anemia and thrombocytopenia. Biochemical abnormalities included hypoalbuminemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and elevated ALP and ALT activities. A SNAP 4Dx test result was positive for Ehrlichia canis. Babesia canis vogeli organisms were found in the peripheral blood films, while morulae of E canis were not seen. Real-time polymerase chain reaction testing confirmed the presence of both B c vogeli and E canis organisms, and also was positive for Anaplasma platys infection. The dog recovered following treatment with doxycycline and imidocarb dipropionate, with normal hematology and biochemical profiles. © 2013 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  4. Subversion of the cytoskeleton by intracellular bacteria: lessons from Listeria, Salmonella, and Vibrio

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Santos, Marcela; Orth, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Summary Entry into host cells and intracellular persistence by invasive bacteria are tightly coupled to the ability of the bacterium to disrupt the eukaryotic cytoskeletal machinery. Herein we review the main strategies used by three intracellular pathogens to harness key modulators of the cytoskeleton. Two of these bacteria, namely Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, exhibit quite distinct intracellular lifestyles, and therefore, provide a comprehensive panel for the understanding of the intricate bacteria-cytoskeleton interplay during infections. The emerging intracellular pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus is depicted as a developing model for the uncovering of novel mechanisms used to hijack the cytoskeleton. PMID:25440316

  5. Antibodies to granulocytic ehrlichiae in white-footed and cotton mice in eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnarelli, L A; Stafford, K C; Ijdo, J W; Fikrig, E; Oliver, J H; Hutcheson, H J; Boone, J L

    1999-04-01

    Serum samples, collected from Peromyscus leucopus (white-footed mouse) or Peromyscus gossypinus (cotton mouse) during 1987 through 1990 in Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, and North Carolina (USA), and in 1997 in southern Connecticut were analyzed by indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) staining methods or Western blot procedures for antibodies to granulocytic ehrlichiae. Of the 82 sera from white-footed mice in Connecticut tested by IFA methods with either the BDS or NCH-1 strain of the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agent, 45 (55%) and 42 (51%) of the samples contained antibodies to these strains, respectively, at concentrations ranging from 1:80 to 1:2560. One (2%) of 43 sera from P. leucopus captured in Assateague Island (Maryland) had a titer of 1:80, while three (20%) of 15 sera from P. gossypinus, captured in Sapelo Island (Georgia) and four (40%) of 10 sera from cotton mice caught in Amelia Island (Florida) had antibodies to the NCH-1 strain at titers of 1:160 to 1:1,280. Fifty-five sera from P. leucopus in Cape Hatteras (North Carolina) and 30 sera from P. gossypinus in Mississippi were negative. Western blot analyses confirmed seropositivity for 19 (95%) of 20 mouse sera positive by IFA staining methods, including samples from both mouse species captured in Connecticut, Maryland, or Florida. There were key banding patterns to proteins having molecular masses of about 44, 80, 105, 110, or 120 kDa. Both serologic assays can be used to determine if mice have been exposed to granulocytic ehrlichiae. These rodents also may be useful in surveillance programs to identify endemic sites for HGE and in performing laboratory studies on immune responses to the etiologic agent.

  6. Rangelia vitalii, Babesia spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs in Passo Fundo, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Gottlieb

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pathogens transmitted by ticks are an emerging problem worldwide, this study aimed to diagnose the causal agents of infection in dogs presenting suspected hemoparasitoses. Fifty-eight dogs with clinical signs such as depression, hemorrhagic diathesis and fever were evaluated regarding clinical presentation, hemogram, blood smears and serological tests, using the indirect immunofluorescence method for the agents Babesia vogeli and Ehrlichia canis and conventional PCR for Babesia spp. (gene 18S rRNA, Rangelia vitalii (gene 18S rRNA and Ehrlichia spp. (gene dsb. Five (8.6% of the 58 dogs were serologically positive for Babesia spp. and three (5.1% for E. canis. Four dogs (6.8% were positive for R. vitalii through the molecular diagnosis. The PCR products were sequenced and the DNA from R. vitalii was found to be 99% genetically identical to samples of R. vitalii that had been isolated in Brazil. No presence of Babesia spp. or E. canis was observed through PCR on the dogs evaluated here. The results indicate the presence of R. vitalii and exposure to Babesia spp. and Ehrlichia spp. among the dogs analyzed.

  7. Bacteria of the genera Ehrlichia and Rickettsia in ticks of the family Ixodidae with medical importance in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Patrick S; Tarragona, Evelina L; Bottero, María N Saracho; Mangold, Atilio J; Mackenstedt, Ute; Nava, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to get an overview about the occurrence of bacteria from the genus Ehrlichia and Rickettsia in ixodid ticks with medical importance in Argentina. Therefore, in 2013 and 2014, free-living ticks were collected in different provinces of northern Argentina. These ticks were determined as Amblyomma sculptum, Amblyomma neumanni, Amblyomma parvum, Amblyomma triste, Amblyomma ovale, Amblyomma tonelliae and Haemaphysalis juxtakochi. All samples were tested to determine the infection with Ehrlichia spp. and Rickettsia spp. by PCR assays. Rickettsial DNA was detected in all tested tick species, with the exception of A. tonelliae. 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii', 'Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae', and Rickettsia parkeri were found in A. neumanni, A. parvum, and A. triste, respectively. Another rickettsial species, Rickettsia bellii, was found in A. sculptum, A. ovale and H. juxtakochi. None of the tested ticks showed infection with Ehrlichia. The results of the study demonstrate that Rickettsia species belonging to the spotted fever group are associated with various species of Amblyomma throughout a wide area of northern Argentina, where cases of Amblyomma ticks biting humans are common.

  8. Detection of Ehrlichia spp., Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., and other eubacteria in ticks from the Thai-Myanmar border and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parola, Philippe; Cornet, Jean-Paul; Sanogo, Yibayiri Osée; Miller, R Scott; Thien, Huynh Van; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Raoult, Didier; Telford III, Sam R; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2003-04-01

    A total of 650 ticks, including 13 species from five genera, were collected from animals, from people, or by flagging of the vegetation at sites on the Thai-Myanmar border and in Vietnam. They were tested by PCR to detect DNA of bacteria of the order RICKETTSIALES: Three Anaplasma spp. were detected in ticks collected in Thailand, including (i) Anaplasma sp. strain AnDa465, which was considered a genotype of Anaplasma platys (formerly Ehrlichia platys) and which was obtained from Dermacentor auratus ticks collected from dogs; (ii) Anaplasma sp. strain AnAj360, which was obtained from Amblyomma javanense ticks collected on a pangolin; and (iii) Anaplasma sp. strain AnHl446, which was closely related to Anaplasma bovis and which was detected in Haemaphysalis lagrangei ticks collected from a bear. Three Ehrlichia spp. were identified, including (i) Ehrlichia sp. strain EBm52, which was obtained from Boophilus microplus ticks collected from cattle from Thailand; (ii) Ehrlichia sp. strain EHh324, which was closely related to Ehrlichia chaffeensis and which was detected in Haemaphysalis hystricis ticks collected from wild pigs in Vietnam; and (iii) Ehrlichia sp. strain EHh317, which was closely related to Ehrlichia sp. strain EBm52 and which was also detected in H. hystricis ticks collected from wild pigs in Vietnam. Two Rickettsia spp. were detected in Thailand, including (i) Rickettsia sp. strain RDla420, which was detected in Dermacentor auratus ticks collected from a bear, and (ii) Rickettsia sp. strain RDla440, which was identified from two pools of Dermacentor larvae collected from a wild pig nest. Finally, two bacteria named Eubacterium sp. strain Hw124 and Eubacterium sp. strain Hw191 were identified in Haemaphysalis wellingtoni ticks collected from chicken in Thailand; these strains could belong to a new group of bacteria.

  9. Association between canine leishmaniosis and Ehrlichia canis co-infection: a prospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attipa, Charalampos; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Papasouliotis, Kostas; Soutter, Francesca; Morris, David; Helps, Chris; Carver, Scott; Tasker, Séverine

    2018-03-20

    In the Mediterranean basin, Leishmania infantum is a major cause of disease in dogs, which are frequently co-infected with other vector-borne pathogens (VBP). However, the associations between dogs with clinical leishmaniosis (ClinL) and VBP co-infections have not been studied. We assessed the risk of VBP infections in dogs with ClinL and healthy controls. We conducted a prospective case-control study of dogs with ClinL (positive qPCR and ELISA antibody for L. infantum on peripheral blood) and clinically healthy, ideally breed-, sex- and age-matched, control dogs (negative qPCR and ELISA antibody for L. infantum on peripheral blood) from Paphos, Cyprus. We obtained demographic data and all dogs underwent PCR on EDTA-blood extracted DNA for haemoplasma species, Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp., Babesia spp., and Hepatozoon spp., with DNA sequencing to identify infecting species. We used logistic regression analysis and structural equation modelling (SEM) to evaluate the risk of VBP infections between ClinL cases and controls. From the 50 enrolled dogs with ClinL, DNA was detected in 24 (48%) for Hepatozoon spp., 14 (28%) for Mycoplasma haemocanis, 6 (12%) for Ehrlichia canis and 2 (4%) for Anaplasma platys. In the 92 enrolled control dogs, DNA was detected in 41 (45%) for Hepatozoon spp., 18 (20%) for M. haemocanis, 1 (1%) for E. canis and 3 (3%) for A. platys. No Babesia spp. or "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum" DNA was detected in any dog. No statistical differences were found between the ClinL and controls regarding age, sex, breed, lifestyle and use of ectoparasitic prevention. A significant association between ClinL and E. canis infection (OR = 12.4, 95% CI: 1.5-106.0, P = 0.022) was found compared to controls by multivariate logistic regression. This association was confirmed using SEM, which further identified that younger dogs were more likely to be infected with each of Hepatozoon spp. and M. haemocanis, and dogs with Hepatozoon spp. were more likely to

  10. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...... milk products, is born with two complete non-replicating chromosomes. L. lactis therefore remain diploid throughout its entire life cycle....

  11. Initiation of chromosomal replication in predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Makowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase. The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box (5’-NN(A/TTCCACA-3’. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus. We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, E. coli or P. aeruginosa systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium.

  12. Uptake and intracellular activity of AM-1155 in phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Kusajima, H; Hosaka, M; Fukuda, H; Oomori, Y; Shinoda, H

    1996-01-01

    The uptake and intracellular activity of AM-1155 in murine J774.1 macrophages and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were investigated. AM-1155 penetrated phagocytic cells rapidly and reversibly, although the penetration process was not affected by metabolic inhibitors such as sodium fluoride, cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, or ouabain or by nucleoside transport system inhibitors such as adenosine. The intracellular concentration-to-extracellular concentration ratio of AM-1155 in both cell types of phagocytes ranged from 5 to 7. These ratios were almost equal to those for sparfloxacin. The intracellular activity of AM-1155 in J774.1 macrophages, examined with Staphylococcus aureus 209P as a test bacterium, was dependent on the extracellular concentration. AM-1155 at a concentration of 1 microgram/ml reduced the number of viable cells of S. aureus ingested by more than 90%. The intracellular activity of AM-1155 was more potent than those of sparfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, flomoxef, and erythromycin. These results suggest that the potent intracellular activity of AM-1155 might mainly be due to the high intracellular concentration and its potent in vitro activity. PMID:9124835

  13. Mixed Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis, and presumptive Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonakis, Mathio E; Koutinas, Alex F; Baneth, Gad; Polizopoulou, Zoe; Fytianou, Anna

    2004-01-01

    A 5-month-old, female, mongrel dog was admitted to the Clinic of Companion Animal Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, with depression, anorexia, fever, peripheral lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, oculonasal discharge, nonregenerative anemia, and mild thrombocytopenia. Cytology of Giemsa-stained buffy coat, bone marrow, and lymph node aspiration smears revealed numerous morulae in mononuclear leukocytes and in neutrophils, and Hepatozoon canis gamonts in neutrophils. The dog was seropositive to Ehrlichia canis (immunofluorescence assay [IFA]) and Hepatozoon canis (ELISA) but not to Anaplasma phagocytophilum (IFA). A nested polymerase chain reaction performed on bone marrow aspirates was positive for E canis. This method was not applied for the detection of A phagocytophilum. Treatment with doxycycline and imidocarb dipropionate resulted in both clinical and parasitologic cure. This is the first reported case of a mixed infection with E canis, H canis, and presumptive A phagocytophilum. The findings emphasize the value of cytology in offering a quick and inexpensive diagnosis in mixed tick-borne infections of dogs.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of parasitic protozoa and Ehrlichia canis in wildlife in Madrid (central Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado-Fornelio, Angel; Martín-Pérez, T; Verdú-Expósito, C; Reinoso-Ortiz, S A; Pérez-Serrano, J

    2018-07-01

    Wildlife species are involved in the transmission of diverse pathogens. This study aimed to monitor raccoons (Procyon lotor), American minks (Neovison vison), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as potential reservoirs in central Spain. Specifically, 200 spleen and fecal samples (from 194 raccoons, 3 minks, and 3 foxes) were analyzed molecularly by PCR/qPCR and sequencing for the presence of piroplasmids, Hepatozoon spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Ehrlichia canis infections in the Community of Madrid (Spain). Biological samples were obtained in the years 2014, 2015, and 2016. No pathogen DNA was found in fecal samples. In contrast, analysis of raccoon spleen samples revealed that Toxoplasma was the most prevalent pathogen (prevalence 3.6 ± 2.6%), followed by Hepatozoon canis and E. canis (each with a prevalence of 2.57 ± 2.2%). Hepatozoon canis was also diagnosed in all three of the analyzed foxes. Analysis of yearly prevalence showed that tick-borne pathogens were less frequent in raccoon in 2015, a dry and warm year compared both to 2014 and 2016. These data suggest that fecal PCR assays are unsuitable for detection of DNA of non-erythrocytic pathogens. Furthermore, they demonstrate that the raccoon (an invasive species often living in proximity to domestic areas) and the red fox are putative reservoirs for pathogenic organisms in the Community of Madrid.

  15. Colorimetric detection of Ehrlichia canis via nucleic acid hybridization in gold nano-colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchuen, Ajima; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Suriyasomboon, Annop; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-08-08

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is a major thick-bone disease of dog caused by Ehrlichia canis. Detection of this causal agent outside the laboratory using conventional methods is not effective enough. Thus an assay for E. canis detection based on the p30 outer membrane protein gene was developed. It was based on the p30 gene amplification using loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP). The primer set specific to six areas within the target gene were designed and tested for their sensitivity and specificity. Detection of DNA signals was based on modulation of gold nanoparticles' surface properties and performing DNA/DNA hybridization using an oligonucleotide probe. Presence of target DNA affected the gold colloid nanoparticles in terms of particle aggregation with a plasmonic color change of the gold colloids from ruby red to purple, visible by the naked eye. All the assay steps were completed within 90 min including DNA extraction without relying on standard laboratory facilities. This method was very specific to target bacteria. Its sensitivity with probe hybridization was sufficient to detect 50 copies of target DNA. This method should provide an alternative choice for point of care control and management of the disease.

  16. First phylogenetic analysis of Ehrlichia canis in dogs and ticks from Mexico. Preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina G. Sosa-Gutiérrez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Phylogenetic characterization of Ehrlichia canis in dogs naturally infected and ticks, diagnosed by PCR and sequencing of 16SrRNA gene; compare different isolates found in American countries. Materials and methods. Were collected Blood samples from 139 dogs with suggestive clinical manifestations of this disease and they were infested with ticks; part of 16SrRNA gene was sequenced and aligned, with 17 sequences reported in American countries. Two phylogenetic trees were constructed using the Maximum likelihood method, and Maximum parsimony. Results. They were positive to E. canis 25/139 (18.0% dogs and 29/139 (20.9% ticks. The clinical manifestations presented were fever, fatigue, depression and vomiting. Rhipicephalus sanguineus Dermacentor variabilis and Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris ticks were positive for E. canis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequences of dogs and ticks in Mexico form a third group diverging of sequences from South America and USA. Conclusions. This is the first phylogenetic analysis of E. canis in Mexico. There are differences in the sequences of Mexico with those reported in South America and USA. This research lays the foundation for further study of genetic variability.

  17. Serologic evidence of infection with granulocytic ehrlichiae in black bears in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Sharon M; Nicholson, William L; Comer, James A; Childs, James E; Humphreys, Jan G

    2002-01-01

    Serum samples from 381 black bears (Ursus americanus) killed in Pennsylvania (USA) on 24 November 1997 were analyzed for antibodies reactive to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE; Ehrlichia sp.) by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Antibody reactivity to HGE antigen was detected in 21% (81/381) of the samples collected. Reactive samples were reported from 56% (14/25) of the counties where bear samples were collected. Endpoint antibody titer ranged from 1:8 to 1:16, 192, with a geometric mean titer of 1:582. There was no significant difference in antibody prevalence between male and female bears (P bears were significantly more likely to have reactive antibodies than juvenile bears (P bear blood clots (n = 181) through nested polymerase chain reaction assays were unsuccessful. Further studies are needed for identification of the pathogen-responsible for induction of HGE-reactive. This is the first description of antibodies reactive to the HGE agent in black bears and suggests these mammals are infected with the agent of HGE or an antigenically related ehrlichial species.

  18. Molecular and serological detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia vogeli in dogs in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, G; André, M R; Faria, J L M; Munhoz, T D; Hernandez-Rodriguez, M; Machado, R Z; Tinucci-Costa, M

    2012-05-25

    Ehrlichiosis and babesiosis are tick-borne diseases, caused mainly by Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis, respectively, with a worldwide occurrence in dogs, whose main vector is the brown-dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The present work aimed to detect the presence of E. canis and Babesia sp. in 91 dog blood samples in Colombia, by molecular and serological techniques. We also performed sequence alignment to indicate the identity of the parasite species infecting these animals. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs from Colombia. Immunoglobulin-G (IgG) antibodies to E. canis and Babesia vogeli were found in 75 (82.4%) and 47 (51.6%) sampled dogs, respectively. Thirty-seven (40.6%) and 5 (5.5%) dogs were positive in PCR for E. canis and Babesia sp., respectively. After sequencing, amplicons showed 99% of identity with isolates of E. canis and B. vogeli. The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA-Anaplasmataceae sequences and 18S rRNA-piroplasmid sequences supported the identity of the found E. canis and B. vogeli DNAs, respectively. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs in Colombia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. Isolated from Various Ticks in Southeastern and Northwestern Regions of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafar Bekloo, Ahmad; Ramzgouyan, Maryam Roya; Shirian, Sadegh; Faghihi, Faezeh; Bakhshi, Hassan; Naseri, Fatemeh; Sedaghat, Mehdi; Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh

    2018-05-01

    Anaplasma/Ehrlichia species are tick-transmitted pathogens that cause infections in humans and numerous domestic and wild animal species. There is no information available on the molecular characteristics and phylogenetic position of Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp. isolated from tick species from different geographic locations in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, molecular characteristics, and phylogenetic relationship of both Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in tick species isolated from different domestic animals from two different geographical locations of Iran. A total of 930 ticks were collected from 93 cattle, 250 sheep, and 587 goats inhabiting the study areas. The collected ticks were then investigated for the presence of Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp. using nested PCR based on the 16S rRNA gene, followed by sequencing. Sequence analysis was done based on the data published in the GenBank on Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp. isolates using bioinformatic tools such as the standard nucleotide BLAST. Genome of Anaplasma or Ehrlichia spp. was detected in 14 ticks collected in Heris, including 5 Dermacentor marginatus, 1 Haemaphysalis erinacei, 3 Hyalomma anatolicum, and 4 Rhipicephalus sanguineus, also in 29 ticks collected in Chabahar, including 14 R. sanguineus, 8 D. marginatus, 3 Hyalomma Anatolicum, and 4 Hyalomma dromedarii. Partial analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of positive samples collected from goats and sheep showed that they were infected with Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp. that were 94-98% identical to ovine Anaplasma and 91-96% identical to Neoehrlichia and Ehrlichia spp. The various ticks identified in this study suggest the possible emergence of tick-borne diseases in animals and humans in these regions. R. sanguineus and D. marginatus seem to be predominant vectors responsible for anaplasmosis in these regions. Partial sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that A. ovis is genetically polymorphic in these regions. Furthermore, an

  20. Development of multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of Ehrlichia canis, Babesia spp and Hepatozoon canis in canine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kledmanee, Kan; Suwanpakdee, Sarin; Krajangwong, Sakranmanee; Chatsiriwech, Jarin; Suksai, Parut; Suwannachat, Pongpun; Sariya, Ladawan; Buddhirongawatr, Ruangrat; Charoonrut, Phingphol; Chaichoun, Kridsada

    2009-01-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been developed for simultaneous detection of canine blood parasites, Ehrlichia canis, Babesia spp and Hepatozoon canis, from blood samples in a single reaction. The multiplex PCR primers were specific to E. canis VirB9, Babesia spp 16S rRNA and H. canis 16S rRNA genes. Specificity of the amplicons was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The assay was evaluated using normal canine and infected blood samples, which were detected by microscopic examination. This multiplex PCR offers scope for simultaneous detection of three important canine blood parasites and should be valuable in monitoring parasite infections in dogs and ticks.

  1. Exploring anti-bacterial compounds against intracellular Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Harrison

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an 'accidental' human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target.

  2. Exploring Anti-Bacterial Compounds against Intracellular Legionella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher F.; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Berschl, Kathrin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Hedberg, Christian; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an ‘accidental’ human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoeba castellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target. PMID:24058631

  3. Neospora caninum and Ehrlichia canis co-infection in a dog with meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroch, Itamar; Baneth, Gad; Salant, Harold; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Berkowitz, Asaf; Shamir, Merav; Chai, Orit

    2018-06-01

    An 8-year-old mixed-breed dog was presented for acute, progressive weakness and ataxia, inappetence, and weight loss. The patient was mentally normal, but nonambulatory, with a right head tilt, right positional ventral strabismus, and slight head tremors. A neurologic lesion was localized to the cerebellum and right brainstem. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly increased protein concentration and mixed pleocytosis, with eosinophil predominance (44%), intracytoplasmic inclusions within eosinophils, consistent with Ehrlichia canis (E canis) morulae, and Toxoplasma gondii (T gondii) or Neospora caninum (N caninum) tachyzoites within eosinophils and monocytes. A serum indirect immunofluorescent antibody test was positive for N caninum (titer 1:12 800) and negative for T gondii. Both blood and CSF PCR results were N caninum- and E canis-positive and T gondii- and Anaplasma phagocytophilum-negative, and blood PCR, but not CSF PCR, was Hepatozoon canis-positive. The dog was treated for 30 days with clindamycin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, doxycycline, prednisone, and cephalosporin, but did not improve neurologically, and was euthanized. Brain histopathology showed moderate multifocal, subacute meningoencephalitis with necrosis and gliosis. The neurologic disease was mostly attributed to central nervous system (CNS) neosporosis, with the possible contribution of ehrlichiosis, which was likely a manifestation of blood-brain barrier disruption. Hepatozoonosis was probably a result or cause of underlying immunosuppression. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CNSN caninum and E canis co-infection detected by both CSF PCR and cytology and E canis morulae identified within CSF eosinophils. © 2018 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  4. Recombination Is a Major Driving Force of Genetic Diversity in the Anaplasmataceae Ehrlichia ruminantium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangi, Nídia; Gordon, Jonathan L; Bournez, Laure; Pinarello, Valérie; Aprelon, Rosalie; Huber, Karine; Lefrançois, Thierry; Neves, Luís; Meyer, Damien F; Vachiéry, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The disease, Heartwater, caused by the Anaplasmataceae E. ruminantium , represents a major problem for tropical livestock and wild ruminants. Up to now, no effective vaccine has been available due to a limited cross protection of vaccinal strains on field strains and a high genetic diversity of Ehrlichia ruminantium within geographical locations. To address this issue, we inferred the genetic diversity and population structure of 194 E. ruminantium isolates circulating worldwide using Multilocus Sequence Typing based on lipA, lipB, secY, sodB , and sucA genes . Phylogenetic trees and networks were generated using BEAST and SplitsTree, respectively, and recombination between the different genetic groups was tested using the PHI test for recombination. Our study reveals the repeated occurrence of recombination between E. ruminantium strains, suggesting that it may occur frequently in the genome and has likely played an important role in the maintenance of genetic diversity and the evolution of E. ruminantium . Despite the unclear phylogeny and phylogeography, E. ruminantium isolates are clustered into two main groups: Group 1 (West Africa) and a Group 2 (worldwide) which is represented by West, East, and Southern Africa, Indian Ocean, and Caribbean strains. Some sequence types are common between West Africa and Caribbean and between Southern Africa and Indian Ocean strains. These common sequence types highlight two main introduction events due to the movement of cattle: from West Africa to Caribbean and from Southern Africa to the Indian Ocean islands. Due to the long branch lengths between Group 1 and Group 2, and the propensity for recombination between these groups, it seems that the West African clusters of Subgroup 2 arrived there more recently than the original divergence of the two groups, possibly with the original waves of domesticated ruminants that spread across the African continent several thousand years ago.

  5. Intraoperative bleeding in dogs from Grenada seroreactive to Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza-Perea, M; Zieger, U; Qurollo, B A; Hegarty, B C; Pultorak, E L; Kumthekar, S; Bruhl-Day, R; Breitschwerdt, E B

    2014-01-01

    Frequent exposure of Grenadian dogs to Rhipicephalus sanguineus results in Anaplasma platys, and Ehrlichia canis seroreactivity. During elective surgeries, substantial intraoperative hemorrhage occurs in some seroreactive dogs. To assess hemostatic parameters and bleeding tendencies as well as prevalence of PCR positivity in apparently healthy A. platys and E. canis seroreactive and seronegative free-roaming dogs from Grenada. Forty-seven elective surgery dogs allocated to 4 groups: Seronegative control (n = 12), A. platys (n = 10), E. canis (n = 14) and A. platys, and E. canis (n = 11) seroreactive. Preoperatively, hemostasis was assessed by platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and buccal mucosal bleeding time. Intra- and postoperative bleeding scores were subjectively assigned. Blood, spleen, bone marrow, and lymph node aspirates were tested by PCR. Bleeding scores in dogs coseroreactive for A. platys and E. canis were higher (P = .015) than those of seronegative dogs. A. platys DNA was amplified from 7/21 (33%) A. platys seroreactive dogs and from 1 E. canis seroreactive dog; E. canis DNA was amplified from 21/25 (84%) E. canis seroreactive dogs. E. canis DNA was amplified most often from blood, whereas A. platys DNA was amplified most often from bone marrow. Apparently healthy, free-roaming dogs coseropositive for A. platys and E. canis may have increased intraoperative bleeding tendencies despite normal hemostatic parameters. Future investigations should explore the potential for vascular injury as a cause for bleeding in these dogs. Improved tick control is needed for dogs in Grenada. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Molecular identification of phosphate solubilizing bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A phosphate solubilizing bacterium was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of upland rice and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The gene sequence showed 99% homology with Alcaligenes faecalis. Based on the gene sequence homology, it was identified as A. faecalis. Interaction effect of this bacterium on growth ...

  7. Survey of Ehrlichia canis, Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp. in dogs from a semiarid region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Emmanuelle de Farias Rotondano

    Full Text Available This study assessed the occurrence of Ehrlichia spp., Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp. infections in 100 tick-harboring dogs from a semiarid region of the State of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil. Blood samples and ticks were collected from the animals, and a questionnaire was submitted to dog owners to obtain general data. Blood samples were used to perform hemogram, direct blood smear and immunological and molecular hemoparasite detection. The 1,151 ticks collected were identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus; direct smears revealed E. canis-like morulae in the monocytes of 4% (4/100 of the non-vaccinated female dogs, and 34% and 25% of the dogs tested positive for Ehrlichia canis by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR, respectively. Blood smear examination revealed Babesia-suggestive merozoites in the erythrocytes of 2% (2/100 of the animals. Babesia vogeli was detected by PCR in ten animals (10% and was correlated with young age (p = 0.007 and thrombocytopenia (p = 0.01. None of the animals showed Hepatozoon spp. positivity. These results indicate that E. canis is the main tick-borne canine pathogen in the study area and provide the first report of B. vogeli infection in dogs from Paraiba State.

  8. Survey of Ehrlichia canis, Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp. in dogs from a semiarid region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondano, Tereza Emmanuelle de Farias; Almeida, Herta Karyanne Araújo; Krawczak, Felipe da Silva; Santana, Vanessa Lira; Vidal, Ivana Fernandes; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia; de Azevedo, Sérgio Santos; Ade lmeida, Alzira Maria Paiva; de Melo, Marcia Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the occurrence of Ehrlichia spp., Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp. infections in 100 tick-harboring dogs from a semiarid region of the State of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil. Blood samples and ticks were collected from the animals, and a questionnaire was submitted to dog owners to obtain general data. Blood samples were used to perform hemogram, direct blood smear and immunological and molecular hemoparasite detection. The 1,151 ticks collected were identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus; direct smears revealed E. canis-like morulae in the monocytes of 4% (4/100) of the non-vaccinated female dogs, and 34% and 25% of the dogs tested positive for Ehrlichia canis by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. Blood smear examination revealed Babesia-suggestive merozoites in the erythrocytes of 2% (2/100) of the animals. Babesia vogeli was detected by PCR in ten animals (10%) and was correlated with young age (p = 0.007) and thrombocytopenia (p = 0.01). None of the animals showed Hepatozoon spp. positivity. These results indicate that E. canis is the main tick-borne canine pathogen in the study area and provide the first report of B. vogeli infection in dogs from Paraiba State.

  9. Canine infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, Dirofilaria immitis, Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in Canada, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, Brian H; Peregrine, Andrew S; Goring, Jonas; Beall, Melissa J; Little, Susan E

    2017-05-19

    Canine test results generated by veterinarians throughout Canada from 2013-2014 were evaluated to assess the geographical distribution of canine infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia spp., and Anaplasma spp. The percent positive test results of 115,636 SNAP® 4Dx® Plus tests from dogs tested were collated by province and municipality to determine the distribution of these vector-borne infections in Canada. A total of 2,844/115,636 (2.5%) dogs tested positive for antibody to B. burgdorferi. In contrast, positive test results for D. immitis antigen and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. were low, with less than 0.5% of dogs testing positive for any one of these three agents nationwide. Provincial seroprevalence for antibodies to B. burgdorferi ranged from 0.5% (Saskatchewan)-15.7% (Nova Scotia); the areas of highest percent positive test results were in proximity to regions in the USA considered endemic for Lyme borreliosis, including Nova Scotia (15.7%) and Eastern Ontario (5.1%). These high endemic foci, which had significantly higher percent positive test results than the rest of the nation (P Canada. Using dogs as sentinels for these pathogens can aid in recognition of the public and veterinary health threat that each pose.

  10. Infection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia spp. in Opossums and Dogs in Campeche, Mexico: The Role of Tick Infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Rojero-Vázquez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, some tick-borne diseases such as anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis became widespread worldwide, threatening the health of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. The aims of this study were to determine the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis in 102 opossums (Didelphis spp. and 44 owned free-ranging dogs in southeastern Mexico using a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR. A. phagocytophilum was detected in opossums and dogs with a prevalence of 3 and 27%, respectively. E. canis was only present in 7% of dogs, while we didn't detect E. chaffeensis in any host. We report the first evidence of infections of A. phagocytophilum in Didelphis virginiana and D. marsupialis in Mexico. The infection rates and patterns we found of A. phagocytophilum suggest that dogs are more directly involved in the ecology of this pathogen than opossums. Despite the small prevalence found, our results are of public health concern because of the zoonotic capabilities of A. phagocytophilum, the high tick infestation rates found and because both opossums and free-ranging dogs can achieve high population densities in the region.

  11. Prevalence and diversity of Babesia, Hepatozoon, Ehrlichia, and Bartonella in wild and domestic carnivores from Zambia, Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brianna M; Berentsen, Are; Shock, Barbara C; Teixiera, Maria; Dunbar, Michael R; Becker, Matthew S; Yabsley, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    A molecular survey was conducted for several hemoparasites of domestic dogs and three species of wild carnivores from two sites in Zambia. Three Babesia spp. were detected including Babesia felis and Babesia leo in lions (Panthera leo) and a Babesia sp. (similar to Babesia lengau) in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and a single lion. All wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) and domestic dogs were negative for Babesia. High prevalences for Hepatozoon were noted in all three wild carnivores (38-61%) and in domestic dogs (13%). Significantly higher prevalences were noted in hyenas and wild dogs compared with domestic dogs and lions. All carnivores were PCR negative for Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia ewingii, and Bartonella spp. Overall, high prevalences and diversity of Babesia and Hepatozoon were noted in wild carnivores from Zambia. This study is the first molecular characterization of Babesia from any hyena species and is the first report of a Babesia sp. closely related to B. lengau, a parasite previously only reported from cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), in lions and hyenas. Although usually benign in wild carnivores, these hemoparasites can be pathogenic under certain circumstances. Importantly, data on vectors for these parasites are lacking, so studies are needed to identify vectors as well as determine transmission routes, infection dynamics, and host specificity of these hemoparasites in wildlife in Africa and also the risk of transmission between domestic animals and wildlife.

  12. Seroprevalence of Ehrlichia ruminantium antibodies and its associated risk factors in indigenous goats of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdladla, Khanyisile; Dzomba, Edgar F; Muchadeyi, Farai C

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigated the seroprevalence of antibodies to Ehrlichia ruminantium and the associated risk factors in goats from five different farming provinces of South Africa. Sera collected from 686 goats of the commercial meat type (n=179), mohair type (n=9), non-descript indigenous goats from Eastern Cape (n=56), KwaZulu-Natal (n=209), Limpopo (n=111), North West (n=61) and Northern Cape (n=11) provinces and a feral Tankwa goat (n=50) were tested for the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to antigens of E. ruminantium using the indirect fluorescent-antibody test (IFAT). Fifty two percent of these goats had ticks. The overall seroprevalence of antibodies to E. ruminantium was 64.87% (445/686) with the highest seroprevalence reported for Limpopo (95.50%) and lowest for Northern Cape (20.29%). Highest seroprevalence for antibodies to E. ruminantium was observed in goats from endemic regions (76.09%), and from smallholder production systems (89.54%). High seroprevalence was also observed in non-descript indigenous goats (85.04%), adult goat (69.62%), in does (67.46%) and goats infested with ticks (85.79%). The logistic model showed a gradient of increasing risk for commercial meat type Savanna (OR=3.681; CI=1.335-10.149) and non-descript indigenous (OR=3.466; CI=1.57-7.645) compared to Boer goats and for goats from the smallholder production system (OR=2.582; CI=1.182-5.639) and those with ticks (OR=3.587; CI=2.105-6.112). Results from this study showed that E. ruminantium infections were prevalent but were widely and unevenly distributed throughout South Africa. Findings from the study facilitate identification and mapping of risk areas for heartwater and its endeminicity in South Africa and should be taken into consideration for future disease control strategies and local goat improvement programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Serology, molecular detection and risk factors of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes-González, Alexander V; Jiménez-Rocha, Ana E; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Dolz, Gaby

    2016-10-01

    A cross-sectional study combining different serological and molecular techniques for the detection of Ehrlichia species in dogs and their ticks was carried out with data from all regions of Costa Rica. A seroprevalence of 32.1% (131/408), and infection with E. canis of 3.2% (13/407) was found, whereas 6.9% (9/130) of ticks attached to the dogs were PCR positive to E. canis. Higher prevalences were found outside the Greater Metropolitan Area (GMA). Risk factors associated with E. canis seropositivity were age, between 2 and 7 years (RR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.2) and 8-15 years (RR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-3.0), number of dogs/total of households [Dogs per Household Ratio (DHR) ≥3.1 (RR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.4-3.0)], number of dogs infested with at least one tick/total of dogs sampled [Tick Infestation Prevalence (TIP)≥31% (RR: 2.1; 95% CI:1.3-3.3)] and living outside the GMA (RR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2-2.4) and being a mixed-breed dog (RR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1). Risk factors for E. canis PCR positive dogs were a depressive attitude (OR: 11.2; 95% CI: 1.1-115.9), fever (OR:4.8; 95% CI:1.2-19.3), DHR≥3.1 (OR: 5.7; 95% CI:1.7-19.2)], number of ticks/total of dogs sampled [Tick Distribution Ratio (TDR) ≥2.1 (OR: 6.5; 95% CI: 1.3-31.8)], and TIP≥40% (OR: 5.7; 95% CI: 1.7-19.2). This paper describes E. canis seroprevalence, PCR prevalence and tick analysis in dogs from Costa Rica, with associated clinical signs and owner perceptions. In summary, most of the E. canis infections in dogs in our country seemed to pass unnoticed by owners. Since most of the seropositive dogs (97.7%, 131/134) were negative for E. canis DNA in their blood, it is important to determine in future studies if these dogs recovered from the E. canis infection without any medication, or are persistently infected, and will develop chronic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of Rickettsia and Ehrlichia spp. in Ticks Associated with Exotic Reptiles and Amphibians Imported into Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Masako; Sakata, Akiko; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiromi; Une, Yumi; Goka, Koichi; Kishimoto, Toshio; Ando, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    One of the major routes of transmission of rickettsial and ehrlichial diseases is via ticks that infest numerous host species, including humans. Besides mammals, reptiles and amphibians also carry ticks that may harbor Rickettsia and Ehrlichia strains that are pathogenic to humans. Furthermore, reptiles and amphibians are exempt from quarantine in Japan, thus facilitating the entry of parasites and pathogens to the country through import. Accordingly, in the current study, we examined the presence of Rickettsia and Ehrlichia spp. genes in ticks associated with reptiles and amphibians originating from outside Japan. Ninety-three ticks representing nine tick species (genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma) were isolated from at least 28 animals spanning 10 species and originating from 12 countries (Ghana, Jordan, Madagascar, Panama, Russia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Tanzania, Togo, Uzbekistan, and Zambia). None of the nine tick species are indigenous in Japan. The genes encoding the common rickettsial 17-kDa antigen, citrate synthase (gltA), and outer membrane protein A (ompA) were positively detected in 45.2% (42/93), 40.9% (38/93), and 23.7% (22/93) of the ticks, respectively, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genes encoding ehrlichial heat shock protein (groEL) and major outer membrane protein (omp-1) were PCR-positive in 7.5% (7/93) and 2.2% (2/93) of the ticks, respectively. The p44 gene, which encodes the Anaplasma outer membrane protein, was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis showed that several of the rickettsial and ehrlichial sequences isolated in this study were highly similar to human pathogen genes, including agents not previously detected in Japan. These data demonstrate the global transportation of pathogenic Rickettsia and Ehrlichia through reptile- and amphibian-associated ticks. These imported animals have potential to transfer pathogens into human life. These results highlight the need to control the international transportation of known and

  15. Detection of Rickettsia and Ehrlichia spp. in Ticks Associated with Exotic Reptiles and Amphibians Imported into Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Andoh

    Full Text Available One of the major routes of transmission of rickettsial and ehrlichial diseases is via ticks that infest numerous host species, including humans. Besides mammals, reptiles and amphibians also carry ticks that may harbor Rickettsia and Ehrlichia strains that are pathogenic to humans. Furthermore, reptiles and amphibians are exempt from quarantine in Japan, thus facilitating the entry of parasites and pathogens to the country through import. Accordingly, in the current study, we examined the presence of Rickettsia and Ehrlichia spp. genes in ticks associated with reptiles and amphibians originating from outside Japan. Ninety-three ticks representing nine tick species (genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma were isolated from at least 28 animals spanning 10 species and originating from 12 countries (Ghana, Jordan, Madagascar, Panama, Russia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Tanzania, Togo, Uzbekistan, and Zambia. None of the nine tick species are indigenous in Japan. The genes encoding the common rickettsial 17-kDa antigen, citrate synthase (gltA, and outer membrane protein A (ompA were positively detected in 45.2% (42/93, 40.9% (38/93, and 23.7% (22/93 of the ticks, respectively, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The genes encoding ehrlichial heat shock protein (groEL and major outer membrane protein (omp-1 were PCR-positive in 7.5% (7/93 and 2.2% (2/93 of the ticks, respectively. The p44 gene, which encodes the Anaplasma outer membrane protein, was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis showed that several of the rickettsial and ehrlichial sequences isolated in this study were highly similar to human pathogen genes, including agents not previously detected in Japan. These data demonstrate the global transportation of pathogenic Rickettsia and Ehrlichia through reptile- and amphibian-associated ticks. These imported animals have potential to transfer pathogens into human life. These results highlight the need to control the international transportation of known

  16. Detection of a Rickettsia Closely Related to Rickettsia aeschlimannii, “Rickettsia heilongjiangensis,” Rickettsia sp. Strain RpA4, and Ehrlichia muris in Ticks Collected in Russia and Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Shpynov, Stanislav; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Rudakov, Nikolay; Tankibaev, Marat; Tarasevich, Irina; Raoult, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Using PCR, we screened 411 ticks from four genera collected in Russia and Kazakhstan for the presence of rickettsiae and ehrlichiae. In Russia, we detected “Rickettsia heilongjiangensis,” Rickettsia sp. strain RpA4, and Ehrlichia muris. In Kazakhstan, we detected Rickettsia sp. strain RpA4 and a rickettsia closely related to Rickettsia aeschlimannii. These agents should be considered in a differential diagnosis of tick-borne infections in these areas.

  17. In Vitro Activities of Telithromycin (HMR 3647) against Rickettsia rickettsii, Rickettsia conorii, Rickettsia africae, Rickettsia typhi, Rickettsia prowazekii, Coxiella burnetii, Bartonella henselae, Bartonella quintana, Bartonella bacilliformis, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis

    OpenAIRE

    Rolain, Jean-Marc; Maurin, Max; Bryskier, André; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    In vitro activities of telithromycin compared to those of erythromycin against Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis were determined. Telithromycin was more active than erythromycin against Rickettsia, Bartonella, and Coxiella burnetii, with MICs of 0.5 μg/ml, 0.003 to 0.015 μg/ml, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, but was inactive against Ehrlichia chaffeensis.

  18. Canine vector-borne co-infections: Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis in the same host monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneth, Gad; Harrus, Shimon; Gal, Arnon; Aroch, Itamar

    2015-02-28

    The protozoon Hepatozoon canis and the rickettsia Ehrlichia canis are tick-borne pathogens, transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, which cause canine hepatozoonosis and canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, respectively. Co-infection of the same host monocytes with H. canis and E. canis confirmed by molecular characterization of the infecting agents and quantitative assessment of co-infected cells is described for the first time in three naturally-infected dogs. Blood smear evaluation indicated that at least 50% of the leukocytes infected with H. canis gamonts contained E. canis morulae. Co-infection of the same host cell demonstrated in this report suggests that infection with one pathogen may permit or enhance invasion or prolonged cellular survival of the other. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of Ehrlichia chaffeensis in adult and nymphal stage lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) from Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixson, T.R.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Campbell, S.R.; Sumner, J.W.; Paddock, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), has increased in abundance in several regions of the northeastern United States, including areas of Long Island, NY. Adult and nymphal stage A. americanum collected from several sites on Long Island were evaluated for infection with Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the causative agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), by using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay. Fifty-nine (12.5%) of ,17.3 adults and eight of 11.3 pools of five nymphs each (estimated minimum prevalence of infection 1.4%) contained DNA of E. chaffeensis. These data, coupled with the documented expansion of lone star tick populations in the northeastern United States, confirm that E. chaffeensis is endemic to many areas of Long Island and that HME should be considered among the differential diagnoses of the many distinct tick-borne diseases that occur in this region.

  20. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually

  1. The pCS20 PCR assay for Ehrlichia ruminantium does not cross-react with the novel deer ehrlichial agent found in white-tailed deer in the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Mahan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available White-tailed deer are susceptible to heartwater (Ehrlichia [Cowdria] ruminantium infection and are likely to suffer high mortality if the disease spreads to the United States. It is vital, therefore, to validate a highly specific and sensitive detection method for E. ruminantium infection that can be reliably used in testing white-tailed deer, which are reservoirs of antigenically or genetically related agents such as Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Anaplasma (Ehrlichia phagocytophilum (HGE agent and Ehrlichia ewingii. Recently, a novel but as yet unnamed ehrlichial species, the white-tailed deer ehrlichia (WTDE, has been discovered in deer populations in the United States. Although the significance of WTDE as a pathogen is unknown at present, it can be distinguished from other Ehrlichia spp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In this study it was differentiated from E. ruminantium by the use of the pCS20 PCR assay which has high specificity and sensitivity for the detection of E. ruminantium. This assay did not amplify DNA from the WTDE DNA samples isolated from deer resident in Florida, Georgia and Missouri, but amplified the specific 279 bp fragment from E. ruminantium DNA. The specificity of the pCS20 PCR assay for E. ruminantium was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Similarly, the 16S PCR primers (nested that amplify a specific 405-412 bp fragment from the WTDE DNA samples, did not amplify any product from E. ruminantium DNA. This result demonstrates that it would be possible to differentiate between E. ruminantium and the novel WTDE agent found in white tailed deer by applying the two respective PCR assays followed by Southern hybridizations. Since the pCS20 PCR assay also does not amplify any DNA products from E. chaffeensis or Ehrlichia canis DNA, it is therefore the method of choice for the detection of E. ruminantium in these deer and other animal hosts.

  2. Intracellular Hg(0) Oxidation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Schaefer, Jeffra K; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Yee, Nathan

    2016-10-03

    The disposal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) wastes in mining and manufacturing areas has caused serious soil and groundwater contamination issues. Under anoxic conditions, certain anaerobic bacteria can oxidize dissolved elemental mercury and convert the oxidized Hg to neurotoxic methylmercury. In this study, we conducted experiments with the Hg-methylating bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 to elucidate the role of cellular thiols in anaerobic Hg(0) oxidation. The concentrations of cell-surface and intracellular thiols were measured, and specific fractions of D. desulfuricans ND132 were examined for Hg(0) oxidation activity and analyzed with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that intracellular thiol concentrations are approximately six times higher than those of the cell wall. Cells reacted with a thiol-blocking reagent were severely impaired in Hg(0) oxidation activity. Spheroplasts lacking cell walls rapidly oxidized Hg(0) to Hg(II), while cell wall fragments exhibited low reactivity toward Hg(0). EXAFS analysis of spheroplast samples revealed that multiple different forms of Hg-thiols are produced by the Hg(0) oxidation reaction and that the local coordination environment of the oxidized Hg changes with reaction time. The results of this study indicate that Hg(0) oxidation in D. desulfuricans ND132 is an intracellular process that occurs by reaction with thiol-containing molecules.

  3. Illuminating the landscape of host–pathogen interactions with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has, in 25 y, become a model in infection biology. Through the analysis of both its saprophytic life and infectious process, new concepts in microbiology, cell biology, and pathogenesis have been discovered. This review will update our knowledge on this intracellular pathogen and highlight the most recent breakthroughs. Promising areas of investigation such as the increasingly recognized relevance for the infectious process, of RNA-mediated regulations in the bacterium, and the role of bacterially controlled posttranslational and epigenetic modifications in the host will also be discussed. PMID:22114192

  4. Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in ticks of dogs in Cuiaba, Mato GrossoEhrlichia canis e Anaplasma platys em carrapatos de cães de Cuiabá, Mato Grosso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Dutra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diseases transmitted by arthropods such as Rhipicephalus sanguineus, are caused by a spectrum of pathogens. Among these are the canine monocytic ehrlichiosis and cyclical thrombocytopenia with a cosmopolitan distribution. Aiming to verify the presence of DNA of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in ticks R. sanguineus collected in the period 2008 to 2009 of 380 infected dogs. Ticks, after maceration, were subjected to DNA extraction and then nested PCR was performed for amplification of A. platys and E. canis. Of these, 81 (29.7% amplified DNA from ehrlichiais agents, where 38 (17.9% amplified in E. canis and 32 (15.7% for A. platys. The observation of two pathogens, combined with worldwide distribution of the tick R. sanguineus, demonstrates the high risk of infection with these pathogens in dogs in the city of Cuiaba. Doenças transmitidas por artrópodes, como o Rhipicephalus sanguineus, são causadas por um espectro de patógenos. Dentre estas, estão a erliquiose monocítica canina e trombocitopenia cíclica com distribuição cosmopolita. Com o objetivo de verificar a presença de DNA de Anaplasma platys e Ehrlichia canis em carrapatos R. sanguineus coletados no período de 2008 a 2009 de 380 cães infestados. Os carrapatos, após a maceração, foram submetidos a extração de DNA e, em seguida, foi realizada a Nested PCR para a amplificação da espécie A. platys e E. canis. Destes, 81 (29.7% amplificaram o DNA dos agentes ehrlichiais, onde 38 (17.9% amplificaram para E. canis e 32 (15.7% para A. platys. A observação dos dois patógenos, combinado com distribuição mundial do carrapato R. sanguineus, demonstra o elevado risco de infecção por esses patógenos de cães na cidade de Cuiabá.

  5. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis in dogs from the Pantanal of Mato Grosso State, Brazil Detecção molecular de Ehrlichia canis em cães do Pantanal do Mato Grosso, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Gabriela Ferreira dos Santos

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the presence of Ehrlichia DNA in the blood samples of 320 dogs from the urban and rural areas of the municipality of Poconé, Pantanal region, Mato Grosso state, by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, targeting the ehrlichial dsb gene. Risk factors for infection in dogs were also evaluated. Forty-eight (15%, 95% CI: 11.4-19.5% dogs were positive: 25 (15.6%, 95% CI: 10.4-22.2% from the urban area and 23 (14.4%, 95% CI: 9.3-20.8% from the rural area (P > 0.05. Partial DNA sequence obtained from PCR products of 18 samples from the urban area and 16 samples from the rural area were 100% identical to E. canis from Brazil and the USA. This study reports the first E. canis molecular detection in dogs from the northern Pantanal region.O presente estudo avaliou a presença de DNA de Ehrlichia spp. em 320 cães das áreas urbana e rural do município de Poconé, região do Pantanal de Mato Grosso, pela PCR visando o gene dsb. Os fatores de risco para a infecção em cães também foram avaliados. Quarenta e oito (15%, IC 95%: 11,4-19,5% cães foram positivos, 25 (15,6%, IC 95%: 10,4-22,2% da área urbana e 23 (14,37%, 95% CI: 9,3-20,8% da área rural (P > 0,05. Sequências parciais de DNAs obtidos a partir de produtos da PCR de 18 amostras da área urbana e 16 da área rural foram 100% idênticas a E. canis do Brasil e EUA. Este estudo relata a primeira detecção molecular de E. canis em cães da região norte do Pantanal.

  6. Insecticide resistance and intracellular proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard M

    2017-12-01

    Pesticide resistance is an example of evolution in action with mechanisms of resistance arising from mutations or increased expression of intrinsic genes. Intracellular proteases have a key role in maintaining healthy cells and in responding to stressors such as pesticides. Insecticide-resistant insects have constitutively elevated intracellular protease activity compared to corresponding susceptible strains. This increase was shown for some cases originally through biochemical enzyme studies and subsequently putatively by transcriptomics and proteomics methods. Upregulation and expression of proteases have been characterised in resistant strains of some insect species, including mosquitoes. This increase in proteolysis results in more degradation products (amino acids) of intracellular proteins. These may be utilised in the resistant strain to better protect the cell from stress. There are changes in insect intracellular proteases shortly after insecticide exposure, suggesting a role in stress response. The use of protease and proteasome inhibitors or peptide mimetics as synergists with improved application techniques and through protease gene knockdown using RNA interference (possibly expressed in crop plants) may be potential pest management strategies, in situations where elevated intracellular proteases are relevant. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  8. Microflora of urogenital tract in pregnancy with asymptomatic bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaeva, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The article contains results of research interrelationship from colonization of vagina and urinary tract diseases. E.coli one of the main factors in development asymptomatic bacterium. Presented high effects of penicillin medicaments and nitrofurans in treatment of asymptomatic bacterium

  9. Engineering a wild fast-growing Mycoplasma bacterium to generate ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-12

    Jan 12, 2018 ... The CCPP bacterium causes sick animals to experience severe symptoms ... because antibiotic treatment does not eliminate the responsible bacterium. ... To develop a fast growing CCPP vaccine for cheaper production and ...

  10. Molecular detection of Dirofilaria immitis, Hepatozoon canis, Babesia spp., Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs on Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lanjing; Kelly, Patrick; Ackerson, Kate; El-Mahallawy, Heba S; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Wang, Chengming

    2014-03-01

    Although vector-borne diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in dogs in tropical areas, there is little information on these conditions in Costa Rica. In PCRs of blood from dogs in Costa Rica, we did not detect DNAs of Rickettsia (R.) felis and Coxiella (C.) burnetii but we did find evidence of infection with Dirofilaria (D.) immitis (9/40, 22.5%), Hepatozoon (H.) canis (15/40, 37.5%), Babesia spp. (10/40, 25%; 2 with B. gibsoni and 8 with B. vogeli), Anaplasma (A.) platys (3/40, 7.5%) and Ehrlichia (E.) canis (20/40, 50%). Nine dogs (22.5%) were free of any vector-borne pathogens while 14 (35%) were infected with a single pathogen, 11 (27.5%) with two, 4 (10%) with three, 1 (2.5%) with four, and 1 (2.5%) with five pathogens. Dogs in Costa Rica are commonly infected with vector-borne agents.

  11. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piratae, Supawadee; Pimpjong, Kiattisak; Vaisusuk, Kotchaphon; Chatan, Wasupon

    2015-01-01

    Canine tick borne diseases showing distribution worldwide have caused morbidity and mortality in dogs. This study observed the mainly tick borne pathogens described for dogs in Thailand, Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli. From May to July 2014, blood samples were collected from 79 stray dogs from 7 districts of Mahasarakham province to molecular surveyed for 16s rRNA gene of E. canis and 18s rRNA gene of H. canis and B. canis vogeli. Twenty eight (35.44%) of stray dogs showed the infection with tick borne pathogens. The prevalence of E. canis infection was the highest with 21.5% (17/79). DNA of H. canis and B. canis vogeli were detected at the prevalence of 10.1% (8/79) and 6.3% (5/79), respectively. Co-infection between E. canis and B. canis vogeli were identified in 2 (2.5%) dogs. The results indicated that a wide range of tick borne pathogens are circulation in the canine population in Mahasarakham province. This study is the first report on prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham, a province in northern part of Thailand. This data providing is important to understand the prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli infection in stray dogs in this region, which will assist in the management of these blood parasite.

  12. Pathology of dogs in Campo Grande, MS, Brazil naturally co-infected with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Braziliano Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different parasites that commonly occur concomitantly can influence one another, sometimes with unpredictable effects. We evaluated pathological aspects of dogs naturally co-infected with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis. The health status of the dogs was investigated based on histopathological, hematological and biochemical analyses of 21 animals infected solely with L. infantum and 22 dogs co- infected with L. infantum and E. canis. The skin of both groups showed chronic, predominantly lymphohistioplasmacytic inflammatory reaction. The plasmacytosis in the lymphoid tissues was likely related with the hypergammaglobulinemia detected in all the dogs. The disorganization of extracellular matrix found in the reticular dermis of the inguinal region and ear, characterized by the substitution of thick collagen fibers for thin fibers, was attributed to the degree of inflammatory reaction, irrespective of the presence of parasites. In addition, the histopathological analysis revealed that twice as many dogs in the co-infected group presented Leishmania amastigotes in the ear skin than those infected solely with Leishmania, increasing the possibility of becoming infected through sand fly vectors. Our findings highlight the fact that the health of dogs infected concomitantly with L. infantum and E. canis is severely compromised due to their high levels of total plasma protein, globulins, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase, and severe anemia.

  13. Solution NMR Structures of Oxidized and Reduced Ehrlichia chaffeensis thioredoxin: NMR-Invisible Structure Owing to Backbone Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2018-01-02

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are small ubiquitous proteins that participate in a diverse variety of redox reactions via the reversible oxidation of two cysteine thiol groups in a structurally conserved active site, CGPC. Here, we describe the NMR solution structures of a Trx from Ehrlichia chaffeensis (Ec-Trx, ECH_0218), the etiological agent responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis, in both the oxidized and reduced states. The overall topology of the calculated structures is similar in both redox states and similar to other Trx structures, a five-strand, mixed -sheet (1:3:2:4:5) surrounded by four -helices. Unlike other Trxs studied by NMR in both redox states, the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of reduced Ec-Trx was missing eight amide cross peaks relative to the spectra of oxidized Ec-Trx. These missing amides correspond to residues C32-E39 in the active site containing helix (2) and S72-I75 in a loop near the active site and suggest a substantial change in the backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C32-C35 disulfide bond.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis and Babesia vogeli in stray dogs in Paraná, Brazil

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    Claudia M. Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Hemoparasitic infections are tick-borne diseases, which affect animals and humans. Considering the importance of canine hemoparasitic infections in veterinary clinics, this study aimed to determine the occurrence of Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis and Babesia vogeli in blood samples from 182 dogs not domiciled in the city of Pato Branco, southwestern region of Paraná State, Brazil, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The prevalence of A. platys and B. vogeli was 32.9% and 10.9% respectively, and A. platys infection prevailed (p<0.001. The number of dogs positive for A. platys was larger in Winter (p<0.05. All blood samples were negative for E. canis. In the dogs, infestation by Amblyomma cajennense predominated over that by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (p<0.001; but there was no significant association between PCR and the variables presence of ticks, sex and age. Dogs infected by A. platys and B. vogeli showed thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia and leukocytosis; but there was no correlation between such hematological changes and infection by hemoparasites. This appears to be the first molecular study that demonstrates the existence of A. platys and B. vogeli in dogs from the southwestern region of Paraná.

  15. Comparison of Ehrlichia muris strains isolated from wild mice and ticks and serologic survey of humans and animals with E. muris as antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, M; Ito, T; Suto, C; Shibata, S; Rikihisa, Y; Hata, K; Hirai, K

    1999-04-01

    In metropolitan Tokyo, the Ehrlichia muris seropositivity rate of 24 wild mice was 63% in Hinohara Village, but in the surrounding areas, it was 0 to 5%. This finding suggests that the reservoir of E. muris is focal. Among the 15 seropositive mice, ehrlichiae were isolated from 9 Apodemus speciosus mice and 1 A. argenteus mouse, respectively. Five ehrlichial isolates were obtained from 10 ticks (Haemaphysalis flava) collected in Asuke Town, Aichi Prefecture, where the E. muris type strain had been isolated. These new isolates were compared with the E. muris type strain. The mouse virulence and ultrastructure of the new isolates were similar to those of the type strain, and all of them were cross-reactive with each other, as well as with the type strain, by indirect immunofluorescent-antibody test. The levels of similarity of the base sequences of the 16S rRNA gene of one of the A. speciosus isolates and one of the tick isolates to that of the E. muris type strain were 99.79 and 99.93%, respectively. We suggest that all of these isolates are E. muris; that E. muris is not limited to Eothenomys kageus but infects other species of mice; and that E. muris is present at locations other than Aichi Prefecture. It appears that H. flava is a potential vector of E. muris. Twenty (1%) of 1803 humans from metropolitan Tokyo were found to be seropositive for E. muris antibodies. A serological survey revealed that exposure to E. muris or organisms antigenically cross-reactive to E. muris occurred among dogs, wild mice, monkeys, bears, deer, and wild boars in Gifu Prefecture, nearby prefectures, and Nagoya City, central Japan. However, human beings and Rattus norvegicus rats in this area were seronegative. These results indicate broader geographic distribution of and human and animal species exposure to E. muris or related Ehrlichia spp. in Japan.

  16. Detection of Ehrlichia spp., Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., and Other Eubacteria in Ticks from the Thai-Myanmar Border and Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Parola, Philippe; Cornet, Jean-Paul; Sanogo, Yibayiri Osée; Miller, R. Scott; Thien, Huynh Van; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Raoult, Didier; Telford III, Sam R.; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2003-01-01

    A total of 650 ticks, including 13 species from five genera, were collected from animals, from people, or by flagging of the vegetation at sites on the Thai-Myanmar border and in Vietnam. They were tested by PCR to detect DNA of bacteria of the order Rickettsiales. Three Anaplasma spp. were detected in ticks collected in Thailand, including (i) Anaplasma sp. strain AnDa465, which was considered a genotype of Anaplasma platys (formerly Ehrlichia platys) and which was obtained from Dermacentor ...

  17. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  18. Characterization of Leptin Intracellular Trafficking

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    E Walum

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is produced by adipose tissue, and its concentration in plasma is related to the amount of fat in the body. The leptin receptor (OBR is a member of the class I cytokine receptor family and several different isoforms, produced by alternative mRNA splicing are found in many tissues, including the hypothalamus. The two predominant isoforms includes a long form (OBRl with an intracellular domain of 303 amino acids and a shorter form (OBRs with an intracellular domain of 34 amino acids. Since OBRl is mainly expressed in the hypotalamus, it has been suggested to be the main signalling form. The peripheral production of leptin by adipocyte tissue and its effects as a signal of satiety in the central nervous system imply that leptin gains access to regions of the brain regulating in energy balance by crossing the blood-brain barrier. In an attempt to characterize the intracellular transport of leptin, we have followed binding internalization and degradation of leptin in HEK293 cells. We have also monitored the intracellular transport pathway of fluorescent conjugated leptin in HEK293 cells. Phenylarsine oxide, a general inhibitor of endocytosis, as well as incubation at mild hypertonic conditions, prevented the uptake of leptin, confirming a receptor-mediated internalization process. When internalized, 125I-leptin was rapidly accumulated inside the cells and reached a maximum after 10 min. After 70 minutes about 40-50% of total counts in each time point were found in the medium as TCA-soluble material. Leptin sorting, at the level of early endosomes, did not seem to involve recycling endosomes, since FITC-leptin was sorted from Cy3- transferrin containing compartments at 37°C. At 45 minutes of continuos internalization, FITC-leptin appeared mainly accumulated in late endocytic structures colocalizing with internalized rhodamine coupled epidermial growth factor (EGF and the lysosomal marker protein lamp-1. The transport of leptin was also shown

  19. Getting “Inside” Type I IFNs: Type I IFNs in Intracellular Bacterial Infections

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    Deann T. Snyder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons represent a unique and complex group of cytokines, serving many purposes during innate and adaptive immunity. Discovered in the context of viral infections, type I IFNs are now known to have myriad effects in infectious and autoimmune disease settings. Type I IFN signaling during bacterial infections is dependent on many factors including whether the infecting bacterium is intracellular or extracellular, as different signaling pathways are activated. As such, the repercussions of type I IFN induction can positively or negatively impact the disease outcome. This review focuses on type I IFN induction and downstream consequences during infection with the following intracellular bacteria: Chlamydia trachomatis, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, Legionella pneumophila, and Coxiella burnetii. Intracellular bacterial infections are unique because the bacteria must avoid, circumvent, and even co-opt microbial “sensing” mechanisms in order to reside and replicate within a host cell. Furthermore, life inside a host cell makes intracellular bacteria more difficult to target with antibiotics. Because type I IFNs are important immune effectors, modulating this pathway may improve disease outcomes. But first, it is critical to understand the context-dependent effects of the type I IFN pathway in intracellular bacterial infections.

  20. Glutathione provides a source of cysteine essential for intracellular multiplication of Francisella tularensis.

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    Khaled Alkhuder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium causing the zoonotic disease tularemia. Its ability to multiply and survive in macrophages is critical for its virulence. By screening a bank of HimarFT transposon mutants of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS to isolate intracellular growth-deficient mutants, we selected one mutant in a gene encoding a putative gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT. This gene (FTL_0766 was hence designated ggt. The mutant strain showed impaired intracellular multiplication and was strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. Here we present evidence that the GGT activity of F. tularensis allows utilization of glutathione (GSH, gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine dipeptide as cysteine sources to ensure intracellular growth. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of a nutrient acquisition system in the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. GSH is the most abundant source of cysteine in the host cytosol. Thus, the capacity this intracellular bacterial pathogen has evolved to utilize the available GSH, as a source of cysteine in the host cytosol, constitutes a paradigm of bacteria-host adaptation.

  1. Luciferase inactivation in the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, C A; Baldwin, T O

    1981-06-01

    Luciferase was rapidly inactivated in stationary-phase cultures of the wild type of the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, but was stable in stationary-phase cultures of mutants of V. harveyi that are nonluminous without exogenous aldehyde, termed the aldehyde-deficient mutants. The inactivation in the wild type was halted by cell lysis and was slowed or stopped by O2 deprivation or by addition of KCN and NaF or of chloramphenicol. If KCN and NaF or chloramphenicol were added to a culture before the onset of luciferase inactivation, then luciferase inactivation did not occur. However, if these inhibitors were added after the onset of luciferase inactivation, then luciferase inactivation continued for about 2 to 3 h before the inactivation process stopped. The onset of luciferase inactivation in early stationary-phase cultures of wild-type cell coincided with a slight drop in the intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) level from a relatively constant log-phase value of 20 pmol of ATP per microgram of soluble cell protein. Addition of KCN and NaF to a culture shortly after this drop in ATP caused a rapid decrease in the ATP level to about 4 pmol of ATP per microgram whereas chloramphenicol added at this same time caused a transient increase in ATP level to about 25 pmol/microgram. The aldehyde-deficient mutant (M17) showed a relatively constant log-phase ATP level identical with that of the wild-type cells, but rather than decreasing in early stationary phase, the ATP level increased to a value twice that in log-phase cells. We suggest that the inactivation of luciferase is dependent on the synthesis of some factor which is produced during stationary phase and is itself unstable, and whose synthesis is blocked by chloramphenicol or cyanide plus fluoride.

  2. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-20

    Classification) " ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF INTRACELLULAR PROTOZOA 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Aikawa, Masamichi 13a. TYPE OF REPORT I13b. TIME COVERED 114...authors suggest that anti-CS protein antibody is important in reducing the prevalence of malaria with increasing age among persons in such areas and... Hygine 33, 220-226. 0Giudice, G.D., Engers, H.D., Tougne, C., Biro, S.S., Weiss, N., Verdini, A.S., Pessi, A., Degremont, A.A., Freyvogel, T.A., Lambert

  3. Evaluation of haemato-biochemical and oxidative indices in naturally infected concomitant tick borne intracellular diseases in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan Sarma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore haemato-biochemical and oxidative stress indices due to concomitant tick borne intracellular diseases in dogs presented at Referral Veterinary Polyclinic, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly during May 2010 to May 2012. Methods: Microscopy of Giemsa blood smear and ELISA test (SNAP 4D伊 were carried out in suspected cases to confirm haemo-parasitic infection. Blood and serum samples were analyzed for oxidative stress indices and haemato-biochemical changes. All the ailing conditions were recorded to investigate the clinical pattern of concomitant tick borne diseases. Ultrasonographic study was carried out to obtain the hepatic involvement. Results: Examination of 3 650 dogs revealed that 2.77% dog were positive for various tick borne diseases, out of which 21.78% were with concomitant infection. Clinical symptoms were noted with overall mean clinical score of 9.95依0.30. Ultrasonographic examination revealed hepatomegaly, distension of gall bladder, and ascites. Haemato-biochemical evaluation confirmed anaemia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia and hyperbilirubinemia with increased serum alanine amino transferase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in concomitant infected dogs. The lipid peroxidation level of concomitant infection was significantly higher (P<0.05 than healthy group whereas superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reduced and catalase activity in concomitant infected group were decreased. Conclusions: The severity of infection was more pronounced in dogs harboring Ehrlichia, Babesia and Hepatozoon and the oxidative stress may have a pathophysiological role in concomitant infection in dogs.

  4. Molecular detection of Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Wolbachia sp. but not Ehrlichia canis in Croatian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Doroteja; Reil, Irena; Duvnjak, Sanja; Jurković, Daria; Lukačević, Damir; Pilat, Miroslav; Beck, Ana; Mihaljević, Željko; Vojta, Lea; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beck, Relja

    2017-11-01

    The bacteria Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia canis are tick-borne agents that cause canine vector-borne disease. The prevalence of these pathogens in South Eastern Europe is unknown with the exception of an isolated case of A. platys detected in a dog imported into Germany from Croatia. To gain a better insight into their presence and prevalence, PCR-based screening for these bacterial pathogens was performed on domesticated dogs from different regions of Croatia. Blood samples from 1080 apparently healthy dogs from coastal and continental parts of Croatia as well as tissue samples collected from 63 deceased dogs with a history of anaemia and thrombocytopenia were collected for molecular screening by an Anaplasmataceae-specific 16S rRNA conventional PCR. Positive samples were confirmed using a second Anaplasmataceae-specific PCR assay with the PCR product sequenced for the purpose of bacterial species identification. All sequenced isolates were georeferenced and a kernel intensity estimator was used to identify clusters of greater case intensity. 42/1080 (3.8%; CI 2.7-5.0) of the healthy dogs were PCR positive for bacteria in the Anaplasmataceae. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplified from these positive samples revealed the presence of A. platys in 2.5% (CI 1.6-3.4%, 27 dogs), A. phagocytophilum in 0.3% (CI 0-0.6%, 3 dogs) and a Wolbachia endosymbiont in 1.1% (CI 0.4-1.6%, 12 dogs) of dogs screened in this study. Necropsied dogs were free from infection. Notably, no evidence of E. canis infection was found in any animal. This survey represents a rare molecular study of Anaplasmataceae in dogs in South Eastern Europe, confirming the presence of A. platys and A. phagocytophilum but not E. canis. The absence of E. canis was surprising given it has been described in all other Mediterranean countries surveyed and raises questions over the regional vector capacity of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Halobacillis halophilus to Its Environment

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    Inga Hänelt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The capability of osmoadaptation is a prerequisite of organisms that live in an environment with changing salinities. Halobacillus halophilus is a moderately halophilic bacterium that grows between 0.4 and 3 M NaCl by accumulating both chloride and compatible solutes as osmolytes. Chloride is absolutely essential for growth and, moreover, was shown to modulate gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in osmoadaptation. The synthesis of different compatible solutes is strictly salinity- and growth phase-dependent. This unique hybrid strategy of H. halophilus will be reviewed here taking into account the recently published genome sequence. Based on identified genes we will speculate about possible scenarios of the synthesis of compatible solutes and the uptake of potassium ion which would complete our knowledge of the fine-tuned osmoregulation and intracellular osmolyte balance in H. halophilus.

  6. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate 15 N supplied as 15 N 2 . As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH 4 + in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship

  7. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. (Univ. of Leeds (England))

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  8. Survival Strategies of the Plant-Associated Bacterium Enterobacter sp. Strain EG16 under Cadmium Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmei; Chao, Yuanqing; Li, Yaying; Lin, Qingqi; Bai, Jun; Tang, Lu; Wang, Shizhong; Ying, Rongrong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-01-04

    Plant-associated bacteria are of great interest because of their potential use in phytoremediation. However, their ability to survive and promote plant growth in metal-polluted soils remains unclear. In this study, a soilborne Cd-resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain EG16. It tolerates high external Cd concentrations (Cd(2+) MIC, >250 mg liter(-1)) and is able to produce siderophores and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both of which contribute to plant growth promotion. Surface biosorption in this strain accounted for 31% of the total Cd accumulated. The potential presence of cadmium sulfide, shown by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, suggested intracellular Cd binding as a Cd response mechanism of the isolate. Cd exposure resulted in global regulation at the transcriptomic level, with the bacterium switching to an energy-conserving mode by inhibiting energy-consuming processes while increasing the production of stress-related proteins. The stress response system included increased import of sulfur and iron, which become deficient under Cd stress, and the redirection of sulfur metabolism to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels in response to Cd toxicity. Increased production of siderophores, responding to Cd-induced Fe deficiency, not only is involved in the Cd stress response systems of EG16 but may also play an important role in promoting plant growth as well as alleviating the Cd-induced inhibition of IAA production. The newly isolated strain EG16 may be a suitable candidate for microbially assisted phytoremediation due to its high resistance to Cd and its Cd-induced siderophore production, which is likely to contribute to plant growth promotion. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. MR imaging of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janick, P.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Asakura, T.

    1989-01-01

    MR imaging was performed on varying concentrations of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin as well as varying proportions of deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in vitro at 1.5T with use of standard spin-echo and gradient-refocused spin sequences. This study indicates that susceptibility-induced T2 shortening occurs over a broad range of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin concentrations (maximal at hematocrits between 20% and 45%), reflecting diffusional effects at the cellular level. T2* gradient-echo imaging enhances the observed hypointensity in images of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin. The characteristic MR appearance of acute hemotomas can be modeled by the behavior of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin

  10. Trade-Offs of Escherichia coli Adaptation to an Intracellular Lifestyle in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Azevedo

    Full Text Available The bacterium Escherichia coli exhibits remarkable genomic and phenotypic variation, with some pathogenic strains having evolved to survive and even replicate in the harsh intra-macrophage environment. The rate and effects of mutations that can cause pathoadaptation are key determinants of the pace at which E. coli can colonize such niches and become pathogenic. We used experimental evolution to determine the speed and evolutionary paths undertaken by a commensal strain of E. coli when adapting to intracellular life. We estimated the acquisition of pathoadaptive mutations at a rate of 10-6 per genome per generation, resulting in the fixation of more virulent strains in less than a hundred generations. Whole genome sequencing of independently evolved clones showed that the main targets of intracellular adaptation involved loss of function mutations in genes implicated in the assembly of the lipopolysaccharide core, iron metabolism and di- and tri-peptide transport, namely rfaI, fhuA and tppB, respectively. We found a substantial amount of antagonistic pleiotropy in evolved populations, as well as metabolic trade-offs, commonly found in intracellular bacteria with reduced genome sizes. Overall, the low levels of clonal interference detected indicate that the first steps of the transition of a commensal E. coli into intracellular pathogens are dominated by a few pathoadaptive mutations with very strong effects.

  11. Serological cross-reactivity of Trypanosoma cruzi, Ehrlichia canis, Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Babesia canis to Leishmania infantum chagasi tests in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Franco Zanette

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the serological cross-reactivity between Leishmania sp. and other canine pathogens. Methods: Positive serum samples for Ehrlichia canis, Babesia canis, Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Trypanosoma cruzi were tested using three serological methods enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT and Kalazar Detect™, for canine visceral leishmaniasis. Results: Of the 57 dog samples tested, 24 (42.1% tested positive using one of the three serological methods: 10/57 (17.5% for ELISA, 11/57 (19.3% for IFAT and 3/57 (5.3% for Kalazar Detect™. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that the presence of other infectious agents may lead to cross-reactivity on leishmaniasis serological tests.

  12. Detecção molecular de Ehrlichia canis e Babesia canis vogeli em Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato de carrapatos em Cuba

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    Maylin Gonzalez Navarrete

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Os carrapatos (Acari: Ixodidae são de importância médica e veterinária relevantes em todo o mundo por causa da variedade de agentes patogênicos que podem transmitir. No presente trabalho, foi realizada uma pesquisa para identificar Babesia spp. e Ehrlichia spp. em carrapatos coletados de cães de Cuba. Foram coletados 431 carrapatos de 378 cães, tendo sido identificados como pertencentes às espécies de Ripicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s. 1. O DNA genômico foi extraído com protocolo usando fenol/clorofórmio. Os carrapatos foram organizados em “pools” e o DNA extraído foi testado pela reação em cadeia da polimerase (nPCR para amplificar 398 pares de bases (pb do DNA ribossômico 16S (rDNA de Ehrlichia canis e PCR para amplificar aproximadamente 560 pb do DNA ribossômico 18S (rDNA. Dos 49 pools testados, 8,16% (n = 4/49 foram positivos para o E. canis por nPCR visando o gene do 16S rDNA e apenas um pool (n = 1/49; 2,04% foi positivo para o gene 18S rDNA para Babesia canis. As quatro sequências obtidas para o fragmento de 16S rDNA foram idênticas entre si e resultaram em 100% de identidade com E. canis de diferentes países. A sequência obtida do gene do 18S rDNA para Babesia spp. apresentou semelhança de 100% com Babesia canis vogeli quando comparada às sequências depositadas no Genbank. Esta foi a primeira detecção molecular desses agentes no carrapato R. sanguineus s. l. em Cuba.

  13. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity

  14. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  15. Secretome of obligate intracellular Rickettsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Kaur, Simran J.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen; Sears, Khandra T.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales, Rickettsiaceae) is comprised of obligate intracellular parasites, with virulent species of interest both as causes of emerging infectious diseases and for their potential deployment as bioterrorism agents. Currently, there are no effective commercially available vaccines, with treatment limited primarily to tetracycline antibiotics, although others (e.g. josamycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin) are also effective. Much of the recent research geared toward understanding mechanisms underlying rickettsial pathogenicity has centered on characterization of secreted proteins that directly engage eukaryotic cells. Herein, we review all aspects of the Rickettsia secretome, including six secretion systems, 19 characterized secretory proteins, and potential moonlighting proteins identified on surfaces of multiple Rickettsia species. Employing bioinformatics and phylogenomics, we present novel structural and functional insight on each secretion system. Unexpectedly, our investigation revealed that the majority of characterized secretory proteins have not been assigned to their cognate secretion pathways. Furthermore, for most secretion pathways, the requisite signal sequences mediating translocation are poorly understood. As a blueprint for all known routes of protein translocation into host cells, this resource will assist research aimed at uniting characterized secreted proteins with their apposite secretion pathways. Furthermore, our work will help in the identification of novel secreted proteins involved in rickettsial ‘life on the inside’. PMID:25168200

  16. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  17. Accumulation of intra-cellular polyphosphate in Chlorella vulgaris cells is related to indole-3-acetic acid produced by Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Beatriz; de-Bashan, Luz E; Hernandez, Juan-Pablo; Bashan, Yoav

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate, as polyphosphate, was measured when the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was immobilized in alginate with either of two wild-type strains of the microalgae growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense or their corresponding IAA-attenuated mutants. Wild type strains of A. brasilense induced higher amounts of intra-cellular phosphate in Chlorella than their respective mutants. Calculations comparing intra-cellular phosphate accumulation by culture or net accumulation by the cell and the amount of IAA that was produced by each of these strains revealed that higher IAA was linked to higher accumulations of intra-cellular phosphate. Application of four levels of exogenous IAA reported for A. brasilense and their IAA-attenuated mutants to cultures of C. vulgaris enhanced accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate; the higher the content of IAA per culture or per single cell, the higher was the amount of accumulated phosphate. When an IAA-attenuated mutant was complemented with exogenous IAA, accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate at the culture level was even higher than phosphate accumulation with the respective wild type strains. When calculating the net accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate in the complementation experiment, net intra-cellular phosphate induced by the IAA-attenuated mutant was completely restored and was similar to the wild strains. We propose that IAA produced by A. brasilense is linked to polyphosphate accumulation in C. vulgaris. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Intracellular localization of Arabidopsis sulfurtransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Dietrich, Christof; Nowak, Katharina; Sierralta, Walter D; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2004-06-01

    Sulfurtransferases (Str) comprise a group of enzymes widely distributed in archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryota which catalyze the transfer of a sulfur atom from suitable sulfur donors to nucleophilic sulfur acceptors. In all organisms analyzed to date, small gene families encoding Str proteins have been identified. The gene products were localized to different compartments of the cells. Our interest concerns the localization of Str proteins encoded in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. Computer-based prediction methods revealed localization in different compartments of the cell for six putative AtStrs. Several methods were used to determine the localization of the AtStr proteins experimentally. For AtStr1, a mitochondrial localization was demonstrated by immunodetection in the proteome of isolated mitochondria resolved by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent blotting. The respective mature AtStr1 protein was identified by mass spectrometry sequencing. The same result was obtained by transient expression of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts, whereas AtStr2 was exclusively localized to the cytoplasm by this method. Three members of the single-domain AtStr were localized in the chloroplasts as demonstrated by transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions in protoplasts and stomata, whereas the single-domain AtStr18 was shown to be cytoplasmic. The remarkable subcellular distribution of AtStr15 was additionally analyzed by transmission electron immunomicroscopy using a monospecific antibody against green fluorescent protein, indicating an attachment to the thylakoid membrane. The knowledge of the intracellular localization of the members of this multiprotein family will help elucidate their specific functions in the organism.

  19. Intracellular calcium homeostasis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) is a universal carrier of biological information: it controls cell life from its origin at fertilization to its end in the process of programmed cell death. Ca(2+) is a conventional diffusible second messenger released inside cells by the interaction of first messengers with plasma membrane receptors. However, it can also penetrate directly into cells to deliver information without the intermediation of first or second messengers. Even more distinctively, Ca(2+) can act as a first messenger, by interacting with a plasma membrane receptor to set in motion intracellular signaling pathways that involve Ca(2+) itself. Perhaps the most distinctive property of the Ca(2+) signal is its ambivalence: while essential to the correct functioning of cells, Ca(2+) becomes an agent that mediates cell distress, or even (toxic) cell death, if its concentration and movements inside cells are not carefully tuned. Ca(2+) is controlled by reversible complexation to specific proteins, which could be pure Ca(2+) buffers, or which, in addition to buffering Ca(2+), also decode its signal to pass it on to targets. The most important actors in the buffering of cell Ca(2+) are proteins that transport it across the plasma membrane and the membrane of the organelles: some have high Ca(2+) affinity and low transport capacity (e.g., Ca(2+) pumps), others have opposite properties (e.g., the Ca(2+) uptake system of mitochondria). Between the initial event of fertilization, and the terminal event of programmed cell death, the Ca(2+) signal regulates the most important activities of the cell, from the expression of genes, to heart and muscle contraction and other motility processes, to diverse metabolic pathways involved in the generation of cell fuels.

  20. Investigação molecular de Ehrlichia spp. e Anaplasma platys em felinos domésticos: alterações clínicas, hematológicas e bioquímicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete S Correa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia sp. e Anaplasma platys são micro-organismos Gram negativos, parasitos intracelulares obrigatórios, residindo em vacúolos citoplasmáticos de leucócitos e plaquetas, encontrados no sangue periférico ou em tecidos. Poucos relatos têm sido feitos sobre erliquiose e anaplasmose em gatos no Brasil, os quais são baseados na presença de mórulas em leucócitos e plaquetas, ou pela detecção de anticorpos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a infecção natural por Ehrlichia sp. e A.platys em gatos no Município de Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ, através da hematoscopia e pela detecção do DNA desses agentes. Foram utilizadas amostras de sangue total e de soro de 91 gatos, independente de raça, sexo e idade. Realizaram-se hemograma, bioquímica sérica e PCR, utilizando oligonucleotídes para Ehrlichia sp. e A.platys. Os dados de hematoscopia mostraram que 9,89% dos gatos apresentaram mórulas em macroplaquetas. O DNA de A.platys foi detectado em 13,18% dos 91 animais e em 44,44% das amostras positivas à hematoscopia. O DNA de Ehrlichia sp. não foi detectado em nenhuma amostra. Nenhuma alteração foi observada nos sinais clínicos nem nos resultados laboratoriais nos animais estudados. Os dados sugerem que os felinos domésticos podem atuar como potenciais reservatórios para A. platys, como forma não sintomática das enfermidades relacionadas

  1. Prevalence of Ehrlichia canis using the nested-PCR, correlation with the presence of morulae and thrombocytopenia in dogs treated in Veterinary Hospital of the Federal University of Espirito Santo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Rúbia Rocha Pereira Sales

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Sales M.R.R.P., Ignacchiti M.D.C., Mendes Junior A.F., Suhett W.G., Porfírio L.C., Marins M., Aptekmann K.P. & Pereira Júnior O.S. [Prevalence of Ehrlichia canis using the nested-PCR, correlation with the presence of morulae and thrombocytopenia in dogs treated in Veterinary Hospital of the Federal University of Espirito Santo.] Prevalência de Ehrlichia canis pela Nested- -PCR, correlação com a presença de mórula e trombocitopenia em cães atendidos no Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(1:47-51, 2015. Centro de Ciências Agrárias, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Rua Projetada s/nº, Caixa Postal 25, Pontal, Marataízes, ES 29349-000, Brasil. E-mail: mararrps@yahoo.com.br Ehrlichia canis, is the primary etiologic agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. The disease is mainly transmitted by the brown dog ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus in different endemic regions of Brazil. The purpose of this study was determinated using the Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (nested-PCR the prevalence of Ehrlichia canis in 85 dogs, regardless of race, age, sex or health status, treated at the Veterinary Hospital of Federal University of Espirito Santo, in Alegre-ES and evaluate its correlation with the presence of morulae and thrombocytopenia. It was observed that 1.17% of the samples were positive by blood smear, for the presence of morulae. However, the nested-PCR showed 5.88% positivity of samples. And 17.64% samples showed thrombocytopenia. By analyzing all the techniques, it was concluded that the introduction of diagnostic techniques such as nested-PCR is an important method for aid in early diagnosis of pathologies.

  2. Ethanologenic potential of the bacterium Bacillus cereus NB-19 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Ethanologenic bacterium was cultivated in a suspension of sugarcane ... bagasse is very useful for obtaining yields of the different products including cell mass and ethanol as ... the resources for the green fuel generation.

  3. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  4. Yersinia pestis intracellular parasitism of macrophages from hosts exhibiting high and low severity of plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Ponnusamy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis causes severe disease in natural rodent hosts, but mild to inapparent disease in certain rodent predators such as dogs. Y. pestis initiates infection in susceptible hosts by parasitizing and multiplying intracellularly in local macrophages prior to systemic dissemination. Thus, we hypothesize that Y. pestis disease severity may depend on the degree to which intracellular Y. pestis overcomes the initial host macrophage imposed stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, the progression of in vitro infection by Y. pestis KIM62053.1+ of mouse splenic and RAW264.7 tissue culture macrophages and dog peripheral blood-derived and DH82 tissue culture macrophages was studied using microscopy and various parameters of infection. The study showed that during the early stage of infection, intracellular Y. pestis assumed filamentous cellular morphology with multiple copies of the genome per bacterium in both mouse and dog macrophages. Later, in mouse macrophages, the infection elicited spacious vacuolar extension of Yersinia containing vacuoles (YCV, and the filamentous Y. pestis reverted to coccobacillary morphology with genomic equivalents approximately equaling colony forming units. In contrast, Y. pestis infected dog macrophages did not show noticeable extension of YCV, and intracellular Y. pestis retained the filamentous cellular morphology for the entire experiment in DH82 cells or were killed by blood-derived macrophages. In addition, during the later stage of infection, Y. pestis infected mouse macrophages exhibited cell lysis whereas dog macrophages did not. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Y. pestis in mouse macrophages can overcome the initial intracellular stress necessary for subsequent systemic infection. However, in dogs, failure of Y. pestis to overcome macrophage imposed stress may result in mild or in apparent disease in dogs.

  5. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  6. Biological synthesis and characterization of intracellular gold ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    thods of reduction of metal ions using plants or microorganisms are often ... have several advantages over bacteria, they are often pre- ferred. ... in static condition for a period of 7 days. ... work was focused on the production of intracellular gold.

  7. Mycobacterium intracellulare Infection Mimicking Progression of Scleroderma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Engelhart, Merete; Thybo, Sören

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with scleroderma who developed Mycobacterium intracellulare infection, which for more than a year mimicked worsening of her connective tissue disorder. The patient was diagnosed with scleroderma based on puffy fingers that developed into sclerodactyly, abnormal......, unfortunately with significant scarring. Immunodeficiency testing was unremarkable. In summary, an infection with Mycobacterium intracellulare was mistaken for an unusually severe progression of scleroderma....

  8. Aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos e hematológicos de 251 cães portadores de mórula de Ehrlichia spp. naturalmente infectados Epidemiological, clinical, and hematological aspects of 251 dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia spp. morulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo retrospectivo dos aspectos epidemiológicos, sinais clínicos, dados de exame físico e alterações hematológicas da erliquiose em 251 cães naturalmente infectados por Ehrlichia spp. Dos 4407 casos atendidos em hospital veterinário no período de janeiro de 2002 a dezembro de 2003, verificou-se que 251 cães eram portadores de mórula de Ehrlichia spp. em leucócitos de sangue periférico. Destes, 48 foram eliminados das avaliações por apresentarem patologias concomitantes. Nos 203 cães restantes, verificou-se que houve maior ocorrência em fêmeas (61,1% e que a doença manteve-se constante durante todo o período avaliado. Observou-se que 38% encontravam-se na faixa etária entre um e 23 meses e 58,6% eram de raça definida. As principais alterações clínicas observadas foram apatia, anorexia/hiporexia, vômito, secreção oculonasal e esplenomegalia. Cento e cinco cães apresentaram temperatura retal entre 38 e 39,5°C. As alterações observadas com maior frequência no hemograma foram anemia, predominando o tipo normocítica normocrômica (58,2%; desvio nuclear de neutrófilos para a esquerda (67% e eosinopenia (58,1%.A study of epidemiological and clinical aspects, alterations of physical exams, and hematological changes of canine ehrlichiosis was performed. A retrospective study was performed in 4,407 dogs referred to a Veterinary Hospital from January 2002 to December 2003. Of all cases, 251 dogs showed Ehrlichia spp. morulae. Among these, 48 were excluded from the study due to other co-infection by other pathologies. In the other 203 evaluated dogs, females (61.1% were more infected than males. The dogs aged from one to 23 months (68.6% and 58.6% were definite breed. Emesis, apathy, anorexia/hypoxeria, spleenomegaly, and nasal discharge were the most common signs presented. Rectal temperature was 38 - 39.5ÚC in 105 dogs. The most usual changes seen during the hematological tests were normochromic and

  9. Activation of Host IRE1α-Dependent Signaling Axis Contributes the Intracellular Parasitism of Brucella melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseem Pandey

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucella spp. are intracellular vacuolar pathogens that causes brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis of profound importance. We previously demonstrated that the activity of host unfolded protein response (UPR sensor IRE1α (inositol-requiring enzyme 1 and ER-associated autophagy confer susceptibility to Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus intracellular replication. However, the mechanism by which host IRE1α regulates the pathogen intracellular lifestyle remains elusive. In this study, by employing a diverse array of molecular approaches, including biochemical analyses, fluorescence microscopy imaging, and infection assays using primary cells derived from Ern1 (encoding IRE1 conditional knockout mice, we address this gap in our understanding by demonstrating that a novel IRE1α to ULK1, an important component for autophagy initiation, signaling axis confers susceptibility to Brucella intracellular parasitism. Importantly, deletion or inactivation of key signaling components along this axis, including IRE1α, BAK/BAX, ASK1, and JNK as well as components of the host autophagy system ULK1, Atg9a, and Beclin 1, resulted in striking disruption of Brucella intracellular trafficking and replication. Host kinases in the IRE1α-ULK1 axis, including IRE1α, ASK1, JNK1, and/or AMPKα as well as ULK1, were also coordinately phosphorylated in an IRE1α-dependent fashion upon the pathogen infection. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the IRE1α-ULK1 signaling axis is subverted by the bacterium to promote intracellular parasitism, and provide new insight into our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intracellular lifestyle of Brucella.

  10. Reduction of chalcogen oxyanions and generation of nanoprecipitates by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Baccolini, Chiara; Francia, Francesco [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Sabatino, Piera [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna (Italy); Turner, Raymond J. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Zannoni, Davide, E-mail: davide.zannoni@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • R. capsulatus cells produce extracellular chalcogens nanoprecipitates when lawsone is present. • Lawsone acts as a redox mediator from reducing equivalents to tellurite and selenite. • Nanoprecipitates production depends on carbon source and requires metabolically active cells. • Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0} nanoprecipitates are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. - Abstract: The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is characterized in its interaction with the toxic oxyanions tellurite (Te{sup IV}) and selenite (Se{sup IV}) by a highly variable level of resistance that is dependent on the growth mode making this bacterium an ideal organism for the study of the microbial interaction with chalcogens. As we have reported in the past, while the oxyanion tellurite is taken up by R. capsulatus cells via acetate permease and it is reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm in the form of splinter-like black intracellular deposits no clear mechanism was described for Se{sup 0} precipitation. Here, we present the first report on the biotransformation of tellurium and selenium oxyanions into extracellular Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0}nanoprecipitates (NPs) by anaerobic photosynthetically growing cultures of R. capsulatus as a function of exogenously added redox-mediator lawsone, i.e. 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. The NPs formation was dependent on the carbon source used for the bacterial growth and the rate of chalcogen reduction was constant at different lawsone concentrations, in line with a catalytic role for the redox mediator. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis demonstrated the Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0} nature of the nanoparticles.

  11. A soluble fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase from the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, D M; Holmes, C G

    1990-01-01

    An enzyme catalyzing the ligation of long chain fatty acids to bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) has been detected and partially characterized in cell extracts of the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Acyl-ACP synthetase activity (optimal pH 7.5-8.0) required millimolar concentrations of ATP and Mg2+ and was slightly activated by Ca2+, but was inhibited at high ionic strength and by Triton X-100. ACP from either Escherichia coli (apparent Km = 20 microM) or V. harveyi was used as a substrate. Of the [14C]fatty acids tested as substrates (8-18 carbons), a preference for fatty acids less than or equal to 14 carbons in length was observed. Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase appears to be a soluble hydrophilic enzyme on the basis of subcellular fractionation and Triton X-114 phase partition assay. The enzyme was not coinduced with luciferase activity or light emission in vivo during the late exponential growth phase in liquid culture. Acyl-ACP synthetase activity was also detected in extracts from the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, but not Photobacterium phosphoreum. The cytosolic nature and enzymatic properties of V. harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase indicate that it may have a different physiological role than the membrane-bound activity of E. coli, which has been implicated in phosphatidylethanolamine turnover. Acyl-ACP synthetase activity in V. harveyi could be involved in the intracellular activation and elongation of exogenous fatty acids that occurs in this species or in the reactivation of free myristic acid generated by luciferase.

  12. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  13. The interaction of antimicrobial peptides with the membrane and intracellular targets of Staphylococcus aureus investigated by ATP leakage, DNA-binding analysis, and the expression of a LexA-controlled gene, recA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of how antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) interact with bacterial membranes and intracellular targets is important for our understanding of how these molecules affect bacteria. Increased knowledge may aid the design of AMPs that work on their target bacterium without inducing bacterial...... resistance. Here, we describe different methods to investigate the mode of action of peptides against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. ATP leakage analysis can be used to evaluate the ability of AMPs to perturb bacteria. DNA-binding and SOS response induction can be analyzed to investigate...

  14. Efficient intracellular delivery and improved biocompatibility of colloidal silver nanoparticles towards intracellular SERS immuno-sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vinay; Srinivasan, Supriya; McGoron, Anthony J

    2015-06-21

    High throughput intracellular delivery strategies, electroporation, passive and TATHA2 facilitated diffusion of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are investigated for cellular toxicity and uptake using state-of-art analytical techniques. The TATHA2 facilitated approach efficiently delivered high payload with no toxicity, pre-requisites for intracellular applications of plasmonic metal nanoparticles (PMNPs) in sensing and therapeutics.

  15. High throughput pyrosequencing technology for molecular differential detection of Babesia vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in canine blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkong, Worasak; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Kongklieng, Amornmas; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Boonmars, Thidarut; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-06-01

    Canine babesiosis, hepatozoonosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis are tick-borne diseases caused by different hemopathogens. These diseases are causes of morbidity and mortality in dogs. The classic method for parasite detection and differentiation is based on microscopic observation of blood smears. The limitations of the microscopic method are that its performance requires a specially qualified person with professional competence, and it is ineffective in differentiating closely related species. This study applied PCR amplification with high throughput pyrosequencing for molecular differential detection of the following 4 hemoparasites common to tropical areas in dog blood samples: Babesia vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma platys. PCR was initially used to amplify specific target regions of the ribosomal RNA genes of each parasite using 2 primer pairs that included 18S rRNA for protozoa (B. vogeli and H. canis) and 16S rRNA for rickettsia (E. canis and A. platys). Babesia vogeli and H. canis were discriminated using 9 nucleotide positions out of 30 base pairs, whereas E. canis and A. platys were differentiated using 15 nucleotide positions out of 34 base pairs that were determined from regions adjacent to 3' ends of the sequencing primers. This method provides a challenging alternative for a rapid diagnosis and surveillance of these tick-borne diseases in canines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical analysis of vector-borne infections in dogs: Babesia vogeli, Babesia gibsoni, Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis in Punjab, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Lachhman Das; Sumbria, Deepak; Mandhotra, Ajay; Bal, M S; Kaur, Paramjit

    2016-12-01

    There are few published studies on various vector borne diseases of dogs in India and most depict clinical infection in dogs, diagnosed by observation of the haemopathogens in stained blood smears. This study provides the first report regarding molecular confirmation and ancestral relationship analysis of blood smears positive cases of assorted haemopathogens in Punjab province of India. On blood smear examination, haemopathogens were observed in 124 out of 778 (15.95%, 95% CI: 13.53- 18.68) blood smears. Further polymerase chain reactions (PCR) was used on bloods smear positive cases to validate the results. Out of 778 blood samples, Babesia gibsoni was most common parasite infecting dogs (15.04%, 95% CI: 12.7-17.72), followed by Ehrlichia canis (0.39%, 95% CI: 0.0-1.13), infection of Babesia vogeli and Hepatozoon canis was same (0.26%, 95% CI: 0.0-0.9). Among various risk factors studied (age, sex, season), prevalence of infection was non-significantly higher in 1-2 year of age group (19.88%, 95% CI: 14.45-26.71), regarding sex same prevalence was recorded (15.94%), and chances of infection was highest in pre-monsoon i.e. summer (18.26%, 95% CI: 14.49-22.76). Phylogenetic analysis revealed ancestral background of Ludhiana isolates of B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, H. canis, and E. canis with the isolates of Philippines, Mongolia and Tunisia.

  17. Soroprevalência e fatores de risco associados à soropositividade para Ehrlichia canis em cães do semiárido da Paraíba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Santos de Azevedo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to determine the seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis infection, as well as to identify risk factors associated to the seropositivity, a serological survey was conducted in 109 dogs assisted at the Hospital Veterinário/Centro de Saúde e Tecnologia Rural (CSTR/Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG, Campus de Patos, Paraíba State, Northeastern Brazil. Serological diagnosis of ehrlichiosis was performed by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT and sera presenting antibody titers >; 40 were considered positive. Of the 109 samples, 72.5% were positive (95% CI = 63.1% - 80.6%. Animals that had contact with other dogs (odds ratio = 3.59; 95% CI = 1.41 - 9.12, contact with ponds (odds ratio = 8.39; 95% CI = 1.01 - 69.87 or with free access to the street (odds ratio = 6.24; 95% CI = 1.28 - 30.39 were more exposed to the risk of infection.

  18. Determination and quantification of the in vitro activity of Aloe marlothii (A. Berger subsp. marlothii and Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch. skeels acetone extracts against Ehrlichia ruminantium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naidoo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available An Ehrlichia ruminantium culture system was utilized for the anti-rickettsial evaluation of two ethnoveterinary plants, Elephantorrhiza elephantina and Aloe marlothii. Well-established E. ruminantium cultures were incubated with the plant leaf acetone extracts and compared to oxytetracycline and untreated controls. Effectivity was established by comparing the percentage parasitised cells and the calculation of both EC50 and extrapolated EC90 in µg/ml. The plant extracts were also screened for antibacterial activity using bioautography. Elephantorrhiza elephantina and A. marlothii demonstrated anti-ehrlichial activity with an EC50 of 111.4 and 64.5 µg/ml and EC 90 of 228.9 and 129.9 µg/ml, respectively. The corresponding EC50 and EC90 for oxytetracycline was 0.29 and 0.08 µg/ml. Both plants appeared to produce their inhibitory activity by a similar mechanism, unrelated to that of the tetracyclines. Both the plant acetone extracts demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC strains.

  19. A serological and molecular survey of Babesia vogeli, Ehrlichia canis and Rickettsia spp. among dogs in the state of Maranhão, northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Pereira da Costa

    Full Text Available This study evaluated exposure and infection by tick-borne agents (Babesia vogeli, Ehrlichia canis and Rickettsia spp. in 172 dogs in rural areas and 150 dogs in urban areas of the municipality of Chapadinha, state of Maranhão, northeastern Brazil, using molecular and serological methods. Overall, 16.1% of the sampled dogs (52/322 were seroreactive to B. vogeli, with endpoint titers ranging from 40 to 640. For E. canis, 14.6% of the dogs (47/322 were seroreactive, with endpoint titers from 80 to 163,840. Antibodies reactive to at least one of the five species of Rickettsia were detected in 18.9% of the dogs (61/322, with endpoint titers ranging from 64 to 4,096. High endpoint titers were observed for Rickettsia amblyommii. Three (0.9% and nine (2.8% canine blood samples were PCR-positive for Babesia spp. and E. canis. The ticks collected from urban dogs were all Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, whereas the rural dogs were infested by R. sanguineus s.l, Amblyomma cajennense sensu lato and Amblyomma ovale. One A. ovale tick was found to be infected by Rickettsia bellii. This study provides an epidemiological background for controlling and preventing canine tick-borne diseases in a neglected region of Brazil.

  20. The Living Cell as a Multi-agent Organisation: A Compositional Organisation Model of Intracellular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, C. M.; Snoep, J. L.; Treur, J.; Westerhoff, H. V.; Wijngaards, W. C. A.

    Within the areas of Computational Organisation Theory and Artificial Intelligence, techniques have been developed to simulate and analyse dynamics within organisations in society. Usually these modelling techniques are applied to factories and to the internal organisation of their process flows, thus obtaining models of complex organisations at various levels of aggregation. The dynamics in living cells are often interpreted in terms of well-organised processes, a bacterium being considered a (micro)factory. This suggests that organisation modelling techniques may also benefit their analysis. Using the example of Escherichia coli it is shown how indeed agent-based organisational modelling techniques can be used to simulate and analyse E.coli's intracellular dynamics. Exploiting the abstraction levels entailed by this perspective, a concise model is obtained that is readily simulated and analysed at the various levels of aggregation, yet shows the cell's essential dynamic patterns.

  1. Investigating Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Simon R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    for signal transduction. One of the major mechanisms for GPCR regulation involves their endocytic trafficking, which serves to internalize the receptors from the plasma membrane and thereby attenuate G protein-dependent signaling. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that GPCRs can signal...... independently of G proteins, as well as from intracellular compartments including endosomes. It is in this context that receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking have attracted renewed interest within the GPCR field. In this chapter, we will review the current understanding and methodologies...

  2. Characteristics of cesium accumulation in the filamentous soil bacterium Streptomyces sp. K202

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahara, Chikako; Fukumoto, Atsushi; Nishina, Masami; Sugiyama, Hideo; Anzai, Yojiro; Kato, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    A filamentous soil bacterium, strain K202, was isolated from soil where an edible mushroom (Boletopsis leucomelas) was growing and identified as belonging to the genus Streptomyces on the basis of its morphological characteristics and the presence of LL-2, 6-diaminopimelic acid. We studied the existence states of Cs and its migration from extracellular to intracellular fluid in the mycelia of Streptomyces sp. K202. The results indicated that Cs accumulated in the cells through at least 2 steps: in the first step, Cs + was immediately and non-specifically adsorbed on the negatively charged cell surface, and in the second step, this adsorbed Cs + was taken up into the cytoplasm, and a part of the Cs entering the cytoplasm was taken up by an energy-dependent transport system(s). Further, we confirmed that a part of the Cs + was taken up into the mycelia competitively with K + , because K + uptake into the intact mycelia of the strain was significantly inhibited by the presence of Cs + in the culture media. This suggested that part of the Cs is transported by the potassium transport system. Moreover, 133 Cs-NMR spectra and SEM-EDX spectra of the mycelia that accumulated Cs showed the presence of at least 2 intracellular Cs states: Cs + trapped by intercellular materials such as polyphosphate and Cs + present in a cytoplasmic pool. - Research highlights: → Cs was taken up into the cells of Streptomyces sp. K202 via 2 steps. → The existence states of Cs accumulated in strain K202 were at least 2 types. → The localized Cs in the cells would be trapped by granules such as polyphosphate. → The localized Cs in the cells might involve in Cs detoxification of strain K202.

  3. Enhancement of cadmium bioremediation by endophytic bacterium Bacillus sp. L14 using industrially used metabolic inhibitors (DCC or DNP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shenglian; Xiao Xiao; Xi Qiang; Wan Yong; Chen Liang; Zeng Guangming; Liu Chengbin; Guo Hanjun; Chen Jueliang

    2011-01-01

    Bioremediations of cadmium by endophytic bacterium (EB) L14 (Bacillus sp.) in the presence of industrially used metabolic inhibitors (DCC or DNP) were investigated. In the presence of DCC or DNP, the biomass population of EB L14 was greatly inhibited. However, the cadmium removal of EB L14 increased from 73.6% (in the absence of DCC or DNP) to 93.7% and 80.8%, respectively. The analysis of total and intracellular cadmium concentrations during 24 h of incubation indicated that this enhanced cadmium removal was the inhibition effect of DCC or DNP on the cations export resistance system of EB L14. This unique property strongly indicated the superiority of this endophyte for practical application in cadmium bioremediation in the presence of industrially used metabolic inhibitors.

  4. Cationic polymers for intracellular delivery of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coué, G.M.J.P.C.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Samal, Sangram; Dubruel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic proteins exert their pharmaceutical action inside the cytoplasm or onto individual organelles inside the cell. Intracellular protein delivery is considered to be the most direct, fastest and safest approach for curing gene-deficiency diseases, enhancing vaccination and triggering

  5. Molecular detection and characterization of sustainable intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Centre for Biopolymer and Bio-Molecular Research, Athlone College of Technology, Republic of Ireland. ... cells was associated with the elongation of micro-villar extension that ... Keywords: Intracellular contaminants, cell cultures, bacteria culture, pre-clinical studies. ... production work involving culture technology.

  6. Spatial Cytoskeleton Organization Supports Targeted Intracellular Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Anne E.; Rieger, Heiko

    2018-03-01

    The efficiency of intracellular cargo transport from specific source to target locations is strongly dependent upon molecular motor-assisted motion along the cytoskeleton. Radial transport along microtubules and lateral transport along the filaments of the actin cortex underneath the cell membrane are characteristic for cells with a centrosome. The interplay between the specific cytoskeleton organization and the motor performance realizes a spatially inhomogeneous intermittent search strategy. In order to analyze the efficiency of such intracellular search strategies we formulate a random velocity model with intermittent arrest states. We evaluate efficiency in terms of mean first passage times for three different, frequently encountered intracellular transport tasks: i) the narrow escape problem, which emerges during cargo transport to a synapse or other specific region of the cell membrane, ii) the reaction problem, which considers the binding time of two particles within the cell, and iii) the reaction-escape problem, which arises when cargo must be released at a synapse only after pairing with another particle. Our results indicate that cells are able to realize efficient search strategies for various intracellular transport tasks economically through a spatial cytoskeleton organization that involves only a narrow actin cortex rather than a cell body filled with randomly oriented actin filaments.

  7. Biological synthesis and characterization of intracellular gold ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, Aspergillus fumigatus was used for the intracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Stable nanoparticles were produced when an aqueous solution of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) was reduced by A. fumigatus biomass as the reducing agent. Production of nanoparticles was confirmed by the colour ...

  8. Antagonistic bioactivity of an endophytic bacterium isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic bioactivity of an endophytic bacterium isolated from Epimedium brevicornu Maxim. R He, G Wang, X Liu, C Zhang, F Lin. Abstract. Endophytic bacteria are one of the most potential biological control agents in plant disease protection. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of a strain of ...

  9. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  10. The Bacterium That Got Infected by a Cow! - Horizontal Gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 1. The Bacterium That Got Infected by a Cow! - Horizontal Gene Transfer and Evolution. Saurabh Dhawan Tomás John Ryan. General Article Volume 12 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 49-59 ...

  11. Monitoring of a novel bacterium, Lactobacillus thermotolerans , in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We successfully established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for specific detection and enumeration of a novel bacterium, Lactobacillus thermotolerans, in chicken feces. The specific FISH probes were designed based on the L. thermotolerans 16S rRNA gene sequences, and these sequences were ...

  12. methoxyethanol by a new bacterium isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    A 2-methoxyethanol degrading bacterium was isolated from anaerobic sludge of a municipal sewage from ... Stoichiometrically, the strain utilized one mole of oxygen per one mole of 2-methoxyethanol instead of ... physiological and biochemical characterization of the .... observed with acetate and the intact resting cells.

  13. Non-obligate predatory bacterium burkholderia casidaeand uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    A novel predator bacterium Burkholderia casidae is disclosed. The invention is directed to the isolation and use of Burkholderia casidae to control microbial diseases of plants. The genetic, biochemical and physiological characteristics of Burkholderia casidae are described. Biocontrol compositions comprising Burkholderia casidae, and antimicrobial compounds and antimicrobial preparations prepared from Burkholderia casidae are also disclosed, as are methods for accomplishing all of the forego...

  14. Non-obligate predatory bacterium Burkholderia casidae and uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    A novel predator bacterium Burkholderia casidae is disclosed. The invention is directed to the isolation and use of Burkholderia casidae to control microbial diseases of plants. The genetic, biochemical and physiological characteristics of Burkholderia casidae are described. Biocontrol compositions comprising Burkholderia casidae, and antimicrobial compounds and antimicrobial preparations prepared from Burkholderia casidae are also disclosed, as are methods for accomplishing all of the forego...

  15. Preparation of genomic DNA from a single species of uncultured magnetotactic bacterium by multiple-displacement amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Shibusawa, Mie; Hosokawa, Masahito; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria comprise a phylogenetically diverse group that is capable of synthesizing intracellular magnetic particles. Although various morphotypes of magnetotactic bacteria have been observed in the environment, bacterial strains available in pure culture are currently limited to a few genera due to difficulties in their enrichment and cultivation. In order to obtain genetic information from uncultured magnetotactic bacteria, a genome preparation method that involves magnetic separation of cells, flow cytometry, and multiple displacement amplification (MDA) using phi29 polymerase was used in this study. The conditions for the MDA reaction using samples containing 1 to 100 cells were evaluated using a pure-culture magnetotactic bacterium, "Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1," whose complete genome sequence is available. Uniform gene amplification was confirmed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) when 100 cells were used as a template. This method was then applied for genome preparation of uncultured magnetotactic bacteria from complex bacterial communities in an aquatic environment. A sample containing 100 cells of the uncultured magnetotactic coccus was prepared by magnetic cell separation and flow cytometry and used as an MDA template. 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the MDA product from these 100 cells revealed that the amplified genomic DNA was from a single species of magnetotactic bacterium that was phylogenetically affiliated with magnetotactic cocci in the Alphaproteobacteria. The combined use of magnetic separation, flow cytometry, and MDA provides a new strategy to access individual genetic information from magnetotactic bacteria in environmental samples.

  16. Optimizing Nanoelectrode Arrays for Scalable Intracellular Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2018-03-20

    Electrode technology for electrophysiology has a long history of innovation, with some decisive steps including the development of the voltage-clamp measurement technique by Hodgkin and Huxley in the 1940s and the invention of the patch clamp electrode by Neher and Sakmann in the 1970s. The high-precision intracellular recording enabled by the patch clamp electrode has since been a gold standard in studying the fundamental cellular processes underlying the electrical activities of neurons and other excitable cells. One logical next step would then be to parallelize these intracellular electrodes, since simultaneous intracellular recording from a large number of cells will benefit the study of complex neuronal networks and will increase the throughput of electrophysiological screening from basic neurobiology laboratories to the pharmaceutical industry. Patch clamp electrodes, however, are not built for parallelization; as for now, only ∼10 patch measurements in parallel are possible. It has long been envisioned that nanoscale electrodes may help meet this challenge. First, nanoscale electrodes were shown to enable intracellular access. Second, because their size scale is within the normal reach of the standard top-down fabrication, the nanoelectrodes can be scaled into a large array for parallelization. Third, such a nanoelectrode array can be monolithically integrated with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics to facilitate the large array operation and the recording of the signals from a massive number of cells. These are some of the central ideas that have motivated the research activity into nanoelectrode electrophysiology, and these past years have seen fruitful developments. This Account aims to synthesize these findings so as to provide a useful reference. Summing up from the recent studies, we will first elucidate the morphology and associated electrical properties of the interface between a nanoelectrode and a cellular membrane

  17. Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection in the reservoir host (white-tailed deer and in an incidental host (dog is impacted by its prior growth in macrophage and tick cell environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathy D S Nair

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis, transmitted from Amblyomma americanum ticks, causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. It also infects white-tailed deer, dogs and several other vertebrates. Deer are its reservoir hosts, while humans and dogs are incidental hosts. E. chaffeensis protein expression is influenced by its growth in macrophages and tick cells. We report here infection progression in deer or dogs infected intravenously with macrophage- or tick cell-grown E. chaffeensis or by tick transmission in deer. Deer and dogs developed mild fever and persistent rickettsemia; the infection was detected more frequently in the blood of infected animals with macrophage inoculum compared to tick cell inoculum or tick transmission. Tick cell inoculum and tick transmission caused a drop in tick infection acquisition rates compared to infection rates in ticks fed on deer receiving macrophage inoculum. Independent of deer or dogs, IgG antibody response was higher in animals receiving macrophage inoculum against macrophage-derived Ehrlichia antigens, while it was significantly lower in the same animals against tick cell-derived Ehrlichia antigens. Deer infected with tick cell inoculum and tick transmission caused a higher antibody response to tick cell cultured bacterial antigens compared to the antibody response for macrophage cultured antigens for the same animals. The data demonstrate that the host cell-specific E. chaffeensis protein expression influences rickettsemia in a host and its acquisition by ticks. The data also reveal that tick cell-derived inoculum is similar to tick transmission with reduced rickettsemia, IgG response and tick acquisition of E. chaffeensis.

  18. Experimental Infection and Detection of Necrotizing Hepatopancreatitis Bacterium in the American Lobster Homarus americanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz A. Avila-Villa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing hepatopancreatitis bacterium (NHPB is an obligated intracellular bacteria causing severe hepatopancreatic damages and mass mortalities in penaeid shrimp. The worldwide distribution of penaeid shrimp as alien species threatens the life cycle of other crustacean species. The aim of the experiment was to evaluate the possibility of experimentally infecting the American lobster (Homarus americanus with NHPB extracted from shrimp hepatopancreas. Homogenates from infected shrimp were fed by force to lobsters. Other group of lobsters was fed with homogenates of NHPB-free hepatopancreas. After the 15th day from initial inoculation, the presence of NHPB was detected by polymerase chain reaction in feces and hepatopancreas from lobsters inoculated with infected homogenates. Necrotized spots were observed in the surface of lobster hepatopancreas. In contrast, lobsters fed on NHPB-free homogenates resulted negative for NHPB. Evidence suggests the plasticity of NHPB which can infect crustacean from different species and inhabiting diverse latitudes. Considering the results, the American lobster could be a good candidate to maintain available NHPB in vivo.

  19. Experimental Infection and Detection of Necrotizing Hepatopancreatitis Bacterium in the American Lobster Homarus americanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Villa, Luz A.; Gollas-Galván, Teresa; Martínez-Porchas, Marcel; Mendoza-Cano, Fernando; Hernández-López, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing hepatopancreatitis bacterium (NHPB) is an obligated intracellular bacteria causing severe hepatopancreatic damages and mass mortalities in penaeid shrimp. The worldwide distribution of penaeid shrimp as alien species threatens the life cycle of other crustacean species. The aim of the experiment was to evaluate the possibility of experimentally infecting the American lobster (Homarus americanus) with NHPB extracted from shrimp hepatopancreas. Homogenates from infected shrimp were fed by force to lobsters. Other group of lobsters was fed with homogenates of NHPB-free hepatopancreas. After the 15th day from initial inoculation, the presence of NHPB was detected by polymerase chain reaction in feces and hepatopancreas from lobsters inoculated with infected homogenates. Necrotized spots were observed in the surface of lobster hepatopancreas. In contrast, lobsters fed on NHPB-free homogenates resulted negative for NHPB. Evidence suggests the plasticity of NHPB which can infect crustacean from different species and inhabiting diverse latitudes. Considering the results, the American lobster could be a good candidate to maintain available NHPB in vivo. PMID:22645497

  20. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.; Tachimi, T.; Saitoh, N.; Nomura, T.; Nagamine, S.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial reduction and deposition of gold nanoparticles was achieved at 25 deg. C over the pH range 2.0-7.0 using the mesophilic bacterium Shewanella algae in the presence of H 2 as the electron donor. The reductive deposition of gold by the resting cells of S. algae was a fast process: 1 mM AuCl 4 - ions were completely reduced to elemental gold within 30 min. At a solution pH of 7, gold nanoparticles 10-20 nm in size were deposited in the periplasmic space of S. algae cells. At pH 2.8, gold nanoparticles 15-200 nm in size were deposited on the bacterial cells, and the biogenic nanoparticles exhibited a variety of shapes that included nanotriangles: in particular, single crystalline gold nanotriangles 100-200 nm in size were microbially deposited. At a solution pH of 2.0, gold nanoparticles about 20 nm in size were deposited intracellularly, and larger gold particles approximately 350 nm in size were deposited extracellularly. The solution pH was an important factor in controlling the morphology of the biogenic gold particles and the location of gold deposition. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles is potentially attractive as an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional methods

  1. New crystal forms of NTPDase1 from the bacterium Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebisch, Matthias; Schäfer, Petra; Lauble, Peter; Sträter, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    The soluble NTPDase1 from L. pneumophila was crystallized in six crystal forms and the structure was solved using a sulfur SAD approach. Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) are a large class of nucleotidases that hydrolyze the (γ/β)- and (β/α)-anhydride bonds of nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates, respectively. NTPDases are found throughout the eukaryotic domain. In addition, a very small number of members can be found in bacteria, most of which live as parasites of eukaryotic hosts. NTPDases of intracellular and extracellular parasites are emerging as important regulators for the survival of the parasite. To deepen the knowledge of the structure and function of this enzyme class, recombinant production of the NTPDase1 from the bacterium Legionella pneumophila has been established. The protein could be crystallized in six crystal forms, of which one has been described previously. The crystals diffracted to resolutions of between 1.4 and 2.5 Å. Experimental phases determined by a sulfur SAD experiment using an orthorhombic crystal form produced an interpretable electron-density map

  2. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia induces resistance to dengue virus in Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowu Bian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic strategies that reduce or block pathogen transmission by mosquitoes have been proposed as a means of augmenting current control measures to reduce the growing burden of vector-borne diseases. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia has long been promoted as a potential vehicle for introducing disease-resistance genes into mosquitoes, thereby making them refractory to the human pathogens they transmit. Given the large overlap in tissue distribution and intracellular localization between Wolbachia and dengue virus in mosquitoes, we conducted experiments to characterize their interactions. Our results show that Wolbachia inhibits viral replication and dissemination in the main dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Moreover, the virus transmission potential of Wolbachia-infected Ae. aegypti was significantly diminished when compared to wild-type mosquitoes that did not harbor Wolbachia. At 14 days post-infection, Wolbachia completely blocked dengue transmission in at least 37.5% of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. We also observed that this Wolbachia-mediated viral interference was associated with an elevated basal immunity and increased longevity in the mosquitoes. These results underscore the potential usefulness of Wolbachia-based control strategies for population replacement.

  3. Prevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Bartonella vinsonii berkhoffii, and Rickettsia spp. in dogs from Grenada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J; McKibben, John; Macpherson, Calum N; Cattan, Peggy F; Cherry, Natalie A; Hegarty, Barbara C; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; O'Connor, Tom; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy; Paterson, Tara; Perea, Marta Lanza; Ball, Geoffrey; Friesen, Stanley; Goedde, Jill; Henderson, Brooke; Sylvester, Wayne

    2008-02-14

    To identify the tick-borne pathogens in dogs from Grenada, we conducted a serologic survey for Ehrlichia canis in 2004 (104 dogs) and a comprehensive serologic and molecular survey for a variety of tick-borne pathogens in 2006 (73 dogs). In 2004 and 2006, 44 and 32 dogs (42.3% and 43.8%) were seropositive for E. canis, respectively. In 2006, several tick-borne pathogens were identified by serology and PCR. DNA of E. canis, Anaplasma platys, Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, and Bartonella sp. were identified in 18 (24.7%), 14 (19.2%), 5 (7%), 5 (7%), and 1 (1.4%) dogs, respectively. Six (8.2%) dogs were seropositive for Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. All dogs were seronegative and PCR-negative for Rickettsia spp. Coinfection with two or three pathogens was observed in eight dogs. Partial 16S rRNA E. canis and A. platys sequences were identical to sequences in GenBank. Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences from the Grenadian H. canis were identical to each other and had one possible mismatch (ambiguous base) from H. canis detected from Spain and Brazil. Grenadian B. c. vogeli sequences were identical to B. c. vogeli from Brazil and Japan. All of the detected pathogens are transmitted, or suspected to be transmitted, by Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Results of this study indicate that dogs from Grenada are infected with multiple tick-borne pathogens; therefore, tick-borne diseases should be included as differentials for dogs exhibiting thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, fever, or lethargy. One pathogen, E. canis, is also of potential public health significance.

  4. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, and D. immitis in hunting dogs from southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantedosi, Diego; Neola, Benedetto; D'Alessio, Nicola; Di Prisco, Francesca; Santoro, Mario; Pacifico, Laura; Sgroi, Giovanni; Auletta, Luigi; Buch, Jesse; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Veneziano, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) are caused by a range of pathogens transmitted to dogs by arthropods. The present study investigates Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, and Dirofilaria immitis seroprevalences in hunting dogs from southern Italy. Dogs (no. 1335) were tested using a commercial in-clinic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated by logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors. Overall, 138/1335 dogs (10.3%) were seroreactive to at least one CVBD pathogen. E. canis, Anaplasma spp., B. burgdorferi s.l., and D. immitis seroprevalences were 7.6, 4.4, 0.3, and 0.2%, respectively. E. canis and Anaplasma spp. co-exposures were found in 30 dogs (2.2%), compared with Anaplasma spp. and B. burgdorferi s.l. co-exposures in 2 dogs (0.1%). Adult age was a risk factor for E. canis (OR 2.35) seroreactivity whereas hunting fur-bearing animals for E. canis (OR 4.75) and Anaplasma spp. (OR 1.87), respectively. The historical presence of tick infestation was identified as a risk factor for positivity to E. canis (OR 2.08) and Anaplasma spp. (OR 2.15). Finally, larger dog pack size was significantly associated with E. canis (OR 1.85) and Anaplasma spp. (OR 2.42) exposures. The results of the present survey indicated that hunting dog populations are at relative risk of CVBDs in southern Italy. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of hunting dogs in the epidemiology of vector-borne organisms due to sharing common environments with wild, sympatric animal populations.

  5. An optimal method of iron starvation of the obligate intracellular pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Thompson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor in a number of critical biochemical reactions, and as such, its acquisition, storage, and metabolism is highly regulated in most organisms. The obligate intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis experiences a developmental arrest when iron within the host is depleted. The nature of the iron starvation response in Chlamydia is relatively uncharacterized because of the likely inefficient method of iron depletion, which currently relies on the compound deferoxamine mesylate (DFO. Inefficient induction of the iron starvation response precludes the identification of iron-regulated genes. This report evaluated DFO with another iron chelator, 2,2’-bipyridyl (Bpdl and presented a systematic comparison of the two across a range of criteria in a single-treatment time-of-infection regimen. We demonstrate that the membrane permeable Bpdl was superior to DFO in the inhibition of chlamydia development, the induction of aberrant morphology, and the induction of an iron starvation transcriptional response in both host and bacteria. Furthermore, iron starvation using Bpdl identified the periplasmic iron binding protein-encoding ytgA gene as iron- responsive. Overall, the data present a compelling argument for the use of Bpdl, rather than DFO, in future iron starvation studies of chlamydia and other intracellular bacteria.

  6. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  7. Leishmania hijacking of the macrophage intracellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2016-02-01

    Leishmania spp., transmitted to humans by the bite of the sandfly vector, are responsible for the three major forms of leishmaniasis, cutaneous, diffuse mucocutaneous and visceral. Leishmania spp. interact with membrane receptors of neutrophils and macrophages. In macrophages, the parasite is internalized within a parasitophorous vacuole and engages in a particular intracellular lifestyle in which the flagellated, motile Leishmania promastigote metacyclic form differentiates into non-motile, metacyclic amastigote form. This phenomenon is induced by Leishmania-triggered events leading to the fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with vesicular members of the host cell endocytic pathway including recycling endosomes, late endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum. Maturation of the parasitophorous vacuole leads to the intracellular proliferation of the Leishmania amastigote forms by acquisition of host cell nutrients while escaping host defense responses. © 2015 FEBS.

  8. Reduction of intracellular glutathione content and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Schans, G.P. van der; Roos-Verheij, W.S.D.

    1986-05-01

    The intracellular glutathione (GSH) content in HeLa, CHO and V79 cells was reduced by incubating the cells in growth medium containing buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or diethyl maleate (DEM). Clonogenicity, single strand DNA breaks (ssb) and double strand DNA breaks (dsb) were used as criteria for radiation induced damage after X- or γ irradiation. In survival experiments DEM gave a slightly larger sensitization although it gave a smaller reduction of the intracellular GSH. In general, sensitization was larger for dsb than for ssb, also the reduction of the OER was generally larger for dsb than for ssb. This may be due to the higher dose rate in case of dsb experiments resulting in a higher rate of radiochemical oxygen consumption. In general, no effect was found on post-irradiation repair of ssb and dsb. (Auth.)

  9. Reduction of intracellular glutathione content and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Schans, G.P. van der; Roos-Verheij, W.S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular glutathione (GSH) content of HeLa, CHO and V79 cells was reduced by incubating the cells in growth medium containing buthionine sulphoximine or diethyl maleate (DEM). Clonogenicity, single-strand DNA breaks (ssb) and double-strand DNA breaks (dsb) were used as criteria for radiation-induced damage after X- or γ-irradiation. In survival experiments, DEM gave a slightly larger sensitization although it gave a smaller reduction of the intracellular GSH. In general, sensitization was larger for dsb than for ssb, also the reduction of the o.e.r. was generally larger for dsb than for ssb. This may be due to the higher dose rate in case of dsb experiments resulting in a higher rate of radiochemical oxygen consumption. In general, no effect was found on post-irradiation repair of ssb and dsb. (author)

  10. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  11. Intracellular serpins, firewalls and tissue necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Stefan J; Lomas, David A

    2008-02-01

    Luke and colleagues have recently attributed a new role to a member of the serpin superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors. They have used Caenorhabditis elegans to show that an intracellular serpin is crucial for maintaining lysosomal integrity. We examine the role of this firewall in preventing necrosis and attempt to integrate this with current theories of stress-induced protein degradation. We discuss how mutant serpins cause disease either through polymerization or now, perhaps, by unleashing necrosis.

  12. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Walters, Jamie D.; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. ► Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. ► Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  13. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  14. Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking and Impact in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Arenas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a critical component of membrane bilayers where it plays key structural and functional roles by regulating the activity of diverse signaling platforms and pathways. Particularly enriched in brain, cholesterol homeostasis in this organ is singular with respect to other tissues and exhibits a heterogeneous regulation in distinct brain cell populations. Due to the key role of cholesterol in brain physiology and function, alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and levels have been linked to brain diseases and neurodegeneration. In the case of Alzheimer disease (AD, however, this association remains unclear with evidence indicating that either increased or decreased total brain cholesterol levels contribute to this major neurodegenerative disease. Here, rather than analyzing the role of total cholesterol levels in neurodegeneration, we focus on the contribution of intracellular cholesterol pools, particularly in endolysosomes and mitochondria through its trafficking via specialized membrane domains delineated by the contacts between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, in the onset of prevalent neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, Parkinson disease, and Huntington disease as well as in lysosomal disorders like Niemann-Pick type C disease. We dissect molecular events associated with intracellular cholesterol accumulation, especially in mitochondria, an event that results in impaired mitochondrial antioxidant defense and function. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the distribution of cholesterol in intracellular compartments may shed light on the role of cholesterol homeostasis disruption in neurodegeneration and may pave the way for specific intervention opportunities.

  15. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB–PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13152.001 PMID:26978792

  16. Host-adaptation of Francisella tularensis alters the bacterium's surface-carbohydrates to hinder effectors of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Zarrella

    Full Text Available The gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis survives in arthropods, fresh water amoeba, and mammals with both intracellular and extracellular phases and could reasonably be expected to express distinct phenotypes in these environments. The presence of a capsule on this bacterium has been controversial with some groups finding such a structure while other groups report that no capsule could be identified. Previously we reported in vitro culture conditions for this bacterium which, in contrast to typical methods, yielded a bacterial phenotype that mimics that of the bacterium's mammalian, extracellular phase.SDS-PAGE and carbohydrate analysis of differentially-cultivated F. tularensis LVS revealed that bacteria displaying the host-adapted phenotype produce both longer polymers of LPS O-antigen (OAg and additional HMW carbohydrates/glycoproteins that are reduced/absent in non-host-adapted bacteria. Analysis of wildtype and OAg-mutant bacteria indicated that the induced changes in surface carbohydrates involved both OAg and non-OAg species. To assess the impact of these HMW carbohydrates on the access of outer membrane constituents to antibody we used differentially-cultivated bacteria in vitro to immunoprecipitate antibodies directed against outer membrane moieties. We observed that the surface-carbohydrates induced during host-adaptation shield many outer membrane antigens from binding by antibody. Similar assays with normal mouse serum indicate that the induced HMW carbohydrates also impede complement deposition. Using an in vitro macrophage infection assay, we find that the bacterial HMW carbohydrate impedes TLR2-dependent, pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages. Lastly we show that upon host-adaptation, the human-virulent strain, F. tularensis SchuS4 also induces capsule production with the effect of reducing macrophage-activation and accelerating tularemia pathogenesis in mice.F. tularensis undergoes host-adaptation which

  17. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Geobacillus sp. strain ID17 a thermophilic bacterium isolated from Deception Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of microorganisms in the synthesis of nanoparticles emerges as an eco-friendly and exciting approach, for production of nanoparticles due to its low energy requirement, environmental compatibility, reduced costs of manufacture, scalability, and nanoparticle stabilization compared with the chemical synthesis. Results The production of gold nanoparticles by the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus sp. strain ID17 is reported in this study. Cells exposed to Au3+ turned from colourless into an intense purple colour. This change of colour indicates the accumulation of intracellular gold nanoparticles. Elemental analysis of particles composition was verified using TEM and EDX analysis. The intracellular localization and particles size were verified by TEM showing two different types of particles of predominant quasi-hexagonal shape with size ranging from 5–50 nm. The mayority of them were between 10‒20 nm in size. FT-IR was utilized to characterize the chemical surface of gold nanoparticles. This assay supports the idea of a protein type of compound on the surface of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. Reductase activity involved in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles has been previously reported to be present in others microorganisms. This reduction using NADH as substrate was tested in ID17. Crude extracts of the microorganism could catalyze the NADH-dependent Au3+ reduction. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by ID17 is mediated by enzymes and NADH as a cofactor for this biological transformation. PMID:23919572

  18. Biosorption of heavy metals by a marine bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Anita; Mody, Kalpana; Jha, Bhavanath

    2005-01-01

    Heavy metal chelation property of exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter cloaceae, a marine bacterium, isolated from the West Coast of India, is reported in this paper. The exopolysaccharide demonstrated excellent chelating properties with respect to cadmium (65%) followed by copper (20%) and cobalt (8%) at 100 mg/l heavy metal concentration. However, it could not chelate mercury. A comparative study of the percentage biosorption of the above mentioned metals is presented here

  19. Biosorption of heavy metals by a marine bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Anita [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Mody, Kalpana [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India)]. E-mail: khmody@csmcri.org; Jha, Bhavanath [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India)

    2005-03-01

    Heavy metal chelation property of exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter cloaceae, a marine bacterium, isolated from the West Coast of India, is reported in this paper. The exopolysaccharide demonstrated excellent chelating properties with respect to cadmium (65%) followed by copper (20%) and cobalt (8%) at 100 mg/l heavy metal concentration. However, it could not chelate mercury. A comparative study of the percentage biosorption of the above mentioned metals is presented here.

  20. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and c...

  1. Antibacterial marine bacterium deter luminous vibriosis in shrimp larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Inhibitory activity of a marine pigmented bacterium - Alteromonas sp. - isolated from Penaeus monodon Fabricius larva against pathogenic and environmental isolates of Vibrio harveyi was studied. All the isolates were inhibited to varying degrees by Alteromonas sp. in vitro. The antibacterial substance produced by the Alteromonas sp. was soluble in organic solvent and closely bound to the external surface of bacterial cells. The antibacterial Alteromonas sp., when allowed to colonize on shrimp...

  2. The complete genome of Teredinibacter turnerae T7901: an intracellular endosymbiont of marine wood-boring bivalves (shipworms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce C Yang

    Full Text Available Here we report the complete genome sequence of Teredinibacter turnerae T7901. T. turnerae is a marine gamma proteobacterium that occurs as an intracellular endosymbiont in the gills of wood-boring marine bivalves of the family Teredinidae (shipworms. This species is the sole cultivated member of an endosymbiotic consortium thought to provide the host with enzymes, including cellulases and nitrogenase, critical for digestion of wood and supplementation of the host's nitrogen-deficient diet. T. turnerae is closely related to the free-living marine polysaccharide degrading bacterium Saccharophagus degradans str. 2-40 and to as yet uncultivated endosymbionts with which it coexists in shipworm cells. Like S. degradans, the T. turnerae genome encodes a large number of enzymes predicted to be involved in complex polysaccharide degradation (>100. However, unlike S. degradans, which degrades a broad spectrum (>10 classes of complex plant, fungal and algal polysaccharides, T. turnerae primarily encodes enzymes associated with deconstruction of terrestrial woody plant material. Also unlike S. degradans and many other eubacteria, T. turnerae dedicates a large proportion of its genome to genes predicted to function in secondary metabolism. Despite its intracellular niche, the T. turnerae genome lacks many features associated with obligate intracellular existence (e.g. reduced genome size, reduced %G+C, loss of genes of core metabolism and displays evidence of adaptations common to free-living bacteria (e.g. defense against bacteriophage infection. These results suggest that T. turnerae is likely a facultative intracellular ensosymbiont whose niche presently includes, or recently included, free-living existence. As such, the T. turnerae genome provides insights into the range of genomic adaptations associated with intracellular endosymbiosis as well as enzymatic mechanisms relevant to the recycling of plant materials in marine environments and the production

  3. MODELING OF MIXED CHEMOSTAT CULTURES OF AN AEROBIC BACTERIUM, COMAMONAS-TESTOSTERONI, AND AN ANAEROBIC BACTERIUM, VEILLONELLA-ALCALESCENS - COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENTAL-DATA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERRITSE, J; SCHUT, F; GOTTSCHAL, JC

    A mathematical model of mixed chemostat cultures of the obligately aerobic bacterium Comamonas testosteroni and the anaerobic bacterium Veillonella alcalescens grown under dual limitation Of L-lactate and oxygen was constructed. The model was based on Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics for the

  4. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a

  5. Azithromycin effectiveness against intracellular infections of Francisella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrolide antibiotics are commonly administered for bacterial respiratory illnesses. Azithromycin (Az is especially noted for extremely high intracellular concentrations achieved within macrophages which is far greater than the serum concentration. Clinical strains of Type B Francisella (F. tularensis have been reported to be resistant to Az, however our laboratory Francisella strains were found to be sensitive. We hypothesized that different strains/species of Francisella (including Type A may have different susceptibilities to Az, a widely used and well-tolerated antibiotic. Results In vitro susceptibility testing of Az confirmed that F. tularensis subsp. holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS (Type B was not sensitive while F. philomiragia, F. novicida, and Type A F. tularensis (NIH B38 and Schu S4 strain were susceptible. In J774A.1 mouse macrophage cells infected with F. philomiragia, F. novicida, and F. tularensis LVS, 5 μg/ml Az applied extracellularly eliminated intracellular Francisella infections. A concentration of 25 μg/ml Az was required for Francisella-infected A549 human lung epithelial cells, suggesting that macrophages are more effective at concentrating Az than epithelial cells. Mutants of RND efflux components (tolC and ftlC in F. novicida demonstrated less sensitivity to Az by MIC than the parental strain, but the tolC disc-inhibition assay demonstrated increased sensitivity, indicating a complex role for the outer-membrane transporter. Mutants of acrA and acrB mutants were less sensitive to Az than the parental strain, suggesting that AcrAB is not critical for the efflux of Az in F. novicida. In contrast, F. tularensis Schu S4 mutants ΔacrB and ΔacrA were more sensitive than the parental strain, indicating that the AcrAB may be important for Az efflux in F. tularensis Schu S4. F. novicida LPS O-antigen mutants (wbtN, wbtE, wbtQ and wbtA were found to be less sensitive in vitro to Az compared to the wild

  6. Molecular detection of Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Rickettsia monacensis in dogs from Maio Island of Cape Verde archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzi, Stefania; Maia, João P; Epis, Sara; Marcos, Ricardo; Pereira, Cristina; Luzzago, Camilla; Santos, Marta; Puente-Payo, Pablo; Giordano, Alessia; Pajoro, Massimo; Sironi, Giuseppe; Faustino, Augusto

    2016-07-01

    Tick-borne diseases are emerging worldwide and have an important zoonotic relevance. Dogs play an important role in the epidemiology of several zoonotic tick-borne pathogens acting as sentinels and/or reservoirs. This study focused on the molecular identification of tick-borne pathogens in blood samples of 153 autochthonous asymptomatic dogs in Maio Island, Cape Verde archipelago. Eighty-four (54.9%) dogs were positive for one or more pathogens. Fifty-five (35.9%) dogs were infected with Hepatozoon canis, 53 (34.6%) with Anaplasma platys, five (3.3%) with Ehrlichia canis and Rickettsia monacensis, an emerging human pathogen, was also identified in a single dog (0.7%). The former three pathogens cause important canine tick-borne diseases that are transmitted or potentially transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l., the only hard tick identified in Cape Verde. Furthermore, Wolbachia spp. was amplified from the blood of one dog. None of the dogs were positive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Midichloria mitochondrii, Bartonella spp., Babesia spp. or Theileria spp. Fifty-four (35.3%) animals showed single infections and 30 (19.6%) co-infections, with A. platys and H. canis co-infection being the most frequent (28 dogs, 18.3%). The frequency of E. canis infection was statistically different among age groups (P=0.017), being higher among dogs older than 4 years compared to younger dogs. Infection by A. platys was also statistically different among age groups (P=0.031), being higher in dogs younger than 2 years compared to older dogs. The statistical analyses showed no significant association of PCR positivity with gender or location. The frequency of tick-borne pathogens detected in dogs in Maio Island, including R. monacensis, highlights the need to improve diagnosis and control in order to prevent the risk of transmission of these pathogens among dogs and humans living in or travelling to this touristic island. Copyright © 2016

  7. Serological survey of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Ehrlichia canis infections in rural and urban dogs in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Virginia Ebani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction[i][/i][/b][i]. Borrelia burgdorferi [/i]sensu lato (s.l. and Anaplasma phagocytophilum are well known zoonotic pathogens, whereas[i] Ehrlichia canis[/i] is usually considered to be of veterinary concern, although on the basis of recent reports it also seems to be able to infect humans. [b]objective[/b]. The aim of the study was to determine the seroprevalence of [i]B. burgdorferi [/i]s.l., A. phagocytophilum and [i]E. canis[/i] in an Italian canine population, and to verify if there are differences between dogs living in urban areas and those from a rural environment. [b]materials and method.[/b] Blood sera of 1,965 dogs, 1,235 from cities and 730 from rural areas, were tested by indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFAT. [b]results[/b]. The overall seroprevalence was highest for E. canis (7.07%, followed by [i]A. phagocytophilum[/i] (4.68%, and [i]B. burgdorferi[/i] s.l. (1.47%. Rural dogs showed the highest seroprevalence to [i]B. burgdorferi[/i] s.l. and [i]A. phagocytophilum[/i]. No significant differences were observed between rural and urban [i]E. canis[/i]-positive dogs. A low percentage (1.32% of dogs with dual seropositivity was detected, and no triple positive reactions were observed. No significant differences were detected in the seroprevalence of the three agents in relationship to the age and gender of the dogs. Seroprevalence in the five years considered were not statistically different, except for the lowest rate for [i]E. canis[/i] observed in 2012. [b]conclusions[/b]. The results confirm the presence of [i]B. burgdorferi[/i] s.l., [i]A. phagocytophilum[/i] and [i]E. canis[/i] in Italian dogs in both urban and rural areas. Monitoring pet dogs, which share the same environment with their owners, is useful for identifying the presence of tick-borne disease agents of both veterinary and public health significance

  8. Intracellular bacteria: the origin of dinoflagellate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E S

    1990-01-01

    Dinoflagellate blooms of the same species have been registered either as toxic or nontoxic and, in the latter case, toxicity may be of different types. A hypothesis has been formulated according to which the bacteria having in some way taken part in the toxin formation are either inside the dinoflagellate cell or in the nutritive liquid. The presence of intracellular bacteria in those microorganisms has been studied mainly in material from cultures, a few from the sea, and several strains were isolated from different species. Experiments with crossed inoculations have shown that the bacterial strain from Gonyaulax tamarensis caused the cells of some other species to become toxic. From nontoxic clonal cultures of Prorocentrum balticum, Glenodinium foliaceum, and Gyrodinium instriatum, after inoculation of that bacterial strain, cultures were obtained whose cell extracts showed the same kind of toxicity as G. tamarensis. No toxic action could be found in the extracts of the bacterial cells form the assayed strains. The interference of intracellular bacteria in the metabolism of dinoflagellates must be the main cause of their toxicity.

  9. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Walters, Jamie D; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2012-11-02

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  11. [Intracellular signaling mechanisms in thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Terán, Paul; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Luna-Ceballos, Rosa Isela; Erazo Valle-Solís, Aura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, the papillary variant accounts for 80-90% of all diagnosed cases. In the development of papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF and RAS genes are mainly affected, resulting in a modification of the system of intracellular signaling proteins known as «protein kinase mitogen-activated» (MAPK) which consist of «modules» of internal signaling proteins (Receptor/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) from the cell membrane to the nucleus. In thyroid cancer, these signanling proteins regulate diverse cellular processes such as differentiation, growth, development and apoptosis. MAPK play an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer as they are used as molecular biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and as possible therapeutic molecular targets. Mutations in BRAF gene have been correlated with poor response to treatment with traditional chemotherapy and as an indicator of poor prognosis. To review the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular signaling of BRAF and RAS genes in thyroid cancer. Molecular therapy research is in progress for this type of cancer as new molecules have been developed in order to inhibit any of the components of the signaling pathway (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK; with special emphasis on the (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf section, which is a major effector of ERK pathway. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Chitin utilization by the insect-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2010-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa.

  13. Rare Freshwater Ciliate Paramecium chlorelligerum Kahl, 1935 and Its Macronuclear Symbiotic Bacterium "Candidatus Holospora parva".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Olivia; Fokin, Sergei I; Lebedeva, Natalia; Migunova, Alexandra; Petroni, Giulio; Potekhin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Ciliated protists often form symbioses with many diverse microorganisms. In particular, symbiotic associations between ciliates and green algae, as well as between ciliates and intracellular bacteria, are rather wide-spread in nature. In this study, we describe the complex symbiotic system between a very rare ciliate, Paramecium chlorelligerum, unicellular algae inhabiting its cytoplasm, and novel bacteria colonizing the host macronucleus. Paramecium chlorelligerum, previously found only twice in Germany, was retrieved from a novel location in vicinity of St. Petersburg in Russia. Species identification was based on both classical morphological methods and analysis of the small subunit rDNA. Numerous algae occupying the cytoplasm of this ciliate were identified with ultrastructural and molecular methods as representatives of the Meyerella genus, which before was not considered among symbiotic algae. In the same locality at least fifteen other species of "green" ciliates were found, thus it is indeed a biodiversity hot-spot for such protists. A novel species of bacterial symbionts living in the macronucleus of Paramecium chlorelligerum cells was morphologically and ultrastructurally investigated in detail with the description of its life cycle and infection capabilities. The new endosymbiont was molecularly characterized following the full-cycle rRNA approach. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the novel bacterium is a member of Holospora genus branching basally but sharing all characteristics of the genus except inducing connecting piece formation during the infected host nucleus division. We propose the name "Candidatus Holospora parva" for this newly described species. The described complex system raises new questions on how these microorganisms evolve and interact in symbiosis.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Stationary Phase in the Marine Bacterium "Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowell, S. M.; Norbeck, A. D.; Lipton, M. S.; Nicora, C. D.; Callister, S. J.; Smith, R. D.; Barofsky, D. F.; Giovannoni, S. J.

    2008-05-09

    The α-proteobacterium ‘Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique’ str. HTCC1062, and most other members of the SAR11 clade, lack genes for assimilatory sulfate reduction, making them dependent on organosulfur compounds that occur naturally in seawater. To investigate how these cells adapt to sulfur limitation, batch cultures were grown in defined media containing either limiting or non-limiting amounts of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) as the sole sulfur source. Protein and mRNA expression were measured during exponential growth, immediately prior to stationary phase, and in late stationary phase. Two distinct responses were observed: one as DMSP became exhausted, and another as cells acclimated to a sulfur-limited environment. The first response was characterized by increased transcription and translation of all Ca. P. ubique genes downstream of previously confirmed S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) riboswitches: bhmT, mmuM, and metY. Proteins encoded by these genes were up to 33 times more abundant as DMSP became limiting. Their predicted function is to shunt all available sulfur to methionine. The secondary response, observed during sulfur-depleted stationary phase, was a 6-10 fold increase in transcription of the heme c shuttle ccmC and two small genes of unknown function (SAR11_1163 and SAR11_1164). This bacterium's strategy for coping with sulfur stress appears to be intracellular redistribution to support methionine biosynthesis, rather than increasing organosulfur import. Many of the genes and SAM riboswitches involved in this response are located in a hypervariable genome region (HVR). One of these HVR genes, ordL, is located downstream of a conserved motif that evidence suggests is a novel riboswitch.

  15. Rare Freshwater Ciliate Paramecium chlorelligerum Kahl, 1935 and Its Macronuclear Symbiotic Bacterium "Candidatus Holospora parva".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Lanzoni

    Full Text Available Ciliated protists often form symbioses with many diverse microorganisms. In particular, symbiotic associations between ciliates and green algae, as well as between ciliates and intracellular bacteria, are rather wide-spread in nature. In this study, we describe the complex symbiotic system between a very rare ciliate, Paramecium chlorelligerum, unicellular algae inhabiting its cytoplasm, and novel bacteria colonizing the host macronucleus. Paramecium chlorelligerum, previously found only twice in Germany, was retrieved from a novel location in vicinity of St. Petersburg in Russia. Species identification was based on both classical morphological methods and analysis of the small subunit rDNA. Numerous algae occupying the cytoplasm of this ciliate were identified with ultrastructural and molecular methods as representatives of the Meyerella genus, which before was not considered among symbiotic algae. In the same locality at least fifteen other species of "green" ciliates were found, thus it is indeed a biodiversity hot-spot for such protists. A novel species of bacterial symbionts living in the macronucleus of Paramecium chlorelligerum cells was morphologically and ultrastructurally investigated in detail with the description of its life cycle and infection capabilities. The new endosymbiont was molecularly characterized following the full-cycle rRNA approach. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the novel bacterium is a member of Holospora genus branching basally but sharing all characteristics of the genus except inducing connecting piece formation during the infected host nucleus division. We propose the name "Candidatus Holospora parva" for this newly described species. The described complex system raises new questions on how these microorganisms evolve and interact in symbiosis.

  16. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  17. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain.

  18. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  19. Responses of a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 to commercial metal oxide nanoparticles compared with responses to metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimkpa, Christian O., E-mail: cdimkpa@usu.edu [Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Calder, Alyssa; Britt, David W. [Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); McLean, Joan E. [Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Anderson, Anne J. [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The toxicity of commercially-available CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to pathogenic bacteria was compared for a beneficial rhizosphere isolate, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The NPs aggregated, released ions to different extents under the conditions used for bacterial exposure, and associated with bacterial cell surface. Bacterial surface charge was neutralized by NPs, dependent on pH. The CuO NPs were more toxic than the ZnO NPs. The negative surface charge on colloids of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was reduced by Cu ions but not by CuO NPs; the EPS protected cells from CuO NPs-toxicity. CuO NPs-toxicity was eliminated by a Cu ion chelator, suggesting that ion release was involved. Neither NPs released alkaline phosphatase from the cells' periplasm, indicating minimal outer membrane damage. Accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species was correlated with CuO NPs lethality. Environmental deposition of NPs could create niches for ion release, with impacts on susceptible soil microbes. - Highlights: > Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) was evaluated in a beneficial bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6). > Aggregated commercial CuO and ZnO NPs released Cu and Zn ions and changed bacterial surface charge, depending on pH. > The NPs were toxic to PcO6 through NP-specific, but also ion release mechanisms. > Reactive oxygen species were produced by CuO NP and Cu ion at lethal concentrations, but bacterial EPS protected against Cu. > The periplasmic marker, alkaline phosphate, activity was increased by the NPs and ions. - Aggregated CuO and ZnO nanoparticles release ions and cause different toxicities in a beneficial soil bacterium.

  20. Responses of a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 to commercial metal oxide nanoparticles compared with responses to metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimkpa, Christian O.; Calder, Alyssa; Britt, David W.; McLean, Joan E.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of commercially-available CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to pathogenic bacteria was compared for a beneficial rhizosphere isolate, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The NPs aggregated, released ions to different extents under the conditions used for bacterial exposure, and associated with bacterial cell surface. Bacterial surface charge was neutralized by NPs, dependent on pH. The CuO NPs were more toxic than the ZnO NPs. The negative surface charge on colloids of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was reduced by Cu ions but not by CuO NPs; the EPS protected cells from CuO NPs-toxicity. CuO NPs-toxicity was eliminated by a Cu ion chelator, suggesting that ion release was involved. Neither NPs released alkaline phosphatase from the cells' periplasm, indicating minimal outer membrane damage. Accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species was correlated with CuO NPs lethality. Environmental deposition of NPs could create niches for ion release, with impacts on susceptible soil microbes. - Highlights: → Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) was evaluated in a beneficial bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6). → Aggregated commercial CuO and ZnO NPs released Cu and Zn ions and changed bacterial surface charge, depending on pH. → The NPs were toxic to PcO6 through NP-specific, but also ion release mechanisms. → Reactive oxygen species were produced by CuO NP and Cu ion at lethal concentrations, but bacterial EPS protected against Cu. → The periplasmic marker, alkaline phosphate, activity was increased by the NPs and ions. - Aggregated CuO and ZnO nanoparticles release ions and cause different toxicities in a beneficial soil bacterium.

  1. Nanobodies: Chemical Functionalization Strategies and Intracellular Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dominik; Helma, Jonas; Schneider, Anselm F. L.; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Nanobodies can be seen as next‐generation tools for the recognition and modulation of antigens that are inaccessible to conventional antibodies. Due to their compact structure and high stability, nanobodies see frequent usage in basic research, and their chemical functionalization opens the way towards promising diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this Review, central aspects of nanobody functionalization are presented, together with selected applications. While early conjugation strategies relied on the random modification of natural amino acids, more recent studies have focused on the site‐specific attachment of functional moieties. Such techniques include chemoenzymatic approaches, expressed protein ligation, and amber suppression in combination with bioorthogonal modification strategies. Recent applications range from sophisticated imaging and mass spectrometry to the delivery of nanobodies into living cells for the visualization and manipulation of intracellular antigens. PMID:28913971

  2. Drosophila VAMP7 regulates Wingless intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; He, Fang; Lin, Xinhua; Wu, Yihui

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila Wingless (Wg) is a morphogen that determines cell fate during development. Previous studies have shown that endocytic pathways regulate Wg trafficking and signaling. Here, we showed that loss of vamp7, a gene required for vesicle fusion, dramatically increased Wg levels and decreased Wg signaling. Interestingly, we found that levels of Dally-like (Dlp), a glypican that can interact with Wg to suppress Wg signaling at the dorsoventral boundary of the Drosophila wing, were also increased in vamp7 mutant cells. Moreover, Wg puncta in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes were Dlp positive. We hypothesize that VAMP7 is required for Wg intracellular trafficking and the accumulation of Wg in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes might affect Wg signaling.

  3. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanobodies: Chemical Functionalization Strategies and Intracellular Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dominik; Helma, Jonas; Schneider, Anselm F L; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2018-02-23

    Nanobodies can be seen as next-generation tools for the recognition and modulation of antigens that are inaccessible to conventional antibodies. Due to their compact structure and high stability, nanobodies see frequent usage in basic research, and their chemical functionalization opens the way towards promising diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this Review, central aspects of nanobody functionalization are presented, together with selected applications. While early conjugation strategies relied on the random modification of natural amino acids, more recent studies have focused on the site-specific attachment of functional moieties. Such techniques include chemoenzymatic approaches, expressed protein ligation, and amber suppression in combination with bioorthogonal modification strategies. Recent applications range from sophisticated imaging and mass spectrometry to the delivery of nanobodies into living cells for the visualization and manipulation of intracellular antigens. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  6. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-11-27

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC.

  7. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, María I; Morrone Seijo, Susana M; Guaimas, Francisco F; Comerci, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus , the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus , ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus .

  8. [Limbic encephalitis with antibodies against intracellular antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akihiko; Kamei, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a paraneoplastic syndrome that is often associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), breast cancer, testicular tumors, teratoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and thymoma. The common clinical manifestations of limbic encephalitis are subacute onset, cognitive dysfunction, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are considered to occur because of cytotoxic T cell responses and antibodies against target neuronal proteins that are usually expressed by an underlying tumor. The main intracellular antigens related to limbic encephalitis are Hu, Ma2, and less frequently CV2/CRMP5 and amphiphysin. The anti-Hu antibody, which is involved in cerebellar degeneration and extensive or multifocal encephalomyelitis such as limbic encephalitis is closely associated with a history of smoking and SCLC. The anti-Ma2 antibody is associated with encephalitis of the limbic system, hypothalamus and brain-stem. For this reason, some patients with limbic encephalitis have sleep disorders (including REM sleep abnormalities), severe hypokinesis and gaze palsy in addition to limbic dysfunction. In men aged less than 50 years, anti-Ma2 antibody encephalitis is almost always associated with testicular germ-cell tumors that are occasionally difficult to detect. In older men and women, the most common tumors are non-SCLC and breast cancer. Limbic encephalitis associated with cell-surface antigens (e.g., voltage-gated potassium channels, NMDA receptors) is mediated by antibodies and often improves after a reduction in the antibody titer and after tumor resection. Patients with antibodies against intracellular antigens, except for those with anti-Ma2 antibodies and testicular tumors, are less responsive. Early diagnosis and treatment with immunotherapy, tumor resection or both are important for improving or stabilizing the condition of limbic encephalitis.

  9. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeong Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla.

  10. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes†

    OpenAIRE

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular p...

  11. Statistical optimization of cell disruption techniques for releasing intracellular X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstün-Aytekin, Özlem; Arısoy, Sevda; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Yıldız, Ece

    2016-03-01

    X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepX) is an intracellular enzyme from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis NRRL B-1821, and it has commercial importance. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of several cell disruption methods on the activity of PepX. Statistical optimization methods were performed for two cavitation methods, hydrodynamic (high-pressure homogenization) and acoustic (sonication), to determine the more appropriate disruption method. Two level factorial design (2FI), with the parameters of number of cycles and pressure, and Box-Behnken design (BBD), with the parameters of cycle, sonication time, and power, were used for the optimization of the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods, respectively. In addition, disruption methods, consisting of lysozyme, bead milling, heat treatment, freeze-thawing, liquid nitrogen, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Triton-X, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, and antibiotics, were performed and compared with the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods. The optimized values of high-pressure homogenization were one cycle at 130 MPa providing activity of 114.47 mU ml(-1), while sonication afforded an activity of 145.09 mU ml(-1) at 28 min with 91% power and three cycles. In conclusion, sonication was the more effective disruption method, and its optimal operation parameters were manifested for the release of intracellular enzyme from a L. lactis spp. lactis strain, which is a Gram-positive bacterium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. "Candidatus Sonnebornia yantaiensis", a member of candidate division OD1, as intracellular bacteria of the ciliated protist Paramecium bursaria (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Qing, Yao; Guo, Xiaohong; Warren, Alan

    2014-02-01

    An intracellular bacterium was discovered in an isolate of Paramecium bursaria from a freshwater pond in Yantai, China. The bacteria were abundant and exclusively found in the cytoplasm of the host which, along with the green alga Chlorella, formed a three-partner consortium that could survive in pure water for at least one week. Cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene showed that the bacterium belonged to the uncultured candidate division OD1, which usually forms part of the rare biosphere. Transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific probes showed that the bacteria were usually located close to the perialgal membranes of endosymbiotic Chlorella cells, and occasionally irregularly distributed throughout the host cytoplasm. The name "Candidatus Sonnebornia yantaiensis" gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for the new bacterium. A strongly supported monophyletic subclade, OD1-p, which included the new species, was recognized and this study highlights that protists can be important hosts for rare bacterial taxa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Tailoring nutritional and process variables for hyperproduction of catalase from a novel isolated bacterium Geobacillus sp. BSS-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauldhar, Baljinder Singh; Sooch, Balwinder Singh

    2016-01-14

    Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) is one of the important industrial enzyme employed in diagnostic and analytical methods in the form of biomarkers and biosensors in addition to their enormous applications in textile, paper, food and pharmaceutical sectors. The present study demonstrates the utility of a newly isolated and adapted strain of genus Geobacillus possessing unique combination of several industrially important extremophilic properties for the hyper production of catalase. The bacterium can grow over a wide range of pH (3-12) and temperature (10-90 °C) with extraordinary capability to produce catalase. A novel extremophilic strain belonging to genus Geobacillus was exploited for the production of catalase by tailoring its nutritional requirements and process variables. One variable at a time traditional approach followed by computational designing was applied to customize the fermentation process. A simple fermentation media containing only three components namely sucrose (0.55 %, w/v), yeast extract (1.0 %, w/v) and BaCl2 (0.08 %, w/v) was designed for the hyperproduction of catalase. A controlled and optimum air supply caused a tremendous increase in the enzyme production on moving the bioprocess from the flask to bioreactor level. The present paper reports high quantum of catalase production (105,000 IU/mg of cells) in a short fermentation time of 12 h. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature that matches the performance of the developed protocol for the catalase production. This is the first serious study covering intracellular catalase production from thermophilic genus Geobacillus. An increase in intracellular catalase production by 214.72 % was achieved in the optimized medium when transferred from the shake flask to the fermenter level. The extraordinary high production of catalase from Geobacillus sp. BSS-7 makes the isolated strain a prospective candidate for bulk catalase production on an industrial scale.

  14. Hydrogen production by co-cultures of Lactobacillus and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro [Department of General Education, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan); Tokumoto, Masaru; Aihara, Yasuyuki; Oku, Masayo; Kohno, Hideki [Department of Applied Molecular Chemistry, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Izumi-cho, Chiba 275-8575 (Japan); Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun [Research Institute for Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Nakoji, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Tomiyama, Masamitsu [Genetic Diversity Department, National Institute of Agrobiological Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC13953, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. Glucose was converted to hydrogen gas in a yield of 7.1mol of hydrogen per mole of glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions. (author)

  15. Isolation and characterization of Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, anaerobic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Mathrani, Indra M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain 6A, was isolated from an alkaline hot spring in Hverageroi, Iceland. The bacterium was non-motile, rod-shaped (1.5-3.5 x 0.7 mu m) and occurred singly, in pairs or in chains and stained gram-negative. The growth...

  16. Dense populations of a giant sulfur bacterium in Namibian shelf sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Brinkhoff, T.; Ferdelman, TG

    1999-01-01

    A previously unknown giant sulfur bacterium is abundant in sediments underlying the oxygen minimum zone of the Benguela Current upwelling system. The bacterium has a spherical cell that exceeds by up to 100-fold the biovolume of the largest known prokaryotes. On the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA...

  17. LIPID SYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND SECRETION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Olga; Stein, Yechezkiel

    1967-01-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating albino mice injected intravenously with 9, 10-oleic acid-3H or 9, 10-palmitic acid-3H, it has been shown that the labeled fatty acids are incorporated into mammary gland glycerides. The labeled lipid in the mammary gland 1 min after injection was in esterified form (> 95%), and the radioautographic reaction was seen over the rough endoplasmic reticulum and over lipid droplets, both intracellular and intraluminal. At 10–60 min after injection, the silver grains were concentrated predominantly over lipid droplets. There was no concentration of radioactivity over the granules in the Golgi apparatus, at any time interval studied. These findings were interpreted to indicate that after esterification of the fatty acid into glycerides in the rough endoplasmic reticulum an in situ aggregation of lipid occurs, with acquisition of droplet form. The release of the lipid into the lumen proceeds directly and not through the Golgi apparatus, in contradistinction to the mode of secretion of casein in the mammary gland or of lipoprotein in the liver. The presence of strands of endoplasmic reticulum attached to intraluminal lipid droplets provides a structural counterpart to the milk microsomes described in ruminant milk. PMID:6033535

  18. Endothelial remodelling and intracellular calcium machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, F; Tanzi, F; Munaron, L

    2014-05-01

    Rather being an inert barrier between vessel lumen and surrounding tissues, vascular endothelium plays a key role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. The de-endothelialization of blood vessels is regarded as the early event that results in the onset of severe vascular disorders, including atherosclerosis, acute myocardial infarction, brain stroke, and aortic aneurysm. Restoration of the endothelial lining may be accomplished by the activation of neighbouring endothelial cells (ECs) freed by contact inhibition and by circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Intracellular Ca(2+) signalling is essential to promote wound healing: however, the molecular underpinnings of the Ca(2+) response to injury are yet to be fully elucidated. Similarly, the components of the Ca(2+) toolkit that drive EPC incorporation into denuded vessels are far from being fully elucidated. The present review will survey the current knowledge on the role of Ca(2+) signalling in endothelial repair and in EPC activation. We propose that endothelial regeneration might be boosted by intraluminal release of specific Ca(2+) channel agonists or by gene transfer strategies aiming to enhance the expression of the most suitable Ca(2+) channels at the wound site. In this view, connexin (Cx) channels/hemichannels and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) stand amid the most proper routes to therapeutically induce the regrowth of denuded vessels. Cx stimulation might trigger the proliferative and migratory behaviour of ECs facing the lesion site, whereas activation of SOCE is likely to favour EPC homing to the wounded vessel.

  19. Intracellular events regulating cross-presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eCresswell

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cross-presentation plays a fundamental role in the induction of CD8-T cell immunity. However, although more than three decades have passed since its discovery, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanisms involved. Here we give an overview of the components involved at different stages of this process. First, antigens must be internalized into the cross-presenting cell. The involvement of different receptors, method of antigen uptake, and nature of the antigen can influence intracellular trafficking and access to the cross-presentation pathway. Once antigens access the endocytic system, different requirements for endosomal/phagosomal processing arise, such as proteolysis and reduction of disulfide bonds. The majority of cross-presented peptides are generated by proteasomal degradation. Therefore, antigens must cross a membrane barrier in a manner analogous to the fate of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER that are retrotranslocated into the cytosol for degradation. Indeed, some components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD machinery have been implicated in cross-presentation. Further complicating the matter, endosomal and phagosomal compartments have been suggested as alternative sites to the ER for loading of peptides on MHC class I molecules. Finally, the antigen presenting cells involved, particularly dendritic cell subsets and their state of maturation, influence the efficiency of cross-presentation.

  20. Intracellular recording from a spider vibration receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Ewald; Burger, Anna-M; Barth, Friedrich G

    2006-05-01

    The present study introduces a new preparation of a spider vibration receptor that allows intracellular recording of responses to natural mechanical or electrical stimulation of the associated mechanoreceptor cells. The spider vibration receptor is a lyriform slit sense organ made up of 21 cuticular slits located on the distal end of the metatarsus of each walking leg. The organ is stimulated when the tarsus receives substrate vibrations, which it transmits to the organ's cuticular structures, reducing the displacement to about one tenth due to geometrical reasons. Current clamp recording was used to record action potentials generated by electrical or mechanical stimuli. Square pulse stimulation identified two groups of sensory cells, the first being single-spike cells which generated only one or two action potentials and the second being multi-spike cells which produced bursts of action potentials. When the more natural mechanical sinusoidal stimulation was applied, differences in adaptation rate between the two cell types remained. In agreement with prior extracellular recordings, both cell types showed a decrease in the threshold tarsus deflection with increasing stimulus frequency. Off-responses to mechanical stimuli have also been seen in the metatarsal organ for the first time.

  1. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  2. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Mancini, E.; Tay, J.; Shahand, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  3. Intracellular Drug Bioavailability: Effect of Neutral Lipids and Phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treyer, Andrea; Mateus, André; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Boriss, Hinnerk; Matsson, Pär; Artursson, Per

    2018-06-04

    Intracellular unbound drug concentrations are the pharmacologically relevant concentrations for targets inside cells. Intracellular drug concentrations are determined by multiple processes, including the extent of drug binding to intracellular structures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of neutral lipid (NL) and phospholipid (PL) levels on intracellular drug disposition. The NL and/or PL content of 3T3-L1 cells were enhanced, resulting in phenotypes (in terms of morphology and proteome) reminiscent of adipocytes (high NL and PL) or mild phospholipidosis (only high PL). Intracellular bioavailability ( F ic ) was then determined for 23 drugs in these cellular models and in untreated wild-type cells. A higher PL content led to higher intracellular drug binding and a lower F ic . The induction of NL did not further increase drug binding but led to altered F ic due to increased lysosomal pH. Further, there was a good correlation between binding to beads coated with pure PL and intracellular drug binding. In conclusion, our results suggest that PL content is a major determinant of drug binding in cells and that PL beads may constitute a simple alternative to estimating this parameter. Further, the presence of massive amounts of intracellular NLs did not influence drug binding significantly.

  4. Genome analysis of the anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Mavromatis

    Full Text Available Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  5. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  6. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and contained cytochrome c3 and desulfoviridin. Except for furfural degradation, the characteristics of the furfural isolate were remarkably similar to those of the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas. The furfural isolate has been tentatively identified as Desulfovibrio sp. strain F-1. Images PMID:16346423

  7. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. The O-antigen structure of bacterium Comamonas aquatica CJG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqian; Kondakova, Anna N; Zhu, Yutong; Knirel, Yuriy A; Han, Aidong

    2017-11-01

    Genus Comamonas is a group of bacteria that are able to degrade a variety of environmental waste. Comamonas aquatica CJG (C. aquatica) in this genus is able to absorb low-density lipoprotein but not high-density lipoprotein of human serum. Using 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, we found that the O-polysaccharide (O-antigen) of this bacterium is comprised of a disaccharide repeat (O-unit) of d-glucose and 2-O-acetyl-l-rhamnose, which is shared by Serratia marcescens O6. The O-antigen gene cluster of C. aquatica, which is located between coaX and tnp4 genes, contains rhamnose synthesis genes, glycosyl and acetyl transferase genes, and ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, and therefore is consistent with the O-antigen structure determined here.

  9. Intracellular invasion of Orientia tsutsugamushi activates inflammasome in asc-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Eun Koo

    Full Text Available Orientia tsutsugamushi, a causative agent of scrub typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium, which escapes from the endo/phagosome and replicates in the host cytoplasm. O. tsutsugamushi infection induces production of pro-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-1β (IL-1β, which is secreted mainly from macrophages upon cytosolic stimuli by activating cysteine protease caspase-1 within a complex called the inflammasome, and is a key player in initiating and maintaining the inflammatory response. However, the mechanism for IL-1β maturation upon O. tsutsugamushi infection has not been identified. In this study, we show that IL-1 receptor signaling is required for efficient host protection from O. tsutsugamushi infection. Live Orientia, but not heat- or UV-inactivated Orientia, activates the inflammasome through active bacterial uptake and endo/phagosomal maturation. Furthermore, Orientia-stimulated secretion of IL-1β and activation of caspase-1 are ASC- and caspase-1- dependent since IL-1β production was impaired in Asc- and caspase-1-deficient macrophages but not in Nlrp3-, Nlrc4- and Aim2-deficient macrophages. Therefore, live O. tsutsugamushi triggers ASC inflammasome activation leading to IL-1β production, which is a critical innate immune response for effective host defense.

  10. Perforin-2 is essential for intracellular defense of parenchymal cells and phagocytes against pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Ryan M; de Armas, Lesley R; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Fiorentino, Desiree G; Olsson, Melissa L; Lichtenheld, Mathias G; Morales, Alejo; Lyapichev, Kirill; Gonzalez, Louis E; Strbo, Natasa; Sukumar, Neelima; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Gregory V; Munson, George P; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Kirsner, Robert S; Russell, David G; Podack, Eckhard R

    2015-01-01

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is a pore-forming, antibacterial protein with broad-spectrum activity. Perforin-2 is expressed constitutively in phagocytes and inducibly in parenchymal, tissue-forming cells. In vitro, Perforin-2 prevents the intracellular replication and proliferation of bacterial pathogens in these cells. Perforin-2 knockout mice are unable to control the systemic dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Salmonella typhimurium and perish shortly after epicutaneous or orogastric infection respectively. In contrast, Perforin-2-sufficient littermates clear the infection. Perforin-2 is a transmembrane protein of cytosolic vesicles -derived from multiple organelles- that translocate to and fuse with bacterium containing vesicles. Subsequently, Perforin-2 polymerizes and forms large clusters of 100 Å pores in the bacterial surface with Perforin-2 cleavage products present in bacteria. Perforin-2 is also required for the bactericidal activity of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and hydrolytic enzymes. Perforin-2 constitutes a novel and apparently essential bactericidal effector molecule of the innate immune system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06508.001 PMID:26402460

  11. Intracellular localization of Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Marttila

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Treponema denticola is an important periodontal pathogen capable of tissue invasion. Its chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP can degrade a number of basement membrane components in vitro, thus suggesting a contribution to tissue invasion by the spirochete. The aim of this study was to analyze the localization of CTLP in chronic periodontitis tissues ex vivo. A polyclonal antibody specific to T. denticola cell-bound CTLP was used to detect the spirochetes in the gingival tissues of patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis (n=25 by immunohistochemistry and periodic acid-Schiff staining (PAS. The presence of T. denticola in the periodontal tissue samples was analyzed by PCR. Periodontal tissue samples of 12 of the 25 patients were found to be positive for T. denticola by PCR. Moreover, CTLP could be detected in the periodontal tissues of all these patients by immunohistochemistry. In the epithelium, the CTLP was mostly intracellular. Typically, the positive staining could be seen throughout the whole depth of the epithelium. When detected extracellularly, CTLP was localized mainly as granular deposits. The connective tissue stained diffusely positive in four cases. The positive staining co-localized with the PAS stain in nine cases. T. denticola and its CTLP could be detected in diseased human periodontium both intra- and extracellularly. The granular staining pattern was suggestive of the presence of T. denticola bacteria, whereas the more diffused staining pattern was indicative of the recent presence of the bacterium and shedding of the cell-bound proteinase.

  12. Phloroglucinol functions as an intracellular and intercellular chemical messenger influencing gene expression in Pseudomonas protegens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jennifer C; Buchanan, Alex; Vining, Oliver; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Chang, Jeff H; McPhail, Kerry L; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria can be both highly communicative and highly competitive in natural habitats and antibiotics are thought to play a role in both of these processes. The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 produces a spectrum of antibiotics, two of which, pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), function in intracellular and intercellular communication, both as autoinducers of their own production. Here, we demonstrate that phloroglucinol, an intermediate in DAPG biosynthesis, can serve as an intercellular signal influencing the expression of pyoluteorin biosynthesis genes, the production of pyoluteorin, and inhibition of Pythium ultimum, a phytopathogenic oomycete sensitive to pyoluteorin. Through analysis of RNAseq data sets, we show that phloroglucinol had broad effects on the transcriptome of Pf-5, significantly altering the transcription of more than two hundred genes. The effects of nanomolar versus micromolar concentrations of phloroglucinol differed both quantitatively and qualitatively, influencing the expression of distinct sets of genes or having opposite effects on transcript abundance of certain genes. Therefore, our results support the concept of hormesis, a phenomenon associated with signalling molecules that elicit distinct responses at different concentrations. Phloroglucinol is the first example of an intermediate of antibiotic biosynthesis that functions as a chemical messenger influencing gene expression in P. protegens. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinu, Farhana R; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Aggio, Raphael

    2017-10-23

    Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  14. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana R. Pinu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  15. Metabolomic response of a marine bacterium to 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose, the rare sugar from red macroalgae, as the sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Eun Ju; Yu, Sora; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2018-03-20

    Marine red macroalgae have received much attention as sustainable resources for producing bio-based products. Therefore, understanding the metabolic pathways of carbohydrates from red macroalgae, in fermentative microorganisms, is crucial for efficient bioconversion of the carbohydrates into bio-based products. Recently, the novel catabolic pathway of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (AHG), the main component of red macroalgae, was discovered in a marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain EJY3. However, the global metabolic network in response to AHG remains unclear. Here, the intracellular metabolites of EJY3 grown on AHG, glucose, or galactose were comparatively profiled using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The global metabolite profiling results revealed that the metabolic profile for AHG significantly differed from those for other common sugars. Specifically, the metabolic intermediate of the AHG pathway, 3,6-anhydrogalactonate, was detected during growth only in the presence of AHG; thus, the recently discovered key steps in AHG catabolism was found not to occur in the catabolism of other common sugars. Moreover, the levels of metabolic intermediates related to glycerolipid metabolism and valine biosynthesis were higher with AHG than those with other sugars. These comprehensive metabolomic analytical results for AHG in this marine bacterium can be used as the basis for having fermentative microbial strains to engineered to efficiently utilize AHG from macroalgal biomass. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide are supplementary energy sources for a marine heterotrophic bacterium: implications for marine carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidbury, Ian D E A; Murrell, J Colin; Chen, Yin

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria of the marine Roseobacter clade are characterised by their ability to utilise a wide range of organic and inorganic compounds to support growth. Trimethylamine (TMA) and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) are methylated amines (MA) and form part of the dissolved organic nitrogen pool, the second largest source of nitrogen after N2 gas, in the oceans. We investigated if the marine heterotrophic bacterium, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, could utilise TMA and TMAO as a supplementary energy source and whether this trait had any beneficial effect on growth. In R. pomeroyi, catabolism of TMA and TMAO resulted in the production of intracellular ATP which in turn helped to enhance growth rate and growth yield as well as enhancing cell survival during prolonged energy starvation. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of two different exogenous energy sources led to a greater enhancement of chemoorganoheterotrophic growth. The use of TMA and TMAO primarily as an energy source resulted in the remineralisation of nitrogen in the form of ammonium, which could cross feed into another bacterium. This study provides greater insight into the microbial metabolism of MAs in the marine environment and how it may affect both nutrient flow within marine surface waters and the flux of these climatically important compounds into the atmosphere.

  17. Complete genome sequence of the photoautotrophic and bacteriochlorophyll e-synthesizing green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum DSM 1677T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tank, Marcus; Liu, Zhenfeng; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Chlorobaculum limnaeum DSM 1677T is a mesophilic, brown-colored, chlorophototrophic green sulfur bacterium that produces bacteriochlorophyll e and the carotenoid isorenieratene as major pigments. This bacterium serves as a model organism in molecular research on photosynthesis, sulfur metabolism...

  18. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  19. The Equine Antimicrobial Peptide eCATH1 Is Effective against the Facultative Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlusselhuber, Margot; Torelli, Riccardo; Martini, Cecilia; Leippe, Matthias; Cattoir, Vincent; Leclercq, Roland; Laugier, Claire; Grötzinger, Joachim; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, the causal agent of rhodococcosis, is a major pathogen of foals and is also responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised humans. Of great concern, strains resistant to currently used antibiotics have emerged. As the number of drugs that are efficient in vivo is limited because of the intracellular localization of the bacterium inside macrophages, new active but cell-permeant drugs will be needed in the near future. In the present study, we evaluated, by in vitro and ex vivo experiments, the ability of the alpha-helical equine antimicrobial peptide eCATH1 to kill intracellular bacterial cells. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of the peptide was assessed in experimental rhodococcosis induced in mice, while the in vivo toxicity was evaluated by behavioral and histopathological analysis. The study revealed that eCATH1 significantly reduced the number of bacteria inside macrophages. Furthermore, the bactericidal potential of the peptide was maintained in vivo at doses that appeared to have no visible deleterious effects for the mice even after 7 days of treatment. Indeed, daily subcutaneous injections of 1 mg/kg body weight of eCATH1 led to a significant reduction of the bacterial load in organs comparable to that obtained after treatment with 10 mg/kg body weight of rifampin. Interestingly, the combination of the peptide with rifampin showed a synergistic interaction in both ex vivo and in vivo experiments. These results emphasize the therapeutic potential that eCATH1 represents in the treatment of rhodococcosis. PMID:23817377

  20. Characterization of a halophilic heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium and its application on treatment of saline wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jinming; Fang, Hongda; Su, Bing; Chen, Jinfang; Lin, Jinmei

    2015-03-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium capable of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification was isolated from marine sediments and identified as Vibrio diabolicus SF16. It had ability to remove 91.82% of NH4(+)-N (119.77 mg/L) and 99.71% of NO3(-)-N (136.43 mg/L). The nitrogen balance showed that 35.83% of initial NH4(+)-N (119.77 mg/L) was changed to intracellular nitrogen, and 53.98% of the initial NH4(+)-N was converted to gaseous denitrification products. The existence of napA gene further proved the aerobic denitrification ability of strain SF16. The optimum culture conditions were salinity 1-5%, sodium acetate as carbon source, C/N 10, and pH 7.5-9.5. When an aerated biological filter system inoculated with strain SF16 was employed to treat saline wastewater, the average removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N and TN reached 97.14% and 73.92%, respectively, indicating great potential of strain SF16 for future full-scale applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization Of A Novel Hydrolytic Enzyme Producing Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated From The Hot Spring Of Azad Kashmir-Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Zahoor

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A thermophilic bacterium (TP-2 was isolated from the Tatta Pani hot spring in Azad Kashmir and was characterized using phenotypic and genotypic characters. The strain developed cream colored, round, smooth, flat and slimy colonies while the cells were Gram positive rods that ranged in size from about 2.1-3.6 μm to 0.2-0.3 μm in width. Sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA gene showed that isolate TP-2 had 89% homology with Geobacillus debilis. It grew within pH range of 5.5 to 8.5 with optimum growth at pH 7.0. The isolate showed optimum growth at 65ºC and gave positive results for gelatin hydrolysis (GEL, ortho nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranosidase (ONPG, and nitrate production and produced acid from sucrose, glucose and maltose. It utilized glucose, fructose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, xylan, starch, filter paper and carboxymethylcellulose as sole carbon source. Isolate TP-2 produced significant amount of industrially important enzymes i.e. extracellular α-amylase, CMCase, FPase, Xylanase, Protease and Lipase and intracellular CMCase and FPase.

  2. Different Metabolomic Responses to Carbon Starvation between Light and Dark Conditions in the Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Nanako; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2018-03-29

    Purple photosynthetic bacteria utilize light energy for growth. We previously demonstrated that light energy contributed to prolonging the survival of multiple purple bacteria under carbon-starved conditions. In order to clarify the effects of illumination on metabolic states under carbon-starved, non-growing conditions, we herein compared the metabolic profiles of starved cells in the light and dark using the purple bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The metabolic profiles of starved cells in the light were markedly different from those in the dark. After starvation for 5 d in the light, cells showed increases in the amount of ATP and the NAD + /NADH ratio. Decreases in the amounts of most metabolites related to glycolysis and the TCA cycle in energy-rich starved cells suggest the active utilization of these metabolites for the modification of cellular components. Starvation in the dark induced the consumption of cellular compounds such as amino acids, indicating that the degradation of these cellular components produced ATP in order to maintain viability under energy-poor conditions. The present results suggest that intracellular energy levels alter survival strategies under carbon-starved conditions through metabolism.

  3. Intracellular Localization of Arabidopsis Sulfurtransferases1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Dietrich, Christof; Nowak, Katharina; Sierralta, Walter D.; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2004-01-01

    Sulfurtransferases (Str) comprise a group of enzymes widely distributed in archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryota which catalyze the transfer of a sulfur atom from suitable sulfur donors to nucleophilic sulfur acceptors. In all organisms analyzed to date, small gene families encoding Str proteins have been identified. The gene products were localized to different compartments of the cells. Our interest concerns the localization of Str proteins encoded in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. Computer-based prediction methods revealed localization in different compartments of the cell for six putative AtStrs. Several methods were used to determine the localization of the AtStr proteins experimentally. For AtStr1, a mitochondrial localization was demonstrated by immunodetection in the proteome of isolated mitochondria resolved by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent blotting. The respective mature AtStr1 protein was identified by mass spectrometry sequencing. The same result was obtained by transient expression of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts, whereas AtStr2 was exclusively localized to the cytoplasm by this method. Three members of the single-domain AtStr were localized in the chloroplasts as demonstrated by transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions in protoplasts and stomata, whereas the single-domain AtStr18 was shown to be cytoplasmic. The remarkable subcellular distribution of AtStr15 was additionally analyzed by transmission electron immunomicroscopy using a monospecific antibody against green fluorescent protein, indicating an attachment to the thylakoid membrane. The knowledge of the intracellular localization of the members of this multiprotein family will help elucidate their specific functions in the organism. PMID:15181206

  4. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    of the physical and biochemical conditions in plant cells. As model system, we use a H(2)O(2) signal originating at the plasma membrane (PM) and spreading through the cytosol. We consider two maximally simple types of signals, isolated pulses and harmonic oscillations. First we consider the basic limits......Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...

  5. New perspective in the assessment of total intracellular magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Sargenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg is essential for biological processes, but its cellular homeostasis has not been thoroughly elucidated, mainly because of the inadequacy of the available techniques to map intracellular Mg distribution. Recently, particular interest has been raised by a new family of fluorescent probes, diaza-18-crown-hydroxyquinoline (DCHQ, that shows remarkably high affinity and specificity for Mg, thus permitting the detection of the total intracellular Mg. The data obtained by fluori- metric and cytofluorimetric assays performed with DCHQ5 are in good agreement with atomic absorption spectroscopy, confirming that DCHQ5 probe allows both qualitative and quantitative determination of total intracellular Mg.

  6. Insight into glycoside hydrolases for debranched xylan degradation from extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Jia

    Full Text Available Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus 6A, an anaerobic and extremely thermophilic bacterium, uses natural xylan as carbon source. The encoded genes of C. lactoaceticus 6A for glycoside hydrolase (GH provide a platform for xylan degradation. The GH family 10 xylanase (Xyn10A and GH67 α-glucuronidase (Agu67A from C. lactoaceticus 6A were heterologously expressed, purified and characterized. Both Xyn10A and Agu67A are predicted as intracellular enzymes as no signal peptides identified. Xyn10A and Agu67A had molecular weight of 47.0 kDa and 80.0 kDa respectively as determined by SDS-PAGE, while both appeared as homodimer when analyzed by gel filtration. Xyn10A displayed the highest activity at 80 °C and pH 6.5, as 75 °C and pH 6.5 for Agu67A. Xyn10A had good stability at 75 °C, 80 °C, and pH 4.5-8.5, respectively, and was sensitive to various metal ions and reagents. Xyn10A possessed hydrolytic activity towards xylo-oligosaccharides (XOs and beechwood xylan. At optimum conditions, the specific activity of Xyn10A was 44.6 IU/mg with beechwood xylan as substrate, and liberated branched XOs, xylobiose, and xylose. Agu67A was active on branched XOs with methyl-glucuronic acids (MeGlcA sub-chains, and primarily generated XOs equivalents and MeGlcA. The specific activity of Agu67A was 1.3 IU/mg with aldobiouronic acid as substrate. The synergistic action of Xyn10A and Agu67A was observed with MeGlcA branched XOs and xylan as substrates, both backbone and branched chain of substrates were degraded, and liberated xylose, xylobiose, and MeGlcA. The synergism of Xyn10A and Agu67A provided not only a thermophilic method for natural xylan degradation, but also insight into the mechanisms for xylan utilization of C. lactoaceticus.

  7. Characterization of the radioresistance in the radioresistant bacterium deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xiangrong; Du Zeji

    1999-01-01

    The radioresistance of wild type Deinococcus radiodurans KD8301 and the factors affecting the radioresistance were investigated. KH3111 which was a DNA repair mutant of KD8301 (Zeji Du, 1998) was used to be compared with KD8301. Deinococcus radiodurans was discovered by Anderson et al (1956) in X-ray sterilized canned meat that was found to have undergone spoilage. this bacterium and other species of this genus share extreme resistance to ionizing radiation and other agents that damage DNA. Wild type KD8301 and its sensitive mutant KH3111 were irradiated with 60 Co γ-ray at the dose range 0.5 ∼ 10 kGy. Dose-survival fraction curves were made and the radio resistances were determined by LD 99 . The relative contents of DNA in cells were measured by Fluorescence Spectrophotometry (Freedman and Bruce, 1971). The results indicated that wild type KD8301 possesses more radioresistant than its mutant KH3111, LD99 were 9.5 kGy and 2.4 kGy respectively. KD8301 grown at exponential phase showed a decreased resistance to radiation, and the LD99 was 5.1 kGy. No differences of DNA/protein in cells were found between the exponential phase and the stationary phase. The results could be concluded that wild type KD8301 possesses remarkable radioresistance, but this ability was decreased or disappeared after mutation (in KH3111). None DNA relative content other than the growth stages were determinant factors of radioresistance in Deinococcus radiodurans. This results were different from other report (Dickie N et al, 1990). The cellular mechanisms might be the deference's of the bacterium cell morphology between the exponential phase and the stationary phase. Recently, the mutation site of KH3111 which was mutated chemically from wild type KD8301 was identified (Zeji Du, 1998). One base pair changed in the novel gene pprA which was isolated from KD8301 genomic DNA. This point mutation was confirmed to be responsible for the sensitivity of KH3111 to γ-ray and other DNA

  8. Disease: H01140 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available obligate intracellular bacteria closely related to Ehrlichia and Anaplasma, causes an infectious mononucleosis...tis, anorexia, generalized lymphadenopathy, and peripheral blood mononucleosis. Infectious disease ... Neoricke

  9. Downmodulation of Vaccine-Induced Immunity and Protection against the Intracellular Bacterium Francisella tularensis by the Inhibitory Receptor FcγRIIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Franz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fc gamma receptor IIB (FcγRIIB is the only Fc gamma receptor (FcγR which negatively regulates the immune response, when engaged by antigen- (Ag- antibody (Ab complexes. Thus, the generation of Ag-specific IgG in response to infection or immunization has the potential to downmodulate immune protection against infection. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of FcγRIIB on immune protection against Francisella tularensis (Ft, a Category A biothreat agent. We utilized inactivated Ft (iFt as an immunogen. Naïve and iFt-immunized FcγRIIB knockout (KO or wildtype (WT mice were challenged with Ft-live vaccine strain (LVS. While no significant difference in survival between naïve FcγRIIB KO versus WT mice was observed, iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO mice were significantly better protected than iFt-immunized WT mice. Ft-specific IgA in serum and bronchial alveolar lavage, as well as IFN-γ, IL-10, and TNF-α production by splenocytes harvested from iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO, were also significantly elevated. In addition, iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO mice exhibited a reduction in proinflammatory cytokine levels in vivo at 5 days after challenge, which correlates with increased survival following Ft-LVS challenge in published studies. Thus, these studies demonstrate for the first time the ability of FcγRIIB to regulate vaccine-induced IgA production and downmodulate immunity and protection. The immune mechanisms behind the above observations and their potential impact on vaccine development are discussed.

  10. Intracellular trafficking of new anticancer therapeutics: antibody–drug conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalim, Muhammad; Chen, Jie; Wang, Shenghao; Lin, Caiyao; Ullah, Saif; Liang, Keying; Ding, Qian; Chen, Shuqing; Zhan, Jinbiao

    2017-01-01

    Antibody–drug conjugate (ADC) is a milestone in targeted cancer therapy that comprises of monoclonal antibodies chemically linked to cytotoxic drugs. Internalization of ADC takes place via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and pinocytosis. Conjugation strategies, endocytosis and intracellular trafficking optimization, linkers, and drugs chemistry present a great challenge for researchers to eradicate tumor cells successfully. This inventiveness of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking has given considerable momentum recently to develop specific antibodies and ADCs to treat cancer cells. It is significantly advantageous to emphasize the endocytosis and intracellular trafficking pathways efficiently and to design potent engineered conjugates and biological entities to boost efficient therapies enormously for cancer treatment. Current studies illustrate endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of ADC, protein, and linker strategies in unloading and also concisely evaluate practically applicable ADCs. PMID:28814834

  11. Intracellular trafficking of new anticancer therapeutics: antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalim, Muhammad; Chen, Jie; Wang, Shenghao; Lin, Caiyao; Ullah, Saif; Liang, Keying; Ding, Qian; Chen, Shuqing; Zhan, Jinbiao

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a milestone in targeted cancer therapy that comprises of monoclonal antibodies chemically linked to cytotoxic drugs. Internalization of ADC takes place via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and pinocytosis. Conjugation strategies, endocytosis and intracellular trafficking optimization, linkers, and drugs chemistry present a great challenge for researchers to eradicate tumor cells successfully. This inventiveness of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking has given considerable momentum recently to develop specific antibodies and ADCs to treat cancer cells. It is significantly advantageous to emphasize the endocytosis and intracellular trafficking pathways efficiently and to design potent engineered conjugates and biological entities to boost efficient therapies enormously for cancer treatment. Current studies illustrate endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of ADC, protein, and linker strategies in unloading and also concisely evaluate practically applicable ADCs.

  12. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  13. Data for automated, high-throughput microscopy analysis of intracellular bacterial colonies using spot detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Christina Lundgaard; Login, Frédéric H.; Jensen, Helene Halkjær

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies is useful in strategies directed against bacterial attachment, subsequent cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. An automated, high-throughput microscopy-method was established to quantify the number and size of intracellular bacteria...

  14. Electromicrobiology of Dissimilatory Sulfur Reducing Bacterium Desulfuromonas acetexigens

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Bandar, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrochmical systems (BES) are engineered electrochemical devices that harness hidden chemical energy of the wastewater in to the form of electricity or hydrogen. Unique microbial communities enrich in these systems for oxidation of organic matter as well as transfer of resulted electron to anode, known them as “electricigens” communities. Exploring novel electricigenesis microbial communities in the nature and understanding their electromicrobiology is one the important aspect for BES systems scale up. Herein, we report first time the electricigenesis property of an anaerobic, fresh water sediment, sulfur reducing bacterium Desulfuromona acetexigens. The electrochemical behavior of D. acetexigens biofilms grown on graphite-rod electrodes in batch-fed mode under an applied potential was investigated with traditional electroanalytical tools, and correlate the electron transfer from biofilms to electrode with a model electricigen Geobacter sulfurreducens electrochemical behavior. Research findings suggest that D. acetexigens has the ability to use electrode as electron acceptor in BES systems through establishing the direct contact with anode by expressing the membrane bound redox proteins, but not due to the secretion of soluble redox mediators. Preliminary results revealed that D. acetexigens express three distinct redox proteins in their membranes for turnover of the electrons from biofilm to electrode, and the 4 whole electricigenesis process observed to be unique in the D. acetexigens compared to that of well-studied model organism G. sulfurreducens.

  15. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  16. Intracellular sodium hydrogen exchange inhibition and clinical myocardial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Robert M; Lasley, Robert D; Jessel, Andreas; Karmazyn, Morris

    2003-02-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying ischemia/reperfusion injury remain elusive, evidence supports the etiologic role of intracellular calcium overload and oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species. Activation of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE) is associated with intracellular calcium accumulation. Inhibition of the NHE-1 isoform may attenuate the consequences of this injury. Although there is strong preclinical and early clinical evidence that NHE inhibitors may be cardioprotective, definitive proof of this concept in humans awaits the results of ongoing clinical trials.

  17. Epithelial Cell Gene Expression Induced by Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglu Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available HEp-2 cell monolayers were cocultured with intracellular Staphylococcus aureus, and changes in gene expression were profiled using DNA microarrays. Intracellular S. aureus affected genes involved in cellular stress responses, signal transduction, inflammation, apoptosis, fibrosis, and cholesterol biosynthesis. Transcription of stress response and signal transduction-related genes including atf3, sgk, map2k1, map2k3, arhb, and arhe was increased. In addition, elevated transcription of proinflammatory genes was observed for tnfa, il1b, il6, il8, cxcl1, ccl20, cox2, and pai1. Genes involved in proapoptosis and fibrosis were also affected at transcriptional level by intracellular S. aureus. Notably, intracellular S. aureus induced strong transcriptional down-regulation of several cholesterol biosynthesis genes. These results suggest that epithelial cells respond to intracellular S. aureus by inducing genes affecting immunity and in repairing damage caused by the organism, and are consistent with the possibility that the organism exploits an intracellular environment to subvert host immunity and promote colonization.

  18. Echinicola shivajiensis sp. nov., a novel bacterium of the family "Cyclobacteriaceae" isolated from brackish water pond

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, T.N.R.; Tryambak, B.K.; AnilKumar, P.

    Strain AK12 sup(T), an orange pigmented Gramnegative, rod shaped, non-motile bacterium, was isolated fromamud sample collected froma brackishwater pond at Rampur of West Bengal, India. The strain was positive for oxidase, catalase and phosphatase...

  19. Reclassification of Clostridium proteoclasticum as Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus comb. nov., a butyrate-producing ruminal bacterium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moon, C. D.; Pacheco, D. M.; Kelly, W. J.; Leahy, S. C.; Li, D.; Kopečný, Jan; Attwood, G. T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2008), s. 2041-2045 ISSN 1466-5026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Butyrivibrio * ruminal bacterium Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.222, year: 2008

  20. Septicemia caused by the gram-negative bacterium CDC IV c-2 in an immunocompromised human.

    OpenAIRE

    Dan, M; Berger, S A; Aderka, D; Levo, Y

    1986-01-01

    A 37-year-old man with plasma cell leukemia developed nonfatal septicemia caused by the gram-negative bacterium CDC IV c-2. Recovery followed appropriate treatment with antibiotics. The biochemical features of this organism are reviewed.

  1. Carbohydrate utilization patterns for the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus reveal broad growth substrate preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanfossen, A.L.; Verhaart, M.R.A.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Kelly, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Co-utilization of hexoses and pentoses derived from lignocellulose is an attractive trait in microorganisms considered for consolidated biomass processing to biofuels. This issue was examined for the H2-producing, extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus growing on

  2. TOF-SIMS investigation of Streptomyces coelicolor, a mycelial bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman; Fletcher, John S.; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; Vickerman, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a mycelial microorganism that produces several secondary metabolites, including antibiotics. The physiology of the organism has largely been investigated in liquid cultures due to ease of monitoring different physiological parameters and more homogeneous culture conditions. However, solid cultures reflect the natural physiology of the microorganism better, given that in its natural state it grows in the soil. Imaging mass spectrometry with TOF-SIMS and C 60 + primary ion beams offers a potential route to studying chemical changes at the molecular level, both intracellular and extracellular that can help in understanding the natural physiology of the microorganism. Here, we report the application of the technique for studying the lateral distribution of the chemical species detected in a population, grown in both liquid and solid cultures. The capability of the technique for studying biological systems with minimal system intervention is demonstrated.

  3. TOF-SIMS investigation of Streptomyces coelicolor, a mycelial bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman; Fletcher, John S.; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; Vickerman, John C.

    2008-12-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a mycelial microorganism that produces several secondary metabolites, including antibiotics. The physiology of the organism has largely been investigated in liquid cultures due to ease of monitoring different physiological parameters and more homogeneous culture conditions. However, solid cultures reflect the natural physiology of the microorganism better, given that in its natural state it grows in the soil. Imaging mass spectrometry with TOF-SIMS and C 60+ primary ion beams offers a potential route to studying chemical changes at the molecular level, both intracellular and extracellular that can help in understanding the natural physiology of the microorganism. Here, we report the application of the technique for studying the lateral distribution of the chemical species detected in a population, grown in both liquid and solid cultures. The capability of the technique for studying biological systems with minimal system intervention is demonstrated.

  4. Study of cross-reactivity in serum samples from dogs positive for Leishmania sp., Babesia canis and Ehrlichia canis in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect fluorescent antibody test Estudo da reatividade cruzada em amostras de soro de cães positivos para Leishmania sp., Babesia canis e Ehrlichia canis, pelo ensaio imunoenzimático indireto e pela reação de imunofluorescência indireta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trícia Maria F. de Sousa Oliveira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To verify the presence of cross-reaction among leishmaniosis, ehrlichiosis and babesiosis in serological diagnostics used in human visceral leishmaniasis control programs, serum samples from leishmaniasis endemic and non-endemic areas were collected and tested by Indirect Fluorescent Antibody (IFAT and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. All serum samples from endemic areas were positive for Leishmania sp., by ELISA and IFAT, 51% positive for Babesia canis and 43% for Ehrlichia canis by IFAT. None of the serum samples from non-endemic areas were positive for Leishmania sp., by IFAT, but 67% were positive for B. canis and 78% for E. canis using the same test. When tested by ELISA for Leishmania sp., four samples from non-endemic area were positive. These dogs were then located and no clinical signs, parasites or antibody was detected in new tests for a six month period. Only one of these 4 samples was positive for B. canis by IFAT and ELISA and three for E. canis by IFAT. The results of the work suggest a co-infection in the endemic area and no serological cross-reaction among these parasites by IFAT and ELISA.Para verificar a existência de reação cruzada entre leishmaniose visceral, erliquiose e babesiose, nos testes sorológicos utilizados em programas de controle da leishmaniose visceral humana, amostras de soro canino provenientes de áreas endêmicas e não endêmicas para essa enfermidade, foram testadas pela Reação de Imunofluorescência (RIFI e Ensaio imunoenzimático (ELISA. Todos os soros provenientes de área endêmica foram positivos para Leishmania sp pelo ELISA e RIFI, 51% para Babesia canis e 43% para Ehrlichia canis pela RIFI. Pela RIFI, nenhum dos soros provenientes de área não endêmica foi positivo para Leishmania sp, sendo 67% positivos para B. canis e 78% para E. canis pelo mesmo teste. Quando testados pelo ELISA para Leishmania sp., quatro soros da área não endêmica foram positivos. Os cães foram localizados

  5. Complete genome of Martelella sp. AD-3, a moderately halophilic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Changzheng; Li, Zhijie; Qian, Jiangchao; Shi, Jie; Huang, Ling; Tang, Hongzhi; Chen, Xin; Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Ping; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-05-10

    Martelella sp. strain AD-3, a moderate halophilic bacterium, was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil with high salinity in China. Here, we report the complete genome of strain AD-3, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. An array of genes related to metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halophilic mechanism in this bacterium was identified by the whole genome analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Endohyphal bacterium enhances production of indole-3-acetic acid by a foliar fungal endophyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele T Hoffman

    Full Text Available Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales, but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales. Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions.

  7. Presence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii, -Neospora caninum, -Leishmania spp. and -Ehrlichia canis antibodies in free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus in the northeastern region of the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available O lobo-guará (Chrysocyon brachyurus habita o ecossistema de Cerrado e é considerado o maior canídeo da América do Sul e uma espécie ameaçada de extinção pela "International Union for Conservation of Nature" (IUNC. O objetivo desse estudo foi investigar a presença de anticorpos anti-Toxoplasma gondii, -Neospora caninum, -Leishmania spp. e -Ehrlichia canis em lobos-guará da região nordeste do estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Das 17 amostras de soro testadas por meio da reação de imunofluorescência indireta (RIFI, 88,2% (15/17, 17,6% (3/17 e 52,9% (9/17 apresentaram anticorpos anti-T. gondii, -Leishmania spp. e -E. canis, respectivamente. Todos os animais testados foram soronegativos para N. caninum. Esses resultados indicam a exposição dos lobos-guará dessa região aos agentes pesquisados. A presença de um complexo industrial, agricultura extensiva e fragmentação de habitat na região nordeste do estado de São Paulo, favorece a proximidade desses animais silvestres a ambientes urbanos o que pode contribuir para a transmissão de doenças entre os animais silvestres, domésticos e o homem.

  8. Intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles in macrophages: intracellular uptake, exocytosis, and intercellular transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LQ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Li Qun Jiang,1 Ting Yu Wang,1 Thomas J Webster,2 Hua-Jian Duan,1 Jing Ying Qiu,1 Zi Ming Zhao,1 Xiao Xing Yin,1,* Chun Li Zheng3,* 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Biodegradable nanomaterials have been widely used in numerous medical fields. To further improve such efforts, this study focused on the intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles (CsNPs in macrophages, a primary cell of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS. Such interactions with the MPS determine the nanoparticle retention time in the body and consequently play a significant role in their own clinical safety. In this study, various dye-labeled CsNPs (about 250 nm were prepared, and a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7 was selected as a model macrophage. The results showed two mechanisms of macrophage incorporation of CsNPs, ie, a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway (the primary and phagocytosis. Following internalization, the particles partly dissociated in the cells, indicating cellular digestion of the nanoparticles. It was proved that, after intracellular uptake, a large proportion of CsNPs were exocytosed within 24 h; this excretion induced a decrease in fluorescence intensity in cells by 69%, with the remaining particles possessing difficulty being cleared. Exocytosis could be inhibited by both wortmannin and vacuolin-1, indicating that CsNP uptake was mediated by lysosomal and multivesicular body pathways, and after exocytosis, the reuptake of CsNPs by neighboring cells was verified by further experiments. This study, thus, elucidated the fate of CsNPs in macrophages as well as identified cellular disposition

  9. Coxiella burnetii transcriptional analysis reveals serendipity clusters of regulation in intracellular bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Leroy

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of the zoonotic disease Q fever, is mainly transmitted to humans through an aerosol route. A spore-like form allows C. burnetii to resist different environmental conditions. Because of this, analysis of the survival strategies used by this bacterium to adapt to new environmental conditions is critical for our understanding of C. burnetii pathogenicity. Here, we report the early transcriptional response of C. burnetii under temperature stresses. Our data show that C. burnetii exhibited minor changes in gene regulation under short exposure to heat or cold shock. While small differences were observed, C. burnetii seemed to respond similarly to cold and heat shock. The expression profiles obtained using microarrays produced in-house were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Under temperature stresses, 190 genes were differentially expressed in at least one condition, with a fold change of up to 4. Globally, the differentially expressed genes in C. burnetii were associated with bacterial division, (pppGpp synthesis, wall and membrane biogenesis and, especially, lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan synthesis. These findings could be associated with growth arrest and witnessed transformation of the bacteria to a spore-like form. Unexpectedly, clusters of neighboring genes were differentially expressed. These clusters do not belong to operons or genetic networks; they have no evident associated functions and are not under the control of the same promoters. We also found undescribed but comparable clusters of regulation in previously reported transcriptomic analyses of intracellular bacteria, including Rickettsia sp. and Listeria monocytogenes. The transcriptomic patterns of C. burnetii observed under temperature stresses permits the recognition of unpredicted clusters of regulation for which the trigger mechanism remains unidentified but which may be the result of a new mechanism of epigenetic regulation.

  10. Relevance of intracellular polarity to accuracy of eukaryotic chemotaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo; Nagamatsu, Akihiro; Akuzawa, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic chemotaxis is usually mediated by intracellular signals that tend to localize at the front or back of the cell. Such intracellular polarities frequently require no extracellular guidance cues, indicating that spontaneous polarization occurs in the signal network. Spontaneous polarization activity is considered relevant to the persistent motions in random cell migrations and chemotaxis. In this study, we propose a theoretical model that connects spontaneous intracellular polarity and motile ability in a chemoattractant solution. We demonstrate that the intracellular polarity can enhance the accuracy of chemotaxis. Chemotactic accuracy should also depend on chemoattractant concentration through the concentration-dependent correlation time in the polarity direction. Both the polarity correlation time and the chemotactic accuracy depend on the degree of responsiveness to the chemical gradient. We show that optimally accurate chemotaxis occurs at an intermediate responsiveness of intracellular polarity. Experimentally, we find that the persistence time of randomly migrating Dictyostelium cells depends on the chemoattractant concentration, as predicted by our theory. At the optimum responsiveness, this ameboid cell can enhance its chemotactic accuracy tenfold. (paper)

  11. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca 2+ on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery

  12. Intracellular transport of fat-soluble vitamins A and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Nozomu; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Vitamins are compounds that are essential for the normal growth, reproduction and functioning of the human body. Of the 13 known vitamins, vitamins A, D, E and K are lipophilic compounds and are therefore called fat-soluble vitamins. Because of their lipophilicity, fat-soluble vitamins are solubilized and transported by intracellular carrier proteins to exert their actions and to be metabolized properly. Vitamin A and its derivatives, collectively called retinoids, are solubilized by intracellular retinoid-binding proteins such as cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) and cellular retinal-binding protein (CRALBP). These proteins act as chaperones that regulate the metabolism, signaling and transport of retinoids. CRALBP-mediated intracellular retinoid transport is essential for vision in human. α-Tocopherol, the main form of vitamin E found in the body, is transported by α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) in hepatic cells. Defects of α-TTP cause vitamin E deficiency and neurological disorders in humans. Recently, it has been shown that the interaction of α-TTP with phosphoinositides plays a critical role in the intracellular transport of α-tocopherol and is associated with familial vitamin E deficiency. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms and biological significance of the intracellular transport of vitamins A and E. © 2014 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Surveillance for Intracellular Antibody by Cytosolic Fc Receptor TRIM21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. McEwan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available TRIM21 has emerged as an atypical Fc receptor that is broadly conserved and widely expressed in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Viruses that traffic surface-bound antibodies into the cell during infection recruit TRIM21 via a high affinity interaction between Fc and TRIM21 PRYSPRY domain. Following binding of intracellular antibody, TRIM21 acts as both antiviral effector and sensor for innate immune signalling. These activities serve to reduce viral replication by orders of magnitude in vitro and contribute to host survival during in vivo infection. Neutralization occurs rapidly after detection and requires the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The microbial targets of this arm of intracellular immunity are still being identified: TRIM21 activity has been reported following infection by several non-enveloped viruses and intracellular bacteria. These findings extend the sphere of influence of antibodies to the intracellular domain and have broad implications for immunity. TRIM21 has been implicated in the chronic auto-immune condition systemic lupus erythematosus and is itself an auto-antigen in Sjögren’s syndrome. This review summarises our current understanding of TRIM21’s role as a cytosolic Fc receptor and briefly discusses pathological circumstances where intracellular antibodies have been described, or are hypothesized to occur, and may benefit from further investigations of the role of TRIM21.

  14. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A., E-mail: David.Jans@monash.edu

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  15. Intracellular renin disrupts chemical communication between heart cells. Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmor eDe Mello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; 1 under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell-to-cell through gap junctions; 2 the intracellular dialysis of renin (100nM disrupts chemical communication-an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100nM; 3 enalaprilat (10-9M administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; 4 aliskiren (10-8M inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication;5 the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; 6 the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed;7 the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis, causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  16. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  17. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beijing K. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies.

  18. Simple Recovery of Intracellular Gold Nanoparticles from Peanut Seedling Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, D; Mehta, Urmil J; Ahmad, Absar

    2015-02-01

    Fabrication of inorganic nanomaterials via a biological route witnesses the formation either extracellularly, intracellulary or both. Whereas extracellular formation of these nanomaterials is cherished owing to their easy and economical extraction and purification processes; the intracellular formation of nanomaterials, due to the lack of a proper recovery protocol has always been dreaded, as the extraction processes used so far were tedious, costly, time consuming and often resulting in very low recovery. The aim of the present study was to overcome the problems related with the extraction and recovery of intracellularly synthesized inorganic nanoparticles, and to devise a method to increasing the output, the shape, size, composition and dispersal of nanoparticles is not altered. Water proved to be much better system as it provided well dispersed, stable gold nanoparticles and higher recovery. This is the first report, where intracellular nanoparticles have been recovered using a very cost-effective and eco-friendly approach.

  19. A Genetic System for the Thermophilic Acetogenic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter kivui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basen, Mirko; Geiger, Irina; Henke, Laura; Müller, Volker

    2018-02-01

    Thermoanaerobacter kivui is one of the very few thermophilic acetogenic microorganisms. It grows optimally at 66°C on sugars but also lithotrophically with H 2 + CO 2 or with CO, producing acetate as the major product. While a genome-derived model of acetogenesis has been developed, only a few physiological or biochemical experiments regarding the function of important enzymes in carbon and energy metabolism have been carried out. To address this issue, we developed a method for targeted markerless gene deletions and for integration of genes into the genome of T. kivui The strain naturally took up plasmid DNA in the exponential growth phase, with a transformation frequency of up to 3.9 × 10 -6 A nonreplicating plasmid and selection with 5-fluoroorotate was used to delete the gene encoding the orotate phosphoribosyltransferase ( pyrE ), resulting in a Δ pyrE uracil-auxotrophic strain, TKV002. Reintroduction of pyrE on a plasmid or insertion of pyrE into different loci within the genome restored growth without uracil. We subsequently studied fructose metabolism in T. kivui The gene fruK (TKV_c23150) encoding 1-phosphofructosekinase (1-PFK) was deleted, using pyrE as a selective marker via two single homologous recombination events. The resulting Δ fruK strain, TKV003, did not grow on fructose; however, growth on glucose (or on mannose) was unaffected. The combination of pyrE as a selective marker and the natural competence of the strain for DNA uptake will be the basis for future studies on CO 2 reduction and energy conservation and their regulation in this thermophilic acetogenic bacterium. IMPORTANCE Acetogenic bacteria are currently the focus of research toward biotechnological applications due to their potential for de novo synthesis of carbon compounds such as acetate, butyrate, or ethanol from H 2 + CO 2 or from synthesis gas. Based on available genome sequences and on biochemical experiments, acetogens differ in their energy metabolism. Thus, there is an

  20. Symbiosome-like intracellular colonization of cereals and other crop plants by nitrogen-fixing bacteria for reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocking, Edward C; Stone, Philip J; Davey, Michael R

    2005-09-01

    It has been forecast that the challenge of meeting increased food demand and protecting environmental quality will be won or lost in maize, rice and wheat cropping systems, and that the problem of environmental nitrogen enrichment is most likely to be solved by substituting synthetic nitrogen fertilizers by the creation of cereal crops that are able to fix nitrogen symbiotically as legumes do. In legumes, rhizobia present intracellularly in membrane-bound vesicular compartments in the cytoplasm of nodule cells fix nitrogen endosymbiotically. Within these symbiosomes, membrane-bound vesicular compartments, rhizobia are supplied with energy derived from plant photosynthates and in return supply the plant with biologically fixed nitrogen, usually as ammonia. This minimizes or eliminates the need for inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. Recently we have demonstrated, using novel inoculation conditions with very low numbers of bacteria, that cells of root meristems of maize, rice, wheat and other major non-legume crops, such as oilseed rape and tomato, can be intracellularly colonized by the non-rhizobial, non-nodulating, nitrogen fixing bacterium,Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus that naturally occurs in sugarcane.G. diazotrophicus expressing nitrogen fixing (nifH) genes is present in symbiosome-like compartments in the cytoplasm of cells of the root meristems of the target cereals and non-legume crop species, somewhat similar to the intracellular symbiosome colonization of legume nodule cells by rhizobia. To obtain an indication of the likelihood of adequate growth and yield, of maize for example, with reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers, we are currently determining the extent to which nitrogen fixation, as assessed using various methods, is correlated with the extent of systemic intracellular colonization byG. diazotrophicus, with minimal or zero inputs.

  1. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    of the bacterium. In situ analyses of Listeria monocytogenes single cells were performed during exposure to different concentrations of the disinfectant Incimaxx DES to study a possible population subdivision. Bacterial survival was quantified with plate counting and disinfection stress at the single-cell level...... by measuring intracellular pH (pHi) over time by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy. pHi values were initially 7 to 7.5 and decreased in both attached and planktonic L. monocytogenes cells during exposure to sublethal and lethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES. The response of the bacterial population...... was homogenous; hence, subpopulations were not detected. However, pregrowth with NaCl protected the planktonic bacterial cells during disinfection with Incimaxx (0.0015%) since pHi was higher (6 to 6.5) for the bacterial population pregrown with NaCl than for cells grown without NaCl (pHi 5 to 5.5) (P

  2. Size-Controlled Production of Gold Bionanoparticles Using the Extremely Acidophilic Fe(III-Reducing Bacterium, Acidocella aromatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Nurul Rizki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of gold-bearing “urban mine” resources, such as waste printed circuit boards (PCBs, is attracting an increasing interest. Some of the gold leaching techniques utilize acidic lixiviants and in order to eventually target such acidic leachates, the utility of the acidophilic Fe(III-reducing heterotrophic bacterium, Acidocella (Ac. aromatica PFBC was evaluated for production of Au(0 bionanoparticles (bio-AuNPs. Au(III ions (as AuCl4−, initially 10 mg/L, were readily adsorbed onto the slightly-positively charged Ac. aromatica cell surface and transported into cytoplasm to successfully form intracellular bio-AuNPs in a simple one-step microbiological reaction. Generally, increasing the initial concentration of formate as e-donor corresponded to faster Au(III bioreduction and a greater number of Au(0 nucleation sites with less crystal growth within 40–60 h: i.e., use of 1, 5, 10, or 20 mM formate led to production of bio-AuNPs of 48, 24, 13, or 12 nm in mean particle size with 2.3, 17, 62, and 97 particles/cell, respectively. Addition of Cu2+ as an enzymatic inhibitor significantly decreased the number of Au(0 nucleation sites but enhanced crystal growth of individual particles. As a result, the manipulation of the e-donor concentration combined with an enzyme inhibitor enabled the 3-grade size-control of bio-AuNPs (nearly within a normal distribution at 48, 26 or 13 nm by use of 1 mM formate, 20 mM formate (+Cu2+ or 10 mM formate, respectively, from highly acidic, dilute Au(III solutions.

  3. Rare Freshwater Ciliate Paramecium chlorelligerum Kahl, 1935 and Its Macronuclear Symbiotic Bacterium “Candidatus Holospora parva”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Natalia; Migunova, Alexandra; Petroni, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliated protists often form symbioses with many diverse microorganisms. In particular, symbiotic associations between ciliates and green algae, as well as between ciliates and intracellular bacteria, are rather wide-spread in nature. In this study, we describe the complex symbiotic system between a very rare ciliate, Paramecium chlorelligerum, unicellular algae inhabiting its cytoplasm, and novel bacteria colonizing the host macronucleus. Paramecium chlorelligerum, previously found only twice in Germany, was retrieved from a novel location in vicinity of St. Petersburg in Russia. Species identification was based on both classical morphological methods and analysis of the small subunit rDNA. Numerous algae occupying the cytoplasm of this ciliate were identified with ultrastructural and molecular methods as representatives of the Meyerella genus, which before was not considered among symbiotic algae. In the same locality at least fifteen other species of “green” ciliates were found, thus it is indeed a biodiversity hot-spot for such protists. A novel species of bacterial symbionts living in the macronucleus of Paramecium chlorelligerum cells was morphologically and ultrastructurally investigated in detail with the description of its life cycle and infection capabilities. The new endosymbiont was molecularly characterized following the full-cycle rRNA approach. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the novel bacterium is a member of Holospora genus branching basally but sharing all characteristics of the genus except inducing connecting piece formation during the infected host nucleus division. We propose the name “Candidatus Holospora parva” for this newly described species. The described complex system raises new questions on how these microorganisms evolve and interact in symbiosis. PMID:27992463

  4. Tethering factors as organizers of intracellular vesicular traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I-Mei; Hughson, Frederick M

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking entails the budding, transport, tethering, and fusion of transport vesicles and other membrane carriers. Here we review recent progress toward a mechanistic understanding of vesicle tethering. The known tethering factors are large complexes important for one or more intracellular trafficking pathways and are capable of interacting directly with many of the other principal components of the cellular trafficking machinery. Our review emphasizes recent developments in the in vitro reconstitution of vesicle tethering and the structural characterization of multisubunit tethering factors. The combination of these and other approaches has led to exciting progress toward understanding how these essential nanomachines work.

  5. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  6. Antibacterial Property of a Coral-Associated Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea Against Shrimp Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi (In Vitro Study)

    OpenAIRE

    OCKY KARNA RADJASA; TORBEN MARTENS; HANS-PETER GROSSART; AGUS SABDONO; MEINHARD SIMON; TONNY BACHTIAR

    2005-01-01

    A coral-associated bacterium was successfully screened for secondary metabolites production based on PCR amplification of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene and was identified as closely related to Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea based on its 16S rDNA. The bacterium was found to inhibit the growth of shrimp pathogenic bacterium tested, Vibrio harveyi. To characterize the inhibiting metabolite, a 279 bp long DNA fragment was obtained and the deduced amino acid sequence showed conserved s...

  7. The epithelial cell cytoskeleton and intracellular trafficking. I. Shiga toxin B-subunit system: retrograde transport, intracellular vectorization, and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Ludger

    2002-07-01

    Many intracellular transport routes are still little explored. This is particularly true for retrograde transport between the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. Shiga toxin B subunit has become a powerful tool to study this pathway, and recent advances on the molecular mechanisms of transport in the retrograde route and on its physiological function(s) are summarized. Furthermore, it is discussed how the study of retrograde transport of Shiga toxin B subunit allows one to design new methods for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic compounds.

  8. Predicting Structure and Function for Novel Proteins of an Extremophilic Iron Oxidizing Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, K.; Zemla, A.; Banfield, J.; Thelen, M.

    2007-12-01

    provide details for a working hypothesis of electron flow within the biofilm's major bacterium. Nearly 7% of the novel proteins contain tetratrico peptide repeat (TPR) modules, a protein-protein interaction domain that participates in signal transduction and a wide variety of other cellular functions. Like many biofilms, the various organisms in this community use unknown mechanisms to communicate, relying upon each other for survival. Especially interesting is evidence that most of these novel TPR proteins are located in the extracellular or membrane fractions, suggesting their role in intracellular communication. (1) Ram et al, 2005, Science 308:1915-20, "Community Proteomics of a Natural Microbial Biofilm" (2) Zemla et al, 2005, Nucleic Acids Res 33 (Web Server issue):W111-5, "AS2TS system for protein structure modeling and analysis" This work was funded by the DOE Genomics: GTL Program and was performed under the auspices of the DOE by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  9. Monitoring intracellular oxidative events using dynamic spectral unmixing microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing interest in using live-cell imaging to monitor not just individual intracellular endpoints, but to investigate the interplay between multiple molecular events as they unfold in real time within the cell. A major impediment to simultaneous acquisition of multip...

  10. FLIPR assays of intracellular calcium in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes sensitive to changes in intracellular calcium have become increasingly popular in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug discovery for several reasons. First of all, the assays using the dyes are easy to perform and are of low cost compared to other assays. Second, most non...

  11. Intracellular localization of Na + /H + antiporter from Malus zumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we examined the intracellular localization of the product of Na+/H+ antiporter gene (MzNHX1) cloned from Malus zumi. Analysis using yeast cells expressing a fusion protein of MzNHX1 and green fluorescent protein confirmed the localization of MzNHX1 on the tonoplast.

  12. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of p...

  13. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna Guldvang

    2016-01-01

    -clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence...

  14. The interferon response to intracellular DNA: why so many receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterholzner, Leonie

    2013-11-01

    The detection of intracellular DNA has emerged to be a key event in the innate immune response to viruses and intracellular bacteria, and during conditions of sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. One of the consequences of the detection of DNA as a 'stranger' and a 'danger' signal is the production of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Much work has been dedicated to the elucidation of the signalling cascades that activate this DNA-induced gene expression programme. However, while many proteins have been proposed to act as sensors for intracellular DNA in recent years, none has been met with universal acceptance, and a theory linking all the recent observations is, as yet, lacking. This review presents the evidence for the various interferon-inducing DNA receptors proposed to date, and examines the hypotheses that might explain why so many different receptors appear to be involved in the innate immune recognition of intracellular DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Galectin-3 guides intracellular trafficking of some human serotransferrin glycoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Carl Michael; Bengtson, Per; Cucak, Helena

    2013-01-01

    these transferrin glycoforms differently after preloading with exogenously added galectin-3. In all, this study provides the first evidence of a functional role for transferrin glycans, in intracellular trafficking after uptake. Moreover, the galectin-3 bound glycoform increased in cancer, suggesting...

  16. Dihydroceramide biology - Structure-specific metabolism and intracellular localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; NikolovaKarakashian, M; Klappe, K; Alexander, C; Merrill, AH

    1997-01-01

    This study utilized fluorescent analogs to characterize the intracellular transport and metabolism of dihydroceramide (DN-Cer), an intermediate in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, When 6-[N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl) amino]hexanoyl-DH-Cer (C-6-NBD-DH-Cer) was incubated with HT29, NRK, BHK,

  17. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTRACELLULAR IONS TO Kv CHANNEL VOLTAGE SENSOR DYNAMICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eGoodchild

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage sensing domains of Kv channels control ionic conductance through coupling of the movement of charged residues in the S4 segment to conformational changes at the cytoplasmic region of the pore domain, that allow K+ ions to flow. Conformational transitions within the voltage sensing domain caused by changes in the applied voltage across the membrane field are coupled to the conducting pore region and the gating of ionic conductance. However, several other factors not directly linked to the voltage dependent movement of charged residues within the voltage sensor impact the dynamics of the voltage sensor, such as inactivation, ionic conductance, intracellular ion identity and block of the channel by intracellular ligands. The effect of intracellular ions on voltage sensor dynamics is of importance in the interpretation of gating current measurements and the physiology of pore/voltage sensor coupling. There is a significant amount of variability in the reported kinetics of voltage sensor deactivation kinetics of Kv channels attributed to different mechanisms such as open state stabilization, immobilization and relaxation processes of the voltage sensor. Here we separate these factors and focus on the causal role that intracellular ions can play in allosterically modulating the dynamics of Kv voltage sensor deactivation kinetics. These considerations are of critical importance in understanding the molecular determinants of the complete channel gating cycle from activation to deactivation.

  18. Biomineralization Patterns of Intracellular Carbonatogenesis in Cyanobacteria: Molecular Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of intracellular carbonatogenesis in several cyanobacteria species has challenged the traditional view that this process was extracellular and not controlled. However, a detailed analysis of the size distribution, chemical composition and 3-D-arrangement of carbonates in these cyanobacteria is lacking. Here, we characterized these features in Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora C7 and Candidatus Synechococcus calcipolaris G9 by conventional transmission electron microscopy, tomography, ultramicrotomy, and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM. Both Ca. G. lithophora C7 and Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 formed numerous polyphosphate granules adjacent or engulfing Ca-carbonate inclusions when grown in phosphate-rich solutions. Ca-carbonates were scattered within Ca. G. lithophora C7 cells under these conditions, but sometimes arranged in one or several chains. In contrast, Ca-carbonates formed at cell septa in Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 and were segregated equally between daughter cells after cell division, arranging as distorted disks at cell poles. The size distribution of carbonates evolved from a positively to a negatively skewed distribution as particles grew. Conventional ultramicrotomy did not preserve Ca-carbonates explaining partly why intracellular calcification has been overlooked in the past. All these new observations allow discussing with unprecedented insight some nucleation and growth processes occurring in intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria with a particular emphasis on the possible involvement of intracellular compartments and cytoskeleton.

  19. Antibody- and TRIM21-dependent intracellular restriction of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakebrandt, Nikolas; Lentes, Sabine; Neumann, Heinz; James, Leo C; Neumann-Staubitz, Petra

    2014-11-01

    TRIM21 ('tripartite motif-containing protein 21', Ro52) is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic Fc receptor, which has a potent role in protective immunity against nonenveloped viruses. TRIM21 mediates intracellular neutralisation of antibody-coated viruses, a process called ADIN (antibody-dependent intracellular neutralisation). Our results reveal a similar mechanism to fight bacterial infections. TRIM21 is recruited to the intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica in epithelial cells early in infection. TRIM21 does not bind directly to S. enterica, but to antibodies opsonising it. Most importantly, bacterial restriction is dependent on TRIM21 as well as on the opsonisation state of the bacteria. Finally, Salmonella and TRIM21 colocalise with the autophagosomal marker LC3, and intracellular defence is enhanced in starved cells suggesting an involvement of the autophagocytic pathway. Our data extend the protective role of TRIM21 from viruses to bacteria and thereby strengthening the general role of ADIN in cellular immunity. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cytoplasmic tail of coronavirus spike protein has intracellular

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/042/02/0231-0244. Keywords. Coronavirus spike protein trafficking; cytoplasmic tail signal; endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi intermediate complex; lysosome. Abstract. Intracellular trafficking and localization studies of spike protein from SARS and OC43 showed that SARS spikeprotein is ...

  1. Facilitating Intracellular Drug Delivery by Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertink, BHA

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to investigate the combination of ultrasound and microbubbles (USMB) for intracellular delivery of (model) drugs in vitro. We have focused on clinically approved drugs, i.e. cisplatin, and microbubbles, i.e. SonoVue™, to facilitate clinical translation. In addition, model

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Mun Su [University of Florida, Gainesville; Moritz, Brelan E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Patel, Milind [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ou, Mark [University of Florida, Gainesville; Harbrucker, Roberta [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  4. Moritella viscosa, a pathogenic bacterium affecting the fillet quality in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2011-01-01

    Moritella viscosa is a bacterium belonging to the family Moritellaceae and was formerly known as Vibrio viscosus. The name ‘viscosa’ originates from the slimy nature of the bacterium. M. viscosa is considered to be the main causative agent of the phenomenon ‘winter ulcer’ or ‘cold-water ulcer......’ which affects various fish species in seawater during cold periods (Lunder et al. 1995). The bacterium is mainly a problem for farmed salmonid species, such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), but has also been isolated from other fish species, including Atlantic...... market price because of a quality downgrade caused by textural changes in the fillet....

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  6. Studies on the pathogenic bacterium of ulcer disease in Epinephelus awoara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the cause of the acute mortality of cage-cultured Epinephelus awoara in the Tong'an Bay of Xiamen, China during the summer of 2002. Predominant bacteria strain TS-628 was isolated from the diseased grouper. The virulence test confirmed that TS-628 was the pathogenic bacterium. Biochemical characteristics of the isolates were determined using the automatic bacterial identification system and standard tube tests. To further confirm the identification, a 1 121 bp 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate was amplified by PCR, which had been deposited into Genbank (accession number: AY747308). According to the biochemical characteristics and by comparing the 16S rRNA gene homology of the isolate, the pathogenic bacterium was identified as Vibrio harveyi. Drug sensitivity tests showed that this pathogenic bacterium was sensitive to 16 antibacterials, especially to chloramphenicol and actinospectacin, but completely resistant to antibacterials likes vancomycin, penicillin, lincomycin, and so on.

  7. Halomonas maura is a physiologically versatile bacterium of both ecological and biotechnological interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Inmaculada; del Moral, Ana; Martínez-Checa, Fernando; Arco, Yolanda; Arias, Soledad; Quesada, Emilia

    2006-01-01

    Halomonas maura is a bacterium of great metabolic versatility. We summarise in this work some of the properties that make it a very interesting microorganism both from an ecological and biotechnological point of view. It plays an active role in the nitrogen cycle, is capable of anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrate and has recently been identified as a diazotrophic bacterium. Of equal interest is mauran, the exopolysaccharide produced by H. maura, which contributes to the formation of biofilms and thus affords the bacterium advantages in the colonisation of its saline niches. Mauran is highly viscous, shows thixotropic and pseudoplastic behaviour, has the capacity to capture heavy metals and exerts a certain immunomodulator effect in medicine. All these attributes have prompted us to make further investigations into its molecular characteristics. To date we have described 15 open reading frames (ORF's) related to exopolysaccharide production, nitrogen fixation and nitrate reductase activity among others.

  8. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution. PMID:27708772

  9. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  10. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  11. Microsporidia are natural intracellular parasites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troemel, Emily R; Félix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barrière, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-12-09

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes.

  12. Vaccination with an Attenuated Mutant of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Induces Pathogen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Immunity and Protection from Tick-Transmitted Wild-Type Challenge in the Canine Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi L McGill

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen and the causative agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Transmitted by the Amblyomma americanum tick, E. chaffeensis also causes disease in several other vertebrate species including white-tailed deer and dogs. We have recently described the generation of an attenuated mutant strain of E. chaffeensis, with a mutation in the Ech_0660 gene, which is able to confer protection from secondary, intravenous-administered, wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in dogs. Here, we extend our previous results, demonstrating that vaccination with the Ech_0660 mutant protects dogs from physiologic, tick-transmitted, secondary challenge with wild-type E. chaffeensis; and describing, for the first time, the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by Ech_0660 mutant vaccination and wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in the canine host. Both vaccination and infection induced a rise in E. chaffeensis-specific antibody titers and a significant Th1 response in peripheral blood as measured by E. chaffeensis antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell proliferation and IFNγ production. Further, we describe for the first time significant IL-17 production by peripheral blood leukocytes from both Ech_0660 mutant vaccinated animals and control animals infected with wild-type E. chaffeensis, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and Th17 cells in the immune response to rickettsial pathogens. Our results are a critical first step towards defining the role of the immune system in vaccine-induced protection from E. chaffeensis infection in an incidental host; and confirm the potential of the attenuated mutant clone, Ech_0660, to be used as a vaccine candidate for protection against tick-transmitted E. chaffeensis infection.

  13. Description of a bacterium associated with redmouth disease of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.J.; Rucker, R.R.; Ewing, W.H.

    1966-01-01

    A description was given of a gram-negative, peritrichously flagellated, fermentative bacterium that was isolated on numerous occasions from kidney tissues of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) afflicted with redmouth disease. Although the bacteria apparently were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it was impossible to determine their taxonomic position within the family with certainty. Hence it was recommended that their taxonomic position remain sub judice for the present. As a temporary designation RM bacterium was used. Redmouth disease was transmitted from infected to normal fish through the medium of water.

  14. From Genome to Function: Systematic Analysis of the Soil Bacterium Bacillus Subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Samuel G.; Wipat, Anil

    2001-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a sporulating Gram-positive bacterium that lives primarily in the soil and associated water sources. Whilst this bacterium has been studied extensively in the laboratory, relatively few studies have been undertaken to study its activity in natural environments. The publication of the B. subtilis genome sequence and subsequent systematic functional analysis programme have provided an opportunity to develop tools for analysing the role and expression of Bacillus genes in situ. In this paper we discuss analytical approaches that are being developed to relate genes to function in environments such as the rhizosphere. PMID:18628943

  15. Protective roles of bacterioruberin and intracellular KCl in the resistance of Halobacterium salinarium against DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahmohammadi, H.R.; Asgarani, E.; Terato, Hiroaki; Saito, Takeshi; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Gekko, Kunihiko; Yamamoto, Osamu; Ide, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Halobacterium salinarium, a member of the extremely halophilic archaebacteria, contains a C 50 -carotenoid namely bacterioruberin. We have previously reported the high resistance of this organism against the lethal actions of DNA-damaging agents including ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light (UV). In this study, we have examined whether bacterioruberin and the highly concentrated salts in this bacterium play protective roles against the lethal actions of ionizing radiation, UV, hydrogen peroxide, and mitomycin-C (MMC). The colourless mutant of H. salinarium deficient in bacterioruberin was more sensitive than the red-pigmented wild-type to all tested DNA-damaging agents except MMC. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of H. salinarium chromosomal DNA at various concentrations of KCl (0-3.5 M) were similar to that of B-DNA, indicating that no conformational changes occurred as a result of high salt concentrations. However, DNA strand-breaks induced by ionizing radiation were significantly reduced by the presence of either bacterioruberin or concentrated KCl, presumably due to scavenging of free radicals. These results suggest that bacterioruberin and intracellular KCl of H. salinarium protect this organism against the lethal effects of oxidative DNA-damaging agents. (author)

  16. EtpE Binding to DNase X Induces Ehrlichial Entry via CD147 and hnRNP-K Recruitment, Followed by Mobilization of N-WASP and Actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Kumar, Dipu; Lin, Mingqun; Xiong, Qingming; Webber, Mathew James; Kural, Comert; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2015-11-03

    obligate intracellular bacterium, causes a blood-borne disease called human monocytic ehrlichiosis, one of the most prevalent life-threatening emerging tick-transmitted infectious diseases in the United States. The survival of Ehrlichia bacteria, and hence, their ability to cause disease, depends on their specific mode of entry into eukaryotic host cells. Understanding the mechanism by which E. chaffeensis enters cells will create new opportunities for developing effective therapies to prevent bacterial entry and disease in humans. Our findings reveal a novel cellular signaling pathway triggered by an ehrlichial surface protein called EtpE to induce its infectious entry. The results are also important from the viewpoint of human cell physiology because three EtpE-interacting human proteins, DNase X, CD147, and hnRNP-K, are hitherto unknown partners that drive the uptake of small particles, including bacteria, into human cells. Copyright © 2015 Mohan Kumar et al.

  17. Enhanced intracellular delivery and antibacterial efficacy of enrofloxacin-loaded docosanoic acid solid lipid nanoparticles against intracellular Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuyu; Yang, Fei; Tao, Yanfei; Chen, Dongmei; Qu, Wei; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Pan, Yuanhu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-01-23

    Enrofloxacin-loaded docosanoic acid solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with different physicochemical properties were developed to enhance activity against intracellular Salmonella. Their cellular uptake, intracellular elimination and antibacterial activity were studied in RAW 264.7 cells. During the experimental period, SLN-encapsulated enrofloxacin accumulated in the cells approximately 27.06-37.71 times more efficiently than free drugs at the same extracellular concentration. After incubation for 0.5 h, the intracellular enrofloxacin was enhanced from 0.336 to 1.147 μg/mg of protein as the sizes of nanoparticles were increased from 150 to 605 nm, and from 0.960 to 1.147 μg/mg of protein when the charge was improved from -8.1 to -24.9 mv. The cellular uptake was more significantly influenced by the size than it was by the charge, and was not affected by whether the charge was positive or negative. The elimination of optimal SLN-encapsulated enrofloxacin from the cells was significantly slower than that of free enrofloxacin after removing extracellular drug. The inhibition effect against intracellular Salmonella CVCC541 of 0.24 and 0.06 μg/mL encapsulated enrofloxacin was stronger than 0.6 μg/mL free drug after all of the incubation periods and at 48 h, respectively. Docosanoic acid SLNs are thus considered as a promising carrier for intracellular bacterial treatment.

  18. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327, a Dairy Bacterium with Anti-Inflammatory Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Hammani, Amal; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2014-07-17

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327 is a dairy bacterium with anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which appears to contain no less than 215 insertion sequence (IS) elements, an exceptionally high number regarding the small genome size of the strain. Copyright © 2014 El Kafsi et al.

  19. High-level intracellular expression of heterologous proteins in Brevibacillus choshinensis SP3 under the control of a xylose inducible promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Urzo Nunzia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In past years research has focused on the development of alternative Gram positive bacterial expression systems to produce industrially relevant proteins. Brevibacillus choshinensis is an easy to handle non-sporulating bacterium, lacking extracellular proteases, that has been already shown to provide a high level of recombinant protein expression. One major drawback, limiting the applicability of the Brevibacillus expression system, is the absence of expression vectors based on inducible promoters. Here we used the PxylA inducible promoter, commonly employed in other Bacillae expression systems, in Brevibacillus. Results Using GFP, α-amylase and TcdA-GT as model proteins, high level of intracellular protein expression (up to 250 mg/L for the GFP was achieved in Brevibacillus, using the pHis1522 vector carrying the B. megaterium xylose-inducible promoter (PxylA. The GFP expression yields were more than 25 fold higher than those reported for B. megaterium carrying the same vector. All the tested proteins show significant increment in their expression levels (2-10 folds than those obtained using the available plasmids based on the P2 constitutive promoter. Conclusion Combining the components of two different commercially available Gram positive expression systems, such as Brevibacillus (from Takara Bio and B. megaterium (from Mobitec, we demonstrate that vectors based on the B. megaterium PxylA xylose inducible promoter can be successfully used to induce high level of intracellular expression of heterologous proteins in Brevibacillus.

  20. Regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking by intracellular amphetamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlig, Kristopher M; Lute, Brandon J; Wei, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    -induced cell surface DAT redistribution may result in long-lasting changes in DA homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which AMPH induces trafficking is not clear. Because AMPH is a substrate, we do not know whether extracellular AMPH stimulates trafficking through its interaction with DAT and subsequent...... alteration in DAT function, thereby triggering intracellular signaling or whether AMPH must be transported and then act intracellularly. In agreement with our previous studies, extracellular AMPH caused cytosolic redistribution of the wild-type human DAT (WT-hDAT). However, AMPH did not induce cytosolic...... redistribution in an uptake-impaired hDAT (Y335A-hDAT) that still binds AMPH. The divalent cation zinc (Zn(2+)) inhibits WT-hDAT activity, but it restores Y335A-hDAT uptake. Coadministration of Zn(2+) and AMPH consistently reduced WT-hDAT trafficking but stimulated cytosolic redistribution of Y335A...

  1. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells......, however, remains difficult or impossible due to their small size and/or sensitivity to manipulation. Here, we report on a method that allows precise measurements in basically any cell type over all ranges of pressure. It is based on the compression of nanoliter and picoliter volumes of oil entrapped...... in the tip of microcapillaries, which we call pico gauges. The production of pico gauges can be accomplished with standard laboratory equipment, and measurements are comparably easy to conduct. Example pressure measurements are performed on cells that are difficult or impossible to measure with other methods....

  2. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... and insulin signalling transduction remain elusive. We believe that one of the reasons is that the role of intracellular compartmentalization as a regulator of metabolic pathways and signalling transduction has been rather ignored. This paper briefly reviews the literature to discuss the role of intracellular...... compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss...

  3. Intracellular Chemistry: Integrating Molecular Inorganic Catalysts with Living Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Anh H; Bose, Sohini; Do, Loi H

    2018-03-23

    This concept article focuses on the rapid growth of intracellular chemistry dedicated to the integration of small-molecule metal catalysts with living cells and organisms. Although biological systems contain a plethora of biomolecules that can deactivate inorganic species, researchers have shown that small-molecule metal catalysts could be engineered to operate in heterogeneous aqueous environments. Synthetic intracellular reactions have recently been reported for olefin hydrogenation, hydrolysis/oxidative cleavage, azide-alkyne cycloaddition, allylcarbamate cleavage, C-C bond cross coupling, and transfer hydrogenation. Other promising targets for new biocompatible reaction discovery will also be discussed, with a special emphasis on how such innovations could lead to the development of novel technologies and chemical tools. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel butyrate-producing bacterium from the mouse intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kläring, K.; Hanske, L.; Bui, T.P.N.; Charrier, C.; Blaut, M.; Haller, D.; Plugge, C.M.; Clavel, T.

    2013-01-01

    Whilst creating a bacterial collection of strains from the mouse intestine, we isolated a Gram-negative, spore-forming, non-motile and strictly anaerobic rod-shaped bacterium from the caecal content of a TNFdeltaARE mouse. The isolate, referred to as strain SRB-521-5-IT, was originally cultured on a

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens Strain 2873, a Novel Anode-Respiring Bacterium

    KAUST Repository

    Katuri, Krishna

    2017-03-03

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens strain 2873, which was originally isolated from digester sludge from a sewage treatment plant in Germany. This bacterium is capable of anode respiration with high electrochemical activity in microbial electrochemical systems. The draft genome contains 3,376 predicted protein-coding genes and putative multiheme c-type cytochromes.

  6. Design of semi industrial radium separator by a new bacterium MGF-48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafourian, H.; Emami, M.R.; Farazmand, A.

    1998-01-01

    Following of a research work which has been recently published in AEOI scientific Bulletin no. 14, a semi industrial bioreactor has been designed for separation of radium using a new bacterium MGF-48. This bioreactor could be utilized for a high rate separation of radium in semi industrial scale. (author)

  7. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermaerobacter litoralis sp. nov., a strictly aerobic and thermophilic bacterium isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanaka, Reiji; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    A novel thermophilic bacterium, strain KW1T, was isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field on the Satsuma Peninsula, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The variably Gram-stained cells were motile rods with flagella, did not form spores and proliferated at 52-78°C (optimum, 70°C), pH 5-8 (optimum, pH 7...

  9. Flavobacterium nitratireducens sp. nov., an amylolytic bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from coastal surface seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nupur; Bhumika, V.; Srinivas, T.N.R.; AnilKumar, P.

    A novel Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile bacterium, designated strain N1 sup(T), was isolated from a marine water sample collected from the sea shore, Bay of Bengal, Visakhapatnam, India. The strain was positive for starch hydrolysis, nitrate...

  10. Marinobacter nitratireducens sp. nov., a halophilic and lipolytic bacterium isolated from coastal surface sea water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhumika, V.; Ravinder, K.; Korpole, S.; Srinivas, T.N.R.; AnilKumar, P.

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile bacterium, designated strain AK21T , was isolated from coastal surface sea water at Visakhapatnam, India. The strain was positive for oxidase, catalase, lipase, L-proline arylamidase...

  11. Aliidiomarina haloalkalitolerans sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from coastal surface seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, T.N.R.; Nupur; AnilKumar, P.

    A novel Gram-negative, rod shaped, motile, non-sporing strictly aerobic bacterium, designated strain AK5 sup(T), was isolated from a sea water sample collected near Visakhapatnam coast, Bay of Bengal, India. Colonies on marine agar were circular, 3...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Advenella kashmirensis Strain W13003, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Decai; Zhou, Lisha; Wu, Liang; An, Wei; Zhao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Advenella kashmirensis strain W13003 is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium isolated from PAH-contaminated marine sediments. Here, we report the 4.8-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide insights into the diversity of A. kashmirensis and the mechanism of PAH degradation in the marine environment. PMID:24482505

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens Strain 2873, a Novel Anode-Respiring Bacterium

    KAUST Repository

    Katuri, Krishna; Albertsen, Mads; Saikaly, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens strain 2873, which was originally isolated from digester sludge from a sewage treatment plant in Germany. This bacterium is capable of anode respiration with high electrochemical activity in microbial electrochemical systems. The draft genome contains 3,376 predicted protein-coding genes and putative multiheme c-type cytochromes.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, a Bacterium Isolated from Wild Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Austin J.; Walters, Amber; Carroll, Courtney; Newell, Peter D.; Chaston, John M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, an anaerobic bacterium isolate from wild Drosophila flies, is reported here. Strain DmW181 possesses genes for sialic acid and mannose metabolism. The assembled genome is 3,201,429?bp, with 3,454 predicted genes.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, a Bacterium Isolated from Wild Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Austin J; Walters, Amber; Carroll, Courtney; Newell, Peter D; Chaston, John M

    2017-07-06

    The draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, an anaerobic bacterium isolate from wild Drosophila flies, is reported here. Strain DmW181 possesses genes for sialic acid and mannose metabolism. The assembled genome is 3,201,429 bp, with 3,454 predicted genes. Copyright © 2017 Hammer et al.

  16. Whole-Genome Sequence of the Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum Strain W4

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Shinji; Hori, Koichi; Maruyama, Fumito; Ren, Shukun; Sugimoto, Saori; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Mori, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takuji; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kurokawa, Ken

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum. The photosynthesis gene cluster comprises two segments?a unique feature among photosynthesis gene clusters of purple bacteria. The genome information will be useful for further analysis of bacterial photosynthesis.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Efficient Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. Strain A9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-liang; Hu, Xiao-min

    2013-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain A9 is an important bioflocculant-producing bacterium, isolated from a soil sample, and is pale pink-pigmented, aerobic, and Gram-positive. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain A9, which is a novel species of Paenibacillus. PMID:23618713

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700, a Halotolerant, Industrially Important Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M. N.; Sharma, A. C.; Pandya, R. V.; Patel, R. P.; Saiyed, Z. M.; Saxena, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700 is a halotolerant, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, pink-pigmented, menaquinone-7-producing bacterium isolated from sediments of a drilling well. The draft genome sequence of the strain, consisting of one chromosome of 4.5 Mb, revealed vital gene clusters involved in vitamin biosynthesis and resistance against various metals and antibiotics. PMID:23105068

  19. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Soil Bacterium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 4. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Soil Bacterium and a Chinese Herb Steal the Show. Pundi N Rangarajan. General Article Volume 21 Issue 4 April 2016 pp 315-326 ...

  20. Exo- and surface proteomes of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a well-known probiotic bacterium extensively studied for its beneficial health effects. Exoproteome (proteins exported into culture medium) and surface proteome (proteins attached to S-layer) of this probiotic were identified by using 2DE followed by MALDI TOF MS...

  1. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of a Novel Yellow Pigment from the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kumar

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment is a major source for many novel natural compounds. A new yellow pigment has been isolated from the marine bacterium P. tunicata and identified as a new member of the tambjamine class of compounds. The structural identification was achieved by a combination of 1D and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry data.

  2. Colwellia agarivorans sp. nov., an agar-digesting marine bacterium isolated from coastal seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, yellowish and agar-digesting marine bacterium, designated strain QM50**T, was isolated from coastal seawater in an aquaculture site near Qingdao, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the novel isolate represented...

  3. Oceanospirillum nioense sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from sediment sample of Palk bay, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.K.; Bhumika, V.; Thomas, M.; AnilKumar, P.; Srinivas, T.N.R.

    A novel Gram-negative, spiral shaped, motile bacterium, designated strain NIO-S6T, was isolated from a sediment sample collected from Offshore Rameswaram, Tamilnadu, India. Strain NIO-S6 sup(T) was found to be positive for oxidase, DNase and lysine...

  4. Genome sequence of the pattern forming Paenibacillus vortex bacterium reveals potential for thriving in complex environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirota-Madi, A.; Olender, T.; Helman, Y.; Ingham, C.; Brainis, I.; Roth, D.; Hagi, E.; Brodsky, L.; Leshkowitz, D.; Galatenko, V.; Nikolaev, V.; Mugasimangalam, R.C.; Bransburg-Zabary, S.; Gutnick, D.L.; Lancet, D.; Ben-Jacob, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The pattern-forming bacterium Paenibacillus vortex is notable for its advanced social behavior, which is reflected in development of colonies with highly intricate architectures. Prior to this study, only two other Paenibacillus species (Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 and Paenibacillus larvae)

  5. Removal of zinc from aqueous solution by metal resistant symbiotic bacterium Mesorhizobium amorphae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xiuli; Mohamad, Osama Abdalla; Xie, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Biosorption of zinc by living biomasses of metal resistant symbiotic bacterium Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 was investigated under optimal conditions at pH 5.0, initial metal concentrations of 100 mg L-1, and a dose of 1.0 g L-1. M. amorphae exhibited an efficient removal of Zn2+ from aqueous...

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense reveals an extensive auxin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Cloots, Lore; Engelen, Kristof; Das, Frederik; Marchal, Kathleen; Vanderleyden, Jos; Spaepen, Stijn

    2011-05-01

    The rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense produces the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) through the indole-3-pyruvate pathway. As we previously demonstrated that transcription of the indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase (ipdC) gene is positively regulated by IAA, produced by A. brasilense itself or added exogenously, we performed a microarray analysis to study the overall effects of IAA on the transcriptome of A. brasilense. The transcriptomes of A. brasilense wild-type and the ipdC knockout mutant, both cultured in the absence and presence of exogenously added IAA, were compared.Interfering with the IAA biosynthesis/homeostasis in A. brasilense through inactivation of the ipdC gene or IAA addition results in much broader transcriptional changes than anticipated. Based on the multitude of changes observed by comparing the different transcriptomes, we can conclude that IAA is a signaling molecule in A. brasilense. It appears that the bacterium, when exposed to IAA, adapts itself to the plant rhizosphere, by changing its arsenal of transport proteins and cell surface proteins. A striking example of adaptation to IAA exposure, as happens in the rhizosphere, is the upregulation of a type VI secretion system (T6SS) in the presence of IAA. The T6SS is described as specifically involved in bacterium-eukaryotic host interactions. Additionally, many transcription factors show an altered regulation as well, indicating that the regulatory machinery of the bacterium is changing.

  7. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well‐documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel‐based NCFM proteomics addressed the so‐called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6–11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D...

  8. Chelation of intracellular calcium blocks insulin action in the adipocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershadsingh, H.A.; Shade, D.L.; Delfert, D.M.; McDonald, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that intracellular Ca 2+ is an essential component of the intracellular mechanism of insulin action in the adipocyte was evaluated. Cells were loaded with the Ca 2+ chelator quin-2, by preincubating them with quin-2 AM, the tetrakis(acetoxymethyl) ester of quin-2. Quin-2 loading inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport without affecting basal activity. The ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake in quin-2-loaded cells could be partially restored by preincubating cells with buffer supplemented with 1.2 mM CaCl 2 and the Ca 2+ ionophore A23187. These conditions had no effect on basal activity and omission of CaCl 2 from the buffer prevented the restoration of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by A23187. Quin-2 loading also inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and the ability of insulin to inhibit cAMP-stimulated lipolysis without affecting their basal activities. Incubation of cells with 100 μM quin-2 or quin-2 AM had no effect on intracellular ATP concentration or the specific binding of 125 I=labeled insulin to adipocytes. These findings suggest that intracellular Ca 2+ is an essential component in the coupling of the insulin-activated receptor complex to cellular physiological/metabolic machinery. Furthermore, differing quin-2 AM dose-response profiles suggest the presence of dual Ca 2+ -dependent pathways in the adipocyte. One involves insulin stimulation of glucose transport and oxidation, whereas the other involves the antilipolytic action of insulin

  9. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...only allow entirely new investigations into the replication of these viruses, but also how this method can be applied to any virus with a known...localization, TurboFISH, hemorrhagic fever virus replication 1. Introduction RNA FISH was developed as a method to visualize cellular RNA by binding a

  10. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  11. Bullous pemphigoid antigen localization suggests an intracellular association with hemidesmosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westgate, G E; Weaver, A C; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    immunofluorescent staining for BPA is linear at the basement membrane zone (BMZ) of skin and many other epithelial tissues. At higher magnification however, we observed a punctate staining pattern for BPA which was regular in appearance and suggested localization of BPA to discrete structures at the BMZ. Subsequent...... intracellularly both in vivo and in vitro. We suggest that BPA is not normally a lamina lucida component, but that it may form part of a linkage between the cytoskeleton and the basement membrane....

  12. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase. When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO, and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells.

  13. Molecular evolution, intracellular organization, and the quinary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, E H

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that at least half of 370 denatured polypeptides from hamster cells and human cells are indistinguishable in terms of isoelectric points and molecular weights. Molecular evolution may have been more conservative for this set of proteins than sequence studies on soluble proteins have implied. This may be a consequence of complexities of intracellular organization and the numerous macromolecular interactions in which most ...

  14. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and heme oxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number...

  15. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  16. Fatty Acid Signaling: The New Function of Intracellular Lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Papackova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, intracellular triacylglycerols (TAG stored in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been considered to be only passive “energy conserves”. Nevertheless, degradation of TAG gives rise to a pleiotropic spectrum of bioactive intermediates, which may function as potent co-factors of transcription factors or enzymes and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular processes. From this point of view, the process of lipolysis not only provides energy-rich equivalents but also acquires a new regulatory function. In this review, we will concentrate on the role that fatty acids liberated from intracellular TAG stores play as signaling molecules. The first part provides an overview of the transcription factors, which are regulated by fatty acids derived from intracellular stores. The second part is devoted to the role of fatty acid signaling in different organs/tissues. The specific contribution of free fatty acids released by particular lipases, hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose triacylglycerol lipase and lysosomal lipase will also be discussed.

  17. Estimating the biophysical properties of neurons with intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jingxin; Rozdeba, Paul J; Morone, Uriel I; Daou, Arij; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a conductance-based neuron model coupled to a model of intracellular calcium uptake and release by the endoplasmic reticulum. The intracellular calcium dynamics occur on a time scale that is orders of magnitude slower than voltage spiking behavior. Coupling these mechanisms sets the stage for the appearance of chaotic dynamics, which we observe within certain ranges of model parameter values. We then explore the question of whether one can, using observed voltage data alone, estimate the states and parameters of the voltage plus calcium (V+Ca) dynamics model. We find the answer is negative. Indeed, we show that voltage plus another observed quantity must be known to allow the estimation to be accurate. We show that observing both the voltage time course V(t) and the intracellular Ca time course will permit accurate estimation, and from the estimated model state, accurate prediction after observations are completed. This sets the stage for how one will be able to use a more detailed model of V+Ca dynamics in neuron activity in the analysis of experimental data on individual neurons as well as functional networks in which the nodes (neurons) have these biophysical properties.

  18. Extracellular and Intracellular Mechanisms Mediating Metastatic Activity of Exogenous Osteopontin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelin, Jami; Lin, Emme C. K.; Hu, Dana D.; Knowles, Susan K.; Do, Kim-Anh; Wang, Xuemei; Sage, E. Helene; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Osteopontin affects several steps of the metastatic cascade. Despite direct correlation with metastasis in experimental systems and in patient studies, the extracellular and intracellular basis for these observations remains unsolved. We used human melanoma and sarcoma cell lines to evaluate the effects of soluble osteopontin on metastasis. METHODS Exogenous osteopontin or negative controls, including a site-directed mutant osteopontin, were used in functional assays in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo designed to test extracellular and intracellular mechanisms involved in experimental metastasis. RESULTS In the extracellular environment, we confirm that soluble osteopontin is required for its pro-metastatic effects; this phenomenon is specific, RGD-dependent, and evident in experimental models of metastasis. In the intracellular environment, osteopontin initially induces rapid Tyr-418 dephosphorylation of c-Src, with decreases in actin stress fibers and increased binding to the vascular endothelium. This heretofore undescribed Tyr dephosphorylation is followed by a tandem c-Src phosphorylation after tumor cell attachment to the metastatic site. CONCLUSION Our results reveal a complex molecular interaction as well as a dual role for osteopontin in metastasis that is dependent on whether tumor cells are in circulation or attached. Such context-dependent functional insights may contribute to anti-metastasis strategies. PMID:19224553

  19. New intracellular activities of matrix metalloproteinases shine in the moonlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin, Parker G; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher M

    2017-11-01

    Adaption of a single protein to perform multiple independent functions facilitates functional plasticity of the proteome allowing a limited number of protein-coding genes to perform a multitude of cellular processes. Multifunctionality is achievable by post-translational modifications and by modulating subcellular localization. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), classically viewed as degraders of the extracellular matrix (ECM) responsible for matrix protein turnover, are more recently recognized as regulators of a range of extracellular bioactive molecules including chemokines, cytokines, and their binders. However, growing evidence has convincingly identified select MMPs in intracellular compartments with unexpected physiological and pathological roles. Intracellular MMPs have both proteolytic and non-proteolytic functions, including signal transduction and transcription factor activity thereby challenging their traditional designation as extracellular proteases. This review highlights current knowledge of subcellular location and activity of these "moonlighting" MMPs. Intracellular roles herald a new era of MMP research, rejuvenating interest in targeting these proteases in therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New recombinant bacterium comprises a heterologous gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and/or an up-regulated native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase, useful for producing ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    dehydrogenase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into a phosphotransacetylase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into an acetate kinase encoding region of the bacterium. It is operably linked to an inducible, a regulated or a constitutive promoter. The up-regulated glycerol......TECHNOLOGY FOCUS - BIOTECHNOLOGY - Preparation (claimed): Producing recombinant bacterium having enhanced ethanol production characteristics when cultivated in growth medium comprising glycerol comprises: (a) transforming a parental bacterium by (i) the insertion of a heterologous gene encoding...... glycerol dehydrogenase; and/or (ii) up-regulating a native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase; and (b) obtaining the recombinant bacterium. Preferred Bacterium: In the recombinant bacterium above, the inserted heterologous gene and/or the up-regulated native gene is encoding a glycerol dehydrogenase...

  1. Enrichment and physiological characterization of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacterium ‘ Candidatus Brocadia sapporoensis’

    KAUST Repository

    Narita, Yuko; Zhang, Lei; Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Ali, Muhammad; Fujii, Takao; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important microbial process in the global nitrogen cycle and wastewater treatment. In this study, we successfully enriched a novel anammox bacterium affiliated with the genus ‘Candidatus Brocadia’ with high purity (>90%) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The enriched bacterium was distantly related to the hitherto characterized ‘Ca. Brocadia fulgida’ and ‘Ca. Brocadia sinica’ with 96% and 93% of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence identity, respectively. The bacterium exhibited the common structural features of anammox bacteria and the production of hydrazine in the presence of hydroxylamine under anoxic conditions. The temperature range of anammox activity was 20 − 45°C with a maximum activity at 37°C. The maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was determined to be 0.0082h−1 at 37°C, corresponding to a doubling time of 3.5 days. The half-saturation constant (KS) for nitrite was 5±2.5μM. The anammox activity was inhibited by nitrite with 11.6mM representing the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) but no significant inhibition was observed in the presence of formate and acetate. The major respiratory quinone was identified to be menaquinone-7 (MK-7). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the anammox bacterium enriched in present study shared nearly half of genes with ‘Ca. Brocadia sinica’ and ‘Ca. Brocadia fulgida’. The bacterium enriched in this study showed all known physiological characteristics of anammox bacteria and can be distinguished from the close relatives by its rRNA gene sequences. Therefore, we proposed the name ‘Ca. Brocadia sapporoensis’ sp. nov.

  2. Isolation, identification, and biocontrol of antagonistic bacterium against Botrytis cinerea after tomato harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Shi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tomato is one of the most important vegetables in the world. Decay after harvest is a major issue in the development of tomato industry. Currently, the most effective method for controlling decay after harvest is storage of tomato at low temperature combined with usage of chemical bactericide; however, long-term usage of chemical bactericide not only causes pathogen resistance but also is harmful for human health and environment. Biocontrol method for the management of disease after tomato harvest has great practical significance. In this study, antagonistic bacterium B-6-1 strain was isolated from the surface of tomato and identified as Enterobacter cowanii based on morphological characteristics and physiological and biochemical features combined with sequence analysis of 16SrDNA and ropB gene and construction of dendrogram. Effects of different concentrations of antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii suspension on antifungal activity after tomato harvest were analyzed by mycelium growth rate method. Results revealed that antifungal activity was also enhanced with increasing concentrations of antagonistic bacterium; inhibitory rates of 1 × 105 colony-forming units (cfu/mL antagonistic bacterial solution on Fusarium verticillioides, Alternaria tenuissima, and Botrytis cinerea were 46.31%, 67.48%, and 75.67%, respectively. By using in vivo inoculation method, it was further confirmed that antagonistic bacterium could effectively inhibit the occurrence of B. cinerae after tomato harvest, biocontrol effect of 1 × 109 cfu/mL zymotic fluid reached up to 95.24%, and antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii has biocontrol potential against B. cinerea after harvest of fruits and vegetables.

  3. Enrichment and physiological characterization of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacterium ‘ Candidatus Brocadia sapporoensis’

    KAUST Repository

    Narita, Yuko

    2017-08-18

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important microbial process in the global nitrogen cycle and wastewater treatment. In this study, we successfully enriched a novel anammox bacterium affiliated with the genus ‘Candidatus Brocadia’ with high purity (>90%) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The enriched bacterium was distantly related to the hitherto characterized ‘Ca. Brocadia fulgida’ and ‘Ca. Brocadia sinica’ with 96% and 93% of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence identity, respectively. The bacterium exhibited the common structural features of anammox bacteria and the production of hydrazine in the presence of hydroxylamine under anoxic conditions. The temperature range of anammox activity was 20 − 45°C with a maximum activity at 37°C. The maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was determined to be 0.0082h−1 at 37°C, corresponding to a doubling time of 3.5 days. The half-saturation constant (KS) for nitrite was 5±2.5μM. The anammox activity was inhibited by nitrite with 11.6mM representing the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) but no significant inhibition was observed in the presence of formate and acetate. The major respiratory quinone was identified to be menaquinone-7 (MK-7). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the anammox bacterium enriched in present study shared nearly half of genes with ‘Ca. Brocadia sinica’ and ‘Ca. Brocadia fulgida’. The bacterium enriched in this study showed all known physiological characteristics of anammox bacteria and can be distinguished from the close relatives by its rRNA gene sequences. Therefore, we proposed the name ‘Ca. Brocadia sapporoensis’ sp. nov.

  4. Draft genome of an Aerophobetes bacterium reveals a facultative lifestyle in deep-sea anaerobic sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Aerophobetes (or CD12) is a recently defined bacterial phylum, of which the metabolic processes and ecological importance remain unclear. In the present study, we obtained the draft genome of an Aerophobetes bacterium TCS1 from saline sediment near the Thuwal cold seep in the Red Sea using a genome binning method. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes of TCS1 and close relatives revealed wide distribution of Aerophobetes in deep-sea sediments. Phylogenetic relationships showed affinity between Aerophobetes TCS1 and some thermophilic bacterial phyla. The genome of TCS1 (at least 1.27 Mbp) contains a full set of genes encoding core metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and pyruvate fermentation to produce acetyl-CoA and acetate. The identification of cross-membrane sugar transporter genes further indicates its potential ability to consume carbohydrates preserved in the sediment under the microbial mat. Aerophobetes bacterium TCS1 therefore probably carried out saccharolytic and fermentative metabolism. The genes responsible for autotrophic synthesis of acetyl-CoA via the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway were also found in the genome. Phylogenetic study of the essential genes for the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway implied relative independence of Aerophobetes bacterium from the known acetogens and methanogens. Compared with genomes of acetogenic bacteria, Aerophobetes bacterium TCS1 genome lacks the genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, sulfur metabolism, signal transduction and cell motility. The metabolic activities of TCS1 might depend on geochemical conditions such as supplies of CO2, hydrogen and sugars, and therefore the TCS1 might be a facultative bacterium in anaerobic saline sediments near cold seeps. © 2016, Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J.B. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  6. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y ATP (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [ 14 C]acetate and [ 14 C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation

  7. The intracellular Scots pine shoot symbiont Methylobacterium extorquens DSM13060 aggregates around the host nucleus and encodes eukaryote-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimäki, Janne J; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Ihantola, Emmi-Leena; Halonen, Outi; Frank, A Carolin

    2015-03-24

    Endophytes are microbes that inhabit plant tissues without any apparent signs of infection, often fundamentally altering plant phenotypes. While endophytes are typically studied in plant roots, where they colonize the apoplast or dead cells, Methylobacterium extorquens strain DSM13060 is a facultatively intracellular symbiont of the meristematic cells of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) shoot tips. The bacterium promotes host growth and development without the production of known plant growth-stimulating factors. Our objective was to examine intracellular colonization by M. extorquens DSM13060 of Scots pine and sequence its genome to identify novel molecular mechanisms potentially involved in intracellular colonization and plant growth promotion. Reporter construct analysis of known growth promotion genes demonstrated that these were only weakly active inside the plant or not expressed at all. We found that bacterial cells accumulate near the nucleus in intact, living pine cells, pointing to host nuclear processes as the target of the symbiont's activity. Genome analysis identified a set of eukaryote-like functions that are common as effectors in intracellular bacterial pathogens, supporting the notion of intracellular bacterial activity. These include ankyrin repeats, transcription factors, and host-defense silencing functions and may be secreted by a recently imported type IV secretion system. Potential factors involved in host growth include three copies of phospholipase A2, an enzyme that is rare in bacteria but implicated in a range of plant cellular processes, and proteins putatively involved in gibberellin biosynthesis. Our results describe a novel endophytic niche and create a foundation for postgenomic studies of a symbiosis with potential applications in forestry and agriculture. All multicellular eukaryotes host communities of essential microbes, but most of these interactions are still poorly understood. In plants, bacterial endophytes are found inside

  8. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  9. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydiales: clonal groupings within the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannekoek, Yvonne; Morelli, Giovanna; Kusecek, Barica; Morré, Servaas A; Ossewaarde, Jacobus M; Langerak, Ankie A; van der Ende, Arie

    2008-02-28

    The obligate intracellular growing bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases like trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Several serovars and genotypes have been identified, but these could not be linked to clinical disease or outcome. The related Chlamydophila pneumoniae, of which no subtypes are recognized, causes respiratory infections worldwide. We developed a multi locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme to understand the population genetic structure and diversity of these species and to evaluate the association between genotype and disease. A collection of 26 strains of C. trachomatis of different serovars and clinical presentation and 18 strains of C. pneumoniae were included in the study. For comparison, sequences of C. abortus, C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis, C. pecorum (Chlamydophila), C. muridarum (Chlamydia) and of Candidatus protochlamydia and Simkania negevensis were also included. Sequences of fragments (400 - 500 base pairs) from seven housekeeping genes (enoA, fumC, gatA, gidA, hemN, hlfX, oppA) were analysed. Analysis of allelic profiles by eBurst revealed three non-overlapping clonal complexes among the C. trachomatis strains, while the C. pneumoniae strains formed a single group. An UPGMA tree produced from the allelic profiles resulted in three groups of sequence types. The LGV strains grouped in a single cluster, while the urogenital strains were distributed over two separated groups, one consisted solely of strains with frequent occurring serovars (E, D and F). The distribution of the different serovars over the three groups was not consistent, suggesting exchange of serovar encoding ompA sequences. In one instance, exchange of fumC sequences between strains of different groups was observed. Cluster analyses of concatenated sequences of the Chlamydophila and Chlamydia species together with those of Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila and Simkania negevensis resulted in a tree identical to that

  10. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydiales: clonal groupings within the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langerak Ankie A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The obligate intracellular growing bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases like trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Several serovars and genotypes have been identified, but these could not be linked to clinical disease or outcome. The related Chlamydophila pneumoniae, of which no subtypes are recognized, causes respiratory infections worldwide. We developed a multi locus sequence typing (MLST scheme to understand the population genetic structure and diversity of these species and to evaluate the association between genotype and disease. Results A collection of 26 strains of C. trachomatis of different serovars and clinical presentation and 18 strains of C. pneumoniae were included in the study. For comparison, sequences of C. abortus, C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis, C. pecorum (Chlamydophila, C. muridarum (Chlamydia and of Candidatus protochlamydia and Simkania negevensis were also included. Sequences of fragments (400 – 500 base pairs from seven housekeeping genes (enoA, fumC, gatA, gidA, hemN, hlfX, oppA were analysed. Analysis of allelic profiles by eBurst revealed three non-overlapping clonal complexes among the C. trachomatis strains, while the C. pneumoniae strains formed a single group. An UPGMA tree produced from the allelic profiles resulted in three groups of sequence types. The LGV strains grouped in a single cluster, while the urogenital strains were distributed over two separated groups, one consisted solely of strains with frequent occurring serovars (E, D and F. The distribution of the different serovars over the three groups was not consistent, suggesting exchange of serovar encoding ompA sequences. In one instance, exchange of fumC sequences between strains of different groups was observed. Cluster analyses of concatenated sequences of the Chlamydophila and Chlamydia species together with those of Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila and Simkania

  11. DMPD: Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18573338 Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. Curr Opin Im...munol. 2008 Aug;20(4):383-8. Epub 2008 Jun 23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular DNA sensors ...in immunity. PubmedID 18573338 Title Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Authors Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. P

  12. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  13. Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma spp. and Leishmania infantum in apparently healthy and CVBD-suspect dogs in Portugal - a national serological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Luís

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs are caused by a wide range of pathogens transmitted to dogs by arthropods including ticks and insects. Many CVBD-agents are of zoonotic concern, with dogs potentially serving as reservoirs and sentinels for human infections. The present study aimed at assessing the seroprevalence of infection with or exposure to Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma spp. and Leishmania infantum in dogs in Portugal. Methods Based on 120 veterinary medical centres from all the regions of mainland and insular Portugal, 557 apparently healthy and 628 CVBD-suspect dogs were sampled. Serum, plasma or whole blood was tested for qualitative detection of D. immitis antigen and antibodies to E. canis, B. burgdorferi s. l., Anaplasma spp. and L. infantum with two commercial in-clinic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Odds ratios (OR were calculated by logistic regression analysis to identify independent risk factors of exposure to the vector-borne agents. Results Total positivity levels to D. immitis, E. canis, B. burgdorferi, Anaplasma spp., L. infantum, one or more agents and mixed agents were 3.6%, 4.1%, 0.2%, 4.5%, 4.3%, 14.0% and 2.0% in the healthy group, and 8.9%, 16.4%, 0.5%, 9.2%, 25.2%, 46.3% and 11.6% in the clinically suspect group, respectively. Non-use of ectoparasiticides was a risk factor for positivity to one or more agents both in the apparently healthy (OR = 2.1 and CVBD-suspect (OR = 1.5 dogs. Seropositivity to L. infantum (OR = 7.6, E. canis (OR = 4.1 and D. immitis (OR = 2.4 were identified as risk factors for the presence of clinical signs compatible with CVBDs. Positivity to mixed agents was not found to be a risk factor for disease. Conclusions Dogs in Portugal are at risk of becoming infected with vector-borne pathogens, some of which are of zoonotic concern. CVBDs should be considered by practitioners and prophylactic measures must be put in

  14. The Evolution of Sterol Biosynthesis in Bacteria: In Situ Fluorescence Localization of Sterols in the Nucleoid Bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budin, M.; Jorgenson, T. L.; Pearson, A.

    2004-12-01

    The biosynthesis of sterols is generally regarded as a eukaryotic process. The first enzymatic step in the production of sterols requires molecular oxygen. Therefore, both the origin of eukaryotes and the evolution of sterol biosynthesis were thought to postdate the rise of oxygen in earth's atmosphere, until Brocks et al. discovered steranes in rocks aged 2.7 Ga (1). Many prokaryotes produce hopanoids, sterol-like compounds that are synthesized from the common precursor squalene without the use of molecular oxygen. However, a few bacterial taxa are also known to produce sterols, suggesting this pathway could precede the rise of oxygen (2, 3). Recently, we discovered the shortest sterol-producing biosynthetic pathway known to date in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus (4). Using genomic searches, we found that Gemmata has the enzymes necessary for synthesis of sterols, and lipid analyses showed that the sterols produced are lanosterol and its isomer parkeol. Gemmata is a member of the Planctomycetes, an unusual group of bacteria, all of the known species of which contain intracellular compartmentalization. Among the Planctomycetes, Gemmata uniquely is the only prokaryote known to contain a double-membrane-bounded nuclear body (5). Since sterols usually are found in eukaryotes, and Gemmata has a eukaryote-like nuclear organelle, we investigated the location of the sterols within Gemmata to postulate whether they play a role in stabilization of the nuclear membrane and control of genomic organization. We used the sterol-specific fluorescent dye Filipin III in conjunction with fluorescent dyes for internal and external cellular membranes in order to determine whether the sterols are located in the nuclear body membrane, external membrane, or both. We found that sterols in Gemmata are concentrated in the internal membrane, implying that they function in maintaining this unusual cellular component. It is notable that Gemmata also produce hopanoids, suggesting that they

  15. Transient fluctuations of intracellular zinc ions in cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Maret, Wolfgang, E-mail: womaret@utmb.edu [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Zinc is essential for cell proliferation, differentiation, and viability. When zinc becomes limited for cultured cells, DNA synthesis ceases and the cell cycle is arrested. The molecular mechanisms of actions of zinc are believed to involve changes in the availability of zinc(II) ions (Zn{sup 2+}). By employing a fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe, FluoZin-3 acetoxymethyl ester, intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations were measured in undifferentiated and in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations are pico- to nanomolar in PC12 cells and are higher in the differentiated than in the undifferentiated cells. When following cellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations for 48 h after the removal of serum, a condition that is known to cause cell cycle arrest, Zn{sup 2+} concentrations decrease after 30 min but, remarkably, increase after 1 h, and then decrease again to about one half of the initial concentration. Cell proliferation, measured by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, decreases after both serum starvation and zinc chelation. Two peaks of Zn{sup 2+} concentrations occur within one cell cycle: one early in the G1 phase and the other in the late G1/S phase. Thus, fluctuations of intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations and established modulation of phosphorylation signaling, via an inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases at commensurately low Zn{sup 2+} concentrations, suggest a role for Zn{sup 2+} in the control of the cell cycle. Interventions targeted at these picomolar Zn{sup 2+} fluctuations may be a way of controlling cell growth in hyperplasia, neoplasia, and diseases associated with aberrant differentiation.

  16. Polymeric gel nanoparticle pH sensors for intracellular measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Sun, Honghao

    2011-01-01

    Precise measurements of pH in cells and intracellular compartments are of importance to both the fundamental understanding of metabolism and to the development of drugs that are released from the endosomes-lysome pathway. We have developed polymer gel nanoparticles as carriers of covalently bound fluorophores for ratiometric measurements of pH. One pH insensitive fluorophore serves as a reference while one or more pH sensitive fluorophores serve to give the desired pH dependence of the output...

  17. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Ebbinghaus, M.; Santen, L.

    2015-09-01

    Cells are the elementary units of living organisms, which are able to carry out many vital functions. These functions rely on active processes on a microscopic scale. Therefore, they are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems, which are driven by continuous energy supply. The tasks that have to be performed in order to maintain the cell alive require transportation of various ingredients, some being small, others being large. Intracellular transport processes are able to induce concentration gradients and to carry objects to specific targets. These processes cannot be carried out only by diffusion, as cells may be crowded, and quite elongated on molecular scales. Therefore active transport has to be organized. The cytoskeleton, which is composed of three types of filaments (microtubules, actin and intermediate filaments), determines the shape of the cell, and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for a special kind of vehicles, namely the cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated. The interest for this type of question was enhanced when it was discovered that intracellular transport breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. Our review includes on the one hand an overview of biological facts, obtained from experiments, and on the other hand a presentation of some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We present some background knowledge on the original and variants of the TASEP (Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process), before turning to more application oriented models. After addressing microtubule based transport in general, with a focus on in vitro experiments, and on cooperative effects in the

  18. Dependence of cerebral arterial contractions on intracellularly stored Ca++.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T; Kassell, N F; Zuccarello, M

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the dependence of the arterial contractions induced by different vasoactive agents upon intracellularly stored calcium in canine versus monkey cerebral arteries. The potency for inducing contractions in Ca++-free media was in the order of 9,11-epithio-11,12-metano-thromboxane A2 (STXA2) greater than prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) much greater than serotonin greater than K+ in canine basilar arteries, and STXA2 greater than PGF2 alpha much greater than serotonin = K+ in monkey basilar arteries.

  19. Oxygen effect and intracellular oxygen content (adaptation hypothesis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmonenko, S P; Ehpshtejn, I M [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Tsentr

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data indicating that a radiomodifying action of hypoxia is dependent on the ''prehistory'' of the irradiated object are considered. This dependence manifests itself in a decreased protective action of acute hypoxia on the hypoxia-adapted objects. To explain this a hypothesis is proposed connecting a degree of cell radiosensitivity modification, determined by the oxygen effect, with the intracellular oxygen content. The latter, in accord with current ideas, is regulated by variations in the diffusion resistance to oxygen shown by the cytoplasmic membranes depending on the energy level of the cell and the degree of its oxygenation.

  20. Oxygen effect and intracellular oxygen content (adaptation hypothesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmonenko, S.P.; Ehpshtejn, I.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data indicating that a radiomodifying action of hypoxia is dependent on the ''prehistory'' of the irradiated object are considered. This dependence manifests itself in a decreased protective action of acute hypoxia on the hypoxia-adapted objects. To explain this a hypothesis is proposed connecting a degree of cell radiosensitivity modification, determined by the oxygen effect, with the intracellular oxygen content. The latter, in accord with current ideas, is regulated by variations in the diffusion resistance to oxygen shown by the cytoplasmic membranes depending on the energy level of the cell and the degree of its oxygenation

  1. Subcellular site and nature of intracellular cadmium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying heavy metal accumulation, toxicity, and tolerance in higher plants are poorly understood. Since subcellular processes are undoubtedly involved in all these phenomena, it is of interest to study the extent, subcellular site and nature of intracellularly accumulated cadmium in higher plants. Whole plants supplied 109 CdCl 2 or 112 CdSO 4 accumulated Cd into roots and aerial tissues. Preparation of protoplasts from aerial tissues followed by subcellular fractionation of the protoplasts to obtain intact vacuoles, chloroplasts and cytosol revealed the presence of Cd in the cytosol but not in vacuoles or chloroplasts. No evidence was obtained for the production of volatile Cd complexes in tobacco

  2. The atherogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis evades circulating phagocytes by adhering to erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows...... the bacterium to adhere to human red blood cells (RBCs) and thereby evade attack by circulating phagocytes. On incubation with normal human serum, the P. gingivalis strain efficiently fixed complement component 3 (C3). Incubation of bacteria with washed whole blood cells suspended in autologous serum resulted...... in a dose- and time-dependent adherence to RBCs. The adherence required functionally intact complement receptor 1 (CR1; also called CD35) on the RBCs and significantly inhibited the uptake of P. gingivalis by neutrophils and B cells within 1 min of incubation (by 64% and 51%, respectively...

  3. Framing in the Spanish press about the health crisis because of the E. coli bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma López Villafranca

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research article analyses  the approach made by press media and other institutional advertising about the E. coli bacterium, most commonly known as cucumber crisis in Spain. While in the rest of Europe this crisis receives the same treatment as A Flu or mad cow disease in this country it is treated as a crisis that affects to the spanish economy and not to the health of the citizen. Economic interests prevail over public health and this is due to official information given. An analysis of contents of the most popular journals in Spain, according to OJD, is made to prove this hypothesis, El Pais, El Mundo and ABC, as well as a study of the main institutional advertising made about E. coli bacterium by official spanish organizations and the media.

  4. Mitigation of membrane biofouling by a quorum quenching bacterium for membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, So-Young; Kim, Han-Shin; Cha, Eunji; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2018-06-01

    In this study, a quorum-quenching (QQ) bacterium named HEMM-1 was isolated at a membrane bioreactor (MBR) plant. HEMM-1 has diplococcal morphology and 99% sequence identity to Enterococcus species. The HEMM-1 cell-free supernatant (CFS) showed higher QQ activities than the CFS of other QQ bacteria, mostly by degrading N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) with short acyl chains. Instrumental analyses revealed that HEMM-1 CFS degraded AHLs via lactonase activity. Under static, flow, and shear conditions, the HEMM-1 CFS was effective in reducing bacterial and activated-sludge biofilms formed on membrane surfaces. In conclusion, the HEMM-1 isolate is a QQ bacterium applicable to the control of biofouling in MBRs via inhibition of biofilm formation on membrane surfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Single-bacterium nanomechanics in biomedicine: unravelling the dynamics of bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, S; Bozec, L; Donos, N; Spratt, D

    2015-01-01

    The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in microbiology has progressed significantly throughout the years since its first application as a high-resolution imaging instrument. Modern AFM setups are capable of characterizing the nanomechanical behaviour of bacterial cells at both the cellular and molecular levels, where elastic properties and adhesion forces of single bacterium cells can be examined under different experimental conditions. Considering that bacterial and biofilm-mediated infections continue to challenge the biomedical field, it is important to understand the biophysical events leading towards bacterial adhesion and colonization on both biological and non-biological substrates. The purpose of this review is to present the latest findings concerning the field of single-bacterium nanomechanics, and discuss future trends and applications of nanoindentation and single-cell force spectroscopy techniques in biomedicine. (topical review)

  6. Five new amicoumacins isolated from a marine-derived Bacterium bacillus subtilis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yongxin; Xu, Ying; Liu, Lingli; Han, Zhuang; Lai, Pok Yui; Guo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xixiang; Lin, Wenhan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Four novel amicoumacins, namely lipoamicoumacins A-D (1-4), and one new bacilosarcin analog (5) were isolated from culture broth of a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis, together with six known amicoumacins. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (2D NNR, IR, CD and MS) analysis and in comparison with data in literature. 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antitrypanosomally Active Sponge-Associated Bacterium Actinokineospora sp. Strain EG49

    KAUST Repository

    Harjes, Janno; Ryu, Tae Woo; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Horn, Hannes; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The marine sponge-associated bacterium Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49 produces the antitrypanosomal angucycline-like compound actinosporin A. The draft genome of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 has a size of 7.5 megabases and a GC content of 72.8% and contains 6,629 protein-coding sequences (CDS). antiSMASH predicted 996 genes residing in 36 secondary metabolite gene clusters.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultured SAR324 Bacterium lautmerah10, Binned from a Red Sea Metagenome

    KAUST Repository

    Haroon, Mohamed; Thompson, Luke R.; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A draft genome of SAR324 bacterium lautmerah10 was assembled from a metagenome of a surface water sample from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The genome is more complete and has a higher G+C content than that of previously sequenced SAR324 representatives. Its genomic information shows a versatile metabolism that confers an advantage to SAR324, which is reflected in its distribution throughout different depths of the marine water column.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antitrypanosomally Active Sponge-Associated Bacterium Actinokineospora sp. Strain EG49

    KAUST Repository

    Harjes, Janno

    2014-03-06

    The marine sponge-associated bacterium Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49 produces the antitrypanosomal angucycline-like compound actinosporin A. The draft genome of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 has a size of 7.5 megabases and a GC content of 72.8% and contains 6,629 protein-coding sequences (CDS). antiSMASH predicted 996 genes residing in 36 secondary metabolite gene clusters.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultured SAR324 Bacterium lautmerah10, Binned from a Red Sea Metagenome

    KAUST Repository

    Haroon, Mohamed

    2016-02-11

    A draft genome of SAR324 bacterium lautmerah10 was assembled from a metagenome of a surface water sample from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The genome is more complete and has a higher G+C content than that of previously sequenced SAR324 representatives. Its genomic information shows a versatile metabolism that confers an advantage to SAR324, which is reflected in its distribution throughout different depths of the marine water column.

  11. Genomic Analysis of Caldithrix abyssi, the Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium of the Novel Bacterial Phylum Calditrichaeota

    OpenAIRE

    Kublanov, Ilya V.; Sigalova, Olga M.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Lebedinsky, Alexander V.; Rinke, Christian; Kovaleva, Olga; Chernyh, Nikolai A.; Ivanova, Natalia; Daum, Chris; Reddy, T.B.K.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Spring, Stefan; G?ker, Markus; Reva, Oleg N.; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L.

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Kublanov, Sigalova, Gavrilov, Lebedinsky, Rinke, Kovaleva, Chernyh, Ivanova, Daum, Reddy, Klenk, Spring, Göker, Reva, Miroshnichenko, Kyrpides, Woyke, Gelfand, Bonch-Osmolovskaya. The genome of Caldithrix abyssi, the first cultivated representative of a phylum-level bacterial lineage, was sequenced within the framework of Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project. The genomic analysis revealed mechanisms allowing this anaerobic bacterium to ferment peptides or to impl...

  12. Permanent draft genome of the malachite-green-tolerant bacterium Rhizobium sp. MGL06.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Runping; Zeng, Runying

    2014-12-01

    Rhizobium sp. MGL06, the first Rhizobium isolate from a marine environment, is a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium with a broader salinity tolerance (range: 0.5% to 9%) than other rhizobia. This study sequences and annotates the draft genome sequence of this strain. Genome sequence information provides a basis for analyzing the malachite green tolerance, broad salinity adaptation, nitrogen fixation properties, and taxonomic classification of the isolate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Five new amicoumacins isolated from a marine-derived Bacterium bacillus subtilis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yongxin

    2012-02-03

    Four novel amicoumacins, namely lipoamicoumacins A-D (1-4), and one new bacilosarcin analog (5) were isolated from culture broth of a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis, together with six known amicoumacins. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (2D NNR, IR, CD and MS) analysis and in comparison with data in literature. 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  14. Alteration of the Canine Small-Intestinal Lactic Acid Bacterium Microbiota by Feeding of Potential Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Manninen, Titta J. K.; Rinkinen, Minna L.; Beasley, Shea S.; Saris, Per E. J.

    2006-01-01

    Five potentially probiotic canine fecal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) strains, Lactobacillus fermentum LAB8, Lactobacillus salivarius LAB9, Weissella confusa LAB10, Lactobacillus rhamnosus LAB11, and Lactobacillus mucosae LAB12, were fed to five permanently fistulated beagles for 7 days. The survival of the strains and their potential effects on the indigenous intestinal LAB microbiota were monitored for 17 days. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) demonstrated that the five fed LAB ...

  15. Comment on "A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate)".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Lei

    2016-08-19

    Yoshida et al (Report, 11 March 2016, p. 1196) reported that the bacterium Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6 can degrade and assimilate poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). However, the authors exaggerated degradation efficiency using a low-crystallinity PET and presented no straightforward experiments to verify depolymerization and assimilation of PET. Thus, the authors' conclusions are rather misleading. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Two New Cholic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Ascidian-Associated Bacterium Hasllibacter halocynthiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hun Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of secondary metabolites in liquid cultures of a recently discovered marine bacterium, Hasllibacter halocynthiae strain KME 002T, led to the isolation of two new cholic acid derivatives. The structures of these compounds were determined to be 3,3,12-trihydroxy-7-ketocholanic acid (1 and 3,3,12-trihydroxy-7-deoxycholanic acid (2 through HRFABMS and NMR data analyses.

  17. Emergence of a New Population of Rathayibacter toxicus: An Ecologically Complex, Geographically Isolated Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Arif, Mohammad; Busot, Grethel Y.; Mann, Rachel; Rodoni, Brendan; Liu, Sanzhen; Stack, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Rathayibacter toxicus is a gram-positive bacterium that infects the floral parts of several Poaceae species in Australia. Bacterial ooze is often produced on the surface of infected plants and bacterial galls are produced in place of seed. R. toxicus is a regulated plant pathogen in the U.S. yet reliable detection and diagnostic tools are lacking. To better understand this geographically-isolated plant pathogen, genetic variation as a function of geographic location, host species, and date of...

  18. A unique virulence factor for proliferation and dwarfism in plants identified from a phytopathogenic bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshi, Ayaka; Oshima, Kenro; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Ishii, Yoshiko; Ozeki, Johji; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Komatsu, Ken; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important themes in agricultural science is the identification of virulence factors involved in plant disease. Here, we show that a single virulence factor, tengu-su inducer (TENGU), induces witches' broom and dwarfism and is a small secreted protein of the plant-pathogenic bacterium, phytoplasma. When tengu was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, these plants showed symptoms of witches' broom and dwarfism, which are typical of phytoplasma infection. Transgenic Arabidop...

  19. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of intact cells of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Ristić, M.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1997-06-01

    The data of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements performed on intact cells of the soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake are compared and discussed. The structural FTIR information obtained is considered together with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) data on the content of metal cations in the bacterial cells. Some methodological aspects concerning preparation of bacterial cell samples for FTIR measurements are also discussed.

  20. The Purine-Utilizing Bacterium Clostridium acidurici 9a: A Genome-Guided Metabolic Reconsideration

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwich, Katrin; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acidurici is an anaerobic, homoacetogenic bacterium, which is able to use purines such as uric acid as sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Together with the two other known purinolytic clostridia C. cylindrosporum and C. purinilyticum, C. acidurici serves as a model organism for investigation of purine fermentation. Here, we present the first complete sequence and analysis of a genome derived from a purinolytic Clostridium. The genome of C. acidurici 9a consists ...

  1. Sexual transmission of a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between conspecific insect vectors during mating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder S Mann

    Full Text Available Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae. The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB, one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4% during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees.

  2. DNA damage response in a radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans: a paradigm shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    Deinococcusradiodurans is best known for its extraordinary resistance to gamma radiation with its D 10 12kGy, and several other DNA damaging agents including desiccation to less than 5% humidity and chemical xenotoxicants. An efficient DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and its ability to protect biomolecules from oxidative damage are a few mechanisms attributed to these phenotypes in this bacterium. Although it regulates its proteome and transcriptome in response to DNA damage for its growth and survival, it lacks LexA mediated classical SOS response mechanism. Since LexA mediated damages response mechanism is highly and perhaps only, characterized DNA damage response processes in prokaryotes, this bacterium keeps us guessing how it responds to extreme doses of DNA damage. Interestingly, this bacterium encodes a large number of eukaryotic type serine threonine/tyrosine protein kinases (eST/YPK), phosphatases and response regulators and roles of eST/YPKs in cellular response to DNA damage and cell cycle regulations are well established in eukaryotes. Here, we characterized an antioxidant and DNA damage inducible eST/YPK (RqkA) and established its role in extraordinary radioresistance and DSB repair in this bacterium. We identified native phosphoprotein substrates for this kinase and demonstrated the involvement of some of these proteins phosphorylation in the regulation of DSB repair and growth under radiation stress. Findings suggesting the possible existence of eST/YPK mediated DNA damage response mechanism as an alternate to classical SOS response in this prokaryote would be discussed. (author)

  3. Crystallographic study of FABP5 as an intracellular endocannabinoid transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanson, Benoît; Wang, Tao; Sun, Jing; Wang, Liqun; Kaczocha, Martin; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale; Li, Huilin

    2014-01-01

    FABP5 was recently found to intracellularly transport endocannabinoid signaling lipids. The structures of FABP5 complexed with two endocannabinoids and an inhibitor were solved. Human FABP5 was found to dimerize via a domain-swapping mechanism. This work will help in the development of inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels. In addition to binding intracellular fatty acids, fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) have recently been reported to also transport the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid derivatives that function as neurotransmitters and mediate a diverse set of physiological and psychological processes. To understand how the endocannabinoids bind to FABPs, the crystal structures of FABP5 in complex with AEA, 2-AG and the inhibitor BMS-309403 were determined. These ligands are shown to interact primarily with the substrate-binding pocket via hydrophobic interactions as well as a common hydrogen bond to the Tyr131 residue. This work advances our understanding of FABP5–endocannabinoid interactions and may be useful for future efforts in the development of small-molecule inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels

  4. Imaging the intracellular degradation of biodegradable polymer nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Barthel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of smart drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles has become of great interest. Drug-loaded nanoparticles can be introduced into the cell interior via endocytotic processes followed by the slow release of the drug due to degradation of the nanoparticle. In this work, poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA was chosen as the biodegradable polymer. Although common degradation of PLLA has been studied in various biological environments, intracellular degradation processes have been examined only to a very limited extent. PLLA nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 120 nm were decorated with magnetite nanocrystals and introduced into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. The release of the magnetite particles from the surface of the PLLA nanoparticles during the intracellular residence was monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM over a period of 14 days. It was demonstrated by the release of the magnetite nanocrystals from the PLLA surface that the PLLA nanoparticles do in fact undergo degradation within the cell. Furthermore, even after 14 days of residence, the PLLA nanoparticles were found in the MSCs. Additionally, the ultrastructural TEM examinations yield insight into the long term intercellular fate of these nanoparticles. From the statistical analysis of ultrastructural details (e.g., number of detached magnetite crystals, and the number of nanoparticles in one endosome, we demonstrate the importance of TEM studies for such applications in addition to fluorescence studies (flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  5. Fluorescent nanosensors for intracellular measurements: synthesis, characterisation, calibration and measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpan Shailesh Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of intracellular acidification is important for understanding fundamental biological pathways as well as developing effective therapeutic strategies. Fluorescent pH nanosensors are an enabling technology for real-time monitoring of intracellular acidification. The physicochemical characteristics of nanosensors can be engineered to target specific cellular compartments and respond to external stimuli. Therefore nanosensors represent a versatile approach for probing biological pathways inside cells. The fundamental components of nanosensors comprise a pH-sensitive fluorophore (signal transducer and a pH-insensitive reference fluorophore (internal standard immobilised in an inert non-toxic matrix. The inert matrix prevents interference of cellular components with the sensing elements as well as minimizing potentially harmful effects of some fluorophores on cell function. Fluorescent nanosensors are synthesised using standard laboratory equipment and are detectable by non-invasive widely accessibly imaging techniques. The outcomes of studies employing this technology are dependent on reliable methodology for performing measurements. In particular special consideration must be given to conditions for sensor calibration, uptake conditions and parameters for image analysis. We describe procedures for: 1 synthesis and characterisation of polyacrylamide and silica based nanosensors 2 nanosensor calibration and 3 performing measurements using fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Modeling nanoparticle uptake and intracellular distribution using stochastic process algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobay, M. P. D., E-mail: maria.pamela.david@physik.uni-muenchen.de; Alberola, A. Piera; Mendoza, E. R.; Raedler, J. O., E-mail: joachim.raedler@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Faculty of Physics, Center for NanoScience (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Computational modeling is increasingly important to help understand the interaction and movement of nanoparticles (NPs) within living cells, and to come to terms with the wealth of data that microscopy imaging yields. A quantitative description of the spatio-temporal distribution of NPs inside cells; however, it is challenging due to the complexity of multiple compartments such as endosomes and nuclei, which themselves are dynamic and can undergo fusion and fission and exchange their content. Here, we show that stochastic pi calculus, a widely-used process algebra, is well suited for mapping surface and intracellular NP interactions and distributions. In stochastic pi calculus, each NP is represented as a process, which can adopt various states such as bound or aggregated, as well as be passed between processes representing location, as a function of predefined stochastic channels. We created a pi calculus model of gold NP uptake and intracellular movement and compared the evolution of surface-bound, cytosolic, endosomal, and nuclear NP densities with electron microscopy data. We demonstrate that the computational approach can be extended to include specific molecular binding and potential interaction with signaling cascades as characteristic for NP-cell interactions in a wide range of applications such as nanotoxicity, viral infection, and drug delivery.

  7. Modeling nanoparticle uptake and intracellular distribution using stochastic process algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobay, M. P. D.; Alberola, A. Piera; Mendoza, E. R.; Rädler, J. O.

    2012-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly important to help understand the interaction and movement of nanoparticles (NPs) within living cells, and to come to terms with the wealth of data that microscopy imaging yields. A quantitative description of the spatio-temporal distribution of NPs inside cells; however, it is challenging due to the complexity of multiple compartments such as endosomes and nuclei, which themselves are dynamic and can undergo fusion and fission and exchange their content. Here, we show that stochastic pi calculus, a widely-used process algebra, is well suited for mapping surface and intracellular NP interactions and distributions. In stochastic pi calculus, each NP is represented as a process, which can adopt various states such as bound or aggregated, as well as be passed between processes representing location, as a function of predefined stochastic channels. We created a pi calculus model of gold NP uptake and intracellular movement and compared the evolution of surface-bound, cytosolic, endosomal, and nuclear NP densities with electron microscopy data. We demonstrate that the computational approach can be extended to include specific molecular binding and potential interaction with signaling cascades as characteristic for NP-cell interactions in a wide range of applications such as nanotoxicity, viral infection, and drug delivery.

  8. Modeling nanoparticle uptake and intracellular distribution using stochastic process algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobay, M. P. D.; Alberola, A. Piera; Mendoza, E. R.; Rädler, J. O.

    2012-03-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly important to help understand the interaction and movement of nanoparticles (NPs) within living cells, and to come to terms with the wealth of data that microscopy imaging yields. A quantitative description of the spatio-temporal distribution of NPs inside cells; however, it is challenging due to the complexity of multiple compartments such as endosomes and nuclei, which themselves are dynamic and can undergo fusion and fission and exchange their content. Here, we show that stochastic pi calculus, a widely-used process algebra, is well suited for mapping surface and intracellular NP interactions and distributions. In stochastic pi calculus, each NP is represented as a process, which can adopt various states such as bound or aggregated, as well as be passed between processes representing location, as a function of predefined stochastic channels. We created a pi calculus model of gold NP uptake and intracellular movement and compared the evolution of surface-bound, cytosolic, endosomal, and nuclear NP densities with electron microscopy data. We demonstrate that the computational approach can be extended to include specific molecular binding and potential interaction with signaling cascades as characteristic for NP-cell interactions in a wide range of applications such as nanotoxicity, viral infection, and drug delivery.

  9. Molecular characterization of a novel intracellular ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dev Churamani

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available ADP-ribosyl cyclases are remarkable enzymes capable of catalyzing multiple reactions including the synthesis of the novel and potent intracellular calcium mobilizing messengers, cyclic ADP-ribose and NAADP. Not all ADP-ribosyl cyclases however have been characterized at the molecular level. Moreover, those that have are located predominately at the outer cell surface and thus away from their cytosolic substrates.Here we report the molecular cloning of a novel expanded family of ADP-ribosyl cyclases from the sea urchin, an extensively used model organism for the study of inositol trisphosphate-independent calcium mobilization. We provide evidence that one of the isoforms (SpARC1 is a soluble protein that is targeted exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen when heterologously expressed. Catalytic activity of the recombinant protein was readily demonstrable in crude cell homogenates, even under conditions where luminal continuity was maintained.Our data reveal a new intracellular location for ADP-ribosyl cyclases and suggest that production of calcium mobilizing messengers may be compartmentalized.

  10. Light irradiation helps magnetotactic bacteria eliminate intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kefeng; Wang, Pingping; Chen, Chuanfang; Chen, Changyou; Li, Lulu; Song, Tao

    2017-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) demonstrate photoresponse. However, little is known about the biological significance of this behaviour. Magnetosomes exhibit peroxidase-like activity and can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). Magnetosomes extracted from the Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 show enhanced peroxidase-like activity under illumination. The present study investigated the effects of light irradiation on nonmagnetic (without magnetosomes) and magnetic (with magnetosomes) AMB-1 cells. Results showed that light irradiation did not affect the growth of nonmagnetic and magnetic cells but significantly increased magnetosome synthesis and reduced intracellular ROS level in magnetic cells. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to analyse the expression level of magnetosome formation-associated genes (mamA, mms6, mms13 and mmsF) and stress-related genes (recA, oxyR, SOD, amb0664 and amb2684). Results showed that light irradiation upregulated the expression of mms6, mms13 and mmsF. Furthermore, light irradiation upregulated the expression of stress-related genes in nonmagnetic cells but downregulated them in magnetic cells. Additionally, magnetic cells exhibited stronger phototactic behaviour than nonmagnetic ones. These results suggested that light irradiation could heighten the ability of MTB to eliminate intracellular ROS and help them adapt to lighted environments. This phenomenon may be related to the enhanced peroxidase-like activity of magnetosomes under light irradiation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  12. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  13. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  14. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin

    2007-01-01

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 ± 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors

  15. Cyanobacteria perceive nitrogen status by sensing intracellular 2-oxoglutarate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro-Pastor, M I; Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    2001-10-12

    The regulatory circuits that control nitrogen metabolism are relatively well known in several bacterial model groups. However, much less is understood about how the nitrogen status of the cell is perceived in vivo. In cyanobacteria, the transcription factor NtcA is required for regulation (activation or repression) of an extensive number of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. In contrast, how NtcA activity is regulated is largely unknown. Assimilation of ammonium by most microorganisms occurs through the sequential action of two enzymes: glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase. Interestingly, regulation of the expression of NtcA-dependent genes in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is altered in mutants with modified levels of GS activity. Two types of mutants were analyzed: glnA null mutants that lack GS type I and gif mutants unable to inactivate GS in the presence of ammonium. Changes in the intracellular pools of 19 different amino acids and the keto acid 2-oxoglutarate were recorded in wild-type and mutant strains under different nitrogen conditions. Our data strongly indicate that the nitrogen status in cyanobacteria is perceived as changes in the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate pool.

  16. Optochemokine Tandem for Light-Control of Intracellular Ca2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Feldbauer

    Full Text Available An optochemokine tandem was developed to control the release of calcium from endosomes into the cytosol by light and to analyze the internalization kinetics of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs by electrophysiology. A previously constructed rhodopsin tandem was re-engineered to combine the light-gated Ca2+-permeable cation channel Channelrhodopsin-2(L132C, CatCh, with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in a functional tandem protein tCXCR4/CatCh. The GPCR was used as a shuttle protein to displace CatCh from the plasma membrane into intracellular areas. As shown by patch-clamp measurements and confocal laser scanning microscopy, heterologously expressed tCXCR4/CatCh was internalized via the endocytic SDF1/CXCR4 signaling pathway. The kinetics of internalization could be followed electrophysiologically via the amplitude of the CatCh signal. The light-induced release of Ca2+ by tandem endosomes into the cytosol via CatCh was visualized using the Ca2+-sensitive dyes rhod2 and rhod2-AM showing an increase of intracellular Ca2+ in response to light.

  17. Horizontal Transmission of Intracellular Insect Symbionts via Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Chrostek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence is accumulating that endosymbionts of phytophagous insects may transmit horizontally via plants. Intracellular symbionts known for manipulating insect reproduction and altering fitness (Rickettsia, Cardinium, Wolbachia, and bacterial parasite of the leafhopper Euscelidius variegatus have been found to travel from infected insects into plants. Other insects, either of the same or different species can acquire the symbiont from the plant through feeding, and in some cases transfer it to their progeny. These reports prompt many questions regarding how intracellular insect symbionts are delivered to plants and how they affect them. Are symbionts passively transported along the insect-plant-insect path, or do they actively participate in the process? How widespread are these interactions? How does symbiont presence influence the plant? And what conditions are required for the new infection to establish in an insect? From an ecological, evolutionary, and applied perspective, this mode of horizontal transmission could have profound implications if occurring frequently enough or if new stable symbiont infections are established. Transmission of symbionts through plants likely represents an underappreciated means of infection, both in terms of symbiont epidemiology and the movement of symbionts to new host species.

  18. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  19. Crystallographic study of FABP5 as an intracellular endocannabinoid transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, Benoît; Wang, Tao [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sun, Jing; Wang, Liqun; Kaczocha, Martin [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Ojima, Iwao [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 1794-3400 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Deutsch, Dale, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Li, Huilin, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    FABP5 was recently found to intracellularly transport endocannabinoid signaling lipids. The structures of FABP5 complexed with two endocannabinoids and an inhibitor were solved. Human FABP5 was found to dimerize via a domain-swapping mechanism. This work will help in the development of inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels. In addition to binding intracellular fatty acids, fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) have recently been reported to also transport the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid derivatives that function as neurotransmitters and mediate a diverse set of physiological and psychological processes. To understand how the endocannabinoids bind to FABPs, the crystal structures of FABP5 in complex with AEA, 2-AG and the inhibitor BMS-309403 were determined. These ligands are shown to interact primarily with the substrate-binding pocket via hydrophobic interactions as well as a common hydrogen bond to the Tyr131 residue. This work advances our understanding of FABP5–endocannabinoid interactions and may be useful for future efforts in the development of small-molecule inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels.

  20. CIRRHOSIS INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN RENAL TISSUE THROUGH INTRACELLULAR OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Cristina Simões da SILVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Renal failure is a frequent and serious complication in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the renal oxidative stress, cell damage and impaired cell function in animal model of cirrhosis. Methods Secondary biliary cirrhosis was induced in rats by ligation of the common bile duct. We measured TBARS, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in kidney as markers of oxidative stress, and activities of the antioxidant enzymes. Relative cell viability was determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay. Annexin V-PE was used with a vital dye, 7-AAD, to distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells and comet assay was used for determined DNA integrity in single cells. Results In bile duct ligation animals there was significant increase in the kidney lipoperoxidation and an increase of the level of intracellular ROS. There was too an increase in the activity of all antioxidant enzymes evaluated in the kidney. The percentage viability was above 90% in the control group and in bile duct ligation was 64.66% and the dominant cell death type was apoptosis. DNA damage was observed in the bile duct ligation. There was a decreased in the mitochondrial membrane potential from 71.40% ± 6.35% to 34.48% ± 11.40% in bile duct ligation. Conclusions These results indicate that intracellular increase of ROS cause damage in the DNA and apoptosis getting worse the renal function in cirrhosis.

  1. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Evans, Anton F; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2016-10-17

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose.

  2. FtsZ from radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is different from its characterized homologues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Kruti P.; Misra, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Polymerization/depolymerization dynamics of FtsZ and its GTPase activity are interdependent and the regulation of these processes determines the growth rate in a bacterium. Deinococcus radiodurans R1 that is best known for its extraordinary radiation resistance and efficient DNA double strand break repair is a comparatively slow growing bacterium and its growth gets arrested in response to gamma radiation. Mechanisms of cell division and its regulation under gamma stressed growth condition would be worth investigating. Genome of this bacterium encodes at least all the known components of divisome. Recombinant FtsZ of D. radiodurans (drFtsZ) preferred Mg 2+ for its GTPase activity. Relatively a very low GTPase activity was observed in presence of Mn 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ while release of inorganic phosphate could not be detected in presence of other divalent ions including Ca 2+ . GTPase activity of drFtsZ was lower than E. coli but higher than Mycobacterium and it required both Mg 2+ and GTP for its polymerization. Its GTPase activity did not increase with increasing concentration of Mg 2+ and correlates with the bundling of protofilaments. Results obtained from transmission electron microscopy and sedimentation analysis supported the reciprocal correlation of polymerization/depolymerization with the levels of GTPase activity. Dynamic light scattering in presence of 5mM or higher concentration of Mg 2+ and Mn 2 showed a characteristic cyclic change in light scattering without addition of extra metal ion or GTP

  3. Antimicrobial polyketide furanoterpenoids from seaweed-associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Thilakan, Bini; Raola, Vamshi Krishna

    2017-10-01

    Brown seaweed Anthophycus longifolius (Turner) Kützing (family Sargassaceae) associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403 was found to be a potent isolate with broad range of antibacterial activity against important perceptive food pathogens Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. This bacterium was positive for polyketide synthetase gene (KC589397), and therefore, was selected to bioprospect specialized metabolites bearing polyketide backbone. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract of the seaweed-associated bacterium segregated four homologous polyketide furanoterpenoids with potential antibacterial activities against clinically important pathogens. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay showed that the referral antibiotics tetracycline and ampicillin were active at 25 μg/mL against the test pathogens, whereas the previously undescribed (4E)-methyl 13-((16-(furan-2-yl) ethyl)-octahydro-7-hydroxy-4-((E)-23-methylbut-21-enyl)-2H-chromen-6-yl)-4-methylpent-4-enoate (compound 1) and methyl 3-(hexahydro-9-((E)-3-methylpent-1-enyl)-4H-furo[3,2-g]isochromen-6-yl) propanoate (compound 3) displayed antibacterial activities against the test pathogens at a lesser concentration (MIC subtilis MTCC 10403 demonstrated to represent a potential source of antimicrobial polyketides for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Aqueous mixed low level wastes (MLLW) containing radionuclides, solvents, and/or heavy metals represent a serious current and future problem for DOE environmental management and cleanup. In order to provide low-cost treatment alternatives under mild conditions for such contained wastes, we have proposed to use the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. This project has focused on developing D. radiodurans strains for dual purpose processes: cometabolic treatment of haloorganics and other solvents and removal of heavy metals from waste streams in an above-ground reactor system. The characteristics of effective treatment strains that must be attained are: (a) high biodegradative and metal binding activity; (b) stable treatment characteristics in the absence of selection and in the presence of physiological stress; (c) survival and activity under harsh chemical conditions, including radiation. The result of this project has been a suite of strains with high biodegradative capabilities that are candidates for pilot stage treatment systems. In addition, we have determined how to create conditions to precipitate heavy metals on the surface of the bacterium, as the first step towards creating dual-use treatment strains for contained mixed wastes of importance to the DOE. Finally, we have analyzed stress response in this bacterium, to create the foundation for developing treatment processes that maximize degradation while optimizing survival under high stress conditions

  5. Purification and Characterization of Haloalkaline, Organic Solvent Stable Xylanase from Newly Isolated Halophilic Bacterium-OKH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghvi, Gaurav; Jivrajani, Mehul; Patel, Nirav; Jivrajani, Heta; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Patel, Shivani

    2014-01-01

    A novel, alkali-tolerant halophilic bacterium-OKH with an ability to produce extracellular halophilic, alkali-tolerant, organic solvent stable, and moderately thermostable xylanase was isolated from salt salterns of Mithapur region, Gujarat, India. Identification of the bacterium was done based upon biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. Maximum xylanase production was achieved at pH 9.0 and 37°C temperature in the medium containing 15% NaCl and 1% (w/v) corn cobs. Sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw also induce xylanase production when used as carbon source. The enzyme was active over a range of 0–25% sodium chloride examined in culture broth. The optimum xylanase activity was observed at 5% sodium chloride. Xylanase was purified with 25.81%-fold purification and 17.1% yield. Kinetic properties such as Km and Vmax were 4.2 mg/mL and 0.31 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The enzyme was stable at pH 6.0 and 50°C with 60% activity after 8 hours of incubation. Enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+ but strongly inhibited by heavy metals such as Hg2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Xylanase was found to be stable in organic solvents like glutaraldehyde and isopropanol. The purified enzyme hydrolysed lignocellulosic substrates. Xylanase, purified from the halophilic bacterium-OKH, has potential biotechnological applications. PMID:27350996

  6. The effect of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacterium on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Moradi-Haghighi, M.; Zarrini, G.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of manganese oxidizing bacterium (MOB), namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. This bacterium was isolated from sewage treatment plants and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The electrochemical techniques such as open circuit potentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization were used to measure the corrosion rate and observe the corrosion mechanism. Also, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies were applied to surface analysis. This study revealed the strong adhesion of the biofilm on the metal surface in the presence of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. that enhanced the corrosion of carbon steel. X-ray diffraction patterns identified a high content of MnO 2 deposition within these biofilms. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel. - Highlights: ► A new type of manganese oxidizing bacteria, namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. was indicated. ► This bacterium can create a biofilm on the part of metal surface and affect localized corrosion. ► In the presence of biofilm, the diffusion of oxygen vacancies and manganese ions has occurred.

  7. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotrophicus Pal5, a wild type strain that showed a stronger mucous phenotype on solid medium containing 28 mM phosphate than on solid medium containing 7 mM phosphate. A G. diazotrophicus Pal5 levansucrase disruptant showed only a weak mucous phenotype regardless of the phosphate concentration, indicating that the mucous phenotype observed on 28 mM phosphate medium was caused by levan. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of a high concentration of phosphate on exopolysaccharide production. PMID:24717418

  8. Chitin Degradation Proteins Produced by the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi Growing on Different Forms of Chitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitil, A L; Chadhain, S; Moore, J A; Kirchman, D L

    1997-02-01

    Relatively little is known about the number, diversity, and function of chitinases produced by bacteria, even though chitin is one of the most abundant polymers in nature. Because of the importance of chitin, especially in marine environments, we examined chitin-degrading proteins in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. This bacterium had a higher growth rate and more chitinase activity when grown on (beta)-chitin (isolated from squid pen) than on (alpha)-chitin (isolated from snow crab), probably because of the more open structure of (beta)-chitin. When exposed to different types of chitin, V. harveyi excreted several chitin-degrading proteins into the culture media. Some chitinases were present with all of the tested chitins, while others were unique to a particular chitin. We cloned and identified six separate chitinase genes from V. harveyi. These chitinases appear to be unique based on DNA restriction patterns, immunological data, and enzyme activity. This marine bacterium and probably others appear to synthesize separate chitinases for efficient utilization of different forms of chitin and chitin by-products.

  9. The effect of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacterium on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H., E-mail: habib_ashassi@yahoo.com [Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Physical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi-Haghighi, M. [Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Physical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarrini, G. [Microbiology laboratory, Biology Department, Science Faculty, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    The present study investigated the role of manganese oxidizing bacterium (MOB), namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. This bacterium was isolated from sewage treatment plants and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The electrochemical techniques such as open circuit potentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization were used to measure the corrosion rate and observe the corrosion mechanism. Also, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies were applied to surface analysis. This study revealed the strong adhesion of the biofilm on the metal surface in the presence of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. that enhanced the corrosion of carbon steel. X-ray diffraction patterns identified a high content of MnO{sub 2} deposition within these biofilms. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new type of manganese oxidizing bacteria, namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. was indicated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This bacterium can create a biofilm on the part of metal surface and affect localized corrosion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the presence of biofilm, the diffusion of oxygen vacancies and manganese ions has occurred.

  10. Genomic Analysis of a Marine Bacterium: Bioinformatics for Comparison, Evaluation, and Interpretation of DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan N. Rekadwad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of five highly related strains of an unidentified marine bacterium were analyzed through their short genome sequences (AM260709–AM260713. Genome-to-Genome Distance (GGDC showed high similarity to Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (X67024. The generated unique Quick Response (QR codes indicated no identity to other microbial species or gene sequences. Chaos Game Representation (CGR showed the number of bases concentrated in the area. Guanine residues were highest in number followed by cytosine. Frequency of Chaos Game Representation (FCGR indicated that CC and GG blocks have higher frequency in the sequence from the evaluated marine bacterium strains. Maximum GC content for the marine bacterium strains ranged 53-54%. The use of QR codes, CGR, FCGR, and GC dataset helped in identifying and interpreting short genome sequences from specific isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the bootstrap test (1000 replicates using MEGA6 software. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was carried out using EMBL-EBI MUSCLE program. Thus, generated genomic data are of great assistance for hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics which combined with phenotypic features represents a basic procedure for a polyphasic approach on unambiguous bacterial isolate taxonomic classification.

  11. Photoproduction of hydrogen by a non-sulphur bacterium isolated from root zones of water fern Azolla pinnata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Pandey, K.D. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (IN). Centre of Advanced Study in Botany)

    1990-01-01

    A photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. BHU strain 1 was isolated from the root zone of water fern Azolla pinnata. The bacterium was found to produce hydrogen with potato starch under phototrophic conditions. The immobilized bacterial cells showed sustained hydrogen production with a more than 4-fold difference over free cell suspensions. The data have been discussed in the light of possible utilization of relatively cheaper raw materials by non-sulphur bacteria to evolve hydrogen. (author).

  12. Thermophilic Anaerobic Degradation of Butyrate by a Butyrate-Utilizing Bacterium in Coculture and Triculture with Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    We studied syntrophic butyrate degradation in thermophilic mixed cultures containing a butyrate-degrading bacterium isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum or in triculture with M. thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacterium. Butyrate was β-oxidized to acetate with protons as the electron acceptors. Acetate was used concurrently with its production in the triculture. We found a higher butyrate degradation rate in th...

  13. Intracellular Trafficking Modulation by Ginsenoside Rg3 Inhibits Brucella abortus Uptake and Intracellular Survival within RAW 264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-03-28

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, has various pharmacological and biological activities; however, its effects against Brucella infection are still unclear. Herein, the inhibitory effects of ginsenoside Rg3 against intracellular parasitic Brucella infection were evaluated through bacterial infection, adherence assays, and LAMP-1 colocalization, as well as immunoblotting and FACS for detecting MAPK signaling proteins and F-actin polymerization, respectively. The internalization, intracellular growth, and adherence of Brucella abortus in Rg3-treated RAW 264.7 cells were significantly decreased compared with the Rg3-untreated control. Furthermore, an apparent reduction of F-actin content and intensity of F-actin fluorescence in Rg3-treated cells was observed compared with B. abortus -infected cells without treatment by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. In addition, treating cells with Rg3 decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling proteins such as ERK 1/2 and p38 compared with untreated cells. Moreover, the colocalization of B. abortus -containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was markedly increased in Rg3-treated cells. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits B. abortus infection in mammalian cells and can be used as an alternative approach in the treatment of brucellosis.

  14. Understanding the interaction between an obligate hyperparasitic bacterium, Pasteuria penetrans and its obligate plant-parasitic nematode host, Meloidogyne spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Keith G

    2009-01-01

    Pasteuria penetrans is an endospore-forming bacterium, which is a hyperparasite of root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne spp. that are economically important pests of a wide range of crops. The life cycle of the bacterium and nematode are described with emphasis on the bacterium's potential as a biocontrol agent. Two aspects that currently prohibit the commercial development of the bacterium as a biocontrol agent are the inability to culture it outside its host and its host specificity. Vegetative growth of the bacterium is possible in vitro; however, getting the vegetative stages of the bacterium to enter sporogenesis has been problematic. Insights from genomic survey sequences regarding the role of cation concentration and the phosphorylation of Spo0F have proved useful in inducing vegetative bacteria to sporulate. Similarly, genomic data have also proved useful in understanding the attachment of endospores to the cuticle of infective nematode juveniles, and a Velcro-like model of spore attachment is proposed that involves collagen-like fibres on the surface of the endospore interacting with mucins on the nematode cuticle. Ecological studies of the interactions between Daphnia and Pasteuria ramosa are examined and similarities are drawn between the co-evolution of virulence in the Daphnia system and that of plant-parasitic nematodes.

  15. Mechanism of H. pylori intracellular entry: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eLiu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of H. pylori reside on gastric epithelial cell surfaces and in the overlying mucus, but a small fraction of H. pylori enter host epithelial and immune cells. To explore the role of the nudA invasin in host cell entry, a ΔnudA deletion derivative of strain J99 was constructed and transformants were verified by PCR and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. AGS cells were inoculated with either wild type (WT strain J99 or its ΔnudA mutant to determine the fraction of bacteria that were bound to the cells and inside these cells using the gentamicin protection assay. We observed no significant difference between either the density of H. pylori bound to AGS cell membranes or the density of intracellular H. pylori. To further explore this finding, separate chambers of each culture were fixed in glutaraldehyde for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and immunogold TEM. This addition to the classical gentamicin assay demonstrated that there were significantly more intracellular, and fewer membrane-bound, H. pylori in WT-infected AGS cells than in ΔnudA allele infected cells. Thus, the sum of intracellular and membrane-bound H. pylori was similar in the two groups. Since no other similar TEM study has been performed, it is at present unknown whether our observations can be reproduced by others Taken together however, our observations suggest that the classical gentamicin protection assay is not sufficiently sensitive to analyze H. pylori cell entry and that the addition of TEM to the test demonstrate that nudA plays a role in H. pylori entry into AGS cells in vitro. In addition, deletion of the invasin gene appears to limit H. pylori to the AGS cell surface, where it may be partly protected against gentamicin. In contrast, this specific environment may render H. pylori more vulnerable to host defense and therapeutic intervention, and less prone to trigger normal immune, carcinogenic, and other developmental response pathways.

  16. Intracellular Crosslinking of Filoviral Nucleoproteins with Xintrabodies Restricts Viral Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamarand Lee Darling

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses assemble large macromolecular repeat structures that become part of the infectious particles or virions. Ribonucleocapsids (RNCs of negative strand RNA viruses are a prime example where repetition of nucleoprotein (NP along the genome creates a core polymeric helical scaffold that accommodates other nucleocapsid proteins including viral polymerase. The RNCs are transported through the cytosol for packaging into virions through association with viral matrix proteins at cell membranes. We hypothesized that RNC would be ideal targets for crosslinkers engineered to promote aberrant protein–protein interactions, thereby blocking their orderly transport and packaging. Previously, we had generated single-domain antibodies (sdAbs against Filoviruses that have all targeted highly conserved C-terminal regions of NP known to be repetitively exposed along the length of the RNCs of Marburgvirus (MARV and Ebolavirus (EBOV. Our crosslinker design consisted of dimeric sdAb expressed intracellularly, which we call Xintrabodies (X- for crosslinking. Electron microscopy of purified NP polymers incubated with purified sdAb constructs showed NP aggregation occurred in a genus-specific manner with dimeric and not monomeric sdAb. A virus-like particle (VLP assay was used for initial evaluation where we found that dimeric sdAb inhibited NP incorporation into VP40-based VLPs whereas monomeric sdAb did not. Inhibition of NP packaging was genus specific. Confocal microscopy revealed dimeric sdAb was diffuse when expressed alone but focused on pools of NP when the two were coexpressed, while monomeric sdAb showed ambivalent partition. Infection of stable Vero cell lines expressing dimeric sdAb specific for either MARV or EBOV NP resulted in smaller plaques and reduced progeny of cognate virus relative to wild-type Vero cells. Though the impact was marginal at later time-points, the collective data suggest that viral replication can be reduced by crosslinking

  17. LDL Receptors as Gateways for Intracellular Porphyrin Uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novick, S.; Laster, B.; Quastel, M.

    2004-01-01

    Boronated compounds are currently being studied for possible use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). We found that one of these agents, BOPP (tetrakis-carborane-carboxylate, esters of 2,4-bis (a,b- dihydroxyethyl) deuteroporphyrin IX), could also be labeled with indium (In-BOPP) and, therefore, could also be used potentially to transport high Z atoms into tumor cell DNA for AET (Auger Electron Therapy). In order to assess the uptake of these agents into cells, the role of the LDL receptor in the intracellular accumulation of BOPP and In-BOPP was investigated. Pre-incubation of V-79 Chinese hamster cells in medium containing delipidized fetal bovine serum (FBS) markedly increased the subsequent uptake of intracellular boron transported by both BOPP and In-BOPP when compared with cells that had been pre-incubated with medium containing 10% normal FBS (lipidized). The increased uptake was characterized by elevated levels of receptor, and greater affinity was shown for both BOPP and In-BOPP, although less marked with the latter. Positive cooperativity was demonstrated by sigmoid saturation curves, Scatchard analysis and Hill plots. Increasing the amount of LDL in the incubation medium had a relatively small effect on the total accumulation of either indium or boron atoms inside the cell. Furthermore, chemical acetylation of LDL did not decrease the intracellular uptake of either boron or indium transported by BOPP or In-BOPP. It is thus concluded that BOPP and In-BOPP preferentially enter the cells directly by way of the LDL receptor and that only a small fraction of these molecules are transported into the cells indirectly using serum LDLs as their carriers. These data suggest a novel way of bringing greater amounts of boron and indium (and perhaps other agents) into tissues. Porphyrins can be used to transport different agents into tumor cells because they are tumor affinic molecules. Tumors express a higher number of LDL receptors than do most normal tissues

  18. Poking cells for efficient vector-free intracellular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Yang; Yan, Li; Kwok, So Ying; Li, Wei; Wang, Zhigang; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Guangyu; Zhang, Wenjun; Chen, Xianfeng; Shi, Peng

    2014-07-01

    Techniques for introducing foreign molecules and materials into living cells are of great value in cell biology research. A major barrier for intracellular delivery is to cross the cell membrane. Here we demonstrate a novel platform utilizing diamond nanoneedle arrays to facilitate efficient vector-free cytosolic delivery. Using our technique, cellular membrane is deformed by an array of nanoneedles with a force on the order of a few nanonewtons. We show that this technique is applicable to deliver a broad range of molecules and materials into different types of cells, including primary neurons in adherent culture. Especially, for delivering plasmid DNAs into neurons, our technique produces at least eightfold improvement (~45% versus ~1-5%) in transfection efficiency with a dramatically shorter experimental protocol, when compared with the commonly used lipofection approach. It is anticipated that our technique will greatly benefit basic research in cell biology and also a wide variety of clinical applications.

  19. Subcellular site and nature of intracellular cadmium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying heavy metal accumulation, toxicity and tolerance in higher plants are poorly understood. Since subcellular processes are undoubtedly involved in all these phenomena, it is of interest to study the extent of, subcellular site of and nature of intracellularly accumulated cadmium in higher plants. Whole plants supplied 109 CdCl 2 or 112 CdSO 4 accumulated Cd into roots and aerial tissues. Preparation of protoplasts from aerial tissue followed by subcellular fractionation of the protoplasts to obtain intact vacuoles, chloroplasts and cytosol revealed the presence of Cd in the cytosol but not in vacuoles or chloroplasts. Particulate materials containing other cell components were also labeled. Of the 109 Cd supplied to plants, 2 to 10% was recovered in both cytosol preparations and in particulate materials. Cytosol contained proteinaceous--Cd complexes, free metal and low molecular weight Cd complexes. Labeling of protoplasts gave similar results. No evidence was obtained for the production of volatile Cd complexes in tobacco

  20. The intracellular cholesterol landscape: dynamic integrator of the immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol has typically been considered an exogenous, disease-related factor in immunity; however, recent literature suggests that a paradigm shift is in order. Sterols are now recognized to ligate several immune receptors. Altered flux through the mevalonic acid synthesis pathway also appears to be a required event in the antiviral interferon response of macrophages and in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of T cells. In this review, evidence is discussed that suggests an intrinsic, ‘professional’ role for sterols and oxysterols in macrophage and T cell immunity. Host defense may have been the original selection pressure behind the development of mechanisms for intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Functional coupling between sterol metabolism and immunity has fundamental implications for health and disease. PMID:27692616

  1. Extraction of intracellular protein from Glaciozyma antarctica for proteomics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizura, S. Nor; Farahayu, K.; Faizal, A. B. Mohd; Asmahani, A. A. S.; Amir, R.; Nazalan, N.; Diba, A. B. Farah; Muhammad, M. Nor; Munir, A. M. Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Two preparation methods of crude extracts of psychrophilic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica were compared in order to obtain a good recovery of intracellular proteins. Extraction with mechanical procedures using sonication was found to be more effective for obtaining good yield compare to alkaline treatment method. The procedure is simple, rapid, and produce better yield. A total of 52 proteins were identified by combining both extraction methods. Most of the proteins identified in this study involves in the metabolic process including glycolysis pathway, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruyate decarboxylation and also urea cyle. Several chaperons were identified including probable cpr1-cyclophilin (peptidylprolyl isomerase), macrolide-binding protein fkbp12 and heat shock proteins which were postulate to accelerate proper protein folding. Characteristic of the fundamental cellular processes inferred from the expressed-proteome highlight the evolutionary and functional complexity existing in this domain of life.

  2. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  3. Intracellular Signaling Mediators in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to phenomenological models of nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms when the vessel lumen caliber varies markedly. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning. Volume 4 is devoted to major sets of intracellular mediators that transmit signals upon stimulation of cell-surface receptors.  Activation of...

  4. Intracellular mediators of potassium-induced aldosterone secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, A.; Chiou, S.; Davis, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular messengers of potassium in eliciting aldosterone secretion in calf adrenal glomerulosa cells since there were unresolved issues relating to the role of phosphoinositides, cAMP and protein kinases. We observed no evidence of hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) in 3 H-inositol labeled alf adrenal cells or increase of cAMP in response to potassium. Addition of calcium channel blocker, nitrendipine after stimulating adrenal glomerulosa cells with potassium, markedly inhibited aldosterone secretion. A calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) produced greater reduction of aldosterone secretion than an inhibitor of protein kinase C (H-7). These results suggest that a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration through voltage-dependent calcium channel and calmodulin are the critical determinants of aldosterone secretion stimulated by potassium

  5. ATPase and GTPase Tangos Drive Intracellular Protein Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shu-Ou

    2016-12-01

    The GTPase superfamily of proteins provides molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The 'GTPase switch' paradigm, in which external regulatory factors control the switch of a GTPase between 'on' and 'off' states, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. However, recent work unveiled a class of nucleotide hydrolases that do not adhere to this classical paradigm. Instead, they use nucleotide-dependent dimerization cycles to regulate key cellular processes. In this review article, recent studies of dimeric GTPases and ATPases involved in intracellular protein targeting are summarized. It is suggested that these proteins can use the conformational plasticity at their dimer interface to generate multiple points of regulation, thereby providing the driving force and spatiotemporal coordination of complex cellular pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluating Nanoparticle Sensor Design for Intracellular pH Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2011-01-01

    Particle-based nanosensors have over the last decade been designed for optical fluorescent-based ratiometric measurements of pH in living cells. However, quantitative and time-resolved intracellular measurements of pH in endosomes and lysosomes using particle nanosensors is challenging...... and there is a need to improve measurement methodology. In the present paper, we have successfully carried out time resolved pH measurements in endosomes and lyosomes in living cells using nanoparticle sensors and show the importance of sensor choice for successful quantification. We have studied two nanoparticle...... quantification of pH is an unfortunate result when measuring pH too close to the limit of the sensitive range of the sensors. Triple-labeled nanosensors with a pH measurement range of 3.2-7.0, which was synthesized by adding two pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pKa to each sensor, seem to be a solution...

  7. Intracellular Events and Cell Fate in Filovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ryabchikova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Marburg and Ebola viruses cause a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans with high fatality rates. Early target cells of filoviruses are monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The infection spreads to the liver, spleen and later other organs by blood and lymph flow. A hallmark of filovirus infection is the depletion of non-infected lymphocytes; however, the molecular mechanisms leading to the observed bystander lymphocyte apoptosis are poorly understood. Also, there is limited knowledge about the fate of infected cells in filovirus disease. In this review we will explore what is known about the intracellular events leading to virus amplification and cell damage in filovirus infection. Furthermore, we will discuss how cellular dysfunction and cell death may correlate with disease pathogenesis.

  8. Intracellular Transport and Kinesin Superfamily Proteins: Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, N.; Takemura, R.

    Using various molecular cell biological and molecular genetic approaches, we identified kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) and characterized their significant functions in intracellular transport, which is fundamental for cellular morphogenesis, functioning, and survival. We showed that KIFs not only transport various membranous organelles, proteins complexes and mRNAs fundamental for cellular functions but also play significant roles in higher brain functions such as memory and learning, determination of important developmental processes such as left-right asymmetry formation and brain wiring. We also elucidated that KIFs recognize and bind to their specific cargoes using scaffolding or adaptor protein complexes. Concerning the mechanism of motility, we discovered the simplest unique monomeric motor KIF1A and determined by molecular biophysics, cryoelectron microscopy and X-ray crystallography that KIF1A can move on a microtubule processively as a monomer by biased Brownian motion and by hydolyzing ATP.

  9. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mliki, A; Zimmermann, W

    1992-01-01

    An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a Km of 17.8 microM and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a Km of 2.07 mM H2O2 and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C alpha-C beta bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydr...

  10. Measuring intracellular redox conditions using GFP-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Ostergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of methods for analyzing the redox conditions in specific compartments in living cells. These methods are based on genetically encoded sensors comprising variants of Green Fluorescent Protein in which vicinal cysteine residues have been introduced at solvent......-exposed positions. Several mutant forms have been identified in which formation of a disulfide bond between these cysteine residues results in changes of their fluorescence properties. The redox sensors have been characterized biochemically and found to behave differently, both spectroscopically and in terms...... of redox properties. As genetically encoded sensors they can be expressed in living cells and used for analysis of intracellular redox conditions; however, which parameters are measured depends on how the sensors interact with various cellular redox components. Results of both biochemical and cell...

  11. 2011 Rita Schaffer lecture: nanoparticles for intracellular nucleic acid delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jordan J

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles are a promising technology for delivery of new types of therapeutics. A polymer library approach has allowed engineering of polymeric particles that are particularly effective for the delivery of DNA and siRNA to human cells. Certain chemical structural motifs, degradable linkages, hydrophobicity, and biophysical properties are key for successful intracellular delivery. Small differences to biomaterial structure, and especially the type of degradable linkage in the polymers, can be critical for successful delivery of siRNA vs. DNA. Furthermore, subtle changes to biomaterial structure can facilitate cell-type gene delivery specificity between human brain cancer cells and healthy cells as well as between human retinal endothelial cells and epithelial cells. These polymeric nanoparticles are effective for nucleic acid delivery in a broad range of human cell types and have applications to regenerative medicine, ophthalmology, and cancer among many other biomedical research areas.

  12. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and Heme oxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number of transporters of heme and heme synthesis intermediates have been described. Here we review aspects of heme metabolism and discuss our current understanding of heme transporters, with emphasis on the function of the cell-surface heme exporter, FLVCR. Knockdown of Flvcr in mice leads to both defective erythropoiesis and disturbed systemic iron homeostasis, underscoring the critical role of heme transporters in mammalian physiology. PMID:21238504

  13. An active matter analysis of intracellular Active Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Tens of thousands of fluorescence-based trajectories at nm resolution have been analyzed, regarding active transport along microtubules in living cells. The following picture emerges. Directed motion to pre-determined locations is certainly an attractive idea, but cannot be pre-programmed as to do so would sacrifice adaptability. The polarity of microtubules is inadequate to identify these directions in cells, and no other mechanism is currently known. We conclude that molecular motors carry cargo through disordered intracellular microtubule networks in a statistical way, with loud cellular ``noise'' both in directionality and speed. Programmed random walks describe how local 1D active transport traverses crowded cellular space efficiently, rapidly, minimizing the energy waste that would result from redundant activity. The mechanism of statistical regulation is not yet understood, however.

  14. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selhuber-Unkel, C.; Yde, P.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2009-01-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast...... Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent...... a that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent a was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences...

  15. Liposome-based Formulation for Intracellular Delivery of Functional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Chatin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular delivery of biologically active protein represents an important emerging strategy for both fundamental and therapeutic applications. Here, we optimized in vitro delivery of two functional proteins, the β-galactosidase (β-gal enzyme and the anti-cytokeratin8 (K8 antibody, using liposome-based formulation. The guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipid bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC (bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol combined to the colipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE (dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine was shown to efficiently deliver the β-gal intracellularly without compromising its activity. The lipid/protein molar ratio, protein amount, and culture medium were demonstrated to be key parameters affecting delivery efficiency. The protein itself is an essential factor requiring selection of the appropriate cationic lipid as illustrated by low K8 binding activity of the anti-K8 antibody using guanidinium-based liposome. Optimization of various lipids led to the identification of the aminoglycoside lipid dioleyl succinyl paromomycin (DOSP associated with the imidazole-based helper lipid MM27 as a potent delivery system for K8 antibody, achieving delivery in 67% of HeLa cells. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy showed that the structure of supramolecular assemblies BGTC:DOPE/β-gal and DOSP:MM27/K8 were different depending on liposome types and lipid/protein molar ratio. Finally, we observed that K8 treatment with DOSP:MM27/K8 rescues the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent chloride efflux in F508del-CFTR expressing cells, providing a new tool for the study of channelopathies.

  16. Vector-free intracellular delivery by reversible permeabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley O'Dea

    Full Text Available Despite advances in intracellular delivery technologies, efficient methods are still required that are vector-free, can address a wide range of cargo types and can be applied to cells that are difficult to transfect whilst maintaining cell viability. We have developed a novel vector-free method that uses reversible permeabilization to achieve rapid intracellular delivery of cargos with varying composition, properties and size. A permeabilizing delivery solution was developed that contains a low level of ethanol as the permeabilizing agent. Reversal of cell permeabilization is achieved by temporally and volumetrically controlling the contact of the target cells with this solution. Cells are seeded in conventional multi-well plates. Following removal of the supernatant, the cargo is mixed with the delivery solution and applied directly to the cells using an atomizer. After a short incubation period, permeabilization is halted by incubating the cells in a phosphate buffer saline solution that dilutes the ethanol and is non-toxic to the permeabilized cells. Normal culture medium is then added. The procedure lasts less than 5 min. With this method, proteins, mRNA, plasmid DNA and other molecules have been delivered to a variety of cell types, including primary cells, with low toxicity and cargo functionality has been confirmed in proof-of-principle studies. Co-delivery of different cargo types has also been demonstrated. Importantly, delivery occurs by diffusion directly into the cytoplasm in an endocytic-independent manner. Unlike some other vector-free methods, adherent cells are addressed in situ without the need for detachment from their substratum. The method has also been adapted to address suspension cells. This delivery method is gentle yet highly reproducible, compatible with high throughput and automated cell-based assays and has the potential to enable a broad range of research, drug discovery and clinical applications.

  17. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  18. Loperamide Restricts Intracellular Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Lung Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Esmeralda; Carranza, Claudia; Sánchez, Guadalupe; González, Mitzi; Chávez, Jaime; Sarabia, Carmen; Torres, Martha; Sada, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    New approaches for improving tuberculosis (TB) control using adjunct host-directed cellular and repurposed drug therapies are needed. Autophagy plays a crucial role in the response to TB, and a variety of autophagy-inducing drugs that are currently available for various medical conditions may serve as an adjunct treatment in pulmonary TB. Here, we evaluated the potential of loperamide, carbamazepine, valproic acid, verapamil, and rapamycin to enhance the antimicrobial immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and murine alveolar cells (MACs) were infected with Mtb and treated with loperamide, carbamazepine, valproic acid, verapamil, and rapamycin in vitro. Balb/c mice were intraperitoneally administered loperamide, valproic acid, and verapamil, and MACs were infected in vitro with Mtb. The induction of autophagy, the containment of Mtb within autophagosomes and the intracellular Mtb burden were determined. Autophagy was induced by all of the drugs in human and mouse macrophages, and loperamide significantly increased the colocalization of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 with Mtb in MDMs. Carbamazepine, loperamide, and valproic acid induced microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and autophagy related 16- like protein 1 gene expression in MDMs and in MACs. Loperamide also induced a reduction in TNF-α production. Loperamide and verapamil induced autophagy, which was associated with a significant reduction in the intracellular growth of Mtb in MACs and alveolar macrophages. The intraperitoneal administration of loperamide and valproic acid induced autophagy in freshly isolated MACs. The antimycobacterial activity in MACs was higher after loperamide treatment and was associated with the degradation of p62. In conclusion, loperamide shows potential as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of TB.

  19. Cannabidiol induces intracellular calcium elevation and cytotoxicity in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato, Susana; Victoria Sánchez-Gómez, María; Matute, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Heavy marijuana use has been linked to white matter histological alterations. However, the impact of cannabis constituents on oligodendroglial pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the in vitro effects of cannabidiol, the main nonpsychoactive marijuana component, on oligodendrocytes. Exposure to cannabidiol induced an intracellular Ca(2+) rise in optic nerve oligodendrocytes that was not primarily mediated by entry from the extracellular space, nor by interactions with ryanodine or IP(3) receptors. Application of the mitochondrial protonophore carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP; 1 μM) completely prevented subsequent cannabidiol-induced Ca(2+) responses. Conversely, the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels elicited by FCCP was reduced after previous exposure to cannabidiol, further suggesting that the mitochondria acts as the source of cannabidiol-evoked Ca(2+) rise in oligodendrocytes. n addition, brief exposure to cannabidiol (100 nM-10 μM) led to a concentration-dependent decrease of oligodendroglial viability that was not prevented by antagonists of CB(1), CB(2), vanilloid, A(2A) or PPARγ receptors, but was instead reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). The oligodendrotoxic effect of cannabidiol was partially blocked by inhibitors of caspase-3, -8 and -9, PARP-1 and calpains, suggesting the activation of caspase-dependent and -independent death pathways. Cannabidiol also elicited a concentration-dependent alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential, and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Finally, cannabidiol-induced cytotoxicity was partially prevented by the ROS scavenger trolox. Together, these results suggest that cannabidiol causes intracellular Ca(2+) dysregulation which can lead to oligodendrocytes demise.

  20. Squalestatin alters the intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic prion peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotoxic peptides derived from the protease-resistant core of the prion protein are used to model the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The current study characterised the ingestion, internalization and intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic peptide containing amino acids 105–132 of the murine prion protein (MoPrP105-132 in neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons. Results Fluorescence microscopy and cell fractionation techniques showed that MoPrP105-132 co-localised with lipid raft markers (cholera toxin and caveolin-1 and trafficked intracellularly within lipid rafts. This trafficking followed a non-classical endosomal pathway delivering peptide to the Golgi and ER, avoiding classical endosomal trafficking via early endosomes to lysosomes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis demonstrated close interactions of MoPrP105-132 with cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1, enzymes implicated in the neurotoxicity of prions. Treatment with squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol levels and caused the redistribution of MoPrP105-132 out of lipid rafts. In squalestatin-treated cells, MoPrP105-132 was rerouted away from the Golgi/ER into degradative lysosomes. Squalestatin treatment also reduced the association between MoPrP105-132 and cPLA2/COX-1. Conclusion As the observed shift in peptide trafficking was accompanied by increased cell survival these studies suggest that the neurotoxicity of this PrP peptide is dependent on trafficking to specific organelles where it activates specific signal transduction pathways.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular ions in perfused from heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnstein, D.; Fossel, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    Intracellular sodium, potassium, and lithium were observed in a perfused frog heart by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A perfusate buffer containing the shift reagent, dysprosium tripolyphosphate, was used in combination with mathematical filtering or presaturation of the extracellular resonance to separate the intra- and extracellular sodium NMR signals. Addition of 10 μM ouabain to the perfusate, perfusion with a zero potassium, low-calcium buffer, and replacement of 66% of the perfusate sodium with lithium resulted in changes in the intracellular sodium levels. An increase of 45% in the intracellular sodium was observed when changing the pacing rate from 0 to 60 beats/min (with proportional changes for intermediate pacing rates). The ratio of intracellular potassium to sodium concentration was determined to be 2.3 by NMR, indicating that a substantial amount of the intracellular potassium is undetectable with these NMR method. In addition, intracellular lithium was observed during perfusion with a lithium-containing perfusate

  2. A Thapsigargin-Resistant Intracellular Calcium Sequestering Compartment in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-31

    have a major impact on neuronal intracellular signaling. Most of the ER in neurons and glia appears to accumulate calcium by energy driven ion pumps...secretion of exocrine, endocrine, and neurocrine products, regulation of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis , intracellular transport, secretion of fluids...the RyRs [140]. Furthermore, the intracellular expression of these receptor-channels in neuronal ER is also reciprocal with RyRs located primarily in

  3. Influence of intracellular acidosis on contractile function in the working rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, F.M.H.; Malloy, C.R.; Radda, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The decrease in myocardial contractility during ischemia, hypoxia, and extracellular acidosis has been attributed to intracellular acidosis. Previous studies of the relationship between pH and contractile state have utilized respiratory or metabolic acidosis to alter intracellular pH. The authors developed a model in the working perfused rat heart to study the effects of intracellular acidosis with normal external pH and optimal O 2 delivery. Intracellular pH and high-energy phosphates were monitored by 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Hearts were perfused to a steady state with a medium containing 10 mM NH 4 Cl. Acidosis induced a substantial decrease in aortic flow and stroke volume which was associated with little change in peak systolic pressure. It was concluded that (1) for the same intracellular acidosis the influence on tension development was more pronounced with a combined extra- and intracellular acidosis than with an isolated intracellular acidosis, and (2) stroke volume at constant preload was impaired by intracellular acidosis even though changes in developed pressure were minimal. These observations suggest that isolated intracellular acidosis has adverse effects on diastolic compliance and/or relaxation

  4. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 Is Effective against both Extra- and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noore, Jabeen; Noore, Adly

    2013-01-01

    The increasing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics and the challenges posed by intracellular bacteria, which may be responsible for chronic and recurrent infections, have driven the need for advanced antimicrobial drugs for effective elimination of both extra- and intracellular pathogens. The purpose of this study was to determine the killing efficacy of cationic antimicrobial peptide LL-37 compared to conventional antibiotics against extra- and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus. Bacterial killing assays and an infection model of osteoblasts and S. aureus were studied to determine the bacterial killing efficacy of LL-37 and conventional antibiotics against extra- and intracellular S. aureus. We found that LL-37 was effective in killing extracellular S. aureus at nanomolar concentrations, while lactoferricin B was effective at micromolar concentrations and doxycycline and cefazolin at millimolar concentrations. LL-37 was surprisingly more effective in killing the clinical strain than in killing an ATCC strain of S. aureus. Moreover, LL-37 was superior to conventional antibiotics in eliminating intracellular S. aureus. The kinetic studies further revealed that LL-37 was fast in eliminating both extra- and intracellular S. aureus. Therefore, LL-37 was shown to be very potent and prompt in eliminating both extra- and intracellular S. aureus and was more effective in killing extra- and intracellular S. aureus than commonly used conventional antibiotics. LL-37 could potentially be used to treat chronic and recurrent infections due to its effectiveness in eliminating not only extracellular but also intracellular pathogens. PMID:23274662

  5. Neutrophilic granulocytes reactive response in candida vulvovaginitis patients with intracellular microorganism persistence complications

    OpenAIRE

    YAKOVYCHUK NINA DMYTRIVNA; DJUIRIAK VALENTYNA STEPANIVNA

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic neutrophilic granulocytes reactive response and body immune reactivity in general considerably decrease in patients suffering from candida vaginitis on the basis of intracellular microorganisms persistence.

  6. Adhesive properties of a symbolic bacterium from a wood-boreing marine shipworm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, S.H.; Greene, R.V.; Griffin, H.L.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesive properties of cellulolytic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from a marine shipworm are described. 35 S-labeled cells of the shipworm bacterium bound preferentially Whatman no.1 cellulose filter paper, compared with its binding to other cellulose substrata or substrata lacking cellulose. The ability of the bacteria to bind to Whatman no. 1 filter paper was significantly reduced by glutaraldehyde or heat treatment of cells. Pretreatment of cells with azide, valinomycin, gramicidin-D, bis-hexafluoroacetylacetone (1799), or carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone inhibited adhesion activity. Cells pretreated with pronase or trypsin also exhibited reduced binding activity, but chymotrypsin and peptidase had no effect on adhesion activity. Cellodextrins and methyl cellulose 15 inhibited the adhesion of the shipworm bacteria to filter paper, whereas glucose, cellobiose, and soluble carboxymethyl cellulose had no significant effect. The divalent cation chelators EDTA and EGTA [ethylene hlycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid] had little or no effect on adhesive properties of shipworm bacteria. Also, preabsorbing the substratum with extracellular endoglucanase isolated from the ship worm bacterium or 1% bovine serum albumin had no apparent effect on bacterial binding. Low concentration (0.01%) of sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized a fraction from whole cells, which appeared to be involved in cellular binding activity. After removal of sodium dodecyl, sulfate, several proteins in this fraction associated with intact cells. These cells exhibited up to 50% enhanced binding to filter paper in comparison to cells which had not been exposed to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized fraction

  7. ANALYSIS OF IMMUNE RESPONSES ON TRANSGENIC TIGER SHRIMP (Penaeus monodon AGAINST PATHOGENIC BACTERIUM Vibrio harveyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Parenrengi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vibriosis is one of main diseases of the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon infected by pathogenic bioluminous bacterium Vibrio harveyi that can cause mass mortalities in shrimp culture. The bacteria can also trigger the disease white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. An effort to produce shrimp disease-resistant strains has been done through transgenesis technology with antiviral gene transfection. By this technology, it is expected an increase in the immune response of shrimp in a variety of diseasecausing pathogens. This study aimed to determine the immune responses (total haemocytes, haemocyte differentiation, and phenoloxydase activity of transgenic tiger shrimp against pathogenic bacterium V. harveyi. Research using completely randomized design, which consists of two treatments and three replications. Test animals being used were transgenic and non-transgenic shrimp with size, weight 3.93±1.25 g and a total length of 7.59±0.87 cm. Treatments being tested were the injection of bacterium V. harveyi (density of 5x106 cfu/mL of 0.1 mL/individual on transgenic (A and non-transgenic shrimp (B. Immune response parameters such as total haemocytes, haemocyte differentiation, and phenoloxydase activity were observed on day 1, 3, and 6 days after challenging. Data were analyzed using t-test by SPSS software. The results showed that the total haemocyte of transgenic shrimp was not significantly different (P>0.05 from non-transgenic shrimp, but haemocyte differentiation and phenoloxydase activity were significantly different (P<0.05 especially on sixth days after being exposed to the bioluminescent bacteria. The study results implied that transgenic shrimp has a better immune response compared than non-transgenic shrimp.

  8. Biodegradable Polymeric Substances Produced by a Marine Bacterium from a Surplus Stream of the Biodiesel Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Sourish; Dubey, Sonam; Singh, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    epsilon-polylysine and 64.6% (w/w) intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) in the same fermentation broth (1 L shake flask) utilizing Jatropha biodiesel waste residues as carbon rich source by marine bacterial strain (Bacillus licheniformis PL26), isolated from west coast of India. The synthesized...

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and sequence analysis of two novel plasmids from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Schrøder, I.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of two novel plasmids isolated from the extreme thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM6725 (A. thermophilum), growing optimally at 70degreesC, has been determined. pBAS2 was found to be a 3653 bp plasmid with a GC content of 43%, and the sequence re...... with highest similarity to DNA repair protein from Campylobacter jejuni (25% aa). Orf34 showed similarity to sigma factors with highest similarity (28% aa) to the sporulation specific Sigma factor, Sigma 28(K) from Bacillus thuringiensis....

  10. A marine bacterium, Micrococcus MCCB 104, antagonistic to vibrios in prawn larval rearing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, N S; Pai, S Somnath; Anas, A; Preetha, R; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2005-12-30

    A marine bacterium, Micrococcus MCCB 104, isolated from hatchery water, demonstrated extracellular antagonistic properties against Vibrio alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. fluviallis, V. nereis, V. proteolyticus, V. mediterranei, V cholerae and Aeromonas sp., bacteria associated with Macrobrachium rosenbergii larval rearing systems. The isolate inhibited the growth of V. alginolyticus during co-culture. The antagonistic component of the extracellular product was heat-stable and insensitive to proteases, lipase, catalase and alpha-amylase. Micrococcus MCCB 104 was demonstrated to be non-pathogenic to M. rosenbergii larvae.

  11. Complete genome sequence of the aerobically denitrifying thermophilic bacterium Chelatococcus daeguensis TAD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chelatococcus daeguensis TAD1 is a themophilic bacterium isolated from a biotrickling filter used to treat NOx in Ruiming Power Plant, located in Guangzhou, China, which shows an excellent aerobic denitrification activity at high temperature. The complete genome sequence of this strain was reported in the present study. Genes related to the aerobic denitrification were identified through whole genome analysis. This work will facilitate the mechanism of aerobic denitrification and provide evidence for its potential application in the nitrogen removal.

  12. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2010-11-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, CA, which substitutes arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical significance.

  13. A fatal endocarditis case due to an emerging bacterium: Moraxella nonliquefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Duployez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella nonliquefaciens is a Gram-negative coccobacillus considered as a commensal organism from the upper respiratory tract, with low pathogenic potential. The phenotypical conventional identification is difficult and the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight technology has increased the resolution of identification of this bacterium. We report a fatal case of endocarditis due to M. nonliquefaciens whose identification was confirmed by 16S rRNA, and we review the literature on this pathogen in endocarditis.

  14. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, P.

    2004-01-01

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals

  15. Isolation of an unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium in a clinical specimen.

    OpenAIRE

    Odugbemi, T; Nwofor, C; Joiner, K T

    1988-01-01

    An unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium isolated from a clinical specimen is reported. The organism was oxidase, urease, and catalase positive; it grew on Thayer-Martin and MacConkey media. The isolate is possibly similar to an unnamed taxon (G.L. Gilardi and Y.C. Faur, J. Clin. Microbiol. 20:626-629, 1984); however, it had unique characteristics of nonmotility with no flagellum detectable and was a gram-negative coccoid with a few rods in pairs and negative for starch hydrolysis.

  16. Isolation of an unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium in a clinical specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odugbemi, T; Nwofor, C; Joiner, K T

    1988-05-01

    An unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium isolated from a clinical specimen is reported. The organism was oxidase, urease, and catalase positive; it grew on Thayer-Martin and MacConkey media. The isolate is possibly similar to an unnamed taxon (G.L. Gilardi and Y.C. Faur, J. Clin. Microbiol. 20:626-629, 1984); however, it had unique characteristics of nonmotility with no flagellum detectable and was a gram-negative coccoid with a few rods in pairs and negative for starch hydrolysis.

  17. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Switzer Blum, Jodi; Kulp, Thomas R; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Hoeft, Shelley E; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F; Webb, Samuel M; Weber, Peter K; Davies, Paul C W; Anbar, Ariel D; Oremland, Ronald S

    2011-06-03

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here, we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.

  18. Aggregation of the rhizospheric bacterium Azospirillum brasilense in response to oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoun, Hamid; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Azospirillum brasilense spp. have ecological, scientific and agricultural importance. As model plant growth promoting rhizobacteria they interact with a large variety of plants, including important food and cash crops. Azospirillum strains are known for their production of plant growth hormones that enhance root systems and for their ability to fix nitrogen. Azospirillum cells transform in response to environmental cues. The production of exopolysaccharides and cell aggregation during cellular transformation are important steps in the attachment of Azospirillum to roots. We investigate signals that induce cellular transformation and aggregation in the Azospirillum and report on the importance of oxygen to the process of aggregation in this rhizospheric bacterium.

  19. Mutagenesis and reparation processes in the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas methanolica after UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, G.N.; Bokhan, I.K.; Multykh, I.G.

    1986-01-01

    High resistance of cells of methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas methanolica to bactericidal and mutagenous effects of ultraviolet irradiation is shown as well as activity of reparation processes after UV irradiation. The presence of low photoreactivating activity in P. methanolica is shown as well. Observed recovery in innutritious medium and decrease of irradiated cells survival rates under effect of reparation inhibitors (coffeine and acriflavine) testify to activity of excision reparation and, perhaps, recombination branch of postreplicative reparation. No manifestation of inducible reparation system is discovered. It is concluded that increased resistance of P. methanolica cells to bactericidal and mutagenous effects of short-wave ultraviolet radiation is related to activity of exact reparation systems

  20. Comparison of the intracellular trafficking itinerary of ctla-4 orthologues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satdip Kaur

    Full Text Available CTLA-4 is an essential inhibitor of T cell immune responses. At steady state, most CTLA-4 resides in intracellular compartments due to constitutive internalisation mediated via a tyrosine based endocytic motif (YVKM within the cytoplasmic domain. This domain is highly conserved in mammals suggesting strong selective pressure. In contrast, the C-terminal domain varies considerably in non-mammals such as fish, xenopus and birds. We compared the ability of the C-terminus of these species to direct the trafficking of CTLA-4 with human CTLA-4. Using a chimeric approach, endocytosis was found to be conserved between human, xenopus and chicken CTLA-4 but was reduced substantially in trout CTLA-4, which lacks the conserved YXXM motif. Nevertheless, we identified an alternative YXXF motif in trout CTLA-4 that permitted limited endocytosis. Post-internalisation, CTLA-4 was either recycled or targeted for degradation. Human and chicken CTLA-4, which contain a YVKM motif, showed efficient recycling compared to xenopus CTLA-4 which contains a less efficient YEKM motif. Specific mutation of this motif in human CTLA-4 reduced receptor recycling. These findings suggest evolutionary development in the endocytic and recycling potential of CTLA-4, which may facilitate more refined functions of CTLA-4 within the mammalian immune system.